Science.gov

Sample records for eurisol-ds multi-mw target

  1. Project X: A Multi-MW Proton Source at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and he study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a uture facility at the energy frontier.

  2. Aeroelastic simulation of multi-MW wind turbines using a free vortex model coupled to a geometrically exact beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saverin, Joseph; Peukert, Juliane; Marten, David; Pechlivanoglou, George; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Greenblatt, David

    2016-09-01

    The current paper investigates the aeroelastic modelling of large, flexible multi- MW wind turbine blades. Most current performance prediction tools make use of the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) model, based upon a number of simplifying assumptions that hold only under steady conditions. This is why a lifting line free vortex wake (LLFVW) algorithm is used here to accurately resolve unsteady wind turbine aerodynamics. A coupling to the structural analysis tool BeamDyn, based on geometrically exact beam theory, allows for time-resolved aeroelastic simulations with highly deflected blades including bend-twist, coupling. Predictions of blade loading and deformation for rigid and flexible blades are analysed with reference to different aerodynamic and structural approaches. The emergency shutdown procedure is chosen as an examplary design load case causing large deflections to place emphasis on the influence of structural coupling and demonstrate the necessity of high fidelity structural models.

  3. Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-26

    Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

  4. Four-dimensional characterization of inflow to and wakes from a multi-MW turbine: overview of the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Kelley, N. D.; Aitken, M.; Clifton, A.; Mirocha, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    To support substantial deployment of renewably-generated electricity from the wind, critical information about the variability of wind turbine wakes in the real atmosphere from multi-MW turbines is required. The assessment of the velocity deficit and turbulence associated with industrial-scale turbines is a major issue for wind farm design, particularly with respect to the optimization of the spacing between turbines. The significant velocity deficit and turbulence generated by upstream turbines can reduce the power production and produce harmful vibrations in downstream turbines, which can lead to excess maintenance costs. The complexity of wake effects depends on many factors arising from both hardware (turbine size, rotor speed, and blade geometry, etc.) and from meteorological considerations such as wind velocity, gradients of wind across the turbine rotor disk, atmospheric stability, and atmospheric turbulence. To characterize the relationships between the meteorological inflow and turbine wakes, a collaborative field campaign was designed and carried out at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center (NREL/NWTC) in south Boulder, Colorado, in spring 2011. This site often experiences channeled flow with a consistent wind direction, enabling robust statistics of wake velocity deficits and turbulence enhancements. Using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation, measurements upwind and downwind of multi-megawatt wind turbine in complex terrain quantified the variability of wind turbine inflow and wakes from an industrial-scale turbine. The turbine of interest has a rated power of 2.3 MW, a rotor diameter of 100m, and a hub height of 80m. In addition to several meteorological towers, one extending to hub height (80m) and another extending above the top of the rotor disk (135m), a Triton mini-sodar and a Windcube lidar characterized the inflow to the turbine and the variability across the site. The centerpiece instrument of the TWICS campaign

  5. Long pulse, multi-MW operation in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, G. T.

    2005-09-01

    Long pulse operation on Tore Supra has now entered a new phase, characterised by the use of heating power level in excess of 10 MW, during pulses lasting several tens of resistive times. This has been made possible by the combined use of 3 radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, at the ion cyclotron frequency (9 MW coupled to the plasma at 57 MHz), the lower hybrid frequency (3 MW at 3.7 GHz) and the electron cyclotron frequency (0.7 MW at 118 GHz). Key technological and physics issues related to long pulse operation, required for a reactor, are addressed.

  6. A ROTATING METAL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT MUON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.; SIMOS,N.; WEGGEL,R.V.; MOKHOV,N.V.

    2002-01-18

    A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target for muon colliders that is based on a rotating metal band. Three candidate materials are considered for the target band: inconel alloy 718, titanium alloy 6Al-4V grade 5 and nickel. A pulsed proton beam tangentially intercepts a chord of the target band that is inside a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal magnetic pion capture channel similar to designs previously considered for muon colliders and neutrino factories. The target band has a radius of 2.5 meters and is continuously rotated at approximately 1 m/s to carry heat away from the production region and through a water cooling tank. The mechanical layout and cooling setup of the target are described, including the procedure for the routine replacement of the target band. A rectangular band cross section is assumed, optionally with I-beam struts to enhance stiffness and minimize mechanical vibrations. Results are presented from realistic MARS Monte Carlo computer simulations of the pion yield and energy deposition in the target and from ANSYS finite element calculations for the corresponding shock heating stresses. The target scenario is found to perform satisfactorily and with conservative safety margins for multi-MW pulsed proton beams.

  7. The MERIT High-Power Target Experiment at the CERN PS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk,H.G.; Tsang, T.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pereira, H.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT experiment was designed as a proof-of-principle test of a target system based on a free mercury jet inside a 15-T solenoid that is capable of sustaining proton beam powers of up to 4 MW. The experiment was run at CERN in the fall of 2007. We describe the results of the tests and their implications. Plans are being discussed for possible future machines which can deliver proton beams with multi-MW beam powers. A prominent application for these powerful beams will be to produce intense secondary beams suitable for investigating important physics issues. Examples include investigations of rare decay processes and neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration [1] has proposed a target system [2, 3] which will be capable of supporting proton beam powers of 4 MW with the purpose of producing and collecting intense muon beams for eventual use in storage rings. The core of this proposed target system consists of a high-Z, free-flowing liquid mercury jet which intercepts the proton beam within the confines of a high-field (15-20 T) solenoid. An important attribute of this system is that the liquid jet target can be replaced for subsequent proton pulses. The experiment described in this paper was designed to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of this concept. Preparations for this experiment have been previously reported [4].

  8. Field Validation of the Stability Limit of a Multi MW Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne S.; Kragh, Knud A.

    2016-09-01

    Long slender blades of modern multi-megawatt turbines exhibit a flutter like instability at rotor speeds above a critical rotor speed. Knowing the critical rotor speed is crucial to a safe turbine design. The flutter like instability can only be estimated using geometrically non-linear aeroelastic codes. In this study, the estimated rotor speed stability limit of a 7 MW state of the art wind turbine is validated experimentally. The stability limit is estimated using Siemens Wind Powers in-house aeroelastic code, and the results show that the predicted stability limit is within 5% of the experimentally observed limit.

  9. Yawing characteristics during slippage of the nacelle of a multi MW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-G.; Dalhoff, P. H.; Gust, P.

    2016-09-01

    High aerodynamic yaw loads coupled with electrical failures in the wind turbine can result to a slippage of the nacelle, due to limited braking capabilities of the yaw system. A slippage on the other hand can lead to a mechanical malfunction of the yaw system. To analyse the yawing characteristics of a wind turbine during nacelle slippage situations, a detailed multibody system model of the yaw system has been developed and incorporated in a multibody system model of a wind turbine based on a 3.3 MW turbine. Extreme load cases which lead to a nacelle slippage have been simulated. The dynamics and loads on different wind turbine components are presented and discussed. First results show minimal load increases of the rotor torque and the bending moments of the blade root sections during slippage but unfavourable rotational speeds of the yaw drives.

  10. Composite Structural Analysis of Flat-Back Shaped Blade for Multi-MW Class Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Hyung-Joon; Shin, Hyung-Ki; Jang, Moon-Seok

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of failure mode estimation based on 3D structural finite element (FE) analysis of the flat-back shaped wind turbine blade. Buckling stability, fiber failure (FF), and inter-fiber failure (IFF) analyses were performed to account for delamination or matrix failure of composite materials and to predict the realistic behavior of the entire blade region. Puck's fracture criteria were used for IFF evaluation. Blade design loads applicable to multi-megawatt (MW) wind turbine systems were calculated according to the Germanischer Lloyd (GL) guideline and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-1 standard, under Class IIA wind conditions. After the post-processing of final load results, a number of principal load cases were selected and converted into applied forces at the each section along the blade's radius of the FE model. Nonlinear static analyses were performed for laminate failure, FF, and IFF check. For buckling stability, linear eigenvalue analysis was performed. As a result, we were able to estimate the failure mode and locate the major weak point.

  11. Multi-MW Closed Cycle MHD Nuclear Space Power Via Nonequilibrium He/Xe Working Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Harada, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prospects for a low specific mass multi-megawatt nuclear space power plant were examined assuming closed cycle coupling of a high-temperature fission reactor with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion and utilization of a nonequilibrium helium/xenon frozen inert plasma (FIP). Critical evaluation of performance attributes and specific mass characteristics was based on a comprehensive systems analysis assuming a reactor operating temperature of 1800 K for a range of subsystem mass properties. Total plant efficiency was expected to be 55.2% including plasma pre-ionization power, and the effects of compressor stage number, regenerator efficiency and radiation cooler temperature on plant efficiency were assessed. Optimal specific mass characteristics were found to be dependent on overall power plant scale with 3 kg/kWe being potentially achievable at a net electrical power output of 1-MWe. This figure drops to less than 2 kg/kWe when power output exceeds 3 MWe. Key technical issues include identification of effective methods for non-equilibrium pre-ionization and achievement of frozen inert plasma conditions within the MHD generator channel. A three-phase research and development strategy is proposed encompassing Phase-I Proof of Principle Experiments, a Phase-II Subscale Power Generation Experiment, and a Phase-III Closed-Loop Prototypical Laboratory Demonstration Test.

  12. Recent developments in high-resolution optical diagnostics of repetitively pulsed laser-target effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred; Althaus, Marion

    1995-05-01

    High energy densities, as required both in research and in industry, are achieved by the use of lasers. Extremely highpower densities are obtained in the pulsed mode with short microsecond(s) -, ns-, or even ultrashort ps- to fs- pulses. The interaction of such powerful laser pulses with any type of solid state, liquid or gaseous materials is then causing rapidly developing, nonstationary, optically nonlinear processes. Experimental investigations of these effects are therefore requiring special measuring techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical and optronical methods have proven to be particularly useful. Methods based on laser diagnostics, including high speed photography, cinematography, speckle techniques, holography, videography, infrared techniques or arbitrary combinations of these, are therefore considered to be important tools in these laser effect studies. The investigations reported in the present paper are referring to carbon dioxide-laser effects in intensity ranges which are useful for many industrial applications, such as for example in the field of material processing. Basic interest is actually in pulsed, plasma sustained laser target interaction phenomena which occur above critical threshold power densities, specific for each type of material. Surface induced, highly ionized absorption waves are then determining the energy transfer from the coherent laser radiation field towards the targets. The experiments at ISL were aimed at investigating plasma parameters and their influence on the energy transfer rates, by fast optical, electrical and optronical techniques, such as mentioned above. The results to be discussed refer to target effects, basically observed on optically transparent materials, subject to high average power pulsed carbon dioxide-laser radiation, with repetition rates of several tens to hundred pps at multi-MW/cm2 to GW/cm2 peak power densities and average power densities in the multi-kW/cm2-range.

  13. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  14. Multi-MW K-Band Harmonic Multiplier: RF Source For High-Gradient Accelerator R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Kazakov, S. Yu.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A preliminary design is presented for a two-cavity harmonic multiplier, intended as a high-power RF source for use in experiments aimed at developing high-gradient structures for a future collider. The harmonic multiplier is to produce power at selected frequencies in K-band (18-26.5 GHz) using as an RF driver an XK-5 S-band klystron (2.856 GHz). The device is to be built with a TE{sub 111} rotating mode input cavity and interchangeable output cavities running in the TE{sub n11} rotating mode, with n = 7,8,9 at 19.992, 22.848, and 25.704 GHz. An example for a 7{sup th} harmonic multiplier is described, using a 250 kV, 20 A injected laminar electron beam; with 10 MW of S-band drive power, 4.7 MW of 20-GHz output power is predicted. Details are described of the magnetic circuit, cavities, and output coupler.

  15. Multi-MW K-Band 7th Harmonic Multiplier for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Hirschfield, J.L.; Kazakevich, G.M.; LaPointe, M.A.; /Yale U.

    2009-05-01

    A preliminary design and current status are presented for a two-cavity 7th harmonic multiplier, intended as a high-power RF source for use in experiments aimed at developing high-gradient structures for a future collider. The harmonic multiplier is to produce power in K-band using as its RF driver an XK-5 S-band klystron (2.856 GHz). The multiplier is to be built with a TE{sub 111} rotating mode input cavity and interchangeable output cavities, a principal example being a TE{sub 711} rotating mode cavity running at 20 GHz. The design that is described uses a 250 kV, 20 A injected laminar electron beam. With 8.5 MW of S-band drive power, 4.4 MW of 20-GHz output power is predicted. The design uses a gun, magnetic coils, and beam collector from an existing waveguide 7th harmonic multiplier. The gun has been re-conditioned and the desired operating parameters have been achieved.

  16. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  17. On Target.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbalich, Andrea

    1991-01-01

    Campus public relations professionals offer advice for improving the effectiveness of public relations efforts by (1) setting behavioral goals; (2) targeting audiences carefully; (3) focusing appeals by making messages explicit; (4) connecting the public relations message with larger societal issues; and (5) reaching internal as well as external…

  18. Students Target

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-12-19

    Using the JMars targeting software, eighth grade students from Charleston Middle School in Charleston, IL, selected the location of -8.37N and 276.66E for capture by the THEMIS visible camera during Mars Odyssey sixth orbit of Mars on Nov. 22, 2005

  19. Tackling Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document is designed to help British training and enterprise councils (TECs) and further education (FE) colleges develop and implement strategies for achieving the National Targets for Education and Training (NTET), which were developed by the Confederation of British Industry in 1992 and endorsed by the British government. The findings from…

  20. Targeting hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Increasing demand for hardwood seedlings has prompted research to identify target seedling characteristics that promote hardwood plantation establishment. Operational establishment of hardwood plantations has typically emphasized seed collection from non-improved genetic sources, bareroot nursery seedling production, and spring planting using machine planters. The...

  1. Target: Lifestyle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlman, Eric T.

    1985-01-01

    "Target: Lifestyle" is a physical education curriculum adopted by Detroit Country Day School which incorporates instruction in nutrition, physical fitness, first aid, and lifetime sports. This curriculum aims to influence student attitudes and lifestyles in health and physical fitness. Four levels of instruction are described. (DF)

  2. Target assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  3. Accelerator target

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  4. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  5. Accelerator target

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  6. Targeting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Ferenczi, Emily; Deisseroth, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Current optogenetic methodology enables precise inhibition or excitation of neural circuits, spanning timescales as needed from the acute (milliseconds) to the chronic (many days or more), for experimental modulation of network activity and animal behavior. Such broad temporal versatility, unique to optogenetic control, is particularly powerful when combined with brain activity measurements that span both acute and chronic timescales as well. This enables, for instance, the study of adaptive circuit dynamics across the intact brain, and tuning interventions to match activity patterns naturally observed during behavior in the same individual. Although the impact of this approach has been greater on basic research than on clinical translation, it is natural to ask if specific neural circuit activity patterns discovered to be involved in controlling adaptive or maladaptive behaviors could become targets for treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here we consider the landscape of such ideas related to therapeutic targeting of circuit dynamics, taking note of developments not only in optical but also in ultrasonic, magnetic, and thermal methods. We note the recent emergence of first-in-kind optogenetically-guided clinical outcomes, as well as opportunities related to the integration of interventions and readouts spanning diverse circuit-physiology, molecular, and behavioral modalities. PMID:27104976

  7. Students' Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03648 Ascraeus Mons

    After examining numerous THEMIS images and using the JMars targeting software, eighth grade students from Charleston Middle School in Charleston, IL, selected the location of -8.37N and 276.66E for capture by the THEMIS visible camera during Mars Odyssey's sixth orbit of Mars on Nov. 22, 2005. The students are investigating relationships between channels, craters, and basins on Mars. The Charleston Middle School students participated in the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP) and submitted a proposal to use the THEMIS visible camera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.8S, Longitude 279.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Students' Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03648 Ascraeus Mons

    After examining numerous THEMIS images and using the JMars targeting software, eighth grade students from Charleston Middle School in Charleston, IL, selected the location of -8.37N and 276.66E for capture by the THEMIS visible camera during Mars Odyssey's sixth orbit of Mars on Nov. 22, 2005. The students are investigating relationships between channels, craters, and basins on Mars. The Charleston Middle School students participated in the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP) and submitted a proposal to use the THEMIS visible camera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.8S, Longitude 279.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets the changes in cancer cells that help them grow, divide, and spread. Learn how targeted therapy works against cancer and about side effects that may occur.

  10. Advanced Target Tracker Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Multiple tar-ets, Target tracking, Target cueing, Target screening, Image processing, Scene analysis, Artificial intelligenv ~e 4 ~’ Ati.ýT PACT (CONTINUE...in successive frames. Furthermore, the artificial intelligence capability of the scene model will allow inference of the target shape from its

  11. Adaptive Target Tracking for Underwater Maneuvering Targets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Gholson and Moose [5] to three-dimensional tracking. The general approach which uses the "adaptive semi-Markov man- euver model" of [4] and [5] implies a...of a maneuvering target (U)," U.S. Naval J. Underwater Acoustics, July 1973. [51 N. H. Gholson and R. L. Moose, "Maneuvering target tracking using

  12. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  13. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  14. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  15. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  16. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  17. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  18. FLIR target screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the segmentation and recognition of individual targets sensed with forward looking infrared detectors are discussed. Particular attention is given to an adaptive multi-scenario target screener.

  19. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/23589545 . Kummar S, Murgo AJ, Tomaszewski JE, Doroshow JH. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cells: Era of molecularly targeted agents. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, ...

  20. An actionable climate target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geden, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Paris Agreement introduced three mitigation targets. In the future, the main focus should not be on temperature targets such as 2 or 1.5 °C, but on the target with the greatest potential to effectively guide policy: net zero emissions.

  1. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  2. Targets for Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, W.; Yao, L.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Heffner, M.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Laptev, A. B.; Massey, T. N.; Meharchand, R.; Qu, H.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Selhan, B.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.

    2014-05-01

    The general properties needed in targets (sources) for high precision, high accuracy measurements are reviewed. The application of these principles to the problem of developing targets for the Fission TPC is described. Longer term issues, such as the availability of actinide materials, improved knowledge of energy losses and straggling and the stability of targets during irradiation are also discussed.

  3. Solid polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Crabb, D.G.

    1994-10-26

    Polarized targets using the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are in use in many laboratories. The method of DNP is reviewed briefly and the technical developments presented at recent meetings are discussed. The operation of target systems at SLAC and CERN are presented as examples. The emergence of frozen HD as a possible target is discussed.

  4. Adaptive infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Jonah C.; Stevens, Mark R.; Eaton, Ross S.; Snorrason, Magnus S.

    2004-09-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are extremely sensitive to differences between the operating conditions under which they are trained and the extended operating conditions (EOCs) in which the fielded algorithms are tested. These extended operating conditions can cause a target's signature to be drastically different from training exemplars/models. For example, a target's signature can be influenced by: the time of day, the time of year, the weather, atmospheric conditions, position of the sun or other illumination sources, the target surface and material properties, the target composition, the target geometry, sensor characteristics, sensor viewing angle and range, the target surroundings and environment, and the target and scene temperature. Recognition rates degrade if an ATR is not trained for a particular EOC. Most infrared target detection techniques are based on a very simple probabilistic theory. This theory states that a pixel should be assigned the label of "target" if a set of measurements (features) is more likely to have come from an assumed (or learned) distribution of target features than from the distribution of background features. However, most detection systems treat these learned distributions as static and they are not adapted to changing EOCs. In this paper, we present an algorithm for assigning a pixel the label of target or background based on a statistical comparison of the distributions of measurements surrounding that pixel in the image. This method provides a feature-level adaptation to changing EOCs. Results are demonstrated on infrared imagery containing several military vehicles.

  5. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  6. Effective neutron targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.

    1997-07-01

    Because of the lack of a free neutron target, deuterium targets have been used extensively in studying the neutron structure. The unique spin structure of the {sup 3}He ground state wave function and the recent developments in laser technologies made polarized {sup 3}He targets widely used in many experiments from neutron electromagnetic form factor studies to nucleon spin structure function measurements at all major electron accelerator facilities. In this talk, the current status of the polarized {sup 3}He targets will be reviewed. The author will focus on neutron electromagnetic form factor studies using polarized {sup 3}He targets. The polarized nucleon spin structure function measurements using polarized {sup 3}He targets will also be discussed.

  7. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  8. [Target infrared detection in target spray].

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; He, Xiong-kui; Zhang, Lu-da; Zeng, Ai-jun; Song, Jian-li; Zou, Jian-jun

    2008-10-01

    Crops in agriculture and forestry are normally planted discretely. The chemical sprayed between crops would cause great waste and serious environment pollution. Therefore realization of the precision spray has great significance. This research discussed the method to realize automatic target detection using infrared detect technology. The infrared can avoid the interference of the visible light effectively and the response speed is very fast. Therefore it can be used to implement non-tough detection. Photoelectric detection systems based on infrared detect technology are normally stable, reliable, low cost, simple structure, and easy to be practically utilized. Therefore it is widely used in the on-line real time detection field. Its key point is to determinate the characteristic wavelength or wave band. The infrared lights emitted from the infrared light emitting diode were irradiated to the detected objects. The reflected infrared lights could be received by the photoelectric device. Then control signal was triggered and automatic target spray was realized. Code-division infrared detection circuit was used in the system. Modulated pulse infrared signals using different coding were used in different photodetector units in the built system so as to eliminate the light path interference between different detector units and other light signal interferences. Therefore the interference capacity of the system is high. The test results showed that the automatic target spray equipment set up in the study could detect crop targets automatically. The light wavelength used in the test is 850 nm. The detection range was tunable within 0.1-0.5 m. The least targets detectable distance was less than 0.3 m.

  9. Target Window Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2016-02-11

    The target window design implemented and tested in experiments at ANL have performed without failure for the available beam of 6 mm FWHM on a 12 mm diameter target. However, scaling that design to a 25 mm diameter target size for a 12 mm FWHM beam has proven problematic. Combined thermal and mechanical (pressure induced) stresses and strains are too high to maintain the small coolant gaps and provide adequate fatigue lifetime.

  10. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  11. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  12. Infrared target array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. A.

    1980-04-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (USAYPG) was requested to develop and acquire a series of infrared targets with controllable thermal signatures to support the test and evaluation of the Target Acquisition Designation System/Pilot Night Vision System (TADS/PNVS) subsystems of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) Fire Control System. Prior to this development effort, no capability beyond the use of real-scene targets existed at USAYPG to provide thermally active targets with characteristic signatures in the infrared band. Three targets were acquired: (1) a detection target; (2) a recognition target; and (3) a laser scoring board. It is concluded that design goals were met and the system was delivered in time to perform its function. The system provides sufficient thermal realism and has advanced the state-of-the-art of infrared imaging system test and evaluation. It is recommended that the Field Equivalent Bar Target (FEBT) system be validated as a potential test standard and that environmentally 'hardened' targets be acquired for continued thermal sight testing.

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  14. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  15. Potassium targets from KI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, G.

    1982-09-01

    Targets of potassium iodide (KI) on thin carbon backings have been prepared. Potassium isotopes are supplied as chlorides, and the chlorine is, in certain experiments, an unwanted contaminant. Target peeparation involves conversion of KCl to KI and subsequent vacuum evaporation of the iodide. Targets of both 39K and 41K in the thickness range of 60 to 100 μg/cm 2 of potassium have been prepared. These targets contain less than 0.5 μg/cm 2 of chlorine impurity and are stable in α-beams of 25 MeV.

  16. GWAS and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may be leveraged by network information to discover known and new drug targets. Results We find that only a very small fraction of drug targets are directly detected in the relevant GWAS studies. We investigate two possible explanations for this observation. First, we find evidence of negative selection acting on drug target genes as a consequence of strong coupling with the disease phenotype, so reducing the incidence of SNPs linked to the disease. Second, we find that GWAS genes are substantially longer on average than drug targets and than all genes, suggesting there is a length related bias in GWAS results. In spite of the low direct relationship between drug targets and GWAS reported genes, we found these two sets of genes are closely coupled in the human protein network. As a consequence, machine-learning methods are able to recover known drug targets based on network context and the set of GWAS reported genes for the same disease. We show the approach is potentially useful for identifying drug repurposing opportunities. Conclusions Although GWA studies do not directly identify most existing drug targets, there are several reasons to expect that new targets will nevertheless be discovered using these data. Initial results on drug repurposing studies using network analysis are encouraging and suggest directions for future development. PMID:25057111

  17. Targeted anti bacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2007-09-01

    The increasing development of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, thus necessitating a strong need to develop new antimicrobial agents. These new antimicrobials should possess novel modes of action and/or different cellular targets compared with the existing antibiotics. As a result, new classes of compounds designed to avoid defined resistance mechanisms are undergoing pre clinical and clinical evaluation. Microbial and phage genomic sequencing are now being used to find previously unidentified genes and their corresponding proteins. In both traditional and newly developed antibiotics, the target selectivity lies in the drug itself, in its ability to affect a mechanism that is unique to prokaryotes. As a result, a vast number of potent agents that, due to low selectivity, in addition to the pathogen also affect the eukaryote host have been excluded from use as therapeutics. Such compounds could be re-considered for clinical use if applied as part of a targeted delivery platform where the drug selectivity is replaced by target-selectivity borne by the targeting moiety. With a large number of antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates already approved or near approval as cancer therapeutics, targeted therapy is becoming increasingly attractive and additional potential targeting moieties that are non-antibody based, such as peptides, non-antibody ligand-binding proteins and even carbohydrates are receiving increasing attention. Still, targeted therapy is mostly focused on cancer, with targeted anti bacterial therapies being suggested only very recently. This review will focus in the various methods of antimicrobial targeting, by systemic and local application of targeted antimicrobial substances.

  18. Matching target dose to target organ

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Desmond I.; Williams, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro assays have become a mainstay of modern approaches to toxicology with the promise of replacing or reducing the number of in vivo tests required to establish benchmark doses, as well as increasing mechanistic understanding. However, matching target dose to target organ is an often overlooked aspect of in vitro assays, and the calibration of in vitro exposure against in vivo benchmark doses is often ignored, inadvertently or otherwise.  An example of this was recently published in Environmental Health Perspectives by Wagner et al., where neural stems cells were used to model the molecular toxicity of lead.  On closer examination of the in vitro work, the doses used in media reflected in vivo lead doses that would be at the highest end of lead toxicity, perhaps even lethal.  Here we discuss the doses used and suggest more realistic doses for future work with stem cells or other neuronal cell lines. PMID:28163899

  19. Segmented Target Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhi, Abdul Rahman; Frank, Nathan; Gueye, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A proposed segmented target would improve decay energy measurements of neutron-unbound nuclei. Experiments like this have been performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) located at Michigan State University. Many different nuclei are produced in such experiments, some of which immediately decay into a charged particle and neutron. The charged particles are bent by a large magnet and measured by a suite of charged particle detectors. The neutrons are measured by the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and Large Multi-Institutional Scintillation Array (LISA). With the current target setup, a nucleus in a neutron-unbound state is produced with a radioactive beam impinged upon a beryllium target. The resolution of these measurements is very dependent on the target thickness since the nuclear interaction point is unknown. In a segmented target using alternating layers of silicon detectors and Be-targets, the Be-target in which the nuclear reaction takes place would be determined. Thus the experimental resolution would improve. This poster will describe the improvement over the current target along with the status of the design. Work supported by Augustana College and the National Science Foundation grant #0969173.

  20. Seedling root targets

    Treesearch

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  1. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... workout Enter your age to find a target heart rate during exercise. You'll get the most out of your activities by staying within this range of heartbeats/minute. Please enter your age in years Calculate Your target heart rate is beats per minute. How to Check Your ...

  2. Knowing Your Learning Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Connie M.; Brookhart, Susan M.; Long, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    No matter what we decide students need to learn, not much will happen until students understand what they are supposed to learn during a lesson and set their sights on learning it. Crafting learning targets for each lesson and deliberately sharing them with students is one way to give students the direction they need. Targets that tell students…

  3. Advanced Targeted Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Arachchige, Mohan C M; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has been the major topic in drug formulation and delivery. As nanomedicine emerges to create nano scale therapeutics and diagnostics, it is still essential to embed targeting capability to these novel systems to make them useful. Here we discuss various targeting approaches for delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic nano materials in view of search for more universal methods to target diseased tissues. Many diseases are accompanied with hypoxia and acidosis. Coating nanoparticles with pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) increases efficiency of targeting acidic diseased tissues. It has been showing promising results to create future nanotheranostics for cancer and other diseases which are dominating in the present world. PMID:25615945

  4. Nuclear target development

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces thin foil targets needed for experiments performed at the ATLAS and Dynamitron accelerators. Targets are not only produced for the Physics Division but also for other divisions and occasionally for other laboratories and universities. In the past year, numerous targets were fabricated by vacuum evaporation either as self-supporting foils or on various substrates. Targets produced included Ag, Au, {sup 10,11}B, {sup 138}Ba, Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 155,160}Gd, {sup 76}Ge, In, LID, {sup 6}LiH, Melamine, Mg, {sup 142,150}Nd, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 206,208}Pb, {sup 194}Pt, {sup 28}Si, {sup 144,148}Sm, {sup 120,122,124}Sn, Ta, {sup 130}Te, ThF{sub 4}, {sup 46,50}Ti, TiH, U, UF{sub 4}, {sup 182}W and {sup 170}Yb. Polypropylene and aluminized polypropylene, along with metallized Mylar were produced for experiments at ATLAS. A number of targets of {sup 11}B of various thickness were made for the DEP 2-MeV Van de Graff accelerator. An increased output of foils fabricated using our small rolling mill included targets of Au, C, {sup 50}Cr, Cu, {sup 155,160}Gd, Mg, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 105,110}Pd. Sc, Ti, and {sup 64,66}Zn.

  5. Rapid Target Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbee, John

    1985-12-01

    Like beauty, "real time" is in the eye of the beholder. Airborne electro-optical (EO) reconnaissance systems can transmit an image in real time to a display in an imagery interpreter's (II) console, but it then takes around 15 min for the II to issue his report. Thus, while the II sees real-time imagery, the officer in the field who requested the coverage sees a report that is not real time and that may be rapidly losing its value. The greatest delay in issuing the report comes from having to determine where the target is. This is currently done on the Analytical Photogrammetric Positioning System (APPS) that uses stereophotomaps to determine the x, y, z coordinates of a point on the ground; it takes many minutes to measure the position of each target. Our goal is to reduce that portion of the recce cycle that uses Itek technology--from time over target to issuance of a report--to less than 2 min. A still shorter time would be desirable in the face of rapidly moving targets,, but there is little point in making the time negligible compared to that required for Oil to evaluate the report and issue orders, plus the time required to respond to the orders. It is clear that we can achieve this 2-min goal only if we can greatly reduce the time it now takes to determine the location of a target. The accuracy with which a target is located should not suffer while the time is reduced. There is a tradeoff to be made between timeliness and accuracy when the target is moving: neither short time with poor accuracy nor high accuracy with long time is desirable. We have arbitrarily adopted goals in which a target can be located to about 100 ft in less than half a minute. The experiments reported here investigated one concept, called Rapid Target Locator (RATL), for achieving this performance.

  6. Internal polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. ); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  7. STIS target acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Steve; Downes, Ron; Katsanis, Rocio; Crenshaw, Mike; McGrath, Melissa; Robinson, Rich

    1997-01-01

    We describe the STIS autonomous target acquisition capabilities. We also present the results of dedicated tests executed as part of Cycle 7 calibration, following post-launch improvements to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) flight software. The residual pointing error from the acquisitions are < 0.5 CCD pixels, which is better than preflight estimates. Execution of peakups show clear improvement of target centering for slits of width 0.1 sec or smaller. These results may be used by Guest Observers in planning target acquisitions for their STIS programs.

  8. Targeted Peptide Specificity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    the conformation of small natural peptide ligands. In the last year two peptides were investigaýed by 2D-NMR,(j2.- conotoxin SI, which targets to the...targets. Although these venoms are very complex, we have focused on three groups of peptide toxins, the a, j and w- conotoxins which target to nicotinic...grant period are summarized below.) In addition, the 2D-NMR work is continuing and in addition to examining one of the conotoxins specific for the

  9. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  10. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  11. Targeting drugs to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heller, Anne; Brockhoff, Gero; Goepferich, Achim

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria are of an increasing interest in pharmaceutical and medical research since it has been reported that dysfunction of these organelles contributes to several diseases with a great diversity of clinical appearance. By the fact that mitochondria are located inside the cell and, in turn, origins of mitochondrial diseases or targets of drugs are located inside mitochondria, a drug molecule has to cross several barriers. This is a severe drawback for the selective accumulation of drug molecules in mitochondria. Therefore, targeting strategies such as direct drug modification or encapsulation into nanocarriers have to be applied to achieve an accumulation of drug molecules in these organelles. In this review, it will be demonstrated how properties and dysfunctions of mitochondria are generating a need for the development of mitochondria specific therapies. Furthermore, intracellular targets of mitochondrial diseases, strategies to utilize mitochondrial specificities and targeting approaches will be discussed. Finally, techniques to investigate mitochondrial characteristics and functionality are reviewed.

  12. Targeting Neural Circuits.

    PubMed

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Ferenczi, Emily; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-04-21

    Optogenetic methodology enables direct targeting of specific neural circuit elements for inhibition or excitation while spanning timescales from the acute (milliseconds) to the chronic (many days or more). Although the impact of this temporal versatility and cellular specificity has been greater for basic science than clinical research, it is natural to ask whether the dynamic patterns of neural circuit activity discovered to be causal in adaptive or maladaptive behaviors could become targets for treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we consider the landscape of ideas related to therapeutic targeting of circuit dynamics. Specifically, we highlight optical, ultrasonic, and magnetic concepts for the targeted control of neural activity, preclinical/clinical discovery opportunities, and recently reported optogenetically guided clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2012-04-23

    Protein toxins constitute the main virulence factors of several species of bacteria and have proven to be attractive targets for drug development. Lead candidates that target bacterial toxins range from small molecules to polymeric binders, and act at each of the multiple steps in the process of toxin-mediated pathogenicity. Despite recent and significant advances in the field, a rationally designed drug that targets toxins has yet to reach the market. This Review presents the state of the art in bacterial toxin targeted drug development with a critical consideration of achieved breakthroughs and withstanding challenges. The discussion focuses on A-B-type protein toxins secreted by four species of bacteria, namely Clostridium difficile (toxins A and B), Vibrio cholerae (cholera toxin), enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (Shiga toxin), and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax toxin), which are the causative agents of diseases for which treatments need to be improved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Targeting: The Joint Targeting Process and Procedures for Targeting Time-Critical Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    680-3153 COMM (757) 727-3153 Marine Corps Commanding General US Marine Corps Combat Development Command ATTN: C42 3300 Russell Road Quantico VA...Plans Division) - Boblingen, GE Marine Corps Combat Development Command, C42 - Quantico VA Marine Corps Combat Development Command, MSTP - Quantico VA...as the target reference point ( TRP ) concept, that are used to quickly identify a target off of a known geographic point. (a) Bullseye Design

  15. Targeting Organizations: Centralized or Decentralized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    target group to �be responsible for all headquarters target analysis functions, provide headquarters data and information on selected targets...them.�42 Forming a joint target group could result in a significant economy of targeting personnel as well as an established procedure for the...analysis of strategic targets, thus reducing the confusion and lack of unity of purpose. In addition, a consolidated target group could ensure all

  16. Targeted α-Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a viable strategy for the delivery of therapeutic, particle emitting radionuclides specifically to tumor cells to either augment anti-tumor action of the native antibodies or to solely take advantage of their action as targeting vectors. Proper and rational selection of radionuclide and antibody combinations is critical to making radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a standard therapeutic modality due to the fundamental and significant differences in the emission of either α- and β-particles. The α-particle has a short path length (50-80 μm) that is characterized by high linear energy transfer (∼100 keV/μm). Actively targeted α-therapy potentially offers a more specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to the surrounding normal tissues than ß-emitters. These properties make targeted α-therapy appropriate therapies to eliminate of minimal residual or micrometastatic disease. RIT using α-emitters such as 213Bi, 211At, 225Ac, and others has demonstrated significant activity in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Limited numbers of clinical trials have progressed to demonstrate safety, feasibility, and therapeutic activity of targeted α-therapy, despite having to traverse complex obstacles. Further advances may require more potent isotopes, additional sources and more efficient means of isotope production. Refinements in chelation and/or radiolabeling chemistry combined with rational improvements of isotope delivery, targeting vectors, molecular targets, and identification of appropriate clinical applications remains as active areas of research. Ultimately, randomized trials comparing targeted α-therapy combined with integration into existing standard of care treatment regimens will determine the clinical utility of this modality. PMID:17992276

  17. Production Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.  The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.  The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.  The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).  The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.  This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  18. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  19. Burglar Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Michael; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both environment- and offender-level factors on residential burglary placement in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Combining cleared burglary data from all study regions in a single statistical model, we make statistical comparisons between environments. Results: In all three study regions, the likelihood an offender selects an area for burglary is positively influenced by proximity to their home, the proportion of easily accessible targets, and the total number of targets available. Furthermore, in two of the three study regions, juvenile offenders under the legal driving age are significantly more influenced by target proximity than adult offenders. Post hoc tests indicate the magnitudes of these impacts vary significantly between study regions. Conclusions: While burglary target selection strategies are consistent with opportunity-based explanations of offending, the impact of environmental context is significant. As such, the approach undertaken in combining observations from multiple study regions may aid criminology scholars in assessing the generalizability of observed findings across multiple environments. PMID:25866418

  20. The Sinuous Target

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the concept for a target material comprised of a multitude of interlaced wires of small dimension. This target material concept is primarily directed at high-power neutrino targets where the thermal shock is large due to small beam sizes and short durations; it also has applications to other high-power targets, particularly where the energy deposition is great or a high surface area is preferred. This approach ameliorates the problem of thermal shock by engineering a material with high strength on the micro-scale, but a very low modulus of elasticity on the meso-scale. The low modulus of elasticity is achieved by constructing the material of spring-like wire segments much smaller than the beam dimension. The intrinsic bends of the wires will allow them to absorb the strain of thermal shock with minimal stress. Furthermore, the interlaced nature of the wires provides containment of any segment that might become loose. We will discuss the progress on studies of analogue materials and fabrication techniques for sinuous target materials.

  1. Penetration of concrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Cargile, J.D.; Tzou, R.D.Y.

    1993-08-01

    We developed penetration equations for ogive-nosed projectiles that penetrated concrete targets after normal impact. Our penetration equations predict axial force on the projectile nose, rigid-body motion, and final penetration depth. For target constitutive models, we conducted triaxial material experiments to confining pressures of 600 MPa and curve-fit these data with a linear pressure-volumetric strain relation and with a linear Mohr-Coulomb, shear strength-pressure relation. To verify our penetration equations, we conducted eleven penetration experiments with 0.90 kg, 26.9-mm-diameter, ogive-nosed projectiles into 1.37-m-diameter concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths between 32-40 MPa. Predictions from our penetration equation are compared with final penetration depth measurements for striking velocities between 280--800 m/s.

  2. Phoenix Color Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  4. Phoenix Color Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Setting reference targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    Reference Targets are used to represent virtual quantities like the magnetic axis of a magnet or the definition of a coordinate system. To explain the function of reference targets in the sequence of the alignment process, this paper will first briefly discuss the geometry of the trajectory design space and of the surveying space, then continue with an overview of a typical alignment process. This is followed by a discussion on magnet fiducialization. While the magnetic measurement methods to determine the magnetic centerline are only listed (they will be discussed in detail in a subsequent talk), emphasis is given to the optical/mechanical methods and to the task of transferring the centerline position to reference targets.

  6. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  7. Targeting the right journal.

    PubMed

    Piterman, L; McCall, L

    1999-07-01

    While research is scientific, publication is a mixture of science and political pragmatism. Targeting the right journal is influenced by the following factors: the discipline that best represents the subject; the purpose of the message; the audience who are to be recipients of the message; the realities of geographic parochialism; the desire of authors to maximise personal and professional opportunities. If the originally targeted journal rejects the article, authors should have alternative publication strategies that give them professional recognition without requiring them to compromise the message or their ethics.

  8. Integrin Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Melissa; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that function as mechanosensors, adhesion molecules and signal transduction platforms in a multitude of biological processes. As such, integrins are central to the etiology and pathology of many disease states. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of integrins is of great interest for the treatment and prevention of disease. In the last two decades several integrin-targeted drugs have made their way into clinical use, many others are in clinical trials and still more are showing promise as they advance through preclinical development. Herein, this review examines and evaluates the various drugs and compounds targeting integrins and the disease states in which they are implicated. PMID:21547158

  9. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M [Brookline, MA; Janse, Daniel M [Brookline, MA

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  10. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  11. Infrared retroreflecting lidar calibration target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, T. K.; Schotland, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A lightweight flexible lidar calibration target has been fabricated for use at 10.6 microns. The biconical reflectance of the target was kept low to reduce the possiblity of detector saturation. The target has been designed so that the biconical reflectance is nearly independent of the target orientation over the range of angles of incidence + or - 60 deg, causing the calibration properties to be independent of target orientation. The present target is relatively inexpensive to construct.

  12. Opportunity Spies Its Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a forward-looking view of the Meridiani Planum plains that lie between the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity and its primary drive target, 'Endurance Crater.' The images in this image mosaic were taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 88.

  13. Active Target Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Draznik, Peter; Frank, Nathan

    2012-10-01

    We have simulated an existing experimental design to determine the resolution improvement upon energy measurements of neutron unbound nuclei. A number of experiments of this type have been performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), located at Michigan State University. An excited nucleus is typically produced with a radioactive beam interacting with a passive Beryllium target. Many different nuclei are produced in experiment, each of which immediately decays into a charged particle and neutron. The charged particles are detected and the neutrons interact in scintillation detectors such as the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and Large Multi-Institutional Scintillation Array (LISA). In our simulation, we have constructed an active target that provides additional information such that the point of nuclear interaction within the target may be determined. This information improves the resolution in decay energy measurements of neutron unbound isotopes. This presentation will cover some aspects of the simulation process, as well as showing some of the results that demonstrate the simulated improvement over a passive target.

  14. Microenvironmental Targets in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehnman, Monika; Larsson, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting all age groups. They are typically classified according to their resemblance to corresponding normal tissue. Their heterogeneous features, for example, in terms of disease-driving genetic aberrations and body location, complicate both disease classification and development of novel treatment regimens. Many years of failure of improved patient outcome in clinical trials has led to the conclusion that novel targeted therapies are likely needed in combination with current multimodality regimens. Sarcomas have not, in contrast to the common carcinomas, been the subject of larger systematic studies on how tumor behavior relates to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. There is consequently an urgent need for identifying suitable molecular targets, not only in tumor cells but also in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses preclinical and clinical data about potential molecular targets in sarcomas. Studies on targeted therapies involving the tumor microenvironment are prioritized. A greater understanding of the biological context is expected to facilitate more successful design of future clinical trials in sarcoma. PMID:26583076

  15. Opportunity Investigation Target Onaping

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-19

    This image from NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover arm extended for examination of a target called Onaping at the base of an outcrop called Copper Cliff in the Matijevic Hill area of the west rim of Endeavour Crater.

  16. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  17. Target-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Target marketing is defining school enrollment goals and then developing a strategic plan to accomplish those goals through the use of specific communication vehicles and community focus. It is critical to reach the right audience, with the right message, at the right time, for the right cost. In this brief article, the author describes several…

  18. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  19. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  20. Right on Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Target Community and Educational Services program, a salaried arrangement that allows students at McDaniel College to complete their studies while living with, and managing, clients with developmental disabilities. In what is believed to be the only arrangement of its kind in the U.S., full-time graduate students agree to…

  1. Target-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Target marketing is defining school enrollment goals and then developing a strategic plan to accomplish those goals through the use of specific communication vehicles and community focus. It is critical to reach the right audience, with the right message, at the right time, for the right cost. In this brief article, the author describes several…

  2. Target Chamber Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  3. Right on Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Target Community and Educational Services program, a salaried arrangement that allows students at McDaniel College to complete their studies while living with, and managing, clients with developmental disabilities. In what is believed to be the only arrangement of its kind in the U.S., full-time graduate students agree to…

  4. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  5. Infrared target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singstock, Brian D.

    1991-12-01

    In this thesis, three approaches were used for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR). These approaches were shape, moment and Fourier generated features, Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) generated features and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) generated features. The KLT approach was modelled after the face recognition research by Suarez, AFIT, and Turk and Pentland, MIT. A KLT is taken of a reduced covariance matrix, composed all three classes of targets, and the resulting eigenimages are used to reconstruct the original images. The reconstruction coefficients for each original image are found by taking the dot product of the original image with each eigenimage. These reconstruction coefficients were implemented as features into a three layer backprop with momentum network. Using the hold one-cut-out technique of testing data, the net could correctly differentiate the targets 100 percent of the time. Using standard features, the correct classification rate was 99.33 percent. The DCT was also taken of each image, and 16 low frequency Fourier components were kept as features. These recognition rates were compared to FFT results where each set contained the top five feature, as determined by a saliency test. The results proved that the DCT and the FFT were equivalent concerning classification of targets.

  6. Targets of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyu; Beevers, Christopher S.; Huang, Shile

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an orange-yellow component of turmeric or curry powder, is a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. For centuries, curcumin has been used in some medicinal preparation or used as a food-coloring agent. In recent years, extensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggested curcumin has anticancer, antiviral, antiarthritic, anti-amyloid, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are diverse and appear to involve the regulation of various molecular targets, including transcription factors (such as nuclear factor-κB), growth factors (such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor), inflammatory cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6), protein kinases (such as mammalian target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt) and other enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase). Thus, due to its efficacy and regulation of multiple targets, as well as its safety for human use, curcumin has received considerable interest as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of various malignant diseases, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, and other inflammatory illnesses. This review summarizes various in vitro and in vivo pharmacological aspects of curcumin as well as the underlying action mechanisms. The recently identified molecular targets and signaling pathways modulated by curcumin are also discussed here. PMID:20955148

  7. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Thomas; Moore, Herbert

    2016-12-05

    The research project, entitled ”Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,” was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  8. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  9. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Shinn, J.L.; Townsend, L.W.

    1993-02-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  10. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  11. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  12. Development of an underwater target classifier using target specific features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, M. H.; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2003-04-01

    In Sonar, the detection and estimation functions are performed by signal processors, which involve the computation of various statistics, for enhancing the overall performance of the system. This also takes into account all the undesirable propagation effects caused by the underwater channel. Underwater targets can be classified by using certain target specific features such as target strength, target dynamics, and the signatures of the noise generated by the targets. Rough identification of the targets is carried out with target strength values at known aspects while for precise identification, classification clues from target dynamics and target signatures are generated. Databases for the engine noise spectra of various underwater targets, propeller noises, machinery noises and cavitation noises, speed-noise characteristics, etc., have been developed. The signal energy estimated within a finite-time interval is compared with the earlier detection/estimation decisions, which are stored in the target data record and the relevant target data are updated. The algorithm for identification of target from the most matching signature patterns in the database will generate the classification clues, which will help in target identification. Salient highlights of an underwater target classifier using the above-discussed target specific features are presented in this paper.

  13. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  14. Children: a soft target.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, M

    1998-02-08

    The inability to resist the ease with which they can be enticed and the absence of possible pregnancy complications make children easy targets for sexual assaults in India. According to the Indian crime statistics, 25% of the 10,000 reported rape cases in 1990 involve children under 16 years old. During a public hearing on minor rape conducted by the India Democratic Women's Association, several incidents of child rape came into the open as parents recalled the incidents before the jury and the public. Commenting on the common trends observed on the revealed cases, the district secretary, Sarasam Jayaraj, noted that the rapist was invariably a familiar person and that the defenseless daily wage earners were the common targets. Considering the seriousness of this problem, the issue has to be a priority in welfare and women's organizations in their national campaigns. This crime also demands an urgent response from the government and sociopolitical systems.

  15. [Targeted treatments: which imaging?].

    PubMed

    Lassau, Nathalie; Chebil, Mohamed; Benatsou, Baya; Chami, Linda; Roche, Alain

    2008-10-01

    Currently, the evaluation of targeted treatments by functional imaging in oncology is a main goal. Several techniques as Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-MRI, CT-perfusion or Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-US are proposed. The blood flow perfusing the tumor, the blood volume corresponding to the percentage of vessels of total tumor or the diffusion of contrast agent are parameters calculated from the acquisition of time intensity curves during several minutes (TIC). Blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time could be calculated by DCE-US, DCE-MRI and CT-perfusion. But the capillary permeability and the interstitial volume could be evaluated only with DCE-MRI and CT-perfusion because US contrast agent is strictly intravascular. These functional imaging techniques allow predicting earlier the clinical response to targeted treatments before the modification of tumoral volume evaluated according to RECIST criteria.

  16. Complement-targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is a central component of innate immunity and bridges the innate to the adaptive immune response. However, it can also turn its destructive capabilities against host cells and is involved in numerous diseases and pathological conditions. Modulation of the complement system has been recognized as a promising strategy in drug discovery, and a large number of therapeutic modalities have been developed. However, successful marketing of complement-targeted drugs has proved to be more difficult than initially expected, and many strategies have been discontinued. The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first complement-specific drug, an antibody against complement component C5 (eculizumab; Soliris), in March 2007, was a long-awaited breakthrough in the field. Approval of eculizumab validates the complement system as therapeutic target and might facilitate clinical development of other promising drug candidates. PMID:17989689

  17. Cellular Targeting in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jennifer L.; Serafin, Donald S.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic agents that were first approved for the treatment of malignancies are now being actively investigated and used in a variety of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren’s syndrome. The relatively recent advance of selective immune targeting has significantly changed the management of autoimmune disorders, and in part, can be attributed to the progress made in understanding effector cell function and their signaling pathways. In this review, we will discuss the recent FDA approved biologic therapies that directly target immune cells as well as the most promising investigational drugs affecting immune cell function and signaling for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23054625

  18. Foucault on targets.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to gain an insight into the behavior of a large NHS trust, in its attempt to meet a 90 percent patient access target, in a week long national audit in March 2003. Why did individuals act in dramatically different ways to their norm over this period. The work of Michel Foucault is used to explore these issues. The discourses of power, knowledge, discipline and governmentality are identified as key foucaudian themes that offer an alternative interpretation of how individuals behave in their place of work. The importance of the historical context of discourse within the NHS cannot be underestimated in shaping the behavior of individuals and groups today. Power and knowledge permeate NHS organizations through disciplinary practices and dressage. Governmentality seeks to maintain the status quo through disciplinary processes such as national healthcare targets. The natural response of NHS organizations is therefore, to seek order and conformity rather than disorder and conflict.

  19. Guilty Feelings, Targeted Actions

    PubMed Central

    Cryder, Cynthia E.; Springer, Stephen; Morewedge, Carey K.

    2014-01-01

    Early investigations of guilt cast it as an emotion that prompts broad reparative behaviors that help guilty individuals feel better about themselves or about their transgressions. The current investigation found support for a more recent representation of guilt as an emotion designed to identify and correct specific social offenses. Across five experiments, guilt influenced behavior in a targeted and strategic way. Guilt prompted participants to share resources more generously with others, but only did so when those others were persons whom the participant had wronged and only when those wronged individuals could notice the gesture. Rather than trigger broad reparative behaviors that remediate one’s general reputation or self-perception, guilt triggers targeted behaviors intended to remediate specific social transgressions. PMID:22337764

  20. Metabolic syndrome targets.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of easy-to-measure clinical phenotypes that serve as markers for increased risk for CVD and diabetes. There is no universal agreement as to the underlying pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome. At its core, the metabolic syndrome is the result of energy excess; therefore treating obesity is a good strategy to reverse the clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. Hypertension is a special case, may not be part of the core pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, and will not be discussed. After a brief review of recent developments in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, this review will concentrate on peripheral targets in the following categories: ectopic fat and fat oxidation, intrinsic defects in substrate switching and mitochondrial biogenesis, lipolysis and lipid turnover, adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, nutrient / energy sensing systems, and inflammation. The advantages and pitfalls of these targets will be discussed with an eye towards the relevant literature.

  1. SETI target selection.

    PubMed

    Latham, D W; Soderblom, D R

    1995-01-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. In this paper we propose strategies for target selection. We have two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. For the main Targeted Search survey of approximately 1000 nearby solar-type stars, we argue that the selection criteria should be heavily biased by what we know about the origin and evolution of life here on Earth. We propose that observations of stars with stellar companions orbiting near the habitable zone should be de-emphasized, because such companions would prevent the formation of habitable planets. We also propose that observations of stars younger than about three billion years should be de-emphasized in favor of older stars, because our own technical civilization took longer than three billion years to evolve here on Earth. To provide the information needed for the preparation of specific target lists, we have undertaken an inventory of a large sample of solar-type stars out to a distance of 60 pc, with the goal of characterizing the relevant astrophysical properties of these stars, especially their ages and companionship. To complement the main survey, we propose that a modest sample of the nearest stars should be observed without any selection biases whatsoever. Finally, we argue that efforts to identify stars with planetary systems should be expanded. If found, such systems should receive intensive scrutiny.

  2. Targeting Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    drug t oxi c i t y and the e ffect i ve dose i n zebrafish and found the best perf ormi ng s t rat egi es usi ng zebrafish - metastasi s model s...CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c . THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified screen, zebrafish , mouse, 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER OF... zebrafish -metastasis models and mouse models of prostate cancer, we aim to investigate whether FDA approved drugs that target these pathways can be

  3. Reaching the Target Audience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    REACHING THE TARGET AUDIENCE A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in...partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE General Studies by MARK S. FLITTON, MAJOR, USAR...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GD Fort

  4. Targeting biodefense markets.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Gene Garrard

    2009-10-01

    The "World Vaccine Congress 2009" held in Washington D.C. (April 20-23, 2009) sponsored several sessions focused on the vaccine market targeting biodefense. On day one of the congress, a panel discussion outlined the federal progress in medical countermeasure preparedness that included emerging infections, influenza, and biodefense focuses. The second day, a session focused on the biodefense vaccine market with both government and industry members discussing the opportunities and challenges associated with the budding market.

  5. FOS Target Acquisition Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha

    1994-01-01

    FOS onboard target acquisition software capabilities will be verified by this test -- point source binary, point source firmware, point source peak-up, wfpc2 assisted realtime, point source peak-down, taled assisted binary, taled assisted firmware, and nth star binary modes. The primary modes are tested 3 times to determine repeatability. This test is the only test that will verify mode-to-mode acquisition offsets. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors.

  6. Leaders as Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-16

    military commanders, when they plan the use of mili- tary power in crisis resolution. Belligerents in modern history have generally balked at... political structures cul- tivated their view that “. . . by 1632 a collective understanding was emerging that the ‘appropriate and legitimate’ means...13 Moreover, “during peacetime, the targeted killing of any individual, whether a combatant or not, is generally considered an assassination and is

  7. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  8. Method for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  9. Follicular penetration and targeting.

    PubMed

    Lademann, Jürgen; Otberg, Nina; Jacobi, Ute; Hoffman, Robert M; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    In the past, intercellular penetration was assumed to be the most important penetration pathway of topically applied substances. First hints that follicular penetration needs to be taken into consideration were confirmed by recent investigations, presented during the workshop "Follicular Penetration and Targeting" at the 4th Intercontinental Meeting of Hair Research Societies", in Berlin 2004. Hair follicles represent an efficient reservoir for the penetration of topically applied substances with subsequent targeting of distinct cell populations, e.g., nestin-expressing follicular bulge cells. The volume of this reservoir can be determined by differential stripping technology. The follicular penetration processes are significantly influenced by the state of the follicular infundibulum; recent experimental investigations could demonstrate that it is essential to distinguish between open and closed hair follicles. Topically applied substances can only penetrate into open hair follicle. Knowledge of follicular penetration is of high clinical relevance for functional targeting of distinct follicular regions. Human hair follicles show a hair-cycle-dependent variation of the dense neuronal and vascular network. Moreover, during hair follicle cycling with initiation of anagen, newly formed vessels occur. Thus, the potential of nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells to form neurons and blood vessels was investigated.

  10. CDTI target selection criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L.; Davis, C. M.; Jackson, C. B.; Mcclellan, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    A Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) is a cockpit instrument which provides information to the aircrew on the relative location of aircraft traffic in the vicinity of their aircraft (township). In addition, the CDTI may provide information to assist in navigation and in aircraft control. It is usually anticipated that the CDTI will be integrated with a horizontal situation indicator used for navigational purposes and/or with a weather radar display. In this study, several sets of aircraft traffic data are analyzed to determine statistics on the number of targets that will be displayed on a CDTI using various target selection criteria. Traffic data were obtained from an Atlanta Terminal Area Simulation and from radar tapes recorded at the Atlanta and Miami terminal areas. Results are given in the form of plots showing the average percentage of time (or probability) that an aircraft equipped with a CDTI would observe from 0 to 10 other aircraft on the display for range settings on the CDTI up to 30 n. mi. and using various target discrimination techniques.

  11. Bromodomains as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Susanne; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Knapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification with broad relevance to cellular signalling and disease biology. Enzymes that ‘write’ (histone acetyltransferases, HATs) and ‘erase’ (histone deacetylases, HDACs) acetylation sites are an area of extensive research in current drug development, but very few potent inhibitors that modulate the ‘reading process’ mediated by acetyl lysines have been described. The principal readers of ɛ-N-acetyl lysine (Kac) marks are bromodomains (BRDs), which are a diverse family of evolutionary conserved protein-interaction modules. The conserved BRD fold contains a deep, largely hydrophobic acetyl lysine binding site, which represents an attractive pocket for the development of small, pharmaceutically active molecules. Proteins that contain BRDs have been implicated in the development of a large variety of diseases. Recently, two highly potent and selective inhibitors that target BRDs of the BET (bromodomains and extra-terminal) family provided compelling data supporting targeting of these BRDs in inflammation and in an aggressive type of squamous cell carcinoma. It is likely that BRDs will emerge alongside HATs and HDACs as interesting targets for drug development for the large number of diseases that are caused by aberrant acetylation of lysine residues. PMID:21933453

  12. Target space ≠ space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Nick

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the significance of T-duality in string theory: the indistinguishability with respect to all observables, of models attributing radically different radii to space-larger than the observable universe, or far smaller than the Planck length, say. Two interpretational branch points are identified and discussed. First, whether duals are physically equivalent or not: by considering a duality of the familiar simple harmonic oscillator, I argue that they are. Unlike the oscillator, there are no measurements 'outside' string theory that could distinguish the duals. Second, whether duals agree or disagree on the radius of 'target space', the space in which strings evolve according to string theory. I argue for the latter position, because the alternative leaves it unknown what the radius is. Since duals are physically equivalent yet disagree on the radius of target space, it follows that the radius is indeterminate between them. Using an analysis of Brandenberger and Vafa (1989), I explain why-even so-space is observed to have a determinate, large radius. The conclusion is that observed, 'phenomenal' space is not target space, since a space cannot have both a determinate and indeterminate radius: instead phenomenal space must be a higher-level phenomenon, not fundamental.

  13. Implementing Target Value Design.

    PubMed

    Alves, Thais da C L; Lichtig, Will; Rybkowski, Zofia K

    2017-04-01

    An alternative to the traditional way of designing projects is the process of target value design (TVD), which takes different departure points to start the design process. The TVD process starts with the client defining an allowable cost that needs to be met by the design and construction teams. An expected cost in the TVD process is defined through multiple interactions between multiple stakeholders who define wishes and others who define ways of achieving these wishes. Finally, a target cost is defined based on the expected profit the design and construction teams are expecting to make. TVD follows a series of continuous improvement efforts aimed at reaching the desired goals for the project and its associated target value cost. The process takes advantage of rapid cycles of suggestions, analyses, and implementation that starts with the definition of value for the client. In the traditional design process, the goal is to identify user preferences and find solutions that meet the needs of the client's expressed preferences. In the lean design process, the goal is to educate users about their values and advocate for a better facility over the long run; this way owners can help contractors and designers to identify better solutions. This article aims to inform the healthcare community about tools and techniques commonly used during the TVD process and how they can be used to educate and support project participants in developing better solutions to meet their needs now as well as in the future.

  14. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  15. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  16. Radiation Calibration Targets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-05

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera. A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00620

  17. Spatiotopic buildup of saccade target representation depends on target size.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-12-01

    How we maintain spatial stability across saccade eye movements is an open question in visual neuroscience. A phenomenon that has received much attention in the field is our seemingly poor ability to discriminate the direction of transsaccadic target displacements. We have recently shown that discrimination performance increases the longer the saccade target has been previewed before saccade execution (Zimmermann, Morrone, & Burr, 2013). We have argued that the spatial representation of briefly presented stimuli is weak but that a strong representation is needed for transsaccadic, i.e., spatiotopic localization. Another factor that modulates the representation of saccade targets is stimulus size. The representation of spatially extended targets is more noisy than that of point-like targets. Here, I show that the increase in transsaccadic displacement discrimination as a function of saccade target preview duration depends on target size. This effect was found for spatially extended targets-thus replicating the results of Zimmermann et al. (2013)-but not for point-like targets. An analysis of saccade parameters revealed that the constant error for reaching the saccade target was bigger for spatially extended than for point-like targets, consistent with weaker representation of bigger targets. These results show that transsaccadic displacement discrimination becomes accurate when saccade targets are spatially extended and presented longer, thus resembling closer stimuli in real-world environments.

  18. Shuttle target measurements program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann, F. M.; Carpenter, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A Space Shuttle vehicle will provide the U.S. Army's Ballistic Missile Defense Advanced Technology Center with a cost effective platform with which to acquire comprehensive exoatmospheric optical sensor data. The data requiring minimum interface with the Shuttle, will be collected through experiments, recorded, and then analyzed upon return. The system will occupy a portion of a commercial pallet and is suitable for early flight consideration. Several block diagrams illustrate the selected hardware configuration designed to provide information on trajectories and vehicle dynamics, signature data from scaled targets, contamination data of the Space Shuttle environment, and other background data. The proposed sensor is a Mosaic Optical Sensor Technology Testbed.

  19. Target mass corrections revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, F.M.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2006-05-15

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x{yields}1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  20. Targeting the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Terence W; Ryan, Charles J

    2012-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is critical to the growth and survival of prostate cancer. Although medical castration and antiandrogen therapy can decrease AR activity and lower PSA, castration resistance eventually develops. Recent work exploring the molecular structure and evolution of AR in response to hormonal therapies has revealed novel mechanisms of progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and yielded new targets for drug development. This review focuses on understanding the mechanisms of persistent AR signaling in the castrate environment, and highlights new therapies either currently available or in clinical trials, including androgen synthesis inhibitors and novel direct AR inhibitors.

  1. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  2. Target Mass Corrections Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; F. Steffens

    2006-03-07

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x {yields} 1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  3. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  4. Polarimetric laser radar target classification.

    PubMed

    Chun, Cornell S L; Sadjadi, Firooz A

    2005-07-15

    Imaging laser radar (ladar) systems have been developed for automatic target identification in surveillance systems. Ladar uses the range value at the target pixels to estimate the target's 3-D shape and identify the target. For targets in clutter and partially hidden targets, there are ambiguities in determining which pixels are on target that lead to uncertainties in determining the target's 3-D shape. An improvement is to use the polarization components of the reflected light. We describe the operation and preliminary evaluation of a polarization diverse imaging ladar system. Using a combination of intensity, range, and degree of polarization, we are better able to identify and distinguish the target from other objects of the same class.

  5. Open Targets: a platform for therapeutic target identification and validation

    PubMed Central

    Koscielny, Gautier; An, Peter; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cham, Jennifer A.; Fumis, Luca; Gasparyan, Rippa; Hasan, Samiul; Karamanis, Nikiforos; Maguire, Michael; Papa, Eliseo; Pierleoni, Andrea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Platt, Theo; Rowland, Francis; Wankar, Priyanka; Bento, A. Patrícia; Burdett, Tony; Fabregat, Antonio; Forbes, Simon; Gaulton, Anna; Gonzalez, Cristina Yenyxe; Hermjakob, Henning; Hersey, Anne; Jupe, Steven; Kafkas, Şenay; Keays, Maria; Leroy, Catherine; Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Magarinos, Maria Paula; Malone, James; McEntyre, Johanna; Munoz-Pomer Fuentes, Alfonso; O'Donovan, Claire; Papatheodorou, Irene; Parkinson, Helen; Palka, Barbara; Paschall, Justin; Petryszak, Robert; Pratanwanich, Naruemon; Sarntivijal, Sirarat; Saunders, Gary; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Smith, Thomas; Sondka, Zbyslaw; Stegle, Oliver; Tang, Y. Amy; Turner, Edward; Vaughan, Brendan; Vrousgou, Olga; Watkins, Xavier; Martin, Maria-Jesus; Sanseau, Philippe; Vamathevan, Jessica; Birney, Ewan; Barrett, Jeffrey; Dunham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and developed a data integration and visualization platform that provides evidence about the association of known and potential drug targets with diseases. The platform is designed to support identification and prioritization of biological targets for follow-up. Each drug target is linked to a disease using integrated genome-wide data from a broad range of data sources. The platform provides either a target-centric workflow to identify diseases that may be associated with a specific target, or a disease-centric workflow to identify targets that may be associated with a specific disease. Users can easily transition between these target- and disease-centric workflows. The Open Targets Validation Platform is accessible at https://www.targetvalidation.org. PMID:27899665

  6. Non-Targeted Analysis Challenge (Non-targeted screening workshop)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief presentation is intended to motivate discussion of the "Non-Targeted Analysis Challenge" at the Advancing Non-Targeted Analyses of Xenobiotics in Environmental and Biological Media workshop held at the EPA RTP campus.

  7. Quantum state targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a primitive for quantum cryptography that we term 'state targeting'. We show that increasing one's probability of success in this task above a minimum amount implies an unavoidable increase in the probability of a particular kind of failure. This is analogous to the unavoidable disturbance to a quantum state that results from gaining information about its identity, and can be shown to be a purely quantum effect. We solve various optimization problems for state targeting that are useful for the security analysis of two-party cryptographic tasks implemented between remote antagonistic parties. Although we focus on weak coin flipping, the results are significant for other two-party protocols, such as strong coin flipping, partially binding and concealing bit commitment, and bit escrow. Furthermore, the results have significance not only for the traditional notion of security in cryptography, that of restricting a cheater's ability to bias the outcome of the protocol, but also for a different notion of security that arises only in the quantum context, that of cheat sensitivity. Finally, our analysis leads to some interesting secondary results, namely, a generalization of Uhlmann's theorem and an operational interpretation of the fidelity between two mixed states.

  8. Quantum state targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a primitive for quantum cryptography that we term “state targeting.” We show that increasing one’s probability of success in this task above a minimum amount implies an unavoidable increase in the probability of a particular kind of failure. This is analogous to the unavoidable disturbance to a quantum state that results from gaining information about its identity, and can be shown to be a purely quantum effect. We solve various optimization problems for state targeting that are useful for the security analysis of two-party cryptographic tasks implemented between remote antagonistic parties. Although we focus on weak coin flipping, the results are significant for other two-party protocols, such as strong coin flipping, partially binding and concealing bit commitment, and bit escrow. Furthermore, the results have significance not only for the traditional notion of security in cryptography, that of restricting a cheater’s ability to bias the outcome of the protocol, but also for a different notion of security that arises only in the quantum context, that of cheat sensitivity. Finally, our analysis leads to some interesting secondary results, namely, a generalization of Uhlmann’s theorem and an operational interpretation of the fidelity between two mixed states.

  9. TARGETED THERAPY IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the emergence of targeted therapies that have led to significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy and completed or ongoing clinical trials of novel agents for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. Methods The literature was systematically reviewed, based on clinical experience and the use of technologies that improved our understanding of carcinogenesis. Results Genomics and model systems have enabled the validation of novel therapeutic strategies. Tumor molecular profiling has enabled the reclassification of cancer, and elucidated some mechanisms of disease progression or resistance to treatment, the heterogeneity between primary and metastatic tumors, and the dynamic changes of tumor molecular profiling over time. Despite the notable technologic advances, there is a gap between the plethora of preclinical data and the lack of effective therapies, which is attributed to suboptimal drug development for “driver” alterations of human cancer, the high cost of clinical trials and available drugs, and limited access of patients to clinical trials. Bioinformatic analyses of complex data to characterize tumor biology, function, and the dynamic tumor changes in time and space may improve cancer diagnosis. The application of discoveries in cancer biology in clinic holds the promise to improve the clinical outcomes in a large scale of patients with cancer. Increased harmonization between discoveries, policies, and practices will expedite the development of anticancer drugs and will accelerate the implementation of precision medicine. Conclusions Combinations of targeted, immunomodulating, antiangiogenic, or chemotherapeutic agents are in clinical development. Innovative adaptive study design is used to expedite effective drug development. PMID:26391154

  10. Old Drug, New Target

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, William J.; Panova, Tatiana; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Panov, Konstantin I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) is the main driving force behind ribosome biogenesis, a fundamental cellular process that requires the coordinated transcription of all three nuclear polymerases. Increased Pol-I transcription and the concurrent increase in ribosome biogenesis has been linked to the high rates of proliferation in cancers. The ellipticine family contains a number of potent anticancer therapeutic agents, some having progressed to stage I and II clinical trials; however, the mechanism by which many of the compounds work remains unclear. It has long been thought that inhibition of Top2 is the main reason behind the drugs antiproliferative effects. Here we report that a number of the ellipticines, including 9-hydroxyellipticine, are potent and specific inhibitors of Pol-I transcription, with IC50 in vitro and in cells in the nanomolar range. Essentially, the drugs did not affect Pol-II and Pol-III transcription, demonstrating a high selectivity. We have shown that Pol-I inhibition occurs by a p53-, ATM/ATR-, and Top2-independent mechanism. We discovered that the drug influences the assembly and stability of preinitiation complexes by targeting the interaction between promoter recognition factor SL1 and the rRNA promoter. Our findings will have an impact on the design and development of novel therapeutic agents specifically targeting ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23293027

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  12. Targeted therapy in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Smalley, Keiran S M; Glass, L Frank; Trimble, James S; Sondak, Vernon K

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. We review the latest developments in our understanding of the role of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling in melanoma, and the development of inhibitors of this pathway. We also explore alternative mutations seen in melanoma, such as NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, and the drug development that is ongoing based on this biology. Strategies for the management of the vexing clinical problem of BRAF inhibitor resistance, primarily via combination therapy, are outlined. With the recent approval of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib for stage IV metastatic melanoma, use of this agent is expanding in the United States. Thus, management of the skin toxicities of this agent, such as squamous cell carcinomas, "acneiform" eruptions, hand-foot syndrome, and panniculitis, will be a growing problem facing dermatologists today. We discuss the toxicities of targeted agents in use for melanoma, in particular the dermatologic effects and the management of these skin toxicities.

  13. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  14. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  15. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  16. Target Housing Material Options

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2016-02-11

    With gas cooling, heat transfer coefficients are low compared to water. The benefit of gas from a heat transfer point of view is that there is really no upper temperature limit for the coolant, as compared to water, which is limited ultimately by the critical point, and in practice the critical heat flux. In our case with parallel flow channels, water is limited to even lower operating limits by nucleate boiling. So gas can get as hot as the containment material will allow, but to get the density and heat transfer up to something reasonable, we must also increase pressure, thus increasing stress on the containment, namely the front and back faces. We are designing to ASME BPVC, which, for most materials allows a maximum stress of UTS/3. So we want the highest possible UTS. For reference, the front face stress in the 12 mm target at 300 psi was about 90 MPa. The inconel 718 allowable stress at 900°C is 1/3 of 517 or 172 MPa. So we are in a very safe place, but the uTS is dropping rapidly with temperature above 900°C. As we increase target diameter, the challenge will be to keep the stress down. We are probably looking at keeping the allowable at or above the present value, and at as high a temperature as possible.

  17. A Note on Inflation Targeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-chong; Chang, Juin-jen

    2001-01-01

    Presents a pedagogical graphical exposition to illustrate the stabilizing effect of price target zones. Finds that authorities' commitment to defend a price target zone affects the public's inflation expectations and, in turn, reduces actual inflation. (RLH)

  18. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  19. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  20. Polarized tritium target development

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Work began on the development of a completely sealed polarized tritium target for experiments at CEBAF. Because of the similarities between optical pumping of tritium and hydrogen, all prototype work is done with hydrogen. We constructed a test station for filling glassware with hydrogen, where we can dissociate molecular hydrogen and monitor the purity of the gas. A simple two-cell glass system was constructed, consisting of a region in which the molecular hydrogen is dissociated with an RF discharge and a region where the atoms can be optically pumped. So far, a clean discharge was obtained in the glassware. With this system, we plan to investigate ways to eliminate the discharge from the optical pumping region and test the quality of the discharge once the pumping cell is coated with drifilm.

  1. Targeting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Curiel, Tyler; Faget, Julien; Manuel, Manuarii; Caux, Christophe; Zou, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    Cancers express tumor-associated antigens that should elicit immune response to antagonize the tumor growth, but spontaneous immune rejection of established cancer is rare, suggesting an immunosuppressive environment hindering host antitumor immunity. Among the specific and active tumor-mediated mechanisms, CD4(+)CD25(high) T regulatory cells (Treg) are important mediators of active immune evasion in cancer. In this review, we will discuss Treg subpopulations and the mechanisms of their suppressive functions. Treg depletion improves endogenous antitumor immunity and the efficacy of active immunotherapy in animal models for cancer, suggesting that inhibiting Treg function could also improve the limited successes of human cancer immunotherapy. We will also discuss specific strategies for devising effective cancer immunotherapy targeting Treg.

  2. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Targeting Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.; Almeida, Ana S.; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria present two key roles on cellular functioning: (i) cell metabolism, being the main cellular source of energy and (ii) modulation of cell death, by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gaseoustransmitter, which presents several biological functions and is involved in maintaining cell homeostasis and cytoprotection. Herein, mitochondrion is approached as the main cellular target of carbon monoxide (CO). In this paper, two main perspectives concerning CO modulation of mitochondrial functioning are evaluated. First, the role of CO on cellular metabolism, in particular oxidative phosphorylation, is discussed, namely, on: cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial respiration, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial biogenesis, and general cellular energetic status. Second, the mitochondrial pathways involved in cell death inhibition by CO are assessed, in particular the control of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. PMID:22536507

  4. The optimal target hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Schwenger, V

    2000-07-01

    There is still controversy concerning the optimal target hemoglobin during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Some evidence suggests that hemoglobin concentrations higher than currently recommended lead to improvements in cognitive function, physical performance, and rehabilitation. At least in patients with advanced cardiac disease, however, one controlled trial failed to show a benefit from normalizing predialysis hemoglobin concentrations. In contrast, preliminary observations in three additional studies (albeit with limited statistical power) failed to show adverse cardiovascular effects from normalization of hemoglobin, but definite benefit with respect to quality of life, physical performance, and cardiac geometry. These observations are consistent with the notion that hemoglobin concentrations higher than those recommended by the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative Anemia Work Group are beneficial, at least in patients without advanced cardiac disease.

  5. [Targeted therapies for melanoma].

    PubMed

    Leiter, U; Meier, F; Garbe, C

    2014-07-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene and also stimulation of immune mediated antitumor response in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. This article addresses the latest developments of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling. In addition, the development of drugs to attack alternative mutations in melanoma, such as NRAS and KIT is described. Strategies for the management of BRAF inhibitor resistance, such as with combination therapy, are outlined. Antitumor immune therapies with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab which acts by promoting T-cell activation or antibody blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1) led to a long term response in metastatic melanoma. Results of latest clinical studies including the toxicity profile are described. Due to selective kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockade, the therapy of unresectable metastatic melanoma has greatly improved and long-term survival of patients with metastatic melanoma seems a real possibility.

  6. Novel astrocyte targets

    PubMed Central

    Carmignoto, Giorgio; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years, it has been well established that a finely tuned, continuous crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes not only critically modulates physiological brain functions but also underlies many neurological diseases. In particular, this novel way of interpreting brain activity is markedly influencing our current knowledge of epilepsy, prompting a re-evaluation of old findings and guiding novel experimentation. Here, we review recent studies that have unraveled novel and unique contributions of astrocytes to the generation and spread of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures and epileptiform activity. The emerging scenario advocates an overall framework in which a dynamic and reciprocal interplay among astrocytic and neuronal ensembles is fundamental for a fuller understanding of epilepsy. In turn, this offers novel astrocytic targets for the development of those really novel chemical entities for the control of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures that have been acknowledged as a key priority in the management of epilepsy. PMID:24609207

  7. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  8. Epilepsy: Novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Anovadiya, Ashish P.; Sanmukhani, Jayesh J.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite of established and effective therapy for epilepsy, 20–25% patients develop therapeutic failure; this encourages finding newer drugs. Novel approaches target receptors which remain unaffected by conventional therapy or inhibit epileptogenesis. AMPA receptor antagonists have shown faster and complete protection compared to diazepam. Protein kinase (PK) plays an important role in the development of epilepsy. PK inhibitors such as K252a, VID-82925, and Herbimycin A have been found effective in inhibition of spread of epileptiform activity and epileptogenesis. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein-coupled receptors classified into three groups. Group 1 mGluRs antagonist and Groups 2 and 3 mGluRs agonists inhibited pentylenetetrazole-induced kindled seizures. Combined use of these agents has also shown favorable results. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in multiple mechanisms of epileptogenesis. mTOR causes transcription, induction of proapoptotic proteins, and autophagy inhibition. Rapamycin was effective in suppression of recurrent seizures as well as in tuberous sclerosis and acute brain injury model. 5% CO2 showed potent effects on cortical epileptiform activity and convulsions in animal epilepsy models and in humans with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. It is found to be rapidly acting, safe and cheap, thus it can be a good option in emergency for suppression of seizure. Neurosteroids are considered as fourth generation neuromessengers, they act as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors. Clinical trial of ganaxolone, an allopregnanolone analogue, has shown a beneficial role in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, most of these drugs are tested in early phases of development and the possible use and safety in epilepsy has to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:22629084

  9. Saying goodbye to targets.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses India's shift from target-driven family planning services to reproductive health services in accordance with the recommendations of the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo. This Ministry of Health and Welfare policy marks a shift away from population control towards a Reproductive and Child Health program that will include the prevention of unwanted pregnancy; prenatal, delivery, and postpartum services; child survival; safe motherhood; and management of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The project will cost about $400 million, and some donor support is expected from the European Union and the World Bank. The official Manual on a Target Free Approach in the Family Welfare Programme describes the new approach and the operational changes and management of a client-oriented and demand-driven quality service program. It is expected that program changes will be gradual due to the population size of India and the status quo nature of program functions over a 50-year period. The program will be based on a decentralized primary health care (PHC) model that uses "bottom up" methods. In 1997, 21,000 PHCs conducted their own Needs Assessment Exercise. The PHC plan will cover all family welfare activities, materials, and supplies. Plans are being coordinated at the district, state, and country levels. Panchayats will eventually be involved. Each worker in the PHC system will have prescribed duties. State officials from the 32 states will undergo 2 days of training in RCH management. Each of the 466 administrators in districts will receive similar training that will be used for training in 5886 community development blocks. The integrated approach will require much more funding than applied for and greater priority in areas with the greatest need.

  10. Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Rennich, Mark J; Crawford, Roy K; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Janney, Jim G

    2010-01-01

    A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

  11. The Healthy Worker Survivor Effect: Target Parameters and Target Populations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel M; Picciotto, Sally; Costello, Sadie; Neophytou, Andreas M; Izano, Monika A; Ferguson, Jacqueline M; Eisen, Ellen A

    2017-07-15

    We offer an in-depth discussion of the time-varying confounding and selection bias mechanisms that give rise to the healthy worker survivor effect (HWSE). In this update of an earlier review, we distinguish between the mechanisms collectively known as the HWSE and the statistical bias that can result. This discussion highlights the importance of identifying both the target parameter and the target population for any research question in occupational epidemiology. Target parameters can correspond to hypothetical workplace interventions; we explore whether these target parameters' true values reflect the etiologic effect of an exposure on an outcome or the potential impact of enforcing an exposure limit in a more realistic setting. If a cohort includes workers hired before the start of follow-up, HWSE mechanisms can limit the transportability of the estimates to other target populations. We summarize recent publications that applied g-methods to control for the HWSE, focusing on their target parameters, target populations, and hypothetical interventions.

  12. Design of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for enhanced cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanick, Jared F.

    Ligand-targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy, yet have not consistently produced successful clinical outcomes. Although these inconsistencies may arise from differences in disease models and target receptors, nanoparticle design parameters can significantly influence therapeutic efficacy. By employing a multifaceted synthetic strategy to prepare peptide-targeted nanoparticles with high purity, reproducibility, and precisely controlled stoichiometry of functionalities, this work evaluates the roles of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, ethylene glycol (EG) peptide-linker length, peptide hydrophilicity, peptide density, and nanoparticle size on tumor targeting in a systematic manner. These parameters were analyzed in multiple disease models by targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in breast cancer and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in multiple myeloma to demonstrate the widespread applicability of this approach. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the targeting peptide sequence and simultaneously optimizing the EG peptide-linker length, the in vitro cellular uptake of targeted liposomes was significantly enhanced. Specifically, including a short oligolysine chain adjacent to the targeting peptide sequence effectively increased cellular uptake ~80-fold using an EG6 peptide-linker compared to ~10-fold using an EG45 linker. In vivo, targeted liposomes prepared in a traditional manner lacking the oligolysine chain demonstrated similar biodistribution and tumor uptake to non-targeted liposomes. However, by including the oligolysine chain, targeted liposomes using an EG45 linker significantly improved tumor uptake ~8-fold over non-targeted liposomes, while the use of an EG6 linker decreased tumor accumulation and uptake, owing to differences in cellular uptake kinetics, clearance mechanisms, and binding site barrier effects. To further improve tumor targeting and enhance the selectivity of targeted

  13. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  14. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20,000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines.

  15. HTLV-1-targeted immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Youko

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a HTLV-1 induced T-cell malignancy with an extremely poor prognosis. There is a long latency period between HTLV-1 infection and the onset of ATL, which indicates the existence of multistep mechanisms of leukemogenesis in the infected cells. Tax, which is encoded by the HTLV-1 pX region, plays a crucial role in HTLV-1 leukemogenesis and is a major target of CTL. We developed an anti-ATL therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells that is pulsed with Tax peptides (Tax-DC). The vaccination protocol was completed with three injections at a 2-week interval, within one month. Good quality of life and long-term treatment-free survival were observed for more than 3 years in two of the three patients enrolled in the pilot study. Furthermore, the proviral load remained mostly around the carrier level, with minor fluctuation, after vaccination. Tax-specific proliferative CTL responses were observed in all cases and sporadically augmented responses were also subsequently detected. The Tax-DC vaccine might be a well-tolerated and long-lasting maintenance therapy that is acceptable even for elderly patients. Based on the encouraging results, we are now conducting a clinical trial of Tax-DC vaccine combined with anti-CCR4 antibody to enhance the efficacy of the vaccine as next-generation immunotherapy.

  16. Windowless solid hydrogen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Morimoto, K.; Nomura, I.; Ozawa, A.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Tanihata, I.; Tsuru, T.

    2002-03-01

    A windowless solid hydrogen target has been successfully developed for RI-beam-induced nuclear reactions in the RIKEN RI Beam Facility. Hydrogen crystals of high quality were grown reproducibly in a cell bored in a 10 mm thick pure copper plate which was in direct contact with a liquid helium reservoir. Normal hydrogen gas was crystallized directly on the cell wall between 4.7 and 7.3 K. The diameter of the crystal was 25 mm and the thickness was chosen to be either 5 or 10 mm. After crystallization, sidewalls of the cell were separated from both the crystal and cell plate, and removed to a remote position inside a cryostat. Thus, the crystal was self-supported in the cell without any extra material in its neighborhood. No damage was observed in the separating process. The observed hydrogen pressure indicated the crystal temperature of 4.3 K, when the liquid helium reservoir was at 4.2 K, in agreement with the temperature estimated from the heat balance in the crystal. It shows that we can put the crystal temperature close to the reservoir temperature, though we could not confirm the crystal temperature when the reservoir temperature was reduced to 3 K. Hydrogen sublimation rate was calculated from the vapor pressure and pumping condition. The sublimation loss is negligibly small if the crystal is held at 3 K.

  17. The target effect: visual memory for unnamed search targets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark D; Williams, Carrick C

    2014-01-01

    Search targets are typically remembered much better than other objects even when they are viewed for less time. However, targets have two advantages that other objects in search displays do not have: They are identified categorically before the search, and finding them represents the goal of the search task. The current research investigated the contributions of both of these types of information to the long-term visual memory representations of search targets. Participants completed either a predefined search or a unique-object search in which targets were not defined with specific categorical labels before searching. Subsequent memory results indicated that search target memory was better than distractor memory even following ambiguously defined searches and when the distractors were viewed significantly longer. Superior target memory appears to result from a qualitatively different representation from those of distractor objects, indicating that decision processes influence visual memory.

  18. Using the Nova target chamber for high-yield targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-09-28

    The existing 2.2-m-radius Nova aluminum target chamber, coated and lined with boron-seeded carbon shields, is proposed for use with 1000-MJ-yield targets in the next laser facility. The laser beam and diagnostic holes in the target chamber are left open and the desired 10/sup -2/ Torr vacuum is maintained both inside and outside the target chamber; a larger target chamber room is the vacuum barrier to the atmosphere. The hole area available is three times that necessary to maintain a maximum fluence below 12 J/cm/sup 2/ on optics placed at a radius of 10 m. Maximum stress in the target chamber wall is 73 MPa, which complies with the intent of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code. However, shock waves passing through the inner carbon shield could cause it to comminute. We propose tests and analyses to ensure that the inner carbon shield survives the environment. 13 refs.

  19. Cooperative Target-capturing with Incomplete Target Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    performance of the proposed strategy is verified through simulations. Keywords Formation control · Sliding mode control · Consensus M. Kothari Research...to derive a target-centric formation controller . We use the sliding mode control to handle uncertainty of a target motion and show that the...the problem, and in Section 3, we derive the target-centric formation controller using consensus and sliding mode control . We discuss numerical results

  20. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  1. Target repurposing for neglected diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pollastri, Michael P; Campbell, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases are an enormous burden to global health and since drug discovery is costly, those infectious diseases that affect the developing world are often not pursued by commercial drug-discovery efforts. Therefore, pragmatic means by which new therapeutics can be discovered are needed. One such approach is target repurposing, where pathogen targets are matched with homologous human targets that have been pursued for drug discovery for other indications. In many cases, the medicinal chemistry, structural biology and biochemistry knowledge around these human targets can be directly repurposed to launch and accelerate new drug-discovery efforts against the pathogen targets. This article describes the overarching strategy of target repurposing as a tool for initiating and prosecuting neglected disease drug-discovery programs, highlighting this approach with three case studies. PMID:21859304

  2. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  3. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  4. Identifying Targets from Filtering Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    Introduction Considering a radar (or sonar) target as more than a simple point scatterer brings up the possibility of identifying the target based on the...2000. [8] M. Vespe, C. J. Baker, and H. D. Griffiths , "Automatic target regognition using multi-diversity radar," Radar, Sonar \\& Navigation, IET, vol...A. Taflove and S. C. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics : The Finite Difference Time Domain Method. Norwood, MA: Artech House, 2005.

  5. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  7. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  8. Data Mining for Target Marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Nissan; Zahavi, Jacob

    Targeting is the core of marketing management. It is concerned with offering the right product/service to the customer at the right time and using the proper channel. In this chapter we discuss how Data Mining modeling and analysis can support targeting applications. We focus on three types of targeting models: continuous-choice models, discrete-choice models and in-market timing models, discussing alternative modeling for each application and decision making. We also discuss a range of pitfalls that one needs to be aware of in implementing a data mining solution for a targeting problem.

  9. Targeted Nanotechnology for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. PMID:25116445

  10. Guidance system for laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1978-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  11. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  12. Targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-09-30

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Target engagement in lead generation.

    PubMed

    Durham, Timothy B; Blanco, Maria-Jesus

    2015-03-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is currently facing multiple challenges, in particular the low number of new drug approvals in spite of the high level of R&D investment. In order to improve target selection and assess properly the clinical hypothesis, it is important to start building an integrated drug discovery approach during Lead Generation. This should include special emphasis on evaluating target engagement in the target tissue and linking preclinical to clinical readouts. In this review, we would like to illustrate several strategies and technologies for assessing target engagement and the value of its application to medicinal chemistry efforts.

  14. Adaptive Target Tracking of Underwater Maneuvering Targets Using Passive Measurements,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    semi-Markov process. An application of this approach to tracking maneuvering targets in two-dimensions by Moose [4] was successfully extended by Gholson ...passive range and depth determina- tion of a maneuvering target (U)," U. S. Naval J. Underwater Acoustics, July 1973. [5] N. H. Gholson and R. L. Moose

  15. Literature evidence in open targets - a target validation platform.

    PubMed

    Kafkas, Şenay; Dunham, Ian; McEntyre, Johanna

    2017-06-06

    We present the Europe PMC literature component of Open Targets - a target validation platform that integrates various evidence to aid drug target identification and validation. The component identifies target-disease associations in documents and ranks the documents based on their confidence from the Europe PMC literature database, by using rules utilising expert-provided heuristic information. The confidence score of a given document represents how valuable the document is in the scope of target validation for a given target-disease association by taking into account the credibility of the association based on the properties of the text. The component serves the platform regularly with the up-to-date data since December, 2015. Currently, there are a total number of 1168365 distinct target-disease associations text mined from >26 million PubMed abstracts and >1.2 million Open Access full text articles. Our comparative analyses on the current available evidence data in the platform revealed that 850179 of these associations are exclusively identified by literature mining. This component helps the platform's users by providing the most relevant literature hits for a given target and disease. The text mining evidence along with the other types of evidence can be explored visually through https://www.targetvalidation.org and all the evidence data is available for download in json format from https://www.targetvalidation.org/downloads/data .

  16. Achieving Plant CRISPR Targeting that Limits Off-Target Effects.

    PubMed

    Wolt, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kan; Sashital, Dipali; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J

    2016-11-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats with associated Cas9 protein) has been used to generate targeted changes for direct modification of endogenous genes in an increasing number of plant species; but development of plant genome editing has not yet fully considered potential off-target mismatches that may lead to unintended changes within the genome. Assessing the specificity of CRISPR-Cas9 for increasing editing efficiency as well as the potential for unanticipated downstream effects from off-target mutations is an important regulatory consideration for agricultural applications. Increasing genome-editing specificity entails developing improved design methods that better predict the prevalence of off-target mutations as a function of genome composition and design of the engineered ribonucleoprotein (RNP). Early results from CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in plant systems indicate that the incidence of off-target mutation frequencies is quite low; however, by analyzing CRISPR-edited plant lines and improving both computational tools and reagent design, it may be possible to further decrease unanticipated effects at potential mismatch sites within the genome. This will provide assurance that CRISPR-Cas9 reagents can be designed and targeted with a high degree of specificity. Improved and experimentally validated design tools for discriminating target and potential off-target positions that incorporate consideration of the designed nuclease fidelity and selectivity will help to increase confidence for regulatory decision making for genome-edited plants. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  17. Target-directed catalytic metallodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, J.C.; Cowan, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs function by binding reversibly to specific biological targets, and therapeutic effects generally require saturation of these targets. One means of decreasing required drug concentrations is incorporation of reactive metal centers that elicit irreversible modification of targets. A common approach has been the design of artificial proteases/nucleases containing metal centers capable of hydrolyzing targeted proteins or nucleic acids. However, these hydrolytic catalysts typically provide relatively low rate constants for target inactivation. Recently, various catalysts were synthesized that use oxidative mechanisms to selectively cleave/inactivate therapeutic targets, including HIV RRE RNA or angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). These oxidative mechanisms, which typically involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), provide access to comparatively high rate constants for target inactivation. Target-binding affinity, co-reactant selectivity, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, ROS products (metal-associated vs metal-dissociated; hydroxyl vs superoxide), and multiple-turnover redox chemistry were studied for each catalyst, and these parameters were related to the efficiency, selectivity, and mechanism(s) of inactivation/cleavage of the corresponding target for each catalyst. Important factors for future oxidative catalyst development are 1) positioning of catalyst reduction potential and redox reactivity to match the physiological environment of use, 2) maintenance of catalyst stability by use of chelates with either high denticity or other means of stabilization, such as the square planar geometric stabilization of Ni- and Cu-ATCUN complexes, 3) optimal rate of inactivation of targets relative to the rate of generation of diffusible ROS, 4) targeting and linker domains that afford better control of catalyst orientation, and 5) general bio-availability and drug delivery requirements. PMID:23828584

  18. DSTO Landmine Detection Test Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    countermeasures program. The targets were developed to simulate specific landmines or to emulate classes of landmines by providing signatures equivalent to...details the landmine detection test targets developed by, and available at DSTO Edinburgh, Weapons System Division. Also described are the equivalent ...of TM62P3-S surrogate landmine (Part B)......................... 31 Figure 23: DSTO (NVESD equivalent ) simulant landmine inserts

  19. Development of Bone Targeting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Molly; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Mackenzie, William G.; Mason, Robert W.; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2017-01-01

    The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the site of action can not only increase efficacy but also reduce toxicity. Bone-targeting drugs are designed with either of two general targeting moieties, aimed at the entire skeletal system or a specific cell type. Most bone-targeting drugs utilize an affinity to hydroxyapatite, a major component of the bone matrix that includes a high concentration of positively-charged Ca2+. The strategies for designing such targeting moieties can involve synthetic and/or biological components including negatively-charged amino acid peptides or bisphosphonates. Efficient delivery of bone-specific drugs provides significant impact in the treatment of skeletal related disorders including infectious diseases (osteoarthritis, osteomyelitis, etc.), osteoporosis, and metabolic skeletal dysplasia. Despite recent advances, however, both delivering the drug to its target without losing activity and avoiding adverse local effects remain a challenge. In this review, we investigate the current development of bone-targeting moieties, their efficacy and limitations, and discuss future directions for the development of these specific targeted treatments. PMID:28644392

  20. Spinning targets for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Several techniques for spinning the ICF targets up prior to or in the course of their compression are suggested. Interference of the rotational shear flow with Rayleigh-Taylor instability is briefly discussed and possible consequences for the target performance are pointed out.

  1. Manpower Targets and Educational Investments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzen, Jo M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the use of quadratic programming to calculate the optimal distribution of educational investments required to closely approach manpower targets when financial resources are insufficient to meet manpower targets completely. Demonstrates use of the quadratic programming approach by applying it to the training of supervisory technicians in…

  2. Collection Management and Targeting Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    distribution is unlimited. Prepared for: Joint Staff, J2S Collection Management and Targeting Architecture by Gordon Schacher Wayne...Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188...August 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Collection Management and Targeting Architecture 5. FUNDING Joint Staff J2 and NGA

  3. Visual motion shifts saccade targets.

    PubMed

    Kosovicheva, Anna A; Wolfe, Benjamin A; Whitney, David

    2014-08-01

    Saccades are made thousands of times a day and are the principal means of localizing objects in our environment. However, the saccade system faces the challenge of accurately localizing objects as they are constantly moving relative to the eye and head. Any delays in processing could cause errors in saccadic localization. To compensate for these delays, the saccade system might use one or more sources of information to predict future target locations, including changes in position of the object over time, or its motion. Another possibility is that motion influences the represented position of the object for saccadic targeting, without requiring an actual change in target position. We tested whether the saccade system can use motion-induced position shifts to update the represented spatial location of a saccade target, by using static drifting Gabor patches with either a soft or a hard aperture as saccade targets. In both conditions, the aperture always remained at a fixed retinal location. The soft aperture Gabor patch resulted in an illusory position shift, whereas the hard aperture stimulus maintained the motion signals but resulted in a smaller illusory position shift. Thus, motion energy and target location were equated, but a position shift was generated in only one condition. We measured saccadic localization of these targets and found that saccades were indeed shifted, but only with a soft-aperture Gabor patch. Our results suggest that motion shifts the programmed locations of saccade targets, and this remapped location guides saccadic localization.

  4. STIS CCD Target Acquisition Workout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Ron

    1997-07-01

    Following update of STIS flight acquisitions and acq/peak software, redemonstrate the capability to perform point source and peakup acquisitions of a bright target. Then demonstrate ability of the STIS FSW to locate targets more typical of those in the science program.

  5. Targeted marketing and public health.

    PubMed

    Grier, Sonya A; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2010-01-01

    Targeted marketing techniques, which identify consumers who share common needs or characteristics and position products or services to appeal to and reach these consumers, are now the core of all marketing and facilitate its effectiveness. However, targeted marketing, particularly of products with proven or potential adverse effects (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, entertainment violence, or unhealthful foods) to consumer segments defined as vulnerable raises complex concerns for public health. It is critical that practitioners, academics, and policy makers in marketing, public health, and other fields recognize and understand targeted marketing as a specific contextual influence on the health of children and adolescents and, for different reasons, ethnic minority populations and other populations who may benefit from public health protections. For beneficial products, such understanding can foster more socially productive targeting. For potentially harmful products, understanding the nature and scope of targeted marketing influences will support identification and implementation of corrective policies.

  6. Targeting ion transport in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, E; Gillies, R J

    2014-03-19

    The metabolism of cancer cells differs substantially from normal cells, including ion transport. Although this phenomenon has been long recognized, ion transporters have not been viewed as suitable therapeutic targets. However, the acidic pH values present in tumours which are well outside of normal limits are now becoming recognized as an important therapeutic target. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is fundamental to tumour pH regulation. CAIX is commonly expressed in cancer, but lowly expressed in normal tissues and that presents an attractive target. Here, we discuss the possibilities of exploiting the acidic, hypoxic tumour environment as possible target for therapy. Additionally, clinical experience with CAIX targeting in cancer patients is discussed.

  7. TARGETING POLYMER THERAPEUTICS TO BONE

    PubMed Central

    Low, Stewart; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2012-01-01

    An aging population in the developing world has led to an increase in musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and bone metastases. Left untreated many bone diseases cause debilitating pain and in the case of cancer, death. Many potential drugs are effective in treating diseases but result in side effects preventing their efficacy in the clinic. Bone, however, provides an unique environment of inorganic solids, which can be exploited in order to effectively target drugs to diseased tissue. By integration of bone targeting moieties to drug-carrying water-soluble polymers, the payload to diseased area can be increased while side effects decreased. The realization of clinically relevant bone targeted polymer therapeutics depends on (1) understanding bone targeting moiety interactions, (2) development of controlled drug delivery systems, as well as (3) understanding drug interactions. The latter makes it possible to develop bone targeted synergistic drug delivery systems. PMID:22316530

  8. SECOND TARGET STATION MODERATOR PERFORMANCE WITH A ROTATING TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Gallmeier, Franz X; Rennich, Mark J; McManamy, Thomas J; Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory manages and operates the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, two of the world's most advanced neutron scattering facilities. Both facilities are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, and are available to researchers from all over the world. Delivering cutting edge science requires continuous improvements and development of the facilities and instruments. The SNS was designed from the outset to accommodate an additional target station, or Second Target Station (STS), and an upgraded accelerator feeding proton beams to STS and the existing First Target Station (FTS). Upgrade of the accelerator and the design and construction of STS are being proposed. The presently considered STS configuration is driven with short (<1 s) proton pulses at 10 Hz repetition rate and 467 kW proton beam power, and is optimized for high intensity and high resolution long wavelength neutron applications. STS will allow installation of 22 beamlines and will expand and complement the current national neutron scattering capabilities. In 2015 the STS studies were performed for a compact tungsten target; first a stationary tungsten plate target was analyzed to considerable details and then dropped in favor of a rotating target. For both target options the proton beam footprint as small as acceptable from mechanical and heat removal aspects is required to arrive at a compact-volume neutron production zone in the target, which is essential for tight coupling of target and moderators and for achieving high-intensity peak neutron fluxes. This paper will present recent STS work with the emphasis on neutronics and moderator performance.

  9. Human MicroRNA Targets

    PubMed Central

    John, Bino; Enright, Anton J; Aravin, Alexei; Tuschl, Thomas; Sander, Chris

    2004-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with target mRNAs at specific sites to induce cleavage of the message or inhibit translation. The specific function of most mammalian miRNAs is unknown. We have predicted target sites on the 3′ untranslated regions of human gene transcripts for all currently known 218 mammalian miRNAs to facilitate focused experiments. We report about 2,000 human genes with miRNA target sites conserved in mammals and about 250 human genes conserved as targets between mammals and fish. The prediction algorithm optimizes sequence complementarity using position-specific rules and relies on strict requirements of interspecies conservation. Experimental support for the validity of the method comes from known targets and from strong enrichment of predicted targets in mRNAs associated with the fragile X mental retardation protein in mammals. This is consistent with the hypothesis that miRNAs act as sequence-specific adaptors in the interaction of ribonuclear particles with translationally regulated messages. Overrepresented groups of targets include mRNAs coding for transcription factors, components of the miRNA machinery, and other proteins involved in translational regulation, as well as components of the ubiquitin machinery, representing novel feedback loops in gene regulation. Detailed information about target genes, target processes, and open-source software for target prediction (miRanda) is available at http://www.microrna.org. Our analysis suggests that miRNA genes, which are about 1% of all human genes, regulate protein production for 10% or more of all human genes. PMID:15502875

  10. Type of Cancer Treatment: Targeted Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the role that targeted therapies play in cancer treatment. Includes how targeted therapies work against cancer, who receives targeted therapies, common side effects, and what to expect when having targeted therapies.

  11. Model of the US CENTCOM Joint Targeting Architecture: Develop Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Shelf CTL Candidate Target List DARS Daily Aerial Reconnaissance and Surveillance DB Database DBS Data Broadcast System DCAP Data Collection...Context, defines the context, systems capabilities, documentations requirements, data collection and analysis plan ( DCAP ), scope, scenarios, and field

  12. Molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma: current and future targets

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Darryl; Magill, Stephen T.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Object Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and diffusely infiltrative primary brain tumor. Recurrence is expected and is extremely difficult to treat. Over the past decade, the accumulation of knowledge regarding the molecular and genetic profile of glioblastoma has led to numerous molecularly targeted therapies. This article aims to review the literature and highlight the mechanisms and efficacies of molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma. Methods A systematic search was performed with the phrase “(name of particular agent) and glioblastoma” as a search term in PubMed to identify all articles published up until 2014 that included this phrase in the title and/or abstract. The references of systematic reviews were also reviewed for additional sources. The review included clinical studies that comprised at least 20 patients and reported results for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma with molecular targeted therapies. Results A total of 42 articles were included in this review. In the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, various targeted therapies have been tested over the past 10–15 years. The targets of interest include epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, Ras pathway, protein kinase C, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone acetylation, and integrins. Unfortunately, the clinical responses to most available targeted therapies are modest at best. Radiographic responses generally range in the realm of 5%–20%. Progression-free survival at 6 months and overall survival were also modest with the majority of studies reporting a 10%–20% 6-month progression-free survival and 5- to 8-month overall survival. There have been several clinical trials evaluating the use of combination therapy for molecularly targeted treatments. In general, the outcomes for combination therapy tend to be superior to single-agent therapy, regardless of the specific agent studied

  13. Ocular toxicity of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Daniel J; Velazquez-Martin, Juan P; Simpson, Rand; Siu, Lillian L; Bedard, Philippe L

    2012-09-10

    Molecularly targeted agents are commonly used in oncology practice, and many new targeted agents are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although these agents are thought to be more specific and less toxic then traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with a variety of toxicities, including ocular toxicity. Many of the molecules targeted by anticancer agents are also expressed in ocular tissues. We reviewed the literature for described ocular toxicities associated with both approved and investigational molecularly targeted agents. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. We discuss the proposed pathogenesis, monitoring guidelines, and management recommendations. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. Ongoing collaboration between oncologists and ocular disease specialists is critical as the use of molecularly targeted agents continues to expand and novel targeted drug combinations are developed.

  14. Aided targeting system simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaio, Joe; Becker, Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Simulation research was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility on the effectiveness and ease of use of three targeting systems. A manual system required the aviator to scan a target array area with a simulated second generation forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, locate and categorize targets, and construct a target hand-off list. The interface between the aviator and the system was like that of an advanced scout helicopter (manual mode). Two aided systems detected and categorized targets automatically. One system used only the FLIR sensor and the second used FLIR fused with Longbow radar. The interface for both was like that of an advanced scout helicopter aided mode. Exposure time while performing the task was reduced substantially with the aided systems, with no loss of target hand-off list accuracy. The fused sensor system showed lower time to construct the target hand-off list and a slightly lower false alarm rate than the other systems. A number of issues regarding system sensitivity and criterion, and operator interface design are discussed.

  15. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jill E.; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E.; Heymach, John V.; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography–based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene “addictions” as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer–targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review. PMID:22157296

  16. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  17. SAR transfer across different targets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bijun; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-07-22

    Despite obvious relevance for the practice of medicinal chemistry, SAR transfer events have thus far only been little investigated in a systematic manner. Two types of SAR transfer can principally be distinguished. In target-based SAR (T_SAR) transfer, a series of corresponding analogs with different core structures display comparable potency progression against a given target. In addition, in series-based SAR (S_SAR) transfer, a given analog series shows comparable potency progression against two or more targets. Only a few studies have previously investigated T_SAR transfer. In these studies, T_SAR transfer series were frequently found for targets belonging to different families. By contrast, S_SAR transfer has thus far not been explored. It is currently unknown to what extent these S_SAR transfer events might occur in available compound data. We have devised an approach to detect S_SAR transfer and systematically searched public domain compound data for S_SAR transfer events. In total, 63 S_SAR transfer series involving two targets and 26 series involving three targets were identified. Series involving four targets were not found. The majority of S_SAR transfer series were identified for different subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors, but transfer series were also found for other target families. However, S_SAR transfer across different families was not observed. On average, S_SAR transfer series consisted of five to six analogs. The series were structurally diverse and represented SARs with varying degrees of continuity or discontinuity but displayed closely corresponding potency progression across related targets. All series and the corresponding source data sets are made freely available.

  18. Guidance and targeting for the strategic target system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John E.

    1989-11-01

    Guidance algorithms and targeting procedures for the Strategic Target System (STARS) launch vehicle are described. The STARS vehicle is a three stage booster, based partly upon retired Polaris A3 missile assets, which is intended to support development and testing of the Strategic Defense Initiative by delivering target payloads to the vicinity of the Kwajalein Atoll. STARS will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility located on Kauai, Hawaii. The STARS guidance objective is to deliver payloads to a prescribed target location with maximum accuracy at inter-continental ballistic missile velocities. The guidance problem is complicated by the fact that all three stages lack thrust termination or other velocity control mechanisms, and by range safety requirements for one or more out-of-plane turns. Mission objectives are achieved with a combination of guidance algorithms. The original Polaris guidance is used during the atmospheric ascent phase. The powered-explicit-guidance used by the Space Shuttle is later employed to execute an out-of-plane turn and to place the third stage as closely as possible into the desired coast trajectory. Third stage targeting is a modified Lambert procedure formulated to eliminate the target miss due to off-nominal ascent phase performance. Active guidance is also used during the third stage burn to maximize the delivery accuracy.

  19. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  20. Versatile cold atom target apparatus.

    PubMed

    Götz, Simone; Höltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2012-07-01

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  1. Backlighting prospects for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.; Matthews, D.; Ahlstrom, H.; Attwood, D.; Price, R.; Coleman, L.; Manes, K.; Slivinsky, V.

    1981-01-01

    High energy x-ray backlighters are necessary to diagnose the implosion symmetry and stability of intermediate and high density targets. Synchronization requirements between the target irradiating pulse and the radiograph place severe constraints on the type of x-ray sources which can be used and favors laser irradiated backlighters. Data gathered on line emitters as a function of laser pulselength, wavelength and intensity in the 5 to 10 keV region are used to determine which diagnostic instruments will be feasible for ICF target experiments, and the requirements for backlighter irradiation.

  2. Space Telescope moving target tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strikwerda, T. E.; Strohbehn, K.; Fowler, K. R.; Skillman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper formulates a Space Telescope (ST) moving target tracking algorithm and evaluates a practical implementation. The algorithm is shown to be satisfactory for tracking such moving objects as the moons of Mars.

  3. Targeting ubiquitination for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Sun, Shao-Cong; Zhang, Shuxing

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination, the structured degradation and turnover of cellular proteins, is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). Most proteins that are critical for cellular regulations and functions are targets of the process. Ubiquitination is comprised of a sequence of three enzymatic steps, and aberrations in the pathway can lead to tumor development and progression as observed in many cancer types. Recent evidence indicates that targeting the UPS is effective for certain cancer treatment, but many more potential targets might have been previously overlooked. In this review, we will discuss the current state of small molecules that target various elements of ubiquitination. Special attention will be given to novel inhibitors of E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially those in the SCF family. PMID:26630263

  4. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  5. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain Control for Kidney Cancer Treatment ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  6. Cavitation in a Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  7. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-08-10

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere.

  8. Cumberland Target Drilled by Curiosity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-20

    NASA Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, Cumberland, during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover work on Mars May 19, 2013 and collected a powdered sample of material from the rock interior.

  9. Targeting the Teaching of Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Charles W.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that six target areas in the teaching of theory and musicianship need more attention and emphasis: listening, analysis, music reading, creativity, music writing, and keyboard harmony. Discusses content and sequence in music theory and presents two sample applications. (SJL)

  10. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  11. Strategically targeting MYC in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    MYC is a major driver of cancer cell growth and mediates a transcriptional program spanning cell growth, the cell cycle, metabolism, and cell survival. Many efforts have been made to deliberately target MYC for cancer therapy. A variety of compounds have been generated to inhibit MYC function or stability, either directly or indirectly. The most direct inhibitors target the interaction between MYC and MAX, which is required for DNA binding. Unfortunately, these compounds do not have the desired pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for in vivo application. Recent studies report the indirect inhibition of MYC through the development of two compounds, JQ1 and THZ1, which target factors involved in unique stages of transcription. These compounds appear to have significant therapeutic value for cancers with high levels of MYC, although some effects are MYC-independent. These approaches serve as a foundation for developing novel compounds to pharmacologically target MYC-driven cancers. PMID:27081479

  12. The network as the target.

    PubMed

    Baggs, Julie E; Hughes, Michael E; Hogenesch, John B

    2010-01-01

    The conventional target centric model of drug discovery is pinned under the weight of prior success and the traditional problems of safety and efficacy for new molecules. An alternative to target centric drug development is to shift focus to the pathways that mediate both biology and pathophysiology. This method has the advantage of not requiring a priori knowledge of the small molecule target, but also comes with it several challenges including target determination. We suggest extending this notion more broadly across the drug discovery process using quantitative network structure-activity relationships (QNSAR), and discuss the steps necessary to test the hypothesis that systems biology approaches can be used to improve the drug discovery process.

  13. Targeted Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Jun; Ledger, William

    2016-01-01

    Among female-specific cancers worldwide, ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the western world. Despite radical surgery and initial high response rates to first-line chemotherapy, up to 70% of patients experience relapses with a median progression-free survival of 12–18 months. There remains an urgent need for novel targeted therapies to improve clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer. This review aims to assess current understanding of targeted therapy in ovarian cancer and evaluate the evidence for targeting growth-dependent mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Of the many targeted therapies currently under evaluation, the most promising strategies developed thus far are antiangiogenic agents and PARP inhibitors. PMID:27215391

  14. Terraced Craters and Layered Targets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-12

    Small impact craters usually have simple bowl shapes; however, when the target material has different layers of different strength, then more complicated crater shapes can emerge as shown in image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  15. Region 6 Targeted Brownfields Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Target Brownfields Assessment (TBA) is a free service the EPA Region 6 Brownfields Team provides to communities to support their eligible brownfields projects. Region 6 consists of Arkansas, Louisiana, new Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

  16. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  17. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  18. Targeting stroma to treat cancers

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Boris; Rowley, Donald A.; Schreiber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    All cancers depend on stroma for support of growth. Leukemias, solid tumors, cancer cells causing effusions, metastases as well as micro-disseminated cancer cells release factors that stimulate stromal cells, which in turn produce ligands that stimulate cancer cells. Therefore, elimination of stromal support by destroying the stromal cells or by inhibiting feedback stimulation of cancer growth is in the focus of many evolving therapies. A stringent evaluation of the efficacy of stromal targeting requires testing in animal models. Most current studies emphasize the successes of stromal targeting rather than deciphering its limitations. Here we show that many of the stromal targeting approaches, while often reducing tumor growth rates, are rarely curative. Therefore, we will also discuss conditions where stromal targeting can eradicate large established tumors. Finally, we will examine still unanswered questions of this promising and exciting area of cancer research. PMID:22212863

  19. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  20. Bionic sonar for target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Gee-In

    1995-07-01

    A variety of experimental results indicate that dolphins possess a unique and sophisticated sonar system. In addition, this sonar system is highly adaptive in detecting, discriminating, and recoginizing objects in highly reverberating and noisy environments. In this paper a new approach using resonance scattering theory in target detection and recognition is presented. The results seems to imply that this approach may be useful in minelike target detection and identification.

  1. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  2. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  3. Nanotechnology of emerging targeting systems

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the design and testing of complex nanoscale payload-carrying systems (i.e. systems with payloads that do not exceed 100 nm in size) are the focus of this brief review. Emerging systems include targeted single-walled nanotubes, viral capsids, dendrimers, gold nanoparticles, milled boron carbide nanoparticles, and protein nucleic acid assemblies. Significant advances are emerging with each of these bionanotechnological approaches to cellular targeting. PMID:21687833

  4. Target identification using laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, J.; Baker, M.; Barrett, J.; Ellis, B.N.; Kacerek, J.; Yee, J.

    1994-12-31

    Solid state lasers have been utilized for many varied applications. This application describes how the high peak power, short pulse capability of an alexandrite laser, in combination with a generation 3 image intensified receiver can solve the problem of very long range target identification. Applications have relevance to both commercial and military uses where day/night all weather imaging is required. Wavelength diversity provides single and multispectral system capability, therefore allowing discrimination of targets against varied backgrounds.

  5. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  6. Novel Aptamers to Target Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0154 TITLE: Novel Aptamers To Target Metastasis...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Aptamers to Target Metastasis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER . 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0154 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...problems. Aptamers , which have proven clinical efficacy for non-neoplastic disease and are generally more specific and stable than antibodies, may have

  7. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-06-25

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro.

  8. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-01-01

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8692828

  9. Emerging targeted therapies for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas B; Pollack, Megan H; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive cutaneous malignancy associated with poor response to traditional therapies. Recent regulatory approval for immune checkpoint inhibitors and agents targeting mutated BRAF has led to a tremendous expansion of effective treatment options for patients with advanced melanoma. Unfortunately, primary or acquired resistance develops in most patients, highlighting the need for additional therapies. Numerous genetic and other molecular features of this disease may provide effective targets for therapy development. This article reviews available melanoma treatments, including immune and molecularly-targeted therapies. We then discuss agents in development, with a focus on targeted (rather than immune) therapies. In particular, we discuss agents that block mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as other emerging approaches such as antibody-drug conjugates, cell-cycle targeting, and novel genetically-informed clinical trials. Despite the incredible advances in melanoma therapeutics over the last several years, a clear need to develop more effective therapies remains. Molecularly-targeted therapy approaches will likely remain a cornerstone of melanoma treatment in parallel to immune therapy strategies.

  10. Targeting Microtubules for Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Charafeddine, Rabab A.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Sharp, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fast and seamless healing is essential for both deep and chronic wounds to restore the skin and protect the body from harmful pathogens. Thus, finding new targets that can both expedite and enhance the repair process without altering the upstream signaling milieu and causing serious side effects can improve the way we treat wounds. Since cell migration is key during the different stages of wound healing, it presents an ideal process and intracellular structural machineries to target. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is rising as an important structural and functional regulator of wound healing. MTs have been reported to play different roles in the migration of the various cell types involved in wound healing. Specific microtubule regulatory proteins (MRPs) can be targeted to alter a section or subtype of the MT cytoskeleton and boost or hinder cell motility. However, inhibiting intracellular components can be challenging in vivo, especially using unstable molecules, such as small interfering RNA. Nanoparticles can be used to protect these unstable molecules and topically deliver them to the wound. Utilizing this approach, we recently showed that fidgetin-like 2, an uncharacterized MRP, can be targeted to enhance cell migration and wound healing. Future Directions: To harness the full potential of the current MRP therapeutic targets, studies should test them with different delivery platforms, dosages, and skin models. Screening for new MT effectors that boost cell migration in vivo would also help find new targets for skin repair. PMID:27785378

  11. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U. C.; Carminati, D.; Catherall, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Correia, J. G.; Crepieux, B.; Dietrich, M.; Elder, K.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, H.; Georg, U.; Giles, T.; Joinet, A.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kirchner, R.; Lau, Ch.; Lettry, J.; Maier, H. J.; Mishin, V. I.; Oinonen, M.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ravn, H. L.; Rinaldi, T.; Santana-Leitner, M.; Wahl, U.; Weissman, L.; Isolde Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce very intense 6He beams (order of 10 13 ions per second) via the 9Be(n,α) reaction using spallation neutrons.

  12. Ligand-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Srinivasarao, Madduri; Low, Philip S

    2017-09-12

    Safety and efficacy constitute the major criteria governing regulatory approval of any new drug. The best method to maximize safety and efficacy is to deliver a proven therapeutic agent with a targeting ligand that exhibits little affinity for healthy cells but high affinity for pathologic cells. The probability of regulatory approval can conceivably be further enhanced by exploiting the same targeting ligand, conjugated to an imaging agent, to select patients whose diseased tissues display sufficient targeted receptors for therapeutic efficacy. The focus of this Review is to summarize criteria that must be met during design of ligand-targeted drugs (LTDs) to achieve the required therapeutic potency with minimal toxicity. Because most LTDs are composed of a targeting ligand (e.g., organic molecule, aptamer, protein scaffold, or antibody), spacer, cleavable linker, and therapeutic warhead, criteria for successful design of each component will be described. Moreover, because obstacles to successful drug design can differ among human pathologies, limitations to drug delivery imposed by the unique characteristics of different diseases will be considered. With the explosion of genomic and transcriptomic data providing an ever-expanding selection of disease-specific targets, and with tools for high-throughput chemistry offering an escalating diversity of warheads, opportunities for innovating safe and effective LTDs has never been greater.

  13. Geometry of statistical target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basener, William F.; Allen, Brian; Bretney, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the underlying geometry and performance of various statistical target detection algorithms for hyperspectral imagery, presents results from algorithm testing, and investigates general trends and observable principles for understanding performance. Over the variety of detection algorithms, there is no universally best performing algorithm. In our test, often top performing algorithms on one class of targets obtain mediocre results on another class of targets. However, there are two clear trends: quadratic detectors such as ACE generally performed better than linear ones especially for subpixel targets (our top 15 scoring algorithms were quadratic detectors), and using anomaly detection to prescreen image spectra improved the performance of the quadratic detectors (8 of our top 9 scoring algorithms using anomaly prescreening). We also demonstrate that simple combinations of detection algorithms can outperform single algorithms in practice. In our derivation of detection algorithms, we provide exposition on the underlying mathematical geometry of the algorithms. That geometry is then used to investigate differences in algorithm performance. Tests are conducted using imagery and targets freely available online. The imagery was acquired over Cooke City, Montana, a small town near Yellowstone National Park, using the HyMap V/NIR/SWIR sensor with 126 spectral bands. There are three vehicle and four fabric targets located in the town and surrounding area.

  14. Antibiotics that target protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa S; Xie, Yun; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    The key role of the bacterial ribosome makes it an important target for antibacterial agents. Indeed, a large number of clinically useful antibiotics target this complex translational ribonucleoprotein machinery. The majority of these compounds, mostly of natural origin, bind to one of the three key ribosomal sites: the decoding (or A-site) on the 30S, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the 50S, and the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S. Antibiotics that bind the A-site, such as the aminoglycosides, interfere with codon recognition and translocation. Peptide bond formation is inhibited when small molecules like oxazolidinones bind at the PTC. Finally, macrolides tend to block the growth of the amino acid chain at the peptide exit tunnel. In this article, the major classes of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome are discussed and classified according to their respective target. Notably, most antibiotics solely interact with the RNA components of the bacterial ribosome. The surge seen in the appearance of resistant bacteria has not been met by a parallel development of effective and broad-spectrum new antibiotics, as evident by the introduction of only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and lipopeptides, in the past decades. Nevertheless, this significant health threat has revitalized the search for new antibacterial agents and novel targets. High resolution structural data of many ribosome-bound antibiotics provide unprecedented insight into their molecular contacts and mode of action and inspire the design and synthesis of new candidate drugs that target this fascinating molecular machine.

  15. Unification of automatic target tracking and automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    The subject being addressed is how an automatic target tracker (ATT) and an automatic target recognizer (ATR) can be fused together so tightly and so well that their distinctiveness becomes lost in the merger. This has historically not been the case outside of biology and a few academic papers. The biological model of ATT∪ATR arises from dynamic patterns of activity distributed across many neural circuits and structures (including retina). The information that the brain receives from the eyes is "old news" at the time that it receives it. The eyes and brain forecast a tracked object's future position, rather than relying on received retinal position. Anticipation of the next moment - building up a consistent perception - is accomplished under difficult conditions: motion (eyes, head, body, scene background, target) and processing limitations (neural noise, delays, eye jitter, distractions). Not only does the human vision system surmount these problems, but it has innate mechanisms to exploit motion in support of target detection and classification. Biological vision doesn't normally operate on snapshots. Feature extraction, detection and recognition are spatiotemporal. When vision is viewed as a spatiotemporal process, target detection, recognition, tracking, event detection and activity recognition, do not seem as distinct as they are in current ATT and ATR designs. They appear as similar mechanism taking place at varying time scales. A framework is provided for unifying ATT and ATR.

  16. Chemical Structural Novelty: On-Targets and Off-Targets

    PubMed Central

    Yera, Emmanuel R.; Cleves, Ann. E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Drug structures may be quantitatively compared based on 2D topological structural considerations and based on 3D characteristics directly related to binding. A framework for combining multiple similarity computations is presented along with its systematic application to 358 drugs with overlapping pharmacology. Given a new molecule along with a set of molecules sharing some biological effect, a single score based on comparison to the known set is produced, reflecting either 2D similarity, 3D similarity, or their combination. For prediction of primary targets, the benefit of 3D over 2D was relatively small, but for prediction of off-targets, the added benefit was large. In addition to assessing prediction, the relationship between chemical similarity and pharmacological novelty was studied. Drug pairs that shared high 3D similarity but low 2D similarity (i.e. a novel scaffold) were shown to be much more likely to exhibit pharmacologically relevant differences in terms of specific protein target modulation. PMID:21916467

  17. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  18. Targeted nanosystems: Advances in targeted dendrimers for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers possess discrete highly compact nanostructures constituted of successive branched layers. Soon after the inception of dendrimers, recognition of their tunable structures and biologically favorable properties provoked a great enthusiasm in delving deeply into the utility of dendrimers for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One of the most important nanotechnology applications is the development of nanomedicines for targeted cancer therapies. Tremendous success in targeted therapies has been achieved with the use of dendrimer-based nanomedicines. This article provides a concise review on latest advances in the utility of dendrimers in immunotherapies and hormone therapies. PMID:26706410

  19. Target Height and Target Range for Japanese Children: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kagami, Masayo

    2007-01-01

    In 1990, we proposed the equations to calculate target height (TH) and target range (TR) for Japanese, taking account of the positive height secular trend observed over the last ∼100 years. However, height difference between generations appears to have become small or negligible in contemporary Japanese populations. Thus, we re-analyzed the Japanese height data, and revised the equations for TH and TR for contemporary Japanese children as follows (cm): Boys, TH = {PH + (MH + 13)} ÷ 2, TR = TH ± 9; and Girls, TH = {(PH – 13) + MH} ÷ 2; TR = TH ± 8, where PH indicates paternal height and MH maternal height. PMID:24790351

  20. Neuroinflammation: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jeffrey M; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2005-10-01

    The increased appreciation of the importance of glial cell-propagated inflammation (termed 'neuroinflammation') in the progression of pathophysiology for diverse neurodegenerative diseases, has heightened interest in the rapid discovery of neuroinflammation-targeted therapeutics. Efforts include searches among existing drugs approved for other uses, as well as development of novel synthetic compounds that selectively downregulate neuroinflammatory responses. The use of existing drugs to target neuroinflammation has largely met with failure due to lack of efficacy or untoward side effects. However, the de novo development of new classes of therapeutics based on targeting selective aspects of glia activation pathways and glia-mediated pathophysiologies, versus targeting pathways of quantitative importance in non-CNS inflammatory responses, is yielding promising results in preclinical animal models. The authors briefly review selected clinical and preclinical data that reflect the prevailing approaches targeting neuroinflammation as a pathophysiological process contributing to onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases. The authors conclude with opinions based on recent experimental proofs of concept using preclinical animal models of pathophysiology. The focus is on Alzheimer's disease, but the concepts are transferrable to other neurodegenerative disorders with an inflammatory component.

  1. Vaccine targets against Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dabin; Pichichero, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Moraxella catarrhalis is a prominent pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults, resulting in a significant socioeconomic burden on healthcare systems globally. No vaccine is currently available for M. catarrhalis. Promising M. catarrhalis target antigens have been characterized in animal models and should soon enter human clinical trials. Areas covered This review discusses the detailed features and research status of current candidate target antigens for an M. catarrhalis vaccine. The approaches for assessing M. catarrhalis vaccine efficacy are also discussed. Expert opinion Targeting the key molecules contributing to serum resistance may be a viable strategy to identify effective vaccine targets among M. catarrhalis antigens. Elucidating the role and mechanisms of the serum and mucosal immune responses to M. catarrhalis is significant for vaccine target selection, testing and evaluation. Developing animal models closely simulating M. catarrhalis-caused human respiratory diseases is of great benefit in better understanding pathogenesis and evaluating vaccine efficacy. Carrying out clinical trials will be a landmark in the progress of M. catarrhalis vaccine research. Combined multicomponent vaccines will be a focus of future M. catarrhalis vaccine studies. PMID:26565427

  2. Targeted alpha therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Elgqvist, Jorgen

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of pinpointing biological targets, and thereby potentially targeting and eradicating small tumors or even single cancer cells, is a tantalizing concept that has been discussed since the magic-bullet concept was first presented by Paul Erlich in the beginning of the 20th century in connection with his work on tissue staining for histological examinations and the work by Kohler and Milstein on antibody production published in 1975. This concept now seems feasible through the use of highly specific targeting constructs, chemical labeling of radioactive substances to these targeting constructs that results in high specific activities, radioimmunocomplexes with good stability even after injection, and the use of radionuclides emitting alpha( α)-particles having exceedingly high ionizing density and, therefore, a high probability of killing cells along its track in tissue. The short range of the emitted α-particles makes them even more interesting by minimizing unwanted irradiation of normal tissue surrounding the targeted cancer cells of interest, assuming high specificity of the targeting construct and good stability of the chemical bonds between the targeting construct and the α-particle emitter. Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT), in which an α-particle emitting radionuclide is specifically directed to the biological target, is gaining more attention as new targets, targeting constructs, chemical labeling techniques, and α-particle emitters are, respectively, identified, constructed, developed, and made available. Results and improvements are now being published at an increasing rate and the number of conceivable applications is expanding, especially in the field of cancer treatment. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to provide an overview of the overall progress in the research field of TAT on a regular basis. However, problems such as limited or delayed diffusion of the α-radioimmunocomplex and inhomogeneous activity distributions in the

  3. Targeted protein degradation by PROTACs.

    PubMed

    Neklesa, Taavi K; Winkler, James D; Crews, Craig M

    2017-02-14

    Targeted protein degradation using the PROTAC technology is emerging as a novel therapeutic method to address diseases driven by the aberrant expression of a disease-causing protein. PROTAC molecules are bifunctional small molecules that simultaneously bind a target protein and an E3-ubiquitin ligase, thus causing ubiquitination and degradation of the target protein by the proteasome. Like small molecules, PROTAC molecules possess good tissue distribution and the ability to target intracellular proteins. Herein, we highlight the advantages of protein degradation using PROTACs, and provide specific examples where degradation offers therapeutic benefit over classical enzyme inhibition. Foremost, PROTACs can degrade proteins regardless of their function. This includes the currently "undruggable" proteome, which comprises approximately 85% of all human proteins. Other beneficial aspects of protein degradation include the ability to target overexpressed and mutated proteins, as well as the potential to demonstrate prolonged pharmacodynamics effect beyond drug exposure. Lastly, due to their catalytic nature and the pre-requisite ubiquitination step, an exquisitely potent molecules with a high degree of degradation selectivity can be designed. Impressive preclinical in vitro and in vivo PROTAC data have been published, and these data have propelled the development of clinically viable PROTACs. With the molecular weight falling in the 700-1000Da range, the delivery and bioavailability of PROTACs remain the largest hurdles on the way to the clinic. Solving these issues and demonstrating proof of concept clinical data will be the focus of many labs over the next few years.

  4. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  5. STIS Target Acquisitions During SMOV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanis, Rocio M.; Downes, Ron; Hartig, George; Kraemer, Steve

    1997-07-01

    We summarize the first results on the analysis of in-flight STIS target acquisition (ACQ and ACQ/PEAK). These results show that the STIS target acquisition (ACQ) is working very accurately for point sources (within 0.5 pixels = 0.025 arcseconds), about 4 times better than specified in the Instrument Handbook. As a result of the accuracy of the ACQ algorithm, we are no longer recommending to perform ACQ/PEAKs for the 0.2 arcsecond wide slits. For diffuse acquisitions the accuracy varies with target size. Although analysis of ACQ/PEAK data is hampered by a flight software problem, we anticipate that peakups will be accurate to roughly ±5% of the slit width (instead of the ±15% pr eviously advertised). We are implementing several enhancements to the flight software that will take effect by mid- August to improve the quality of the acquisitions.

  6. 3-Bromopyruvate: targets and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Maria C

    2012-02-01

    The pyruvate mimetic 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is generally presented as an inhibitor of glycolysis and has shown remarkable efficacy in not only preventing tumor growth, but even eradicating existant tumors in animal studies. We here review reported molecular targets of 3-BP and suggest that the very range of possible targets, which pertain to the altered energy metabolism of tumor cells, contributes both to the efficacy and the tumor specificity of the drug. Its in vivo efficacy is suggested to be due to a combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, as well as to secondary effects affecting the tumor microenvironment. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP is less due to pyruvate mimicry than to alkylation of, e.g., key thiols. Alkylation of DNA/RNA has not been reported. More research is warranted to better understand the pharmacokinetics of 3-BP, and its potential toxic effects to normal cells, in particular those that are highly ATP-/mitochondrion-dependent.

  7. Targeting retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, V; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral vectors capable of efficient in vivo gene delivery to specific target cell types or to specific locations of disease pathology would greatly facilitate many gene therapy applications. The surface glycoproteins of membrane-enveloped viruses stand among the choice candidates to control the target cell receptor recognition and host range of retroviral vectors onto which they are incorporated. This can be achieved in many ways, such as the exchange of glycoprotein by pseudotyping, their biochemical modifications, their conjugation with virus-cell bridging agents or their structural modifications. Understanding the fundamental properties of the viral glycoproteins and the molecular mechanism of virus entry into cells has been instrumental in the functional alteration of their tropism. Here we briefly review the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral envelope glycoproteins and we discuss the emerging targeting strategies based on retroviral and lentiviral vector systems.

  8. Integrin Targeted Delivery of Radiotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaofei; Wang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy, which is based on the selective delivery of a sufficient radiation dose to tumors without significantly affecting normal tissues, is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies. Integrins, a family of cell adhesion molecules, play key roles during tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Among all the integrins, αvβ3 seems to be the most important in the process of tumor angiogenesis. Integrin αvβ3 is highly expressed on activated endothelial cells, new-born vessels as well as some tumor cells, but is not present in resting endothelial cells and most normal organ systems, making it a suitable target for anti-tumor therapy. In this review, we summarize the current development and applications of antibody-, peptide-, and other ligand-based integrin targeted radiotherapeutics for tumor radiation therapy. PMID:21547160

  9. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  10. Cholinergic Targets in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Eliot R

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancers express an autocrine cholinergic loop in which secreted acetylcholine can stimulate tumor growth through both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Because activation of mAChR and nAChR stimulates growth; tumor growth can be stimulated by both locally synthesized acetylcholine as well as acetylcholine from distal sources and from nicotine in the high percentage of lung cancer patients who are smokers. The stimulation of lung cancer growth by cholinergic agonists offers many potential new targets for lung cancer therapy. Cholinergic signaling can be targeted at the level of choline transport; acetylcholine synthesis, secretion and degradation; and nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. In addition, the newly describe family of ly-6 allosteric modulators of nicotinic signaling such as lynx1 and lynx2 offers yet another new approach to novel lung cancer therapeutics. Each of these targets has their potential advantages and disadvantages for the development of new lung cancer therapies which are discussed in this review.

  11. Thermal Targets for Satellite Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-01-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The MTI imager is a research and development project with 15 wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared spectral regions. A plethora of targets with known temperatures such as power plant heated lakes, volcano lava vents, desert playas and aluminized Mylar tarps are being used in the validation of the five thermal bands of the MTI satellite. SRTC efforts in the production of ''cold targets'' with aluminized Mylar tarps will be described. Visible and thermal imagery and wavelength dependent radiance measurements of the calibration targets will be presented.

  12. Observations of Spacecraft Targets, Unusual Asteroids, and Targets of Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Obtain physical and astrometric observations of: (1) spacecraft targets to support mission operations; (2) known asteroids with unusual orbits to help determine their origin; and (3) newly discovered minor planets (including both asteroids and comets) that represent a particular opportunity to add significant new knowledge of the Solar System.

  13. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  14. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H. B. Jr.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R. Jr.

    1995-09-15

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  15. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, H. B.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R.

    1995-09-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  16. [Biotherapy targeting the immune system].

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibody targeted therapy has changed the management of several diseases, including in hematology and immunology. The panel of the present available biotherapies allows a specific action at various stages of the immune response. Indeed, some of these molecules can target the naive T cell at the immunological synapse or the way of TH1, TH17 and regulatory T cell. Others may be more specific for the B cell and immunoglobulin. Some will even be active on both B and T cells.

  17. Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Nadia; Russell, Kerry S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity of molecularly targeted cancer agents is increasingly recognized as a significant side effect of chemotherapy. These new potent therapies may not only affect the survival of cancer cells, but have the potential to adversely impact normal cardiac and vascular function. Unraveling the mechanisms by which these therapies affect the heart and vasculature is crucial for improving drug design and finding alternative therapies to protect patients predisposed to cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the classification and side effects of currently approved molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics. PMID:22758623

  18. Targeting cancer using cholesterol conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Awwad A.; Alanazi, Fares K.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of cholesterol moiety to active compounds for either cancer treatment or diagnosis is an attractive approach. Cholesterol derivatives are widely studied as cancer diagnostic agents and as anticancer derivatives either in vitro or in vivo using animal models. In largely growing studies, anticancer agents have been chemically conjugated to cholesterol molecules, to enhance their pharmacokinetic behavior, cellular uptake, target specificity, and safety. To efficiently deliver anticancer agents to the target cells and tissues, many different cholesterol–anticancer conjugates were synthesized and characterized, and their anticancer efficiencies were tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24493968

  19. Apparatus for producing laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, T.R.; Baker, W.R.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to an apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25u to 75u diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection. (auth)

  20. Method for producing laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Baker, William R.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25.mu. to 75.mu. diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection.

  1. DNA Methylation-Targeted Drugs.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Elodie M; McInnes, Gabrielle; Beaudry, Annie; Raynal, Noël J-M

    Targeting DNA hypermethylation, using nucleoside analogs, is an efficient approach to reprogram cancer cell epigenome leading to reduced proliferation, increased differentiation, recognition by the immune system, and ultimately cancer cell death. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. To improve clinical efficacy and overcome mechanisms of drug resistance, a second generation of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors has been designed and is currently in clinical trials. Although efficient in monotherapy against hematologic malignancies, the potential of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to synergize with small molecules targeting chromatin or immunotherapy will provide additional opportunities for their future clinical application against leukemia and solid tumors.

  2. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  3. Dynamics of aerial target pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.

    2015-12-01

    During pursuit and predation, aerial species engage in multitasking behavior that involve simultaneous target detection, tracking, decision-making, approach and capture. The mobility of the pursuer and the target in a three dimensional environment during predation makes the capture task highly complex. Many researchers have studied and analyzed prey capture dynamics in different aerial species such as insects and bats. This article focuses on reviewing the capture strategies adopted by these species while relying on different sensory variables (vision and acoustics) for navigation. In conclusion, the neural basis of these capture strategies and some applications of these strategies in bio-inspired navigation and control of engineered systems are discussed.

  4. The Smart Targeting of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam D.; Claypool, Sarah E.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge in nanomedicine is how to selectively deliver nanoparticles to diseased tissues. Nanoparticle delivery system requires targeting for specific delivery to pathogenic sites when enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) is not suitable or inefficient. Functionalizing nanoparticles is a widely-used technique that allows for conjugation with targeting ligands, which possess inherent ability to direct selective binding to cell types or states and, therefore, confer “smartness” to nanoparticles. This review illustrates methods of ligand-nanoparticle functionalization, provides a cross-section of various ligand classes, including small molecules, peptides, antibodies, engineered proteins, or nucleic acid aptamers, and discusses some unconventional approaches currently under investigation. PMID:23470005

  5. Novel targets for mitochondrial medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria—classically viewed as the powerhouses of the cell—have taken center stage in disease pathogenesis and resolution. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which originates from primary defects within the organelle or is induced by environmental stresses, plays a critical role in human disease. Despite their central role in human health and disease, there are no approved drugs that directly target mitochondria. We present possible new druggable targets in mitochondrial biology, including protein modification, calcium ion (Ca2+) transport, and dynamics, as we move into a new era of mitochondrial medicine. PMID:26888432

  6. The Evolution of Air Force Targeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    campaign against Japan. This group eventually evolved into the first Joint Target Group . The deputy assistant chief of the Air Staff for targeting...Far East Command (GHQ FEC) as- sumed responsibility for targeting. The chief of staff established the GHQ Target Group on 14 July 1950 and made it...responsible for target nominations. However, the GHQ Target Group was not capable of performing this task. The work of this group was nei- ther

  7. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  8. Raw eggs-moving target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Doug

    1999-09-01

    High school physics students often have difficulty with understanding when and where to use an appropriate calculation to solve a problem. In this activity students have to solve a real problem using formulas they have seen before, but in a context with which they are unfamiliar; namely dropping a raw egg on a moving target-their instructor.

  9. Targeting Resources for Local Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Focusing state and federal dollars on targeted areas, the Kentucky Appalachian Community Development Initiative helps communities in eastern Kentucky fund their own strategies for economic growth. In Hindman, the project focuses on creating the Kentucky School of Crafts, to train master artisans; supporting the Kentucky Appalachian Artisan Center;…

  10. Emerging targeted therapies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie J; Wen, Patrick Y

    2016-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Despite aggressive treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, these tumors are incurable and invariably recur. Molecular characterization of these tumors in recent years has advanced our understanding of gliomagenesis and offered an array of pathways that can be specifically targeted. Areas covered: The most commonly dysregulated signaling pathways found in gliomas will be discussed, as well as the biologic importance of these disrupted pathways and how each may contribute to tumor development. Our knowledge regarding these pathways are most relevant to Grade IV glioma/glioblastoma, but we will also discuss genomic categorization of low grade glioma. Further, drugs targeting single pathways, which have undergone early phase clinical trials will be reviewed, followed by an in depth discussion of emerging treatments on the horizon, which will include inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and receptor tyrosine kinases, Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K), angiogenesis, cell cycle and mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations. Expert opinion: Results from single agent targeted therapy trials have been modest. Lack of efficacy may stem from a combination of poor blood brain barrier penetration, the genetically heterogeneous make-up of the tumors and the emergence of resistance mechanisms. These factors can be overcome by rational drug design that capitalizes on ways to target critical pathways and limits upregulation of redundant pathways.

  11. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  12. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhua; Zhang, Bo; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Davidson, Mercy M; Hei, Tom K

    2017-03-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on cytoplasmic organelles is often underestimated because the general dogma considers direct DNA damage in the nuclei to be the primary cause of radiation induced toxicity. Using a precision microbeam irradiator, we examined the changes in mitochondrial dynamics and functions triggered by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation with α-particles. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation led to activation of autophagy, which degraded dysfunctional mitochondria in order to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. The activation of autophagy was cytoplasmic irradiation-specific and was not detected in nuclear irradiated cells. This autophagic process was oxyradical-dependent and required the activity of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1). The resultant mitochondrial fission induced phosphorylation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) which leads to further activation of the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 with concomitant inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to initiate autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy resulted in delayed DNA damage repair and decreased cell viability, which supports the cytoprotective function of autophagy. Our results reveal a novel mechanism in which dysfunctional mitochondria are degraded by autophagy in an attempt to protect cells from toxic effects of targeted cytoplasmic radiation.

  13. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  14. Target recovery in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiman; Zeng, An

    2017-01-01

    The invulnerability of complex networks is an important issue which has been widely analyzed in different fields. A lot of works have been done to measure and improve the stability of complex networks when being attacked. Recently, how to recover networks after attack was intensively studied. The existing methods are mainly designed to recover the overall functionality of networks, yet in many real cases the recovery of important nodes should be given priority, to which we refer target recovery. For example, when the cold wave paralyses the railway networks, target recovery means to repair those stations or railways such that the transport capacity of densely-populated cities can be recovered as fast as possible. In this paper, we first compare the impact of attacks on the whole network and target nodes respectively, and then study the efficiency of traditional recovery methods that are proposed based on global centrality metrics. Furthermore, based on target centrality metrics, we introduce a local betweenness recovery method and we find it has better performance than the traditional methods. We finally propose a hybrid recovery method which includes local betweenness metric and local closeness metric. The performance of the hybrid method is shown to be similar to that of the greedy algorithm.

  15. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  16. Targeting Phospholipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Menglin; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    All cancers tested so far display abnormal choline and ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism, which has been detected with numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) approaches in cells, animal models of cancer, as well as the tumors of cancer patients. Since the discovery of this metabolic hallmark of cancer, many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular origins of deregulated choline metabolism, to identify targets for cancer treatment, and to develop MRS approaches that detect choline and ethanolamine compounds for clinical use in diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Several enzymes in choline, and recently also ethanolamine, phospholipid metabolism have been identified, and their evaluation has shown that they are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several already established enzymes as well as a number of emerging enzymes in phospholipid metabolism can be used as treatment targets for anticancer therapy, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic approaches. This review summarizes the current knowledge of established and relatively novel targets in phospholipid metabolism of cancer, covering choline kinase α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D1, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelinases, choline transporters, glycerophosphodiesterases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, and ethanolamine kinase. These enzymes are discussed in terms of their roles in oncogenic transformation, tumor progression, and crucial cancer cell properties such as fast proliferation, migration, and invasion. Their potential as treatment targets are evaluated based on the current literature. PMID:28083512

  17. Promiscuous tumor targeting phage proteins.

    PubMed

    Gross, Amanda L; Gillespie, James W; Petrenko, Valery A

    2016-03-01

    Cancer cell-specific targeting ligands against numerous cancer cell lines have been selected previously and used as ligands for cell-specific delivery of chemotherapies and various nanomedicines. However, tumor heterogeneity is one recognized problem hampering clinical translation of targeted anti-cancer medicines. Therefore, a novel class of targeting ligands is required that recognize receptors expressed between a variety of cancer phenotypes, identified here as 'promiscuous' ligands. In this work, promiscuous phage fusion proteins were first identified by a novel selection scheme to enrich for pan-cancer cell binding abilities, as indicated by conserved structural motifs identified previously in other cancer types. Additionally, peptide sequences containing a combination of motifs were identified to modulate binding. A panel of phage fusion proteins was studied for their specificity and selectivity for lung and pancreatic cancer cells. Phage displaying the fusion peptides GSLEEVSTL or GEFDELMTM, the two predominate clones with greatest binding ability, were used to modify preformed, doxorubicin-loaded, liposomes. These modified liposomes increased cytotoxicity up to 8.1-fold in several cancer cell lines when compared with unmodified liposomal doxorubicin. Taken together, these data indicate that promiscuous phage proteins, selected against different cancer cell lines, can be used as targeting ligands for treatment of heterogeneous tumor populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Target Homework to Maximize Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Targeted homework is based upon the belief that homework can make a significant contribution to student achievement in the areas of knowledge, skills, and values. It centers on the notion that homework achieves maximum effectiveness when teachers share the school's homework policy as well as their policy with students and parents or guardians. The…

  19. Combinatorial targeting and nanotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Christianson, Dawn R; Ozawa, Michael G; Miller, J Houston; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2010-08-01

    The development of improved methods for targeted cell detection is of general interest in many fields of research and drug development. There are a number of well-established techniques for the study and detection of biomarkers expressed in living cells and tissues. Many of them rely on multi-step procedures that might not meet ideal assay requirements for speed, cost, sensitivity, and specificity. Here we report and further validate an approach that enables spontaneous molecular assembly to generate biologically active networks of bacteriophage (phage) assembled with gold (Au) nanoparticles (termed Au-phage nanoshuttles). Here, the nanoshuttles preserve the cell binding and internalization attributes mediated by a displayed peptide targeted to a cell surface receptor. The organization of such targeted assemblies can be further manipulated to be used as a multimodal detection assembly, and they can be characterized as fractal nanostructures by angle-dependent light scattering fractal dimension analysis. Targeted Au-phage nanoshuttles offer multiple functionalities for nanotechnology-based sensing and reporting, including enhanced fluorescence and improved contrast for darkfield microscopy.

  20. Targeted Nanoparticles in Mitochondrial Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rakesh K.; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the so-called “energy factory of cells” not only produce energy but also contribute immensely in cellular mortality management. Mitochondrial dysfunctions result in various diseases including but not limited to cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the recent years, targeting mitochondria emerged as an attractive strategy to control mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Despite the desire to direct therapeutics to the mitochondria, the actual task is more difficult due to the highly complex nature of the mitochondria. The potential benefits of integrating nanomaterials with properties such as biodegradability, magnetization, fluorescence, and near-infrared absorption into a single object of nanoscale dimensions can lead to the development of hybrid nano-medical platforms for targeting therapeutics to the mitochondria. Only a handful of nanoparticles based on metal oxides, gold nanoparticles, dendrons, carbon nanotubes, and liposomes were recently engineered to target mitochondria. Most of these materials face tremendous challenges when administered in vivo due to their limited biocompatibility. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles emerged as eminent candidates for effective drug delivery. In this review we highlight the current advancements in the development of biodegradable nanoparticle platforms as effective targeting tools for mitochondrial medicine. PMID:25348382

  1. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  2. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  3. Novel GABA receptor pesticide targets.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has four distinct but overlapping and coupled targets of pesticide action importantly associated with little or no cross-resistance. The target sites are differentiated by binding assays with specific radioligands, resistant strains, site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling. Three of the targets are for non-competitive antagonists (NCAs) or channel blockers of widely varied chemotypes. The target of the first generation (20th century) NCAs differs between the larger or elongated compounds (NCA-IA) including many important insecticides of the past (cyclodienes and polychlorocycloalkanes) or present (fiproles) and the smaller or compact compounds (NCA-IB) highly toxic to mammals and known as cage convulsants, rodenticides or chemical threat agents. The target of greatest current interest is designated NCA-II for the second generation (21st century) of NCAs consisting for now of isoxazolines and meta-diamides. This new and uniquely different NCA-II site apparently differs enough between insects and mammals to confer selective toxicity. The fourth target is the avermectin site (AVE) for allosteric modulators of the chloride channel. NCA pesticides vary in molecular surface area and solvent accessible volume relative to avermectin with NCA-IBs at 20-22%, NCA-IAs at 40-45% and NCA-IIs at 57-60%. The same type of relationship relative to ligand-docked length is 27-43% for NCA-IBs, 63-71% for NCA-IAs and 85-105% for NCA-IIs. The four targets are compared by molecular modeling for the Drosophila melanogaster GABA-R. The principal sites of interaction are proposed to be: pore V1' and A2' for NCA-IB compounds; pore A2', L6' and T9' for NCA-IA compounds; pore T9' to S15' in proximity to M1/M3 subunit interface (or alternatively an interstitial site) for NCA-II compounds; and M1/M3, M2 interfaces for AVE. Understanding the relationships of these four binding sites is important in resistance management and in the discovery and use

  4. Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciullo, Guiseppe; Contalbrigo, Marco; Lenisa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Remarks on the history of workshops on "spin tools" / E. Steffens -- Polarized proton beams in RHIC / A. Zelenski -- The COSY/Julich polarized H[symbol] and D[symbol] ion source / O. Felden -- The new source of polarized ions for the JINR accelerator complex / V. V. Fimushkin -- Resonance effects in nuclear dichroism - an inexpensive source of tensor-polarized deuterons / H. Seyfarth -- Polarized electrons and positrons at the MESA accelerator / K. Aulenbacher -- Status report of the Darmstadt polarized electron injector / Y. Poltoratska -- The Mott polarimeter at MAMI / V. Tioukine -- Proton polarimetry at the relativistic heavy ion collider / Y. Makdisi -- Polarisation and polarimetry at HERA / B. Sobloher -- Polarisation measurement at the ILC with a Compton polarimeter / C. Bartels -- Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders / A. Hartin -- Electron beam polarimetry at low energies and its applications / R. Barday -- Polarized solid targets: recent progress and future prospects / C. D. Keith -- HD gas distillation and analysis for HD frozen spin targets / A. D'Angelo -- Electron spin resonance study of hydrogen and alkyl free radicals trapped in solid hydrogen aimed for dynamic nuclear polarization of solid HD / T. Kumada -- Change of ultrafast nuclear-spin polarization upon photoionization by a short laser pulse / T. Nakajima -- Radiation damage and recovery in polarized [symbol]NH[symbol] ammonia targets at Jefferson lab / J. D. Maxwell.Polarized solid proton target in low magnetic field and at high temperature / T. Uesaka -- Pulse structure dependence of the proton spin polarization rate / T. Kawahara -- Proton NMR in the large COMPASS [symbol]NH[symbol] target / J. Koivuniemi -- DNP with TEMPO and trityl radicals in deuterated polystyrene / L. Wang -- The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources / L. Rinolfi -- Status of high intensity polarized electron gun at MIT-Bates / E. Tsentalovich -- Target section for spin

  5. Multidrug transporters as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Liang, X-J; Aszalos, A

    2006-08-01

    Transport molecules can significantly affect the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs. An important transport molecule, the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp), is constitutively expressed at several organ sites in the human body. Pgp is expressed at the blood-brain barrier, in the kidneys, liver, intestines and in certain T cells. Other transporters such as the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and MRP2 also contribute to drug distribution in the human body, although to a lesser extent than Pgp. These three transporters, and especially Pgp, are often targets of drugs. Pgp can be an intentional or unintentional target. It is directly targeted when one wants to block its function by a modifier drug so that another drug, also a substrate of Pgp, can penetrate the cell membrane, which would otherwise be impermeable. Unintentional targeting occurs when several drugs are administered to a patient and as a consequence, the physiological function of Pgp is blocked at different organ sites. Like Pgp, MRP1 also has the capacity to mediate transport of many drugs and other compounds. MRP1 has a protective role in preventing accumulation of toxic compounds and drugs in epithelial tissue covering the choroid plexus/cerebrospinal fluid compartment, oral epithelium, sertoli cells, intesticular tubules and urinary collecting duct cells. MRP2 primarily transports weakly basic drugs and bilirubin from the liver to bile. Most compounds that efficiently block Pgp have only low affinity for MRP1 and MRP2. There are only a few effective and specific MRP inhibitors available. Drug targeting of these transporters may play a role in cancer chemotherapy and in the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs.

  6. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  7. Targeting vascular calcification: softening-up a hard target.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Alexander; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2009-04-01

    Widespread vascular calcification is a ubiquitous feature of aging and is prevalent in association with a number of common pathologies including atherosclerosis, renal failure, and diabetes. Once thought of as innocuous, emerging evidence suggests that calcification is causal in precipitating vascular events and mediating chronic cardiovascular damage, independent of disease context. Importantly, a large body of data has shed light on the factors that favor the formation of calcification in vivo, as well as on the complex mechanisms that initiate and promote it. This has identified some novel targets and allowed for the possibility that calcification can potentially be blocked and ultimately regressed. Targets include local and circulating inhibitors of calcification as well as factors that may ameliorate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis. Despite this, the vasculature remains a difficult tissue to target and currently there are no effective treatments in general use. More crucially, any potential treatments will need to be carefully evaluated as they may impinge on bone metabolism. Our best hope for the near future is to normalize factors associated with accelerated calcification in pathologies such as renal failure where, aberrant mineral metabolism, as well as treatment regimes, may contribute to the initiation and progression of calcification.

  8. Hyperspectral target detection using manifold learning and multiple target spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Theiler, James; Messinger, David W.

    2016-03-31

    Imagery collected from satellites and airborne platforms provides an important tool for remotely analyzing the content of a scene. In particular, the ability to remotely detect a specific material within a scene is of critical importance in nonproliferation and other applications. The sensor systems that process hyperspectral images collect the high-dimensional spectral information necessary to perform these detection analyses. For a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, however, where d is the number of spectral bands, it is common for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to recent interestmore » in the use of manifold learning, which seeks to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, nonlinear manifold that the data discretely approximate. The research presented in this paper focuses on a graph theory and manifold learning approach to target detection, using an adaptive version of locally linear embedding that is biased to separate target pixels from background pixels. Finally, this approach incorporates multiple target signatures for a particular material, accounting for the spectral variability that is often present within a solid material of interest.« less

  9. Hyperspectral target detection using manifold learning and multiple target spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Theiler, James; Messinger, David W.

    2016-03-31

    Imagery collected from satellites and airborne platforms provides an important tool for remotely analyzing the content of a scene. In particular, the ability to remotely detect a specific material within a scene is of critical importance in nonproliferation and other applications. The sensor systems that process hyperspectral images collect the high-dimensional spectral information necessary to perform these detection analyses. For a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, however, where d is the number of spectral bands, it is common for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to recent interest in the use of manifold learning, which seeks to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, nonlinear manifold that the data discretely approximate. The research presented in this paper focuses on a graph theory and manifold learning approach to target detection, using an adaptive version of locally linear embedding that is biased to separate target pixels from background pixels. Finally, this approach incorporates multiple target signatures for a particular material, accounting for the spectral variability that is often present within a solid material of interest.

  10. Mechanisms of gene targeting in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Akinori; Anai, Hirofumi; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome modifications using techniques that alter the genomic information of interest have contributed to multiple studies in both basic and applied biology. Traditionally, in gene targeting, the target-site integration of a targeting vector by homologous recombination is used. However, this strategy has several technical problems. The first problem is the extremely low frequency of gene targeting, which makes obtaining recombinant clones an extremely labor intensive task. The second issue is the limited number of biomaterials to which gene targeting can be applied. Traditional gene targeting hardly occurs in most of the human adherent cell lines. However, a new approach using designer nucleases that can introduce site-specific double-strand breaks in genomic DNAs has increased the efficiency of gene targeting. This new method has also expanded the number of biomaterials to which gene targeting could be applied. Here, we summarize various strategies for target gene modification, including a comparison of traditional gene targeting with designer nucleases.

  11. Targeting an efficient target-to-target interval for P300 speller brain–computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Eric W.; Wang, Xingyu

    2013-01-01

    Longer target-to-target intervals (TTI) produce greater P300 event-related potential amplitude, which can increase brain–computer interface (BCI) classification accuracy and decrease the number of flashes needed for accurate character classification. However, longer TTIs requires more time for each trial, which will decrease the information transfer rate of BCI. In this paper, a P300 BCI using a 7 × 12 matrix explored new flash patterns (16-, 18- and 21-flash pattern) with different TTIs to assess the effects of TTI on P300 BCI performance. The new flash patterns were designed to minimize TTI, decrease repetition blindness, and examine the temporal relationship between each flash of a given stimulus by placing a minimum of one (16-flash pattern), two (18-flash pattern), or three (21-flash pattern) non-target flashes between each target flashes. Online results showed that the 16-flash pattern yielded the lowest classification accuracy among the three patterns. The results also showed that the 18-flash pattern provides a significantly higher information transfer rate (ITR) than the 21-flash pattern; both patterns provide high ITR and high accuracy for all subjects. PMID:22350331

  12. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  13. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  14. Remote moving target indication assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to design and test key components of a sensor to be used on remotely piloted vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for the detection of moving vehicles in cluttered backgrounds. The proposed sensor uses modern large-array focal planes to provide multiple infrared observations of moving targets and capable on-board computers to integrate multiple observations to detect moving targets in background clutter. This combination reduces the size, weight, and cost of the sensor to levels that can be flown on many small unmanned platforms. This effort selected the actual components, integrated them into a test bed, tested the performance of the sensor against realistic generated scenes, and designed a proof-of-concept prototype.

  15. Targeting caspases in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Patrick; Mishra, Murli; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the fundamental role of apoptosis in the growth balance and normal homeostasis against cell proliferation led to the recognition of its loss contributing to tumorigenesis. The mechanistic significance of reinstating apoptosis signaling towards selective targeting of malignant cells heavily exploits the caspase family of death-inducing molecules as a powerful therapeutic platform for the development of potent anticancer strategies. Some apoptosis inhibitors induce caspase expression and activity in preclinical models and clinical trials by targeting both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and restoring the apoptotic capacity in human tumors. Furthermore, up-regulation of caspases emerges as a sensitizing mechanism for tumors exhibiting therapeutic resistance to radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of the functional involvement of caspases in apoptosis control and the current understanding of reactivating caspase-mediated apoptosis signaling towards effective therapeutic modalities in cancer treatment. PMID:23509217

  16. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  17. Genome engineering with targetable nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Current technology enables the production of highly specific genome modifications with excellent efficiency and specificity. Key to this capability are targetable DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair pathways. The break made by these reagents can produce localized sequence changes through inaccurate nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), often leading to gene inactivation. Alternatively, user-provided DNA can be used as a template for repair by homologous recombination (HR), leading to the introduction of desired sequence changes. This review describes three classes of targetable cleavage reagents: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). As a group, these reagents have been successfully used to modify genomic sequences in a wide variety of cells and organisms, including humans. This review discusses the properties, advantages, and limitations of each system, as well as the specific considerations required for their use in different biological systems.

  18. Advances in targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    New technologies have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in diverse systems. This includes precise manipulation of gene sequences in their natural chromosomal context and addition of transgenes to specific genomic loci. This progress has been facilitated by advances in engineering targeted nucleases with programmable, site-specific DNA-binding domains, including zinc finger proteins and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Recent improvements have enhanced nuclease performance, accelerated nuclease assembly, and lowered the cost of genome editing. These advances are driving new approaches to many areas of biotechnology, including biopharmaceutical production, agriculture, creation of transgenic organisms and cell lines, and studies of genome structure, regulation, and function. Genome editing is also being investigated in preclinical and clinical gene therapies for many diseases.

  19. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  20. New therapeutic targets in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Martí, R M; Sorolla, A; Yeramian, A

    2012-09-01

    Research into molecular targets for drug development in melanoma is starting to bear fruit. Of the drugs tested to date in patients with metastatic melanoma, those that have yielded the best results are V600E BRAF inhibitors in melanomas carrying the V600E mutation; c-kit tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors in melanomas carrying c-kit mutations; and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) antibodies, which block the mechanisms involved in immune tolerance. Many problems have yet to be resolved in these areas, however, such as the rapid development of resistance to BRAF and c-kit inhibitors and the lack of biomarkers to predict treatment response in the case of CTLA-4 blockers. We review the results of targeted therapy with these and other drugs in metastatic melanoma and discuss what the future holds for this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting interleukin-22 in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ji-Qing

    2014-02-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is an IL-10 family cytokine that was recently discovered to be released by T helper 17 (Th17) cells, Th22 cells, etc. Recently, there is emerging evidence that IL-22 is involved in the development and pathogenesis of psoriasis. For instance, IL-22 can inhibit keratinocyte terminal differentiation and can induce psoriasis-like epidermis alterations; serum IL-22 levels were correlated with the disease severity of psoriasis patients, and IL-22 mRNA was positively expressed in the psoriatic skin lesions, but negatively expressed in the normal controls. All these findings suggest that IL-22 may be implicated in psoriasis; therapeutics targeting IL-22 may have promise as a potential therapeutic target for treating psoriasis. In the present review, we summarize recent advances on the role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis.

  2. Hox Targets and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are a group of genes that specify structures along the anteroposterior axis in bilaterians. Although in many cases they do so by modifying a homologous structure with a different (or no) Hox input, there are also examples of Hox genes constructing new organs with no homology in other regions of the body. Hox genes determine structures though the regulation of targets implementing cellular functions and by coordinating cell behavior. The genetic organization to construct or modify a certain organ involves both a genetic cascade through intermediate transcription factors and a direct regulation of targets carrying out cellular functions. In this review I discuss new data from genome-wide techniques, as well as previous genetic and developmental information, to describe some examples of Hox regulation of different cell functions. I also discuss the organization of genetic cascades leading to the development of new organs, mainly using Drosophila melanogaster as the model to analyze Hox function. PMID:24490109

  3. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research.

  4. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  5. Nondestructive Testing and Target Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-21

    A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ RTB1 Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research Laboratory...DE 19716 US 8.  PERFORMING ORGANIZATION      REPORT NUMBER 9.  SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AF Office of Scientific Research...ABSTRACT This grant is concerned with three problems that are related to Air Force needs: 1) The extension of the linear sampling method in target

  6. Fire Damage and Strategic Targeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    both thermally and blast-induced ignitions. The vulnerability is expressed as an incident radiation flux level or as an overpressure, and thus...massive thermal influx. In either case, the probability of fire damage is a function of the incident thermal flux , the level of blast effects, and...considered as variable parameters and were allowed to assume a range of values. The target vulnerability to the thermal flux depends on the type and

  7. Dissecting and Targeting Latent Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    bone metastasis seed pre-selection by a mesenchymal-rich stroma in the mammary tumor. Blue and grey cells represent mesenchymal and non -mesenchymal...proliferate in vitro but have the capacity to enter a state of long-term latency after infiltrating target organs including lungs, the bone marrow...survival of breast cancer cells that infiltrated the bone marrow. The studies and progress in the first year therefore represent highly promising

  8. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  9. Targeting inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welty, Francine K; Alfaddagh, Abdulhamied; Elajami, Tarec K

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is comprised of a cluster of closely related risk factors, including visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, hypertension, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; all of which increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A chronic state of inflammation appears to be a central mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and MetS. In this review, we summarize recent research which has provided insight into the mechanisms by which inflammation underlies the pathophysiology of the individual components of MetS including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. On the basis of these mechanisms, we summarize therapeutic modalities to target inflammation in the MetS and its individual components. Current therapeutic modalities can modulate the individual components of MetS and have a direct anti-inflammatory effect. Lifestyle modifications including exercise, weight loss, and diets high in fruits, vegetables, fiber, whole grains, and low-fat dairy and low in saturated fat and glucose are recommended as a first line therapy. The Mediterranean and dietary approaches to stop hypertension diets are especially beneficial and have been shown to prevent development of MetS. Moreover, the Mediterranean diet has been associated with reductions in total and cardiovascular mortality. Omega-3 fatty acids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists lower high levels of triglyceride; their role in targeting inflammation is reviewed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone blockers comprise pharmacologic therapies for hypertension but also target other aspects of MetS including inflammation. Statin drugs target many of the underlying inflammatory pathways involved in MetS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of thick molybdenum targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thick natural molybdenum deposits on nickel plated copper substrates were prepared by thermal decomposition of molybdenum hexacarbonyl vapors on a heated surface in an inert gas atmosphere. The molybdenum metal atoms are firmly bonded to the substrate atoms, thus providing an excellent thermal contact across the junction. Molybdenum targets thus prepared should be useful for internal bombardment in a cyclotron where thermal energy inputs can exceed 10 kW.

  11. Targeted therapy in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Soffietti, Riccardo; Trevisan, Elisa; Rudà, Roberta

    2012-11-01

    To review the state of the art and new developments in the field of targeted agents for brain metastases. The huge amount of information on new molecular compounds and the advances in understanding the molecular pathways that mediate brain colonization have led to an increase of interest in preclinical and clinical investigations in the field of brain metastases. Targeted therapies can be employed either on established brain metastases or in a prevention setting. Targeting angiogenesis is an attractive approach. Up to date, large clinical trial datasets have shown that antiangiogenic agents do not increase the risk of bleeding into the brain. Bevacizumab (an anti-VEGF agent) is undergoing investigation in clinical trials on brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer and melanoma. Sunitinib, a multitarget small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is a promising agent in brain metastases from renal cell cancer. The EGFR inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib have a definite activity in brain metastases from NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations. Regarding HER2-positive breast cancer patients with established brain metastases, lapatinib (small molecule TKI) seems particularly active in association with capecitabine. Lapatinib alone is attractive in the prevention setting. Brain metastases from melanoma with BRAF V600E mutations respond to a specific inhibitor, such as vemurafenib. The immunomodulator ipilimumab is also active on brain metastases from melanoma. The use of targeted agents in brain metastases from solid tumors is promising. The setting of prevention will be probably expanded in the next years. Well designed clinical trials with proper endpoints are needed.

  12. Target Oriented Drugs against Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-26

    leishmanlal excreted factor (EF) antibody in rabbit sera was developed. The assay, using Leishmania trop ica and Leishmania donovani promastigote EF...tropica LRC L137 L52 Leishmaniia donovani LRC L52 These strains were obtained from the WHO Leishmania Peference Centre collection maintained in the...FO 0 AD M FINAL REPORT0 (N TARGET ORIENTED DRUGS AGAINST LEISHMANIA I URI ZEHAVI, Ph.D. and JOSEPH EL-ON, Ph.D. Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL

  13. Aided versus automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hair, Mark A.; Purvis, Bradley D.; Brown, Jeff

    1997-06-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms have offered the promise of recognizing items of military importance over the past 20 years. It is the experience of the authors that greater ATR success would be possible if the ATR were used to 'aid' the human operator instead of automatically 'direct' the operator. ATRs have failed not due to their probability of detection versus false alarm rate, but to neglect of the human component. ATRs are designed to improve overall throughput by relieving the human operator of the need to perform repetitive tasks like scanning vast quantities of imagery for possible targets. ATRs are typically inserted prior to the operator and provide cues, which are then accepted or rejected. From our experience at three field exercises and a current operational deployment to the Bosnian theater, this is not the best way to get total system performance. The human operator makes decisions based on learning, history of past events, and surrounding contextual information. Loss of these factors by providing imagery, latent with symbolic cues on top of the original imagery, actually increases the workload of the operator. This paper covers the lessons learned from the field demonstrations and the operational deployment. The reconnaissance and intelligence community's primary use of an ATR should be to establish prioritized cues of potential targets for an operator to 'pull' from and to be able to 'send' targets identified by the operator for a 'second opinion.' The Army and Air Force are modifying their exploitation workstations over the next 18 months to use ATRs, which operate in this fashion. This will be the future architecture that ATRs for the reconnaissance and intelligence community should integrate into.

  14. Sparsity Motivated Automated Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-29

    been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for automatic target...Sparsity-based methods have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of...have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for

  15. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only.

  16. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    G0 in the bone marrow , which renders them insensitive to chemotherapies designed to target actively proliferating cancer cells. Our goal is to...examine whether dormant DTCs enter G0 in the bone marrow and test whether the disruption of DTC quiescence may reduce tumor burden and improve treatment...dynamics, and that these cell lines respond to signals from the bone marrow thought to promote dormancy by increasing cell cycle arrest. In our xenograft

  17. Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E; Baker, K; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Olivier, S; Brase, J; Olivier, S; Brase, J

    2003-10-03

    Laboratory and field demonstration results obtained as part of the DARPA-sponsored Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting (CCIT) program are reviewed. The CCIT concept uses a Phase Conjugation Engine based on a quadrature receiver array, a hologram processor and a spatial light modulator (SLM) for high-speed, digital beam control. Progress on the enabling MEMS SLM, being developed by a consortium consisting of LLNL, academic institutions and small businesses, is presented.

  18. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  19. Modular design for a liquid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Jahangiri, P.; Zacchia, N.; Uittenbosch, T.; Buckley, K.; Martinez, D. M.; Hoehr, C.

    2017-05-01

    A modular target with varying depth has been designed and built to investigate density reduction in liquid targets. An interchangeable middle piece allows target depths from 7.5 to 52.5 mm. The target has been tested and found to be leak tight and functional.

  20. Novel targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, Warner C; Debyser, Zeger; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Freed, Eric O; Stephens, Edward; Yonemoto, Wes; Buckheit, Robert W; Esté, José A; Cihlar, Tomas

    2008-12-01

    There are currently 25 drugs belonging to 6 different inhibitor classes approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, new anti-HIV agents are still needed to confront the emergence of drug resistance and various adverse effects associated with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy. The 21st International Conference on Antiviral Research, held in April 2008 in Montreal, Canada, therefore featured a special session focused on novel targets for HIV therapy. The session included presentations by world-renowned experts in HIV virology and covered a diverse array of potential targets for the development of new classes of HIV therapies. This review contains concise summaries of discussed topics that included Vif-APOBEC3G, LEDGF/p75, TRIM 5alpha, virus assembly and maturation, and Vpu. The described viral and host factors represent some of the most noted examples of recent scientific breakthroughs that are opening unexplored avenues to novel anti-HIV target discovery and validation, and should feed the antiretroviral drug development pipeline in the near future.

  1. Fixed Target Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Kathryn C.

    2016-12-01

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Previous results have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies of 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb potential analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions are presented and are found to be consistent with results from previous experiments. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared to published results from the AGS.

  2. Targeting tachykinin receptors in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Szymansky, Annabell; Seiler, Marleen; Althoff, Kristina; Beckers, Anneleen; Speleman, Frank; Schäfers, Simon; De Preter, Katleen; Astrahanseff, Kathy; Struck, Joachim; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Bergmann, Andreas; Schulte, Johannes H.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial tumor in children. Despite aggressive multimodal treatment, high-risk neuroblastoma remains a clinical challenge with survival rates below 50%. Adding targeted drugs to first-line therapy regimens is a promising approach to improve survival in these patients. TACR1 activation by substance P has been reported to be mitogenic in cancer cell lines. Tachykinin receptor (TACR1) antagonists are approved for clinical use as an antiemetic remedy since 2003. Tachykinin receptor inhibition has recently been shown to effectively reduce growth of several tumor types. Here, we report that neuroblastoma cell lines express TACR1, and that targeting TACR1 activity significantly reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cell lines. Gene expression profiling revealed that TACR1 inhibition repressed E2F2 and induced TP53 signaling. Treating mice harboring established neuroblastoma xenograft tumors with Aprepitant also significantly reduced tumor burden. Thus, we provide evidence that the targeted inhibition of tachykinin receptor signaling shows therapeutic efficacy in preclinical models for high-risk neuroblastoma. PMID:27888795

  3. Homodimeric enzymes as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, D; Salo-Ahen, O M H; Ferrari, S; Ponterini, G; Cruciani, G; Carosati, E; Tochowicz, A M; Mangani, S; Wade, R C; Costi, M P

    2010-01-01

    Many enzymes and proteins are regulated by their quaternary structure and/or by their association in homo- and/or hetero-oligomer complexes. Thus, these protein-protein interactions can be good targets for blocking or modulating protein function therapeutically. The large number of oligomeric structures in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.rcsb.org/) reflects growing interest in proteins that function as multimeric complexes. In this review, we consider the particular case of homodimeric enzymes as drug targets. There is intense interest in drugs that inhibit dimerization of a functionally obligate homodimeric enzyme. Because amino acid conservation within enzyme interfaces is often low compared to conservation in active sites, it may be easier to achieve drugs that target protein interfaces selectively and specifically. Two main types of dimerization inhibitors have been developed: peptides or peptidomimetics based on sequences involved in protein-protein interactions, and small molecules that act at hot spots in protein-protein interfaces. Examples include inhibitors of HIV protease and HIV integrase. Studying the mechanisms of action and locating the binding sites of such inhibitors requires different techniques for different proteins. For some enzymes, ligand binding is only detectable in vivo or after unfolding of the complexes. Here, we review the structural features of dimeric enzymes and give examples of inhibition through interference in dimer stability. Several techniques for studying these complex phenomena will be presented.

  4. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens.

  5. Targeted Treatment Options in Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Vaes, Mélanie; Benghiat, Fleur Samantha; Hermine, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Mastocytosis refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from the clonal proliferation of abnormal mast cells and their accumulation in the skin (cutaneous mastocytosis when only in the skin, CM) or in various organs (systemic mastocytosis, SM). This leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations resulting from excessive mediator release in CM and benign forms of SM (indolent SM, ISM) and from tissue mast cell infiltration causing multiorgan dysfunction and failure in more aggressive subtypes (aggressive SM, ASM, or mast cell leukemia). In addition, SM may be associated with hematological neoplasms (AHN). While treatment of ISM primarily aims at symptom management with anti-mediator therapies, cytoreductive and targeted therapies are needed to control the expansion of neoplastic mast cells in advanced forms of SM, in order to improve overall survival. Mast cell accumulation results from a gain-of-function mutation (mostly the D816V mutation) within the KIT tyrosine kinase domain expressed by mast cells and additional genetic and epigenetic mutations may further determine the features of the disease (ASM and AHN). Consequently, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and targeted therapies directed against the oncogenic signaling machinery downstream of KIT are attractive therapeutic approaches. A better understanding of the relative contribution of these genetic and epigenetic events to the molecular pathogenesis of mastocytosis is of particular interest for the development of targeted therapies and therefore to better choose patient subgroups that would best benefit from a given therapeutic strategy. PMID:28775983

  6. Interferon α-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Hironari; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to various cellular components. Although many of therapies have shown great efficacy, they often associate with adverse effects. The development of safer therapies for SLE has led to recent emphasis on targeting selected pathways that can be important in the inflammatory process in SLE. The cytokine family of type I interferons (IFNs), and especially the IFNα subtypes, are implicated in pathogenesis of SLE. Genetic polymorphisms of several components of the IFN signaling pathway have been associated with an increased risk of SLE. Therefore, IFNα subtypes have been identified as a potential target for drug development in SLE. There have been developed three agents, IFNα-targeted therapy, Sifalimumab, Rontalizumab and NNC 0152-0000-0001. They are anti-IFNα monoclonal antibodies that bind to and specifically neutralizes most IFNα subtypes, preventing signaling through the type I IFN receptor. The safety and dose-proportional pharmacokinetics of those agents were demonstrated. A larger study is currently ongoing, further safety profile will be evaluated. This review provides an update on the ongoing clinical trials of anti-IFNα therapy and the promise and obstacles in the use of biologics in SLE.

  7. Clusterin as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark R; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2017-02-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a stress-activated, ATP-independent molecular chaperone, normally secreted from cells, that is up-regulated in Alzheimer disease and in many cancers. It plays important roles in protein homeostasis/proteostasis, inhibition of cell death pathways, and modulation of pro-survival signalling and transcriptional networks. Changes in the CLU gene locus are highly associated with Alzheimer disease, and many therapy-resistant cancers over-express CLU. The extensive post-translational processing and heterogeneous oligomerization of CLU have so far prevented any definitive structure determination. This in turn has meant that targeting CLU with small molecule inhibitors is challenging. Therefore, inhibiting CLU at the gene-expression level using siRNA or antisense is a valid approach to inhibit its function. Areas covered: This article reviews recent advances regarding the role of CLU in proteostasis, cellular trafficking, human diseases, and signalling pathways involved in oncogenesis. It addresses the rationale for CLU as a therapeutic target in cancer, and the current status of pre-clinical and clinical studies using CLU antisense inhibitor OGX011. Expert opinion: Discusses challenges facing the therapeutic targeting of CLU including rapid changes in the treatment landscape for prostate cancer with multiple new FDA approved drugs, selection of windows of intervention, and potential side effects when silencing CLU expression.

  8. Therapeutic targets in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    The precise aetiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains elusive, but significant advances over the past few years have improved our understanding of the underlying pathogenic processes and identified key pathways and mediators that are potential therapeutic targets. The situation is complicated by the clinical heterogeneity of SSc and the differential pathogenesis that underlies the two commonest subsets, namely diffuse and limited cutaneous disease. However, there are common mediators that could be targeted to provide clinical benefit in both types of disease. To date, clinical success with therapies directed against logical profibrotic mediators, such as connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor-β, is yet to be reported, although studies are ongoing. More promising clinical results have been obtained with the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan, which has been shown to manage two vascular complications of SSc effectively: pulmonary arterial hypertension and digital ulceration. It remains to be determined whether the identification of additional mediators merely furthers our knowledge of the natural history of SSc or presents targets that can be manipulated to manage SSc patients effectively. PMID:17767744

  9. Using Chemistry to Target Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jeanne N; Li, Xingguo; Zheng, Y George; Lotta, Louis T; Dedhe, Abhishek; Schor, Nina F

    2017-08-11

    Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the neural crest almost exclusively seen in childhood. While children with single, small primary tumors are often cured with surgery alone, the 65% of children with neuroblastoma whose disease has metastasized have less than a 50% chance of surviving five years after diagnosis. Innovative pharmacological strategies are critically needed for these children. Efforts to identify novel targets that afford ablation of neuroblastoma with minimal toxicity to normal tissues are underway. Developing approaches to neuroblastoma include those that target the catecholamine transporter; ubiquitin E3 ligase; the ganglioside, GD2; the retinoic acid receptor; the protein kinases ALK and Aurora; and protein arginine N-methyltransferases. Here, as examples of the use of chemistry to combat neuroblastoma, we describe targeting of: the protein arginine N-methyltransferases and their role in prolonging the half-life of the neuroblastoma oncoprotein N-Myc; redox signaling in neuroblastoma; and developmentally regulated proteins expressed in primitive neuroblastoma cells but not in mature neural crest elements.

  10. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  11. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Targeting the Brain with Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Felix; Cruz, Luis J

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we review innovative nanomedicine-based approaches for treating, preventing and diagnosing neurodegenerative diseases. We focus on nanoscale systems such as polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), liposomes, micelles and other vehicles (e.g. dendrimers, nanogels, nanoemulsions and nanosuspensions) for targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to the brain. To ensure maximum selectivity for optimal therapeutic or diagnostic results, researchers must employ delivery systems that are non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible. This entails: (i) use of "safe" materials, such as polymers or lipids; (ii) targeting to the brain and, specifically, to the desired active site within the brain; (iii) controlled release of the loaded agent; and (iv) use of agents that, once released into the brain, will exhibit the desired pharmacologic activity. Here, we explore the design and preclinical use of representative delivery systems that have been proposed to date. We then analyze the principal challenges that have delayed clinical application of these and other approaches. Lastly, we look at future developments in this area, addressing the needs for increased penetration of the blood brain barrier (BBB), enhanced targeting of specific brain sites, improved therapeutic efficacy and lower neurotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Multisensor Target Detection And Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Mills, James P.; Kabrisky, Matthew

    1988-08-01

    In this paper a new approach to the detection and classification of tactical targets using a multifunction laser radar sensor is developed. Targets of interest are tanks, jeeps, trucks, and other vehicles. Doppler images are segmented by developing a new technique which compensates for spurious doppler returns. Relative range images are segmented using an approach based on range gradients. The resultant shapes in the segmented images are then classified using Zernike moment invariants as shape descriptors. Two classification decision rules are implemented: a classical statistical nearest-neighbor approach and a multilayer perceptron architecture. The doppler segmentation algorithm was applied to a set of 180 real sensor images. An accurate segmentation was obtained for 89 percent of the images. The new doppler segmentation proved to be a robust method, and the moment invariants were effective in discriminating the tactical targets. Tanks were classified correctly 86 percent of the time. The most important result of this research is the demonstration of the use of a new information processing architecture for image processing applications.

  14. Thomson scattering on inhomogeneous targets.

    PubMed

    Thiele, R; Sperling, P; Chen, M; Bornath, Th; Fäustlin, R R; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Kraeft, W-D; Pukhov, A; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, Th; Redmer, R

    2010-11-01

    The introduction of brilliant free-electron lasers enables new pump-probe experiments to characterize warm dense matter states. For instance, a short-pulse optical laser irradiates a liquid hydrogen jet that is subsequently probed with brilliant soft x-ray radiation. The strongly inhomogeneous plasma prepared by the optical laser is characterized with particle-in-cell simulations. The interaction of the soft x-ray probe radiation for different time delays between pump and probe with the inhomogeneous plasma is also taken into account via radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We calculate the respective scattering spectrum based on the Born-Mermin approximation for the dynamic structure factor considering the full density and temperature-dependent Thomson scattering cross section throughout the target. We can identify plasmon modes that are generated in different target regions and monitor their temporal evolution. Therefore, such pump-probe experiments are promising tools not only to measure the important plasma parameters density and temperature but also to gain valuable information about their time-dependent profile through the target. The method described here can be applied to various pump-probe scenarios by combining optical lasers and soft x ray, as well as x-ray sources.

  15. A cryogenic infrared calibration target.

    PubMed

    Wollack, E J; Kinzer, R E; Rinehart, S A

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ⩽ 0.003, from 800 to 4800 cm(-1) (12 - 2 μm). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000 cm(-1) (25 - 1 μm) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ⩽ 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ∼4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented.

  16. Other targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rodón, Jordi; Karachaliou, Niki; Sánchez, Jesús; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Riso, Aldo; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy drugs are developed against specific molecular alterations on cancer cells. Because they are “targeted” to the tumor, these therapies are more effective and better tolerated than conventional therapies such as chemotherapy. In the last decade, great advances have been made in understanding of melanoma biology and identification of molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of cells. The identification of oncogenic mutated kinases involved in this process provides an opportunity for development of new target therapies. The dependence of melanoma on BRAF-mutant kinase has provided an opportunity for development of mutation-specific inhibitors with high activity and excellent tolerance that are now being used in clinical practice. This marked a new era in the treatment of metastatic melanoma and much research is now ongoing to identify other “druggable” kinases and transduction signaling networking. It is expected that in the near future the spectrum of target drugs for melanoma treatment will increase. Herein, we review the most relevant potential novel drugs for melanoma treatment based on preclinical data and the results of early clinical trials. PMID:26605312

  17. Pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence: target symptoms and target mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Markus; Egli, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a major public health problem and resembles, in many ways, other chronic relapsing medical conditions. At least 2 separate dimensions of its symptomatology offer targetable pathophysiological mechanisms. Systems that mediate positive reinforcement by alcohol are likely important targets in early stages of the disease, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. In contrast, long term neuroadaptive changes caused by chronic alcohol use primarily appear to affect systems mediating negative affective states, and gain importance following a prolonged history of dependence. Feasibility of pharmacological treatment in alcoholism has been demonstrated by a first wave of drugs which consists of 3 currently approved medications, the aldehyde dehydrogenase blocker disulfiram, the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) and the functional glutamate antagonist acamprosate (ACM). The treatment toolkit is likely to be expanded in the near future. This will improve overall efficacy and allow individualized treatment, ultimately taking in account the patient's genetic makeup. In a second wave, early human efficacy data are available for the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron, the GABA-B agonist baclofen and the anticonvulsant topiramate. The third wave is comprised of compounds predicted to be effective based on a battery of animal models. Using such models, a short list of additional targets has accumulated sufficient preclinical validation to merit clinical development. These include the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, receptors modulating glutamatergic transmission (mGluR2, 3 and 5), and receptors for stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and nociceptin. Once novel treatments are developed, the field faces a major challenge to assure their delivery to patients.

  18. Method for forming electrically charged laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  19. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs.

  20. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs. PMID:28408882

  1. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  2. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) upon binding of nitric oxide (NO) to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK) inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc. PMID:27824545

  3. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  4. Pinatubo global cooling on target

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1993-01-29

    When Pinatubo blasted millions of tons of debris into the stratosphere in June 1991, Hansen of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies used his computer climate model to predict that the shade cost by the debris would cool the globe by about half a degree C. Year end temperature reports for 1992 are now showing that the prediction was on target-confirming the tentative belief that volcanos can temporarily cool the climate and validating at least one component of the computer models predicting a greenhouse warming.

  5. Electromagnetic Scattering from Realistic Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shung- Wu; Jin, Jian-Ming

    1997-01-01

    The general goal of the project is to develop computational tools for calculating radar signature of realistic targets. A hybrid technique that combines the shooting-and-bouncing-ray (SBR) method and the finite-element method (FEM) for the radiation characterization of microstrip patch antennas in a complex geometry was developed. In addition, a hybridization procedure to combine moment method (MoM) solution and the SBR method to treat the scattering of waveguide slot arrays on an aircraft was developed. A list of journal articles and conference papers is included.

  6. Pfizer targets genomics through Pfizergen

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, V.

    1995-06-01

    Recently, Pfizer (New York) formed Pfizergen to develop and commercialize genomics. For starters, Pfizergen involves investments by Pfizer of more than $115 million - excluding milestone payments and royalties on future products - in four biotech firms. Seeking a strong foothold in genomics, Pfizer is piecing together a multifaceted network of technologies. Through its alliance with Incyte, Pfizer has already accessed gene databases, high-throughput gene sequencing, and transcription analysis. Through Pfizergen, it will access expertise in microbial genetic engineering and combinatorial chemistry, as well as antiviral, antisense, and gene therapy capabilities. Future investments could target firms specializing in such products as positional cloning and bioinformatics.

  7. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Venning, Freja A.; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression. PMID:26539408

  8. Airborne Passive Target Motion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Assumptions ............................... 12 2.Practical Geometrical Considerations ..................... 13 C. SYSTEM MODEL...throughout that the target and sensor 13 RAW a omI. SEC7K SCP TAUCT A/C I c. ec La atlrs>.. -’ SARG T 0, UA I II Figure 2.3 Practical Geometric...34 ’" • i r l - • • , , " 1 " , q " " r i , ’ •i ’ r I , , i ( , " Q - " q *." ° ’’ " @ iSTOcA,. SSZ -0got U * , oa ow Figure 4.1 Normally Distributed Beanng

  9. A search for SETI targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Jane

    The benefits and development of a star catalog for identifying SETI targets are discussed. Major stellar surveys aimed at developing a guide star catalog are examined. The objectives and components of the Guide Star Catalog survey, the Hipparcos satellite, the Tycho project, the California Institute of Technology and U.S. Naval Observatory project, and the CCD transit instrument project are described. It is noted that these surveys are limited by the lack of detection of the luminosity class of the stars, and an ideal stellar survey is proposed.

  10. Voyager 1 Saturn targeting strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesarone, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A trajectory targeting strategy for the Voyager 1 Saturn encounter has been designed to accomodate predicted uncertainties in Titan's ephemeris while maximizing spacecraft safety and science return. The encounter is characterized by a close Titan flyby 18 hours prior to Saturn periapse. Retargeting of the nominal trajectory to account for late updates in Titan's estimated position can disperse the ascending node location, which is nominally situated at a radius of low expected particle density in Saturn's ring plane. The strategy utilizes a floating Titan impact vector magnitude to minimize this dispersion. Encounter trajectory characteristics and optimal tradeoffs are presented.

  11. Approaching Rock Target No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D stereo anaglyph image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists plan to use instruments at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  12. Climatological targets for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.

    1994-01-01

    Four areas fit within the elevation and latitude constraints: Chryse, Elysium, Amazonis, and Isidis. There is geomorphic evidence that all have supported standing water. In some cases it would be difficult to pick a landing site that had no hope of teaching us about the climatic history of Mars. The southeast Elysium Basin provides an optimal target in which a variety of materials may be accessible in a near-shore environment. The albedo of the region is moderately low, and the thermal inertia is indicative of moderate rock coverage or some consolidation of fines, arguing that the site has not been covered with eolian dust deposits.

  13. Aptamers and aptamer targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Amy C.; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    When aptamers first emerged almost two decades ago, most were RNA species that bound and tagged or inhibited simple target ligands. Very soon after, the ‘selectionologists’ developing aptamer technology quickly realized more potential for the aptamer. In recent years, advances in aptamer techniques have enabled the use of aptamers as small molecule inhibitors, diagnostic tools and even therapeutics. Aptamers are now being employed in novel applications. We review, herein, some of the recent and exciting applications of aptamers in cell-specific recognition and delivery. PMID:19458497

  14. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression.

  15. Target raster system at CEBAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, C.; Adderley, P.; Carlini, R.; Cuevas, C.; Vulcan, W.; Wines, R.

    1995-02-01

    A fast raster (FR) system consisting of two Litz cable air-core magnets ( x, y) has been installed and tested in the Hall C beam line tunnel, 21 m from the cryogenic target. The system provides a maximum deflection of 0.06 mrad at a frequency range of 15-45 kHz for a 6 GeV electron beam. The FR magnets are driven by a MOSFET bipolar switching power source with a triangle current waveform, the peak-to-peak current is 40 A.

  16. The challenge of targeting metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Isaiah J; Kripke, Margaret L

    2015-12-01

    Metastases that are resistant to conventional therapy are the major cause of death from cancer. In most patients, metastasis has already occurred by the time of diagnosis. Thus, the prevention of metastasis is unlikely to be of therapeutic benefit. The biological heterogeneity of metastases presents a major obstacle to treatment. However, the growth and survival of metastases depend on interactions between tumor cells and host homeostatic mechanisms. Targeting these interactions, in addition to the tumor cells, can produce synergistic therapeutic effects against existing metastases.

  17. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  18. Properties of Protein Drug Target Classes

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Simon C.; Doig, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of drug targets is a crucial part of any drug development program. We mined the human proteome to discover properties of proteins that may be important in determining their suitability for pharmaceutical modulation. Data was gathered concerning each protein’s sequence, post-translational modifications, secondary structure, germline variants, expression profile and drug target status. The data was then analysed to determine features for which the target and non-target proteins had significantly different values. This analysis was repeated for subsets of the proteome consisting of all G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases and proteases, as well as proteins that are implicated in cancer. Machine learning was used to quantify the proteins in each dataset in terms of their potential to serve as a drug target. This was accomplished by first inducing a random forest that could distinguish between its targets and non-targets, and then using the random forest to quantify the drug target likeness of the non-targets. The properties that can best differentiate targets from non-targets were primarily those that are directly related to a protein’s sequence (e.g. secondary structure). Germline variants, expression levels and interactions between proteins had minimal discriminative power. Overall, the best indicators of drug target likeness were found to be the proteins’ hydrophobicities, in vivo half-lives, propensity for being membrane bound and the fraction of non-polar amino acids in their sequences. In terms of predicting potential targets, datasets of proteases, ion channels and cancer proteins were able to induce random forests that were highly capable of distinguishing between targets and non-targets. The non-target proteins predicted to be targets by these random forests comprise the set of the most suitable potential future drug targets, and should therefore be prioritised when building a drug development programme. PMID

  19. NLC Positron Target Heating(LCC-0065)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D

    2003-10-07

    The NLC requires an intense beam with a large number of positrons. These positrons are produced by a high energy electron beam impinging on a solid tungsten-rhenium alloy target. The particle shower that develops in the solid target deposits significant energy in the material, leading to target stresses and potentially to target damage. The stresses can be analyzed once the magnitude and extent of the energy deposition is known. This note details the modeling of the energy deposition using EGS, performed for the NLC and the SLC targets and for possible NLC targets made of copper or nickel instead of WRe.

  20. The Ursinus College Liquid Hydrogen Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palardy, Jessica; Ferrante, Nicholas; Riley, Lewis; Zegers, Remco

    2010-11-01

    The Ursinus College Liquid Hydrogen Target has been constructed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University, for the purpose of eliminating unwanted gamma-rays from carbon in polyethylene or deuterated polyethylene targets that are commonly used in experiments requiring thick proton targets. Existing geant4 simulations of the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA) and the CAESium iodide ARray (CAESAR) have been modified to incorporate the liquid hydrogen target. The impact of the target on gamma-ray detection efficiencies and the use of the simulations to plan experiments with the target are discussed.

  1. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, Heidi; Yanny, Brian

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  2. Enzyme engineering by targeted libraries.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Moshe; Tawfik, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the strategies we apply for directed enzyme evolution using targeted libraries, namely, libraries that diversify specific residues with predefined mutational compositions. The theoretical grounds underlining the design of such libraries are described, including the mutational load, the ratio of beneficial versus deleterious mutations, and screening capacity. We point out the advantage of using mutational spiking strategies for "hedging the bets," exploring a large number of potentially beneficial mutations, and tuning the library's mutational load. Also highlighted are the merits of low-throughput screens that measure multiple parameters at high accuracy, and of using the desired substrate and reaction conditions rather than surrogates. We subsequently describe library construction strategies (rational and analytical) based on structure and sequence analyses, including ancestral libraries, which are particularly suitable for low-throughput screens. We also discuss the critical role of including compensatory, stabilizing mutations during library construction. Finally, the design efficiency and the optimal mutational loads of libraries are assessed by comparing targeted mutational libraries versus libraries of random mutations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Seismoelectric imaging of shallow targets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.; Pride, S.R.; Klemperer, S.L.; Biondi, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have undertaken a series of controlled field experiments to develop seismoelectric experimental methods for near-surface applications and to improve our understanding of seismoelectric phenomena. In a set of off-line geometry surveys (source separated from the receiver line), we place seismic sources and electrode array receivers on opposite sides of a man-made target (two sand-filled trenches) to record separately two previously documented seismoelectric modes: (1) the electromagnetic interface response signal created at the target and (2) the coseismic electric fields located within a compressional seismic wave. With the seismic source point in the center of a linear electrode array, we identify the previously undocumented seismoelectric direct field, and the Lorentz field of the metal hammer plate moving in the earth's magnetic field. We place the seismic source in the center of a circular array of electrodes (radial and circumferential orientations) to analyze the source-related direct and Lorentz fields and to establish that these fields can be understood in terms of simple analytical models. Using an off-line geometry, we create a multifold, 2D image of our trenches as dipping layers, and we also produce a complementary synthetic image through numerical modeling. These images demonstrate that off-line geometry (e.g., crosswell) surveys offer a particularly promising application of the seismoelectric method because they effectively separate the interface response signal from the (generally much stronger) coseismic and source-related fields. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Targeted Molecular Therapies for SBMA.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Malik, Bilal; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset neuromuscular disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor gene which results in progressive spinal and bulbar motor neuron degeneration, and muscle atrophy. Although the causative genetic defect is known, until recently, the molecular pathogenesis of the disease was unclear, resulting in few, if any, targets for therapy development. However, over the past decade, our understanding of the pathomechanisms that play a role in SBMA has increased dramatically, and several of these pathways and mechanisms have now been investigated as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss some of the key pathomechanisms implicated in SBMA and describe some of the therapeutic strategies that have been tested in SBMA to date, which fall into four main categories: (i) gene silencing; (ii) protein quality control and/or increased protein degradation; (iii) androgen deprivation; and (iv) modulation of AR function. Finally, it is also now clear that in addition to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie disease, the development of an effective disease modifying therapy for SBMA will require the coordinated, collaborative effort of research teams with diverse areas of expertise, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies as well as patient groups.

  5. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E.; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM’s biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein—coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  6. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-08-19

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM's biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer.

  7. Targeting FGFR Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Touat, Mehdi; Ileana, Ecaterina; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-06-15

    The fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway (FGFR signaling) is an evolutionary conserved signaling cascade that regulates several basic biologic processes, including tissue development, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Substantial evidence indicates that aberrant FGFR signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Recent developments of deep sequencing technologies have allowed the discovery of frequent molecular alterations in components of FGFR signaling among several solid tumor types. Moreover, compelling preclinical models have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of these aberrations in driving tumor growth, promoting angiogenesis, and conferring resistance mechanisms to anticancer therapies. Recently, the field of FGFR targeting has exponentially progressed thanks to the development of novel agents inhibiting FGFs or FGFRs, which had manageable safety profiles in early-phase trials. Promising treatment efficacy has been observed in different types of malignancies, particularly in tumors harboring aberrant FGFR signaling, thus offering novel therapeutic opportunities in the era of precision medicine. The most exciting challenges now focus on selecting patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents, increasing the efficacy of therapies with the development of novel potent compounds and combination strategies, and overcoming toxicities associated with FGFR inhibitors. After examination of the basic and translational research studies that validated the oncogenic potential of aberrant FGFR signaling, this review focuses on recent data from clinical trials evaluating FGFR targeting therapies and discusses the challenges and perspectives for the development of these agents.

  8. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  9. Targeting telomerase with radiolabeled inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Waghorn, Philip A; Jackson, Mark R; Gouverneur, Veronique; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-01-05

    The expression of telomerase in approximately 85% of cancers and its absence in the majority of normal cells makes it an attractive target for cancer therapy. However the lag period between initiation of telomerase inhibition and growth arrest makes direct inhibition alone an insufficient method of treatment. However, telomerase inhibition has been shown to enhance cancer cell radiosensitivity. To investigate the strategy of simultaneously inhibiting telomerase while delivering targeted radionuclide therapy to cancer cells, (123)I-radiolabeled inhibitors of telomerase were synthesized and their effects on cancer cell survival studied. An (123)I-labeled analogue of the telomerase inhibitor MST-312 inhibited telomerase with an IC50 of 1.58 μM (MST-312 IC50: 0.23 μM). Clonogenic assays showed a dose dependant effect of (123)I-MST-312 on cell survival in a telomerase positive cell line, MDA-MB-435. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  10. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.; Yanny, B.

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  11. String theory in target space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Hansen, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    It is argued that the complete S-matrix of string theory at tree level in a flat background can be obtained from a small set of target space properties, without recourse to the worldsheet description. The main non-standard inputs are (generalised) Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten shifts, as well as the monodromy relations for open string theory and the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations for closed string theory. The roots of the scattering amplitudes and especially their appearance in the residues at the kinematic poles are central to the story. These residues determine the amplitudes through on-shell recursion relations. Several checks of the formalism are presented, including a computation of the Koba-Nielsen amplitude in the bosonic string. Furthermore the question of target space unitarity is (re-)investigated. For the Veneziano amplitude this question is reduced by Poincaré invariance, unitarity and locality to that of positivity of a particular numerical sum. Interestingly, this analysis produces the main conditions of the no-ghost theorem on dimension and intercept from the first three poles of this amplitude.

  12. Synthetic membrane-targeted antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vooturi, S K; Firestine, S M

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance continues to evolve and presents serious challenges in the therapy of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The rise of resistant strains like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) suggests that antimicrobial resistance is an inevitable evolutionary response to antimicrobial use. This highlights the tremendous need for antibiotics against new bacterial targets. Agents that target the integrity of bacterial membrane are relatively novel in the clinical armamentarium. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide is a classical example of membrane-bound antibiotic. Nature has also utilized this tactic. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are found in all kingdoms, function primarily by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane. AMPs have several advantages over existing antibiotics including a broad spectrum of activity, rapid bactericidal activity, no cross-resistance with the existing antibiotics and a low probability for developing resistance. Currently, a small number of peptides have been developed for clinical use but therapeutic applications are limited because of poor bioavailability and high manufacturing cost. However, their broad specificity, potent activity and lower probability for resistance have spurred the search for synthetic mimetics of antimicrobial peptides as membrane-active antibiotics. In this review, we will discuss the different classes of synthetic membrane-bound antibiotics published since 2004.

  13. Bayesian Spectroscopy and Target Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C

    2001-05-01

    Statistical analysis gives a paradigm for detection and tracking of weak-signature sources that are moving among a network of detectors. The detector platforms compute and exchange information with near-neighbors in the form of Bayesian probabilities for possible sources. This can shown to be an optimal scheme for the use of detector information and communication resources. Here, we apply that paradigm to the detection and discrimination of radiation sources using multi-channel gamma-ray spectra. We present algorithms for the reduction of detector data to probability estimates and the fusion of estimates among multiple detectors. A primary result is the development of a goodness-of-fit metric, similar to {chi}{sup 2}, for template matching that is statistically valid for spectral channels with low expected counts. Discrimination of a target source from other false sources and detection of imprecisely known spectra are the main applications considered. We use simulated NaI spectral data to demonstrate the Bayesian algorithm compare it to other techniques. Results of simulations of a network of spectrometers are presented, showing its capability to distinguish intended targets from nuisance sources.

  14. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin As a Therapeutic Target in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gengyang; Ren, Hui; Qiu, Ting; Zhang, Zhida; Zhao, Wenhua; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Jinjing; Tang, Jingjing; Liang, De; Yao, Zhensong; Yang, Zhidong; Jiang, Xiaobing

    2017-08-23

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in sensing and integrating large amounts of environmental cues to regulate organismal growth, homeostasis, and many major cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences highlight its roles in regulating bone homeostasis, which sheds light on the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. The activation/inhibition of mTOR signaling is reported to positively/negatively regulate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)/osteoblasts-mediated bone formation, adipogenic differentiation, osteocytes homeostasis, and osteoclasts-mediated bone resorption, which result in the changes of bone homeostasis, thereby resulting in or protect against osteoporosis. Given the likely importance of mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, here we discuss the detailed mechanisms in mTOR machinery and its association with osteoporosis therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. EURISOL Desktop Assistant Toolkit (EDAT): A modeling, simulation and visualization support to the preliminary radiological assessment of RIB projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamanu, D.; Vamanu, B.; Acasandrei, V.; Maceika, E.; Plukis, A.

    2010-04-01

    The paper describes an approach taken within the EURISOL-DS project (European Isotope Separation Online Radioactive Ion Beam Facility) to a number of safety and radioprotection issues raised by the advent of radioactive ion beam facilities in the cutting edge area of particle accelerators. The ensuing solution emerged from a collaborative effort of the investigating team-in-charge, affiliated with the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest, with expert colleagues at the Physics Institute in Vilnius, and at CERN, within the participation in the EURISOL-DS project, Sub-Task B: Radiation, Activation, Shielding and Doses of the Safety and Radioprotection, Task 5. The work was primarily geared towards the identification of knowledge and data in line with validated, accepted and nationally/internationally recommended methods and models of radiological assessment applied within the nuclear power fuel cycle, deemed to be suitable for assessing health and environmental impact of accelerator operations as well. As a result, a computer software platform code-named “EURISOL Desktop Assistant Toolkit” was developed. The software is, inter alia, capable to assess radiation doses from pure or isotopically mixed open or shielded point sources; emergency response-relevant doses; critical group doses via complex pathways, including the air, the water, and the food chain and derived release limits for the normal, routine operations of nuclear facilities. Dedicated data libraries and GIS (Geographic Information System) facilities assist the input/output operations.

  16. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  17. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  19. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edwards, O.; Fair, J.; Fedorov, M.; Fry, J.; Gibson, C.; Haid, B.; Holunga, D.; Kohut, T.; Lewis, T.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E.; Sater, J.; Skulina, K.; Trummer, D.; Walters, C.

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highly constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.

  20. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  1. Tracking a maneuvering target in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Andrew P.; Blanchard, Jeffrey A.; Grabbe, Michael T.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents an Extended Kalman Filter for tracking a maneuvering target, where the kinematics of a typical target aircraft maneuver have been incorporated into the filter state equations. Such a formulation allows the target's motion to be accurately determined through estimation of heading and lateral acceleration. This is an improvement over the the typical approach of modeling target motion with acceleration terms represented by random processes, such as that used in the Singer model. In the following pages, a three-dimensional target maneuver model is formulated in conjunction with the kinematic equations of a sensor tracking a target in spherical coordinates. Three degree-of-freedom simulation results of the proposed filter, simplified for planar target maneuvers, are compared to a filter modeling target motion with the Singer model.

  2. Bacteriophage gene targeting vectors generated by transplacement.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, C; Woltjen, K; Mansergh, F C; Ishidate, K; Rancourt, D E

    2002-10-01

    A rate-determining step in gene targeting is the generation of the targeting vector. We have developed bacteriophage gene targeting vectorology, which shortens the timeline of targeting vector construction. Using retro-recombination screening, we can rapidly isolate targeting vectors from an embryonic stem cell genomic library via integrative and excisive recombination. We have demonstrated that recombination can be used to introduce specific point mutations or unique restriction sites into gene targeting vectors via transplacement. Using the choline/ethanolamine kinase alpha and beta genes as models, we demonstrate that transplacement can also be used to introduce specifically a neo resistance cassette into a gene targeting phage. In our experience, the lambdaTK gene targeting system offers considerable flexibility and efficiency in TV construction, which makes generating multiple vectors in one week's time possible.

  3. Cumberland Selected as Curiosity Second Drilling Target

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-09

    This map shows the location of Cumberland, the second rock-drilling target for NASA Mars rover Curiosity, in relation to the rover first drilling target, John Klein, within the southwestern lobe of a shallow depression called Yellowknife Bay.

  4. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    SciTech Connect

    Cowna, Thomas; Malekos, Steven; Korgan, Grant; Adams, Jesse; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; LeGalloudec, Nathalie

    2014-06-10

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  5. Targets culture wastes energy on wrong things.

    PubMed

    Fyffe, Theresa

    2016-09-14

    Healthcare targets have been in the news a lot - and not in ways that offer comfortable reading. Missed emergency department waiting-time targets and patients waiting longer for treatments have made headlines.

  6. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    DOE PAGES

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; ...

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highlymore » constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.« less

  7. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Malekos, Steven; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Korgan, Grant; Cowan, Thomas; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2016-05-17

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  8. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Thomas [Dresden, DE; Malekos, Steven [Reno, NV; Korgan, Grant [Reno, NV; Adams, Jesse [Reno, NV; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [Reno, NV; Le Galloudec, Nathalie [Reno, NV; Fuchs, Julien [Paris, FR

    2012-07-24

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  9. Terahertz-based target typing.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.; Barrick, Todd A.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to create a THz component set and understanding to aid in the rapid analysis of transient events. This includes the development of fast, tunable, THz detectors, along with filter components for use with standard detectors and accompanying models to simulate detonation signatures. The signature effort was crucial in order to know the spectral range to target for detection. Our approach for frequency agile detection was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays.

  10. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOEpatents

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  11. Economic targeting in modern warfare

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeth, B.S.; Lewis, K.N.

    1982-07-01

    Nuclear weapons and strategies for their use play a variety of roles in the defense and foreign policies of the United States and Soviet Union. Accordingly, both nations buy forces and prepare war plans for many purposes. Although it is perhaps the least likely contingency for which either country prepares, the scenario in which both sides launch more or less all-out attacks against their opponent's economic or urban-industrial target system often dominates public consideration of strategic policy issues. These kinds of strikes, generically termed countervalue attacks, are usually assumed to throw many thousands of nuclear weapons against cities and isolated facilities in order to destroy the adversary nation as an organized, functioning, and economically viable entity.

  12. "Clickable" nanoparticles for targeted imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Eric Yi; Josephson, Lee; Weissleder, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Nanomaterials functionalized with targeting ligands are increasingly recognized as useful materials for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we describe the development and validation of azide-alkyne reactions ("click chemistry") for the rapid, site-specific modification of nanoparticles with small molecules. The facile preparation of stable nanoparticles bearing azido or alkyne groups capable of reaction with their corresponding counterpart functionalized small molecules is demonstrated. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes is shown to be a highly efficient and selective method for point functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles. Derivatized nanoparticles bearing biotin, fluorochrome, or steroid moieties are stable for several months. Nanoparticle click chemistry will be useful for other nanomaterials, design of novel sensors, and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  14. Cost Sensitive Moving Target Consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Sisi; Li, Yun; Levitt, Karl N.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus is a fundamental approach to implementing fault-tolerant services through replication where there exists a tradeoff between the cost and the resilience. For instance, Crash Fault Tolerant (CFT) protocols have a low cost but can only handle crash failures while Byzantine Fault Tolerant (BFT) protocols handle arbitrary failures but have a higher cost. Hybrid protocols enjoy the benefits of both high performance without failures and high resiliency under failures by switching among different subprotocols. However, it is challenging to determine which subprotocols should be used. We propose a moving target approach to switch among protocols according to the existing system and network vulnerability. At the core of our approach is a formalized cost model that evaluates the vulnerability and performance of consensus protocols based on real-time Intrusion Detection System (IDS) signals. Based on the evaluation results, we demonstrate that a safe, cheap, and unpredictable protocol is always used and a high IDS error rate can be tolerated.

  15. Pharmacotherapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Yif'at; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I; Adlard, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by an increasing impairment in normal memory and cognitive processes that significantly diminishes a person's daily functioning. Despite decades of research and advances in our understanding of disease aetiology and pathogenesis, there are still no effective disease-modifying drugs available for the treatment of AD. However, numerous compounds are currently undergoing pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. These candidate pharma-cotherapeutics are aimed at various aspects of the disease, such as the microtubule-associated τ-protein, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and metal ion dyshomeostasis – all of which are involved in the development and progression of AD. We will review the way these pharmacological strategies target the biochemical and clinical features of the disease and the investigational drugs for each category. PMID:19040415

  16. Targeted Strategies for Henipavirus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bossart, Katharine N; Bingham, John; Middleton, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are related emergent paramyxoviruses that infect and cause disease in animals and humans. Disease manifests as a generalized vasculitis affecting multiple organs, but is the most severe in the respiratory and central nervous systems. The high case fatality and person-to-person transmission associated with the most recent NiV outbreaks, and the recent re-emergence of HeV, emphasize the importance and necessity of effective therapeutics for these novel agents. In recent years henipavirus research has revealed a more complete understanding of pathogenesis and, as a consequence, viable approaches towards vaccines and therapeutics have emerged. All strategies target early steps in viral replication including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Animal models have been developed, some of which may prove more valuable than others for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic agents and regimes. Assessments of protective host immunity and drug pharmacokinetics will be crucial to the further advancement of therapeutic compounds. PMID:19440455

  17. Epigenetic Modifications as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Jones, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications work with genetic mechanisms to determine transcriptional activity and, while somatically heritable they are also reversible, making them good therapeutic candidates. Epigenetic changes can precede disease pathology and thus are diagnostic indicators for risk, and can act as prognostic indicators for disease progression. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methylation inhibitors have been FDA approved for several years and are clinically successful. More recently, histone methylation and microRNAs have also gained attention as potential therapeutic targets. The presence of multiple epigenetic aberrations within a diseased tissue and the abilities of cells to develop resistance suggest that combination therapies may be most beneficial. This review will focus on recent examples of using epigenetic modifications to evaluate disease risk, progression and clinical response and will describe the latest clinical advances in epigenetic therapies concentrating on treatments which combine epigenetic therapeutics with each other and with cytotoxic agents to increase clinical response. PMID:20944599

  18. Targeting epigenetic regulations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bo; Li, Wenyuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongfu

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a dynamic and reversible process with DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. Recently, groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of DNA and chromatin regulatory proteins from different aspects, including stem cell, development, and tumor genesis. Abnormal epigenetic regulation is frequently associated with diseases and drugs targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been approved for cancer therapy. Although the network of epigenetic regulation is more complex than people expect, new potential druggable chromatin-associated proteins are being discovered and tested for clinical application. Here we review the key proteins that mediate epigenetic regulations through DNA methylation, the acetylation and methylation of histones, and the reader proteins that bind to modified histones. We also discuss cancer associations and recent progress of pharmacological development of these proteins. PMID:26508480

  19. [Index contaminants and target organs].

    PubMed

    Zona, Amerigo; Marcello, Ida; Carere, Mario; Soggiu, Maria Eleonora; Falleni, Fabrizio; Beccaloni, Eleonora; Comba, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    SENTIERI Project evaluates the health impact of environmental exposures on residential population of National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs). It takes into account a priori etiological hypotheses, based on the epidemiological evidence of an association between those exposures and selected diseases or causes of death. Building on the previous chapter, this one acts as a blueprint for future causal inferences based on scientific evidence relating to the health effects of exposure to specific pollutants present in the sites. In order to select the relevant pollutants, we make use of data concerning soil, aquifers, the food chain and the atmosphere. For each pollutant, we indicate cancer site and target organs, for non-neoplastic diseases, based on scientific assessment by international Agencies. We have chosen to focus on two sites: Brescia-Caffaro and Priolo. This method may conceivably be used by SENTIERI in the future to carry out more specific studies and provides the basis for a systematic analysis of contaminated sites.

  20. Dendritic Cell-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Delamarre, Lélia

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort, the development of effective vaccines inducing strong and durable T-cell responses against intracellular pathogens and cancer cells has remained a challenge. The initiation of effector CD8+ T-cell responses requires the presentation of peptides derived from internalized antigen on class I major histocompatibility complex molecules by dendritic cells (DCs) in a process called cross-presentation. A current strategy to enhance the effectiveness of vaccination is to deliver antigens directly to DCs. This is done via selective targeting of antigen using monoclonal antibodies directed against endocytic receptors on the surface of the DCs. In this review, we will discuss considerations relevant to the design of such vaccines: the existence of DC subsets with specialized functions, the impact of the antigen intracellular trafficking on cross-presentation, and the influence of maturation signals received by DCs on the outcome of the immune response. PMID:24910635

  1. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as and which decay by the emission of -particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of and -particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the -particles emitted by radionuclides such as and , -particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with - and -labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of -emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [Glioblastoma—a moving target

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The slow development of effective treatment of glioblastoma is contrasted by the rapidly advancing research on the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Amplification and overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases, particularly EGFR and PDGFRA, are complemented by mutations in the PI3K, RB1, and p53 signaling pathways. In addition to finding effective means to target these pathways, we may take advantage of the recent understanding of the hierarchical structure of tumor cell populations, where the progressive expansion of the tumor relies on a minor subpopulation of glioma stem cells, or glioma-initiating cells. Finding ways to reprogram these cells and block their self-renewal is one of the most important topics for future research. PMID:22512247

  2. Obesity treatment: novel peripheral targets.

    PubMed

    Field, Benjamin C T; Chaudhri, Owais B; Bloom, Stephen R

    2009-12-01

    Our knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis has expanded enormously in recent years. Food intake and body weight are tightly regulated by the hypothalamus, brainstem and reward circuits, on the basis both of cognitive inputs and of diverse humoral and neuronal signals of nutritional status. Several gut hormones, including cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, oxyntomodulin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin, have been shown to play an important role in regulating short-term food intake. These hormones therefore represent potential targets in the development of novel anti-obesity drugs. This review focuses on the role of gut hormones in short- and long-term regulation of food intake, and on the current state of development of gut hormone-based obesity therapies.

  3. Envisaging bacteria as phage targets

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    It can be difficult to appreciate just how small bacteria and phages are or how large, in comparison, the volumes that they occupy. A single milliliter, for example, can represent to a phage what would be, with proper scaling, an “ocean” to you and me. Here I illustrate, using more easily visualized macroscopic examples, the difficulties that a phage, as a randomly diffusing particle, can have in locating bacteria to infect. I conclude by restating the truism that the rate of phage adsorption to a given target bacterium is a function of phage density, that is, titer, in combination with the degree of bacterial susceptibility to adsorption by an encountering phage. PMID:23616932

  4. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1995-02-28

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil. 7 figs.

  5. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  6. Tumour-targeted nanomedicines: principles and practice

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, T; Hennink, W E; Storm, G

    2008-01-01

    Drug targeting systems are nanometre-sized carrier materials designed for improving the biodistribution of systemically applied (chemo)therapeutics. Various different tumour-targeted nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, and clear evidence is currently available for substantial improvement of the therapeutic index of anticancer agents. Here, we briefly summarise the most important targeting systems and strategies, and discuss recent advances and future directions in the development of tumour-targeted nanomedicines. PMID:18648371

  7. Targeting Radiotherapy to Cancer by Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is an alternative method of radiation treatment which uses a tumor-seeking agent carrying a radioactive atom to deposits of tumor, wherever in the body they may be located. Recent experimental data signifies promise for the amalgamation of gene transfer with radionuclide targeting. This review encompasses aspects of the integration of gene manipulation and targeted radiotherapy, highlighting the possibilities of gene transfer to assist the targeting of cancer with low molecular weight radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:12721515

  8. Purity of targets prepared on Cu substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méens, A.; Rossini, I.; Sens, J. C.

    1993-09-01

    The purity of several elemental self-supporting targets usually prepared by evaporation onto soluble Cu substrates has been studied. The targets were analysed by Rutherford backscattering and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Because of the high percentage of Cu observed in some Si targets, further measurements, including transmission electron microscopy, have been performed on Si targets deposited by e-gun bombardment onto Cu and ion-beam sputtering onto betaine.

  9. Unfolding-resistant Translocase Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Dagda, Ruben K.; Barwacz, Chris A.; Cribbs, J. Thomas; Strack, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) consists of scaffolding (A), catalytic (C), and variable (B, B’, and B”) subunits. Variable subunits dictate subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme. The Bβ regulatory subunit gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12, and one of its splice variants, Bβ2, targets PP2A to mitochondria to promote apoptosis in PC12 cells. Here, we report that Bβ2 is localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane by a novel mechanism, combining a cryptic mitochondrial import signal with a structural arrest domain. Scanning mutagenesis demonstrates that basic and hydrophobic residues mediate mitochondrial association and the proapoptotic activity of Bβ2. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the N terminus of Bβ2 acts as a cleavable mitochondrial import signal. Surprisingly, full-length Bβ2 is not detectably cleaved and is retained at the outer mitochondrial membrane, even though it interacts with the TOM22 import receptor, as shown by luciferase complementation in intact cells. Mutations that open the C-terminal β-propeller of Bβ2 facilitate mitochondrial import, indicating that this rigid fold acts as a stop-transfer domain by resisting the partial unfolding step prerequisite for matrix translocation. Because hybrids of prototypical import and β-propeller domains recapitulate this behavior, we predict the existence of other similarly localized proteins and a selection against highly stable protein folds in the mitochondrial matrix. This unfolding-resistant targeting to the mitochondrial translocase is necessary but not sufficient for the proapoptotic activity of Bβ2, which also requires association with the rest of the PP2A holoenzyme. PMID:15923182

  10. Detection of Marine Radar Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John N.

    A radar must detect targets before it can display them. Yet manufacturers' data sheets rarely tell us what the products will detect at what range. Many of the bigger radars are Type Approved so we consult the relevant IMO performance standard A 477 (XII). Paraphrasing Section 3.1 of the draft forthcoming revision (NAV 41/6): under normal propagation conditions with the scanner at height of 15 m, in the absence of clutter, the radar is required to give clear indication of an object such as a navigational buoy having a radar cross section area (RCS) of 10 m2 at 2 n.m. and, as examples, coastlines whose ground rises to 60/6 m at ranges of 20/7 n.m., a ship of 5000 tons at any aspect at 7 n.m. and a small vessel 10 m long at 3 n.m.This helps, but suppose we must pick up a 5 m2 buoy at g km? What happens in clutter? Should we prefer S- or X-band? To answer such questions we use equations which define the performance of surveillance radars, but the textbooks and specialist papers containing them often generalize with aeronautical and defence topics, making life difficult for the nonspecialist.This paper attempts a concise and self-contained engineering account of all main factors affecting detection of passive and active targets on civil marine and vessel traffic service (VTS) radars. We develop a set of equations for X- and S-band (3 and 10 cm, centred on 9400 and 3000 MHz respectively), suited for spreadsheet calculation.Sufficient theory is sketched in to indicate where results should be valid. Some simplifications of conventional treatments have been identified.

  11. Moringa oleifera Lam: Targeting Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Karim, Nurul Ashikin Abd; Ibrahim, Muhammad Din; Kntayya, Saie Brindha; Rukayadi, Yaya; Hamid, Hazrulizawati Abd; Razis, Ahmad Faizal Abdull

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam, family Moringaceae, is a perennial plant which is called various names, but is locally known in Malaysia as "murungai" or "kelor". Glucomoringin, a glucosinolate with from M. oleifera is a major secondary metabolite compound. The seeds and leaves of the plant are reported to have the highest amount of glucosinolates. M. oleifera is well known for its many uses health and benefits. It is claimed to have nutritional, medicinal and chemopreventive potentials. Chemopreventive effects of M. oleifera are expected due to the existence of glucosinolate which it is reported to have the ability to induce apoptosis in anticancer studies. Furthermore, chemopreventive value of M. oleifera has been demonstrated in studies utilizing its leaf extract to inhibit the growth of human cancer cell lines. This review highlights the advantages of M. oleifera targeting chemoprevention where glucosinolates could help to slow the process of carcinogenesis through several molecular targets. It is also includes inhibition of carcinogen activation and induction of carcinogen detoxification, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Finally, for synergistic effects of M. oleifera with other drugs and safety, essential for chemoprevention, it is important that it safe to be consumed by human body and works well. Although there is promising evidence about M. oleifera in chemoprevention, extensive research needs to be done due to the expected rise of cancer in coming years and to gain more information about the mechanisms involved in M. oleifera influence, which could be a good source to inhibit several major mechanisms involved in cancer development.

  12. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  13. Targets and Tools in Dutch Access Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Frans; Vossensteyn, Hans

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science set a concrete target: by 2010, close to 50% of the age cohort should participate in higher education, following the targets set in the UK and Sweden. However clear the target is set, the ways to achieve it are far less specified. In the article a number of possible instruments to…

  14. Suppression: sound and light interference with targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Short, Kenneth R.; DeMarco, Robert M.; Chua, Florence B.; Janal, Malvin N.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Civilian law enforcement and military operations on urban terrain (MOUT) regularly enter into unknown situations where some unidentified subset of the populace may possess armaments that may be used against them. Ultimately, the most relevant test of the effectiveness of non-lethal energies in these situations is their ability to interfere with the targeting of those weapons on the friendly forces. It is also the test that offers the most immediate and tangible reward in the prevention of personnel injuries. Perceptual interference (e.g., light-induced flash blindness) or distractions from loud noises may contribute to targeting interference. How much do various energies or perceptual interventions actually interfere with targeting? We have devised a program of experimentation that allows for the pure and precise measurement of interference with the targeting process by any of a broad range of energies and stimuli. Our primary focus has been on sound and light interference with targeting, and experiments toward that purpose are described here. As expected, targeting accuracy decreased and targeting latency increased as the distance from fixation point to the target increased. The light flash interfered more with shots at more distant targets. Furthermore, as the angle between the fixation point and the flash increased, targeting latency increased but targeting accuracy was unaffected. Thus, light interference is greatest when the flash is not at the point of fixation. These studies suggest that foveal flashes are less disruptive than peripheral flashes, and that disruption increases as targeting task demands increase.

  15. Species of Redundancy in Visual Target Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Algom, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We report a series of investigations into the effects of common names, physical identity, and physical similarity on visual detection time. The effect of these factors on the capacity of the system processing the signals was also examined. We used a redundant targets design with separate testing of the target-distractor (single target),…

  16. Target manifold formation using a quadratic SDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Charles F.; Risko, Kelly K. D.

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic Discriminant Function (SDF) formulation of correlation filters provides constraints for forming target subspaces for a target set. In this paper we extend the SDF formulation to include quadratic constraints and use this solution to form nonlinear manifolds in the target space. The theory for forming these manifolds will be developed and demonstrated with data.

  17. Proprioceptive information about target location suppresses autokinesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Zabkar, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of autokinesis perceived by subjects who had proprioceptive information about target locations was conducted. When subjects were permitted to grasp the target light mount, their perceptions of autokinesis were found to be fewer and of smaller magnitude than when only visual information about the target location was available. The decrease in autokinesis was correlated with an enhancement of oculomotor control.

  18. Recognition of Hits in a Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerak, Vojtech; Drahansky, Martin

    This paper describes two possible ways of hit recognition in a target. First method is based on frame differencing with use of a stabilization algorithm to eliminate movements of a target. Second method uses flood fill with random seed point definition to find hits in the target scene.

  19. Categorically Defined Targets Trigger Spatiotemporal Visual Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Potter, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    Transient attention to a visually salient cue enhances processing of a subsequent target in the same spatial location between 50 to 150 ms after cue onset (K. Nakayama & M. Mackeben, 1989). Do stimuli from a categorically defined target set, such as letters or digits, also generate transient attention? Participants reported digit targets among…

  1. Performance of a 20-target MSE classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Leslie M.; Owirka, Gregory J.; Brower, William S.

    1998-08-01

    MIT Lincoln Laboratory is responsible for developing the ATR system for the DARPA/DARO/NIMA/OSD-sponsored SAIP program; the baseline ATR system recognizes 10 GOB targets; the enhanced version of SAIP requires the ATR system to recognize 20 GOB targets. This paper compares ATR performance results for 10- and 20-target MSE classifiers using high-resolution SAR imagery.

  2. Starkweather Target Game for Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkweather, Elizabeth K.

    The Starkweather Target Game is designed to measure preschool children's willingness to try difficult tasks independent of ability. The game consists of a box-shaped target which responds, when the target is hit by a rolled ball, somewhat like a jack-in-a-box. When the bull's eye is hit, the lid opens and a surprise picture appears. After being…

  3. Aimpoint Processor for Quantizing Target Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    target tracking system and a selected target reference point. The processor includes a programmable calculator which converts the angular separation...display frames on a target silhouette. The programmable calculator also is able to perform a coordinate rotation in order to compensate for angular

  4. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Christopher J; Wham, Robert M; Hobbs, Randall W; Owens, R Steven; Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  5. Liquid Metal Target for NLC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, John C.

    2002-08-19

    Possibility of creating the liquid lead target with parameters, optimum for the NLC positron source, is investigated. Target has a form of titanium vessel, filled with liquid lead, pumped through. The energy deposition in target is characterized by 35 kW average power and up to 250 J/g specific energy at optimum beam sigma 0.6 mm. The use of pumped through liquid lead as target material solves both the problems of power evacuation and target survival. The window for beam exit is made of both temperature and pressure resistive material--the diamond-like ceramic BN.

  6. Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T

    2007-08-01

    To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

  7. Targeted Magnetic Liposomes Loaded with Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Pallab; Banerjee, Rinti; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Koch, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Plank, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems for anticancer drugs are urgently needed to achieve maximum therapeutic efficacy by site-specific accumulation and thereby minimizing adverse effects resulting from systemic distribution of many potent anticancer drugs. We have prepared folate receptor-targeted magnetic liposomes loaded with doxorubicin, which are designed for tumor targeting through a combination of magnetic and biological targeting. Furthermore, these liposomes are designed for hyperthermia-induced drug release to be mediated by an alternating magnetic field and to be traceable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, detailed preparation and relevant characterization techniques of targeted magnetic liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin are described.

  8. Weak point target detection in star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Xiong, Yazhou; Li, Yi; Wang, Li; Li, Chunyan; Yin, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Space weak point targets detection is very useful in non cooperative target detection. Influenced by the chip noise and space environmental noise, weak point targets detection becomes a difficulty. In the paper, firstly the star is extracted from the picture, the background picture is filtered to reduce the noise, and then the moving distance between adjacent pictures is calculated, after picture overlapping between adjacent pictures, the energy of the weak point target is improved, with a appropriate threshold, the weak point target is extracted. The proposed method can be widely utilized in space exploration, space defense etc.

  9. Tantalum/Copper X-Ray Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William J.; Edmonds, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed unique solution to subsidiary problem of fabrication of x-ray target. Plasma spraying enabled fabrication of lightweight, high-performance targets. Power settings, atmosphere-control settings, rate of deposition, and other spraying parameters developed. Thin coats of tantalum successfully deposited on copper targets. Targets performed successfully in tests and satisfied all criteria expressed in terms of critical parameters. Significantly reduces projected costs of fabrication of targets and contributes to development of improved, long-lived, lightweight x-ray system.

  10. Tantalum/Copper X-Ray Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William J.; Edmonds, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed unique solution to subsidiary problem of fabrication of x-ray target. Plasma spraying enabled fabrication of lightweight, high-performance targets. Power settings, atmosphere-control settings, rate of deposition, and other spraying parameters developed. Thin coats of tantalum successfully deposited on copper targets. Targets performed successfully in tests and satisfied all criteria expressed in terms of critical parameters. Significantly reduces projected costs of fabrication of targets and contributes to development of improved, long-lived, lightweight x-ray system.

  11. Radar target classification using compressively sensed features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, Ismail

    2017-05-01

    The paper focuses on extracting scattering centers of radar targets using compressive sensing and using them as features in a target recognition system. It has been shown that a target's high resolution range profile (HRRP) is sparse in time corresponding to few scatterers that can be associated with target geometry. The recognition system is tested using real radar data of commercial aircraft models. Classification is carried out using distance based and correlation based techniques. Scenarios where the target aspect angle is unknown or known to be within a certain range are also examined.

  12. Targeted therapy in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.; Goldkorn, Amir; Quinn, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) has an increasing incidence internationally and is a disease for which there have been limited therapeutic options until recently. The last decade has seen a vastly improved understanding of the biological and clinical factors that predict the outcome of this disease. We now understand some of the different molecular underpinnings of renal clear cell carcinoma by mutation or silencing of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene and subsequent deregulated proliferation and angiogenesis. Survival in advanced disease is predicted by factors (performance status, anemia, hypercalcemia, and serum lactate dehydrogenase, time from diagnosis to recurrence) incorporated into the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria (also referred to as ‘Motzer’ criteria). These criteria allow classification of patients with RCC into good, intermediate and poor risk categories with median overall survivals of 22 months, 12 months and 5.4 months, respectively. Predicated upon these advances, six new targeted drugs (sorafenib, sunitinib, temsirolimus, everolimus, bevacizumab and pazopanib) have been tested in well-designed phase III trials, selected or stratified for MSKCC risk criteria, with positive results. All of these new drugs act at least in part through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediated pathways with other potential therapeutic impact on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), raf kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Importantly, data from each of these trials show a consistent doubling of progression-free survival (PFS) over prior standard of care treatments. In addition, sorafenib, sunitinib and temsirolimus, have demonstrated significant overall survival (OS) benefits as well; further follow-up is required to determine whether the disease control exhibited by everolimus and pazopanib will translate into a survival advantage. These drugs are generally well tolerated, as demonstrated by quality

  13. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.; Raja, Chand; Rizvi, Syed; Li, Yong; Tsui, Wendy; Zhang, David; Song, Emma; Qu, Chang Fa; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Thompson, John

    2004-08-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human

  14. The trajectory of the target probability effect.

    PubMed

    Hon, Nicholas; Yap, Melvin J; Jabar, Syaheed B

    2013-05-01

    The effect of target probability on detection times is well-established: Even when detection accuracy is high, lower probability targets are detected more slowly than higher probability ones. Although this target probability effect on detection times has been well-studied, one aspect of it has remained largely unexamined: How the effect develops over the span of an experiment. Here, we investigated this issue with two detection experiments that assessed different target probability ratios. Conventional block segment analysis and linear mixed-effects modeling converged on two key findings. First, we found that the magnitude of the target probability effect increases as one progresses through a block of trials. Second, we found, by examining the trajectories of the low- and high-probability targets, that this increase in effect magnitude was driven by the low-probability targets. Specifically, we found that low-probability targets were detected more slowly as a block of trials progressed. Performance to high-probability targets, on the other hand, was largely invariant across the block. The latter finding is of particular interest because it cannot be reconciled with accounts that propose that the target probability effect is driven by the high-probability targets.

  15. Automatic target tracking in FLIR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abdullah; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2004-09-01

    Moving target tracking is a challenging task and is increasingly becoming important for various applications. In this paper, we have presented target detection and tracking algorithm based on target intensity feature relative to surrounding background, and shape information of target. Proposed automatic target tracking algorithm includes two techniques: intensity variation function (IVF) and template modeling (TM). The intensity variation function is formulated by using target intensity feature while template modeling is based on target shape information. The IVF technique produces the maximum peak value whereas the reference target intensity variation is similar to the candidate target intensity variation. When IVF technique fails, due to background clutter, non-target object or other artifacts, the second technique, template modeling, is triggered by control module. By evaluating the outputs from the IVF and TM techniques, the tracker determines the real coordinates of the target. Performance of the proposed ATT is tested using real life forward-looking infrared (FLIR) image sequences taken from an airborne, moving platform.

  16. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  17. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  18. Air target models for fuzing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, J. F., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    Radar backscatter models for air targets suitable for computer simulation of radar fuze-air target encounters are described. These models determine the characteristics of the energy reflected to the fuze when the target is illuminated by a fuze radar. When the target models are coupled with fuze models, the time when the fuze detects the presence of the target can be determined for any arbitrary terminal encounter geometry. Fuze detection times for representative trajectories can be compared with fuze specifications to measure fuze performance or can be used as a part of a simulation of an entire system to determine system performance. Following one basic methodology, target models have been written for the Fishbed, Foxbat, and Flogger fighter aircraft; the Hind-D helicopter; and the Backfire, Blinder, and B-1 bombers. All of the models are specular point models where the major return is assumed to come from a small number of glitter points or specular points on the target.

  19. Targeting dendritic cells--why bother?

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2013-04-11

    Vaccination is among the most efficient forms of immunotherapy. Although sometimes inducing lifelong protective B-cell responses, T-cell-mediated immunity remains challenging. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is an extensively explored concept aimed at improving cellular immunity. The identification of various DC subsets with distinct functional characteristics now allows for the fine-tuning of targeting strategies. Although some of these DC subsets are regarded as superior for (cross-) priming of naive T cells, controversies still remain about which subset represents the best target for immunotherapy. Because targeting the antigen alone may not be sufficient to obtain effective T-cell responses, delivery systems have been developed to target multiple vaccine components to DCs. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of targeting DCs: if targeting is beneficial at all and which vaccine vehicles and immunization routes represent promising strategies to reach and activate DCs.

  20. Fabrication of light water reactor tritium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pilger, J.P.

    1991-11-01

    The mission of the Fabrication Development Task of the Tritium Target Development Project is: to produce a documented technology basis, including specifications and procedures for target rod fabrication; to demonstrate that light water tritium targets can be manufactured at a rate consistent with tritium production requirements; and to develop quality control methods to evaluate target rod components and assemblies, and establish correlations between evaluated characteristics and target rod performance. Many of the target rod components: cladding tubes, end caps, plenum springs, etc., have similar counterparts in LWR fuel rods. High production rate manufacture and inspection of these components has been adequately demonstrated by nuclear fuel rod manufacturers. This summary describes the more non-conventional manufacturing processes and inspection techniques developed to fabricate target rod components whose manufacturability at required production rates had not been previously demonstrated.

  1. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  2. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  3. Megajoule Dense Plasma Focus Solid Target Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podpaly, Y. A.; Falabella, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Shaw, B. H.; Cooper, C. M.; Chapman, S.; Bennett, N.; Sipe, N.; Olson, R.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) devices are plasma sources that can produce significant neutron yields from beam into gas interactions. Yield increases, up to approximately a factor of five, have been observed previously on DPFs using solid targets, such as CD2 and D2O ice. In this work, we report on deuterium solid-target experiments at the Gemini DPF. A rotatable target holder and baffle arrangement were installed in the Gemini device which allowed four targets to be deployed sequentially without breaking vacuum. Solid targets of titanium deuteride were installed and systematically studied at a variety of fill pressures, bias voltages, and target positions. Target holder design, experimental results, and comparison to simulations will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Targeted drugs and nanomedicine: present and future.

    PubMed

    Debbage, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Packaging small-molecule drugs into nanoparticles improves their bio-availability, bio-compatibility and safety profiles. Multifunctional particles carrying large drug payloads for targeted transport, immune evasion and favourable drug release kinetics at the target site, require a certain minimum size usually 30-300 nm diameter, so are nanoparticles. Targeting particles to a disease site can signal the presence of the disease site, block a function there, or deliver a drug to it. Targeted nanocarriers must navigate through blood-tissue barriers, varying in strength between organs and highest in the brain, to reach target cells. They must enter target cells to contact cytoplasmic targets; specific endocytotic and transcytotic transport mechanisms can be used as trojan horses to ferry nanoparticles across cellular barriers. Specific ligands to cell surface receptors, antibodies and antibody fragments, and aptamers can all access such transport mechanisms to ferry nanoparticles to their targets. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the targeted drug-bearing particle depend critically on particle size, chemistry, surface charge and other parameters. Particle types for targeting include liposomes, polymer and protein nanoparticles, dendrimers, carbon-based nanoparticles e.g. fullerenes, and others. Immunotargeting by use of monoclonal antibodies, chimeric antibodies and humanized antibodies has now reached the stage of clinical application. High-quality targeting groups are emerging: antibody engineering enables generation of human/like antibody (fragments) and facilitates the search for clinically relevant biomarkers; conjugation of nanocarriers to specific ligands and to aptamers enables specific targeting with improved clinical efficacy. Future developments depend on identification of clinically relevant targets and on raising targeting efficiency of the multifunctional nanocarriers.

  5. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery.

  6. [Therapeutic targets in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Pilar; Roca, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) occurs because of deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucocerebrosidase that results in accumulation of this glycolipid compound in the cells of the macrophage-monocyte system. There are 3 types: type 1 is non-neuronopathic with primarily visceral signs and symptoms which range tremendously in severity; infantile-onset type 2 and later-onset type 3 involve the central nervous system. More than 300 mutations have been described in the gene, partially explaining phenotypic heterogeneity. Commercialization in 1991 of the first enzyme replacement therapy, alglucerase, resulted in a revolution in the management of patients with symptomatic GD (i.e., by improving the hematological and visceral signs and symptoms). Within the first 5 years of alglucerase, its safety and efficacy in improving hemoglobin levels and platelet counts, and in reducing splenic and hepatic enlargement were confirmed albeit recognizing its inability to impact neurological symptoms and signs because of its large molecular size. Recombinant imiglucerase soon replaced alglucerase as the standard of care for GD. The therapeutic targets recently defined as treatment goals were: normalization of cell counts; reduction of liver and spleen volume; elimination of the infiltration in the bone marrow to prevent the complications, and improvement in surrogate biomarkers.

  7. Targeting ceramide metabolism in obesity.

    PubMed

    Aburasayn, Hanin; Al Batran, Rami; Ussher, John R

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a major health concern that increases the risk for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an enormous research effort has been invested into understanding how obesity-associated dyslipidemia and obesity-induced alterations in lipid metabolism increase the risk for these diseases. Accordingly, it has been proposed that the accumulation of lipid metabolites in organs such as the liver, skeletal muscle, and heart is critical to these obesity-induced pathologies. Ceramide is one such lipid metabolite that accumulates in tissues in response to obesity, and both pharmacological and genetic strategies that reduce tissue ceramide levels yield salutary actions on overall metabolic health. We will review herein why ceramide accumulates in tissues during obesity and how an increase in intracellular ceramide impacts cellular signaling and function as well as potential mechanisms by which reducing intracellular ceramide levels improves insulin resistance, T2D, atherosclerosis, and heart failure. Because a reduction in skeletal muscle ceramide levels is frequently associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity in humans, the beneficial findings reported for reducing ceramides in preclinical studies may have clinical application in humans. Therefore, modulating ceramide metabolism may be a novel, exciting target for preventing and/or treating obesity-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. X-ray target cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a rotatable anode for an X-ray tube. It comprises: a hollow rotatable anode wheel having two circular faces, one of the faces having a beveled edge for a target region; a circular baffle having first and second sides situated concentrically inside the hollow anode wheel, the circular baffle having means for imparting a tangential velocity of a liquid on either side of the baffle. The outer perimeter of the circular baffle spaced away from the interior of the anode wheel the second side of the circular baffle having means situated thereon for creating operation between a forced and a free vortex condition in liquid in the vicinity of the disc periphery; means for supplying cooling liquid to the central portion of the first side of the baffle; means for removing cooling liquid from the central portion of the second side of the baffle, the second side of the baffle adjacent to the face of the hollow rotatable anode wheel having the beveled edge; and structural means for rotating the baffle when the anode wheel is being rotated.

  9. Emerging targets for antidepressant therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Holtzheimer, Paul E; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    Despite adequate antidepressant monotherapy, the majority of depressed patients do not achieve remission. Even optimal and aggressive therapy leads to a substantial number of patients who show minimal and often only transient improvement. In order to address this substantial problem of treatment-resistant depression, a number of novel targets for antidepressant therapy have emerged as a consequence of major advances in the neurobiology of depression. Three major approaches to uncover novel therapeutic interventions are: first, optimizing the modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission; second, developing medications that act upon neurotransmitter systems other than monoaminergic circuits; and third, using focal brain stimulation to directly modulate neuronal activity. We review the most recent data on novel therapeutic compounds and their antidepressant potential. These include triple monoamine reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotic augmentation, and dopamine receptor agonists. Compounds affecting extra-monoamine neurotransmitter systems include CRF1 receptor antagonists, glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, substance P receptor antagonists, NMDA receptor antagonists, nemifitide, omega-3 fatty acids, and melatonin receptor agonists. Focal brain stimulation therapies include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:19501541

  10. Pharmaceutical Targeting of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Krizbai, István A; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Farkas, Attila E; Traweger, Andreas; Haskó, János; Bauer, Hannelore; Wilhelm, Imola

    2016-01-01

    Besides being indispensable for the protection and nutrition of the central nervous system (CNS), blood-brain barrier (BBB)-forming cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) have a major role in hampering drugs to reach therapeutically relevant concentrations in the brain. In this respect, the most important defense systems of CECs are tight junctions (TJs) sealing the paracellular way of transport, efflux pumps (ABC transporters) and metabolic enzymes. Here we review current strategies aiming at overcoming the BBB with the purpose of effectively delivering drugs to the CNS. Besides chemical modification of drug candidates to improve CNS availability, the main strategies include: bypassing the BBB (intracranial or nasal routes), reversible opening of TJs (using hyperosmotic mannitol, ultrasounds, peptides and other physical methods or chemical agents), vector-mediated drug delivery systems (nanocarriers, exploitation of receptor- and carrier-mediated transport) and inhibition of efflux transporters. We discuss the main advantages, disadvantages and clinical relevance of each strategy. Special emphasis will be given to the description of the chemical characteristics of nanoparticles (lipidic, polymeric, inorganic, etc.) and the main strategies of targeting them to the CNS.

  11. Millimeter radar improves target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2011-06-01

    Recently developed millimeter wave radar has advantages for target identification over conventional microwave radar which typically use lower frequencies. We describe the pertinent features involved in the construction of the new millimeter wave radar, the pseudo-optical cavity source and the quasi-optical duplexer. The long wavelength relative to light allows the radar beam to penetrate through most weather because the wavelength is larger than the particle size for dust, drizzle rain, fog. Further the mm wave beam passes through an atmospheric transmission window that provides a dip in attenuation. The higher frequency than conventional radar provides higher Doppler frequencies, for example, than X-band radar. We show by simulation that small characteristic vibrations and slow turns of an aircraft become visible so that the Doppler signature improves identification. The higher frequency also reduces beam width, which increases transmit and receive antenna gains. For the same power the transmit beam extends to farther range and the increase in receive antenna gain increases signal to noise ratio for improved detection and identification. The narrower beam can also reduce clutter and reject other noise more readily. We show by simulation that the radar can be used at lower elevations over the sea than conventional radar.

  12. Targeting hedgehog in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Irvine, David A; Copland, Mhairi

    2012-03-08

    The Hedgehog pathway is a critical mediator of embryonic patterning and organ development, including hematopoiesis. It influences stem cell fate, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis in responsive tissues. In adult organisms, hedgehog pathway activity is required for aspects of tissue maintenance and regeneration; however, there is increasing awareness that abnormal hedgehog signaling is associated with malignancy. Hedgehog signaling is critical for early hematopoietic development, but there is controversy over its role in normal hematopoiesis in adult organisms where it may be dispensable. Conversely, hedgehog signaling appears to be an important survival and proliferation signal for a spectrum of hematologic malignancies. Furthermore, hedgehog signaling may be critical for the maintenance and expansion of leukemic stem cells and therefore provides a possible mechanism to selectively target these primitive cell subpopulations, which are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Indeed, phase 1 clinical trials of hedgehog pathway inhibitors are currently underway to test this hypothesis in myeloid leukemias. This review covers: (1) the hedgehog pathway and its role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, (2) the recent development of clinical grade small molecule inhibitors of the pathway, and (3) the potential utility of hedgehog pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in hemato-oncology.

  13. Targeting podocyte-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Nguyen, Tri Q; Dendooven, Amélie; Kok, Robbert J; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2010-11-30

    Injury to the podocytes is the initiating cause of many renal diseases, leading to proteinuria with possible progression to end-stage renal disease. Podocytes are highly specialized cells, with an important role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and producing growth factors for both mesangial cells and endothelial cells. With their foot processes they cover the glomerular basement membrane, and form slit diaphragms with neighboring podocytes. Human podocytopathies include focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, collapsing glomerulopathy and diabetic nephropathy. Research in the last two decades has demonstrated great progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to podocytopathies. These include single gene defects in slit diaphragm proteins, but also discovery of apoptotic, enzymatic and other pathways involved in podocyte injury. With this progress, a great number of animal models is now available to study either specific podocytopathies, e.g. in mouse models with single gene mutations, or more general podocyte injury patterns, such as the lipopolysaccharide or protamine sulfate model of foot process effacement. In this review, the morphology of the glomerulus will be discussed, with a focus on the podocyte, its interactions with surrounding cells, and the highly differentiated slit diaphragm separating the apical from the basal membrane. We also provide an overview of human podocytopathies and animal models to study these diseases. In the last part we discuss targeted therapies addressing pathways and proteins affected in podocyte injury.

  14. Endoglin for targeted cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Lee S; Gordon, Michael S; Robert, Francisco; Matei, Daniela E

    2014-02-01

    Endoglin is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein receptor for transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic proteins. Endoglin is essential for angiogenesis, being densely expressed on proliferating endothelial cells and upregulated during hypoxia. Its expression is implicated in development of resistance to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition. TRC105 is an antibody that binds endoglin and prevents endothelial cell activation. Targeting endoglin and the VEGF pathway concurrently improves treatment in vitro and appears to reverse resistance to bevacizumab in some refractory cancer patients. Randomized trials are under way to assess the clinical benefit of adding TRC105 therapy to bevacizumab therapy. Further trials are under way to assess the activity of TRC105 with small-molecule inhibitors of the VEGF pathway in renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma. Stratification of soft tissue sarcomas based on endoglin expression levels is proposed to identify patients most likely to benefit from TRC105 treatment. The development of a TRC105 antibody-drug conjugate is also described.

  15. Emerging targets for COPD therapy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2005-12-01

    No currently available treatments reduce the progression of COPD or suppress the inflammation in small airways and lung parenchyma. However, several new treatments that target the inflammatory process are in clinical development. A group of specific therapies are directed against the influx of inflammatory cells into the airways and lung parenchyma that occurs in COPD; these include adhesion molecule and chemokine-directed therapy, as well as therapies to combat tumour necrosis factor-alpha and augment interleukin-10. Broad spectrum anti-inflammatory drugs are now in phase III development for COPD, and include phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors. Other drugs that inhibit cell signalling include inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphoinositide-3 kinase-gamma. More specific approaches are to give antioxidants, inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and leukotriene B4 receptor antagonists. Epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibitors and calcium-activated chloride channel inhibitors have potential to combat mucus overproduction. Therapy to inhibit fibrosis is being developed against transforming growth factor-beta1 and protease activated receptor-2. There is also a search for serine proteinase and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors to prevent lung destruction and the development of emphysema, as well as drugs such as retinoids that may even reverse this process. Effective delivery of drugs to the sites of disease in the peripheral lung is an important consideration, and there is the need for validated biomarkers and monitoring techniques in early clinical studies with new therapies for COPD.

  16. Targeting CXCL13 During Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Amanda K.; Irani, David N.

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine, C-X-C motif ligand 13 (CXCL13), is constitutively expressed in lymphoid organs and controls the recruitment and compartmentalization of lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells within these specialized structures. Recent data, however, also find induction of this molecule during central nervous system (CNS) inflammation under a variety of circumstances. While its role(s) in the pathogenesis of neoplastic, infectious and autoimmune disorders of the CNS remain incompletely understood, several lines of evidence suggest that CXCL13 could become a relevant therapeutic target in at least some of these diseases. This review focuses on how CXCL13 contributes to the pathogenesis of selected CNS disorders involving both experimental animals and humans, paying particular attention to the issue of whether (and if so, how) blockade of this ligand or its receptor might benefit the host. Current blocking strategies largely involve the use of monoclonal antibodies, but an improved understanding of downstream signaling pathways makes small molecule inhibition a future possibility. PMID:26855687

  17. Targeting SGK1 in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Vallon, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Compelling evidence is accumulating pointing to a pathophysiological role of the serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in the development and complications of diabetes. SGK1 is ubiquitously expressed with exquisitely high transcriptional volatility. Stimulators of SGK1 expression include hyperglycemia, cell shrinkage, ischemia, glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by insulin and growth factors via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 activates ion channels (including ENaC, TRPV5, ROMK, KCNE1/KCNQ1 and CLCKa/Barttin), carriers (including NCC, NKCC, NHE3, SGLT1 and EAAT3), and the Na+/K+-ATPase. It regulates the activity of several enzymes (e.g. glycogen-synthase-kinase-3, ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, phosphomannose-mutase-2), and transcription factors (e.g. forkhead-transcription-factor FOXO3a, β-catenin, nuclear-factor-kappa-B NFκB). A common SGK1 gene variant (~3–5% prevalence in Caucasians, ~10% in Africans) is associated with increased blood pressure, obesity and type 2 diabetes. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes, SGK1 presumably contributes to fluid retention and hypertension, enhanced coagulation, and increased deposition of matrix proteins leading to tissue fibrosis such as diabetic nephropathy. Accordingly, targeting SGK1 may favourably influence occurrence and course of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19764891

  18. Targeting microenvironment in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew; Wei, Han; Lu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    During development of a novel treatment for cancer patients, the tumor microenvironment and its interaction with the tumor cells must be considered. Aspects such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), secreted factors, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the host immune response, and tumor-associated microphages (TAM) are critical for cancer progression and metastasis. Additionally, signaling pathways such as the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can promote further cytokine release in the tumor environment, and impact tumor progression greatly. Importantly, cytokine overexpression has been linked to drug resistance in cancers and is therefore an attractive target for combinational therapies. Specific inhibitors of cytokines involved in signaling between tumor cells and the microenvironment have not been studied in depth and have great potential for use in personalized medicines. Together, the interactions between the microenvironment and tumors are critical for tumor growth and promotion and should be taken into serious consideration for future novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27270649

  19. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  20. New targets in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Juergen

    2016-12-01

    PsA is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that affects both skin and joints; it is a heterogeneous disease characterized by synovitis, enthesitis, dactylitis and spondylitis. The impact on patients and the burden of disease are substantial. For assessment of the disease, patient-reported outcomes are increasingly important. Conventional therapy consists of NSAIDs, local and systemic CSs, and synthetic and biological DMARDs. While MTX, LEF, SSZ and CYC are the synthetic drugs mainly used, TNF-α blocking agents have represented the majority of biologics used in the last decade (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab and golimumab). Treat-to-target strategies have been used successfully in PsA. This review concentrates on new developments, mainly covering biologic agents with an IL-17 inhibitor (secukinumab) and an anti-IL-23 agent (ustekinumab), but also synthetic drugs, including a novel phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (apremilast) and a Janus kinase inhibitor (tofacitinib) that blocks mainly Jak3 and Jak1 and, to a lesser extent, Jak2. The efficacy of some of these new agents may be even better for the skin than for the joints. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Tensor Target Polarization at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G

    2014-10-27

    The first measurements of tensor observables in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ scattering experiments were performed in the mid-80's at TRIUMF, and later at SIN/PSI. The full suite of tensor observables accessible in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ elastic scattering were measured: $T_{20}$, $T_{21}$, and $T_{22}$. The vector analyzing power $iT_{11}$ was also measured. These results led to a better understanding of the three-body theory used to describe this reaction. %Some measurements were also made in the absorption and breakup channels. A direct measurement of the target tensor polarization was also made independent of the usual NMR techniques by exploiting the (nearly) model-independent result for the tensor analyzing power at 90$^\\circ _{cm}$ in the $\\pi \\vec{d} \\rightarrow 2p$ reaction. This method was also used to check efforts to enhance the tensor polarization by RF burning of the NMR spectrum. A brief description of the methods developed to measure and analyze these experiments is provided.

  2. Targeted delivery to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pouton, Colin W; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Roth, Daniela M; Moseley, Gregory W; Jans, David A

    2007-08-10

    Macromolecules and supramolecular complexes are frequently required to enter and exit the nucleus during normal cell function, but access is restricted and exchange to and from the nucleus is tightly controlled. We describe the mechanisms which regulate nuclear import of endogenous molecules and indicate how viruses exploit these mechanisms during their life cycle. Opportunities exist to make use of natural pathways for delivery of therapeutic entities, in particular to develop safe and effective methods for gene therapy, although past attempts to design non-viral nuclear delivery systems have met with limited success. To increase the likelihood of success scientists will need an appreciation of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nucleus, and will need a commitment to control the architecture of non-viral delivery systems at the molecular level. Effective delivery systems will require several attributes to facilitate endosomal escape, microtubular transport and uptake through the nuclear pore complex. The published literature provides a strong foundation for design of nuclear targeting systems. The challenge faced by delivery scientists is to assemble a system which is as effective as, for example, the adenovirus but which lacks its immunogenicity. This article reviews the relevant literature and indicates key areas for future research.

  3. 26 CFR 1.430(d)-1 - Determination of target normal cost and funding target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of target normal cost and funding target. 1.430(d)-1 Section 1.430(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Determination of target normal cost and funding target. (a) In general—(1) Overview. This section sets...

  4. 26 CFR 1.430(d)-1 - Determination of target normal cost and funding target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Determination of target normal cost and funding target. 1.430(d)-1 Section 1.430(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Determination of target normal cost and funding target. (a) In general—(1) Overview. This section sets...

  5. 26 CFR 1.430(d)-1 - Determination of target normal cost and funding target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determination of target normal cost and funding target. 1.430(d)-1 Section 1.430(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Determination of target normal cost and funding target. (a) In general—(1) Overview. This section sets...

  6. Using the Dual-Target Cost to Explore the Nature of Search Target Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Michael J.; Menneer, Tamaryn; Cave, Kyle R.; Donnelly, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Eye movements were monitored to examine search efficiency and infer how color is mentally represented to guide search for multiple targets. Observers located a single color target very efficiently by fixating colors similar to the target. However, simultaneous search for 2 colors produced a dual-target cost. In addition, as the similarity between…

  7. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  8. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  9. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are available under...

  10. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  11. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reinsurance transaction for the insurance contracts deemed transferred from old target to new target. See... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  12. Using the Dual-Target Cost to Explore the Nature of Search Target Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Michael J.; Menneer, Tamaryn; Cave, Kyle R.; Donnelly, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Eye movements were monitored to examine search efficiency and infer how color is mentally represented to guide search for multiple targets. Observers located a single color target very efficiently by fixating colors similar to the target. However, simultaneous search for 2 colors produced a dual-target cost. In addition, as the similarity between…

  13. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  14. Watershed segmentation of infrared target based on multiscale mathematical morphology and target enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiang-zhi; Zhou, Fu-gen; Jin, Ting; Liu, Zhao-ying

    2009-07-01

    A new infrared target segmentation algorithm by using watershed transform based on multi-scale mathematical morphology and target enhancement is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the multi-scale mathematical morphological operator is used to pre-process the original infrared image, which suppresses the effect of noises and protects targets. Secondly, the property of the infrared image, non-parameter kernel method and linear extension are used to enhance dim target. Thirdly, some pixels of the enhanced target regions are binarized and then processed by morphological operators as the markers of the infrared targets. Finally, after the gradient of the pre-processed infrared image is calculated by using Sobel detector, the watershed is performed on the gradient image guided by the markers of target regions to segment the target regions. The proposed method can be widely used in different applications of target detection, target tracking, navigation system and so on. Experimental results verify that the proposed method is efficient.

  15. Target injection methods for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Petzoldt, R.W.; Moir, R.W.

    1994-06-01

    We have studied four methods to inject IFE targets: the gas gun, electrostatic accelerator, induction accelerator, and rail gun. We recommend a gas gun for indirect drive targets because they can support a gas pressure load on one end and can slide along the gun barrel without damage. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable; for other types of targets, a sabot would be necessary. A cam and poppet valve arrangement is recommended for gas flow control. An electrostatic accelerator is attractive for use with lightweight spherical direct drive targets. Since there is no physical contact between the target and the injector, there will be no wear of either component during the injection process. An induction accelerator has an advantage of no electrical contact between the target and the injector. Physical contact is not even necessary, so the wear should be minimal. It requires a cylindrical conductive target sleeve which is a substantial added mass. A rail gun is a simpler device than an electrostatic accelerator or induction accelerator. It requires electrical contact between the target and the rails and may have a significant wear rate. The wear in a vacuum could be reduced by use of a solid lubricant such as MoS{sub 2}. The total required accuracy of target injection, tracking and beam pointing of {plus_minus}0.4 mm appears achievable but will require development and experimental verification.

  16. Target injection methods for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Moir, Ralph W.

    1994-06-01

    We have studied four methods to inject IFE targets: the gas gun, electrostatic accelerator, induction accelerator, and rail gun. We recommend a gas gun for indirect drive targets because they can support a gas pressure load on one end and can slide along the gun barrel without damage. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable; for other types of targets, a sabot would be necessary. A cam and poppet valve arrangement is recommended for gas flow control. An electrostatic accelerator is attractive for use with lightweight spherical direct drive targets. Since there is no physical contact between the target and the injector, there will be no wear of either component during the injection process. An induction accelerator has an advantage of no electrical contact between the target and the injector. Physical contact is not even necessary, so the wear should be minimal. It requires a cylindrical conductive target sleeve which is a substantial added mass. A rail gun is a simpler device than an electrostatic accelerator or induction accelerator. It requires electrical contact between the target and the rails and may have a significant wear rate. The wear in a vacuum could be reduced by use of a solid lubricant such as MoS2. The total required accuracy of target injection, tracking and beam pointing of +/- 0.4 mm appears achievable but will require development and experimental verification.

  17. 3 MW solid rotating target design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManamy, T.; Rennich, M.; Gallmeier, F.; Ferguson, P.; Janney, J.

    2010-03-01

    A rotating solid target design concept is being developed for potential use at the second SNS target station (STS). A long pulse beam (˜1 ms) at 1.3 GeV and 20 Hz is planned with power levels at or above 1 MW. Since the long pulse may give future opportunities for higher power, this study is looking at 3 MW to compare the performance of a solid rotating target to a mercury target. Unlike the case for stationary solid targets at such powers this study indicates that a rotating solid target, when used with large coupled hydrogen moderators, has neutronic performance equal to or better than that with a mercury target, and the solid target has a greatly increased lifetime. Design studies have investigated water cooled tungsten targets with tantalum cladding approximately 1.2 m in diameter, and 70 mm thick. Operating temperatures are low (<150 °C) with mid-plane, top and bottom surface cooling. In case of cooling system failure, the diameter gives enough surface area to remove the decay heat by radiation to the surrounding reflector assemblies while keeping the peak temperatures below approximately 700 °C. This temperature should mitigate potential loss of coolant accidents and subsequent steam, tungsten interaction which has a threshold of approximately 800 °C. Design layouts for the sealing systems and potential target station concepts have been developed.

  18. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  19. Air Force, Cyberpower, Targeting: Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyberpower Targeting Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    AIR FORCE, CYBERPOWER, TARGETING: Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyberpower Targeting Theory BY STEVEN J. ANDERSON, LIEUTENANT COLONEL...Targeting:Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyberpower Targeting Theory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This thesis examines historical targeting theories for airpower and their effects on the Air Force organize

  20. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.