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Sample records for euroharp catchment network

  1. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  2. Catchments network on badlands around Mediterranean area (RESOBAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Yoann; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Regues-Munoz, David; Latron, Jerome; Solé-Benet, Albert; Canton, Yolanda; Nadal-Romero, Estela; Della Seta, Marta; Rossi, Mauro; Capolongo, Domenico; Maquaire, Olivier; Forey, Estelle; Di-Giovanni, Christian; Gallart, Francesc; Delmonte, Maurizio; Vergari, Francesca; Massei, Nicolas; Torri, Dino

    2016-04-01

    Between 2013 and 2014, a network funded by MISTRALS-ENVIMED institution, was born around some instrumented catchments developing a badland-type morphology. This network has grouped 3 countries (France, Spain and Italy) with 12 scientific labs. RESOBAM has concerned two sites in France (Draix-Bléone and Vaches Noires), three in Spain (Vallcebre, Araguas and El Cautivo) and some sites in Italy (Tuscany, Basilicata). Main goal of this network was to federate the research around badlands at the European scale, by proposing some scientific topics as: sediment and water transports / budget, (bio)geochemical cycles, agricultural (farming), education, restoration, cultural heritage, soil conservation / biodiversity, climatic change etc. Other main interests were also to propose some common scientific projects and the development of students exchanges. This communication presents the synthesis of our four meetings held at Draix, Zaragoza, Almeriá and Rouen and some perspectives to continue this network.

  3. Controls of catchments` sub-storage contributions to dynamic water quality patterns in the stream network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Maike Hegenauer, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Water quality is usually observed either continuously at a few stations within a catchment or with few snapshot sampling campaigns throughout the whole stream network. Although we know that the depletion of catchment sub-storages can vary throughout the stream network according to their actual water content (spatial variability of actual storage conditions can be caused amongst others by unevenly distributed rainfall, storage size or spatial differences in soil characteristics and land use), we know little about the impact of this process on spatial water quality patterns. For summer low flow recession periods, when stream water composition can be crucial for aquatic ecosystem conditions and the exceedance of water quality thresholds, knowledge on the controls of the dynamic interplay of catchment storages and stream water composition might improve water quality management and the implementation of corresponding mitigation measures. We studied this process throughout the stream network of a first-order agricultural headwater catchment in south-western Germany during two summer low flow recession periods. The underlying geology of the study area is a deep layer of aeolian loess, whilst the dominating soil is a silty calcaric regosol with gleizations in the colluvium. The land use in the catchment is dominated by viniculture (63 %) and arable crops (18 %). Due to the dense drainpipe network within the catchment we could identify 12 sub-catchments contributing during summer low flow recession periods to total stream discharge. We continuously observed discharge, electrical conductivity and water temperatures for 8 of the sub-catchments and at the catchment outlet. This data set was accomplished by 10 snapshot campaigns where we sampled for water temperatures, electrical conductivity, major ions, pH and O2 throughout the stream network. Using either discharge concentration relationships or time dependent functions, we derived continuous export rates for all measures in

  4. Connectivity of overland flow by drainage network expansion in a rain forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander; Turner, Benjamin L.; Francke, Till; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2014-02-01

    Soils in various places of the Panama Canal Watershed feature a low saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) at shallow depth, which promotes overland-flow generation and associated flashy catchment responses. In undisturbed forests of these areas, overland flow is concentrated in flow lines that extend the channel network and provide hydrological connectivity between hillslopes and streams. To understand the dynamics of overland-flow connectivity, as well as the impact of connectivity on catchment response, we studied an undisturbed headwater catchment by monitoring overland-flow occurrence in all flow lines and discharge, suspended sediment, and total phosphorus at the catchment outlet. We find that connectivity is strongly influenced by seasonal variation in antecedent wetness and can develop even under light rainfall conditions. Connectivity increased rapidly as rainfall frequency increased, eventually leading to full connectivity and surficial drainage of entire hillslopes. Connectivity was nonlinearly related to catchment response. However, additional information on factors such as overland-flow volume would be required to constrain relationships between connectivity, stormflow, and the export of suspended sediment and phosphorus. The effort to monitor those factors would be substantial, so we advocate applying the established links between rain event characteristics, drainage network expansion by flow lines, and catchment response for predictive modeling and catchment classification in forests of the Panama Canal Watershed and in similar regions elsewhere.

  5. Establishment of a hydrological monitoring network in a tropical African catchment: An integrated participatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomani, M. C.; Dietrich, O.; Lischeid, G.; Mahoo, H.; Mahay, F.; Mbilinyi, B.; Sarmett, J.

    Sound decision making for water resources management has to be based on good knowledge of the dominant hydrological processes of a catchment. This information can only be obtained through establishing suitable hydrological monitoring networks. Research catchments are typically established without involving the key stakeholders, which results in instruments being installed at inappropriate places as well as at high risk of theft and vandalism. This paper presents an integrated participatory approach for establishing a hydrological monitoring network. We propose a framework with six steps beginning with (i) inception of idea; (ii) stakeholder identification; (iii) defining the scope of the network; (iv) installation; (v) monitoring; and (vi) feedback mechanism integrated within the participatory framework. The approach is illustrated using an example of the Ngerengere catchment in Tanzania. In applying the approach, the concept of establishing the Ngerengere catchment monitoring network was initiated in 2008 within the Resilient Agro-landscapes to Climate Change in Tanzania (ReACCT) research program. The main stakeholders included: local communities; Sokoine University of Agriculture; Wami Ruvu Basin Water Office and the ReACCT Research team. The scope of the network was based on expert experience in similar projects and lessons learnt from literature review of similar projects from elsewhere integrated with local expert knowledge. The installations involved reconnaissance surveys, detailed surveys, and expert consultations to identify best sites. First, a Digital Elevation Model, land use, and soil maps were used to identify potential monitoring sites. Local and expert knowledge was collected on flow regimes, indicators of shallow groundwater plant species, precipitation pattern, vegetation, and soil types. This information was integrated and used to select sites for installation of an automatic weather station, automatic rain gauges, river flow gauging stations

  6. US Forest Service Experimental Forests and Ranges Network: a continental research platform for catchment-scale research

    Treesearch

    Daniel Neary; Deborah Hayes; Lindsey Rustad; James Vose; Gerald Gottfried; Stephen Sebesteyn; Sherri Johnson; Fred Swanson; Mary Adams

    2012-01-01

    The US Forest Service initiated its catchment research program in 1909 with the first paired catchment study at Wagon Wheel Gap, Colorado, USA. It has since developed the Experimental Forests and Ranges Network, with over 80 long-term research study sites located across the contiguous USA, Alaska, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. This network provides a unique, powerful...

  7. Predictive optimal control of sewer networks using CORAL tool: application to Riera Blanca catchment in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Puig, V; Cembrano, G; Romera, J; Quevedo, J; Aznar, B; Ramón, G; Cabot, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the global control of the Riera Blanca catchment in the Barcelona sewer network using a predictive optimal control approach. This catchment has been modelled using a conceptual modelling approach based on decomposing the catchments in subcatchments and representing them as virtual tanks. This conceptual modelling approach allows real-time model calibration and control of the sewer network. The global control problem of the Riera Blanca catchment is solved using a optimal/predictive control algorithm. To implement the predictive optimal control of the Riera Blanca catchment, a software tool named CORAL is used. The on-line control is simulated by interfacing CORAL with a high fidelity simulator of sewer networks (MOUSE). CORAL interchanges readings from the limnimeters and gate commands with MOUSE as if it was connected with the real SCADA system. Finally, the global control results obtained using the predictive optimal control are presented and compared against the results obtained using current local control system. The results obtained using the global control are very satisfactory compared to those obtained using the local control.

  8. Complex networks, community structure, and catchment classification in a large-scale river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Koren; Sivakumar, Bellie; Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces the concepts of complex networks, especially community structure, to classify catchments in large-scale river basins. The Mississippi River basin (MRB) is considered as a representative large-scale basin, and daily streamflow from a network of 1663 stations are analyzed. Six community structure methods are employed: edge betweenness, greedy algorithm, multilevel modularity optimization, leading eigenvector, label propagation, and walktrap. The influence of correlation threshold (i.e. spatial correlation in flow between stations) on classification (i.e. community formation) is examined. The consistency among the methods in classifying catchments is assessed, using a normalized mutual information (NMI) index. An attempt is also made to explain the community formation in terms of river network/branching and some important catchment/flow properties. The results indicate that the correlation threshold has a notable influence on the number and size of communities identified and that there is a high level of consistency in the performance among the methods (except for the leading eigenvector method at lower thresholds). The results also reveal that only a few communities combine to represent a majority of the catchments, with the 10 largest communities (roughly 4% of the total number of communities) representing almost two-thirds of the catchments. Community formation is found to be influenced not only by geographic proximity but also, more importantly, by the organization of the river network (i.e. main stem and subsequent branching). Some communities are found to exhibit a greater variability in catchment/flow properties within themselves when compared to that of the whole network, thus indicating that such characteristics are unlikely to be a significant influence on community grouping.

  9. Spatial relationships in a dendritic network: the herpetofaunal metacommunity of the Mattole River catchment of northwest California.

    Treesearch

    Hartwell Welsh; Garth Hodgson

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the aquatic and riparian herpetofauna in a 789 km² river catchment in northwest California to examine competing theories of biotic community structuring in catchment stream networks. Research in fluvial geomorphology has resulted in multi-scale models of dynamic processes that cyclically create, maintain, and destroy environments in stream...

  10. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, United Kingdom Summary The challenge of improving water quality (WQ) is a growing global concern [1]. Poor WQ is mainly attributed to poor water management and outdated agricultural activities. We propose that collaborative sensor networks spread across an entire catchment can allow cooperation among individual activities for integrated WQ monitoring and management. We show that sharing information on critical parameters among networks of water bodies and farms can enable identification and quantification of the contaminant sources, enabling better decision making for agricultural practices and thereby reducing contaminants fluxes. Motivation and results Nutrient losses from land to water have accelerated due to agricultural and urban pursuits [2]. In many cases, the application of fertiliser can be reduced by 30-50% without any loss of yield [3]. Thus information about nutrient levels and trends around the farm can improve agricultural practices and thereby reduce water contamination. The use of sensor networks for monitoring WQ in a catchment is in its infancy, but more applications are being tested [4]. However, these are focussed on local requirements and are mostly limited to water bodies. They have yet to explore the use of this technology for catchment-scale monitoring and management decisions, in an autonomous and dynamic manner. For effective and integrated WQ management, we propose a system that utilises local monitoring networks across a catchment, with provision for collaborative information sharing. This system of networks shares information about critical events, such as rain or flooding. Higher-level applications make use of this information to inform decisions about nutrient management, improving the quality of monitoring through the provision of richer datasets of catchment information to local networks. In the full paper, we present example scenarios and analyse how the benefits of

  11. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, Till H. M.; Lyon, Steve W.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Troch, Peter A.

    2010-11-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in mountainous catchments. Given economical considerations, a long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement of a small number of rain gauges to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for the Sabino Canyon catchment near Tucson, Arizona, USA, given its complex topography and dominant storm track pattern. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate all possible configurations of a "practical" network having from one to four rain gauges. A multicriteria design strategy is used to guide rain gauge placement, by simultaneously minimizing the residual percent bias and maximizing the coefficient of correlation between the estimated and true mean areal rainfall and minimizing the normalized spatial mean squared error between the estimated and true spatiotemporal rainfall distribution. The performance of the optimized rain gauge network was then compared against randomly designed network ensembles by evaluating the quality of streamflows predicted using the Kinematic Runoff and Erosion (KINEROS2) event-based rainfall-runoff model. Our results indicate that the multicriteria strategy provided a robust design by which a sparse but accurate network of rain gauges could be implemented for semiarid basins such as the one studied.

  12. Modeling water flow in a tile drainage network in glacial clayey tills in an agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Schepper, G.; Therrien, R.; Refsgaard, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tile drainage is a widespread water management practice applied to poorly drained production fields to increase crop productivity and reduce flooding risks. A challenge associated with water resources management in agricultural catchments is to properly understand and quantify the role of tile drainage for the catchment water balance. Only a few studies have been presented where different numerical modeling approaches were tested to simulate tile drainage at the field or catchment scale. These studies suggest that challenges still remainto represent correctly subsurface drainage networks in numerical models while accounting for their influence on water flow and transport. To investigate the impact of tile drains, a variably-saturated flow model has been applied to the Lillebaek agricultural catchment, Denmark. The Lillebaek catchment covers 5 ha and is underlain by about 30 m of Quaternary deposits that consist of a local sandy aquifer with upper and lower clayey till units. A tile drainage network is located in the upper clay till. Water table elevations are recorded daily in a network of piezometers within the catchment, as well as drainage and stream discharge. The control volume finite element HydroGeoSphere model is used to simulate 3D variably-saturated flow in the catchment, coupled with 1D open-channel flow in tile drains and 2D overland flow. That approach requires that the tile drainage network be represented explicitly in the model with 1D elements. The 3D field-scale hydrogeological model was first generated from a national-scale geological model for Denmark combined with available local borehole data. A reference model was then generated for 3D variably-saturated subsurface flow coupled with 2D overland flow. That reference model also incorporates discrete 1D elements to represent the entire drainage network, with a critical depth boundary condition applied to the outlet of the drainage networks. A series of simulation were performed to test the

  13. Estimation of regional recharge in the HOBE catchment using data from a distributed soil moisture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, M.; Andreasen, L. A.; Bircher, S.; Sonnenborg, T.; Jensen, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The regional variation of recharge of ground water is dependent on a larger number of variables and conditions and is therefore difficult to quantify. In this study we have estimated regional recharge using data from a distributed network of soil moisture stations within the HOBE catchment. The network has been designed in an arrangement of three clusters along a long-term precipitation gradient and the stations have been distributed according to respective fractions of classes combining the prevailing land use, top- and subsoil conditions. At each of the 30 stations water content has been measured at three depths (0-5cm, 20-25cm and 50-55cm) for the period 2009-2011 at a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. The 1D soil-plant-atmosphere system model DAISY has been applied to each of the field locations to simulate the water balance of the root zone and the associated components of evapotranspiration and recharge. The 30 models have been formulated and parameterized using specific information on local climate, soil texture, land use and management. Each model was calibrated to the measured soil water content from the distributed network using the PEST (Parameter ESTimation) software. The calibrated parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and van Genuchten parameter n as they were found most sensitive. The 30 sets of results were averaged to represent the mean conditions of the catchment. An effective parameterization was also determined by calibration against mean soil moisture and compared to the results obtained by using effective parameters using various averaging methods. The regional variation in groundwater recharge, actual evapotranspiration and soil water content in the catchment was dependent on land use. The simulated results showed that the largest recharge was found at the agricultural sites (554 mm/yr) and the lowest at the forested sites (257 mm/yr). Correspondingly, the highest actual evapotranspiration was found at the forested sites (614

  14. Effects of a network of sand-storage dams on the hydrology on catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits; Strohschein, Paul; Onencan, Abby; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Water conservation is a high priority in the drier areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Storage of water from the rainy season to the dry season, or even from wet years to dry years is highly important. Small multi-purpose sub-surface water reservoirs recharged through infiltration are used to provide water for humans, livestock and crops in the Kitui region in Kenya. The groundwater dams obstruct the natural flow of water in wet seasons or periods, and provide storage of water during dry seasons or periods. This paper links the hydrology of the sand-storage dams to human agency. When is a dam a success in hydrological terms? When it provides water every year? Every two years? How many months? What happens in very dry years? Obviously, water use will decrease the water volume and thus the water level upstream of the dam, but to what extent typically depends on the amounts used compared to the size of the dam and the water use itself. Longer-term effects on groundwater levels to be expected depend strongly on the way the water is used. Household water use and river banks infiltration increasing seasonal storage can go hand in hand. However, when water in dams is used for higher water demanding activities such as (motorized) irrigation, the infiltration effect into banks may be minimal. A dam can also be "too effective" and decrease water availability for water users further downstream. It is unlikely, however, that an individual farmer will effect on the downstream users of the resources he/she is tapping, but a network of dams as in Kitui may have considerable effect. Measurements indicate that only about 2% to 3% of the total yearly runoff within the catchment directly associated with a single dam is stored in its reservoir. Therefore only this small percentage of the total flow of a seasonal river with dams is blocked. The paper will detail these general concepts with a case study of the Kiindu catchment. The hydrology of the Kiindu catchment is dependent on different

  15. Regionalization of land-use impacts on streamflow using a network of paired catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Tocachi, Boris F.; Buytaert, Wouter; De Bièvre, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying the impact of land use and cover (LUC) change on catchment hydrological response is essential for land-use planning and management. Yet hydrologists are often not able to present consistent and reliable evidence to support such decision-making. The issue tends to be twofold: a scarcity of relevant observations, and the difficulty of regionalizing any existing observations. This study explores the potential of a paired catchment monitoring network to provide statistically robust, regionalized predictions of LUC change impact in an environment of high hydrological variability. We test the importance of LUC variables to explain hydrological responses and to improve regionalized predictions using 24 catchments distributed along the Tropical Andes. For this, we calculate first 50 physical catchment properties, and then select a subset based on correlation analysis. The reduced set is subsequently used to regionalize a selection of hydrological indices using multiple linear regression. Contrary to earlier studies, we find that incorporating LUC variables in the regional model structures increases significantly regression performance and predictive capacity for 66% of the indices. For the runoff ratio, baseflow index, and slope of the flow duration curve, the mean absolute error reduces by 53% and the variance of the residuals by 79%, on average. We attribute the explanatory capacity of LUC in the regional model to the pairwise monitoring setup, which increases the contrast of the land-use signal in the data set. As such, it may be a useful strategy to optimize data collection to support watershed management practices and improve decision-making in data-scarce regions.

  16. Applying the Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network for mapping erosive status in the Ria Formosa catchment (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja Martins, F. M.; Neto Paixão, H. M.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.; Bellinfante, N.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the soil erosion risk is the starting point for development and sustainable land management. The intensity of soil erosion risk is conditioned by soil erodibility, slope, land use and vegetation cover. The objective of this work is mapping the erosive status of the Ria Formosa catchment using "Fuzzy ARTMAP" neural network. The study area is the catchment of Ria Formosa, which includes a shallow coastal lagoon with an area of about 16000 ha located in Algarve (southern Portugal). It is protected by EU and national laws, and is classified as a wetland of international importance under the RAMSAR convention. Previously to the construction of the artificial neuronal network model, it was necessary to establish the training areas (< 1% of total study area) in order to get information about lithofacies, land use, slope and the percentage of vegetation cover. These variables were assessed by supervised classification. Five classes of erosive status were obtained by the artificial neuronal network. These classes were compared with the map of erosive status elaborated with the methodology proposed by the Priority Action Plan/Regional Activity Centre (PAP/RAC, 1997). The differences between both methods were about 1% of the total area. Both maps were validated with field observations and analysis of aerial photographs.

  17. Mapping hydrological signatures in the tropical Andes using a network of paired catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Tocachi, B. F.; Buytaert, W.; De Bièvre, B.

    2016-12-01

    The complexity and data scarcity of tropical Andean catchments make regional hydrological predictions very challenging. The strong spatiotemporal patterns of the local climate contrast with the inadequate coverage, especially of remote areas, by the national monitoring networks. We present an approach to regionalize the hydrological impacts of land-use and land-cover (LUC) using a network of 24 headwater catchments in a pairwise comparison approach. We monitored precipitation and streamflow through an informal partnership of stakeholders in the Andes, known as iMHEA. Using a `trading-space-for-time' approach, our design aims at strengthening the statistical significance of LUC signals. To test our hypothesis, we summarized the hydrological responses using a set of indices, which are then regionalized against catchment properties including land-use. Lastly, the regionalization model is then used to generate distributed maps of hydrological signatures in ungauged areas. Our results clearly reflect the dominant regional climate patterns of the tropical Andes and the associated wide spectrum of hydrological responses. Although the hydrological impacts of LUC are equally diverse, we find consistent trends within different biomes. Contrary to earlier studies, we find that incorporating LUC variables in the regionalization increases significantly the performance of the regression model and its predictive capacity, which makes it possible to generate regional maps that predict the dynamics and propagation of streamflow signatures in complex regions with an explicit report of uncertainty. We attribute the robust regionalization results to the regional pairwise setup that covers diverse physiographic characteristics, contrasting LUC types, and degrees of conservation/alteration. As such, it may be a useful strategy to optimize data collection, leverage commonly available geographical information, and understand the major controls of hydrological response in data

  18. A low cost strategy to monitor the expansion and contraction of the flowing stream network in mountainous headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assendelft, Rick; van Meerveld, Ilja; Seibert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Streams are dynamic features in the landscape. The flowing stream network expands and contracts, connects and disconnects in response to rainfall events and seasonal changes in catchment wetness. Sections of the river system that experience these wet and dry cycles are often referred to as temporary streams. Temporary streams are abundant and widely distributed freshwater ecosystems. They account for more than half of the total length of the global stream network, are unique habitats and form important hydrological and ecological links between the uplands and perennial streams. However, temporary streams have been largely unstudied, especially in mountainous headwater catchments. The dynamic character of these systems makes it difficult to monitor them. We describe a low-cost, do-it-yourself strategy to monitor the occurrence of water and flow in temporary streams. We evaluate this strategy in two headwater catchments in Switzerland. The low cost sensor network consists of electrical resistivity sensors, water level switches, temperature sensors and flow sensors. These sensors are connected to Arduino microcontrollers and data loggers, which log the data every 5 minutes. The data from the measurement network are compared with observations (mapping of the temporary stream network) as well as time lapse camera data to evaluate the performance of the sensors. We look at how frequently the output of the sensors (presence and absence of water from the ER and water level data, and flow or no-flow from the flow sensors) corresponds to the observed channel state. This is done for each sensor, per sub-catchment, per precipitation event and per sensor location to determine the best sensor combination to monitor temporary streams in mountainous catchments and in which situation which sensor combination works best. The preliminary results show that the sensors and monitoring network work well. The data from the sensors corresponds with the observations and provides information

  19. Catchment organisation, free energy dynamics and network control on critical zone water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Kleidon, A.; Jackisch, C.; Scherer, U.; Blume, T.

    2012-04-01

    From a functional point of view the catchment system is compiled by patterns of permeable and less permeable textural elements - soils and mother rock. Theses textural elements provide a mechanical stabile matrix for growth of terrestrial biota and soil formation. They furthermore organize subsurface storage of water against gravity, dissolved nutrients and heat. Storage against gravity is only possible because water acts as wetting fluid and is thus attracted by capillary forces in the pores space. Capillarity increases non-linearly with decreasing pore size and is zero at local saturation. The pore size distribution of a soil is thus characteristic of its capability to store water against losses such as drainage, evaporation and root extraction and at the same time a fingerprint of the work that has been performed by physical, chemical and biological processes to weather solid mother rock and form a soil. A strong spatial covariance of soil hydraulic properties within the same soil type is due to a fingerprint of strong spatial organization at small scales. Spatial organization at the hillslope scale implies the existence of a typical soil catena i.e. that hillslopes exhibit the same/ downslope sequence of different soils types. Textural storage elements are separated by strikingly self-similar network like structures, we name them flow structures. These flow structures are created in a self-reinforcing manner by work performed either by biota like earth worms and plant roots or by dissipative processes such as soil cracking and water/fluvial erosion. Regardless of their different origin connected flow structures exhibit a highly similar functioning and similar characteristics: they allow for high mass flows at small driving potential gradients because specific flow resistance along the network is continuously very small. This implies temporal stability even during small extremes, due to the small amount of local momentum dissipation per unit mass flow, as well

  20. Estimation of snow covered area for an urban catchment using image processing and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Matheussen, B V; Thorolfsson, S T

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a method to estimate the snow covered area (SCA) for small urban catchments. The method uses images taken with a digital camera positioned on top of a tall building. The camera is stationary and takes overview images of the same area every fifteen minutes throughout the winter season. The images were read into an image-processing program and a three-layered feed-forward perceptron artificial neural network (ANN) was used to calculate fractional snow cover within three different land cover types (road, park and roofs). The SCA was estimated from the number of pixels with snow cover relative to the total number of pixels. The method was tested for a small urban catchment, Risvollan in Trondheim, Norway. A time series of images taken during spring of 2001 and the 2001-2002 winter season was used to generate a time series of SCA. Snow covered area was also estimated from aerial photos. The results showed a strong correlation between SCA estimated from the digital camera and the aerial photos. The time series of SCA can be used for verification of urban snowmelt models.

  1. Design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction: assessment based on spatial moments of catchment rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Zoccatelli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in terrain characterized by complex orography. A long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement and density of a rain gauge network to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for a number of catchments subject to flash floods observed in Europe. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate several configurations of a raingauge network with variable spatial densities. A methodology is used for the selection of raingauge sites, given a certain spatial density, which is based on the use of the spatial moments of catchment rainfall. This set of statistics quantifies the dependence existing between spatial rainfall organisation, basin morphology and runoff response. These statistics describe the spatial rainfall organisation in terms of position and dispersion as a function of the distance measured along the flow routing coordinate. Rainfall estimates obtained from the 'optimised' raingauge network are used as input for a distributed hydrological model. Results from these simulations are compared with those obtained by using the measured rainfall and with those obtained by estimating rainfall from randomly designed network ensembles. Our results show that indications from the optimization of the spatial moments of catchment rainfall may help to provide a robust design for rain gauge network design.

  2. Analysis of spatiotemporal soil moisture patterns at the catchment scale using a wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, Heye R.; Huisman, Johan A.; Rosenbaum, Ulrike; Weuthen, Ansgar; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    Soil water content plays a key role in partitioning water and energy fluxes and controlling the pattern of groundwater recharge. Despite the importance of soil water content, it is not yet measured in an operational way at larger scales. The aim of this paper is to present the potential of real-time monitoring for the analysis of soil moisture patterns at the catchment scale using the recently developed wireless sensor network SoilNet [1], [2]. SoilNet is designed to measure soil moisture, salinity and temperature in several depths (e.g. 5, 20 and 50 cm). Recently, a small forest catchment Wüstebach (~27 ha) has been instrumented with 150 sensor nodes and more than 1200 soil sensors in the framework of the Transregio32 and the Helmholtz initiative TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories). From August to November 2009, more than 6 million soil moisture measurements have been performed. We will present first results from a statistical and geostatistical analysis of the data. The observed spatial variability of soil moisture corresponds well with the 800-m scale variability described in [3]. The very low scattering of the standard deviation versus mean soil moisture plots indicates that sensor network data shows less artificial soil moisture variations than soil moisture data originated from measurement campaigns. The variograms showed more or less the same nugget effect, which indicates that the sum of the sub-scale variability and the measurement error is rather time-invariant. Wet situations showed smaller spatial variability, which is attributed to saturated soil water content, which poses an upper limit and is typically not strongly variable in headwater catchments with relatively homogeneous soil. The spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture at 50 cm depth was significantly lower than at 5 and 20 cm. This finding indicates that the considerable variability of the top soil is buffered deeper in the soil due to lateral and vertical water fluxes

  3. Ensemble modelling of nutrient loads and nutrient load partitioning in 17 European catchments.

    PubMed

    Kronvang, B; Behrendt, H; Andersen, H E; Arheimer, B; Barr, A; Borgvang, S A; Bouraoui, F; Granlund, K; Grizzetti, B; Groenendijk, P; Schwaiger, E; Hejzlar, J; Hoffmann, L; Johnsson, H; Panagopoulos, Y; Lo Porto, A; Reisser, H; Schoumans, O; Anthony, S; Silgram, M; Venohr, M; Larsen, S E

    2009-03-01

    An ensemble of nutrient models was applied in 17 European catchments to analyse the variation that appears after simulation of net nutrient loads and partitioning of nutrient loads at catchment scale. Eight models for N and five models for P were applied in three core catchments covering European-wide gradients in climate, topography, soil types and land use (Vansjø-Hobøl (Norway), Ouse (Yorkshire, UK) and Enza (Italy)). Moreover, each of the models was applied in 3-14 other EUROHARP catchments in order to inter-compare the outcome of the nutrient load partitioning at a wider European scale. The results of the nutrient load partitioning show a variation in the computed average annual nitrogen and phosphorus loss from agricultural land within the 17 catchments between 19.1-34.6 kg N ha(-1) and 0.12-1.67 kg P ha(-1). All the applied nutrient models show that the catchment specific variation (range and standard deviation) in the model results is lowest when simulating the net nutrient load and becomes increasingly higher for simulation of the gross nutrient loss from agricultural land and highest for the simulations of the gross nutrient loss from other diffuse sources in the core catchments. The average coefficient of variation for the model simulations of gross P loss from agricultural land is nearly twice as high (67%) as for the model simulations of gross N loss from agricultural land (40%). The variation involved in model simulations of net nutrient load and gross nutrient losses in European catchments was due to regional factors and the presence or absence of large lakes within the catchment.

  4. Network-based Modeling of Mesoscale Catchments - The Hydrology Perspective of Glowa-danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, R.; Escher-Vetter, H.; Hennicker, R.; Mauser, W.; Niemeyer, S.; Reichstein, M.; Tenhunen, J.

    Within the GLOWA initiative of the German Ministry for Research and Educa- tion (BMBF), the project GLOWA-Danube is funded to establish a transdisciplinary network-based decision support tool for water related issues in the Upper Danube wa- tershed. It aims to develop and validate integration techniques, integrated models and integrated monitoring procedures and to implement them in the network-based De- cision Support System DANUBIA. An accurate description of processes involved in energy, water and matter fluxes and turnovers requires an intense collaboration and exchange of water related expertise of different scientific disciplines. DANUBIA is conceived as a distributed expert network and is developed on the basis of re-useable, refineable, and documented sub-models. In order to synthesize a common understand- ing between the project partners, a standardized notation of parameters and functions and a platform-independent structure of computational methods and interfaces has been established using the Unified Modeling Language UML. DANUBIA is object- oriented, spatially distributed and raster-based at its core. It applies the concept of "proxels" (Process Pixel) as its basic object, which has different dimensions depend- ing on the viewing scale and connects to its environment through fluxes. The presented study excerpts the hydrological view point of GLOWA-Danube, its approach of model coupling and network based communication (using the Remote Method Invocation RMI), the object-oriented technology to simulate physical processes and interactions at the land surface and the methodology to treat the issue of spatial and temporal scal- ing in large, heterogeneous catchments. The mechanisms applied to communicate data and model parameters across the typical discipline borders will be demonstrated from the perspective of a land-surface object, which comprises the capabilities of interde- pendent expert models for snowmelt, soil water movement, runoff formation, plant

  5. A spatially distributed isotope sampling network in a snow-dominated catchment for the quantification of snow meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, Andrea; Boss, Stefan; Von Freyberg, Jana; Zappa, Massimiliano; Kirchner, James

    2017-04-01

    In mountainous catchments with seasonal snowpacks, river discharge in downstream valleys is largely sustained by snowmelt in spring and summer. Future climate warming will likely reduce snow volumes and lead to earlier and faster snowmelt in such catchments. This, in turn, may increase the risk of summer low flows and hydrological droughts. Improved runoff predictions are thus required in order to adapt water management to future climatic conditions and to assure the availability of fresh water throughout the year. However, a detailed understanding of the hydrological processes is crucial to obtain robust predictions of river streamflow. This in turn requires fingerprinting source areas of streamflow, tracing water flow pathways, and measuring timescales of catchment storage, using tracers such as stable water isotopes (18O, 2H). For this reason, we have established an isotope sampling network in the Alptal, a snowmelt-dominated catchment (46.4 km2) in Central-Switzerland, as part of the SREP-Drought project (Snow Resources and the Early Prediction of hydrological DROUGHT in mountainous streams). Precipitation and snow cores are analyzed for their isotopic signature at daily or weekly intervals. Three-week bulk samples of precipitation are also collected on a transect along the Alptal valley bottom, and along an elevational transect perpendicular to the Alptal valley axis. Streamwater samples are taken at the catchment outlet as well as in two small nested sub-catchments (< 2 km2). In order to catch the isotopic signature of naturally-occurring snowmelt, a fully automatic snow lysimeter system was developed, which also facilitates real-time monitoring of snowmelt events, system status and environmental conditions (air and soil temperature). Three lysimeter systems were installed within the catchment, in one forested site and two open field sites at different elevations, and have been operational since November 2016. We will present the isotope time series from our

  6. Use of spatially distributed time-integrated sediment sampling networks and distributed fine sediment modelling to inform catchment management.

    PubMed

    Perks, M T; Warburton, J; Bracken, L J; Reaney, S M; Emery, S B; Hirst, S

    2017-02-06

    Under the EU Water Framework Directive, suspended sediment is omitted from environmental quality standards and compliance targets. This omission is partly explained by difficulties in assessing the complex dose-response of ecological communities. But equally, it is hindered by a lack of spatially distributed estimates of suspended sediment variability across catchments. In this paper, we demonstrate the inability of traditional, discrete sampling campaigns for assessing exposure to fine sediment. Sampling frequencies based on Environmental Quality Standard protocols, whilst reflecting typical manual sampling constraints, are unable to determine the magnitude of sediment exposure with an acceptable level of precision. Deviations from actual concentrations range between -35 and +20% based on the interquartile range of simulations. As an alternative, we assess the value of low-cost, suspended sediment sampling networks for quantifying suspended sediment transfer (SST). In this study of the 362 km(2) upland Esk catchment we observe that spatial patterns of sediment flux are consistent over the two year monitoring period across a network of 17 monitoring sites. This enables the key contributing sub-catchments of Butter Beck (SST: 1141 t km(2) yr(-1)) and Glaisdale Beck (SST: 841 t km(2) yr(-1)) to be identified. The time-integrated samplers offer a feasible alternative to traditional infrequent and discrete sampling approaches for assessing spatio-temporal changes in contamination. In conjunction with a spatially distributed diffuse pollution model (SCIMAP), time-integrated sediment sampling is an effective means of identifying critical sediment source areas in the catchment, which can better inform sediment management strategies for pollution prevention and control.

  7. The Children's Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN): case catchment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Jessica R B; Spector, Logan G; Krailo, Mark D; Reaman, Gregory H; Linabery, Amy M; Poynter, Jenny N; Stork, Susan K; Adamson, Peter C; Ross, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children's Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age <20 years were registered in the CCRN, including 45%, 57%, 51%, 44%, and 24% of those diagnosed at birth, ages 1 to 4 years, ages 5 to 9 years, ages 10 to 14 years, and ages 15 to 19 years, respectively. Some malignancies were better represented in the CCRN (leukemia, 59%; renal tumors, 67%) than others (retinoblastoma, 34%). There was little evidence of differences by sex or race/ethnicity, although rates in nonwhites were somewhat lower than rates in whites. Given the low observed-to-expected ratio, it will be important to identify challenges and barriers to registration to improve case ascertainment, especially for rarer diagnoses and older age groups; however, it is encouraging that some diagnoses in younger children are fairly representative of the population. Overall, the CCRN is providing centralized, real-time access to cases for research and could be used as a model for other national cooperative groups. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  8. Optimizing embedded sensor network design for catchment-scale snow-depth estimation using LiDAR and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroza, Carlos A.; Zheng, Zeshi; Glaser, Steven D.; Tuia, Devis; Bales, Roger C.

    2016-10-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of a machine-learning algorithm that uses LiDAR data to optimize ground-based sensor placements for catchment-scale snow measurements. Sampling locations that best represent catchment physiographic variables are identified with the Expectation Maximization algorithm for a Gaussian mixture model. A Gaussian process is then used to model the snow depth in a 1 km2 area surrounding the network, and additional sensors are placed to minimize the model uncertainty. The aim of the study is to determine the distribution of sensors that minimizes the bias and RMSE of the model. We compare the accuracy of the snow-depth model using the proposed placements to an existing sensor network at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Each model is validated with a 1 m2 LiDAR-derived snow-depth raster from 14 March 2010. The proposed algorithm exhibits higher accuracy with fewer sensors (8 sensors, RMSE 38.3 cm, bias = 3.49 cm) than the existing network (23 sensors, RMSE 53.0 cm, bias = 15.5 cm) and randomized placements (8 sensors, RMSE 63.7 cm, bias = 24.7 cm). We then evaluate the spatial and temporal transferability of the method using 14 LiDAR scenes from two catchments within the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory. In each region, the optimized sensor placements are determined using the first available snow raster for the year. The accuracy in the remaining LiDAR surveys is then compared to 100 configurations of sensors selected at random. We find the error statistics (bias and RMSE) to be more consistent across the additional surveys than the average random configuration.

  9. Modeling Stochastic Boundary Conditions in a Coastal Catchment using a Bayesian Network: An Application to the Houston Ship Channel, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couasnon, Anaïs; Sebastian, Antonia; Morales-Nápoles, Oswaldo

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has highlighted the increased risk of compound flooding in the U.S. In coastal catchments, an elevated downstream water level, resulting from high tide and/or storm surge, impedes drainage creating a backwater effect that may exacerbate flooding in the riverine environment. Catchments exposed to tropical cyclone activity along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts are particularly vulnerable. However, conventional flood hazard models focus mainly on precipitation-induced flooding and few studies accurately represent the hazard associated with the interaction between discharge and elevated downstream water levels. This study presents a method to derive stochastic boundary conditions for a coastal watershed. Mean daily discharge and maximum daily residual water levels are used to build a non-parametric Bayesian network (BN) based on copulas. Stochastic boundary conditions for the watershed are extracted from the BN and input into a 1-D process-based hydraulic model to obtain water surface elevations in the main channel of the catchment. The method is applied to a section of the Houston Ship Channel (Buffalo Bayou) in Southeast Texas. Data at six stream gages and two tidal stations are used to build the BN and 100-year joint return period events are modeled. We find that the dependence relationship between the daily residual water level and the mean daily discharge in the catchment can be represented by a Gumbel copula (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.31) and that they result in higher water levels in the mid- to upstream reaches of the watershed than when modeled independently. This indicates that conventional (deterministic) methods may underestimate the flood hazard associated with compound flooding in the riverine environment and that such interactions should not be neglected in future coastal flood hazard studies.

  10. On the Derivation of Pan-European River Networks and Catchment Boundaries from a 250m DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, R.; Vogt, J. V.; Soille, P.; Paracchini, M. L.; de Jager, A. L.

    2003-04-01

    Mapping and characterisation of catchments and river courses for the European continent is of relevant interest to support the environmental monitoring activities of the European Environmental Agency (EEA) and for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). At continental or global scale the river networks and associated catchments are generally derived from a set of standard DEM processing techniques, including pit filling, stream burning, and the calculation of flow direction and flow accumulation grids. The continental final river networks are generally detected by imposing a constant critical contributing area threshold, independently of widely varying landscape conditions. If the same critical area for all environments is assumed, the resulting drainage density does not reflect the real degree of dissection and the produced river map may be unrealistic. To overcome this limitation, we propose a classification of the landscape and we present a new approach to derive river networks and catchments over extended heterogeneous areas from medium resolution digital elevation data (250 m grid cell size) and environmental characteristics,. We show that the implementation of a European landscape characterisation, coupled with the analysis of the local slope versus contributing area represents a viable way for mapping the spatial variability of the river networks. Such landscape classification has been realised using a parametric model that keeps into account a set of five variables [annual rainfall (P), local relief (R), vegetation cover (V), soil transmissivity (T), and bedrock erodibility (E)] that quantify the environmental factors governing drainage density. The critical contributing area was derived for each landscape drainage density class by analysing the log-log plot of local slope contributing area relationships derived from the digital elevation data. The scaling break corresponding to the main valley networks was defined as the last inflection

  11. Integration of Volterra model with artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff simulation in forested catchment of northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Kashani, Mahsa; Ghorbani, Mohammad Ali; Dinpashoh, Yagob; Shahmorad, Sedaghat

    2016-09-01

    Rainfall-runoff simulation is an important task in water resources management. In this study, an integrated Volterra model with artificial neural networks (IVANN) was presented to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. The proposed integrated model includes the semi-distributed forms of the Volterra and ANN models which can explore spatial variation in rainfall-runoff process without requiring physical characteristic parameters of the catchments, while taking advantage of the potential of Volterra and ANNs models in nonlinear mapping. The IVANN model was developed using hourly rainfall and runoff data pertaining to thirteen storms to study short-term responses of a forest catchment in northern Iran; and its performance was compared with that of semi-distributed integrated ANN (IANN) model and lumped Volterra model. The Volterra model was applied as a nonlinear model (second-order Volterra (SOV) model) and solved using the ordinary least square (OLS) method. The models performance were evaluated and compared using five performance criteria namely coefficient of efficiency, root mean square error, error of total volume, relative error of peak discharge and error of time for peak to arrive. Results showed that the IVANN model performs well than the other semi-distributed and lumped models to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. Comparing to the integrated models, the lumped SOV model has lower precision to simulate the rainfall-runoff process.

  12. Integration of Volterra model with artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff simulation in forested catchment of northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Mahsa H.; Ghorbani, Mohammad Ali; Dinpashoh, Yagob; Shahmorad, Sedaghat

    2016-09-01

    Rainfall-runoff simulation is an important task in water resources management. In this study, an integrated Volterra model with artificial neural networks (IVANN) was presented to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. The proposed integrated model includes the semi-distributed forms of the Volterra and ANN models which can explore spatial variation in rainfall-runoff process without requiring physical characteristic parameters of the catchments, while taking advantage of the potential of Volterra and ANNs models in nonlinear mapping. The IVANN model was developed using hourly rainfall and runoff data pertaining to thirteen storms to study short-term responses of a forest catchment in northern Iran; and its performance was compared with that of semi-distributed integrated ANN (IANN) model and lumped Volterra model. The Volterra model was applied as a nonlinear model (second-order Volterra (SOV) model) and solved using the ordinary least square (OLS) method. The models performance were evaluated and compared using five performance criteria namely coefficient of efficiency, root mean square error, error of total volume, relative error of peak discharge and error of time for peak to arrive. Results showed that the IVANN model performs well than the other semi-distributed and lumped models to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. Comparing to the integrated models, the lumped SOV model has lower precision to simulate the rainfall-runoff process.

  13. An integrated approach for catchment delineation and conduit-network modeling in karst aquifers: application to a site in the Swiss tabular Jura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Vouillamoz, Jonathan; Weber, Eric

    2015-11-01

    An essential issue in karst hydrology is the characterization of the hydrogeological flow systems, i.e., the delineation of catchment areas and the organization of the main flow paths (conduit network) feeding one or several outlets. The proposed approach provides an explicit way to sketch catchment areas, and to generate karst conduits on the basis of a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of the aquifer (KARSYS approach). The approach follows three main principles: (1) conduits develop according to the hydraulic gradient, which depends on the aquifer zonation, (2) conduits are guided by preferential guidance features (or inception horizons) prevailing in the unsaturated and saturated zones of the aquifer, and (3) conduits initiate on a regular basis below the autogenic zone of the catchment area. This approach was applied to a site in the Swiss Jura as a base for the assessment of flood-hazard risks. The resulting model proposes a new delineation of the system catchment area and appears fairer regarding hydrological measurements than previous interpretations, which under-estimated the catchment area by about 20 %. Furthermore, the proposed conduit network for the whole aquifer is also consistent with local cave surveys and dye-tracing observations. These interesting results demonstrate that the combination of this approach with the KARSYS 3D model provides an integrated and effective way for the characterization of karst-flow systems.

  14. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heyden, Constantin J.; New, Mark G.

    Dambos are shallow, seasonally inundated wetlands and are a widespread landform in Central and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology of dambos is of considerable interest: varied, and sometimes contradictory, hydrological characteristics have been described in the literature. The issues in contention focus on the role of the dambo in (i) the catchment evapotranspiration (ET) budget, (ii) flood flow retardation and attenuation, and (iii) sustaining dry season flow to the river down-stream. In addition, both rainfall and groundwater have been identified as the dominant source of water to the dambo and various hydrogeological models have been proposed to describe the hydrological functions of the landform. In this paper, hydrological and geochemical data collected over a full hydrological year are used to investigate and describe the hydrological functions of a dambo in north-western Zambia. The Penman estimate of wetland ET was less than the ET from the miombo-wooded interfluve and the wetland has been shown to have little effect on flood flow retardation or attenuation. Discharge of water stored within the wetland contributed little to the dry season flow from the dambo, which was sustained primarily by groundwater discharge. Flow in a perched aquifer within the catchment soils contributed a large portion of baseflow during the rains and early dry season. This source ceased by the mid dry season, implying that the sustained middle to late dry season streamflow from the wetland is through discharge of a deeper aquifer within the underlying regolith or bedrock. This hypothesis is tested through an analysis of groundwater and wetland geochemistry. Various physical parameters, PHREEQC model results and end member mixing analysis (EMMA) suggest strongly that the deep Upper Roan dolomite aquifer is the source of sustained discharge from the wetland.

  15. Water level and response time of rivers during flash floods derived from a nested network in the Claduègne Mediterranean catchment (43 km2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Sosa, Enrique; Braud, Isabelle; Molinié, Gilles; Nord, Guillaume; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Uber, Magdalana

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods are natural hazards that affect the Mediterranean region. They are caused by intense rainfall events but catchments characteristics are also influential on the hydrological response. In order to study the respective roles of rainfall, land use, geology and soil moisture on this hydrological response at various scales, a high space-time resolution hydrometeorological experimental monitoring system was set in the Mediterranean Claduègne catchment (43 km2), located in the Ardèche catchment, south-east France between 2011 and 2014 (Braud et al., 2014; Nord et al., in prep). Rainfall was monitored using a high resolution rainfall network (Hpiconet) composed of 21 rain gauges with 1 min time step covering an area of about 100 km2. The monitoring of surface hydrology include water level measurements at the outlet of 10 subcatchments ranging from 0.2 to 2.2 km2 and hydrometric measurements (water level, discharge) at the outlet of 3 catchments (Gazel: 3.4 km², SJ1: 12 km² and Claduègne: 43 km²). The 10 subcatchments as well as the Gazel and SJ1 catchments are all embedded within the Claduègne catchments. The location of the 10 subcatchments was chosen to sample different combinations of geology, land use and pedology within the Claduègne catchment. In particular, 4 of these subcathments are located within the Gazel catchment and 2 are located within the SJ1 catchment. Soil moisture data with a 20 minutes time step at depths 10cm, 20-25 and 30-50 cm is also available at nine locations, sampling different combinations of land use and geology. Catchment rainfall was computed from the Hpiconet data for each sub-catchment and all rainfall events using the Thiessen polygons method. The corresponding hydrological response was extracted for the whole data sets. For each event, rainfall characteristics describing rainfall amount and intensity, antecedent rainfall (and thus initial soil moisture) were computed. When a hydrological response was observed, reaction

  16. A mountain environmental virtual observatory (Mountain-EVO) to support participatory monitoring in a network of Andean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Ochoa Tocachi, Boris; De Bievre, Bert; Zulkafli, Zed

    2015-04-01

    The tropical Andes are a hotspot of environmental change. The combination of dramatic land-use change with global climate change, demographic growth, and increasing water demand is causing extreme pressures on water resources. This is of particular concern to rural upland communities. They are facing a double challenge of maintaining their own livelihoods with dwindling natural resources, and at the same time supporting downstream ecosystem services such as a well buffered stream flow and good water quality. This challenge is complicated further by the acute lack of data on the hydrological functioning of Andean catchments. The factors controlling their hydrological response are extremely variable in space and time, including meteorological forcing, land cover types, soil properties and geology. This makes it very difficult to predict accurately the impact of human activities such as land use, ecosystem management, and watershed investments. Such predictions are essential for policy-making and sustainable ecosystem management. To tackle the issue of hydrological data scarcity in the tropical Andes, an initiative was set up to implement a network of hydrological monitoring of upland catchments in a pairwise fashion. Using a trading-space-for-time approach, the initiative intends to use these data to improve predictions about the impact of land-use changes and other ecosystem management practices on the hydrological response. Currently, over 25 catchments are being monitored for precipitation and streamflow in 9 sites located in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela. The sites are supported by local stakeholders and communities in a participatory monitoring scheme that otherwise would be impractical or prohibitively expensive. To overcome the technical challenges of monitoring hydrological variables in remote mountain areas, the initiative has set up a web-based infrastructure to support local technicians and stakeholders. Additionally, using open data standards such

  17. A comparison of methods to avoid overfitting in neural networks training in the case of catchment runoff modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jarosław J.

    2013-01-01

    SummaryArtificial neural networks (ANNs) becomes very popular tool in hydrology, especially in rainfall-runoff modelling. However, a number of issues should be addressed to apply this technique to a particular problem in an efficient way, including selection of network type, its architecture, proper optimization algorithm and a method to deal with overfitting of the data. The present paper addresses the last, rarely considered issue, namely comparison of methods to prevent multi-layer perceptron neural networks from overfitting of the training data in the case of daily catchment runoff modelling. Among a number of methods to avoid overfitting the early stopping, the noise injection and the weight decay have been known for about two decades, however only the first one is frequently applied in practice. Recently a new methodology called optimized approximation algorithm has been proposed in the literature. Overfitting of the training data leads to deterioration of generalization properties of the model and results in its untrustworthy performance when applied to novel measurements. Hence the purpose of the methods to avoid overfitting is somehow contradictory to the goal of optimization algorithms, which aims at finding the best possible solution in parameter space according to pre-defined objective function and available data. Moreover, different optimization algorithms may perform better for simpler or larger ANN architectures. This suggest the importance of proper coupling of different optimization algorithms, ANN architectures and methods to avoid overfitting of real-world data - an issue that is also studied in details in the present paper. The study is performed for Annapolis River catchment, characterized by significant seasonal changes in runoff, rapid floods during winter and spring, moderately dry summers, severe winters with snowfall, snow melting, frequent freeze and thaw, and presence of river ice. The present paper shows that the elaborated noise

  18. Comparative analyses of factors determining soil erosion rates based on network of Mediterranean monitored catchments for the innovative, adaptive and resilient agriculture of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanová, Anna; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Raclot, Damien; Perdo Nunes, João; Licciardello, Feliciana; Mathys, Nicolle; Latron, Jérôme; Rodríguez Caballero, Emilio; Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Klotz, Sébastien; Mekki, Insaf; Gallart, Francesc; Solé Benet, Albert; Pérez Gallego, Nuria; Andrieux, Patrick; Jantzi, Hugo; Moussa, Roger; Planchon, Olivier; Marisa Santos, Juliana

    2015-04-01

    In order to project the soil erosion response to climate change in the fragile Mediterranean region it is inevitable to understand its existing patterns. Soil erosion monitoring on a catchment scale enables to analyse temporal and spatial variability of soil erosion and sediment delivery, while the integrating study of different catchments is often undertaken to depicther the general patterns. In this study, eight small catchments (with area up to 1,32 km2), representative for the western part of the Mediterranean region (according to climate, bedrock, soils and main type of land use) were compared. These catchments, grouped in the R-OS Med Network were situated in France (3), Spain (2), Portugal (1), Italy (1) and Tunisia (1). The average precipitation ranged between 236 to 1303 mm·a-1 and mean annual sediment yield varied 7.5 to 6900 Mg·km-2·a-1. The complex databes was based on more than 120 years of hydrological and sediment data, with series between 3 and 29 years long. The variability of sediment data was described on annual and monthly basis. The relationship between the sediment yield and more than 35 factors influencing the sediment yield including the characteristics of climate, topography, rainfall, runoff, land use, vegetation and soil cover, connectivity and dominant geomorphic processes, was studied. The preliminary results confirmed the differences in rainfall, runoff and sediment response, and revealed both the similarities and differences in soil erosion responses of the catchments. They are further dependent on the variability of factors themselves, with important contribution of the state of soil properties, vegetation cover and land use. Anna Smetanová has received the support of the European Union, in the framework of the Marie-Curie FP7 COFUND People Programme, through the award of an AgreenSkills' fellowship (under grant agreement n° 267196)

  19. The influence of drainage networks on patterns of soil respiration in a desert catchment.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Ryan A; Fisher, Stuart G

    2008-04-01

    Hydrologic flow and connectivity act as important determinants of ecological pattern and process in heterogeneous landscapes. Here we examine how the routing of water through the drainage network of an upper Sonoran Desert basin influences landscape patterns of soil respiration (SR) at both seasonal and event-based timescales. At seasonal timescales, SR varied up to 13-fold with downstream position in the drainage network, and annual estimates of CO2 efflux ranged from 185 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) to 1190 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) for sites arrayed along the same flow path. Spatial patterns of SR were unrelated to the carbon and water content of surface soils, but rather tracked changes in plant size and productivity, which in turn reflect downstream increases in groundwater availability. The relative importance of precipitation and temperature as drivers of SR also changed with landscape position, with the latter becoming more important in downstream locations. At the scale of individual precipitation events, SR increased up to 30-fold upon rewetting but typically returned to background levels within 24 h, even when soil moisture remained elevated. Unlike patterns observed at seasonal scales, event-based losses of CO2 varied across the landscape as a function of the organic-matter content in surface soils. Results from labile carbon amendments confirm that CO2 losses following precipitation pulses are initially constrained by substrate availability, not soil drying. By mediating spatial patterns of vegetation structure and soil resource availability, drainage networks represent an important physical template upon which belowground processes are organized in desert basins.

  20. Evaporation over a Heterogeneous Mixed Savanna-Agricultural Catchment using a Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, N. C.; Mande, T.; Barrenetxea, G.; Vetterli, M.; Yacouba, H.; Repetti, A.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Small scale rain fed agriculture is the primary livelihood for a large part of the population of Burkina Faso. Regional climate change means that this population is becoming increasingly vulnerable. Additionally, as natural savanna is converted for agriculture, hydrological systems are observed to become less stable as infiltration is decreased and rapid runoff is increased to the detriment of crop productivity, downstream populations and local water sources. The majority of the Singou River Basin, located in South East Burkina Faso is managed by hunting reserves, geared to maintaining high populations of wild game; however, residents surrounding the protected areas have been forced to intensify agriculture that has resulted in soil degradation as well as increases in the frequency and severity of flooding and droughts. Agroforestry, or planting trees in cultivated fields, has been proposed as a solution to help buffer these negative consequences, however the specific hydrologic behavior of the watershed land cover is unknown. We have installed a distributed sensor network of 17 Sensorscope wireless meteorological stations. These stations are dispersed across cultivated rice and millet fields, natural savanna, fallow fields, and around agroforestry fields. Sensorscope routes data through the network of stations to be delivered by a GPRS connection to a main server. This multi hop network allows data to be gathered over a large area and quickly adapts to changes in station performance. Data are available in real time via a website that can be accessed by a mobile phone. The stations are powered autonomously by small photovoltaic panels. This deployment is the first time that these meteorological stations have been used on the African continent. Initial calibration with measures from 2 eddy covariance stations allows us to calculate the energy balance at each of the Sensorscope stations. Thus, we can observe variation in evaporation over the various land cover in the

  1. Network analysis of sediment cascades derived from a digital geomorphological map - an example from the Gradenbach catchment (Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Joachim; Heckmann, Tobias; Schrott, Lothar

    2013-04-01

    A detailed geomorphological map of the Gradenbach catchment (32 km², Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps) is presented that focuses on the sediment transfer system. Data were acquired in the field and by the interpretation of orthophotos, LIDAR data and derivatives (slope, curvature, aspect, shaded relief). The resulting digital geomorphological map contains polygon representations of landforms together with their morphometric parameters and an assessment of recent geomorphic activity. Special attention was paid to landform coupling, i.e. an additional table was constructed that indicates recently observable coupling between specific landforms (based on their ID in the database). From these data, we can obtain sediment cascades as a succession of coupled landforms along which sediment transfer occurs through the activity of various geomorphic processes. Based on this digital landform inventory the sediment transfer system is analysed using graph theory. As a rather new approach in geomorphology (already established within several disciplines; e.g. hydrology, biogeography), graph theory provides a promising framework for connectivity analysis in geomorphologic systems and powerful tools to visualise and analyse catchment-wide sediment transfer networks. Since the concept is arbitrarily scalable it can be applied to discrete land surface units (e.g. mapped landforms) or to continuous surface data (e.g. grid cells). In combination with geomorphological mapping, the concept allows for the (abstracted) visualisation of complex coupling relationships between multiple sediment storage landforms. Graph networks can be analysed at the level of nodes (e.g. the number of incoming and/or outgoing edges and their character as sediment source, sink or link), edges (e.g. importance within the network as conveyors of sediment from different sources), pathways (e.g. edge sequences leading to the catchment outlet or to storage landforms; these can be termed sediment cascades), or the

  2. Collective arrangements and social networks: Coping strategies for the poor households in the Great Ruaha Catchment in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadigi, Reuben M. J.; Mdoe, N. S. Y.; Ashimogo, G. C.

    Access to water and land resources underpins the socio-economic fabric of many societies in the Southern Africa region, which is characterized broadly as underdeveloped with widespread food insecurity, exacerbated by persistent droughts, erratic rainfalls and increasing human populations. The availability of land and water resources is increasingly diminishing and becoming a stumbling block to the development of the agrarian societies in the region. The poor households have in turn adopted new livelihood coping mechanisms but little research has been done to assess the effectiveness of these ‘instruments’. Consequently, the concepts of sustainable water resources management and agricultural development have remained elusive and poorly understood by policy makers as well as by water resources planners and managers. Recognizing this, a study was conducted between 2002 and 2005 under the RIPARWIN (Raising Irrigation Productivity and Releasing Water for Intersectoral Needs) project to assess the spatial dynamics of livelihood capital, vulnerability and coping strategies for the poor agrarian households in the Upper Great Ruaha River Catchment (GRRC) in Tanzania. The results of analysis showed an array of livelihood platforms and institutional contexts that act to shape the existing livelihood typologies in the GRRC. In addition, the results showed a gradual increase in household vulnerability from upstream to downstream, particularly in terms of access to physical and natural assets. Vulnerability was found to be directly associated with the number of dependants. The female-headed households were relatively more likely to be vulnerable than the male-headed households (cf. probabilities of 27% and 21%, respectively). The value of collective arrangements and drawing on social networks crosscut all social strata and ranked as the most common livelihood strategy. This suggests that the scope for reducing vulnerability among the poor households in the GRRC critically

  3. Catchment-flowline network and selected model inputs for an enhanced and updated spatially referenced statistical assessment of dissolved-solids load sources and transport in streams of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buto, Susan G.; Spangler, Lawrence E.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2017-01-01

    This USGS data release consists of the synthetic stream network and associated catchments used to develop spatially referenced regressions on watershed attributes (SPARROW) model of dissolved-solids sources and transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin as well as geology and selected Basin Characterization Model (BCM) data used as input to the model.

  4. The StreamCat Dataset: Accumulated Attributes for NHDPlusV2 Catchments (Version 2.1) for the Conterminous United States: National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network - Nitrogen Deposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset represents deposition estimates of nutrients within individual local NHDPlusV2 catchments and upstream, contributing watersheds based on the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (See Supplementary Info for Glossary of Terms). The National Trends Network provides long-term records of precipitation chemistry across the United States. Individual rasters describe ammonium, nitrate, inorganic nitrogen, and average sulfur/nitrogen deposition per year. See Source Info for links to NADP. The nitrogen and sulfur characteristics (kg N/ha/yr) were summarized to produce local catchment-level and watershed-level metrics as a continuous data type (see Data Structure and Attribute Information for a description).

  5. Integrated observation and modelling of runoff and sediments across different compartments of semi-arid catchments and channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstert, Axel; Ramon, Batalla; Araújo José C., De; da Costa Alexandre, Cunha; Till, Francke; Andreas, Güntner; Jose, Lopez-Tarazon; George, Mamede; Müller Eva, N.

    2010-05-01

    About one-third of the global population currently lives in countries which experience conditions of water stress. Such regions, often located within dryland ecosystems, are exposed to the hazard that the available freshwater resources fail to meet the water demand in domestic, agricultural and industrial sectors. Water availability often relies on the retention of river runoff in artificial lakes and reservoirs. However, the water storage in reservoirs is often adversely affected by sedimentation as a result of soil erosion. Erosion of the land surface due to natural or anthropogenic reasons and deposition of the eroded material in reservoirs threatens the reliability of reservoirs as a source of water supply. To sustain future water supply, a quantification of the sediment export from large dryland catchments becomes indispensable. A comprehensive modelling framework for water and sediment transport at the meso-scale, with a particular focus on dryland regions, has been developed from a German, Catalonian and Brazilian team during the last decade. It includes novel components for erosion from erosion-prone hillslopes, sediment transfer, retention and re-mobilization through the river system and sediment distribution, trapping and transfer through a reservoir. The parameterisation for pilot catchments is based on field monitoring campaigns of water and sediment fluxes, the analysis of land-use patterns, and the identification of the sediment hot spots through remotely sensed data. We present results of erosion-prone landscape units, the role of sediment transport in the river system, and the sedimentation processes in reservoirs. The modelling studies demonstrate the wide range of environmental problems where the model may be employed to develop sustainable management strategies for land and water resources. Evaluation of scenarios (land use, climate change) combined with an integrated assessment of options in reservoir management opens the opportunity to address

  6. How old is streamwater? Open questions in catchment transit time conceptualization, modeling and analysis

    Treesearch

    J.J. McDonnell; K. McGuire; P. Aggarwal; K.J. Beven; D. Biondi; G. Destouni; S. Dunn; A. James; J. Kirchner; P. Kraft; S. Lyon; P. Maloszewski; B. Newman; L. Pfister; A. Rinaldo; A. Rodhe; T. Sayama; J. Seibert; K. Solomon; C. Soulsby; M. Stewart; D. Tetzlaff; C. Tobin; P. Troch; M. Weiler; A. Western; A. Wörman; S. Wrede

    2010-01-01

    The time water spends travelling subsurface through a catchment to the stream network (i.e. the catchment water transit time) fundamentally describes the storage, flow pathway heterogeneity and sources of water in a catchment. The distribution of transit times reflects how catchments retain and release water and solutes that in turn set biogeochemical conditions and...

  7. Hydrological response of karst systems to large-scale climate variability for different catchments of the French karst observatory network INSU/CNRS SNO KARST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massei, Nicolas; Labat, David; Jourde, Hervé; Lecoq, Nicolas; Mazzilli, Naomi

    2017-04-01

    The french karst observatory network SNO KARST is a national initiative from the National Institute for Earth Sciences and Astronomy (INSU) of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). It is also part of the new french research infrastructure for the observation of the critical zone OZCAR. SNO KARST is composed by several karst sites distributed over conterminous France which are located in different physiographic and climatic contexts (Mediterranean, Pyrenean, Jura mountain, western and northwestern shore near the Atlantic or the English Channel). This allows the scientific community to develop advanced research and experiments dedicated to improve understanding of the hydrological functioning of karst catchments. Here we used several sites of SNO KARST in order to assess the hydrological response of karst catchments to long-term variation of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Using NCEP reanalysis products and karst discharge, we analyzed the links between large-scale circulation and karst water resources variability. As karst hydrosystems are highly heterogeneous media, they behave differently across different time-scales : we explore the large-scale/local-scale relationships according to time-scales using a wavelet multiresolution approach of both karst hydrological variables and large-scale climate fields such as sea level pressure (SLP). The different wavelet components of karst discharge in response to the corresponding wavelet component of climate fields are either 1) compared to physico-chemical/geochemical responses at karst springs, or 2) interpreted in terms of hydrological functioning by comparing discharge wavelet components to internal components obtained from precipitation/discharge models using the KARSTMOD conceptual modeling platform of SNO KARST.

  8. The effect of social networks and social support on mental health services use, following a life event, among the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area cohort.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Pallab K; Eaton, William W; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2011-01-01

    The study examined the association between life events and mental health services use, accounting for social networks and social support. Main and stress-buffering effects were estimated using longitudinal data from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area cohort (1,920 participants in 1993-1996, of whom 1,071 were re-interviewed in 2004-2005). Following a life event, the odds of using general medical services were increased by almost 50% when there was increased social support from spouse/partner (referral function). The odds of using mental health services within general health setup were reduced by 60% when there was increased support from relatives (stress-reduction function). Increased social support from friends and relatives was associated with a 40-60% decreased odds of using specialty psychiatric services after experiencing different life events (stress-reduction function). Overall, social support rather than social networks were more strongly associated with increased mental health service use following a life event. The implications for service delivery and program development are discussed.

  9. Streamflow predictions in Alpine Catchments by using artificial neural networks. Application in the Alto Genil Basin (South Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimeno-Saez, Patricia; Pegalajar-Cuellar, Manuel; Pulido-Velazquez, David

    2017-04-01

    This study explores techniques of modeling water inflow series, focusing on techniques of short-term steamflow prediction. An appropriate estimation of streamflow in advance is necessary to anticipate measures to mitigate the impacts and risks related to drought conditions. This study analyzes the prediction of future streamflow of nineteen subbasins in the Alto-Genil basin in Granada (Southeast of Spain). Some of these basin streamflow have an important component of snowmelt due to part of the system is located in Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, the highest mountain of continental Spain. Streamflow prediction models have been calibrated using time series of historical natural streamflows. The available streamflow measurements have been downloaded from several public data sources. These original data have been preprocessed to turn them to the original natural regime, removing the anthropic effects. The missing values in the adopted horizon period to calibrate the prediction models have been estimated by using a Temez hydrological balance model, approaching the snowmelt processes with a hybrid degree day method. In the experimentation, ARIMA models are used as baseline method, and recurrent neural networks ELMAN and nonlinear autoregressive neural network (NAR) to test if the prediction accuracy can be improved. After performing the multiple experiments with these models, non-parametric statistical tests are applied to select the best of these techniques. In the experiments carried out with ARIMA, it is concluded that ARIMA models are not adequate in this case study due to the existence of a nonlinear component that cannot be modeled. Secondly, ELMAN and NAR neural networks with multi-start training is performed with each network structure to deal with the local optimum problem, since in neural network training there is a very strong dependence on the initial weights of the network. The obtained results suggest that both neural networks are efficient for the short

  10. Using spatial-stream-network models and long-term data to understand and predict dynamics of faecal contamination in a mixed land-use catchment.

    PubMed

    Neill, Aaron James; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Strachan, Norval James Colin; Hough, Rupert Lloyd; Avery, Lisa Marie; Watson, Helen; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-09-04

    An 11year dataset of concentrations of E. coli at 10 spatially-distributed sites in a mixed land-use catchment in NE Scotland (52km(2)) revealed that concentrations were not clearly associated with flow or season. The lack of a clear flow-concentration relationship may have been due to greater water fluxes from less-contaminated headwaters during high flows diluting downstream concentrations, the importance of persistent point sources of E. coli both anthropogenic and agricultural, and possibly the temporal resolution of the dataset. Point sources and year-round grazing of livestock probably obscured clear seasonality in concentrations. Multiple linear regression models identified potential for contamination by anthropogenic point sources as a significant predictor of long-term spatial patterns of low, average and high concentrations of E. coli. Neither arable nor pasture land was significant, even when accounting for hydrological connectivity with a topographic-index method. However, this may have reflected coarse-scale land-cover data inadequately representing "point sources" of agricultural contamination (e.g. direct defecation of livestock into the stream) and temporal changes in availability of E. coli from diffuse sources. Spatial-stream-network models (SSNMs) were applied in a novel context, and had value in making more robust catchment-scale predictions of concentrations of E. coli with estimates of uncertainty, and in enabling identification of potential "hot spots" of faecal contamination. Successfully managing faecal contamination of surface waters is vital for safeguarding public health. Our finding that concentrations of E. coli could not clearly be associated with flow or season may suggest that management strategies should not necessarily target only high flow events or summer when faecal contamination risk is often assumed to be greatest. Furthermore, we identified SSNMs as valuable tools for identifying possible "hot spots" of contamination which

  11. The Immatsiak network of groundwater wells in a small catchment basin in the discontinuous permafrost zone of Northern Quebec, Canada: A unique opportunity for monitoring the impacts of climate change on groundwater (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, R.; Lemieux, J.; Molson, J. W.; Therrien, R.; Ouellet, M.; Bart, J.

    2013-12-01

    During a summer drilling campaign in 2012, a network of nine groundwater monitoring wells was installed in a small catchment basin in a zone of discontinuous permafrost near the Inuit community of Umiujaq in Northern Quebec, Canada. This network, named Immatsiak, is part of a provincial network of groundwater monitoring wells to monitor the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. It provides a unique opportunity to study cold region groundwater dynamics in permafrost environments and to assess the impacts of permafrost degradation on groundwater quality and availability as a potential source of drinking water. Using the borehole logs from the drilling campaign and other information from previous investigations, an interpretative cryo-hydrogeological cross-section of the catchment basin was produced which identified the Quaternary deposit thickness and extent, the depth to bedrock, the location of permafrost, one superficial aquifer located in a sand deposit, and another deep aquifer in fluvio-glacial sediments and till. In the summer of 2013, data were recovered from water level and barometric loggers which were installed in the wells in August 2012. Although the wells were drilled in unfrozen zones, the groundwater temperature is very low, near 0.4 °C, with an annual variability of a few tenths of a degree Celsius at a depth of 35 m. The hydraulic head in the wells varied as much as 6 m over the last year. Pumping tests performed in the wells showed a very high hydraulic conductivity of the deep aquifer. Groundwater in the wells and surface water in small thermokarst lakes and at the catchment outlet were sampled for geochemical analysis (inorganic parameters, stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δ2H), and radioactive isotopes of carbon (δ14C), hydrogen (tritium δ3H) and helium (δ3He)) to assess groundwater quality and origin. Preliminary results show that the signature of melt water from permafrost thawing is observed in the

  12. A new perspective on catchment storage gained from a nested catchment experiment in Luxembourg (Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe; François Iffly, Jean; Gourdol, Laurent; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2014-05-01

    Recent hydrological process research focussed on how much water a catchment can store and how these catchments store and release water. Storage can be a valuable metric for catchment description, inter-comparison, and classification. Further storage controls catchment mixing, non-linearities in rainfall-runoff transformation and eco-hydrological processes. Various methods exist to determine catchment storage (e.g. natural tracer, soil moisture and groundwater data, hydrological models). Today it remains unclear what parts of the catchment storage are measured with the different models. Here we present a new hydrometric approach to answer the question how much water a catchment can store. We tested our approach in a dense hydro-climatological monitoring network that encompasses 16 recording streamgauges and 21 pluviographs in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). Catchment scales are ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2 and they have clean- and mixed combinations of distinct geologies ranging from schists to marls, sandstone, dolomite and limestone. Previous investigations in the area of interest have shown that geology largely controls winter runoff coefficients. Here, we focus at how catchment geology is ultimately affecting catchment storage. We used the approach of Sayama et al. (2011) to compute catchment dynamic storage changes for each winter season over the period 2002-2012 (based on precipitation as input; discharge and evapotranspiration as output). We determined dynamic storage changes for each winter semester (October to March) in all 16 catchments over the period 2002-2012. At the beginning of each hydrological winter season, all catchments showed similar trends in storage change. A few weeks into the winter season, catchments with lowest permeability (e.g. marls) started to plateau. The highest storage values were reached several months later in the season in catchments dominated by permeable substrate (e.g. sandstone). For most catchments, we found

  13. Can spatial statistical river temperature models be transferred between catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Faye L.; Fryer, Robert J.; Hannah, David M.; Malcolm, Iain A.

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing use of spatial statistical models to understand and predict river temperature (Tw) from landscape covariates. However, it is not financially or logistically feasible to monitor all rivers and the transferability of such models has not been explored. This paper uses Tw data from four river catchments collected in August 2015 to assess how well spatial regression models predict the maximum 7-day rolling mean of daily maximum Tw (Twmax) within and between catchments. Models were fitted for each catchment separately using (1) landscape covariates only (LS models) and (2) landscape covariates and an air temperature (Ta) metric (LS_Ta models). All the LS models included upstream catchment area and three included a river network smoother (RNS) that accounted for unexplained spatial structure. The LS models transferred reasonably to other catchments, at least when predicting relative levels of Twmax. However, the predictions were biased when mean Twmax differed between catchments. The RNS was needed to characterise and predict finer-scale spatially correlated variation. Because the RNS was unique to each catchment and thus non-transferable, predictions were better within catchments than between catchments. A single model fitted to all catchments found no interactions between the landscape covariates and catchment, suggesting that the landscape relationships were transferable. The LS_Ta models transferred less well, with particularly poor performance when the relationship with the Ta metric was physically implausible or required extrapolation outside the range of the data. A single model fitted to all catchments found catchment-specific relationships between Twmax and the Ta metric, indicating that the Ta metric was not transferable. These findings improve our understanding of the transferability of spatial statistical river temperature models and provide a foundation for developing new approaches for predicting Tw at unmonitored locations across

  14. River network bedload model: a tool to investigate the impact of flow regulation on grain size distribution in a large Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport rates along rivers and the grain size distribution (GSD) of coarse channel bed sediment are the result of the long term balance between transport capacity and sediment supply. Transport capacity, mainly a function of channel geometry and flow competence, can be altered by changes in climatic forcing as well as by human activities. In Alpine rivers it is hydropower production systems that are the main causes of modification to the transport capacity of water courses through flow regulation, leading over longer time scales to the adjustment of river bed GSDs. We developed a river network bedload transport model to evaluate the impacts of hydropower on the transfer of sediments and the GSDs of the Upper Rhône basin, a 5,200 km2 catchment located in the Swiss Alps. Many large reservoirs for hydropower production have been built along the main tributaries of the Rhône River since the 1960s, resulting in a complex system of intakes, tunnels, and pumping stations. Sediment storage behind dams and intakes, is accompanied by altered discharge due to hydropower operations, mainly higher flow in winter and lower in summer. It is expected that this change in flow regime may have resulted in different bedload transport. However, due the non-linear, threshold-based nature of the relation between discharge and sediment mobilization, the effects of changed hydraulic conditions are not easily deducible, and because observations of bedload in pre- and post-dam conditions are usually not available, a modelling approach is often necessary. In our modelling approach, the river network is conceptualized as a series of connected links (river reaches). Average geometric characteristics of each link (width, length, and slope of cross section) are extracted from digital elevation data, while surface roughness coefficients are assigned based on the GSD. Under the assumptions of rectangular prismatic cross sections and normal flow conditions, bed shear stress is estimated

  15. What makes catchment management groups "tick"?

    PubMed

    Oliver, P

    2001-01-01

    The work of catchment management groups throughout Australia represents a significant economic and social investment in natural resource management. Institutional structures and policies, the role of on-ground coordinators, facilitation processes, citizen participation and social capital are critical factors influencing the success of catchment management groups. From a participant-researcher viewpoint, this paper signposts research directions and themes that are being pursued from the participant/coordinator, catchment group, and lead government/non-government agency perspective on the influence of these factors on the success of a catchment management group in the Pumicestone Region of Southeast Queensland, Australia. Research directions, themes and discussion/reflection points for practitioners include--the importance of understanding milieu; motivation; success; having fun; "networking networks"; involvement of "nontraditional" stakeholders; development of stakeholder/participant partnerships; learning from other practitioners; methods of stakeholder/participant representation; evaluation; the need for guiding principles or philosophy; the equivalence of planning, implementation, evaluation, and resourcing; catchments as fundamental units of Nature; continuity of support for groups; recognising a new role for government; working with existing networks; and the need for an eclectic approach to natural resource management.

  16. On Radar Rainfall, Catchment Runoff and the Response Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, E.; Goodrich, D. C.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2001-12-01

    The general research hypothesis is that: "a rainfall event, extreme at a specific scale, has the potential to generate an extreme runoff event in a catchment, which characterized by this response scale". In the presented study, which is a first step in testing this hypothesis, we examine if catchments have a stable response scale in the above context. For that purpose, we compare maximum storm rainfall intensities at different time and space scales with runoff peak discharges in order to determine at what scale these two variables are best related to each other. Three types of rainfall variable are tested: 1) gage rainfall intensity, 2) radar rainfall intensity, and 3) radar reflectivity. Initial results are available for the Walnut Gulch Experimental Catchment, a 150-km2 semi-arid catchment, located in southern Arizona. The catchment is well equipped with dense networks of rainfall and runoff gages. Radar data are also available for the catchment from the Tucson NEXRAD system. Preliminary results indicate a response scale in the order of 6-km and 2-hours for the 150-km2 catchment and for the 126- and 94-km2 sub-catchments. The response scale of a 25-km2 sub-catchment is reduced to 1-km and 20-minutes. The three types of rainfall variable tested point to the same response scale. As mentioned, the above results are initial and based on a limited number of events. We are investigating this hypothesis on a larger number of events as well as additional catchments.

  17. Water Catchment and Storage Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenig, Michael; Dunbabin, Matt; Moore, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and Sensor Networks technologies provide the means for comprehensive understanding of natural processes in the environment by radically increasing the availability of empirical data about the natural world. This step change is achieved through a dramatic reduction in the cost of data acquisition and many orders of magnitude increase in the spatial and temporal granularity of measurements. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is undertaking a strategic research program developing wireless sensor network technology for environmental monitoring. As part of this research initiative, we are engaging with government agencies to densely monitor water catchments and storages, thereby enhancing understanding of the environmental processes that affect water quality. In the Gold Coast hinterland in Queensland, Australia, we are building sensor networks to monitor restoration of rainforest within the catchment, and to monitor methane flux release and water quality in the water storages. This poster will present our ongoing work in this region of eastern Australia. The Springbrook plateau in the Gold Coast hinterland lies within a World Heritage listed area, has uniquely high rainfall, hosts a wide range of environmental gradients, and forms part of the catchment for Gold Coast's water storages. Parts of the plateau are being restored from agricultural grassland to native rainforest vegetation. Since April 2008, we have had a 10-node, multi-hop sensor network deployed there to monitor microclimate variables. This network will be expanded to 50-nodes in February 2010, and to around 200-nodes and 1000 sensors by mid-2011, spread over an area of approximately 0.8 square kilometers. The extremely dense microclimate sensing will enhance knowledge of the environmental factors that enhance or inhibit the regeneration of native rainforest. The final network will also include nodes with acoustic and image sensing capability for

  18. Catchment scale multi-objective flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Steve; Worrall, Peter; Rosolova, Zdenka; Hammond, Gene

    2010-05-01

    Rural land management is known to affect both the generation and propagation of flooding at the local scale, but there is still a general lack of good evidence that this impact is still significant at the larger catchment scale given the complexity of physical interactions and climatic variability taking place at this level. The National Trust, in partnership with the Environment Agency, are managing an innovative project on the Holnicote Estate in south west England to demonstrate the benefits of using good rural land management practices to reduce flood risk at the both the catchment and sub-catchment scales. The Holnicote Estate is owned by the National Trust and comprises about 5,000 hectares of land, from the uplands of Exmoor to the sea, incorporating most of the catchments of the river Horner and Aller Water. There are nearly 100 houses across three villages that are at risk from flooding which could potentially benefit from changes in land management practices in the surrounding catchment providing a more sustainable flood attenuation function. In addition to the contribution being made to flood risk management there are a range of other ecosystems services that will be enhanced through these targeted land management changes. Alterations in land management will create new opportunities for wildlife and habitats and help to improve the local surface water quality. Such improvements will not only create additional wildlife resources locally but also serve the landscape response to climate change effects by creating and enhancing wildlife networks within the region. Land management changes will also restore and sustain landscape heritage resources and provide opportunities for amenity, recreation and tourism. The project delivery team is working with the National Trust from source to sea across the entire Holnicote Estate, to identify and subsequently implement suitable land management techniques to manage local flood risk within the catchments. These

  19. Exploring links between tectonics, catchment morphology and hydrographs across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Campforts, Benjamin; Van Ruyskensvelde, Glenn; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of studies show that contemporary catchment sediment yields (SY, [t/km²/y]) are strongly correlated to patterns of seismic activity at regional to continental scales. Nonetheless, the mechanisms explaining these correlations are still poorly understood. Seismicity may increase SY by triggering landslides or weakening the surface lithology. On the other hand seismicity can be considered as a proxy for tectonic movements, while there is a growing consensus that tectonics exert an important influence on catchment morphology. This morphology influences the properties of runoff events (e.g. peak discharge, stream power). Given the large influence of large runoff events on annual SY, it is therefore possible that observed correlations between SY and seismicity are (at least partly) attributable to tectonic influences on catchment morphology. We test this hypothesis by investigating links between runoff hydrographs and patterns in catchment properties at a European scale using numerous catchment indices such as the slope, channel steepness, circularity, drainage length, river network topology, etc. From DEMs with a resolution of ca. 100m we randomly delineated over 5000 catchments across Europe with an area of 90 to 100 km². For each of these catchments, we simulated a runoff hydrograph, using a simple Hortonian runoff model that routes water through the catchment based on previously proposed flow velocity equations. We made abstraction of rainfall patterns, lithology, land use and all factors other than topography. Hence, the hydrographs only reflect the influence of the morphological properties of the catchments and allow for comparisons. First results show that, apart from average catchment slope, there are very few regional patterns in catchment morphological properties that may significantly affect hydrographs. In some tectonically active regions, channel slopes are slightly steeper compared to catchments with the same average catchment slope in

  20. The artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, W.; Gerwin, W.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Zeyer, J.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    The artificial catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is the main research site of the Transregional Collaborative Research Center SFB/TRR 38. Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the SFB/TRR 38 has gathered more than 50 scientists from BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich to study the patterns and processes - and their interaction - of the initial phase of ecosystem development in an artificial catchment. The catchment was constructed in 2003 to 2005 in the Lusatian lignite-mining area close to Cottbus, Germany. It has an area of 6 ha including a small lake and is mainly composed of a 2-4 m layer of sandy to loamy Quaternary overburden sediments above a 1-2 m clay layer that seals the total catchment area at the bottom. No restoration, planting or other reclamation measures were carried out. Main research objectives are: Which abiotic and biotic patterns and processes are regulating the initial phase of ecosystem development? How do processes interact with abiotic and biotic patterns? Which patterns and processes can be used to define development stages? Which parameters are suitable for generalization and application to other initial ecosystems? The presentation will present the research concept of the SFB/TRR 38, the construction process of the catchment and first results.

  1. A Treatment Train Approach To Catchment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Nick; Quinn, Paul; Org, EdenDTC

    2017-04-01

    The treatment train approach has been attempted in a 1.6km2 catchment in the River Eden as part of the UK Demonstration Test Catchment Project. The catchment is one of three detailed study catchments of 10km2 that are investigating diffuse pollution losses from an intense grassland farming system. The catchment is very susceptible to saturation and high losses of fine sediment and phosphorus in storm events. The poster will show how a sequence of mitigation features that target nutrient sources and flow pathways can reduce nutrient losses. 5 features have been installed from farmyard runoff control, along polluting tracks and sediment traps in the farm ditch network. Together the features can slow, store and trap sediment and pollutants. The potential to have further impacts on flood generation and drought mitigation are also being studied. Although the features are currently small in size the ability to directly reduce pollution can be demonstrated. Hence, the potential to scale up these features to a broader catchment scale can be explored and the likely costs and benefits can be simulated. This work builds upon similar work addressing flood control features, sediment trapping on farms and methods for the direct mitigation of fast polluting pathways often referred to as Nature Based Solutions. The designs and construction of the completed features will be shown in the poster. Early results show that the combined effect of the 5 features can significantly impact on sediment and pollution during storm events. The specific yield of the impact was 42 kg of suspended sediment/ha 0.06 kg P/ha of P trapped and 0.16 kg of N/ha. This mitigation impact is derived from an area of only 0.02% of the catchment. The potential to increase the mitigated area is thus large. Payment schemes for farmers could encourage the take up the of these methods and future maintenance regimes for managing the features would also have to be created. However, the potential to mitigate fast

  2. Relations between hydrological and landscape indicators for headwater catchment similarity study - A way to extrapolate hydrologic behaviour of elementary catchments at regional extent, Languedoc Roussillon (southern France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabit, A.; Colin, F.; Lagacherie, P.

    2009-04-01

    On a regional extent, there is a need of acquiring hydrological knowledge under elementary ungauged basins because of their importance in agricultural practices management. On such extent, we note a lack of information concerning catchment hydrological behaviour and we meet high spatiotemporal heterogeneities of rainfall repartition, soils, vegetation, land use and agricultural practices. This study tests the hypothesis of a relation between landscape characteristics and hydrology behaviour and propose a methodology that allows extrapolating hydrological response of Mediterranean elementary catchments on a regional extent from representative sampled catchments. The methodology is based on a coupled field observations-modelling approach aiming to define statistical relations between hydrological and landscape indicators. Taking into account the hypothesis that two catchments, which look similar from their physical properties, have a similar hydrologic response, we are able to predict hydrological behaviour with a given uncertainty on ungauged elementary watersheds. The current study is conducted on 14 headwater elementary catchments (1km²) located in the Mediterranean region Languedoc-Roussillon, Southern of France. Each catchment is equipped with a light device composed by a rain gauge and a limnimetric station. Due to the Mediterranean climate particularities (quick and intensive storms), catchment's hydrology is studied at the event scale. Based on observed data the following methodology to analyse hydrological similarities is: (i) to define, landscape and hydrological indicators considering a perceptual model of catchment function, (ii) to compare catchments from those indicators to establish a classification, (iii) to improve catchment similarities by using distributed hydrologic modelling on semi-virtual catchments which are synthetics catchments distorted from real ones (by changing hydrographic network density, land use, soil properties…) In this poster

  3. Heterogeneity in catchment properties: a case study of Grey and Buller catchments, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, U.; Pearson, C. P.; Nikora, V. I.; Ibbitt, R. P.

    The scaling behaviour of landscape properties, including both morphological and landscape patchiness, is examined using monofractal and multifractal analysis. The study is confined to two neighbouring meso-scale catchments on the west coast of the South Island of New Zealand. The catchments offer a diverse but largely undisturbed landscape with population and development impacts being extremely low. Bulk landscape properties of the catchments (and their sub-basins) are examined and show that scaling of stream networks follow Hack’s empirical rule, with exponents ˜0.6. It is also found that the longitudinal and transverse scaling exponents of stream networks equate to νl ≈0.6 and νw≈ 0.4, indicative of self-affine scaling. Catchment shapes also show self-affine behaviour. Further, scaling of landscape patches show multifractal behaviour and the analysis of these variables yields the characteristic parabolic curves known as multifractal spectra. A novel analytical approach is adopted by using catchments as hydrological cells at various sizes, ranging from first to sixth order, as the unit of measure. This approach is presented as an alternative to the box-counting method as it may be much more representative of hydro-ecological processes at catchment scales. Multifractal spectra are generated for each landscape property and spectral parameters such as the range in α (Holder exponent) values and maximum dimension at α0, (also known as the capacity dimension Dcap), are obtained. Other fractal dimensions (information Dinf and correlation Dcor) are also calculated and compared. The dimensions are connected by the inequality Dcap≥Dinf≥Dcor. Such a relationship strongly suggests that the landscape patches are heterogeneous in nature and that their scaling behaviour can be described as multifractal. The quantitative parameters obtained from the spectra may provide the basis for improved parameterisation of ecological and hydrological models.

  4. The Roles of Groundwater Flowpaths and Stream Network Expansion in Landscape Connectivity and Resulting Runoff and Solute Dynamics in an Ephemeral Piedmont Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Much catchment hydrology has been conducted in steep, perennial stream watersheds with shallow soil. In contrast, we investigated an ephemeral stream watershed with deep, highly weathered soils, gentle relief, and the dynamic hydro-climatology of the Piedmont region of the United States. We seek to gain new understanding about increasingly recognized challenges in the hydrological sciences, including influences of shallow and deep flowpath connectivity and the role of ephemeral streams in hydrologically connecting distal portions of landscapes. We investigated how overland, shallow soil, and deep subsurface flow across landscape positions and antecedent conditions manifest in observed baseflow and stormflow generation and the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon, electrical conductivity, and a suite of cations and anions. Extensive channel expansion and contraction coupled with spatially and temporally variable shallow and deep groundwater flowpaths led to both clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis in the relationship between runoff and solute concentrations as a function of antecedent moisture conditions. This suggests that vertical and horizontal hillslope connectivity to the aquatic system is variable across seasons and storms and influences biogeochemical expression at the watershed scale. Our research in Duke Forest, North Carolina has begun to elucidate the interrelationships between the space-time dynamics of runoff generation processes and observed biogeochemical behavior in this deeply weathered, low relief landscape, to provide new insight into processes widely active but less easily identified and quantified elsewhere.

  5. Terrain representation impact on periurban catchment morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Bocher, E.; Chancibault, K.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryModelling the hydrological behaviour of suburban catchments requires an estimation of environmental features, including land use and hydrographic networks. Suburban areas display a highly heterogeneous composition and encompass many anthropogenic elements that affect water flow paths, such as ditches, sewers, culverts and embankments. The geographical data available, either raster or vector data, may be of various origins and resolutions. Urban databases often offer very detailed data for sewer networks and 3D streets, yet the data covering rural zones may be coarser. This study is intended to highlight the sensitivity of geographical data as well as the data discretisation method used on the essential features of a periurban catchment, i.e. the catchment border and the drainage network. Three methods are implemented for this purpose. The first is the DEM (for digital elevation model) treatment method, which has traditionally been applied in the field of catchment hydrology. The second is based on urban database analysis and focuses on vector data, i.e. polygons and segments. The third method is a TIN (or triangular irregular network), which provides a consistent description of flow directions from an accurate representation of slope. It is assumed herein that the width function is representative of the catchment's hydrological response. The periurban Chézine catchment, located within the Nantes metropolitan area in western France, serves as the case study. The determination of both the main morphological features and the hydrological response of a suburban catchment varies significantly according to the discretization method employed, especially on upstream rural areas. Vector- and TIN-based methods allow representing the higher drainage density of urban areas, and consequently reveal the impact of these areas on the width function, since the DEM method fails. TINs seem to be more appropriate to take streets into account, because it allows a finer

  6. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  7. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  8. Linking catchment structure to hydrologic function: Implications of catchment topography for patterns of landscape hydrologic connectivity and stream flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jencso, K. G.; McGlynn, B. L.; Marshall, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between catchment structure (topography and topology), stream network hydrologic connectivity, and runoff response remains poorly understood. Hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) water table connectivity serves as the hydrologic linkage between a catchment’s uplands and the channel network and facilitates the transmission of water and solutes to streams. While there has been tremendous interest in the concept of hydrological connectivity to characterize catchments, there are relatively few studies that have quantified hydrologic connectivity at the stream network and catchment scales. Here, we examine how catchment topography influenced patterns of stream network HRS connectivity and resultant runoff dynamics across 11 nested headwater catchments in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF), MT. This study extends the empirical findings of Jencso et al. (2009) who found a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.92) between the upslope accumulated area (UAA) and annual duration of shallow ground water table connectivity observed across 24 HRS transects (146 groundwater recording wells) within the TCEF. We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify the frequency distribution of stream network connectivity through time (as a function of UAA) and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. Each catchment’s estimated connectivity duration curve (CDC) was highly related to its flow duration curve (FDC); albeit the rate of change of runoff with respect to stream network connectedness varied significantly across catchments. To ascertain potential reasons for these differences we compared the slope of each catchment’s CDC-FDC relationship (annual, peak, transition and baseflow periods) in multiple linear models against median values of common terrain indices and land cover-vegetation characteristics. Significant predictors (p<0.05) included the flow path distance to the creek (DFC), the flow path gradient to the

  9. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  10. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  11. Modelling the Impact of Land Use Change on Water Quality in Agricultural Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnes, P. J.; Heathwaite, A. L.

    1997-03-01

    Export coefficient modelling was used to model the impact of agriculture on nitrogen and phosphorus loading on the surface waters of two contrasting agricultural catchments. The model was originally developed for the Windrush catchment where the highly reactive Jurassic limestone aquifer underlying the catchment is well connected to the surface drainage network, allowing the system to be modelled using uniform export coefficients for each nutrient source in the catchment, regardless of proximity to the surface drainage network. In the Slapton catchment, the hydrological pathways are dominated by surface and lateral shallow subsurface flow, requiring modification of the export coefficient model to incorporate a distance-decay component in the export coefficients. The modified model was calibrated against observed total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads delivered to Slapton Ley from inflowing streams in its catchment. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to isolate the key controls on nutrient export in the modified model. The model was validated against long-term records of water quality, and was found to be accurate in its predictions and sensitive to both temporal and spatial changes in agricultural practice in the catchment. The model was then used to forecast the potential reduction in nutrient loading on Slapton Ley associated with a range of catchment management strategies. The best practicable environmental option (BPEO) was found to be spatial redistribution of high nutrient export risk sources to areas of the catchment with the greatest intrinsic nutrient retention capacity.

  12. Long term (2006-2016) seasonal and inter-annual variability of soil electrical resistivity in a Laotian catchment of the OZCAR network. Impact of land use change, soil type and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robain, Henri; Ribolzi, Olivier; De Rouw, Anneke; Silvera, Norbert; Souniaphong, Phabvilay; Soulileuth, Bousamai; Latchasak, Keooudone; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Valentin, Christian; Gaillardet, Jerome

    2017-04-01

    The MSEC(1) observatory of the critical zone in south-east Asia, which is part of the OZCAR(2) Network, has been monitored since 1999 (Laos, Thailand, Vietnam) to study the long term impact of land use changes in tropical mountainous regions, in terms of soil properties (porosity, depth, SOC, nutrients…), biodiversity (weeds, soil macro fauna), plant roots (architecture, functions,…), and transfers within the critical zone at various temporal and space scales: partition between infiltration and runoff, water quality (physical, chemical and bacteriological) and erosion processes (splash, inter-rill and rill, tillage, mass-movement). In the Houay Pano catchment located in Northern Laos, a long-term monitoring system was implemented in 2006 combining Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), with soil and hydrological equipments to better analyse the interactions between bank and hillslopes groundwater, and streamwater, in a context of steep slopes (>50%) and rapid land use change (conversion of annual crops to teak plantation). This continuous ERT monitoring has been carried out along a representative 100 m long transect in the middle of the 65 ha catchment perpendicular to the stream. The data were collected every week during rainy season and every second week during dry season. It has been associated with hydrological monitoring (piezometers, limnimeters, gauging weirs). Such high resolution geophysical monitoring data set (approx. 900 apparent resistivity measurements for each acquisition) provides an invaluable non-invasive proxy of soil water content variations in the different layers of the vadose zone. It demonstrates: i) the influence of plant cover on water infiltration; ii) the pathways for vertical and horizontal water fluxes within the soil cover; iii) the control of soil organisation along the hillslope over the hydrological behaviour of the unsaturated part of the critical zone. (1) «Multi-Scale Environmental Changes» : http://msec.obs-mip.fr/ (2

  13. Hydrological Catchment Similarity Assessment in Geum River Catchments, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ara; Park, Kisoon; Lee, Hyosang

    2013-04-01

    Similarity measure of catchments is essential for regionalization studies, which provide in depth analysis in hydrological response and flood estimations at ungauged catchments. However, this similarity measure is often biased to the selected catchments and is notclearly explained in hydrological sense. This study applied a type of hydrological similarity distance measure-Flood Estimation Handbook to 25 Geum river catchments, Korea. Three Catchment Characteristics, Area (A)-Annual precipitation (SAAR)-SCS Curve Number (CN), are used in Euclidian distance measures. Furthermore, six index of Flow Duration Curve (ILow:Q275/Q185, IDrought:Q355/Q185, IFlood:Qmax/Q185, IAbundant:Q95/Q185, IFloodDuration:Q10/Q355 and IRiverRegime:Qmax/Qmin) are applied to clustering analysis of SPSS. The catchments' grouping of hydrological similarity measures suggests three groups: H1 (Cheongseong, Gidae, Bukil, Oksan, Seockhwa, Habgang and Sangyeogyo), H2 (Cheongju, Guryong, Ugon, Boksu, Useong and Seokdong) and H3 (Muju, Yangganggyo and YongdamDam). The four catchments (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, DaecheongDam and Indong) are not grouped in this study. The clustering analysis of FDC provides four Groups; CFDC1 (Muju, YongdamDam, Yangganggyo, DaecheongDam, Cheongseong, Gidae, Seokhwa, Bukil, Habgang, Cheongju, Oksan, Yuseong and Guryong), CFDC2 (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, Boksu, Indong, Nonsan, Seokdong, Ugon, Simcheon, Useong and Sangyeogyo), CFDC3 (Songcheon) and CFDC4 (Tanbu). The six catchments (out of seven) of H1 are grouped in CFDC1, while Sangyeogyo is grouped in CFDC2. The four catchments (out of six) of H2 are also grouped in CFDC2, while Cheongju and Guryong are grouped in CFDC1. The catchments of H3 are categorized in CFDC1. The authors examine the results (H1, H2 and H3) of similarity measure based on catchment physical descriptors with results (CFDC1 and CFDC2) of clustering based on catchment hydrological response. The results of hydrological similarity measures are supported by

  14. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    texture topsoil), climate (humid sub Mediterranean) and land use (80-90% cultivated with winter grain crops). Ozkotz principal (ca.1,700 ha) is covered with forest and pasture (cattle-breeding); while Oskotz woodland (ca. 500 ha), a sub-watershed of the Oskotz principal, is almost completely covered with forest. The predominant climate in the Oskotz catchments sub-Atlantic. Furthermore, antecedent conditions and event characteristics were analysed. The loops were compared quantitatively and qualitatively between catchments for similar events and within the catchments for events with different characteristics. In this study, several measures to objectively classify hysteresis loops in an automated way were developed. These were consecutively used to classify several hundreds of loops from several agricultural catchments in Northern Spain. These loop characteristics were compared to event specific characteristics such as antecedent precipitation, time of year, and precipitation intensity, duration and total. The combination of hysteresis loops and variables influencing connectivity can then tell something about the sources of sediments for different events and catchments. References Baartman, J.E.M., Masselink, R.H., Keesstra, S.D., Temme, A.J.A.M., 2013. Linking landscape morphological complexity and sediment connectivity. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38: 1457-1471. Masselink RJH, Heckmann T, Temme AJAM, Anders NS, Gooren HPA, Keesstra SD. 2016. A network theory approach for a better understanding of overland flow connectivity. Hydrological Processes. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10993 Masselink, R.J.H., Keesstra, S.D., Temme, A.J.A.M., Seeger, M., Giménez, R., Casalí, J., 2016. Modelling Discharge and Sediment Yield at Catchment Scale Using Connectivity Components. Land Degradation and Development 27: 933-945, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2512 Mekonnen, M., Keesstra, S.D., Baartman, J.E.M., Stroosnijder, L., Maroulis, J., Reducing sediment connectivity through man-made and natural

  15. Catchment Concentraton-Discharge Archetypes Explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, H. E.; Jawitz, J. W.; Rao, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes interact within catchments, producing hydrographs (Q(t)) and chemographs (C(t)), with the inter-dependence represented by an empirical function: C = aQ^b, where a and b are constants. Three archetypes of C-Q relationships have been observed in stream networks: (1) dilution; b<0; (2) accretion; b>0; and (3) constant C; b~0. Each relationship can exhibit either a relatively constant variance (homoscedastic) or decreasing variance with increasing Q (heteroscedastic). For the third type, the homoscedastic case has been referred to in the literature as chemostatic, while we describe the heteroscedastic case as chemo-convergence. We offer conceptual models for specific linkages between hydrologic and biogeochemical coupling to generate these observed relationships. We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with hydrologic responses affect C-Q patterns, and investigate the following broad questions: (1) How does the coupling of flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas vary across a catchment under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing?, (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the observed C-Q relationships?, and (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for implementation of best management practices for reducing exported solute loads? Our overarching hypothesis is that each of these C-Q patterns can be produced by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a landscape. To test this hypothesis, we developed a conceptual catchment model coupled to a dual-domain source-zone model to simulate solute export from each landscape unit. Outputs from the source-zone are then routed through the catchment to generate hydrographs and chemographs. This approach allows explicit links to be identified between specific hydrologic responses and spatial patterns of solute

  16. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Barquín, J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2), in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we coupled general principles of hydro-geomorphic processes with computer tools to characterize the fluvial landscape. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to topography, valley morphology, river network structure, and fan and terrace landforms. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  17. Groundwater recharge from point to catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leterme, Bertrand; Di Ciacca, Antoine; Laloy, Eric; Jacques, Diederik

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is a challenging task as only a few devices (if any) can measure it directly. In this study, we discuss how groundwater recharge can be calculated at different temporal and spatial scales in the Kleine Nete catchment (Belgium). A small monitoring network is being installed, that is aimed to monitor the changes in dominant processes and to address data availability as one goes from the point to the catchment scale. At the point scale, groundwater recharge is estimated using inversion of soil moisture and/or water potential data and stable isotope concentrations (Koeniger et al. 2015). At the plot scale, it is proposed to monitor the discharge of a small drainage ditch in order to calculate the field groundwater recharge. Electrical conductivity measurements are necessary to separate shallow from deeper groundwater contribution to the ditch discharge (see Di Ciacca et al. poster in session HS8.3.4). At this scale, two or three-dimensional process-based vadose zone models will be used to model subsurface flow. At the catchment scale though, using a mechanistic, process-based model to estimate groundwater recharge is debatable (because of, e.g., the presence of numerous drainage ditches, mixed land use pixels, etc.). We therefore investigate to which extent various types of surrogate models can be used to make the necessary upscaling from the plot scale to the scale of the whole Kleine Nete catchment. Ref. Koeniger P, Gaj M, Beyer M, Himmelsbach T (2015) Review on soil water isotope based groundwater recharge estimations. Hydrological Processes, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10775

  18. Environmental care in agricultural catchments: Toward the communicative catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter

    1991-11-01

    Substantial land degradation of agricultural catchments in Australia has resulted from the importation of European farming methods and the large-scale clearing of land. Rural communities are now being encouraged by government to take responsibility for environmental care. The importance of community involvement is supported by the view that environmental problems are a function of interactions between people and their environment. It is suggested that the commonly held view that community groups cannot care for their resources is due to inappropriate social institutions rather that any inherent disability in people. The communicative catchment is developed as a vision for environmental care into the future. This concept emerges from a critique of resource management through the catchment metaphors of the reduced, mechanical, and the complex, evolving catchment, which reflect the development of systemic and people-centered approaches to environmental care. The communicative catchment is one where both community and resource managers participate collaboratively in environmental care. A methodology based on action research and systemic thinking (systemic action research) is proposed as a way of moving towards the communicative catchment of the future. Action research is a way of taking action in organizations and communities that is participative and informed by theory, while systemic thinking takes into account the interconnections and relationships between social and natural worlds. The proposed vision, methodology, and practical operating principles stem from involvement in an action research project looking at extension strategies for the implementation of total catchment management in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales.

  19. Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Preferential Flow Occurrence in the Shale Hills Catchment: From the Hillslope to the Catchment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of preferential flow (PF) occurrence is important in revealing hillslope and catchment hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Quantitative assessment of the frequency and control of PF occurrence in the field, however, has been limited, especially at the landscape scale of hillslope and catchment. By using 5.5-years' (2007-2012) real-time soil moisture at 10 sites response to 323 precipitation events, we tested the temporal consistency of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale in the forested Shale Hills Catchment; and by using 25 additional sites with at least 1-year data (2011-2012), we evaluated the spatial patterns of PF occurrence across the catchment. To explore the potential effects of PF occurrence on catchment hydrology, wavelet analysis was performed on the recorded time series of hydrological signals (i.e., precipitation, soil moisture, catchment discharge). Considerable temporal consistence was observed in both the frequency and the main controls of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale, which was attributed largely to the statistical stability of precipitation pattern over the monitoring period and the relatively stable subsurface preferential pathways. Preferential flow tended to occur more often in response to intense rainfall events, and favored the conditions at dry hilltop or wet valley floor sites. When upscaling to the entire catchment, topographic control on the PF occurrence was amplified remarkably, leading to the identification of a subsurface PF network in the catchment. Higher frequency of PF occurrence was observed at the valley floor (average 48%), hilltop (average 46%), and swales/hillslopes near the stream (average 40%), while the hillslopes in the eastern part of the catchment were least likely to experience PF (0-20%). No clear relationship, however, was observed between terrain attributes and PF occurrence, because the initiation and persistency of PF in this catchment was controlled

  20. Dynamic processes in the mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Arakelian, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The process of the river cftchment foundation and the mechanisms being in the basis of its development are not clear at present. Principal phenomena determining the dynamics of formation of the river catchment are under our study in this paper for the case of the mountain basin as an example. The methodology of this monitoring includes the space image recognition and computer data processing of the images for the Maliy Caucasus Mountains. Mountain river catchment formation on the slope of the ridge can be considered as a self-organizing staged process of its evolution passing through several non-equilibrium but steady-state conditions. We consider a system of tributaries in the mountain river catchment as a system of cracks, which are formed on the slope of the mountain massif. In other words, the formation of river networks should be the result of development of several processes, among of which the mechanisms of crack development should play a dominant role. The principal results, discussed in the present report, can be formulated as follow. (1) The mountain catchment (litho-watershed) formation takes place under conditions of the confined states of a mountain massif: on the one hand it is bounded by the surface of the slope; but on the other hand, - by a primary cracks density occurrence (as a spatial distribution 3D-crack net). (2) The development in time of the river catchment takes place by several stages. Each stage specifies a definite energetic state of the system in the mountain massif. (3) The overhead river streams arise not only due to surface water, but and namely due to rising of water from underground water horizons over the watercourse cracks penetrating deeply into the underground. (4) The 3D-river catchment structure results in concept in behavior of the unit as an open nonlinear dynamic system with a spatially distributed feedback. The energetic (endogen) processes of formation, rising and bifurcation for cracks are the consequence of relaxation

  1. The catchment based approach using catchment system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The catchment based approach (CaBa) has been championed as a potential mechanism for delivery of environmental directives such as the Water Framework Directive in the UK. However, since its launch in 2013, there has been only limited progress towards achieving sustainable, holistic management, with only a few of examples of good practice ( e.g. from the Tyne Rivers trust). Common issues with developing catchment plans over a national scale include limited data and resources to identify issues and source of those issues, how to systematically identify suitable locations for measures or suites of measures that will have the biggest downstream impact and how to overcome barriers for implementing solutions. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. A significant component of the runoff generation can be managed by targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source, many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality and biodiversity. A catchment, community-led mitigation measures plan using the CSE approach will be presented from a catchment in Northumberland, Northern England that demonstrate a generic framework for identification of multi-purpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-ditch measures. Progress on the implementation of measures will be reported alongside potential impacts on the runoff regime at both local and catchment scale and costs.

  2. Vulnerability of European freshwater catchments to climate change.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Danijela; Carrizo, Savrina F; Kärcher, Oskar; Walz, Ariane; David, Jonathan N W

    2017-09-01

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate the current threats to freshwater ecosystems, yet multifaceted studies on the potential impacts of climate change on freshwater biodiversity at scales that inform management planning are lacking. The aim of this study was to fill this void through the development of a novel framework for assessing climate change vulnerability tailored to freshwater ecosystems. The three dimensions of climate change vulnerability are as follows: (i) exposure to climate change, (ii) sensitivity to altered environmental conditions and (iii) resilience potential. Our vulnerability framework includes 1685 freshwater species of plants, fishes, molluscs, odonates, amphibians, crayfish and turtles alongside key features within and between catchments, such as topography and connectivity. Several methodologies were used to combine these dimensions across a variety of future climate change models and scenarios. The resulting indices were overlaid to assess the vulnerability of European freshwater ecosystems at the catchment scale (18 783 catchments). The Balkan Lakes Ohrid and Prespa and Mediterranean islands emerge as most vulnerable to climate change. For the 2030s, we showed a consensus among the applied methods whereby up to 573 lake and river catchments are highly vulnerable to climate change. The anthropogenic disruption of hydrological habitat connectivity by dams is the major factor reducing climate change resilience. A gap analysis demonstrated that the current European protected area network covers <25% of the most vulnerable catchments. Practical steps need to be taken to ensure the persistence of freshwater biodiversity under climate change. Priority should be placed on enhancing stakeholder cooperation at the major basin scale towards preventing further degradation of freshwater ecosystems and maintaining connectivity among catchments. The catchments identified as most vulnerable to climate change provide preliminary targets for

  3. Delineating wetland catchments and modeling hydrologic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In traditional watershed delineation and topographic modeling, surface depressions are generally treated as spurious features and simply removed from a digital elevation model (DEM) to enforce flow continuity of water across the topographic surface to the watershed outlets. In reality, however, many depressions in the DEM are actual wetland landscape features with seasonal to permanent inundation patterning characterized by nested hierarchical structures and dynamic filling–spilling–merging surface-water hydrological processes. Differentiating and appropriately processing such ecohydrologically meaningful features remains a major technical terrain-processing challenge, particularly as high-resolution spatial data are increasingly used to support modeling and geographic analysis needs. The objectives of this study were to delineate hierarchical wetland catchments and model their hydrologic connectivity using high-resolution lidar data and aerial imagery. The graph-theory-based contour tree method was used to delineate the hierarchical wetland catchments and characterize their geometric and topological properties. Potential hydrologic connectivity between wetlands and streams were simulated using the least-cost-path algorithm. The resulting flow network delineated potential flow paths connecting wetland depressions to each other or to the river network on scales finer than those available through the National Hydrography Dataset. The results demonstrated that

  4. Characterizing Runoff and Water Yield from Headwater Catchments in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate where much of the annual precipitation falls during winter, the snow-capped Sierra Nevada serves as the primary source of dry season runoff that supports agriculture, industries, urban, and other ecosystems. Increased warming has led to significant reductions in mountain snowpack accumulation and earlier snowmelt throughout the western United States where most of the snow accumulates at temperatures near the freezing point. As a result, declines in dry season runoff magnitude, earlier runoff timing, and altered flood risk have been reported across the region. An important question in this context is, how to best manage forested catchments for water and other ecosystem services? We depict the differences in hydrologic response of ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW) research project using continuous precipitation, snow, and runoff data during 2004-2014. The size of these catchments ranges from 50 to 475 ha, and they span a 600-m elevation range in the rain snow transitional zone. In terms of soil, Shaver and Gerle-Cagwin dominate the lower elevation Providence catchments, and Cagwin soils dominate the higher elevation Bull catchments. The majority of these catchments have southwest aspect, moderate average slope (i.e. <25%), and a well-developed drainage network with drainage density ranging from 4.6 to 10.1 km/km2. Bull catchments, on average, have higher runoff than the Providence catchments across all hydrologic signatures extracted from daily hydrographs. Mean annual runoff ranges between 281 to 408 mm in Providence and 436 to 656 mm in Bull catchments despite no significant difference in precipitation among KREW's four meteorological stations. However, high elevation Bull catchments receive significantly more precipitation as snow than the low elevation Providence catchments. The average runoff ratio ranges from 18% to as high as 43% among different catchments, indicating that the catchment

  5. Is the subarctic landscape still a carbon sink? Evidence from a detailed catchment balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Erik J.; Klaminder, Jonatan; Giesler, Reiner; Persson, Andreas; Olefeldt, David; Heliasz, Michal; Christensen, Torben R.; Karlsson, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Climate warming raises the question whether high-latitude landscape still function as net carbon (C) sinks. By compiling an integrated C balance for an intensely studied subarctic catchment, we show that this catchment's C balance is not likely to be a strong current sink of C, a commonly held assumption. In fact, it is more plausible (71% probability) that the studied catchment functions as a C source (-11 ± 20 g C m-2 yr-1). Analyses of individual fluxes indicate that soil and aquatic C losses offset C sequestering in other landscape components (e.g., peatlands and aboveground forest biomass). Our results stress the importance of fully integrated catchment C balance estimates and highlight the importance of upland soils and their interaction with the aquatic network for the catchment C balance.

  6. Spatial organisation in hydrological model structure for New Zealand catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Woods, Ross; Clark, Martyn

    2013-04-01

    Hydrologists increasingly agree that a single hydrological model structure is unlikely to be suitable for all catchments: instead, models should be selected according to characteristics of the catchment. Our challenge is to determine how to select the most appropriate model structure. This complex question requires that we use observed data to infer dominant runoff generation processes, and translate this process knowledge into model structure choices. We can then ask questions such as: over what scales do recommended model structures change? How much data is needed to select model structure? How can we generalise model structure choices to catchments where data is scarce? In this presentation we address these questions, using the New Zealand landscape as our 'virtual laboratory'. New Zealand is an excellent location to test hypotheses relating to model structure, due to its rich diversity of hydrological landscapes. Landscape types range from temperate rainforest with steep, bedrock gorges, through rolling pasture, to alluvial plains with braided rivers. Our method is to apply diagnostic signatures, which use a range of hydrological data types, to target specific aspects of model structure choice. We bring together results from national hydrometric networks, and in-depth studies in experimental catchments, to explore organisation, similarity and diversity in recommended model structures across the New Zealand landscape. To identify model structures which are consistent with measured data, we use a range of diagnostic signatures tailored to the data types available. At the national scale, networks of rain and flow gauges are used to investigate runoff ratio, recession characteristics and threshold responses to precipitation and soil moisture. At the experimental Mahurangi catchments, dense networks of 13 rain, 27 flow and 36 soil moisture gauges within a 50 km2 area enable us to evaluate small-scale patterns and diversities of model structure. In contrast, the

  7. Deriving N-year discharges in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvinka, Ondrej; Bohac, Milon

    2016-04-01

    Maximum discharges with the return period of 100 years (Q100) belong to basic hydrological data that are derived and provided for any profile of the river network by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI). However, as regards small catchments, the determination of these characteristics is largely subjective and thus it is rather performed by comparing the results of several methods. The first approach is to extrapolate the three parameters of maximum peak discharges (average Qmax, coefficient of variation Cvmax, Q100) from water-gauging stations to selected unobserved profiles (using regression relationships and regularities at the confluence points). For this purpose, the so-called program Budsez is utilized. During this process, the physical-geographical (PG) features, rainfall data and other information about catchments are considered, based on which the parameters of theoretical distributions of N-year discharges are optimized. For smaller catchments the relationships between the 100-year specific runoff q100 and the catchment area and other PG characteristics are used that are determined in a GIS environment with the extension AGPosudek. In this innovative method, besides many other PG characteristics, especially the average value of CN and N-year maximum daily precipitation are taken into account when computing Q100. In the older methodologies, Q100 is based on the average slope of the stream and the average slope of the catchment. The values of Q100 are then corrected according to the percentage of forested areas and the catchment shape. Hydrologists compare the values of Q100 coming from different approaches in a logarithmic graph (q100 against area) for the particular catchment or its analogon. The final value is determined with respect to experience and previously issued values. The remaining N-year discharges are usually assessed through the ratio QN/Q100 from the nearest water-gauging station or the closest profile where these ratios were

  8. Towards Estimating the Nutrient Balance of the Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) Catchment, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner-Kittridge, Michael; Zessner, Matthias; Broer, Martine; Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-05-01

    The fate of nutrients introduced by human activities have significant impacts on both nature and our civilization. Excessive nutrients can contaminate our drinking water as well as promote algae blooms that deplete the surrounding waters of oxygen for aquatic life. It is estimated that agriculture in Austria contributes approximately 60% to the total discharge of nitrogen and 40% to the total discharge of phosphorus. Understanding the specific pathways and sources of nitrogen and phosphorus from agriculture land could greatly improve our ability to mitigate for excessive discharges if the problems can be targeted more precisely. The objective of our research is to determine the complete nitrogen and phosphorous balance within a 66.7 hectare catchment in Lower Austria. The Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) catchment is located in Lower Austria approximately 100 km west of Vienna. The HOAL catchment was established in 2009 through funding by the Austrian Science Foundation to be used for multidisciplinary hydrologic research for understanding water flow and transport processes in catchments. The catchment land cover is characterized as 90% agriculture, 5% impermeable surface, and 3% forest. The predominant soil type is a clayey silt loam and a section of the catchment contain a subsurface tile drainage network that extend approximately 5.5 km. Nitrogen and phosphorus are the two primary nutrients assessed in this study. To accomplish the nutrient balance, the research is divided into three different scales: Field Scale, Subcatchment Scale, and Catchment Scale. The Catchment scale encompasses the entirety of the catchment, the subcatchment scale encompasses a 6.4 hectare area within the catchment that is completely underlain by the tile drainage network, and the field scale studies are performed on several square meter plots within the subcatchment. Each scale attempts to determine different parts of the total nutrient budget. The initial phase of the research

  9. Influence of Rainfall Data Resolution and Catchment Subdivision on Runoff Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttaraksa Mapiam, Punpim; Chauysuk, Suttiched

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation and catchment characteristics are significant factors for runoff modelling. This study demonstrates the relative benefits offered by the application of alternate rainfall products to several scales of catchment subdivision for simulation of the runoff hydrograph in the upper Ping river basin, northern Thailand. Two point locations at the runoff stations in the upper Ping river basin were selected for model calibration over the period of 2004-2005. Rain gauge and radar rainfall products were specified as inputs to the semi-distributed hydrological URBS model at each runoff station with five catchment subdivision schemes for runoff simulation. Point rainfall from the sparse rain gauge network and estimated radar rainfall at each radar pixel were spatially averaged over each sub-catchment using Thiessen polygons and arithmetic averaging approaches, respectively. Results for using high resolution of radar rainfall input appear that the accuracy of runoff estimates is affected appreciably by a number of sub-catchments, and the accuracy of runoff estimates tends to obviously increase with an increase of the number of sub-catchments. On the other hand, there is no significant improvement with an increasing number of sub-catchments while the coarse resolution of rain gauge rainfall input is used. The comparison on runoff accuracy among different scenarios indicates that the use of radar rainfall together with the largest number of sub-catchments gives the highest accuracy of runoff estimates.

  10. Biogeochemical Dynamics of Zero-Order Arctic Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, T.; Godsey, S.; Jones, J.; Risser, R. R.; Rushlow, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    A significant fraction of arctic catchments underlain by permafrost may be drained by linear flowpaths constituting zero-order channels, which are termed water tracks. Hydrology and biogeochemistry of arctic hillslopes are subject to rapid changes caused by thawing permafrost, changing precipitation regime, and altered vegetation patterns. We investigated coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles at six water tracks that drain to the Kuparuk River to understand the role of zero-order catchments in delivering solutes to stream networks, and better predict how solute fluxes will respond to changing climate. Peak concentrations of organic solutes occurred during snowmelt, and snowmelt-derived water remained in catchments until mid-summer, indicating that changes in snowpack or timing of melt will induce strong changes in delivery of solutes to stream networks. Further, temporal coherence in solute chemistry between water tracks and the Kuparuk river suggests that water tracks are important contributors of solutes to downstream ecosystems. Solute dynamics during storms follow a flush and dilution pattern indicative of source-limited solute transport. However, the relative difference between minimum and maximum concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and ammonium decreased during successive storms, suggesting decreased availability of these solutes as flowpaths deepen throughout the season. Despite these broad patterns, individual water tracks vary significantly in solute concentrations and storm responses, suggesting that site-level characteristics including sources of water contributing to flow, rates of solute uptake, contributing area, and depth of thaw influence the delivery of solutes from arctic hillslopes to stream networks. Hydrologic and biogeochemical signals potentially propagate from these zero-order catchments to stream networks and coasts, and may contribute to observed long-term changes in solute and freshwater fluxes in arctic river networks.

  11. Catchment systems science and management: from evidence to resilient landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul

    2014-05-01

    There is an urgent need to reassess both the scientific understanding and the policy making approaches taken to manage flooding, water scarcity and pollution in intensively utilised catchments. Many European catchments have been heavily modified and natural systems have largely disappeared. However, working with natural processes must still be at the core of any future management strategy. Many catchments have greatly reduced infiltration rates and buffering capacity and this process needs to be reversed. An interventionist and holistic approach to managing water quantity and quality at the catchment scale is urgently required through the active manipulation of natural flow processes. Both quantitative (field experiments and modelling) and qualitative evidence (local knowledge) is required to demonstrate that catchment have become 'unhealthy'. For example, dense networks of low cost instrumentation could provide this multiscale evidence and, coupled with stakeholder knowledge, build a comprehensive understanding of whole system function. Proactive Catchment System Management is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of landscape scale hydrological flow pathways. Many of the changes to hydrological processes cannot be detected at the catchment scale as the primary causes of flooding and pollution. Evidence shows it is the land cover and the soil that are paramount to any change. Local evidence shows us that intense agricultural practices reduce the infiltration capacity through soil degradation. The intrinsic buffering capacity has also been lost across the landscape. The emerging hydrological process is one in which the whole system responds too quickly (driven by near surface and overland flow processes). The bulk of the soil matrix is bypassed during storm events and there is little or no buffering capacity in the riparian areas or in headwater catchments. The prospect of lower intensity farming rates is

  12. Added-value from a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series at ungauged pollution control-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drogue, Gilles; Ben Khediri, Wiem; Conan, Céline

    2016-05-01

    We explore the potential of a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series by the spatial proximity method. Three criteria have been used: (1) spatial proximity; (2) physical similarity; (3) stream gauging network topology. An extensive assessment of our spatial proximity method variant is made on a 149 catchment-data set located in the Rhine-Meuse catchment. The competitiveness of the method is evaluated against spatial interpolation of catchment model parameters with ordinary kriging. We found that the spatial proximity approach is more efficient than ordinary kriging. When distance to upstream/downstream stream gauge stations is considered as a second order criterion in the selection of donor catchments, an unprecedented level of efficiency is reached for nested catchments. Nevertheless, the spatial proximity method does not take advantage from physical similarity between donor catchments and receiver catchments because catchments that are the most hydrologically similar to each catchment poorly match with the catchments that are the most physically similar to each catchment.

  13. A Fresh Start for Flood Estimation in Ungauged UK Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giani, Giulia; Woods, Ross

    2017-04-01

    The standard regression-based method for estimating the median annual flood in ungauged UK catchments has a high standard error (95% confidence interval is +/- a factor of 2). This is also the dominant source of uncertainty in statistical estimates of the 100-year flood. Similarly large uncertainties have been reported elsewhere. These large uncertainties make it difficult to do reliable flood design estimates for ungauged catchments. If the uncertainty could be reduced, flood protection schemes could be made significantly more cost-effective. Here we report on attempts to develop a new practical method for flood estimation in ungauged UK catchments, by making more use of knowledge about rainfall-runoff processes. Building on recent research on the seasonality of flooding, we first classify more than 1000 UK catchments into groups according to the seasonality of extreme rainfall and floods, and infer possible causal mechanisms for floods (e.g. Berghuijs et al, Geophysical Research Letters, 2016). For each group we are developing simplified rainfall-runoff-routing relationships (e.g. Viglione et al, Journal of Hydrology, 2010) which can account for spatial and temporal variability in rainfall and flood processes, as well as channel network routing effects. An initial investigation by Viglione et al suggested that the relationship between rainfall amount and flood peak could be summarised through a dimensionless response number that represents the product of the event runoff coefficient and a measure of hydrograph peakedness. Our hypothesis is that this approach is widely applicable, and can be used as the basis for flood estimation. Using subdaily and daily rainfall-runoff data for more than 1000 catchments, we identify a subset of catchments in the west of the UK where floods are generated predominantly in winter through the coincidence of heavy rain and low soil moisture deficits. Floods in these catchments can reliably be simulated with simple rainfall

  14. Crossing thresholds: Analysis of hazardous tipping points in alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutzmann, Silke; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels or torrents in small alpine catchments are characterized by high geomorphic activity with sediment dynamics being inherently nonlinear and threshold-mediated. Localized, high intensity rainstorms can drive torrential systems past a tipping point resulting in a sudden onset of hazardous events like (flash-) flooding, heavy bedload transport or debris flows. Such responses exhibit an abrupt switch in the fluvial system's mode (e.g. transport / supply limited). Changes in functional connectivity may persist beyond the tipping point. Torrential hazards cause costly damage in the densely populated Alpine Region. Thus, there is a rising interest in potential effects of climate change on torrential sediment dynamics. Understanding critical conditions close to tipping points is important to reduce uncertainty in predicting sediment fluxes. In this study we aim at (i) establishing threshold precipitation characteristics for the Eastern Alps of Austria. Precipitation is hypothesized to be the main forcing factor of torrential events. (ii) How do thresholds vary in space and time? (iii) The effect of external triggers is strongly mediated by the internal disposition of catchments to respond. Which internal conditions are critical for susceptibility? (iv) Is there a change in magnitude or frequency in the recent past and what can be expected for the future? The 71 km2 catchment of the river Schöttlbach in the East Alpine Region of Styria (Austria) is monitored since a heavy precipitation event resulted in a catastrophic flood in July 2011. Sediment mobilization from slopes as well as within-channel storage and bedload transport are regularly measured using photogrammetric methods and sediment impact sensors. Thus, detailed knowledge exists on magnitude and spatial propagation of sediment waves through the catchment. The associated hydro-meteorological (pre-) conditions can be inferred from a dense station network. Changing bedload transport rates and

  15. Integration for sustainable catchment management.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Christopher J A; Scholefield, David; Haygarth, Philip M

    2007-02-15

    Sustainable catchment management requires increased levels of integration between groups of natural and social scientists, land and water users, land and water managers, planners and policy makers across spatial scales. Multiple policy drivers, covering urban and rural communities and their relationships with land and water use, have resulted in the need for an integrated decision making framework that operates from the strategic national scale to the local catchment scale. Large gaps in integration between policies are resulting in uncertain outcomes of conflicting and competing policy measures. The need for further integration is illustrated by little or no reductions in nitrate and phosphate levels in surface and ground waters in England and Wales. There is a requirement for natural scientists to consider the socio-economic setting and implications of their research. Moreover, catchment system level science requires natural and social scientists to work more closely, to provide robust analysis of the state of the environment that fully considers the bio-physical, social, political and economic settings. The combined use of spatial technologies, scenarios, indicators and multicriteria analysis are increasingly being used to enable improved integration for sustainable catchment management.

  16. Understanding the relationship between sediment connectivity and spatio-temporal landscape changes in two small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Meisina, Claudia; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Bordoni, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    The degree of linkage between the sediments sources and downstream areas (i.e., sediment connectivity) is one of the most important properties controlling landscape evolution. Many factors have been found to affect sediment connectivity, especially at the catchment scale. In particular, the degree of linkage between different areas within a catchment depends largely on the morphological complexity of the catchment (relief, terrain roughness, stream network density and catchment shape) and the combined effects of vegetation, such as land use changes and land abandonment. Moreover, the analysis of the spatial distribution of sediment connectivity and its temporal evolution can be also useful for the characterization of sediment source areas. Specifically, these areas represent sites of instability and their connectivity influences the probability that a local on-site effect could propagate within a multiple-events feedback system. Within this framework, the aim of this study is to apply a geomorphometric approach to analyze the linkage between landscape complexity and the sediment connectivity at the catchment scale. Moreover, to assess sediment delivery, the index of connectivity (IC) proposed by Cavalli et al. (2013) was used to evaluate the potential connection of sediment source areas with the main channel network. To better understand the relationship between morphological complexity of the catchment's landscape and the sediment spatial distribution and mobilization, two catchments with different size and geomorphological and land use characteristics were analysed: the Rio Frate and Versa catchments (Oltrepo Pavese, Southern Lombardy, Italy). Several shallow landslides, which represents the main sediment source area type in the catchments, were triggered especially in the period from 2009 to 2013. Moreover, relevant modification of land use and drainage system during last decades, especially related to land abandonment, have conditioned the sediment connectivity

  17. Identifying trace metal distribution and occurrence in sediments, inundated soils, and non-flooded soils of a reservoir catchment using Self-Organizing Maps, an artificial neural network method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangyan; Liu, Shiliang; Yin, Yijie; Zhang, Yueqiu; Zhao, Qinghe; Dong, Shikui

    2017-07-10

    The Lancang-Mekong River is a trans-boundary river which provides a livelihood for over 60 million people in Southeast Asia. Its environmental security is vital to both local and regional inhabitants. Efforts have been undertaken to identify controlling factors of the distribution of trace metals in sediments and soils of the Manwan Reservoir catchment in the Lancang-Mekong River basin. The physicochemical attributes of 63 spatially distributed soil and sediment samples, along with land-use, flooding, topographic, and location characteristics, were analyzed using the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) methodology. The SOM permits the analysis of complex multivariate datasets and gives a visual interpretation that is generally not easy to obtain using traditional statistical methods. Across the catchment, enrichments of trace metals are rare overall, despite the severely enriched cadmium (Cd). The analysis of SOM showed that flooded levels and land-use types were associated with high concentrations of Cd. Sediments and inundated soils covered with shrub and open woodlands in downstream always have a high concentration of Cd. The results demonstrate that SOM is a useful tool that can aid in the interpretation of complex datasets and help identify the environment of enriched metals on a catchment scale.

  18. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  19. Modeling of matters removal from swampy catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inishev, N. G.; Inisheva, L. I.

    2010-05-01

    This work shows the results of fixed study of geochemical conditions in the system of landscape oligotrophic profile at Vasyugan mire spurs, and also we make an approach to processes modelling of compounds removal from swampy catchment. During investigation of symbolic model of chemical matters removal from the surface of a catchment basin and their movement along the channel network it was taken into account that removal of chemical elements during the period of spring flood and rain high waters occur mainly with overland flow. During calculation of dissolved matters movement the following admissions take place: 1. The problem is solved at one-dimension set-up. Concentration of investigated components is taken as averaged one along the flow cross section or effective area of slope cross-section for overland runoff, i.e. it changes only lengthways and in time. 2. It is considered that dissolved matters spread due to movement of water and together with its particles. 3. Processes of water self-clarification are not considered. The model is calculated on the basis of discharge of the investigated ingredient, i.e. matter mass moving through the given flow cross-section into time unit. This is the peculiarity of the model. Matter removal together with water flow is determined if necessary. Everyday impurity consumptions and its concentration can be estimated at the outlet at the moment of time according to convolution integral. Estimation of overland runoff and water inflow into the channel network is based on the mathematic model of outflow formation from peatland areas which considers basic processes carrying out at catchment and basin channel network. Stored moisture estimation of snow cover is taken according to snow survey data before snow melting. Everyday water supply to the surface of water collection was determined according to the results of snow melt intensity estimation by the methods of temperature coefficient and water yield from snow (A.G. Kovzel). All

  20. Mapping storm velocity over catchments: Distribution and scale dependence for flash flood-inducing storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Zoccatelli, D.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of catchment-scale storm velocity permits examination of storm motion and velocity from the perspective of a distance metric imposed by the drainage network structure of a catchment. This paper aims to examine the distribution and scale-dependency of catchment scale storm velocity values for major flash flood-inducing storms. Eight extreme flash flood-inducing storms occurred in Europe in the period 1999 to 2008 are examined. Analyses are carried out for a set of basins that range in area from 7 to 982 km2. It is shown that the distribution of catchment-scale storm velocity depends on basin-averaged rain rate and catchment size. Hourly velocity values corresponding to maximal rain rates during the flood producing period exhibit a non linear dependence on basin scale and may attain values as high as 2 m s-1. Integration of velocity over the catchment response time leads to a reduction of maximal velocities. Response-time integrated maximal storm velocity shows a peak for catchment scales in the range of 20-100 km2, with values up to 1 m s-1.

  1. Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takeo; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment coevolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density and slope-area relationship) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow-duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found a significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The intra-annual flow variability was also significantly related to catchments age. Younger catchments tended to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibited more flashy runoff. The decrease in baseflow with catchment age is consistent with the existing hypothesis that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways change over time from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in a set of similar, but younger volcanic catchments in the Oregon Cascades, in which drainage density increased with age. In that case, older catchments were thought to show more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths. Our results suggests two competing hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in mature catchments. One is that as catchments continue to age, the hydrologically active channels retreat

  2. The application of GEOtop for catchment scale hydrology in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Xu, X.; Albertson, J.; Kiely, G.

    2009-04-01

    GEOtop represents the new generation of distributed hydrological model driven by geospatial data (e.g. topography, soils, vegetation, land cover). It estimates rainfall-runoff, evapotranspiration and provides spatially distributed outputs as well as routing water and sediment flows through stream and river networks. The original version of GEOtop designed in Italy, includes a rigorous treatment of the core hydrological processes (e.g. unsaturated and saturated flow and transport, surface energy balances, and streamflow generation/routing). Recently GEOtop was extended to include treatment of shallow landslides. The GEOtop model is built on an open-source programming framework, which makes it well suited for adaptation and extension. GEOtop has been run very successfully in a number of alpine catchments (such as Brenta) but has not been used on Irish catchments before. The cell size used for the spatially distributed inputs varies from catchment to catchment. In smaller catchments (less than 2000ha) 50 by 50m cells have been used and 200 by 200 for larger catchments. Smaller cell sizes have been found to significantly increase the computational time so a larger cell size is used providing it does not significantly affect the performance of the model. Digital elevation model, drainage direction, landuse and soil type maps are the minimum spatial requirements with precipitation, radiation, temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind speed been the minimum meteorological requirements for a successful run. The soil type maps must also contain information regarding texture and hydraulic conductivity. The first trial of GEOtop in Ireland was on a small 1524 ha catchment in the south of Ireland. The catchment ranges from 50 to just over 200m, the land use is predominately agricultural grassland and it receives on average 1400mm of rain per year. Within this catchment there is a meteorological tower which provides the meteorological inputs, soil moisture is also recorded at

  3. Geomorphometric assessment of spatial sediment connectivity in small Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Marco; Trevisani, Sebastiano; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    Complex and rugged topography induces large variations in erosion and sediment delivery in the headwaters of alpine catchments. An effective connection of hillslopes with the channel network results in highly efficient sediment transfer processes, such as debris flows. In contrast, morphological conditions producing decoupling of hillslopes from channels (e.g. glacial cirques) may exclude large areas of the catchment from sediment delivery to its lower parts. Moreover, an efficient connection between hillslopes and channel network does not always ensure an effective downstream transfer of sediment. Low-slope channel reaches (e.g. in hanging valleys) cause sediment deposition, which often results in changes of the sediment transport processes, typically from debris flow to streamflow with low bedload and suspended load rates. The availability of high-resolution digital terrain models, such as those derived from aerial LiDAR, improves our capability to quantify the topographic controls on sediment connectivity. A geomorphometric index, based on the approach by Borselli et al. (2008), was developed and applied to assess spatial sediment connectivity in two small catchments of the Italian Alps featuring contrasting morphological characteristics. The results of the geomorphometric analysis were checked against field evidences, showing good performance and thus potential usefulness of the index.

  4. a Study of Urban Stormwater Modeling Approach in Singapore Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, S. C.; Liong, S. Y.; Vu, M. T.

    2011-07-01

    Urbanization has the direct effect of increasing the amount of surface runoff to be discharged through man-made drainage systems. Thus, Singapore's rapid urbanization has drawn great attention on flooding issues. In view of this, proper stormwater modeling approach is necessary for the assessment planning, design, and control of the storm and combines sewerage system. Impacts of urbanization on surface runoff and catchment flooding in Singapore are studied in this paper. In this study, the application of SOBEK-urban 1D is introduced on model catchments and a hypothetical catchment model is created for simulation purpose. Stormwater modeling approach using SOBEK-urban offers a comprehensive modeling tool for simple or extensive urban drainage systems consisting of sewers and open channels despite its size and complexity of the network. The findings from the present study show that stormwater modeling is able to identify flood area and the impact of the anticipated sea level on urban drainage network. Consequently, the performance of the urban drainage system can be improved and early prevention approaches can be carried out.

  5. Influence of Roughness Surface In Hydrological Response of Semiarid Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, A.; Noto, L.; Aronica, G.

    Here, an investigation has been carried out in order to understand the influence of the variation of the surface roughness in the definition of the hydrological response of semiarid catchments. In the original version of TOPMODEL the convolution rout- ing procedure used takes in account the distribution of predicted inflow with distance along the channel network from the outflow, considering the distributed nature of the channel network, but does not allow for the routing on the hillslopes. This type of approach is appropriate for humid basins but not for semiarid catchments which are mainly characterised by steep and straight hillslopes. In previous studies, same au- thors proposed a modified version of TOPMODEL in which the convolution routing procedure has been extended to the hillslopes by specifying the routing velocity for each pixel of the watershed. These velocities have been linked to the watershed land use because the different surface roughness whose coefficients has been derived on the basis of Engman's table. In this new study, roughness coefficients distribution are expressed as function of a unique value treated as a calibration parameter. The original and modified versions of TOPMODEL have been applied for the simulation of flood events in a Sicilian catchment.

  6. A water and sediment budget for a Mediterranean mountainous catchment (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuset, Jordi; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.

    2016-04-01

    Sediment transport in Mediterranean mountainous catchments is highly variable influenced principally by sediment availability, which in turn is controlled by the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall, runoff and land uses. In this paper we present the water and sediment budget of the Ribera Salada, a Mediterranean forest catchment located in the Catalan Pre-Pyrenees (NE Iberian Peninsula). The river drains an area of 224 km2. The data acquisition design is composed by five nested experimental sub-catchments. Each monitoring station registers discharge and suspended sediment transport continuously. Here we present the data obtained between 2012 and 2013, two contrasted hydrological years. These data allows to analyse the contribution of each sub-catchment to the total water and suspended sediment yield of the catchment at multiple temporal scales. Annual water yield in the catchment outlet varied between 15 and 31 hm3 y-1. Maximum peak flow in the outlet of the basin was 60.9 m3 s-1; equivalent to a specific discharge of 0.28 m3 s-1 km2. Results indicate that, hydrologically, the catchment can divided in two areas with contrasted regimes. The upper part of catchment is the wettest zone, where the water yield of each sub-catchment is in directly and positive correlated to its area. In contrast, the bottom of the valley has an ephemeral hydrological regime that only supplies water during important rainfall events. Annual suspended sediment load at the catchment outlet oscillated between 615 and 3415 t y-1, with an average value of 2015 t y-1 (i.e. 9.3 t km-2 y-1). In contrast to the water yield, most of the suspended sediment load (i.e. 80%) is supplied from the driest part of the catchment where sediment availability is greater and there is a greater connectivity between sediment sources and the channel network. The humid part of the catchment only yielded the 20% of the sediment load, where, as in the case of the water yield, sediment yield is directly and

  7. Integrated monitoring of nitrogen dynamics in contrasting catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, M.; Fleischer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The research institute WESS (Water & Earth System Science) is monitoring three adjacent meso-scale catchments (72 - 140 km2) in southwest Germany with respect to water quantity and quality. Due to their spatial proximity, the studied catchments are similar regarding climatic conditions and water balance. Geology is characterized by sedimentary rocks which are partly karstified. The catchments contrast strongly in land use and show a range from predominantly agriculture to almost exclusively forestry. In this context, a special focus of our research is the distinction of matter coming from the catchment area versus substances stemming from urban point sources. One important compound representing inputs from the catchment area is nitrogen. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient governing plant growth. If available in excess it leads to eutrophication and is therefore one of the globally most widespread contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Transport of human-derived nitrogen through landscapes including urban areas to the oceans predominantly occurs via river network systems. Hence, monitoring of nitrogen fluxes in streams and rivers reveals mechanisms and dynamics of its transport and gives also insight into hydrologic processes which influence the mobilization of nitrogen. Presently, the catchments are equipped with online probes enabling high resolution monitoring of nitrate concentrations and other parameters. We found that average nitrate concentrations in stream water perfectly reflect the portion of fertilized arable land. The dynamics of N transport, however, largely depends on the hydrologic system and is driven by the dominating runoff generation processes. The interplay between different hydrological storages, which eventually also act as N pools, turns out to be decisive for the temporal variability of N concentrations in stream discharge. Inversely, the study of N transport dynamics can be used to infer the hydrologic mechanisms responsible for N mobilization

  8. Soil moisture controlled runoff mechanisms in a small agricultural catchment in Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Szeles, Borbala; Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Hogan, Patrick; Oismueller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2017-04-01

    Understanding runoff generation mechanisms is pivotal for improved estimation of floods in small catchments. However, this requires in situ measurements with a high spatial and temporal resolution of different land surface parameters, which are rarely available distributed over the catchment scale and for a long period. The Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) is a hydrological observatory which comprises a complex agricultural catchment, covering 66 ha. Due to the agricultural land use and low permeability of the soil part of the catchment was tile drained in the 1940s. The HOAL is equipped with an extensive soil moisture network measuring at 31 locations, 4 rain gauges and 12 stream gauges. By measuring with so many sensors in a complex catchment, the collected data enables the investigation of multiple runoff mechanisms which can be observed simultaneously in different parts of the catchment. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize different runoff mechanisms and the control soil moisture dynamics exert on them. As a first step 72 rainfall events were identified within the period 2014-2015. By analyzing event discharge response, measured at the different stream gauges, and root zone soil moisture, four different runoff mechanisms are identified. The four mechanisms exhibit contrasting soil moisture-discharge relationships. In the presented study we characterize the runoff response types by curve-fitting the discharge response to the soil moisture state. The analysis provides insights in the main runoff processes occurring in agricultural catchments. The results of this study a can be of assistance in other catchments to identify catchment hydrologic response.

  9. Demonstrating the value of community-based ('citizen science') observations for catchment modelling and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Eleanor; Parkin, Geoff; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Large, Andy; Quinn, Paul; Gibson, Ceri

    2017-05-01

    Despite there being well-established meteorological and hydrometric monitoring networks in the UK, many smaller catchments remain ungauged. This leaves a challenge for characterisation, modelling, forecasting and management activities. Here we demonstrate the value of community-based ('citizen science') observations for modelling and understanding catchment response as a contribution to catchment science. The scheme implemented within the 42 km2 Haltwhistle Burn catchment, a tributary of the River Tyne in northeast England, has harvested and used quantitative and qualitative observations from the public in a novel way to effectively capture spatial and temporal river response. Community-based rainfall, river level and flood observations have been successfully collected and quality-checked, and used to build and run a physically-based, spatially-distributed catchment model, SHETRAN. Model performance using different combinations of observations is tested against traditionally-derived hydrographs. Our results show how the local network of community-based observations alongside traditional sources of hydro-information supports characterisation of catchment response more accurately than using traditional observations alone over both spatial and temporal scales. We demonstrate that these community-derived datasets are most valuable during local flash flood events, particularly towards peak discharge. This information is often missed or poorly represented by ground-based gauges, or significantly underestimated by rainfall radar, as this study clearly demonstrates. While community-based observations are less valuable during prolonged and widespread floods, or over longer hydrological periods of interest, they can still ground-truth existing traditional sources of catchment data to increase confidence during characterisation and management activities. Involvement of the public in data collection activities also encourages wider community engagement, and provides important

  10. A comparative study of data-driven approaches for flood early warning in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzkes, Christine; Singer, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Philipp, Andy; Kerl, Florian; Schütze, Niels

    2017-04-01

    Flood early warning for small catchments is a challenging task: As the basin response is fast, proper warning lead times strongly depend on precipitation forecasts which are subject to quantitative and spatial uncertainties. In addition, gauge data in small catchments is often sparse and therefore, the hydrological regime is hardly known. In presence of these uncertainties, the benefit of different model approaches in terms of their predictive quality and their transferability to ungauged catchments is in question. For investigating this issue, two data-driven model approaches of different complexity were developed and comparatively tested. The first model is an artificial neural network for flood forecasting, in particular a two-layer perceptron feedforward network. Precipitation and discharge here serve as forcing data. The second approach is a flood potential assessment procedure. Precipitation history and precipitation forecasts are classified based on threshold values from a precipitation analysis. From this, a score of flood potential is derived. For the model evaluation a quantile-based mapping procedure is used to assign the resulting scores to catchment-specific discharge values. The two model approaches have been tested on 50 catchments in Saxony, Germany, with areas ranging from 5 to 1000 km2. Two datasets of quantitative precipitation estimates - one from rain gauge measurements, one from radar measurements RADOLAN - and two datasets of quantitative precipitation forecasts - a probabilistic forecast based on expert knowledge Quantile Forecast and a numerical weather forecast COSMO-DE - are used as input data. Update cycles as well as lead times are varied within the tests. The model performance is evaluated using different statistical quality criteria. Based on a Leave-one-out cross-validation, the potential of model parameter transfer to ungauged catchments is examined. The large number and the wide range of considered catchments provide a

  11. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  12. A physically-based Distributed Hydrologic Model for Tropical Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, N. A.; Ogden, F. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological models are mathematical formulations intended to represent observed hydrological processes in a watershed. Simulated watersheds in turn vary in their nature based on their geographic location, altitude, climatic variables and geology and soil formation. Due to these variations, available hydrologic models vary in process formulation, spatial and temporal resolution and data demand. Many tropical watersheds are characterized by extensive and persistent biological activity and a large amount of rain. The Agua Salud catchments located within the Panama Canal Watershed, Panama, are such catchments identified by steep rolling topography, deep soils derived from weathered bedrock, and limited exposed bedrock. Tropical soils are highly affected by soil cracks, decayed tree roots and earthworm burrows forming a network of preferential flow paths that drain to a perched water table, which forms at a depth where the vertical hydraulic conductivity is significantly reduced near the bottom of the bioturbation layer. We have developed a physics-based, spatially distributed, multi-layered hydrologic model to simulate the dominant processes in these tropical watersheds. The model incorporates the major flow processes including overland flow, channel flow, matrix and non-Richards film flow infiltration, lateral downslope saturated matrix and non-Darcian pipe flow in the bioturbation layer, and deep saturated groundwater flow. Emphasis is given to the modeling of subsurface unsaturated zone soil moisture dynamics and the saturated preferential lateral flow from the network of macrospores. Preliminary results indicate that the model has the capability to simulate the complex hydrological processes in the catchment and will be a useful tool in the ongoing comprehensive ecohydrological studies in tropical catchments, and help improve our understanding of the hydrological effects of deforestation and aforestation.

  13. How tritium illuminates catchment structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M.; Morgenstern, U.; McDonnell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Streams contain water which has taken widely-varying times to pass through catchments, and the distribution of ages is likely to change with the flow. Part of the water has 'runoff' straight to the stream with little delay, other parts are more delayed and some has taken years (in some cases decades) to traverse the deeper regolith or bedrock of the catchment. This work aims to establish the significance of the last component, which is important because it can cause catchments to have long memories of contaminant inputs (e.g. nitrate). Results of tritium studies on streams world-wide were accessed from the scientific literature. Most of the studies assumed that there were just two age-components present in the streams (i.e. young and old). The mean ages and proportions of the components were found by fitting simulations to tritium data. It was found that the old component in streams was substantial (average was 50% of the annual runoff) and had considerable age (average mean age was 10 years) (Stewart et al., 2010). Use of oxygen-18 or chloride variations to estimate streamflow mean age usually does not reveal the age or size of this old component, because these methods cannot detect water older than about four years. Consequently, the use of tritium has shown that substantial parts of streamflow in headwater catchments are older than expected, and that deep groundwater plays an active and sometimes even a dominant role in runoff generation. Difficulties with interpretation of tritium in streams in recent years due to interference from tritium due to nuclear weapons testing are becoming less serious, because very accurate tritium measurements can be made and there is now little bomb-tritium remaining in the atmosphere. Mean ages can often be estimated from single tritium measurements in the Southern Hemisphere, because there was much less bomb-tritium in the atmosphere. This may also be possible for some locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Age determination on

  14. RNICO: a new simple geometric index for assessing the impact of urban development pattern on peak flows in urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaee Roodsari, B.; Chandler, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Urban sprawl is widespread across the world and the associated hydrologic impacts are increasing in peri-urban catchments due to increased area of impervious. There is a strong agreement on the positive correlation between the fractional impervious area and peak flows in urban catchments. Nevertheless, the effect of land development pattern on peak flows is not well investigated. In this study, a new simple geometric index, Relative Nearness of Imperviousness to the Catchment Outlet (RNICO), is defined to correlate imperviousness distribution of peri-urban catchments to runoff peak flows. Results of applying RNICO to 20 sub-catchments in New York State showed a strong positive correlation (R2>0.97) between RNICO and runoff peak flows for small peri-urban catchments (A< 42 km2) indicating higher flood risk of downstream urbanization. For large catchments (A> 42 km2), no correlation was indicated between RNICO and peak flows. We highlight the necessity of a greater discharge monitoring network at small peri-urban catchments to support local urban flood forecast.

  15. Hydrologic connectivity between landscapes and streams: Transferring reach- and plot-scale understanding to the catchment scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jencso, K.G.; McGlynn, B.L.; Gooseff, M.N.; Wondzell, S.M.; Bencala, K.E.; Marshall, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between catchment structure and runoff characteristics is poorly understood. In steep headwater catchments with shallow soils the accumulation of hillslope area (upslope accumulated area (UAA)) is a hypothesized first-order control on the distribution of soil water and groundwater. Hillslope-riparian water table connectivity represents the linkage between the dominant catchment landscape elements (hillslopes and riparian zones) and the channel network. Hydrologic connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape elements is heterogeneous in space and often temporally transient. We sought to test the relationship between UAA and the existence and longevity of HRS shallow groundwater connectivity. We quantified water table connectivity based on 84 recording wells distributed across 24 HRS transects within the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (U.S. Forest Service), northern Rocky Mountains, Montana. Correlations were observed between the longevity of HRS water table connectivity and the size of each transect's UAA (r2 = 0.91). We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify landscape-scale connectivity through time and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. We found that the shape of the estimated annual landscape connectivity duration curve was highly related to the catchment flow duration curve (r2 = 0.95). This research suggests internal catchment landscape structure (topography and topology) as a first-order control on runoff source area and whole catchment response characteristics. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Catchment classification by means of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrand, Hugo; Ley, Rita; Casper, Markus

    2013-04-01

    An important hydrological objective is catchment classification that will serve as a basis for the regionalisation of discharge parameters or model parameters. The main task of this study is the development and assessment of two classification approaches with respect to their efficiency in catchment classification. The study area in western Germany comprises about 80 catchments that range in size from 8 km2 up to 1500 km2, covering a wide range of geological substrata, soils, landscapes and mean annual precipitation. In a first approach Self Organising Maps (SOMs) use discharge characteristics or catchment characteristics to classify the catchments of the study area. Next, a reference hydrological model calibrates the catchments of the study area and tests the possibilities of parameter transfer. Compared to the transfer of parameters outside a class, for most catchments the model performance improves when parameters within a class are transferred. Thus, it should be possible to distinguish catchment classes by means of a hydrological model. The classification results of the SOM are compared to the classification results of the reference hydrological model in order to determine the latter validity. The second approach builds on the first approach in such a way that it uses the Superflex Modelling Framework instead of only one reference model. Within this framework multiple conceptual model structures can be calibrated and adapted. Input data for each calibration of a catchment are hourly time series of runoff, precipitation and evaporation for at least eight years. The calibration of multiple models for each catchment and their comparison allows for the assessment of the influence of different model structures on model performance. Learning loops analyse model performance and adapt model structures accordingly with a view to performance improvement. The result of the modelling exercise is a best performing model structure for each catchment that serves as a basis

  17. Map correlation method: Selection of a reference streamgage to estimate daily streamflow at ungaged catchments.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Daily streamflow time series are critical to a very broad range of hydrologic problems. Whereas daily streamflow time series are readily obtained from gaged catchments, streamflow information is commonly needed at catchments for which no measured streamflow information exists. At ungaged catchments, methods to estimate daily streamflow time series typically require the use of a reference streamgage, which transfers properties of the streamflow time series at a reference streamgage to the ungaged catchment. Therefore, the selection of a reference streamgage is one of the central challenges associated with estimation of daily streamflow at ungaged basins. The reference streamgage is typically selected by choosing the nearest streamgage; however, this paper shows that selection of the nearest streamgage does not provide a consistent selection criterion. We introduce a new method, termed the map-correlation method, which selects the reference streamgage whose daily streamflows are most correlated with an ungaged catchment. When applied to the estimation of daily streamflow at 28 streamgages across southern New England, daily streamflows estimated by a reference streamgage selected using the map-correlation method generally provides improved estimates of daily streamflow time series over streamflows estimated by the selection and use of the nearest streamgage. The map correlation method could have potential for many other applications including identifying redundancy and uniqueness in a streamgage network, calibration of rainfall runoff models at ungaged sites, as well as for use in catchment classification.

  18. Runoff generation in a Mediterranean semi-arid landscape: Thresholds, scale, rainfall and catchment characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Fabian; Schmidt, Sebastian; Sauter, Martin; Lange, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Surface runoff acts as an integrated response of catchment characteristics and hydrological processes. In the Eastern Mediterranean region, a lack of runoff data has hindered a better understanding of runoff generation processes on the catchment scale, despite the importance of surface runoff as a water resource or flood hazard. Our main aim was to identify and explain differences in catchment runoff reactions across a variety of scales. Over a period of five years, we observed runoff in ephemeral streams of seven watersheds with sizes between 3 and 129 km2. Landuse and surface cover types (share of vegetation, bare soil and rock outcrops) were derived from aerial images by objective classification techniques. Using data from a dense rainfall network we analysed the effects of scale, catchment properties and aridity on runoff generation. Thereby we extracted rainfall and corresponding runoff events from our time-series to calculate event based rainfall characteristics and catchment runoff coefficients. Soil moisture observations provided additional information on antecedent moisture conditions, infiltration characteristics and the evolution of saturated areas. In contrast to the prevailing opinion that the proportion of Hortonian overland flow increases with aridity, we found that in our area the largest share (> 95 %) of runoff is generated by saturation excess overland flow in response to long lasting, rainfall events of high amount. This was supported by a strong correlation between event runoff and precipitation totals. Similar rainfall thresholds (50 mm) for runoff generation were observed in all investigated catchments. No scale effects on runoff coefficients were found; instead we identified up to three-fold runoff coefficients in catchments with larger extension of arid areas, higher percentage of rock outcrops and urbanization. Comparing two headwater catchments with noticeable differences in extent of olive orchards, no difference in runoff generation was

  19. Trend analysis of nutrient loadings in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Chun, K. P.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient loadings in river catchments have increased in the past years as a consequence of rapid expansion of agricultural areas, new urban developments and industries, and population growth. Nutrient enrichment of water bodies has intensified eutrophication conditions that degrade water quality and ecosystem health. In large-scale catchments, the assessment of temporal and spatial variability of nutrient loads imply challenges due to climate, land use and geology heterogeneity, and to anthropogenic changes. In this study we carried out a trend analysis of total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads in the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) catchment. This catchment is located in the Canadian Prairie Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The eastern and central areas of the catchment consist mostly of croplands, pasture lands and livestock farms, whereas the western parts are located on the Rocky Mountains that are the source of most of the catchment's streamflows. The trend analysis was performed applying a novel approach to analyse nutrient time series recorded at long-term water quality stations along the main stems of the SSR river network. Since water quality is taken infrequently, in the proposed approach the time series were complemented using regression analysis methods based on streamflow data recorded at the nearest gauge stations. The time series were subsequently pre-whitened in order to remove the autocorrelation, and then subjected to non-parametric statistical test to detect trends. Seasonal analysis of trends at each of the water quality stations were performed in order to determine the relationships between annual flow regimes and nutrient loads in the catchment, in particular, the influence of the high spring runoff on nutrient export. Decadal analysis was also performed to determine the long-tern relationships of nutrients with anthropogenic changes in the catchment. In particular, the capacity of reservoirs to trap nutrients and the effects of the

  20. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-06-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed to explore the potential of developing classification systems for catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. This principle also applies to catchments. However, to be useful, soil classifications have to be based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time. When defining permanent catchment characteristics, discharge data would therefore appear to be less suitable. But permanent soil characteristics do not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards the required functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for three recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous soils with varying soil structures during the year and about spatial and temporal variability. The suggestion is made therefore to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, possibly incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a catchment classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we suggest to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates. Such characteristics may well be derived from societal issues being studied, as is illustrated for the Green Water Credits program.

  1. Storage as a Metric of Catchment Comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, J.P.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bishop, K.; Soulsby, C.; Seyfried, M.; Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.

    2011-01-01

    The volume of water stored within a catchment, and its partitioning among groundwater, soil moisture, snowpack, vegetation, and surface water are the variables that ultimately characterize the state of the hydrologic system. Accordingly, storage may provide useful metrics for catchment comparison. Unfortunately, measuring and predicting the amount of water present in a catchment is seldom done; tracking the dynamics of these stores is even rarer. Storage moderates fluxes and exerts critical controls on a wide range of hydrologic and biologic functions of a catchment. While understanding runoff generation and other processes by which catchments release water will always be central to hydrologic science, it is equally essential to understand how catchments retain water. We have initiated a catchment comparison exercise to begin assessing the value of viewing catchments from the storage perspective. The exercise is based on existing data from five watersheds, no common experimental design, and no integrated modelling efforts. Rather, storage was estimated independently for each site. This briefing presents some initial results of the exercise, poses questions about the definitions and importance of storage and the storage perspective, and suggests future directions for ongoing activities. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Seasonal isotope hydrology of Appalachian forest catchments

    Treesearch

    D. R. DeWalle; P. J. Edwards; B. R. Swistock; R. J. Drimmie; R. Aravena

    1995-01-01

    Seasonal hydrologic behavior of small forested catchments in the Appalachians was studied using oxygen-18 as a tracer. Oxygen-18 in samples of precipitation and streamflow were used to determine seasonal variations of subsurface water recharge and movement within two 30-40 ha forest catchments (Watershed 3 and 4) at the Fernow Experimental Forest in northcentral West...

  3. Determining health-care facility catchment areas in Uganda using data on malaria-related visits.

    PubMed

    Zinszer, Kate; Charland, Katia; Kigozi, Ruth; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R; Buckeridge, David L

    2014-03-01

    To illustrate the use of a new method for defining the catchment areas of health-care facilities based on their utilization. The catchment areas of six health-care facilities in Uganda were determined using the cumulative case ratio: the ratio of the observed to expected utilization of a facility for a particular condition by patients from small administrative areas. The cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to these facilities was determined using data from the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project. Catchment areas were also derived using various straight line and road network distances from the facility. Subsequently, the 1-year cumulative malaria case rate was calculated for each catchment area, as determined using the three methods. The 1-year cumulative malaria case rate varied considerably with the method used to define the catchment areas. With the cumulative case ratio approach, the catchment area could include noncontiguous areas. With the distance approaches, the denominator increased substantially with distance, whereas the numerator increased only slightly. The largest cumulative case rate per 1000 population was for the Kamwezi facility: 234.9 (95% confidence interval, CI: 226.2-243.8) for a straight-line distance of 5 km, 193.1 (95% CI: 186.8-199.6) for the cumulative case ratio approach and 156.1 (95% CI: 150.9-161.4) for a road network distance of 5 km. Use of the cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to determine health-care facility catchment areas was feasible. Moreover, this approach took into account patients' actual addresses, whereas using distance from the facility did not.

  4. Determining health-care facility catchment areas in Uganda using data on malaria-related visits

    PubMed Central

    Charland, Katia; Kigozi, Ruth; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R; Buckeridge, David L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To illustrate the use of a new method for defining the catchment areas of health-care facilities based on their utilization. Methods The catchment areas of six health-care facilities in Uganda were determined using the cumulative case ratio: the ratio of the observed to expected utilization of a facility for a particular condition by patients from small administrative areas. The cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to these facilities was determined using data from the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project. Catchment areas were also derived using various straight line and road network distances from the facility. Subsequently, the 1-year cumulative malaria case rate was calculated for each catchment area, as determined using the three methods. Findings The 1-year cumulative malaria case rate varied considerably with the method used to define the catchment areas. With the cumulative case ratio approach, the catchment area could include noncontiguous areas. With the distance approaches, the denominator increased substantially with distance, whereas the numerator increased only slightly. The largest cumulative case rate per 1000 population was for the Kamwezi facility: 234.9 (95% confidence interval, CI: 226.2–243.8) for a straight-line distance of 5 km, 193.1 (95% CI: 186.8–199.6) for the cumulative case ratio approach and 156.1 (95% CI: 150.9–161.4) for a road network distance of 5 km. Conclusion Use of the cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to determine health-care facility catchment areas was feasible. Moreover, this approach took into account patients’ actual addresses, whereas using distance from the facility did not. PMID:24700977

  5. Hydrogeochemical responses of forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins Church, M.; Hornberger, George; Driscoll, Charles; Sklash, Michael; Hemond, Harold

    The AGU Chapman Conference on Hydrogeochemical Responses of Forested Catchments was held September 18-21, 1989, in Bar Harbor, Maine, and brought together geochemists with interests in determining the effects of different geochemical processes on resulting surface water chemistry and hydrologists with interests in explaining flow generation in catchments with the aim of fostering better communication between the two groups on the topic of geochemical and hydrological interactions in intermediate-size watersheds. An important point of consideration was the emphasis on intermediate-size watersheds, which we defined operationally as watersheds of sufficient size to yield flow and habitat suitable for supporting at least a marginal recreational fishery, for example, on the order of at least a few square kilometers in the northeast United States. This emphasis is important because it is the potential effects of pollutants, as modified by watershed geochemical and hydrological processes, in watersheds of this scale that drive much of the concern of the nation's regulatory agencies with regard to adverse environmental effects and required water quality legislation. A good example of this is the current concern over potential adverse effects of acidic deposition on surface water quality, especially in streams that support upland sport fisheries.

  6. Process type identification in torrential catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Eisl, Julia; Spangl, Bernhard; Hübl, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The classification of torrential processes takes place according to factors like sediment concentration and flow behavior and ranges from fluvial process types, including water floods and fluvial sediment transport processes, to fluvial mass movements such as debris flows. This study hypothises a context between basic geomorphological disposition parameters and potential dominant flow process types in steep headwater catchments. Thus, examined catchments were selected based on a historical event documentation of torrential events in the Austrian Alps. In total, 84 catchments could be analysed, and 11 different morphometric parameters were considered. To predict the dominant torrential process type within a catchment, a naive Bayes classifier, a decision tree model, and a multinomial regression model was trained against the compiled geomorphological disposition parameters. All models as well as their combination were compared, based on bootstrapping and complexity. The presented classification model with the lowest prediction error for our data might help to identify the most likely torrential process within a considered catchment.

  7. Health at the Sub-catchment Scale: Typhoid and Its Environmental Determinants in Central Division, Fiji.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Aaron Peter; Jupiter, Stacy; Mueller, Ute; Jenney, Adam; Vosaki, Gandercillar; Rosa, Varanisese; Naucukidi, Alanieta; Mulholland, Kim; Strugnell, Richard; Kama, Mike; Horwitz, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The impact of environmental change on transmission patterns of waterborne enteric diseases is a major public health concern. This study concerns the burden and spatial nature of enteric fever, attributable to Salmonella Typhi infection in the Central Division, Republic of Fiji at a sub-catchment scale over 30-months (2013-2015). Quantitative spatial analysis suggested relationships between environmental conditions of sub-catchments and incidence and recurrence of typhoid fever. Average incidence per inhabited sub-catchment for the Central Division was high at 205.9/100,000, with cases recurring in each calendar year in 26% of sub-catchments. Although the numbers of cases were highest within dense, urban coastal sub-catchments, the incidence was highest in low-density mountainous rural areas. Significant environmental determinants at this scale suggest increased risk of exposure where sediment yields increase following runoff. The study suggests that populations living on large systems that broaden into meandering mid-reaches and floodplains with alluvial deposition are at a greater risk compared to small populations living near small, erosional, high-energy headwaters and small streams unconnected to large hydrological networks. This study suggests that anthropogenic alteration of land cover and hydrology (particularly via fragmentation of riparian forest and connectivity between road and river networks) facilitates increased transmission of typhoid fever and that environmental transmission of typhoid fever is important in Fiji.

  8. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  9. Creating a catchment scale perspective for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Barquín, J.

    2011-09-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2), in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we used computer tools to examine the spatial patterns of fluvial landscapes that are associated with five domains of hydro-geomorphic processes and landforms. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to hillslope and valley topography, river network structure, and channel elevation profiles. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  10. Restoring Landform Geodiversity in Modified Rivers and Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ben; Clifford, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    also undertaken to show landform position within catchments and the wider river network. We conclude that river restoration could play an important role in the assessment and improvement of geodiversity within heavily-modified European catchments

  11. Comparing runoff on 11 poorly-gauged headwater catchments using a soft monitoring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Crabit, A.; Moussa, R.

    2012-04-01

    used to compare the runoff of 11 small catchments with ephemeral streams (0,1-0,6 km2) with the given uncertainty at both the event and the annual scale (Crabit et al., in Hydrological Processes 25 (18), 2011). The results indicate significant variability between the catchment's responses. This variability allows for classification in spite of all the uncertainty associated with runoff estimation. This study highlights the potential of using a network of poorly gauged catchments. From almost no catchment understanding the proposed methodology allows to compare poorly gauged catchments and highlights similarity/dissimilarity between catchment responses.

  12. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests: Hydrometeorological variability in three neighbouring catchments with different forest cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Beatriz H.; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hegger, Zita; Leemans, Rik

    2017-09-01

    Mountain areas are characterized by a large heterogeneity in hydrological and meteorological conditions. This heterogeneity is currently poorly represented by gauging networks and by the coarse scale of global and regional climate and hydrological models. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs) are found in a narrow elevation range and are characterized by persistent fog. Their water balance depends on local and upwind temperatures and moisture, therefore, changes in these parameters will alter TMCF hydrology. Until recently the hydrological functioning of TMCFs was mainly studied in coastal regions, while continental TMCFs were largely ignored. This study contributes to fill this gap by focusing on a TMCF which is located on the northern eastern Andes at an elevation of 1550-2300 m asl, in the Orinoco river basin highlands. In this study, we describe the spatial and seasonal meteorological variability, analyse the corresponding catchment hydrological response to different land cover, and perform a sensitivity analysis on uncertainties related to rainfall interpolation, catchment area estimation and streamflow measurements. Hydro-meteorological measurements, including hourly solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, precipitation, soil moisture and streamflow, were collected from June 2013 to May 2014 at three gauged neighbouring catchments with contrasting TMCF/grassland cover and less than 250 m elevation difference. We found wetter and less seasonally contrasting conditions at higher elevations, indicating a positive relation between elevation and fog or rainfall persistence. This pattern is similar to that of other eastern Andean TMCFs, however, the study site had higher wet season rainfall and lower dry season rainfall suggesting that upwind contrasts in land cover and moisture can influence the meteorological conditions at eastern Andean TMCFs. Contrasting streamflow dynamics between the studied catchments reflect the overall system response

  13. Dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions: what can we learn from biological and isotopic tracers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Klaus, J.; Wetzel, C. E.; Stewart, M. K.; McDonnell, J.; Martinez Carreras, N.

    2014-12-01

    One emerging and important control on catchment hydrological functions of water storage, mixing and release is bedrock geology. Until today, catchment-based work has been limited by small ranges of rock types in adjacent basins. Moreover, conventional hydrological tracer approaches suffer from limitations inherent to the large storages related to certain bedrock types (e.g. the damping of stable isotope tracer signatures in deep storage catchments and obliteration of output signals at larger spatial scales). Here, we show how a multi-tracer approach, based on terrestrial diatoms and different stable and radioactive isotopic tracers can help refining our understanding of the dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions, especially the role of bedrock geology. We present new data and results from a nested catchment set-up, located in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). These 16 catchments (with sizes ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2) are characterized by clean and mixed assemblages of geology and land use. We have monitored these systems since 2002, including meteorological variables (precipitation, air temperature, etc.), as well as 15 minute discharge. Additional parameters have been monitored bi-weekly and at the event time scale, including geochemical and isotopic (3H, D, 18O) tracers, as well as terrestrial diatom communities in streamwater. Our results show that water balance derived dynamic storage significantly differs across the 16 catchments and scales. Catchment mixing potential inferred from standard deviations in stream baseflow ∂D (as a proxy for the damping of isotopic signatures in precipitation), as well as tritium-derived baseflow transit times, both exhibit a significant spatial variability, but strong correlation to bedrock pemeability. Terrestrial diatom assemblages in streamwater, as a proxy for rapid flow pathway connectedness to the stream network, are highly variable across the study catchments but also show strong

  14. Hydrological characterisation of pesticide loads using hydrograph separation at different scales in a German catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; Hartmann, H.; Bach, M.; Spiteller, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2003-03-01

    Pesticide pollution of surface waters was studied in a 49.7 km 2 catchment in Germany. The loads were differentiated into point source (PSP) and non-point source pollution (NPSP). The contribution of runoff, interflow, groundwater, drainage and spray drift to river contamination was defined as NPSP. Pesticides discharged into the river via wastewater treatment plants and sewer overflows were considered as PSP. Hydrology and pesticide loads were studied on the scale of the entire catchment and in two sub-catchments not influenced by PSP. River discharges and concentrations of 19 pesticides were measured at four locations over 447 days. The total load detected in the entire catchment amounted to 3249 g active ingredient (a.i.). The stream flow data were separated into base and direct flow applying a non-linear reservoir separation algorithm. Single rainfall events leading to runoff and interflow dominated NPSP in the sub-catchments. For the sub-catchment Rossberg 87% and for Leidenhofen 71% of the pesticide load could be attributed to direct flow. This corresponded to 14 and 34% time of peak flow events for Rossberg and Leidenhofen, respectively. For the entire catchment only 15% of the NPSP was transported with direct flow with 49% attributed to base flow. The difference between the entire and the sub-catchment contribution was attributed to dilution, hysteresis and merging effects. Applying a digital recursive filter technique for hydrograph separation confirmed the results of the non-linear reservoir separation algorithm. The impact of the hydrograph separation technique on the hydrological characterisation of pesticide loads was insignificant. The results emphasise the dynamic nature of pesticide transport and its complex interaction between size and position of source areas along a stream flow network. The measured loads in the sub-catchments were scaled up to the entire catchment as an estimate for the total NPSP. The fraction of the area treated with a

  15. Catchment-scale biogeography of riverine bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Read, Daniel S; Gweon, Hyun S; Bowes, Michael J; Newbold, Lindsay K; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J; Griffiths, Robert I

    2015-01-01

    Lotic ecosystems such as rivers and streams are unique in that they represent a continuum of both space and time during the transition from headwaters to the river mouth. As microbes have very different controls over their ecology, distribution and dispersion compared with macrobiota, we wished to explore biogeographical patterns within a river catchment and uncover the major drivers structuring bacterioplankton communities. Water samples collected across the River Thames Basin, UK, covering the transition from headwater tributaries to the lower reaches of the main river channel were characterised using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. This approach revealed an ecological succession in the bacterial community composition along the river continuum, moving from a community dominated by Bacteroidetes in the headwaters to Actinobacteria-dominated downstream. Location of the sampling point in the river network (measured as the cumulative water channel distance upstream) was found to be the most predictive spatial feature; inferring that ecological processes pertaining to temporal community succession are of prime importance in driving the assemblages of riverine bacterioplankton communities. A decrease in bacterial activity rates and an increase in the abundance of low nucleic acid bacteria relative to high nucleic acid bacteria were found to correspond with these downstream changes in community structure, suggesting corresponding functional changes. Our findings show that bacterial communities across the Thames basin exhibit an ecological succession along the river continuum, and that this is primarily driven by water residence time rather than the physico-chemical status of the river. PMID:25238398

  16. Catchment-scale biogeography of riverine bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Read, Daniel S; Gweon, Hyun S; Bowes, Michael J; Newbold, Lindsay K; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J; Griffiths, Robert I

    2015-02-01

    Lotic ecosystems such as rivers and streams are unique in that they represent a continuum of both space and time during the transition from headwaters to the river mouth. As microbes have very different controls over their ecology, distribution and dispersion compared with macrobiota, we wished to explore biogeographical patterns within a river catchment and uncover the major drivers structuring bacterioplankton communities. Water samples collected across the River Thames Basin, UK, covering the transition from headwater tributaries to the lower reaches of the main river channel were characterised using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. This approach revealed an ecological succession in the bacterial community composition along the river continuum, moving from a community dominated by Bacteroidetes in the headwaters to Actinobacteria-dominated downstream. Location of the sampling point in the river network (measured as the cumulative water channel distance upstream) was found to be the most predictive spatial feature; inferring that ecological processes pertaining to temporal community succession are of prime importance in driving the assemblages of riverine bacterioplankton communities. A decrease in bacterial activity rates and an increase in the abundance of low nucleic acid bacteria relative to high nucleic acid bacteria were found to correspond with these downstream changes in community structure, suggesting corresponding functional changes. Our findings show that bacterial communities across the Thames basin exhibit an ecological succession along the river continuum, and that this is primarily driven by water residence time rather than the physico-chemical status of the river.

  17. Instrumenting Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments are extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations ar...

  18. Using Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments is extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations a...

  19. Morphometric properties of the trans-Himalayan river catchments: Clues towards a relative chronology of orogen-wide drainage integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sinha, Sayan; Misra, Arindam

    2015-03-01

    The geomorphological evolution of the Himalayan mountain belt both in terms of crustal deformation and concomitant erosion by surface processes has been suggested to have a profound influence on a number of earth system processes and has been extensively researched through a number of different techniques. The huge catchments of the trans-Himalayan rivers are the product of long-term fluvial erosion of the landscape. This work attempts to understand their evolution through a study of drainage network, morphology, and internal organization of the smaller watersheds nested within each catchment. Using morphometric techniques applied to an orogen-wide digital elevation data grid, we characterized the drainage network structure and catchment of all the 18 trans-Himalayan rivers situated between the exits of the Indus and Brahmaputra rivers and constructed rectangular approximations of the catchment geometries. With the help of catchment dimensions measured transverse and parallel to the strike of the orogen, and by analyzing the dimension and spatial dispositions of the rectangular approximations, we demonstrate that the trans-Himalayan catchment shapes cannot be explained only as a product of the headward enlargement of drainage networks on a topographic slope, or orogenic taper. Within individual catchments we identified the existence of drainage components (watersheds) that are organized in a systematic manner with respect to the first-order physiographic features of the Himalayas, formed at different periods of geological time. Each of them shows distinct morphometric characteristics that are indicative of differences in processes and / or time scale involved in their formation. The hypsometric properties of the watersheds occupying the upper part of the catchments suggest that they are the remnants of pre-orogenic drainage that became confined to the leeward side of the Himalayas before the advent of monsoon circulation. The shape and organization of the

  20. Integrated process studies and dynamical upscaling from the observation scale to the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Schröder, B.; Lee, H.; Sivapalan, M.

    2005-05-01

    A cardinal problem in hydrology is what we call the "scale gap" in understanding. We urgently need representative data on dynamics of surface and subsurface state variables at the catchment scale, for e.g., as additional performance measures for validating meso-scale models. However, due to the known shortcomings of geophysical measurement techniques such as time domain reflectometry (TDR), ground penetrating radar (GPR) or geo electrics, our observations, and therefore also our process understanding, are restricted to the point or small field scale. Common ways to assess e.g. information on the space-time pattern of soil moisture at larger scales is to perform a distributed set of point observations either using mobile sensors, such as the "green machine", or a fixed set of TDR stations distributed in a catchment. The first approach is restricted to field campaigns and does not yield continuous information in time. The latter suffers from the fact that the correlation structure of soil moisture depends on the saturation state of the catchment. Hence, especially in dry states the network might be too coarse for explaining spatial variability of soil moisture in a geo-statistical sense. Whatever measurement approach is employed, there is no easy way to scale the information from the distributed set of small scale observations to the catchment scale because of non-linear process dynamics and strong sub-catchment heterogeneity of soils and vegetation. Geostatistical interpolation including updating approaches suffer from the fact that they either assume stationary relations between drift parameters and soil moisture or the sampling is not sufficient to obtain useful posterior probability distributions of soil moisture within different classes of available soft information. In this study we present an approach for integrated process studies in catchments by comparing principles from landscape ecology such as the pattern process paradigm with physical reasoning

  1. Does the simple dynamical systems approach provide useful information about catchment hydrological functioning in a Mediterranean context? Application to the Ardèche catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, M.; Braud, I.; Branger, F.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study explores how catchment heterogeneity and variability can be summarized in simplified models, representing the dominant hydrological processes. It focuses on Mediterranean catchments, characterized by heterogeneous geology, pedology, and land use, as well as steep topography and a rainfall regime in which summer droughts contrast with high-rainfall periods in autumn. The Ardèche catchment (south-east France), typical of this environment, is chosen to explore the following questions: (1) can such a Mediterranean catchment be adequately characterized by simple dynamical systems approach and what are the limits of the method under such conditions? (2) What information about dominant predictors of hydrological variability can be retrieved from this analysis in such catchments? In this work we apply the data-driven approach of Kirchner (WRR, 2009) to estimate discharge sensitivity functions that summarize the behavior of four sub-catchments of the Ardèche, using non-vegetation periods (November-March) from 9 years of data (2000-2008) from operational networks. The relevance of the inferred sensitivity function is assessed through hydrograph simulations, and through estimating precipitation rates from discharge fluctuations. We find that the discharge-sensitivity function is downward-curving in double-logarithmic space, thus allowing further simulation of discharge and non-divergence of the model, only during non-vegetation periods. The analysis is complemented by a Monte-Carlo sensitivity analysis showing how the parameters summarizing the discharge sensitivity function impact the simulated hydrographs. The resulting discharge simulation results are good for granite catchments, found to be predominantly characterized by saturation excess runoff and sub-surface flow processes. The simple dynamical system hypothesis works especially well in wet conditions (peaks and recessions are well modeled). On the other hand, poor model performance is associated with

  2. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  3. Effects of urban stormwater infrastructure on frequency, magnitude and scaling characteristics of runoff, and their implications for the transport of particulate material in arid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, L.; Hale, R. L.; Earl, S.; Grimm, N. B.; Childers, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Over recent decades urbanization has occurred rapidly, particularly in the arid and semi-arid southwestern USA. Major changes in ecosystem structure occur during urbanization, including changes in land cover and drainage networks. Changes in the connectivity of hydrological flow paths result from the construction of stormwater infrastructure, which in some instances increases flow connectivity and in others decrease it. In this study we investigate the effects of urbanization, specifically different types of stormwater infrastructure, on the frequency, magnitude and scaling characteristics of runoff in urban catchments. We evaluate consequences of these runoff characteristics for hydrologically mediated transport of particulate material and nutrient transport within urban catchments. A series of nested catchments was instrumented to monitor flow and water quality in the Indian Bend Wash catchment, Scottsdale, AZ. Catchments range in area from 6 to >17,000 ha and are predominantly residential. At the smallest spatial scales, catchments of comparable size represent different types of stormwater infrastructure, allowing us to isolate the effects of specific types of stormwater infrastructure on flow dynamics and material transport. Stormwater infrastructure in larger catchments (> 100 ha) is heterogeneous, allowing us to investigate the scaling characteristics of runoff and material transport. Results show that catchments with highly connected stormwater infrastructure (such as pipes) generate runoff in response to very low rainfall amounts, contributing to frequent flushing of particulate materials. The combination of high flow velocities and frequent flushing renders material transport within these catchments supply limited. In contrast, in catchments with disconnected stormwater infrastructure (such as retention basins), more rainfall is required to generate a runoff response at the catchment outlet, and runoff is less flashy than in highly connected catchments

  4. A method to employ the spatial organization of catchments into semi-distributed rainfall-runoff models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppel, Henning; Schumann, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    A distributed or semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model should consider the hydrologically most relevant catchment characteristics. These are heterogeneously distributed within a watershed but often interrelated and subject to a certain spatial organization which results in archetypes of combined characteristics. In order to reproduce the natural rainfall-runoff response the reduction of variance of catchment properties as well as the incorporation of the spatial organization of the catchment are desirable. In this study the width-function approach is utilized as a basic characteristic to analyse the succession of catchment characteristics. By applying this technique we were able to assess the context of catchment properties like soil or topology along the streamflow length and the network geomorphology, giving indications of the spatial organization of a catchment. Moreover, this information and this technique have been implemented in an algorithm for automated sub-basin ascertainment, which included the definition of zones within the newly defined sub-basins. The objective was to provide sub-basins that were less heterogeneous than common separation schemes. The algorithm was applied to two parameters characterizing the topology and soil of four mid-European watersheds. Resulting partitions indicated a wide range of applicability for the method and the algorithm. Additionally, the intersection of derived zones for different catchment characteristics could give insights into sub-basin similarities. Finally, a HBV96 case study demonstrated the potential benefits of modelling with the new subdivision technique.

  5. Improved understanding and prediction of the hydrologic response of highly urbanized catchments through development of the Illinois Urban Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantone, Joshua; Schmidt, Arthur

    2011-08-01

    What happens to the rain in highly urbanized catchments? That is the question that urban hydrologists must ask themselves when trying to integrate the hydrologic and hydraulic processes that affect the hydrologic response of urban catchments. The Illinois Urban Hydrologic Model (IUHM) has been developed to help answer this question and improve understanding and prediction of hydrologic response in highly urbanized catchments. Urban catchments are significantly different than natural watersheds, but there are similarities that allow features of the pioneering geomorphologic instantaneous unit hydrograph concept developed for natural watersheds to be adapted to the urban setting. This probabilistically based approach is a marked departure from the traditional deterministic models used to design and simulate urban sewer systems and does not have the burdensome input data requirements that detailed deterministic models possess. Application of IUHM to the CDS-51 catchment located in the village of Dolton, Illinois, highlights the model's ability to predict the hydrologic response of the catchment as well as the widely accepted SWMM model and is in accordance with observed data recorded by the United States Geological Survey. In addition, the unique structure and organization of urban sewer networks make it possible to characterize a set of ratios for urban catchments that allow IUHM to be applied when detailed input data are not available.

  6. Variable catchment sizes for the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Whippo, Tara

    2012-07-01

    Government efforts designed to help improve healthcare access rely on accurate measures of accessibility so that resources can be allocated to truly needy areas. In order to capture the interaction between physicians and populations, various access measures have been utilized, including the popular two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. However, despite the many advantages of 2SFCA, the problems associated with using fixed catchment sizes have not been satisfactorily addressed. We propose a new method to dynamically determine physician and population catchment sizes by incrementally increasing the catchment until a base population and a physician-to-population ratio are met. Preliminary application to the ten-county region in northern Illinois has demonstrated that the new method is effective in determining the appropriate catchment sizes across the urban to suburban/rural continuum and has revealed greater detail in spatial variation of accessibility compared to results using fixed catchment sizes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Time-variant Catchment Transit Time Distribution and StorAge Selection Functions in Neighbouring Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, J.; Rodriguez, N. B.; McGuire, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of the catchment functions of storage, mixing, and release is a major research challenge as their behavior is fundamental for understanding water quality and flow quantity and timing. Generally, the complexity of the flow paths and associated mixing processes is still a major hindrance to a thorough understanding of catchment functions. Catchment transit time distributions can be used as an integrative descriptor of catchment functions. Here we aim to understand these fundamental catchment functions in four neighboring catchments of the HJA Experimental Forest in Oregon, USA. The areas of the four catchments (WS2, WS3, WS9, WS10) range from 0.085 to 1.011 km2. The catchments are fully forested with Douglas fir, western hemlock, and western redcedar dominating the lower elevations, and noble fir, Pacific silver fir, Douglas fir dominating higher elevations. Geology is dominated by volcaniclastics, covering 68% to 99% of the catchments. We employed a two storage conceptual model in each catchment for stream flow and transport modeling. We used solutions of the Master Equation to determine transit time distributions. We assumed randomly sampled/fully mixed conditions in each storage to model 18Oxygen in stream flow over a two year period. For example, modeling results for WS10 yielded a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.84 for stream flow of and a NSE of 0.7 for the (volume weighted) 18O in stream flow. Furthermore, we derived the master transit time distribution (mttd) for the catchments. Eventually we investigated the landscape controls (topography, geology, morphology) on mttd and the dynamics of storage selection functions of each catchment.

  8. Applying different spatial distribution and modelling concepts in three nested mesoscale catchments of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongartz, K.

    Distributed, physically based river basin models are receiving increasing importance in integrated water resources management (IWRM) in Germany and in Europe, especially after the release of the new European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Applications in mesoscale catchments require an appropriate approach to represent the spatial distribution of related catchment properties such as land use, soil physics and topography by utilizing techniques of remote sensing and GIS analyses. The challenge is to delineate scale independent homogeneous modelling entities which, on the one hand may represent the dynamics of the dominant hydrological processes and, on the other hand can be derived from spatially distributed physiographical catchment properties. This scaling problem is tackled in this regional modelling study by applying the concept of hydrological response units (HRUs). In a nested catchment approach three different modelling conceptualisations are used to describe the runoff processes: (i) the topographic stream-segment-based HRU delineation proposed by Leavesley et al. [Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System, User’s Manual, Water Resource Investigations Report 83-4238, US Geological Survey, 1983]; (ii) the process based physiographic HRU-concept introduced by Flügel [Hydrol. Process. 9 (1995) 423] and (iii) an advanced HRU-concept adapted from (ii), which included the topographic topology of HRU-areas and the river network developed by Staudenraush [Eco Regio 8 (2000) 121]. The influence of different boundary conditions associated with changing the landuse classes, the temporal data resolution and the landuse scenarios were investigated. The mesoscale catchment of the river Ilm ( A∼895 km 2) in Thuringia, Germany, and the Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System (PRMS) were selected for this study. Simulations show that the physiographic based concept is a reliable method for modelling basin dynamics in catchments up to 200 km 2 whereas in larger catchments

  9. Relict rock glaciers as groundwater storage in alpine catchments - the example of the Seckauer Tauern Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Pauritsch, Marcus; Winkler, Gerfried

    2015-04-01

    Debris accumulations like relict rock glaciers (RRG) might act as groundwater storages in alpine catchments influencing the discharge dynamics of mountain streams. The degree of influence is related to the hydrometeorological conditions and changes seasonally. Especially during drought and flood events, the storage/buffer abilities of RRGs have an impact on the downstream river network. Stream flow could be assured during low flow periods and peak flows might be dampened during storm events. The assessment of the impact is investigated in the Seckauer Tauern Range, the easternmost subunit of the Niedere Tauern Range. In more detail, the discharge of a spring (Schöneben spring) emerging at the front of a RRG draining a catchment of 0.67 km² and discharges at gauging stations Finsterliesing and Unterwald further downstream with areal extents of 7.26 and 44.10 km² respectively are used as input for a lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff model, a modified version of the GR4J (Perrin et al., 2003). The Schöneben spring is 100% influenced by the RRG groundwater storage, as the whole catchment drains through the RRG. The flow dynamics of the other catchments are influenced only partially by RRGs with 15 and 12% as only headwater sections of it are drained by RRGs. The areal extend of the RRG (sub-) catchments, vegetation, debris in general and bare rock are compared to the storage parameters (routing and production store) of the rainfall-runoff model. As such, the influence of RRGs can be identified even in the overall catchment. It can be concluded that RRGs, due to their storage and buffer capabilities and abundance in the Seckauer Tauern Range are important for stream basin management and as a water resource for the sensitive ecosystem in alpine catchments. References: Perrin, C., Michel, C., Andréassian, V. (2003): Improvement of a parsimonious model for streamflow simulation. Journal of Hydrology 279, 275-289.

  10. Plot and Catchment Scale Hydrological Impacts of Agricultural Field Boundary Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Natural flood management aims to reduce downstream flow levels by delaying the movement of water through a catchment and increasing the amount of soil infiltration. Field boundary features such as hedgerows and dry stone walls are common features in the rural landscape. It is hypothesised that there presence could reduce runoff connectivity and change the soil moisture levels by altering the soil structure and porosity. The use of larger agricultural machinery has resulted in the removal of field boundaries and the subsequent increase in field sizes over the 20th Century. This change in the rural landscape is likely to have changed the partitioning of rainfall into runoff and the hydrological pathways throughout the catchment. However, the link between field boundaries and catchment scale flood risk has not yet been proven. We aim to address this need for evidence to support natural flood management by focussing on these widespread features in the rural landscape. Firstly, we quantify the change in the density of field boundaries over the past 120 years for the Skell catchment, Northern England using historical OS maps. The analysis has shown that field size has approximately doubled in the Skell catchment since 1892, due to the removal of field boundaries. Secondly, we assess the effect of field boundaries on local soil characteristics and hydrological processes through plot scale continuous monitoring of the hydrological processes along a 20m transect through the linear boundary features. For the summer period results show that soil moisture levels are lower immediately next to the hedgerow compared to distances greater than 1m from the hedgerow. Finally, we use this data to parameterise and validate a catchment scale hydrological model. The model is then applied to test the impact of a network of field boundaries on river flow extremes at the catchment scale.

  11. Hydrogeomorphological and water quality impacts of oil palm conversion and logging in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo: a multi-catchment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Rory; Nainar, Anand; Bidin, Kawi; Higton, Sam; Annammala, Kogilavani; Blake, William; Luke, Sarah; Murphy, Laura; Perryman, Emily; Wall, Katy; Hanapi, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    The last three decades have seen a combination of logging and land-use change across most of the rainforest tropics. This has involved conversion to oil palm across large parts of SE Asia. Although much is now known about the hydrological and sediment transport impacts of logging, relatively little is known about how impacts of oil palm conversion compare with those of logging. Furthermore little is known about the impacts of both on river morphology and water quality. This paper reports some findings of the first phase of a ten-year large-scale manipulative multi-catchment experiment (part of the SAFE - Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems - Project), based in the upper part of the Brantian Catchment in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo; the project is designed to assess the degree to which adverse impacts of oil palm conversion (on erosion, downstream channel change, water quality and river ecology) might be reduced by retaining buffer zones of riparian forest of varying width from zero to 120 metres. Ten 2 km2 catchments of contrasting land use history have been instrumented since 2011 to record discharge, turbidity, conductivity and water temperature at 5-minute intervals. These comprise 6 repeat-logged catchments being subjected in 2015-16 to conversion to oil palm with varying riparian forest widths; a repeat-logged 'control' catchment; an old regrowth catchment; an oil palm catchment; and a primary forest catchment. In addition, (1) monthly water samples from the catchments have been analysed for nitrates and phosphates, (2) channel cross-sectional change along each stream has been monitored at six-monthly intervals and (3) supplementary surveys have been made of downstream bankfull channel cross-sectional size and water chemistry at a wider range of catchment sites, and (4) sediment cores have been taken and contemporary deposition monitored at a hierarchical network of sites in the large Brantian catchment for geochemical analysis and dating to establish the

  12. Natural flood risk management in flashy headwater catchments: managing runoff peaks, timing, water quality and sediment regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Addy, Steve; Ghimire, Sohan; Kenyon, Wendy; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; Stutter, Marc; Watson, Helen

    2013-04-01

    catchments are known for their rapid runoff generation and have downstream local communities at risk of flash flooding. In Bowmont, NFM measures are currently being put in place to restore river bars and to store water more effectively on the flood plains during these flashy events. For example, Apex engineered wood structure in the river channel and riparian zones are designed to trap sediment and log bank protection structures are being installed to stop bank erosion. Tree planting in the catchment is also taking place. In the Belford catchment storage ponds and woody debris have been installed over the past five years to help to reduce the flood risk to the village of Belford. A dense instrumentation network has provided data for analysis and modelling which shows evidence of local scale flood peak reductions along with the collection of large amounts of sediment. A modelling study carried out (using a pond network model) during an intense summer storm showed that 30 small scale pond features used in sequence could reduce the flood peak by ~35% at the local scale. Findings show that managing surface runoff and local ditch flow at local scale headwater catchments is a cost effective way of managing flashy catchment for flood risk and sediment control. Working with catchment stakeholders is vital. Information given by the local community post flooding has been useful in placing NFM measures throughout the catchments. Involving the local communities in these projects and giving them access to the data and model outputs has helped to develop these projects further.

  13. Nitrogen budgets on Appalachian forest catchments

    Treesearch

    David R. DeWalle

    1997-01-01

    Variations in nitrogen losses in streamflow on catchments in the Appalachians suggests that the level of nitrogen retention in hardwood forests varies widely. Stream losses of dissolved nitrate-N on several small experimental forested catchments range from about 0.2 to 8.5 kg ha-1 y-1. This wide range of losses is equivalent to less than 10% to nearly 100% of measured...

  14. A perspective on stream-catchment connections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological study of the hyporheic zone is leading to recognition of a need for additional hydrologic understanding. Some of this understanding can be obtained by viewing the hyporheic zone as a succession of isolated boxes adjacent to the stream. Further understanding, particularly relevant to catchment-scale ecology, may come from studies focussed on the fluid mechanics of the flow-path connections between streams and their catchments.

  15. Improved baseflow characterization in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoelzle, Michael; Stahl, Kerstin; Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Seibert, Jan; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the baseflow regime is crucial for managing river ecosystems during low flow periods. Then aquatic conditions, water supply or streamflow forecast highly depend on the sustainability, magnitude, timing or rate of change of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, especially in areas of water shortage or with high water demand. This study aims to improve the understanding of the interplay between quick- and baseflow components by revising a widely used baseflow separation method (WMO or IH-UK method). Baseflow Index (BFI) and quickflow-baseflow-regimes were analyzed for 50 meso-scale catchments in southwestern Germany and Switzerland along a pronounced altitudinal gradient from 200 to 3200 m asl. Since the graphical separation of the baseflow signal depends on the chosen method, we evaluated the separation procedure by analyzing the relation between the seasonal variability of the stable water isotope signal in streamflow and the contribution of the quickflow component. We found that the snowmelt signal in high-elevation catchments is mostly accounted as baseflow suggesting that the used method is only valid for catchment with pluvial regimes. The large variability of BFI values found between the low-elevation, rainfall-driven catchments indicates that here catchment controls such as hydrogeological characteristics determine the baseflow contribution to streamflow. Relationships between several physiographic characteristics and the BFI values differed systematically for rainfall- and snowmelt-driven catchments suggesting that besides quick- and baseflow another delayed storage contributes to streamflow in mountainous catchments. By adjusting the separation procedure (variation of filter parameters) we were able to separate more delayed contributions of snowmelt from the faster groundwater signal. Thus, variable filter parameters are helpful to identify delayed streamflow contributions from different sources (e.g. snow and groundwater). The study

  16. The role of topography on catchment-scale water residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, K.J.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Weiler, M.; Kendall, C.; McGlynn, B.L.; Welker, J.M.; Seibert, J.

    2005-01-01

    The age, or residence time, of water is a fundamental descriptor of catchment hydrology, revealing information about the storage, flow pathways, and source of water in a single integrated measure. While there has been tremendous recent interest in residence time estimation to characterize watersheds, there are relatively few studies that have quantified residence time at the watershed scale, and fewer still that have extended those results beyond single catchments to larger landscape scales. We examined-topographic controls on residence time for seven catchments (0.085-62.4 km2) that represent diverse geologic and geomorphic conditions in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Our primary objective was to determine the dominant physical controls on catchment-scale, water residence time and specifically test the hypothesis that residence time is related to the size of the basin. Residence times were estimated by simple convolution models that described the transfer of precipitation isotopic composition to the stream network. We found that base flow mean residence times for exponential distributions ranged from 0.8 to 3.3 years. Mean residence time showed no correlation to basin area (r2 < 0.01) but instead was correlated (r2 =-0:91) to catchment terrain indices representing the flow path distance and flow path gradient to the stream network. These results illustrate that landscape organization (i.e., topography) rather than basin area controls catchment-scale transport. Results from this study may provide a framework for describing scale-invariant transport across climatic and geologic conditions, whereby the internal form and structure of the basin defines the first-order control on base flow residence time. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Understanding Pesticide Behaviour At The Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Pendlington, D.; Groves, S.

    Pesticides in stream flow at the outlet of a 142ha catchment in Eastern England (Col- worth, Bedfordshire), have been monitored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. The data from this catchment are being used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT contaminant transport pack- age at the catchment scale. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available with a useful set of pesticide application and detection data. Following calibration and validation of the hydrology of the catchment, pesticide modelling was carried out for tebuconazole, terbutryn, and terbuthylazine. This paper reports on the results of a sen- sitivity analysis of the model, and the final calibrated pesticide component. Analysis of the results obtained show that the timing and decay of predicted pesticide concen- trations are correct. It is therefore recommended that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behaviour at the catchment scale.

  18. Topic: Catchment system dynamics: Processes and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    In this meeting we can talk about my main expertise: the focus of my research ocus revolves around understanding catchment system dynamics in a holistic way by incorporating both processes on hillslopes as well as in the river channel. Process knowledge enables explanation of the impact of natural and human drivers on the catchment systems and which consequences these drivers have for water and sediment connectivity. Improved understanding of the catchment sediment and water dynamics will empower sustainable land and river management and mitigate soil threats like erosion and off-side water and sediment accumulation with the help of nature's forces. To be able to understand the system dynamics of a catchment, you need to study the catchment system in a holistic way. In many studies only the hillslopes or even plots are studied; or only the channel. However, these systems are connected and should be evaluated together. When studying a catchment system any intervention to the system will create both on- as well as off sites effects, which should especially be taken into account when transferring science into policy regulations or management decisions.

  19. Catchment Classification: Connecting Climate, Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Wagener, T.; Sivapalan, M.; Troch, P. A.; Carrillo, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrology does not yet possess a generally accepted catchment classification framework. Such a classification framework needs to: [1] give names to things, i.e. the main classification step, [2] permit transfer of information, i.e. regionalization of information, [3] permit development of generalizations, i.e. to develop new theory, and [4] provide a first order environmental change impact assessment, i.e., the hydrologic implications of climate, land use and land cover change. One strategy is to create a catchment classification framework based on the notion of catchment functions (partitioning, storage, and release). Results of an empirical study presented here connects climate and structure to catchment function (in the form of select hydrologic signatures), based on analyzing over 300 US catchments. Initial results indicate a wide assortment of signature relationships with properties of climate, geology, and vegetation. The uncertainty in the different regionalized signatures varies widely, and therefore there is variability in the robustness of classifying ungauged basins. This research provides insight into the controls of hydrologic behavior of a catchment, and enables a classification framework applicable to gauged and ungauged across the study domain. This study sheds light on what we can expect to achieve in mapping climate, structure and function in a top-down manner. Results of this study complement work done using a bottom-up physically-based modeling framework to generalize this approach (Carrillo et al., this session).

  20. Influence of landscape mosaic on streamflow of a peri-urban catchment under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Ferreira, António

    2017-04-01

    Peri-urban areas tend to be characterized by patchy landscape mosaics of different land-uses. Although the impact of land-use changes on catchment hydrology have been widely investigated, the impact of mixed land-use patterns on the streamflow of peri-urban areas is still poorly understood. This study aims to (i) explore and quantify streamflow delivery from sub-catchments characterized by distinct landscape mosaics; (ii) assess the impact of different urbanization styles on hydrograph properties; and (iii) explore the influence of urbanization type on flow connectivity and stream discharge. The study was carried out in Ribeira dos Covões, a small (6.2km2) peri-urban catchment in central Portugal. The climate is Mediterranean, with a mean annual rainfall of 892mm. Catchment geology comprises sandstone (56%), limestone (41%) and alluvial deposits (3%). Soils developed on sandstone are generally deep (>3m) Fluvisols and Podsols, whereas on limestone the Leptic Cambisols are typically shallow (<0.4m). Forest is the dominant land-use (56%), but urban areas cover an extensive area (40%), whereas agricultural land has declined to a very small area (4%). The urban area comprises contrasting urban styles, notably older discontinuous urban areas with buildings separated by gardens of low population density (<25 inhabitants km-2), and recent well-defined continuous urban cores dominated by apartment blocks and of high population density (9900 inhabitants km-2). The study uses hydrological data recorded over three hydrological years, starting in November 2010, in a monitoring network comprising eight streamflow gauging stations (instrumented with water level recorders) and five rainfall gauges. The gauging stations provide information on the discharge response to rainstorms of the catchment outlet and upstream sub-catchments of different size, urban pattern (in terms of percentage urban land-use and impervious area, distance to the stream network, and storm water management

  1. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  2. An approach to predict water quality in data-sparse catchments using hydrological catchment similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Glendell, Miriam; Stutter, Marc I.; Helliwell, Rachel C.

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of catchment response to climate and land use change at a regional scale is necessary for the assessment of mitigation and adaptation options addressing diffuse nutrient pollution. It is well documented that the physicochemical properties of a river ecosystem respond to change in a non-linear fashion. This is particularly important when threshold water concentrations, relevant to national and EU legislation, are exceeded. Large scale (regional) model assessments required for regulatory purposes must represent the key processes and mechanisms that are more readily understood in catchments with water quantity and water quality data monitored at high spatial and temporal resolution. While daily discharge data are available for most catchments in Scotland, nitrate and phosphorus are mostly available on a monthly basis only, as typified by regulatory monitoring. However, high resolution (hourly to daily) water quantity and water quality data exist for a limited number of research catchments. To successfully implement adaptation measures across Scotland, an upscaling from data-rich to data-sparse catchments is required. In addition, the widespread availability of spatial datasets affecting hydrological and biogeochemical responses (e.g. soils, topography/geomorphology, land use, vegetation etc.) provide an opportunity to transfer predictions between data-rich and data-sparse areas by linking processes and responses to catchment attributes. Here, we develop a framework of catchment typologies as a prerequisite for transferring information from data-rich to data-sparse catchments by focusing on how hydrological catchment similarity can be used as an indicator of grouped behaviours in water quality response. As indicators of hydrological catchment similarity we use flow indices derived from observed discharge data across Scotland as well as hydrological model parameters. For the latter, we calibrated the lumped rainfall-runoff model TUWModel using multiple

  3. Connectivity influences on nutrient and sediment migration in the Wartburg catchment, KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollongei, Kipkemboi J.; Lorentz, Simon A.

    Non-point-source (NPS) pollution of surface and groundwater by sediment and nutrient loads emanating from agricultural catchments is a prominent environmental issue, with major consequences on water supply and aquatic ecosystem quality. The concept of connectivity has proved invaluable in understanding migration of NPS pollutants in catchments. Observations of sediments or suspended solids (SS), nitrate (NO3) and phosphorous (P) fluxes alongside stable water isotope sampling were made on a nested basis at field and catchment (41 km2) scales for a series of events in the Wartburg catchment, South Africa. The nested catchment scale sampling was focused on control features in the stream network, including road crossings, farm dams and wetland zones. The analyzed stable water (δ18O and δ2H) isotopes results were used to interpret the connectivity of the contributing land forms and the stream network. The results reveal the dominant influences of farm dams and wetlands in limiting the downstream migration of sediment and nutrients for all but the most intense events. Certain events resulted in mixing in the dams and larger resultant outflow than inflow loads. These occurrences appear to be as a result of combinations of reservoir status, catchment antecedent conditions and rainfall depth and intensity. The nutrients loads between Bridge 1 and Bridge 2 stations reflect the bedrock control, where contributions from sugar cane hillslopes between these stations are not retained, even in the short wetland upstream of Bridge 2. Isotope analyses reveal that the headwaters, comprising 70% of the catchment area, contribute as little as 29% of the total catchment discharge, due to impoundments in this area. However, this contribution varies significantly for different events, reaching a maximum of 78% of the catchment discharge. It can therefore be concluded that nutrients and sediment migration in the Wartburg catchment is greatly influenced by connectivity. The δ18O and δ2H

  4. Shale to Regolith Evolution: The Controls on Catchment Solute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Pamela; Goddéris, Yves; Shi, Yuning; Singha, Kamini; Clarke, Brian; Schott, Jacques; Duff, Chritopher; Brantley, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that control the formation of regolith and the evolution of pore space within regolith as it is moves upward to the surface is of global importance. Unfortunately, both access and high costs have been prohibitive in gathering information about the bedrock-regolith boundary. Recognizing the need for data at depth, the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) network initiated the "Drill the Ridge" project. The goal of this project is to investigate fresh bedrock at each CZO and then to perform an array of downhole geophysical survey and geochemical analyses to understand regolith formation. In response to this call, several ridgetop boreholes were drilled at the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO in 2012 and 2013. Here we present the optical televiewer and gamma logs of these boreholes, along with downcore bulk geochemical analysis to shed light on the geochemical and lithological controls on the evolution of the watershed. Observations of catchment hydrology are also being used with estimates of hydrologic parameters to quantify near-surface geologic evolution and geochemical fluxes associated with weathering at depth. To quantify the contribution of weathering fluxes from the mobile regolith, we then link the meteorological forcing from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2), the fully-coupled land-surface Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (Flux-PIHM), and the geochemical box model WITCH. With this cascade of models, solute fluxes for the CZO are being simulated. At depth, the bulk geochemical analysis of ridgetop sediments indicates that pyrite had the deepest depletion front, which was concurrent with the regional water table position. Hydrologic data together with detailed borehole and bulk soil/rock geochemical analysis elucidated an eastern to western progression in lithology across the SSHCZO catchment controls fracture distribution and thus groundwater flow. Where shale and mudstone underlie the eastern portion of

  5. Catchment Transit Times - Does Scale Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Soulsby, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Speed, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mean transit times (MTT) can give useful insights into the internal processes of hydrological systems. However, our understanding of how they vary and scale remains unclear. The objective of this study was therefore to compare MTT at different scales and to thereby identify possible changes in dominant flow pathways and mixing processes over several orders of magnitude from small headwaters to large scale catchments. Furthermore, the study aimed at finding a new way to determine MTT, suitable for application in ungauged catchments. MTTs were estimated using an input weighed convolution integral approach with a Gamma distribution as transit time distribution and weekly δ18O data from 20, mostly nested, contrasting catchments in North-East Scotland ranging from 1 to 1800 km2. The estimated MTTs ranged between 270 and 1172 days and were used to test a previously developed multiple linear regression (MLR) model for MTT prediction based on metrics of soil cover, landscape organization and climate. We show that the controls on MTT identified by the MLR model hold with the independent data from these 20 sites and that the MLR can be used to predict MTT in ungauged montane catchments within a mean relative error of 25 % without the need for independent tracer information. Furthermore, it was found that the dominant controls on MTT not only remain unchanged in regions other than those used for the original calibration of the MLR but also over 3 more orders of magnitude of catchment size, suggesting no major change of dominant flow paths and mixing processes at larger scales. This is consistent with the fact that only the variance of MTT, rather than MTT, showed a scaling relationship above a potential threshold of ~ 50 km2. However, MTT itself appeared to converge with increasing catchment scale, apparently due to the integration of heterogeneous headwater responses in larger downstream catchments.

  6. Inductive machine learning for improved estimation of catchment-scale snow water equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, David; Skalka, Christian; Bongard, Josh

    2015-05-01

    Infrastructure for the automatic collection of single-point measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is well-established. However, because SWE varies significantly over space, the estimation of SWE at the catchment scale based on a single-point measurement is error-prone. We propose low-cost, lightweight methods for near-real-time estimation of mean catchment-wide SWE using existing infrastructure, wireless sensor networks, and machine learning algorithms. Because snowpack distribution is highly nonlinear, we focus on Genetic Programming (GP), a nonlinear, white-box, inductive machine learning algorithm. Because we did not have access to near-real-time catchment-scale SWE data, we used available data as ground truth for machine learning in a set of experiments that are successive approximations of our goal of catchment-wide SWE estimation. First, we used a history of maritime snowpack data collected by manual snow courses. Second, we used distributed snow depth (HS) data collected automatically by wireless sensor networks. We compared the performance of GP against linear regression (LR), binary regression trees (BT), and a widely used basic method (BM) that naively assumes non-variable snowpack. In the first experiment set, GP and LR models predicted SWE with lower error than BM. In the second experiment set, GP had lower error than LR, but outperformed BT only when we applied a technique that specifically mitigated the possibility of over-fitting.

  7. Assessing the simple dynamical systems approach in a Mediterranean context: application to the Ardeche catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, M.; Braud, I.; Branger, F.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-05-01

    This study explores how catchment heterogeneity and variability can be summarized in simplified models, representing the dominant hydrological processes. It focuses on Mediterranean catchments, characterized by heterogeneous geology, pedology and land use, as well as steep topography and a rainfall regime in which summer droughts contrast with high-rainfall periods in autumn. The Ardeche catchment (Southeast France), typical of this environment, is chosen to explore the following questions: (1) can such a Mediterranean catchment be adequately characterized by a simple dynamical systems approach and what are the limits of the method under such conditions? (2) what information about dominant predictors of hydrological variability can be retrieved from this analysis in such catchments? In this work we apply the data-driven approach of Kirchner (2009) to estimate discharge sensitivity functions that summarize the behaviour of four sub-catchments of the Ardeche, using low-vegetation periods (November-March) from 9 years of measurements (2000-2008) from operational networks. The relevance of the inferred sensitivity function is assessed through hydrograph simulations, and through estimating precipitation rates from discharge fluctuations. We find that the discharge sensitivity function is downward-curving in double-logarithmic space, thus allowing further simulation of discharge and non-divergence of the model, only during low-vegetation periods. The analysis is complemented by a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showing how the parameters summarizing the discharge sensitivity function impact the simulated hydrographs. The resulting discharge simulation results are good for granite catchments, which are likely to be characterized by shallow subsurface flow at the interface between soil and bedrock. The simple dynamical system hypothesis works especially well in wet conditions (peaks and recessions are well modelled). On the other hand, poor model performance is associated

  8. Transport of cyazofamid and kresoxim methyl in runoff at the plot and catchment scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Joaquín García Verdú, Antonio; Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2013-04-01

    Surface runoff and erosion during the course of rainfall events represent major processes of pesticides transport from agricultural land to aquatic ecosystem. In general, field and catchment studies on pesticide transfer are carried out separately. A study at both scales may enable to improve the understanding of scale effects on processes involved in pesticides transport and to give clues on the source areas within an agricultural catchment. In this study, the transport in runoff of two widely used fungicides, i.e. kresoxim methyl (KM) and cyazofamid (CY) was assessed in a 43 ha vineyard catchment and the relative contribution of the total fungicides export from one representative plot was evaluated. During an entire period of fungicide application, from May to August 2011, the discharge and loads of dissolved and particle-laden KM and CY were monitored at the plot and catchment scales. The results showed larger export coefficient of KM and CY from catchment (0.064 and 0.041‰ for KM and CY respectively) than from the studied plot (0.009 and 0.023 ‰ for KM and CY respectively). It suggests that the plot margins especially the road network contributed as well to the fungicide loads. This result underlines the impact of fungicide drift on non-target areas. Furthermore, a larger rainfall threshold is necessary at the plot scale to trigger runoff and mobilise pesticides than on the road network. At the plot scale, a rapid dissipation of the both fungicides in the top soil was observed. It highlights that the risky period encompasses the first rainfall events triggering runoff after the applications. At both scales, KM and CY were not detected in suspended solids (i.e. > 0.7 µm). However their partitioning in runoff water differed. 64.1 and 91.8% of the KM load was detected in the dissolved phase (i.e. < 0.22 µm) at the plot and catchment scales respectively, whereas 98.7 and 100% of the CY load was detected in the particulate phase (i.e. between 0.22 and 0.7 µm

  9. Development and validation of a runoff and erosion model for lowland drained catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grangeon, Thomas; Cerdan, Olivier; Vandromme, Rosalie; Landemaine, Valentin; Manière, Louis; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Foucher, Anthony; Evrard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Modelling water and sediment transfer in lowland catchments is complex as both hortonian and saturation excess-flow occur in these environments. Moreover, their dynamics was complexified by the installation of tile drainage networks or stream redesign. To the best of our knowledge, few models are able to simulate saturation runoff as well as hortonian runoff in tile-drained catchments. Most of the time, they are used for small scale applications due to their high degree of complexity. In this context, a model of intermediate complexity was developed to simulate the hydrological and erosion processes at the catchment scale in lowland environments. This GIS-based, spatially distributed and lumped model at the event scale uses a theoretical hydrograph to approximate within-event temporal variations. It comprises two layers used to represent surface and subsurface transfers. Observations of soil surface characteristics (i.e. vegetation density, soil crusting and roughness) were used to document spatial variations of physical soil characteristics (e.g. infiltration capacity). Flow was routed depending on the local slope, using LIDAR elevation data. Both the diffuse and the gully erosion are explicitly described. The model ability to simulate water and sediment dynamics at the catchment scale was evaluated using the monitoring of a selection of flood events in a small, extensively cultivated catchment (the Louroux catchment, Loire River basin, central France; 25 km2). In this catchment, five monitoring stations were equipped with water level sensors, turbidity probes, and automatic samplers. Discharge and suspended sediment concentration were deduced from field measurements. One station was installed at the outlet of a tile drain and was used to parameterize fluxes supplied by the drainage network. The selected floods were representative of various rainfall and soil surface conditions (e.g. low-intensity rainfall occurring on saturated soils as well as intense rainfall

  10. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-02-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed in relation to the functioning and characterisation of catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. However, such classifications are based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time and this does not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous field soils with varying soil structures during the year and the suggestion is made to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we advise to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates.

  11. Catchment biophysical drivers of streamflow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancoso, R.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of streamflow reflect the co-evolution of climate, soils, topography and vegetation of catchments. Hydrological metrics or signatures can represent the long-term behaviour and integrate the influence of all the streamflow drivers. Although this sort of relationship has been developed in regional studies exploring prediction of Flow Duration Curves and other streamflow metrics, little is known about the controls of other key streamflow characteristics especially in continent scale. This study aims to understand how catchment biophysical variables control key hydrological metrics such as baseflow index, elasticity of streamflow to rainfall variability and intermittency in continent scale and regionally. We used a set of catchment biophysical variables to model key streamflow signatures using multivariate power-law and beta regressions in 355 catchments located along the eastern Australian seaboard. Streamflow signatures were derived from daily streamflow time series data from 1980 to 2013. We tested 52 catchment biophysical characteristics related to climate, soil, topography, geography, geomorphology, vegetation and land-cover as predictors of the streamflow signatures. The prediction R-squared ranged from 63 to 72% when relationships are built in continent scale, but can be greater than 80% when regressions are regionalised. The interpretation of the modelled relationships offers new insights regarding the controls of flow characteristics.

  12. Simulating Catchment Scale Afforestation for Mitigating Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, M. S.; Bathurst, J. C.; Quinn, P. F.; Birkinshaw, S.

    2016-12-01

    After the 2013-14, and the more recent 2015-16, winter floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management practice remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. This project aims to improve the understanding of the impacts of upland afforestation on flood risk at the sub-catchment and full catchment scales. This will be achieved through an integrated fieldwork and modelling approach, with the use of a series of process based hydrological models to scale up and examine the effects forestry can have on flooding. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, catchment system engineering and the installation of runoff attenuation features (RAFs), such as engineered log jams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. Additionally, the proportion of a catchment or riparian reach that would need to be forested in order to achieve a significant impact on reducing downstream flooding will be defined. The consequential impacts of a corresponding reduction in agriculturally productive farmland and the potential decline of water resource availability will also be considered in order to safeguard the UK's food security and satisfy the global demand on water resources.

  13. In Lieu of the Paired-Catchment Approach - Hydrologic Model Change Detection at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegre, N. P.

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the effects of forest management on hydrology primarily comes from paired-catchment studies conducted world-wide. While this approach has been useful for discerning changes in small experimental catchments and has contributed fundamental knowledge of the effects of forest and natural resources management on hydrology, results from experimental catchment studies exhibit temporal variability, have limited spatial inference, and lack insight into internal catchment processes. To address these limitations, traditional field experiments can be supplemented with numerical models to isolate the effects of disturbance on catchment behavior. Outlined in this study is an alternative method of change detection for daily time-series streamflow that integrates hydrologic modeling and statistical change detection methods used to discern the effects of contemporary forest management on the hydrology of western Oregon Cascades headwater catchments. In this study, a simple rainfall-runoff model was used to generate virtual reference catchments using attributes that reflect streamflow conditions absent of forest disturbance. Streamflow was simulated under three levels of model uncertainty using GLUE and were used to construct generalized least squares regression models to discern changes in hydrologic behavior. By considering processes within a single experimental catchment rather than the two spatially explicit catchments used in traditional paired experiments, it was possible to reduce unexplained variation and increase the likelihood of correctly detecting hydrologic effects following forest harvesting. In order to evaluate the stability of the hydrologic and statistical models and catchment behavior over time, the change detection method was applied to a contemporary reference catchment. By applying the change detection model to reference catchments, it was possible to eliminate unexpected variation as a cause for detected changes in observed hydrology. Further, it

  14. Quantifying in-stream retention of nitrate at catchment scales using a practical mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Schwientek, Marc; Selle, Benny

    2016-02-01

    As field data on in-stream nitrate retention is scarce at catchment scales, this study aimed at quantifying net retention of nitrate within the entire river network of a fourth-order stream. For this purpose, a practical mass balance approach combined with a Lagrangian sampling scheme was applied and seasonally repeated to estimate daily in-stream net retention of nitrate for a 17.4 km long, agriculturally influenced, segment of the Steinlach River in southwestern Germany. This river segment represents approximately 70% of the length of the main stem and about 32% of the streambed area of the entire river network. Sampling days in spring and summer were biogeochemically more active than in autumn and winter. Results obtained for the main stem of Steinlach River were subsequently extrapolated to the stream network in the catchment. It was demonstrated that, for baseflow conditions in spring and summer, in-stream nitrate retention could sum up to a relevant term of the catchment's nitrogen balance if the entire stream network was considered.

  15. Flood Nowcasting With Linear Catchment Models, Radar and Kalman Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegram, Geoff; Sinclair, Scott

    A pilot study using real time rainfall data as input to a parsimonious linear distributed flood forecasting model is presented. The aim of the study is to deliver an operational system capable of producing flood forecasts, in real time, for the Mgeni and Mlazi catchments near the city of Durban in South Africa. The forecasts can be made at time steps which are of the order of a fraction of the catchment response time. To this end, the model is formulated in Finite Difference form in an equation similar to an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model; it is this formulation which provides the required computational efficiency. The ARMA equation is a discretely coincident form of the State-Space equations that govern the response of an arrangement of linear reservoirs. This results in a functional relationship between the reservoir response con- stants and the ARMA coefficients, which guarantees stationarity of the ARMA model. Input to the model is a combined "Best Estimate" spatial rainfall field, derived from a combination of weather RADAR and Satellite rainfield estimates with point rain- fall given by a network of telemetering raingauges. Several strategies are employed to overcome the uncertainties associated with forecasting. Principle among these are the use of optimal (double Kalman) filtering techniques to update the model states and parameters in response to current streamflow observations and the application of short term forecasting techniques to provide future estimates of the rainfield as input to the model.

  16. What can we learn from the hydrological modeling of small-scale catchments for the discharge and water balance modeling of mesoscale catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Thomas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Bogena, Heye

    2015-04-01

    The application of 3D hydrological models remains a challenge both in research and application studies because the parameterization not only depends on the amount and quality of data available for calibration and validation but also on the spatial and temporal model resolution. In recent years, the model parameterization has improved with the availability of high resolution data (e.g. eddy-covariance, wireless soil sensor networks). Unfortunately, these high resolution data are typically only available for small scale research test sites. This study aims to upscale the parameterization from a highly equipped, small-scale catchment to a mesoscale catchment in order to reduce the parameterization uncertainty at that scale. The two nested catchments chosen for the study are the 0.38 km² large spruce covered Wüstebach catchment and the 42 km² large Erkensruhr catchment characterized by a mixture of spruce and beech forest and grassland vegetation. The 3D hydrogeological model HydroGeoSphere (HGS) has already been setup for the Wüstebach catchment in a previous study with a focus on the simulation performance of soil water dynamics and patterns. Thus, the parameterization process did not only optimize the water balance components but the catchment's wireless soil sensor network data were utilized to calibrate porosities in order to improve the simulation of soil moisture dynamics. In this study we compared different HGS model realizations for the Erkensruhr catchment with different input data. For the first model realization, the catchment is treated heterogeneous in terms of soil properties and topography but homogeneous with respect to land use, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. For this case, the spruce forest parameterization and the climate input data were taken directly from the small-scale Wüstebach model realization. Next, the calibrated soil porosity for the Wüstebach catchment is applied to the Erkensruhr. Further model realizations

  17. Seasonalstreamflow Generation At Variousspatial Scales On A Smallmediterranean Vineyard Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marofi, S.; Moussa, R.; Voltz, M.

    The importance of surface hydrological processes, under field and sub-catchment conditions, was examines on a small-cultivated watershed, located in South of France. Hydrological responses at different spatial scales were evaluated during the wetness and drier phases, which included the within-year and the long-term periods. The experimental design involved monitoring of surface runoff, streamflow and groundwaters behaviours, in response to rainfall events, during three hydrological cycles. In addition to the mean outlet of catchment and the two vineyard fields that have different situations, runoff was measured at 8 sub-catchments of site. Rainfall was monitored on continuous basis at 4 sites, and the water tables fluctuations also were recorded in more than 15 locations of catchment. During the experimentation period, more than 175 rainy events were observed. The dates analyse show that the regime of surface water, compound of three principals phases: (i) the phases of great flow circulation, (ii) the recession phases, and (iii) the phase without surface flow. The results also indicate that the annual runoff changes appreciably according to hydrological cycles and the rainfall variability. It varies from 28% to 50% of the total of precipitation. The inter-annual variations of the runoff also recovers that the annual runoff flow is insured for approximately 40% by the instantaneous floods, which occur the moment or a few hours only after precipitation, and about 60% by the recession periods, which take place for the long time after floods. The flood events were classified in three groups, differentiated by the initial water table levels and their occurrence period. The direct runoff and the baseflow calculation show that according to the type of flood, they change respectively from 7% to17% and 0% to 7% of precipitation. Comparing to the field areas, on average, the total runoff and direct runoff of the mean basin respectively are 46% and 35%. The water flow

  18. Contrasting Patterns of Fine Fluvial Sediment Delivery in Two Adjacent Upland Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M.; Bracken, L.; Warburton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying patterns of fine suspended sediment transfer in UK upland rivers is of vital importance in combating the damaging effects of elevated fluxes of suspended sediment, and sediment associated transport of contaminants, on in-stream biota. In many catchments of the UK there is still a lack of catchment-wide understanding of both the spatial patterns and temporal variation in fine sediment delivery. This poster describes the spatial and temporal distribution of in-stream fine sediment delivery from a network of 44 time-integrated mass flux samplers (TIMs) in two adjacent upland catchments. The two catchments are the Esk (210 km2) and Upper Derwent (236 km2) which drain the North York Moors National Park. Annual suspended sediment loads in the Upper Derwent are 1273 t, whereas in the Esk catchment they are greater at 1778 t. Maximum yields of 22 t km-2 yr -1 were measured in the headwater tributaries of the Rye River (Derwent), whereas peak yields in the Esk are four times greater (98 t km-2 yr-1) on the Butter Beck subcatchment. Analysis of the within-storm sediment dynamics, indicates that the sediment sources within the Upper Derwent catchment are from distal locations possibly mobilised by hillslope runoff processes, whereas in the Esk, sediment sources are more proximal to the channel e.g. within channel stores or bank failures. These estimates of suspended sediment flux are compared with the diffuse pollution potential generated by a risk-based model of sediment transfer (SCIMAP) in order to assess the similarity between the model predictions and observed fluxes.

  19. Before and After Integrated Catchment Management in a Headwater Catchment: Changes in Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew O.; Quinn, John M.

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  20. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  1. How old is upland catchment water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Harald; Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water supply catchments is an essential part of water management. Upland catchments provide a continuous, reliable source of high quality water not only for some of the world's biggest cities, but also for agriculture and industry. Headwater streams control river flow in lowland agricultural basins as the majority of river discharge emerges from upland catchments. Many rivers are perennial and flow throughout the year, even during droughts. However, it is still unclear how reliable and continuous upland catchment water resources really are. Despite many efforts in upland catchment research, there is still little known about where the water is stored and how long it takes to travel through upper catchments. Resolving these questions is crucial to ensure that this resource is protected from changing land use and to estimate potential impacts from a changing climate. Previous research in this important area has been limited by existing measurement techniques. Knowledge to date has relied heavily on the use of variation in stable isotope signals to estimate the age and origin of water from upland catchments. The problem with relying on these measures is that as the water residence time increases, the variation in the stable isotope signal decreases. After a maximum period of four years, no variation can be detected This means that to date, the residence time in upland catchments is likely to have been vastly underestimated. Consequently, the proportion of water flow out of upland river catchments to the total river flow is also underestimated. Tritium (3H) combines directly with water molecules and enters the flow paths with the infiltrating water. Its half-life (12.32 years) makes it ideal to describe residence times in upper catchment reservoirs as it can theoretically measure water up to about 150 years old. The bomb pulse peak in the southern hemisphere was several orders of magnitude lower than in the northern hemisphere. Hence the

  2. Validation of Pacific Northwest hydrologic landscapes at the catchment scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and de...

  3. Validation of Pacific Northwest hydrologic landscapes at the catchment scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and de...

  4. Relating water-discharge and catchment area in modern and ancient catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eide, C. H.; Helland-Hansen, W.

    2016-12-01

    Models relating sediment supply to catchment properties are important in order to use the geological record to deduce landscape evolution and the interplay between tectonics and climate. Water discharge (Qw) is an important factor in the widely used BQwART-model of Syvitski and Milliman (2007), which relates sediment load to a set of measureable catchment parameters. Although many of the factors in this equation may be independently estimated with some degree of certainty in ancient systems, water discharge (Qw) certainly cannot. An analysis of a world database of modern catchments (Milliman and Farnsworth, 2011) shows that the commonly applied equation relating catchment area (A) to water discharge (Qw=0.075A0.8), does not predict water discharge from catchment area well in many cases (R2=0.46 and an error spanning 4 orders of magnitude). Neither does the equation incorporate the effect of arid and wet climate on this relationship. This is a problem since first-order estimates of paleoclimate can often be deduced on the basis of sedimentological data such as paleosol types, presence of calcretes or coal beds, and paleohydraulics. In this contribution, we investigate how the relationship between catchment size and river discharge vary with four runoff categories (arid, subarid, humid, wet) which are recognizable in the geological record, and modify the coefficient and exponent of the equation according to these classes. It follows from this analysis that arid catchments are so variable that water discharge cannot be predicted from catchment area. Our modified model yields greatly improved results in relating discharge to catchment size (R2=0.94 and error spanning 1 order of magnitude) when core or regional paleoclimate reconstruction data is available in non-arid systems. We conclude that this model, in contrast to the previous, is sufficient for most geological applications and will lead to a higher degree of confidence in the application of mass-balance models in

  5. Environmental isotope hydrology of salinized experimental catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. V.; Arad, A.; Johnston, C. D.

    1987-10-01

    Deuterium, oxygen-18, tritium and chloride concentrations were used in three salinized experimental catchments to gain insight into the mechanism of solute concentration and flow processes in the saturated and unsaturated zones. The three experimental catchments were studied because of their location in different rainfall regions, their status with respect to clearing of native vegetation and with respect to secondary salinization. Two uncleared catchments have average annual rainfalls of approximately 820 and 1220 mm, respectively. The third cleared catchment has an annual rainfall of 650-750 mm. This catchment was in an advanced state of secondary salinization and displayed large areas of saline groundwater discharge with halite encrustation at the ground surface. The stable isotope compositions of the solution phase in solute bulge profiles in the unsaturated zone showed a close agreement with the amount-weighted mean isotopic composition of rainfall and only surficial evidence of isotopic enrichment due to evaporation. Evaporation from the soil surface plays a minor role as a mechanism of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone. The dominant process of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone was ion exclusion during uptake of water by tree roots which was evidently a solute but not isotope fractionating process. Tritium analyses of unsaturated zone water and grondwater indicated movement of recent recharge to 7-10 m depth at the low rainfall site but over the full depth of the 15 m unsaturated zone at the higher rainfall site. The variability in δ18O and δ2H values of groundwaters was used in association with chloride concentrations to provide information on mixing characteristics of groundwaters within the catchments.

  6. Siting analyses for water quality sampling in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Lin, Chin-Lien; Hu, Wen-Hsin

    2008-04-01

    Pollution loads discharged from upstream development or human activities significantly degrade the water quality of a reservoir. The design of an appropriate water quality sampling network is therefore important for detecting potential pollution events and monitoring pollution trends. However, under a limited budgetary constraint, how to site an appropriate number of sampling stations is a challenging task. A previous study proposed a method applying the simulated annealing algorithm to design the sampling network based on three cost factors including the number of reaches, bank length, and subcatchment area. However, these factors are not directly related to the distribution of possible pollution. Thus, this study modified the method by considering three additional factors, i.e. total phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment loads. The larger the possible load, the higher the probability of a pollution event may occur. The study area was the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Pollution loads were derived from the AGNPS model with rainfall intensity estimated using the Thiessen method. Analyses for a network with various numbers of sampling sites were implemented. The results obtained based on varied cost factors were compared and discussed. With the three additional factors, the chosen sampling network is expected to properly detect pollution events and monitor pollution distribution and temporal trends.

  7. Picturing and modelling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle; Jackisch, Conrad; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling studies often start with a qualitative sketch of the hydrological processes of a catchment. These so-called perceptual models are often pictured as hillslopes and are generalizations displaying only the dominant and relevant processes of a catchment or hillslope. The problem with these models is that they are prone to become too much predetermined by the designer's background and experience. Moreover it is difficult to know if that picture is correct and contains enough complexity to represent the system under study. Nevertheless, because of their qualitative form, perceptual models are easy to understand and can be an excellent tool for multidisciplinary exchange between researchers with different backgrounds, helping to identify the dominant structures and processes in a catchment. In our study we explore whether a perceptual model built upon an intensive field campaign may serve as a blueprint for setting up representative hillslopes in a hydrological model to reproduce the functioning of two distinctly different catchments. We use a physically-based 2D hillslope model which has proven capable to be driven by measured soil-hydrological parameters. A key asset of our approach is that the model structure itself remains a picture of the perceptual model, which is benchmarked against a) geo-physical images of the subsurface and b) observed dynamics of discharge, distributed state variables and fluxes (soil moisture, matric potential and sap flow). Within this approach we are able to set up two behavioral model structures which allow the simulation of the most important hydrological fluxes and state variables in good accordance with available observations within the 19.4 km2 large Colpach catchment and the 4.5 km2 large Wollefsbach catchment in Luxembourg without the necessity of calibration. This corroborates, contrary to the widespread opinion, that a) lower mesoscale catchments may be modelled by representative hillslopes and b) physically

  8. Identification of internal flow dynamics in two experimental catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.P.; Jakeman, A.J.; Kendall, C.; Weizu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the internal flow dynamics in catchments is difficult because of the lack of information in precipitation -stream discharge time series alone. Two experimental catchments, Hydrohill and Nandadish, near Nanjing in China, have been set up to monitor internal flows reaching the catchment stream at various depths, from the surface runoff to the bedrock. With analysis of the precipitation against these internal discharges, it is possible to quantify the time constants and volumes associated with various flowpaths in both catchments.

  9. Spatio-temporal distribution of soil surface moisture in a heterogeneously farmed Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, O.; Voltz, M.; Andrieux, P.; Moussa, R.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryObservation and interpretation of spatial soil surface moisture patterns are fundamental to spatially distributed modelling of runoff generation, soil evaporation, and plant transpiration. Compared to natural basins, man-made managements in farmed basins, such as field limits, agricultural practices and the networks of ditches, lead to great spatial heterogeneity in hydrological processes at the catchment scale. The aim of this study was to identify the factors controlling the spatio-temporal variability of the surface soil moisture in the farmed Mediterranean catchment of Roujan (0.91 km 2) located in southern France. Intensive measurements of soil moisture patterns were recorded during two drying sequences, respectively, in dry and wet seasons. Results show that the soil surface characteristics (SSC), which result in part from the agricultural practices such as soil tillage, chemical weed control or grass covering, are the main factors controlling the spatio-temporal distribution of the soil surface moisture during both the wet and dry drying sequences. However, in this study, none of the local factors such as the soil insolation (sunlight reaching soil surface through the plant canopy if there is one), the slope, the aspect and the soil texture is correlated to the soil moisture spatial variability. Only local factors control the spatio-temporal variability of soil surface moisture because agricultural operations like tillage influence greatly the local surface runoff by altering soil hydrologic properties. Also, the ditch networks influence the water transfer from the fields to the catchment outlet by routing runoff directly to the catchment outlet without modifying the soil surface moistures of downslope fields. Consequently, in farmed catchments the agricultural managements and practices strongly modify the spatio-temporal soil moisture distribution and must be taken into account in the understanding and in the modelling of hydrological processes.

  10. Terrestrial and in-stream influences on the spatial variability of nitrate in a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Todd M.; Ingram, Spencer M.; Riscassi, Ami L.

    2010-06-01

    A vast majority of monitoring programs designed to assess nutrient fluxes from headwater systems rely upon temporally intensive sampling at a single position within the stream network, essentially measuring the integrated response of the catchment. Missing from such an approach is spatial information related to how nutrient availability varies throughout the network, where freshwater biota live and where biogeochemical processes ultimately shape the downstream water chemistry. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of nitrate (NO3-) concentrations within the Paine Run catchment, a forested headwater catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Nitrate concentrations throughout the stream network were measured as part of synoptic surveys conducted in 1992-1994, in the aftermath of region-wide gypsy moth defoliation that caused dramatic increases in stream water NO3- concentrations. A follow-up synoptic survey was conducted in 2007, when the stream water NO3- concentrations had returned to predefoliation levels. Common to each of the eight synoptic surveys were observations of multiple-fold declines in NO3- concentration along the main stem of the stream network from the headwaters to the catchment outlet. A portion of this decline was caused by dilution, as water input by tributaries at the lower elevations of the catchment tended to have lower NO3- concentrations. A stream network model was applied to determine the relative contributions of terrestrial versus in-stream processes to the spatial variability of the NO3- concentrations. Model results suggest that even though nitrate removal within the stream network can be substantial, terrestrial factors that determine the NO3- inputs to streams account for the vast majority of the spatial variability in stream water NO3- concentrations.

  11. Development of regionalisation procedures using a multi-model approach for flow simulation in an ungauged catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; O'Connor, K. M.; Bhattarai, K. P.

    2007-02-01

    SummaryFlow simulation in ungauged catchments is presently regarded as one of the most challenging tasks in surface water hydrology. Many of the ungauged catchments are located in the headwaters of rivers in mountainous regions of the world having enormous potential for sustainable water resource development. However, due to inaccessibility, rugged and inhospitable terrain, and historical lack of foresight concerning the need to have these headwaters adequately gauged, their potential is not readily realizable. Many downstream sites also suffer from non-availability of site-specific data as even in countries having extensive networks of gauged stations data may not be available at sites where these are most needed. As predictive tools for water resources, water quality, natural hazard mitigation and water availability assessment are generally data-driven, the lack of adequate hydrometric records poses difficult problems for planners, engineers, managers, and stake-holders alike. In this study, a methodology is developed for flow simulation in ungauged catchments using a regionalisation and multi-model approach involving a suite of rainfall-runoff models and combination techniques. Daily observed hydrometeorological data for 12 French catchments are used for illustrating the procedures. Following a preliminary investigation of the regional homogeneity of that group of catchments, three regional flow simulation techniques are applied. Although all 12 catchments are gauged, initially each catchment is successively considered as being ungauged for the purpose of flow simulation in that catchment, their actual discharges being subsequently used for evaluating the performance of the flow estimation procedures for the catchment. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index ( R2) is used for assessing and ranking the relative performances of the regionalisation-model couples to identify the most appropriate couple for the region. The final step of applying that couple to a truly

  12. Sediment transport dynamics in steep, tropical volcanic catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkel, Christian; Solano Rivera, Vanessa; Granados Bolaños, Sebastian; Brenes Cambronero, Liz; Sánchez Murillo, Ricardo; Geris, Josie

    2017-04-01

    How volcanic landforms in tropical mountainous regions are eroded, and how eroded materials move through these mostly steep landscapes from the headwaters to affect sediment fluxes are critical to water resources management in their downstream rivers. Volcanic landscapes are of particular importance because of the short timescales (< years) over which they transform. Owing to volcanism and seismic activity, landslides and other mass movements frequently occur. These processes are amplified by high intensity precipitation inputs resulting in significant, but natural runoff, erosion and sediment fluxes. Sediment transport is also directly linked to carbon and solute export. However, knowledge on the sediment sources and transport dynamics in the humid tropics remains limited and their fluxes largely unquantified. In order to increase our understanding of the dominant erosion and sediment transport dynamics in humid tropical volcanic landscapes, we conducted an extensive monitoring effort in a pristine and protected (biological reserve Alberto Manuel Brenes, ReBAMB) tropical forest catchment (3.2 km2), located in the Central Volcanic Cordillera of Costa Rica (Figure 1A). Typical for tropical volcanic and montane regions, deeply incised V-form headwaters (Figure 1B) deliver the majority of water (>70%) and sediments to downstream rivers. At the catchment outlet (Figure 1C) of the San Lorencito stream, we established high temporal resolution (5min) water quantity and sediment monitoring (turbidity). We also surveyed the river network on various occasions to characterize fluvial geomorphology including material properties. We could show that the rainfall-runoff-sediment relationships and their characteristic hysteresis patterns are directly linked to variations in the climatic input (storm intensity and duration) and the size, form and mineralogy of the transported material. Such a relationship allowed us to gain the following insights: (i) periodic landslides contribute

  13. Parsimonious hydrological modeling of urban sewer and river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, Sylvain; Del Giudice, Dario; Rossi, Luca; Barry, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryA parsimonious model of flow capable of simulating flow in natural/engineered catchments and at WWTP (Wastewater Treatment Plant) inlets was developed. The model considers three interacting, dynamic storages that account for transfer of water within the system. One storage describes the “flashy” response of impervious surfaces, another pervious areas and finally one storage describes subsurface flow. The sewerage pipe network is considered as an impervious surface and is thus included in the impervious surface storage. In addition, the model assumes that water discharged from several CSOs (combined sewer overflows) can be accounted for using a single, characteristic CSO. The model was calibrated on, and validated for, the Vidy Bay WWTP, which receives effluent from Lausanne, Switzerland (population about 200,000), as well as for an overlapping urban river basin. The results indicate that a relatively simple approach is suitable for predicting the responses of interacting engineered and natural hydrosystems.

  14. Organizing groundwater regimes and response thresholds by soils: A framework for understanding runoff generation in a headwater catchment

    Treesearch

    John P. Gannon; Scott W. Bailey; Kevin J. McGuire

    2014-01-01

    A network of shallow groundwater wells in a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, U.S. was used to investigate the hydrologic behavior of five distinct soil morphological units. The soil morphological units were hypothesized to be indicative of distinct water table regimes. Water table fluctuations in the wells were...

  15. Integrating structural and functional connectivity to characterize sediment dynamics in a small Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Blok, Michiel; Lucía, Ana; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Sediment connectivity can be regarded as a descriptor of the internal linkages between different landscape components within a catchment. The recent focus of the scientific community on connectivity related topics, both concerning hydrological and sediment connectivity, stresses the importance of understanding the main active pathways for a better estimation of energy and matter transfer at catchment scale. This task can be addressed using topography-based indices that analyse the linkages between landscape units. This approach to characterize connectivity is known as structural connectivity. The main limitation of structural connectivity is that it does not account for the processes driving sediment and energy fluxes (i.e., functional connectivity). In this work the integration between structural and functional approaches is proposed for characterizing sediment connectivity in mountain catchments. The structural approach, based on a topography-based sediment connectivity index, was used for assessing hillslope-to-channel connectivity. Since field data on processes driving sediment transport along the channel network are available, a functional approach has been devised to estimate within-channel connectivity. An index of unit stream power computed from the hydraulic properties of the channel (i.e., discharge, slope and channel width) has been compared with the critical unit stream power computed from incipient motion thresholds derived from field data to identify the cells of the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in which sediment can be mobilized under near-bankfull conditions. The index expressing the within-channel connectivity is given by the length of the reaches consisting of contiguous cells that exceed the critical unit stream power. During high-magnitude floods, when unit stream power values exceed the threshold for incipient motion, channels experience an increase in both hydrological and sediment connectivity. The proposed index characterizes those sections

  16. The artifcial catchment Chicken Creek as a tool to study initial ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, W.; Elmer, M.; Fischer, A.; Gerwin, W.; Nenov, R.

    2011-12-01

    areas with evolving terrestrial or aquatic characteristics and from a very episodic to a more permanent stream network and discharge, together with the observed vegetation dynamics increased site diversity and heterogeneity with respect to water and nutrient availability and transformation processes compared to the more homogenous conditions at point zero. We expect that these more permanent structures and patterns established after five years will greatly influence the future development of the catchment with respect to e.g. input and accumulation of soil organic matter, nitrogen input and availability by symbiotic microbial N-fixation, development of root systems and soil food webs, weathering and soil formation, element cycling, and the water and element budget at the catchment scale.

  17. Significance of erosion-induced carbon fluxes in the carbon balance of a Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeu, Elisabet; de Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    's slopes during the study period, 80% of which remained within the catchment's boundaries (10.5% in stream beds, 42% behind check-dams and 26% on the slopes) while the rest was exported out of the catchment or was assumed to be mineralized. We did not account for C replacement at eroding sites, which could potentially balance C exports. Yet, the presented situation could significantly change in the long term. The fact that the redistributed C remains mainly stored in the depositional sites created by the network of check-dams indicates that the stability of these structures and the effectiveness of C burial at these depositional sites will be crucial for the significance and temporal evolution of the C balance at the catchment.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Blake, William; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Ferreira, António

    2017-04-01

    Sediment fluxes driven by hydrological processes lead to natural soil losses, but human activities, such as urbanization, influence hydrology and promote erosion, altering the landscape and sediment fluxes. In peri-urban areas, comprising a mixture of semi-natural and man-made land-uses, understanding sediment fluxes is still a research challenge. This study investigates spatial and temporal dynamics of fluvial sediments in a rapidly urbanizing catchment. Specific objectives are to understand the main sources of sediments relating to different types of urban land disturbance, and their variability driven by (i) weather, season and land-use changes through time, and (ii) sediment particle size. The study was carried out Ribeira dos Covões, a peri-urban catchment (6.2km2) in central Portugal. The climate is humid Mediterranean, with mean annual temperature and rainfall of 15˚ C and 892 mm, respectively. The geology comprises sandstone (56%), limestone (41%) and alluvial deposits (3%). The catchment has an average slope of 9˚ , but includes steep slopes of up to 46˚ . The land-use is a complex mosaic of woodland (56%), urban (40%) and agricultural (4%) land parcels, resulting from urbanization occurring progressively since 1973. Urbanization since 2010 has mainly comprised the building of a major road, covering 1% of the catchment area, and the ongoing construction of an enterprise park, occupying 5% of the catchment. This study uses a multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting approach, based on X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses to characterize the elemental geochemistry of sediments collected within the stream network after three storm events in 2012 and 2015. A range of statistical techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis, was used to identify discriminant sediment properties and similarities between fine bed-sediment samples of tributaries and downstream sites. Quantification of sediment supply from upstream sub-catchments was undertaken using a Bayesian

  19. Influence of urbanization pattern on stream flow of a peri-urban catchment under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste A. O.

    2015-04-01

    . Percentage impermeable surface seems to control streamflow particularly during dry periods. Winter runoff was 2-4 times higher than total river flow in the summer dry season in highly urbanized areas, but was 21-fold higher in winter in the least urbanized sub-catchment, denoting greater flow connectivity enhanced by increased soil moisture. Although impermeable surfaces are prone to generate overland flow, the proximity to the stream network is an important parameter determining their hydrological impacts. During the monitoring period, the enlargement of 2% of the urban area at downslope locations in the Covões sub-catchment, led to a 6% increase in the runoff coefficient. In contrast, the urban area increase from 9 to 25% mainly in upslope parts of the Quinta sub-catchment did not increase the peak streamflow due to downslope infiltration and surface retention opportunities. Despite impermeable surfaces enhance overland flow, some urban features (e.g. walls and road embankments) promote surface water retention. The presence of artificial drainage systems, on the other hand, enhances flow connectivity, leading to increasing peak flow and quicker response times (~10 minutes versus 40-50 minutes) as in the Covões sub-catchment. Urbanization impact on streamflow responses may be minimized through planning the land-use mosaic so as to maximize infiltration opportunities. Knowledge of the influence of distinct urban mosaics on flow connectivity and stream discharge is therefore important to landscape managers and should guide urban planning in order to minimize flood hazards.

  20. satellite synthetic observations heterogenety variability as studied from virtual catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Pablo; Simmer, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    The FOR2131 research unit is currently developing and improving data assimilation schemes for coupled subsurface-land surface-atmosphere models, namely the TerrSysMP comprised by ParFlow-CLM-COSMO models. That framework is used to test how different kinds of observations and networks of observations can improve system state estimation with a focus on in and inter-compartment fluxes of matter and heat energy. The focus of the present contribution is to analyze satellite observations (focus on SMOS and SMAP missions) which provide information on spatial and temporal scales that are hardly supported by in-situ observation networks. In that context, a satellite virtual observation operator has been developed in order to provide synthetic observation for the high spatial-resolution TerrSysMP model applied to the Neckar catchment in the south-west of Germany. Therefore, SMOS real and synthetic observations are used in order to understand the the effects on the microwave signature from the inclusion of sub-pixel land-surface heterogeneity which incorporates comparatively large-scale satellite observations in the data assimilation framework developed by the FOR2131 research unit. Preliminary results performed in a multi incident angle approach it is shown that SMOS real observations shows larger dynamic range as compared to the synthetic observations, while the temporal variability (daily bases) is good represented after a estimation of proper MW radiative transfer parameter specifically adjusted for the TerrSysMP Neckar catchment. This results focused on satellite observations, among other data sources, are mean to support and to confine the system states needed for the development of data assimilation framework by FOR2131.

  1. Hydrological Modelling of Small Catchments Using Swat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Groves, S.

    The data from a 142ha catchment in Eastern England(Colworth, Bedfordshire)are be- ing used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT software for modelling hydrology of small catchments. Stream flow at the catchment outlet has been mon- itored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available. Calibration and validation of stream flow was carried out with both runoff modelling options in the SWAT model (USDA curve number method and the Green and Ampt method). The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiencies for the calibration period were 66% and 63% respec- tively. The performance of SWAT was better in the validation period as a whole, with regard to timing of peaks, baseflow values and Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency. An ef- ficiency of 70% was obtained using the curve number method, which is comparable with the efficiencies obtainable with more complex models. Despite this performance, SWAT is under predicting stream flow peaks. A detailed investigation of important model components, has allowed us to identify some of the reasons for under predic- tion of stream flow peaks.

  2. Try This: Construct a Water Catchment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2017

    2017-01-01

    EngQuest, an initiative of Engineers Australia, provides an exciting, non-competitive way for students to participate in free, fun and educational engineering activities involving mathematics, science and technology. This article describes a project designed to teach middle school students how to construct a water catchment system. Water…

  3. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  4. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  5. Simultaneous occurrences of floods in mesoscale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bàrdossy, Andràs

    2016-04-01

    Floods in mesoscale catchments are often the result of intense precipitation of varying duration. The spatial extent of precipitation is linked to the extent of flooding. The simultaneous occurrence of floods in different medium size catchments is often the reason for large scale floods. The spatial behavior of extreme precipitation and discharge can be investigated using copulas and extreme indices. The relationship between intense precipitations measured at different locations depends on the large scale meteorological conditions. Depending on the geographic location and the dominating weather pattern certain catchments have frequent simultaneous extremes while others behave in a complementary fashion. The purpose of this work is to investigate the simultaneous and complementary occurrence of floods in catchments using copulas conditioned on atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). Circulation patterns responsible for simultaneous floods are identified using areal precipitation and/or unusual discharge increases. Patterns are identified using a fuzzy rule based approach based on anomalies of the 700 hPa surfaces. The rules are formed by maximizing the explained variance under the assumption of simultaneous and complementary behavior. The conditional copulas are investigated for extreme behavior. Besides the traditional bivariate investigations higher dimensional dependences are investigated using an entropy based approach.

  6. Catchment management and the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Brodie, J; Christie, C; Devlin, M; Haynes, D; Morris, S; Ramsay, M; Waterhouse, J; Yorkston, H

    2001-01-01

    Pollution of coastal regions of the Great Barrier Reef is dominated by runoff from the adjacent catchment. Catchment land-use is dominated by beef grazing and cropping, largely sugarcane cultivation, with relatively minor urban development. Runoff of sediment, nutrients and pesticides is increasing and for nitrogen is now four times the natural amount discharged 150 years ago. Significant effects and potential threats are now evident on inshore reefs, seagrasses and marine animals. There is no effective legislation or processes in place to manage agricultural pollution. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act does not provide effective jurisdiction on the catchment. Queensland legislation relies on voluntary codes and there is no assessment of the effectiveness of the codes. Integrated catchment management strategies, also voluntary, provide some positive outcomes but are of limited success. Pollutant loads are predicted to continue to increase and it is unlikely that current management regimes will prevent this. New mechanisms to prevent continued degradation of inshore ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area are urgently needed.

  7. Catchment-Scale Simulation of Nitrogen Dynamics Using a Modular Hydrological Modelling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Shafii, M.; Craig, J. R.; Schiff, S. L.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrological modelling framework Raven is a modular and flexible modelling framework for semi-distributed simulation of watershed hydrology. Raven enables the incorporation of different hydrologic processes, the evaluation of model choices, and hypothesis testing about model structure. Raven also supports the simulation of solute transport in catchments and in the surface water network. We developed a coupled hydrological-biogeochemical model within Raven to simulate catchment-scale nitrate loss in the Grand River Watershed (GRW), the largest basin in Southern Ontario feeding into the Lake Erie. GRW is a snow-dominated catchment and has severe nitrate contamination issues (due to intensive agriculture and a dense tile drainage system), especially during the snowmelt events. We used several sets of hydrochemical data (including tiles data), combined with a unique flow partitioning approach to constrain flow pathways in the hydrology model, which is critical to the accurate representation of the sources and sinks in the biogeochemical model. A biogeochemical model was then coupled to the hydrologic model in Raven to simulate nitrogen processes and identify nitrate loss at a variety of spatio-temporal scales in GRW. The preliminary results obtained after applying the coupled model to a subbasin in GRW are promising and we are at the stage of upscaling the model to the entire watershed. Raven, as an open-source object-oriented software, is currently being used by watershed managers, and incorporating nutrients dynamics in the code makes it applicable to solving water quality problems at the catchment scale as well.

  8. Innovative framework to simulate the fate and transport of nonconservative constituents in urban combined sewer catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. M.; Quijano, J. C.; Schmidt, A.; Garcia, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a probabilistic model to simulate the fate and transport of nonconservative constituents in urban watersheds. The approach implemented here extends previous studies that rely on the geomorphological instantaneous unit hydrograph concept to include nonconservative constituents. This is implemented with a factor χ that affects the transfer functions and therefore accounts for the loss (gain) of mass associated with the constituent as it travels through the watershed. Using this framework, we developed an analytical solution for the dynamics of dissolved oxygen (DO) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in urban networks based on the Streeter and Phelps model. This model breaks down the catchment into a discreet number of possible flow paths through the system, requiring less data and implementation effort than well-established deterministic models. Application of the model to one sewer catchment in the Chicago area with available BOD information proved its ability to predict the BOD concentration observed in the measurements. In addition, comparison of the model with a calibrated Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) of another sewer catchment from the Chicago area showed that the model predicted the BOD concentration as well as the widely accepted SWMM. The developed model proved to be a suitable alternative to simulate the fate and transport of constituents in urban catchments with limited and uncertain input data.

  9. Budyko framework of catchment water-energy balance: Enhancement and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianli; Liu, Meixian

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff is the key to assessing water availability globally. We developd a universal model to predict water-energy partitioning (ϖ parameter for the Fu's equation, one form of the Budyko framework) which spans small to large scale basins globally. A neural network (NN) model was developed using a data set of 224 small U.S. basins (100-10,000 km2) and 32 large, global basins ( 230,000-600,000 km2) independently and combined based on both local (slope, normalized difference vegetation index) and global (geolocation) factors. The Budyko framework with NN estimated ϖ reproduced observed mean annual ET well for the combined 256 basins. The NN model enhances the capability of the Budyko framework for assessing water availability at global scales using readily available data. Based on the datasets of 13 typical catchments that have different karst landform coverages in southwest China, we proved that budyko hypothesis is suitable for karst catchments; and found that catchment water-energy balance is firstly energy limited in subtropical karst area of China (rich cloudy days), but also specifically constrained by special geological background (limestone dominate), that is, water supply become more and more limiting with increases in the portion of karst landform in a catchment.

  10. Non-linearities in hydrological connectivity and microbiological flux in nested catchments - implications of environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Capell, R.; Speed, M.

    2009-12-01

    The non-linearities of catchment hydrological behaviour are strongly influenced by the connectivity of hillslopes and channel networks, particularly where overland flow is an important runoff mechanism. Such surface connectivity also controls the flux of microbiological pollutants (coliform bacteria) from areas of live stock grazing which can have serious health implications for potable water supplies. We report a nested catchment study where hydrological and tracer monitoring over a two year period has been coupled with regular sampling for faecal indicator organisms (FIOs). The study has been based in catchments with mixed landuse where FIOs are derived from livestock (sheep and cows) in agricultural land and wild animals (red deer) on moorlands. At all scales (3-1800km2), high levels of FIO were transient and episodic and strongly correlated with periods of high hydrological connectivity. We show how this non-linearity in connectivity can be captured within a dynamic hydrological model. The model was used, along with climate change predictions, to assess possible scenarios of change in connectivity and microbiological contamination in catchments with different land use.

  11. Assessing the applicability of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to Irish Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymszewicz, A.; Mockler, E.; O'Sullivan, J.; Bruen, M.; Turner, J.; Conroy, E.; Kelly-Quinn, M.; Harrington, J.; Lawler, D.

    2015-03-01

    Elevated suspended sediment concentrations in fluvial environments have important implications for system ecology and even small concentrations may have serious consequences for sensitive ecosystems or organisms, such as freshwater pearl mussels (Margaritifera margaritifera). Informed decision making is therefore required for land managers to understand and control soil erosion and sediment delivery to the river network. However, given that monitoring of sediment fluxes requires financial and human resources which are often limited at a national scale, sediment mobilisation and delivery models are commonly used for sediment yield estimation and management. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is the most widely used model for overland flow erosion and can, when combined with a sediment delivery ratio (SDR), provide reasonable sediment load estimations for a catchment. This paper presents RUSLE factors established from extant GIS and rainfall datasets that are incorporated into a flexible catchment modelling approach. We believe that this is the first time that results from a RUSLE application at a national scale are tested against measured sediment yield values available from Ireland. An initial assessment of RUSLE applied to Irish conditions indicates an overestimation of modelled sediment yield values for most of the selected catchments. Improved methods for model and SDR factors estimation are needed to account for Irish conditions and catchment characteristics. Nonetheless, validation and testing of the model in this study using observed values is an important step towards more effective sediment yield modelling tools for nationwide applications.

  12. Characterizing long-term hydrologic-response and sediment-transport for the R-5 catchment.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Christopher S; Loague, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Recently there have been several calls to establish long-term data collection networks to monitor near-surface hydrologic response and landscape evolution. The focus of this paper is a long-term dataset from the International Hydrologic Decade (1965-1974). The small upland catchment, known as R-5, located near Chickasha, Olahoma, has been the subject of considerable attention within the event-based hydrologic modeling community for more than 30 yr. Here, for the first time, 8 yr of continuous near-surface hydrologic-response and sediment-transport data are analyzed to show trends in the catchment's long-term behavior. The datasets include precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, soil-water content, infiltration, water discharge, and sediment discharge. Potential and actual evapotranspiration rates were estimated and used to calculate an average annual water balance for the catchment. Findings include, for example, that rainfall intensity rarely exceeds the threshold for Horton-type runoff, soil-water content is both spatially and temporally variable, and the water and sediment discharge rates are positively correlated. The R-5 data provide a unique opportunity to test (and refine) process-based models of continuous hydrologic response and sediment transport at the catchment scale for applications in the emerging fields of hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology.

  13. Occurrence of metolachlor and trifluralin losses in the Save river agricultural catchment during floods.

    PubMed

    Boithias, Laurie; Sauvage, Sabine; Taghavi, Lobat; Merlina, Georges; Probst, Jean-Luc; Pérez, José Miguel Sánchez

    2011-11-30

    Rising pesticide levels in streams draining intensively managed agricultural land have a detrimental effect on aquatic ecosystems and render water unfit for human consumption. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to simulate daily pesticide transfer at the outlet from an agriculturally intensive catchment of 1110 km(2) (Save river, south-western France). SWAT reliably simulated both dissolved and sorbed metolachlor and trifluralin loads and concentrations at the catchment outlet from 1998 to 2009. On average, 17 kg of metolachlor and 1 kg of trifluralin were exported at outlet each year, with annual rainfall variations considered. Surface runoff was identified as the preferred pathway for pesticide transfer, related to the good correlation between suspended sediment exportation and pesticide, in both soluble and sorbed phases. Pesticide exportation rates at catchment outlet were less than 0.1% of the applied amount. At outlet, SWAT hindcasted that (i) 61% of metolachlor and 52% of trifluralin were exported during high flows and (ii) metolachlor and trifluralin concentrations exceeded European drinking water standards of 0.1 μg L(-1) for individual pesticides during 149 (3.6%) and 17 (0.4%) days of the 1998-2009 period respectively. SWAT was shown to be a promising tool for assessing large catchment river network pesticide contamination in the event of floods but further useful developments of pesticide transfers and partition coefficient processes would need to be investigated.

  14. Variability of rainfall over Lake Kariba catchment area in the Zambezi river basin, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchuru, Shepherd; Botai, Joel O.; Botai, Christina M.; Landman, Willem A.; Adeola, Abiodun M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, average monthly and annual rainfall totals recorded for the period 1970 to 2010 from a network of 13 stations across the Lake Kariba catchment area of the Zambezi river basin were analyzed in order to characterize the spatial-temporal variability of rainfall across the catchment area. In the analysis, the data were subjected to intervention and homogeneity analysis using the Cumulative Summation (CUSUM) technique and step change analysis using rank-sum test. Furthermore, rainfall variability was characterized by trend analysis using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall statistic. Additionally, the rainfall series were decomposed and the spectral characteristics derived using Cross Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Wavelet Coherence (WC) analysis. The advantage of using the wavelet-based parameters is that they vary in time and can therefore be used to quantitatively detect time-scale-dependent correlations and phase shifts between rainfall time series at various localized time-frequency scales. The annual and seasonal rainfall series were homogeneous and demonstrated no apparent significant shifts. According to the inhomogeneity classification, the rainfall series recorded across the Lake Kariba catchment area belonged to category A (useful) and B (doubtful), i.e., there were zero to one and two absolute tests rejecting the null hypothesis (at 5 % significance level), respectively. Lastly, the long-term variability of the rainfall series across the Lake Kariba catchment area exhibited non-significant positive and negative trends with coherent oscillatory modes that are constantly locked in phase in the Morlet wavelet space.

  15. Catchment scale afforestation for mitigating flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mhari; Quinn, Paul; Bathurst, James; Birkinshaw, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    After the 2013-14 floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. At present, 1 in 6 homes in Britain are at risk of flooding and current EU legislation demands a sustainable, 'nature-based solution'. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management technique remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. SHETRAN, physically-based spatially-distributed hydrological models of the Irthing catchment and Wark forest sub-catchments (northern England) have been developed in order to test the hypothesis of the effect trees have on flood magnitude. The advanced physically-based models have been designed to model scale-related responses from 1, through 10, to 100km2, a first study of the extent to which afforestation and woody debris runoff attenuation features (RAFs) may help to mitigate floods at the full catchment scale (100-1000 km2) and on a national basis. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, and the installation of nature-based RAFs, such as woody debris dams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. The impacts of riparian planting and the benefits of adding large woody debris of several designs and on differing sizes of channels has also been simulated using advanced hydrodynamic (HiPIMS) and hydrological modelling (SHETRAN). With the aim of determining the effect forestry may have on flood frequency, 1000 years of generated rainfall data representative of current conditions has been used to determine the difference between current land-cover, different distributions of forest cover and the defining scenarios - complete forest removal and complete afforestation of the catchment. The simulations show the percentage of forestry required to have a significant impact on mitigating

  16. Effects of model structure and catchment discretization on discharge simulation in a small forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, Diana; Schwarze, Robert; Schütze, Niels

    2017-04-01

    In the past a variety of different modeling approaches has been developed in catchment hydrology. Even though there is no argument on the relevant processes taking place, there is no unified theory on how best to represent them computationally. Thus a vast number of models has been developed, varying from lumped models to physically based models. Most of them have a more or less fixed model structure and follow the "one fits all" paradigm. However, a more flexible approach could improve model realism by designing catchment specific model structures based on data availability. This study focuses on applying the flexible hydrological modelling framework RAVEN (Craig et al., 2013), to systematically test several conceptual model structures on the 19 km2 Große Ohe Catchment in the Bavarian Forest (Germany). By combining RAVEN with the DREAM algorithm (Vrugt et al., 2009), the relationship between catchment characteristics, model structure, parameter uncertainty and data availability are analyzed. The model structure is progressively developed based on the available data of the well observed forested catchment area. In a second step, the impact of the catchment discretization is analyzed by testing different spatial resolutions of topographic input data.

  17. Inferring the effect of catchment complexity on mesoscale hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FröHlich, Holger L.; Breuer, Lutz; Vaché, Kellie B.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2008-09-01

    The effect of catchment complexity on hydrologic and hydrochemical catchment response was characterized in the mesoscale Dill catchment (692 km2), Germany. This analysis was developed using multivariate daily stream concentration and discharge data at the basin outlet, in connection with less frequently sampled catchment-wide end-member chemistries. The link between catchment-wide runoff sources and basin output was observed through a combination of concentration-discharge (C-Q) analysis and multivariate end-member projection. Subsurface stormflow, various groundwater and wastewater sources, as well as urban surface runoff emerged in catchment output chemistry. Despite the identification of multiple sources, several runoff sources observed within the catchment failed to display consistent links with the output chemistry. This failure to associate known source chemistry with outlet chemistry may have resulted from a lack of hydraulic connectivity between sources and basin outlet, from different arrival times of subbasin-scale runoff contributions, and also from an overlap of source chemistries that subsumed discrete runoff sources in catchment output. This combination of catchment heterogeneity and complexity simply suggests that the internal spatial organization of the catchment impeded the application of lumped mixing calculations at the 692 km2 outlet. Given these challenges, we suggest that in mesoscale catchment research, the potential effects of spatial organization should be included in any interpretation of highly integrated response signals, or when using those signals to evaluate numerical rainfall-runoff models.

  18. Predicting the Impacts of Rural Catchment Changes on Runoff Generation and Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enda O'Connell, P.; Ewen, John; O'Donnell, Greg

    2010-05-01

    of these is an information tracking approach which can track runoff generated at any spatial location within a catchment to a downstream point of impact. Packets of runoff are labelled in time and space, injected into a hydraulic network routing model and subsequently tracked to a downstream location where a flood hydrograph is recorded. Using the information provided by all the tracked packets, the hydrograph can be decomposed in space and time, and maps of source runoff constructed for the hydrograph peak, for example. A further new technique, extending the concept of information tracking, is being developed which uses adjoint modelling to create maps of sensitivity to change that can be used to support decision-making in land management for flood mitigation. Predictions in the form of vulnerability maps can be used to assess where in the catchment landscape mitigating interventions might best be made to mitigate downstream flooding. Examples of the application of these techniques to UK catchments will be given.

  19. River-groundwater connectivity and nutrient dynamics in a mesoscale catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Musolff, Andreas; Gilfedder, Benjamin; Frei, Sven; Wankmüller, Fabian; Trauth, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse solute exports from catchments are governed by many interrelated factors such as land use, climate, geological-/ hydrogeological setup and morphology. Those factors create spatial variations in solute concentrations and turnover rates in the subsurface as well as in the stream network. River-groundwater connectivity is a crucial control in this context: On the one hand groundwater is a main pathway for nitrate inputs to the stream. On the other hand, groundwater connectivity with the stream affects the magnitude of hyporheic exchange of stream water with the stream bed. We present results of a longitudinal sampling campaign along the Selke river, a 67 km long third-order stream in the Harz mountains in central Germany. Water quality at the catchment outlet is strongly impacted by agriculture with high concentrations of nitrate and a chemostatic nitrate export regime. However, the specific nitrate pathways to the stream are not fully understood as there is arable land distributed throughout the catchment. While the sparsely distributed arable land in the mountainous upper catchment receives much higher amounts of precipitation, the downstream alluvial plains are drier, but more intensively used. The three-day campaign was conducted in June 2016 under constant low flow conditions. Stream water samples were taken every 2 km along the main stem of the river and at its major tributaries. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, major cations and anions, N-O isotopes, nutrients and Radon-222 (Rn) concentrations. Additionally, at each sampling location, river discharge was manually measured using current meters. Groundwater influxes to each sampled river section were quantified from the Rn measurements using the code FINIFLUX, (Frei and Gilfedder 2015). Rn and ion concentrations showed an increase from the spring to the mouth, indicating a growing impact of groundwater flux to the river. However, increases in groundwater gains were not gradual. The strongest

  20. Catchment rehabilitation and hydro-geomorphic characteristics of mountain streams in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebreyohannes Asfaha, Tesfaalem; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The catchments in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia are highly responsive in terms of hydro-geomorphic changes. With rapid deforestation in the first half of the 20th century, dense gully and scar networks developed, exporting huge amounts of runoff and sediment down to the fertile and densely populated Raya Valley. Consequently, threatening the environment and the livelihoods of the people both in the upstream and downstream areas. To reverse this problem, catchment-scale rehabilitation activities were initiated in the mid-1980s. In this study, we examine the hydro-geomorphic response of streams after catchment rehabilitation. Scar density was digitized from Google Earth imagery (2005) in 20 adjacent catchments and was explained in terms of its corresponding Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and slope gradient. This was accompanied by analysis of incidental repeat photographs and field observations. As evidenced by the series of repeat photographs, the vegetation cover of the catchments decreased up to 1975 and rapid reforestation occurred thereafter. A multiple regression analysis (R2=0.53, P<0.01) showed that scar density is negatively correlated with NDVI and positively with average gradient of very steep slopes (>60%). Moreover, due to reduction in discharge and sediment flow from the rehabilitated catchments, stream adjustments were observed in the field: previously braided stream channels have changed to single-thread streams, many lateral bars are stabilized and covered by vegetation, stream channels are incising due to clear water effect and the size of boulder deposits decreases. Therefore, the study shows that, land degradation activities in the upper catchments resulted in changes in hydro-geomorphic characteristics of the streams and reduction in runoff and sediment transport to the Raya Valley. Key words: scar density; NDVI; stream incision; soil and water conservation; stream adjustment; land use change.

  1. Groundwater Head Control of Catchment Nitrate Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Rode, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated nutrient fluxes from agricultural catchments affect downstream water resources. A method to assess nutrient fluxes is the evaluation of the export regime. The export regime classifies the relation between concentration and discharge and integrates mobilization as well as retention processes. Solutes can be exported chemostatically (variance of concentration << variance of discharge) or chemodynamically (variance of concentration ≥ variance of discharge). Starting point of this study is the evaluation of export regimes of nitrate in a series of neighboring sub-catchments of the Central German River Bode catchment. We found an accretion pattern of nitrate with increasing concentration when discharge is increasing and thus a chemodynamic export regime. Here we follow a nested approach and have a closer look at the controls of nitrate export in the small (1.4 km2) headwater catchment of the Sauerbach stream. The Sauerbach catchment is dominated by agricultural land use and is characterized by tile drains. We hypothesize that discharge as well as nitrate export is controlled by the groundwater head variability over time. To that end we follow a joint data analysis of discharge, groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile drains and surface water. At the gauging station the nitrate export is chemodynamic exhibiting the typical accretion pattern also found at the larger scale. Our data analysis shows that nitrate export regime is in two ways controlled by the depth to groundwater and the groundwater head variability: Discharge increases with increasing groundwater heads due to the activation of tile drains. On the other hand, depth to groundwater and passage through the unsaturated zone is the major control of aquifer nitrate concentration. At wells with larger depth to groundwater nitrate concentrations are significantly lower than at more shallow wells indicating retention processes in the unsaturated zone. Therefore the concentration in

  2. Characterizing hot spots throughout the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, N.; Lockington, D.; Jakeman, T.; Hunt, R.

    2012-04-01

    Few catchments in the world are left truly undisturbed. Rather, they are under anthropogenic stress for a variety of reasons ranging from climate forcing to meeting the basic water allocation needs of the population. Reduction in the number of inundation areas has significantly decreased the nutrient and organic matter retention capacity along the river corridor, with major consequences for the both the riverine and coastal ecosystems. Cumulative stress may build up to a "tipping point" which can cause a change or set of changes which could occur non-linearly. In order to mitigate the environmental stress on these ecosystems, management plans are created to balance the needs of the dependent populations and those of ecology. While these catchment-wide plans aim to improve the ecological function of aquatic areas over the large scale, this sledge-hammer approach ignores the inherent heterogeneity in the catchment. Societal (and policy) decisions involve more than abiotic quantification of water storage and flow. A more encompassing ecohydrological view facilitates a more rounded policy framework that has flexibility to accommodate multiple social drivers, and one that can accommodate an "ecosystem improvement" rather than single species improvement. Not every spot in the landscape is equally valuable for specific societal values. Areas of high activity may provide the resilience capacity necessary to prevent catastrophic changes. In times of ecological instability, ecosystem resilience is of paramount importance in maintaining essential ecosystem services. Hot spots of biogeochemical cycling will occur where unique situations arise, such as areas of surface and groundwater interaction, creating spots of localized, high activity. In order to understand the systems' potential to support various habitat niches in the large scale, the identification of specific hot spots or hot moments is necessary. A basal understanding of the concurrent biogeochemical cycles enables

  3. Spatial and temporal water quality dynamics during baseflow in an agricultural headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Saroos, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the interaction of time variant source areas and biogeochemical in-stream processes and the determination of resulting spatial and temporal signatures of stream water composition will improve the prediction and management of water quality at the catchment scale. During baseflow periods runoff source areas can change over time depending e.g. on storage depletion rates, actual wetness, groundwater level or local evapotranspiration rates. Due to the resulting space/time variant water fluxes, these effects are also expressed in the physico-chemical composition of surface waters. Unfortunately the resulting signature is often overlain by biogeochemical in-stream processes, which make it difficult to identify physico-chemical signatures of specific runoff source areas. We studied these interactions in a 1.7 km² agricultural headwater catchment. A dense artificial drainage network and a predominantly impervious streambed allowed for detecting distinct locations of groundwater inflow and determining ongoing biogeochemical in-stream processes. The analysis of sub-catchment storage depletion and resulting time variant quantitative and qualitative impacts on stream water composition was based on observations made during 11 catchment wide synoptic sampling campaigns during the summer baseflow period. We measured stream discharges with salt dilution gauging as well as water temperatures (T) and electrical conductivity (EC) upstream, downstream and inside all active drain pipes. During two campaigns we took additional water samples for major ion analysis at all sampling points. Discharges, T and EC stream-network data sets were used to spatially determine groundwater contributions using mixing equations for 2 and 3 components, respectively. Thereby we derived local baseflow recessions in relation to the catchment wide stream discharge. Using a water balance approach we determined active runoff source areas for each drain pipe and identified the dominant land use

  4. Controls on Nitrate Spatial Variability in Paine Run Catchment of Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, S. M.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This research examines the catchment-scale controls on in-stream nitrate concentrations by (1) quantifying nitrate spatial variability in a headwater catchment and (2) determining the biophysical processes underlying this variability. The Shenandoah Watershed Study (SWAS) established thirty-eight stream sampling sites in the Paine Run catchment to collect field data on stream chemistry, discharge and transient storage. An evaluation of SWAS data at these sites from the early 1990s to 2007 reveals spatial and temporal variability in nitrate concentrations following the gypsy moth defoliation. We observed high in-stream nitrate concentrations with elevation and an apparent dilution at lower elevations. Main topographic descriptors related to the spatial distribution of nitrate, elevation and contributing area, are associated with differing biophysical factors such as soil residence time, bacterial denitrification, vegetation and mineralization. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physical properties of hyporheic zones can strongly influence denitrification rates. We examined this in the Paine Run catchment with tracer tests to evaluate dilution effects and predict stream outflow and inflow from hyporheic zones responsible for denitrification. We then looked for biophysical processes responsible for higher nitrate levels at higher elevation by using the OTIS model for transient storage to evaluate hyporhiec zones in Paine Run. We also established a method to evaluate soil parameters for depth and permeability. By identifying the controls on nitrate inputs, transport and denitrification, we isolated a set of criteria applied to a quantitative model for nitrate spatial variability. This research has important implications for defining nutrient availability both within the stream network and at the outlet of forested headwater catchments.

  5. Minimizing uncertainty of daily rainfall interpolation over large catchments through realistic sampling of anisotropic correlogram parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Yeboah

    2016-04-01

    It has been established that daily rainfall gauged network density is not adequate for the level of hydrological modelling required of large catchments involving pollutant and sediment transport, such as the catchments draining the coastal regions of Queensland, Australia, to the sensitive Great Barrier Reef. This paper seeks to establish a link between the spatial structure of radar and gauge rainfall for improved interpolation of the limited gauged data over a grid or functional units of catchments in regions with or without radar records. The study area is within Mt. Stapylton weather radar station range, a 128 km square region for calibration and validation, and the Brisbane river catchment for validation only. Two time periods (2000-01-01 to 2008-12-31 and 2009-01-01 to 2015-06-30) were considered, the later period for calibration when radar records were available and both time periods for validation without regard to radar information. Anisotropic correlograms of both the gauged and radar data were developed and used to establish the linkage required for areas without radar records. The maximum daily temperature significantly influenced the distributional parameters of the linkage. While the gauged, radar and sampled correlogram parameters reproduced the mean estimates similarly using leave-one-out cross-validation of Ordinary Kriging, the gauged parameters overestimated the standard deviation (SD) which reflects uncertainty by over 91% of cases compared with the radar or the sampled parameter sets. However, the distribution of the SD generated by the radar and the sampled correlogram parameters could not be distinguished, with a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test p-value of 0.52. For the validation case with the catchment, the percentage overestimation of SD by the gauged parameter sets decreased to 81.2% and 87.1% for the earlier and later time periods, respectively. It is observed that the extreme wet days' parameters and statistics were fairly widely distributed

  6. Quantification of suspended sediment transfers in a lowland agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Blanes, Sebastien; Manière, Louis; Grangeon, Thomas; Cerdan, Olivier; Evrard, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Vandromme, Rosalie

    2017-04-01

    Lowland agricultural landscapes underwent important changes since the second half of the XXth century such as hedges removal, implementation of drainage systems, stream redesign and land reallocation. It resulted in changes in sediment transfer processes, and in widespread morphological alterations of water bodies. However, little is known about the sediment dynamics in these environments. The Louroux catchment (25 km2) is located in central France. It is a typical intensively cultivated and tile drained lowland catchment. The Xth century pond located at its outlet (52 ha) is undergoing large siltation, with a current sedimentation rate 60 fold higher than the pre-1950 period. Five monitoring stations, measuring water levels and turbidity at high frequency (15 mn and 1 mn respectively), combined with automatic samplers, were implemented in 2013. Three stations are located at the main tributaries outlets of the pond, one in a sub-catchment, and one at a tile drain outlet. 45 floods were observed during the three studied hydrological years. They occurred mostly between December and March (33 floods) and in May-June (8 floods). Specific sediment yields ranged from 0.02 to 0.38 t.ha-1.yr-1 depending on the monitoring site and the considered year. The vast majority of suspended sediment transfers occur during the winter floods. While large water volumes were also measured during spring floods, the sediment yields remained low. Suspended sediment yields present large inter-annual (ratio ranging between 2 and 6 depending on the monitoring station) and spatial variations, due to significant differences in total rainfall amounts during the winter season and variations in land use, respectively. The processes related to sediment transfers are most likely linked to soil saturation during winter despite the presence of a tile drainage network, with transfers occurring both at the soil surface and through the drainage system. While sediment transfer rates can be considered as

  7. Downward approach at the catchment scale or at the catchment set scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, C.; Andréassian, V.; Le Moine, N.

    2009-04-01

    The downward approach that learns from observations the main features of the catchment hydrological response has long been recognized as a way to develop hydrological models for the catchment scale (Klemes, 1983). In this approach, a link is made between rainfall inputs and flow outputs using the mathematical tools found the most efficient to reproduce catchment behaviour. This approach received recently more attention, as some limitations of the upward approach were identified (Sivapalan et al., 2003). However model structures developed with this downward approach at the catchment scale are often difficult to generalize, i.e. difficult to transpose to other catchments. Indeed they are often over-adapted to the specific features of the catchment on which they were developed. Generalization is a major problem in current hydrological modelling (Sivakumar, 2008). This is potentially a major drawback for the application of such models to the case of ungauged catchments. We argue that a better way to develop the structure of hydrological models following a downward approach is to place model development at the level of large set of catchments and not only at the level of a single catchment. This way of developing models will force them to be general, i.e. more transposable in space. They will capture the essential features of the rainfall-runoff transformation common between catchments. This way of developing models also gives the opportunity to analyse the spatial patterns of model failures, therefore providing more robust sources of explanations and more convincing ways to improve models. We do not believe that we could develop a single model that fit all conditions, but models developed with this approach are likely to be better starting points to get general models. Then we have to find ways to make them more appropriate to specific conditions without losing their generality. We will illustrate the advantages (and possible limitations) of this approach using

  8. Effect of Agricultural Practices on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small agricultural catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of agriculture in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in agricultural practices as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of agricultural chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of agricultural runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.

  9. High-resolution seismic monitoring of geomorphic activity in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J.; McArdell, B.; Vergne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous survey of the surface activity in a river catchment is essential for the understanding of the landscape dynamics. In steep mountain catchments, a detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of geomorphic processes is generally impossible. The classic techniques (imagery and in situ channel approaches) are not adapted to the extreme conditions that occur during strong rainstorms. There is a real need to develop a method and to define the procedures that will allow the study of surface processes without any environmental dependency. Nowadays, more and more studies explore the use of the seismic instruments to survey the catchment activity. Seismometers can be deployed in sheltered area, which allow us to record in continuous the ground vibrations induced by surface processes, like the sediment transport and mass movements. To continue the exploration of this potential, we deployed a dense array of 10 seismometers in the Illgraben, a 10-km2 catchment in the Swiss Alps, during the summer 2011. This catchment is highly prone to hillslope and debris flow activity, so almost every summer convective storms trigger geomorphic events. The network was designed to monitor the spatial and temporal features of every type of surface activity. Thus during rainstorms, the stations located along the main stream well record the channel activity like the passage of sediment flows, while the instruments installed around the catchment reveal the occurrences of many rockfalls. These latter events show a spectral seismic signature at high frequencies (> 1 Hz), whereas the channel activity is dominant between 10 and 30 Hz. For the largest debris flow of the summer, we are able to identify the location of its initiation from the hillslope. Then, we can map the secondary events, which were triggered by the propagation of the debris flow. With these preliminary results, we demonstrate that the use of a dense seismic array is relevant to map in real time the landscape dynamics at the

  10. Spatial and temporal occurrence of preferential flow in a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiekenkamp, I.; Huisman, J. A.; Bogena, H. R.; Lin, H. S.; Vereecken, H.

    2016-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of preferential flow in time and space makes it challenging to identify and analyze its occurrence at the catchment scale. Novel analysis methods using soil moisture sensor response times offer an opportunity to investigate catchment-wide controls on preferential flow. The aim of this study was to identify factors that control preferential flow occurrence based on 3-year soil moisture monitoring using a wireless sensor network in the Wüstebach catchment, Germany. At 101 locations, the sensor response times at three depths (5, 20, and 50 cm) were classified into one of four classes: (1) non-sequential preferential flow, (2) velocity-based preferential flow, (3) sequential flow, and (4) no response. A conceptual model, postulating that preferential flow in the Wüstebach catchment is dominated by differences in soil type, landscape position, and rainfall input, was proposed for hypothesis testing. To test the conceptual model, the classification results were combined with spatial and event-based data to understand and identify controlling factors. Spatial parameters consisted of hydrological, topographical, and soil physical and chemical parameters. Temporal factors included precipitation characteristics and antecedent soil moisture conditions. The conceptual model as proposed could only be partly confirmed. Event-based occurrence of preferential flow was highly affected by precipitation amount, with a nearly catchment-wide preferential response during large storm events. During intermediate events, preferential flow was controlled by small-scale heterogeneity, instead of showing catchment-wide patterns. The effect of antecedent catchment wetness on the occurrence of preferential flow was generally less profound, although a clear negative relationship was found for precipitation events with more than 25 mm. It was found that spatial occurrence of preferential flow was however governed by small-scale soil and biological features and local

  11. Surface Water - Groundwater Interaction Research in Chalk Catchments: UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D.; Wheater, H.; Howden, N.; Gallagher, A.; Bloomfield, J.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of new European legislation on integrated management and, in particular, on ecological quality, raises major scientific and technical questions. These require improved understanding of catchment systems and hydro-ecological interactions that can only be obtained from integrated and multi-disciplinary experimental research. The main water supply aquifers in the United Kingdom, namely the Cretaceous Chalk and Permo-Triassic Sherwood Sandstone, are situated, for the most part, in lowland England, particularly in the Midlands, South and South East. These aquifers have a major, often dominant influence on the river systems that they underlie. These lowland permeable catchments present a particular set of challenges; management pressures are great, the scientific understanding of the major UK aquifers is poor, and tools for the integrated modelling of surface water-groundwater interactions and associated hydro-ecological processes are limited. In response to these factors, the LOwland CAtchment Research programme (LOCAR) was conceived. The programme also provides intrumented catchments to address some of these scientific issues. This paper describes the programme and early results of research into the influence of lithostratigraphy and karst features on surface water/groundwater interaction in the two Chalk LOCAR catchments.

  12. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  13. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, S.; Del Giudice, D.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Building facades are protected from microbial attack by incorporation of biocides within them. Flow over facades leaches these biocides and transports them to the urban environment. A parsimonious water quantity/quality model applicable for engineered urban watersheds was developed to compute biocide release from facades and their transport at the urban basin scale. The model couples two lumped submodels applicable at the basin scale, and a local model of biocide leaching at the facade scale. For the facade leaching, an existing model applicable at the individual wall scale was utilized. The two lumped models describe urban hydrodynamics and leachate transport. The integrated model allows prediction of biocide concentrations in urban rivers. It was applied to a 15 km2urban hydrosystem in western Switzerland, the Vuachère river basin, to study three facade biocides (terbutryn, carbendazim, diuron). The water quality simulated by the model matched well most of the pollutographs at the outlet of the Vuachère watershed. The model was then used to estimate possible ecotoxicological impacts of facade leachates. To this end, exceedance probabilities and cumulative pollutant loads from the catchment were estimated. Results showed that the considered biocides rarely exceeded the relevant predicted no-effect concentrations for the riverine system. Despite the heterogeneities and complexity of (engineered) urban catchments, the model application demonstrated that a computationally "light" model can be employed to simulate the hydrograph and pollutograph response within them. It thus allows catchment-scale assessment of the potential ecotoxicological impact of biocides on receiving waters.

  14. Water quality in sugar catchments of Queensland.

    PubMed

    Rayment, G E

    2003-01-01

    Water quality condition and trend are important indicators of the impact of land use on the environment, as degraded water quality causes unwelcome changes to ecosystem composition and health. These concerns extend to the sea, where discharges of nutrients, sediments and toxicants above natural levels are unwelcome, particularly when they drain to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and other coastal waters of Queensland. Sugarcane is grown in 26 major river catchments in Queensland, most in environmentally sensitive areas. This puts pressure on the Queensland Sugar Industry to manage the land in ways that have minimum adverse off-site impacts. Sugar researchers including CRC Sugar have been associated with water quality studies in North Queensland. These include investigations and reviews to assess the role of groundwater as a pathway for nitrate loss from canelands in the Herbert Catchment, to find causes of oxygen depletion in water (including irrigation runoff) from Ingham to Mackay, to use residues of superseded pesticides as indicators of sediment loss to the sea, and to assemble information on water quality pressure and status in sugar catchments. Key findings, plus information on input pressures are described in this paper, and areas of concern and opportunities discussed.

  15. Picturing and modeling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle K.; Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas; van Schaik, Loes; Wienhöfer, Jan; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-03-01

    This study explores the suitability of a single hillslope as a parsimonious representation of a catchment in a physically based model. We test this hypothesis by picturing two distinctly different catchments in perceptual models and translating these pictures into parametric setups of 2-D physically based hillslope models. The model parametrizations are based on a comprehensive field data set, expert knowledge and process-based reasoning. Evaluation against streamflow data highlights that both models predicted the annual pattern of streamflow generation as well as the hydrographs acceptably. However, a look beyond performance measures revealed deficiencies in streamflow simulations during the summer season and during individual rainfall-runoff events as well as a mismatch between observed and simulated soil water dynamics. Some of these shortcomings can be related to our perception of the systems and to the chosen hydrological model, while others point to limitations of the representative hillslope concept itself. Nevertheless, our results confirm that representative hillslope models are a suitable tool to assess the importance of different data sources as well as to challenge our perception of the dominant hydrological processes we want to represent therein. Consequently, these models are a promising step forward in the search for the optimal representation of catchments in physically based models.

  16. Connectivity of surface flow and sediments in a small upland catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexartza-Artza, I.; Wainwright, J.

    2009-04-01

    The study of connectivity can help understand complex systems in which different factors interact to influence water-transfer pathways across the landscape. Changes in the catchment can affect connectivity, which in turn can have significant effects on catchment processes and network structure. Furthermore, the potential negative effects of the transfer of nutrients, pollutants and sediments by water from land to water bodies make it necessary to improve our understanding of connectivity. This need is reinforced by increasing demands of legislation such as the Water Framework Directive for effective Integrated Catchment Management in which whole systems are considered rather than their individual parts separately. Thus, connectivity can potentially be a useful concept to assess more effectively the effects that changes can have in complex systems, and could provide useful knowledge for decision makers. Field-based approaches to connectivity, needed to gain a useful understanding of real systems, need to include both the structural and functional aspects of connectivity, as the interaction between function and structure has to be understood to examine the complexity of the relationships between factors influencing pathways and transfer processes. This has to be taken into consideration, therefore, when designing and carrying studies to assess connectivity of flow networks that can provide context-specific data necessary to inform modelling approaches. The Ingbirchworth Catchment, in the uplands of the River Don, England, is used to assess the feedbacks between the different factors influencing transfer networks and the spatial and temporal variability in dynamic and non-linear process responses across the landscape. An especial focus has been given to land-use change, as one of the variables that might have a considerable influence on runoff generation and pathways. This 8.5 km2 catchment shares many characteristics with many others in the River Don uplands

  17. Land use control of nitrate export behavior across catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient exports from catchments and their temporal and spatial variability significantly affect downstream water quality and ecosystem health. There is hence a need to better understand and classify catchment nutrient export dynamics in order to reproduce catchment functions (such as nutrient mobilization and retention) and predict the response of these functions to changing boundary conditions. However, the complexity of catchment structure and the multitude of the processes involved challenge this objective. One approach to meet this challenge is a top-down, data-driven analysis of integrated catchment responses, such as discharge and solute concentration time series. For top-down analysis, different catchments are compared to identify key variables governing catchment response. We conducted a multi-catchment study applying top-down methods to analyze nitrate concentration and discharge time series from streams draining nine catchments in central Germany. The studied catchments, ranging from "pristine" mountains to agriculturally-managed lowlands, span gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. We hypothesized that land use type is the main control on stream nitrate concentrations and catchment export behaviour, with more chemostatic export behaviour occurring in catchments with higher percentages of agricultural land use due to the presence of large nitrate stocks that effectively function as an unlimited nitrate storage. Consistent with this hypothesis we found that median nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with the percentage of agricultural land use in the different catchments despite differences in catchment climatic and geological conditions. Magnitude and direction of concentration-discharge relationship was evaluated using the slope b of the linear regression of log nitrate concentrations vs. log discharge as a metric for export behaviour. All catchments exhibited a positive slope b indicating concentrations increase with

  18. Assessment of contaminant fate in catchments using a novel integrated hydrobiogeochemical-multimedia fate model.

    PubMed

    Nizzetto, Luca; Butterfield, Dan; Futter, Martyn; Lin, Yan; Allan, Ian; Larssen, Thorjørn

    2016-02-15

    Models for pollution exposure assessment typically adopt an overly simplistic representation of geography, climate and biogeochemical processes. This strategy is unsatisfactory when high temporal resolution simulations for sub-regional spatial domains are performed, in which parameters defining scenarios can vary interdependently in space and time. This is, for example, the case when assessing the influence of biogeochemical processing on contaminant fate. Here we present INCA-Contaminants, the Integrated Catchments model for Contaminants; a new model that simultaneously and realistically solves mass balances of water, carbon, sediments and contaminants in the soil-stream-sediment system of catchments and their river networks as a function of climate, land use/management and contaminant properties. When forced with realistic climate and contaminant input data, the model was able to predict polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations in multiple segments of a river network in a complex landscape. We analyzed model output sensitivity to a number of hydro-biogeochemical parameters. The rate of soil organic matter mineralization was the most sensitive parameter controlling PCBs levels in river water, supporting the hypothesis that organic matter turnover rates will influence re-mobilization of previously deposited PCBs which had accumulated in soil organic matrix. The model was also used to project the long term fate of PCB 101 under two climate scenarios. Catchment diffuse run-off and riverine transport were the major pathways of contaminant re-mobilization. Simulations show that during the next decade the investigated boreal catchment will shift from being a net atmospheric PCB sink to a net source for air and water, with future climate perturbation having little influence on this trend. Our results highlight the importance of using credible hydro-biogeochemical simulations when modeling the fate of hydrophobic contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  19. PAI-OFF: A new proposal for online flood forecasting in flash flood prone catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G. H.; Cullmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe Process Modelling and Artificial Intelligence for Online Flood Forecasting (PAI-OFF) methodology combines the reliability of physically based, hydrologic/hydraulic modelling with the operational advantages of artificial intelligence. These operational advantages are extremely low computation times and straightforward operation. The basic principle of the methodology is to portray process models by means of ANN. We propose to train ANN flood forecasting models with synthetic data that reflects the possible range of storm events. To this end, establishing PAI-OFF requires first setting up a physically based hydrologic model of the considered catchment and - optionally, if backwater effects have a significant impact on the flow regime - a hydrodynamic flood routing model of the river reach in question. Both models are subsequently used for simulating all meaningful and flood relevant storm scenarios which are obtained from a catchment specific meteorological data analysis. This provides a database of corresponding input/output vectors which is then completed by generally available hydrological and meteorological data for characterizing the catchment state prior to each storm event. This database subsequently serves for training both a polynomial neural network (PoNN) - portraying the rainfall-runoff process - and a multilayer neural network (MLFN), which mirrors the hydrodynamic flood wave propagation in the river. These two ANN models replace the hydrological and hydrodynamic model in the operational mode. After presenting the theory, we apply PAI-OFF - essentially consisting of the coupled "hydrologic" PoNN and "hydrodynamic" MLFN - to the Freiberger Mulde catchment in the Erzgebirge (Ore-mountains) in East Germany (3000 km 2). Both the demonstrated computational efficiency and the prediction reliability underline the potential of the new PAI-OFF methodology for online flood forecasting.

  20. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    different particle size fractions (0.125-2.000mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm). Seventeen stream sites were sampled plus a sample of sediment from a road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of much greater significance as sediment sources, probably because of the high soil saturation. At limestone stream sites receiving runoff from the newly constructed road, fine bed-sediment geochemistry was found to be similar to that of road sediment, indicating a high contribution of this source. These results are supported by spatio-temporal differences in streamflow and suspended sediment concentrations at instrumented monitoring stations. It is concluded that this methodology represents a potentially useful tool to enable river managers to detect and assess sediment sources in urbanized and partly urbanized catchments, and to supporting them in designing and implementing effective land-use mosaics and site-specific measures to mitigate erosion.

  1. Problems with the interpolation of precipitation amounts in mountainous catchments using traditional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Sandoval, J. C.; Jacquin, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial distribution of precipitation is a major source of predictive uncertainty in hydrological modeling, especially in catchments characterized by a complex topography. In this case, traditional methods utilized in hydrology are most probably unable to provide reliable estimations of precipitation amounts corresponding to different elevations. However, the simplicity and ease of application of such methods maintain them as attractive alternatives for engineering practitioners. This study is intended to evaluate to what extent precipitation estimates provided by traditional methods are appropriate in the case of Andean catchments. The catchment case study is Aconcagua River at Chacabuquito, located in the Andean region of Central Chile. This is a snowmelt dominated catchment with a surface of 2110[Km2], where approximately 5% corresponds to glaciers. Elevation ranges from 950[m.a.s.l.] to 5930[m.a.s.l.]. Most precipitation occurs between May and August, while precipitation amounts during the rest of the year are relatively low. The pluviometric network is extremely sparse. In this study, monthly data from nine precipitation stations in the period April 1965-March 2001 are used. All of these stations are located between 600[m.a.s.l.] and 3000[m.a.s.l.] and only four of them are actually within the catchment Precipitation interpolation techniques applied in this study include multiquadratic function (MF) fitting, Thiessen Polygons (TP) and inverse distance (ID) weighting. The goodness of fit of precipitation estimates is evaluated by means of cross validation experiments. Due to the limitations existing in the spatial extent of data, these experiments only provide information about the plausibility of the precipitation estimates below 3000[m.a.s.l.], where about 62% of the catchment area is located. Results reveal that estimation errors are significant for all methods, especially during the humid season. Throughout the hydrological year, the MF method provides the

  2. Multi-catchment rainfall-runoff simulation for extreme flood estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    rainfall of each event is distributed through the different sub-catchments using the spatial patterns calculated in the SPAZM precipitation reanalysis (Gottardi et al., 2012) for comparable situations of the 1948-2005 period. Corresponding runoffs are calculated with the hydrological models and aggregated to compute the discharge at the outlet of the main catchment. A complete distribution of flood discharges is finally computed. This method is illustrated with the example of the Durance at Serre-Ponçon catchment (south of French Alps, 3600 km2) which has been divided in four sub-catchements. The proposed approach is compared with the "classical" SCHADEX approach applied on the whole catchment. References: Garçon, R. (1996). Prévision opérationnelle des apports de la Durance à Serre-Ponçon à l'aide du modèle MORDOR. Bilan de l'année 1994-1995. La Houille Blanche, (5), 71-76. Gottardi, F., Obled, C., Gailhard, J., & Paquet, E. (2012). Statistical reanalysis of precipitation fields based on ground network data and weather patterns: Application over French mountains. Journal of Hydrology, 432, 154-167. Paquet, E., Garavaglia, F., Garçon, R., & Gailhard, J. (2013). The SCHADEX method: A semi-continuous rainfall-runoff simulation for extreme flood estimation. Journal of Hydrology, 495, 23-37.

  3. Leaching of nitrogen from forested catchments in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortelainen, Pirkko; Saukkonen, Sari; Mattsson, Tuija

    1997-12-01

    This study provides an assessment on the spatial variability of the long-term leaching (8-23 years) of nitrogen and organic carbon from 22 forested catchments (0.69-56 km2). The catchments are located throughout Finland excluding the northernmost regions. The Kruunuoja catchment is located in a national park; the other catchments represent typical Finnish forestry land. The leaching from the 21 forestry land catchments can be considered to represent average leaching from Finnish forestry land since the most important forestry practices (ditching, clear-cutting, scarification, and fertilization) since the 1960s have affected about 2.4% of the catchment area per year (compare 2.5% in the entire country in 1980 and 2% in 1991). Moreover, the mean annual runoff from the catchments, 230-420 mm yr-1, agree with the mean annual runoff from Finland (301 mm yr-1 from 1931 to 1990). The major part of the nitrogen transported from the catchments consisted of organic nitrogen (on average 79%). The average inorganic nitrogen proportion ((NO3-N + NH4-N)/Ntot) was lowest (7.3%) in the Kruunuoja catchment and was highest (54%) in the southernmost Teeressuonoja catchment located in the highest anthropogenic nitrogen deposition area. The median C/N ratio in the study streams was high, ranging from 34 to 66. Nitrate leaching from the catchments varied between 2.8 (Kruunuoja) and 100 kg km-2 yr-1 (Teeressuonoja) and was negatively related to C/N ratio in stream water and latitude. The stepwise multiple regression model selected C/N ratio and nitrogen deposition which together explained 72% of the variation in NO3-N leaching. Retention of NO3-N deposition (calculated as ((input-output)/input) was high in all catchments, ranging from 0.99 in Kruunuoja to 0.67 in Teeressuonoja.

  4. Characterising Groundwater-dominated Lowland Catchments - the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports on a major 10million UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. We focus here on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. We give an overview of the experimental approach and highlight some current research findings. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and Karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture is emerging of localised subsurface inflows, linked to structural geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel. Hyporheic zone research has shown significant areas of methanogenesis and denitrification - the catchment-scale significance of this remains to be determined. Similarly, analysis of nutrient transformations in riparian wetlands is being linked to analysis of groundwater flowpaths to

  5. Modelling overbank flow on farmed catchments taking into account spatial hydrological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, R.; Tilma, M.; Chahinian, N.; Huttel, O.

    2003-04-01

    In agricultural catchments, hydrological processes are largely variable in space due to human impact causing hydrological discontinuities such as ditch network, field limits and terraces. The ditch network accelerates runoff by concentrating flows, drains the water table or replenishes it by reinfiltration of the runoff water. During extreme flood events, overbank flow occurs and surface pathflows are modified. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of overbank flow on hydrograph shape during flood events. For that, MHYDAS, a physically based distributed hydrological model, was especially developed to take into account these hydrological discontinuities. The model considers the catchment as a series of interconnected hydrological unit. Runoff from each unit is estimated using a deterministic model based on the pounding-time algorithm and then routed through the ditch network using the diffusive wave equation. Overbank flow is modelled by modifying links between the hydrological units and the ditch network. The model was applied to simulate the main hydrological processes on a small headwater farmed Mediterranean catchment located in Southern France. The basic hydrometeorological equipment consists of a meteorological station, rain gauges, a tensio-neutronic and a piezometric measurement network, and eight water flow measurements. A multi-criteria and multi-scale approach was used. Three independent error criteria (Nash, error on volume and error on peak flow) were calculated and combined using the Pareto technique. Then, a multi-scale approach was used to calibrate and validate the model for the eight water flow measurements. The application of MHYDAS on the extreme ten flood events of the last decade enables to identify the ditches where overbank flows occur and to calculate discharge at various points of the ditch network. Results show that for the extreme flood event, more than 45% of surface runoff occur due to overbank flow. Discussion shows that

  6. Catchment classification and similarity using correlation in streamflow time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, B.; Archfield, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Catchment classification is an important component of hydrologic analyses, particularly for linking changes in ecological integrity to streamflow alteration, transferring time series or model parameters from gauged to ungauged locations, and as a way to understand the similarity in the response of catchments to change. Metrics of similarity used in catchment classification have ranged from aggregate catchment properties such as geologic or climate characteristics to variables derived from the daily streamflow hydrograph; however, no one set of classification variables can fully describe similarity between catchments as the variables used for such assessments often depend on the question being asked. We propose an alternative method based on similarity for hydrologic classification: correlation between the daily streamflow time series. If one assumes that the streamflow signal is the integrated response of a catchment to both climate and geology, then the strength of correlation in streamflow between two catchments is a measure of the strength of similarity in hydrologic response between those two catchments. Using the nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient between streamflow time series at 54 unregulated and unaltered streamgauges in the mid-Atlantic United States, we show that correlation is a parsimonious classification metric that results in physically interpretable classes. Using the correlation between the deseasonalized streamflow time series and reclassifying the streamgauges, we also find that seasonality plays an important role in understanding catchment flow dynamics, especially those that can be linked to ecological response and similarity although not to a large extent in this study area.

  7. Conditional flood frequency and catchment state: a simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brettschneider, Marco; Bourgin, François; Merz, Bruno; Andreassian, Vazken; Blaquiere, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Catchments have memory and the conditional flood frequency distribution for a time period ahead can be seen as non-stationary: it varies with the catchment state and climatic factors. From a risk management perspective, understanding the link of conditional flood frequency to catchment state is a key to anticipate potential periods of higher flood risk. Here, we adopt a simulation approach to explore the link between flood frequency obtained by continuous rainfall-runoff simulation and the initial state of the catchment. The simulation chain is based on i) a three state rainfall generator applied at the catchment scale, whose parameters are estimated for each month, and ii) the GR4J lumped rainfall-runoff model, whose parameters are calibrated with all available data. For each month, a large number of stochastic realizations of the continuous rainfall generator for the next 12 months are used as inputs for the GR4J model in order to obtain a large number of stochastic realizations for the next 12 months. This process is then repeated for 50 different initial states of the soil moisture reservoir of the GR4J model and for all the catchments. Thus, 50 different conditional flood frequency curves are obtained for the 50 different initial catchment states. We will present an analysis of the link between the catchment states, the period of the year and the strength of the conditioning of the flood frequency compared to the unconditional flood frequency. A large sample of diverse catchments in France will be used.

  8. Simulation of the fate of Boscalid and its transformation product 4-Chlorobenzoic acid in a vineyard-terraces catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollert, Dieter; Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    In the viniculture fungicides are commonly applied foliar on the plant surface, resulting in high concentrations in runoff water. The fungicide Boscalid occurred frequently and in high concentrations in runoff water in the Loechernbach catchment, a 180 ha vineyard catchment in south-west Germany, during rainfall-runoff events in 2016. The catchment is characterized by a typical terraces structure and the connection of a dense road network. The washing off from drift-depositions on the streets is expected to be a major pathway for pesticides. The main objective of this study was the provision of a catchment model to simulate the transport and transformation processes of Boscalid. Based on this model, source areas of Boscalid residue pollution and its export pathways will be identified and provide urgently needed information for the development of water pollution control strategies. The distributed, process-based, reactive transport catchment model ZIN-AgriTra was used for the evaluation of the pesticide mobilization and the export processes. The hydrological model was successfully calibrated for a 6-month high-resolution time series of discharge data. Pesticide modelling was calibrated for single rainfall events after Boscalid application. Additionally, the transformation product 4-Chlorobenzoic acid has been simulated using literature substance parameters, in order to gain information about anticipated environmental concentrations. The pathways for the discharge of Boscalid were characterized and the streets were confirmed as major pathway for the pesticide discharge in the catchment. The main Boscalid loss occured during the first flush after a storm event containing concentrations up to 10 µg/l. The results show that storage on surfaces without sorption contributes significantly to the export of pesticides through the first flush. Therefore, the mobilization process affects a combination of both sorptive (e.g. at the soil) and non-sorptive (e.g. on the surface

  9. Catchment-scale evaluation of pollution potential of urban snow at two residential catchments in southern Finland.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, Nora; Koivusalo, Harri

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of snow in the hydrological cycle in cold climate conditions, monitoring studies of urban snow quality often lack discussions about the relevance of snow in the catchment-scale runoff management. In this study, measurements of snow quality were conducted at two residential catchments in Espoo, Finland, simultaneously with continuous runoff measurements. The results of the snow quality were used to produce catchment-scale estimates of areal snow mass loads (SML). Based on the results, urbanization reduced areal snow water equivalent but increased pollutant accumulation in snow: SMLs in a medium-density residential catchment were two- to four-fold higher in comparison with a low-density residential catchment. The main sources of pollutants were related to vehicular traffic and road maintenance, but also pet excrement increased concentrations to a high level. Ploughed snow can contain 50% of the areal pollutant mass stored in snow despite its small surface area within a catchment.

  10. Catchment virtual observatory for sharing flow and transport models outputs: using residence time distribution to compare contrasting catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Zahra; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Kolbe, Tamara; Abbott, Ben; Marcais, Jean; Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven; Bishop, Kevin; Le Henaff, Geneviève; Squividant, Hervé; Pichelin, Pascal; Pinay, Gilles; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2017-04-01

    The distribution of groundwater residence time in a catchment provides synoptic information about catchment functioning (e.g. nutrient retention and removal, hydrograph flashiness). In contrast with interpreted model results, which are often not directly comparable between studies, residence time distribution is a general output that could be used to compare catchment behaviors and test hypotheses about landscape controls on catchment functioning. In this goal, we created a virtual observatory platform called Catchment Virtual Observatory for Sharing Flow and Transport Model Outputs (COnSOrT). The main goal of COnSOrT is to collect outputs from calibrated groundwater models from a wide range of environments. By comparing a wide variety of catchments from different climatic, topographic and hydrogeological contexts, we expect to enhance understanding of catchment connectivity, resilience to anthropogenic disturbance, and overall functioning. The web-based observatory will also provide software tools to analyze model outputs. The observatory will enable modelers to test their models in a wide range of catchment environments to evaluate the generality of their findings and robustness of their post-processing methods. Researchers with calibrated numerical models can benefit from observatory by using the post-processing methods to implement a new approach to analyzing their data. Field scientists interested in contributing data could invite modelers associated with the observatory to test their models against observed catchment behavior. COnSOrT will allow meta-analyses with community contributions to generate new understanding and identify promising pathways forward to moving beyond single catchment ecohydrology. Keywords: Residence time distribution, Models outputs, Catchment hydrology, Inter-catchment comparison

  11. Runoff responses to forest thinning at plot and catchment scales in a headwater catchment draining Japanese cypress forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, Bui Xuan; Gomi, Takashi; Miyata, Shusuke; Sidle, Roy C.; Kosugi, Kenichiro; Onda, Yuichi

    2012-06-01

    SummaryWe examined the effect of forest thinning on runoff generation at plot and catchment scales in headwater basins draining a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) forest. We removed 58.3% of the stems (corresponding to 43.2% of the basal area) in the treated headwater basin (catchment M5), and left the control catchment (M4) untreated. In both catchments, we monitored overland flow from hillslope plots and stream runoff from catchments at basin outlets over a 2-year pre-thinning period and a 2-year post-thinning period. Paired catchment analysis revealed that annual catchment runoff increased 240.7 mm after thinning. Delayed runoff increased significantly, while quick runoff followed similar patterns in the pre- and post-thinning periods. Flow duration in the ephemeral channel in catchment M5 increased from 56.9% in the pre-thinning period to 73.3% in the post-thinning period. Despite the changes in hydrological responses at the catchment scale, increases in overland flow were not significant. The increased availability of water in the soil matrix, caused by decreased interception loss and evapotranspiration, increased base flow after thinning. Based on the summarized data of previous studies together with this study, the effects of forest thinning on increases in runoff were less than partial harvesting in which the managed areas were concentrated within a watershed. We demonstrated that the effect of forest thinning was strongly scale dependent, an important finding for optimizing water and forest management in forested watersheds.

  12. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  13. Which spatial discretization for distributed hydrological models? Proposition of a methodology and illustration for medium to large-scale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehotin, J.; Braud, I.

    2008-05-01

    Distributed hydrological models are valuable tools to derive distributed estimation of water balance components or to study the impact of land-use or climate change on water resources and water quality. In these models, the choice of an appropriate spatial discretization is a crucial issue. It is obviously linked to the available data, their spatial resolution and the dominant hydrological processes. For a given catchment and a given data set, the "optimal" spatial discretization should be adapted to the modelling objectives, as the latter determine the dominant hydrological processes considered in the modelling. For small catchments, landscape heterogeneity can be represented explicitly, whereas for large catchments such fine representation is not feasible and simplification is needed. The question is thus: is it possible to design a flexible methodology to represent landscape heterogeneity efficiently, according to the problem to be solved? This methodology should allow a controlled and objective trade-off between available data, the scale of the dominant water cycle components and the modelling objectives. In this paper, we propose a general methodology for such catchment discretization. It is based on the use of nested discretizations. The first level of discretization is composed of the sub-catchments, organised by the river network topology. The sub-catchment variability can be described using a second level of discretizations, which is called hydro-landscape units. This level of discretization is only performed if it is consistent with the modelling objectives, the active hydrological processes and data availability. The hydro-landscapes take into account different geophysical factors such as topography, land-use, pedology, but also suitable hydrological discontinuities such as ditches, hedges, dams, etc. For numerical reasons these hydro-landscapes can be further subdivided into smaller elements that will constitute the modelling units (third level of

  14. Modeling relationships between catchment attributes and river water quality in southern catchments of the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasani Sangani, Mohammad; Jabbarian Amiri, Bahman; Alizadeh Shabani, Afshin; Sakieh, Yousef; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    Increasing land utilization through diverse forms of human activities, such as agriculture, forestry, urban growth, and industrial development, has led to negative impacts on the water quality of rivers. To find out how catchment attributes, such as land use, hydrologic soil groups, and lithology, can affect water quality variables (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), HCO 3 (-) , pH, TDS, EC, SAR), a spatio-statistical approach was applied to 23 catchments in southern basins of the Caspian Sea. All input data layers (digital maps of land use, soil, and lithology) were prepared using geographic information system (GIS) and spatial analysis. Relationships between water quality variables and catchment attributes were then examined by Spearman rank correlation tests and multiple linear regression. Stepwise approach-based multiple linear regressions were developed to examine the relationship between catchment attributes and water quality variables. The areas (%) of marl, tuff, or diorite, as well as those of good-quality rangeland and bare land had negative effects on all water quality variables, while those of basalt, forest land cover were found to contribute to improved river water quality. Moreover, lithological variables showed the greatest most potential for predicting the mean concentration values of water quality variables, and noting that measure of EC and TDS have inversely associated with area (%) of urban land use.

  15. Resilience of catchment sediment yield to climate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco; Lipkowski, Emily

    2015-04-01

    It is commonly thought that catchment sediment yield is largely governed by allogenic controls acting on the catchment. Under this paradigm, variations in climatic, tectonic or anthropogenic forcing are directly transmitted to the catchment sediment yield. The sediment yield thus represents a temporal signature of the governing external forces. This paradigm, however, has been challenged by recent research, which has shown that autogenic controls from within the catchment can significantly affect and, in some cases, overwrite the allogenic signal in the sediment yield signal. In these cases the catchment sediment yield can be considered to be resilient to external perturbation. On the other hand, it also has been shown that, in some other cases, the allogenic signal can indeed be transmitted efficiently through the catchment, without too much distortion by the autogenic controls. In these latter cases, the sediment yield signal, and hence the downstream sediment deposits, can be a reliable archive of past environmental forcing. This study uses computer simulation to investigate the autogenic resilience of catchment sediment yields. Specifically, it investigates allogenic signal preservation in catchment sediment yield in the context of climate signals. It is hypothesized that 1) the resilience of the catchment sediment yield signal is largely determined by the catchment's spatial heterogeneity (of topography, vegetation, soil properties, ...) and the external signal's temporal heterogeneity and amplitude; and 2) catchment resilience is inversely correlated with spatial heterogeneity and positively correlated with the temporal heterogeneity and amplitude of the allogenic signal. This hypothesis is tested using a set of similar catchments, but with different relief ranges, different levels of topographic smoothness, different sediment distributions, and different artificial vegetation covers. These catchments are subjected to a range of rainfall scenarios over a 300

  16. Validation of Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Landscapes at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Leibowitz, S. G.; Comeleo, R. L.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and describe climatic and physical properties for over 5000 assessment units. This approach was then extended to the three Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho (PNW HL). The HLs were developed using the National Hydrography Dataset's WBD HU12 scale and are comprised of classification components describing climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. To compare the PNW HL classification to catchment hydrologic behavior, HLs were aggregated to catchment scale to compare against the input/output of water in the catchment. HL aggregation must preserve information on the location of the HL within the catchment outlet (upstream vs. downstream) and properties of that HL (i.e. water source vs. sink). Catchment function was investigated by use of hydrologic signatures, which are attributes of long-term time series of water into and out of the catchment. Signatures include Runoff Ratio, Baseflow Index, Snow Ratio, and Recession Coefficients. This study has three primary objectives: 1) derivation of hydrologic signatures to capture the hydrologic behavior for catchments in the Pacific Northwest: 2) development of methodology to aggregate HLs to the catchment scale; and 3) statistical analysis of signature values and trends with respect to aggregated HL classification. We hypothesize that we will find: 1) strong relationships between aggregated HLs and hydrologic signatures; 2) signatures related to water balance are explained by climatic conditions; and 3) signatures describing flow paths are predicted by terrain, soil, and aquifer permeability. This study examined 230 catchments to achieve objectives and test hypotheses stated.

  17. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  18. Evaluation of TOPLATS on three Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-08-01

    Physically based hydrological models are complex tools that provide a complete description of the different processes occurring on a catchment. The TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS) simulates water and energy balances at different time steps, in both lumped and distributed modes. In order to gain insight on the behavior of TOPLATS and its applicability in different conditions a detailed evaluation needs to be carried out. This study aimed to develop a complete evaluation of TOPLATS including: (1) a detailed review of previous research works using this model; (2) a sensitivity analysis (SA) of the model with two contrasted methods (Morris and Sobol) of different complexity; (3) a 4-step calibration strategy based on a multi-start Powell optimization algorithm; and (4) an analysis of the influence of simulation time step (hourly vs. daily). The model was applied on three catchments of varying size (La Tejeria, Cidacos and Arga), located in Navarre (Northern Spain), and characterized by different levels of Mediterranean climate influence. Both Morris and Sobol methods showed very similar results that identified Brooks-Corey Pore Size distribution Index (B), Bubbling pressure (ψc) and Hydraulic conductivity decay (f) as the three overall most influential parameters in TOPLATS. After calibration and validation, adequate streamflow simulations were obtained in the two wettest catchments, but the driest (Cidacos) gave poor results in validation, due to the large climatic variability between calibration and validation periods. To overcome this issue, an alternative random and discontinuous method of cal/val period selection was implemented, improving model results.

  19. A numerical solution to define channel heads and hillslope parameters from digital topography of glacially conditioned catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard; Baumann, Sebastian; Kober, Florian; Robl, Jörg; Heiniger, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of the slope-area relationship in bedrock streams is a common way for discriminating the channel from the hillslope domain and associated landscape processes. Spatial variations of these domains are important indicators of landscape change. In fluvial catchments, this relationship is a function of contributing drainage area, channel slope and the threshold drainage area for fluvial erosion. The resulting pattern is related to climate, tectonic and underlying bedrock. These factors may become secondary in catchments affected by glacial erosion, as it is the case in many mid- to high-latitude mountain belts. The perturbation (i.e. the destruction) of an initial steady state fluvial bedrock morphology (where uplift is balanced by surface lowering rates) will tend to become successively larger if the repeated action of glacial processes exceeds the potential of fluvial readjustment during deglaciated periods. Topographic change is associated with a decrease and fragmentation of the channel network and an extension of the hillslope domain. In case of glacially conditioned catchments discrimination of the two domains remains problematic and a discrimination inconsistent. A definition is therefore highly needed considering that (i) a spatial shift in the domains affect the process and rate of erosion and (ii) topographic classifications of alpine catchments often base on channel and hillslope parameters (i.e.channel or hillslope relief). Here we propose a novel numerical approach to topographically define channel heads from digital topography in glacially conditioned mountain range catchments in order to discriminate the channel from the hillslope domain. We analyzed the topography of the southern European Central Alps, a region which (i) has been glaciated multiple times during the Quaternary, shows (ii) little lithological variations, is (iii) home of very low erodible rocks and is (iv) known as a region were tectonic processes have largely ceased. The

  20. Topological and canonical kriging for design flood prediction in ungauged catchments: an improvement over a traditional regional regression approach?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Pugliese, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio; Skøien, Jon O.; Kiang, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, estimation of flood frequency quantiles at ungauged locations has been largely based on regional regression techniques that relate measurable catchment descriptors to flood quantiles. More recently, spatial interpolation techniques of point data have been shown to be effective for predicting streamflow statistics (i.e., flood flows and low-flow indices) in ungauged catchments. Literature reports successful applications of two techniques, canonical kriging, CK (or physiographical-space-based interpolation, PSBI), and topological kriging, TK (or top-kriging). CK performs the spatial interpolation of the streamflow statistic of interest in the two-dimensional space of catchment descriptors. TK predicts the streamflow statistic along river networks taking both the catchment area and nested nature of catchments into account. It is of interest to understand how these spatial interpolation methods compare with generalized least squares (GLS) regression, one of the most common approaches to estimate flood quantiles at ungauged locations. By means of a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, the performance of CK and TK was compared to GLS regression equations developed for the prediction of 10, 50, 100 and 500 yr floods for 61 streamgauges in the southeast United States. TK substantially outperforms GLS and CK for the study area, particularly for large catchments. The performance of TK over GLS highlights an important distinction between the treatments of spatial correlation when using regression-based or spatial interpolation methods to estimate flood quantiles at ungauged locations. The analysis also shows that coupling TK with CK slightly improves the performance of TK; however, the improvement is marginal when compared to the improvement in performance over GLS.

  1. The hydrological response of a small catchment after the abandonment of terrace cultivation. A study case in northwestern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente-Adán, Jose A.; Lana-Renault, Noemí; Galilea, Ianire; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificacion

    2015-04-01

    Terrace construction for cultivation results in a complete transformation of the hillslopes to a series of flat sectors and almost vertical steps. This strategy, which involves a redistribution of soils and a re-organization of the drainage network, provides fertile soil over steep slopes, improves infiltration and controls overland flow under conditions of intense rainstorms. In Camero Viejo (north-western Iberian ranges) most of the hillslopes are occupied by terraced fields. During the XXth century, rural population declined and agricultural practices were abandoned. In this area, a small catchment (1.9 km2) was monitored in 2012 for studying how the abandonment of agricultural terraces affect water and sediment transfer from the hillslopes to the channels. Terraces occupy 40% of the catchment and are covered by sparse grass and shrubs. The equipment installed in the catchment registers continuously meteorological data, discharge and water table fluctuations. Data on suspended sediment transport is obtained by means of a rising-stage sampler. Here we present the hydrological results corresponding to the years 2012-13 and 2013-14. The hydrological response of the catchment was moderate (annual runoff coefficient < 0.20), which could be in part explained by the high evapotranspiration rates reported in the area. Lows flows were recorded in summer and autumn, when the water reserves of the catchment were dry, and high flows occurred from January, when the catchment became wetter. The shape of the hydrographs, with slow response times, moderate peakflows and long recession limbs suggested a large contribution of subsurface flow, probably favored by deep and well structured soils in the bench terraces. Soil saturation areas were not observed during the study period, suggesting that soil infiltration processes and subsurface flow are important, and that the drainage system of the terraces is probably well maintained. No suspended sediment has been collected so far

  2. A simple linear catchment-response model for investigating sediment efflux associated with climate and land use change in Goodwin Creek, MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Thompson, S. E.; Hassan, M. A.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Erosion and sediment transport are influenced by hydrological regime (rainfall-runoff), catchment properties (vegetation, topography, soil properties), management practices (land use), and their interactions. Here, we use a simple linear catchment response model to describe sediment transport in the Goodwin Creek catchment. The model includes two linear stores, one for the hillslope and one for the fluvial network. The hillslope store is supplied with sediments from upland erosion, with event-driven mobilization occurring over the effective duration of each storm. Some of the mobilized sediments are redeposited on the hillslope and the remainder is transferred to the river network. Additional sediment supply to the network occurs from the channel via bank erosion. Suspended sediment transport and deposition are considered along river channels in order to determine the timing and magnitude of sediment efflux from the catchment. In environments dominated by hillslope erosion, sediment delivery ratio (the ratio between upland erosion and sediment yield at the outlet) is expected to be closely related to catchment hydrological response. However, fluvial storage obscures this relationship by modulating the morphodynamic response to primary hydrological and geomorphological drivers. We used the model to distinguish the relative influence of climate forcing, hydrological response and land use practices on sediment transport and delivery in the Goodwin Creek catchment, where sediment and channel dynamics have been monitored in fourteen sub-catchments for over twenty years. These sub-catchments include a range of channel sizes and a diversity of management practices over the length of the data record. Our results suggest that hillslope processes dominate the delivery ratio in smaller catchments but that channel processes become more important at larger spatial scales. Furthermore, although climate variability could explain a large proportion of the variability in sediment

  3. Human-Landscape interaction in cultivated lowland catchments (Louroux catchment, Loire Valley, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Gay, Aurore; Salvador Blanes, Sébastien; Evrard, Olivier; Desmet, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Change of land use or agricultural practices are known to have high impacts on sediment transfer in catchments and rivers. Numerous studies have particularly illustrated these effects in sloping land in tropical areas undergoing deforestation. Much less attention has been paid to lowland humid areas, where permanent land uses have been plowed more recently. However recent studies reported significant erosion rates in these environments despite the gentle topography and the temperate climate. In order to quantify these changing fluxes of sediment, several instrumentation and historical database analyses were carried out in various catchments of the Loire Valley, France. More particularly, a multiparameter analysis was conducted on sedimentary deposits of a pond created in the 11th century in a catchment representative of cultivated and drained lowland environments where an intensification of agricultural practices has occurred during the last 60 years. The results showed that the initial land consolidation period (1954-1960) was characterized by a dominance of allochtonous material input to the pond. This input represents an erosion of 1900 to 2300 t.km-².yr-1 originating from the catchment. Then, between 1970-1990, terrigenous material flow decreased progressively and tended to stabilize, whereas eutrophication and associated primary production increased in the pond. In addition to these temporal changes, material input across the pond during the last 10 years corresponds to a loss of material in the catchment ranging between 90 and 102 t.km-2.yr-1. While a strong decrease is observed, it still represents a 60-fold increase of the sediment fluxes to the pond compared to the preintensification period. Subsequent research monitoring studies permitted to differentiate between the different sources of sediment and highlight the importance of surface erosion during flood events and of bank erosion during low flows. The increased export of the sediment is primarily due

  4. Investigating the impact of data uncertainty on the estimation of catchment nutrient fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Charlotte; Freer, Jim; Collins, Adrian; Johnes, Penny; Coxon, Gemma

    2014-05-01

    Changing climate and a growing population are increasing pressures on the world's water bodies. Maintaining food security has resulted in changes in agricultural practices, leading to adverse impacts on water quality. To address this problem robust evidence is needed to determine which on-farm mitigation strategies are likely to be most effective in reducing pollutant impacts. The introduction of in-situ quasi-continuous monitoring of water quality provides the means to improve the characterisation of pollutant behaviour and gain new and more robust understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical flux behaviours in catchments. Here we analyse a suite of high temporal resolution data sets generated from in-situ sensor networks within an uncertainty framework to provide robust estimates of nutrient fluxes from catchments impacted by intensive agricultural production practices. Previous research into nutrient flux estimation has focused on assessing the uncertainty associated with the use of different load models to interpolate or extrapolate nutrient data where daily or sub-daily discharge data are generally available and used with lower resolution nutrient concentrations. In such studies examples of datasets where paired discharge and nutrient concentrations are available are used as a benchmark of 'truth' against which the other data models or sample resolutions are tested. This work illustrates that even given high temporal-resolution paired datasets, where no load model is necessary, there will still be significant uncertainties and therefore demonstrates the importance of analysing such data within an uncertainty framework to obtain robust estimates of catchment nutrient loads. This study uses 15-minute resolution paired velocity and stage height data, in order to calculate river discharge, along with high temporal resolution (15 or 30 minute) nutrient data from four field sites collected as part of the Hampshire Avon Demonstration Test Catchment project

  5. Automatic Calibration of Hydrological Models in the Newly Reconstructed Catchments: Issues, Methods and Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazemi, Alireza; Elshorbagy, Amin

    2010-05-01

    The use of optimisation methods has a long tradition in the calibration of conceptual hydrological models; nevertheless, most of the previous investigations have been made in the catchments with long period of data collection and only with respect to the runoff information. The present study focuses on the automatic calibration of hydrological models using the states (i.e. soil moisture) as well as the fluxes (i.e., AET) in a prototype catchment, in which intensive gauging network collects variety of catchment variables; yet only a short period of data is available. First, the characteristics of such a calibration attempt are highlighted and discussed and a number of research questions are proposed. Then, four different optimisation methods, i.e. Latin Hypercube Sampling, Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis, Multi-Objective Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis and Non-dominated Sort Genetic Algorithm II, have been considered and applied for the automatic calibration of the GSDW model in a newly oil-sand reconstructed catchment in northern Alberta, Canada. It is worthwhile to mention that the original GSDW model had to be translated into MATLAB in order to enable the model to be automatically calibrated. Different conceptualisation scenarios are generated and calibrated. The calibration results have been analysed and compared in terms of the optimality and the quality of solutions. The concepts of multi-objectivity and lack of identifiability are addressed in the calibration solutions and the best calibration algorithm is selected based on the error of representing the soil moisture content in different layers. The current study also considers uncertainties, which might occur in the formulation of calibration process by considering different calibration scenarios using the same model and dataset. The interactions among accuracy, identifiability, and the model parsimony are addressed and discussed. The present investigation concludes that the calibration of

  6. Catchment controls and human disturbances on the geomorphology of small Mediterranean estuarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrany, Joan; Grimalt, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Geographic signatures are physical and human-induced characteristics or processes that identify comparable or unique features of estuaries along latitudinal gradients. In Mediterranean areas, the microtidal regime and the strong seasonal and inter-annual contrasts cause an alternation between relatively high runoff and arid conditions. Furthermore, the long history of human settlement also increases the complexity in the study of these estuarine systems. This study investigates these signatures of the estuaries located within the Mallorcan eastern coast, which are geomorphologically homogeneous because of a similar bedrock geology and Holocene history. A multi-method approach focused on the integration of geomorphometry, hydraulics, historical sources and statistics was used. We explore the role played by catchment morphometric parameters, severe flash flood events and human disturbances in controlling the geomorphology of 10 beach-barrier enclosed, fluvial incised lagoons. Most of the lagoons discharge into 'calas', ranging in size from 1345 to 17,537 m2 and their related catchments are representative of the Mediterranean hydrological systems. Multiple regression models illustrate that the size, slope and drainage network development of the catchments explain the variance in length (r2 = 0.67), volume (r2 = 0.49), area (r2 = 0.64), circularity (r2 = 0.72) and average width (r2 = 0.81) of the lagoons. Depending on these catchment morphometric variables, the shape of the lagoons is also determined by the occurrence of catastrophic flash floods, which cause scouring and dredging, whereas the ordinary flood events and sea storms promote refilling and sedimentation. A historical analysis since 1850 documented 18 flood events, 5 of which were catastrophic with destructive effects along the catchments and large morphological changes in coastal lagoons. High intensity rainfall (up to 200 mm in 2 h), the geomorphometry of the catchments and the massive construction of

  7. Heterogeneity in sensitivity and response to drought in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geris, J.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2014-12-01

    Soils are of critical importance in modulating the response of catchment water storage and flux dynamics under changing hydrological conditions. We explored the short term impacts of an extreme drought on the water storage and transmission dynamics of different hydropedological units, and the role of their spatial organisation on the runoff generation at the integrated catchment scale in a northern environment. Soil types included poorly drained histosols in riparian zones and freely draining podzols on steeper hillslopes in a northern headwater catchment (3.2 km2) in the Scottish Highlands. We employed an integrated monitoring approach of hydrometric data and stable water isotopes in precipitation, stream, soil, and groundwater, to characterise the spatio-temporal storage and runoff dynamics before, during and after a drought period. We found high spatial variability in the storage resistance and resilience to drought impacts, associated with the distribution of the different soil types, and exacerbated by land use. For example, storage changes in the riparian histosols were remarkably small (<40 mm) during the dry period, compared to those in hillslope moorland (~100 mm) and forest (~200mm) covered podzols. However, results showed that during events, there was consistent threshold behaviour in all soil units and their integrated response at the catchment scale, which appeared not to be affected by relative drying or wetting conditions. The data analyses indicated that during dry periods, large parts of the catchment were disconnected from the river network and runoff was generated mainly from the permanently wet riparian histosols. However, during events there was a quasi-continuous connection of the upper hillslopes that recharged the wetland and stream, which did not appear to have been affected by the drought. This caused a strong recovery and resilience of the catchment in its integrated runoff response. Nevertheless, as future climate projections for

  8. Effects of impervious pavements on reducing runoff in an arid urban catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epshtein, O.; Turnbull, L.; Earl, S.

    2011-12-01

    from 5 mm to 25 mm. Model testing shows total event discharge simulated well, although low Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients for events indicate a poor fit between the shape and timing of the modeled and monitored hydrograph, which we attribute to poor characterization of friction factors in urban catchments. Scenario-based model analysis tested catchment response to substitution of pervious for conventional pavement by percent and pavement-function scenarios. Results are consistent with previous findings in that short duration-high intensity storms trigger threshold infiltration capacity, past which pervious pavement damping of runoff volume levels off, approaching conventional levels. However at the modeled catchment scale, this initial damping represents a significant reduction in volume, peak flow velocity, and contaminant loading potential. Urban surface drainage networks concentrate and channel flow along roads: the capacity of pervious pavements to simultaneously increase infiltration directly at location of greatest runoff and mitigate inflow effects from remote points has compelling potential as a hydrologic and urban systems engineering tool.

  9. Catchment Restoration in the Tweed UNESCO-IHP HELP Basin - Eddleston Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spray, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    initial characterisation of the catchment; the identification of potential key locations and types of intervention to improve ecological status and flood risk reduction; the setting up of the monitoring networks, the engagement with local communities and land managers; initial habitat modifications and the early results of the study. We situate this within the wider context of priorities for restoration and the UNESCO IHP-HELP programme.

  10. An Eco-hydrologic Assessment of Small Experimental Catchments with Various Land Uses within the Panama Canal Watershed: Agua Salud Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, T. D.; Ogden, F. L.; Stallard, R. F.; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological processes in the humid tropics are poorly understood and an important topic when it comes to water management in the seasonal tropics. The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project, seeks to understand these processes and quantify the long-term effects of different land cover and uses across the Panama Canal Watershed. One of the project’s main objectives is to understand how reforestation effects seasonal stream flows. To meet this objective, a baseline characterization of hydrology on the small catchment scale is being assessed across different land uses typical in rural Panama. The small experimental catchments are found within Panama’s protected Soberania National Park and the adjacent headwaters of the Agua Salud and Mendoza Rivers, all of which are part of the greater Panama Canal Watershed. The land uses being monitored include a variety of control catchments as well as treated pasture sites. The catchments used for this study include a mature old regrowth forest, a 50% deforested or mosaic regrowth site, an active pasture and a monoculture invasive grass site (saccharum spontaneum) as experimental controls and two treated catchments that were recently abandoned pastures converted to teak and native species timber plantations. Installed instrumentation includes a network of rain gauges, v-notched weirs, atmometers, an eddy covariance system and an assortment of meteorological and automated geochemical sampling systems. Spatial, rainfall, runoff and ET data across these six geologically and topographically similar catchments are available from 2009 and 2010. Classic water balance and paired catchment techniques were used to compare the catchments on an annual, seasonal, and event basis. This study sets the stage for hydrologic modeling and for better understanding the effects of vegetation and land-use history on rainfall-runoff processes for the Agua Salud Project and Panama Canal

  11. Optimization models for siting water quality monitoring stations in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Hu, Wen-Shin

    2012-01-01

    A water quality monitoring network (WQMN) must be designed so as to adequately protect the water quality in a catchment. Although a simulated annealing (SA) method was previously applied to design a WQMN, the SA method cannot ensure the solution it obtained is the global optimum. Therefore, two new linear optimization models are proposed in this study to minimize the deviation of the cost values expected to identify the possible pollution sources based on uniform cost (UC) and coverage elimination uniform cost (CEUC) schemes. The UC model determines the expected cost values by considering each sub-catchment being covered by which station, while the CEUC model determines the coverage of each station by eliminating the area covered by any upstream station. The proposed models are applied to the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Results show that the global optimal WQMN can be effectively determined by using the UC or CEUC model, for which both results are better than those from the SA method, especially when the number of stations becomes large.

  12. Structural and functional connectivity in the agricultural Can Revull catchment (Mallorca, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calsamiglia, Aleix; García-Comendador, Julián; Fortesa, Josep; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Alorda, Bartomeu; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Unravelling the spatio-temporal variability of the sediment transfer within a catchment represents a challenge of great importance to quantify erosion, soil redistribution and their impacts on agricultural landscape. Structural and functional connectivity have been identified as useful aspects of connectivity that may clarify how these processes are coupled or decoupled in various types of catchment sediment cascades. In this study, hydrological and sediment connectivity in a Mediterranean agricultural catchment (1.4 km2) modified through traditional drainage systems (i.e., ditches and subsurface tile drainages) was assessed during two contrasted rainfall events occurred in October 2016 (20 mm in 24 h -return period < 1 yr-, I30 6.6 mm h-1 with 32 mm accumulated in 14 days) and in December 2016 (99 mm in 24 h -return period ≈ 25 yr-, I30 23 mm h-1 with 39 mm accumulated in 14 days). A morphometric index of connectivity (IC) was calculated to study the spatial patterns of structural connectivity. The identification of the main sediment pathways -in terms of functional connectivity- was conducted by field mapping, whilst the estimation of erosion and deposition rates by the analysis of high resolution digital terrain models (i.e., 5 cm pix-1; RMSE < 0.05 m) obtained from automated digital photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The IC estimations allowed the identification of the most (dis-)connected areas related with the anthropogenic control in the resisting forces of the catchment. On the one hand, in the upper part of the catchment, depositional compartments were created by dry-stone walls that separate agricultural properties laminating flash floods. On the other hand, in the lower part of the catchment these depositional compartments were generated by an orthogonal network of ditches situated topographically above the natural thalwegs. In its turn, the most connected areas are located in the steepest parts of the catchment under rainfed herbaceous

  13. Generality of Fractal 1/f Scaling in Catchment Tracer Time Series: Implications for Catchment Travel Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Palucis, M. C.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    The mean travel time - the time that it takes a parcel of rainwater to reach the stream - is a basic parameter used to characterize catchments. More generally, a catchment is characterized by its travel-time distribution, which is described not only by its mean but also its shape. The travel time distribution of water in a catchment is typically inferred from passive tracer time series (typically water isotopes or chloride concentrations) in rainfall and streamflow. The catchment mixes precipitation inputs (and thus passive tracers) falling at different points in time; as a result, tracer fluctuations in streamflow are usually strongly damped relative to precipitation. Mathematically, this mixing of waters of different ages is represented by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation inputs to generate the stream outputs. Previous analyses of both rainfall and streamflow tracer time series from several catchments in Wales have demonstrated that rainfall chemistry spectra resemble white noise, whereas these same catchments exhibit fractal 1/f scaling in stream tracer chemistry over three orders of magnitude. These observations imply that these catchments have an approximate power-law distribution of travel times, and thus they retain a long memory of past inputs. The observed fractal scaling places strong constraints on possible models of catchment behavior: commonly-used exponential or advection-dispersion travel time distribution models do not exhibit fractal scaling. Here we test the generality of the observed fractal scaling of streamflow chemistry, by analyzing long-term tracer time series from 17 other catchments in North America and Europe. Special care is taken to account for the effects of spectral aliasing. We demonstrate that 1/f fractal scaling of stream chemistry is a common feature of these catchments and discuss the implications of this observation to catchment-scale hydrologic modeling. We then present the best-fit travel

  14. Standardised survey method for identifying catchment risks to water quality.

    PubMed

    Baker, D L; Ferguson, C M; Chier, P; Warnecke, M; Watkinson, A

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a systematic methodology to identify and quantify risks in drinking water and recreational catchments. The methodology assesses microbial and chemical contaminants from both diffuse and point sources within a catchment using Escherichia coli, protozoan pathogens and chemicals (including fuel and pesticides) as index contaminants. Hazard source information is gathered by a defined sanitary survey process involving use of a software tool which groups hazards into six types: sewage infrastructure, on-site sewage systems, industrial, stormwater, agriculture and recreational sites. The survey estimates the likelihood of the site affecting catchment water quality, and the potential consequences, enabling the calculation of risk for individual sites. These risks are integrated to calculate a cumulative risk for each sub-catchment and the whole catchment. The cumulative risks process accounts for the proportion of potential input sources surveyed and for transfer of contaminants from upstream to downstream sub-catchments. The output risk matrices show the relative risk sources for each of the index contaminants, highlighting those with the greatest impact on water quality at a sub-catchment and catchment level. Verification of the sanitary survey assessments and prioritisation is achieved by comparison with water quality data and microbial source tracking.

  15. Framework for measuring sustainable development in catchment systems.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Jay J

    2002-02-01

    Integrated catchment management represents an approach to managing the resources of a catchment by integrating environmental, economic, and social issues. It is aimed at deriving sustainable benefits for future generations, while protecting natural resources, particularly water, and minimizing possible adverse social, economic, and environmental consequences. Indicators of sustainable development, which summarize information for use in decision-making, are invaluable when trying to assess the diverse, interacting components of catchment processes and resource management actions. The Driving-Forces--Pressure--State--Impact--Response (DPSIR) indicator framework is useful for identifying and developing indicators of sustainable development for catchment management. Driving forces have been identified as the natural conditions occurring in a catchment and the level of development and economic activity. Pressures include the natural and anthropogenic supply of water, water demand, and water pollution. State indicators can be split into those of quantity and those of quality. Impacts include those that affect the ecosystems directly and those that impact the use value of the resource. It core indicators are identified within each of the categories given in the framework, most major catchment-based management issues can be evaluated. This framework is applied to identify key issues in catchment management in South Africa, and develop a set of indicators for evaluating catchments throughout the country.

  16. Application of the MAGIC model to the Glacier Lakes catchments

    Treesearch

    John O. Reuss

    1994-01-01

    The MAGIC model (Cosby et al. 1985, 1986) was calibrated for East and West Glacier Lakes, two adjacent high-altitude (3200 m- 3700 m) catchments in the Medicine Bow National Forest of southern Wyoming. This model uses catchment characteristics including weathering rates, soil chemical characteristics, hydrological parameters, and precipitation amounts and composition...

  17. A mechanistic assessment of nutrient flushing at the catchment scale

    Treesearch

    Willem J. van Verseveld; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Kate Lajtha

    2008-01-01

    This paper mechanistically assesses the flushing mechanism of DOC, DON, and DIN at the hillslope and catchment scales during two storm events, in a small catchment (WS10), H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Using a combination of natural tracer and hydrometric data, and end-member mixing analysis, we were able to describe the...

  18. An integrated suspended sediment budgeting of the agricultural Can Revull catchment (Mallorca, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrany, J.; Garcia, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Mediterranean region of Europe has a long history of human settlement and human impacts. The very high spatial and temporal variability of fluvial processes in the region also creates problems for measurement and monitoring and for assessment of effects. Extensive rainfed herbaceous crops are one of the most representative agricultural elements of this region, which should be one of the major factor affecting erosion processes. Although land use is commonly seen as resulting in increased sediment yields, the implementation of soil and water conservation practices can have the reverse effect. Sediment budgets offer a means to assess the sources, storage, rates of transport, yields, and efficiency of delivery of sediment for a range of catchment scales. Field measurements were conducted in Can Revull, a small agricultural catchment (1.03 km2) on the island of Mallorca. This study uses 137Cs measurements, sediment source fingerprinting and continuous turbidity records of four hydrological years (2004-2005 to 2007-2008) to quantify the individual components of the budget. A large proportion of the material mobilized from cultivated fields without conservation practices (gross erosion was 775 t yr-1; 1,270 t km-2 yr-1) was, however, subsequently deposited either within the field of origin (112 t yr-1; 180 t km-2 yr-1) or at intermediate locations between the source field and the channel network (field-to-channel conveyance loss was 591 t yr-1; 1,090 t km-2 yr-1). The estimates of sediment accumulation rates on the floodplain in the lower reaches of the catchment indicate that the mean sedimentation rate was 0.47 g cm-2 yr-1. This value was extrapolated to the total area of the floodplain to estimate a total annual conveyance loss or storage of 150 t yr-1. Monitoring at the catchment outlet over the study period indicated a mean annual suspended sediment yield of 7 t km-2 yr-1. The sum of the estimates of sediment yield and floodplain storage (157 t yr-1) was taken

  19. Time-variant Lagrangian transport formulation reduces aggregation bias of water and solute mean travel time in heterogeneous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Mohammad; Botter, Gianluca; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-05-01

    Lack of hydro-bio-chemical data at subcatchment scales necessitates adopting an aggregated system approach for estimating water and solute transport properties, such as residence and travel time distributions, at the catchment scale. In this work, we show that within-catchment spatial heterogeneity, as expressed in spatially variable discharge-storage relationships, can be appropriately encapsulated within a lumped time-varying stochastic Lagrangian formulation of transport. This time (variability) for space (heterogeneity) substitution yields mean travel times (MTTs) that are not significantly biased to the aggregation of spatial heterogeneity. Despite the significant variability of MTT at small spatial scales, there exists a characteristic scale above which the MTT is not impacted by the aggregation of spatial heterogeneity. Extensive simulations of randomly generated river networks reveal that the ratio between the characteristic scale and the mean incremental area is on average independent of river network topology and the spatial arrangement of incremental areas.

  20. Catchment Systems Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. F.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent catchment initiatives have highlighted the need for new holistic approaches to sustainable water management. Catchment Systems Engineering seeks to describe catchment the function (or role) as the principal driver for evaluating how it should be managed in the future. Catchment Systems Engineering does not seek to re-establish a natural system but rather works with natural processes in order to engineer landscapes to accrue multiple benefits. The approach involves quantifying and assessing catchment change, impacts and most importantly, suggests an urgent and proactive agenda for future planning. In particular, an interventionist approach to managing hydrological flow pathways across scale is proposed. It is already accepted that future management will require a range of scientific expertise and full engagement with stakeholders. This inclusive concept under a Catchment Systems Engineering agenda forces any consortia to commit to actively changing and perturbing the catchment system and thus learn, in situ, how to manage the environment for collective benefits. The shared cost, the design, the implementation, the evaluation and any subsequent modifications should involve all relevant parties in the consortia. This joint ownership of a 'hands on' interventionist agenda to catchment change is at the core of Catchment Systems Engineering. In this paper we show a range of catchment engineering projects from the UK that have addressed multi-disciplinary approaches to flooding, pollution and ecosystem management, whilst maintaining economic food production. Examples using soft engineered features such as wetlands, ponds, woody debris dams and infiltration zones will be shown. Local scale demonstration activities, led by local champions, have proven to be an effective means of encouraging wider uptake. Evidence that impacts can be achieved at local catchment scale will be introduced. Catchment Systems Engineering is a concept that relies on all relevant parties

  1. CHUM: a hydrochemical model for upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Edward

    1996-01-01

    CHUM (CHemistry of the Uplands Model) simulates soil-water chemical interactions and water flows in upland catchments with acid soils. The chemical interactions are described with the equilibrium speciation code WHAM, which emphasises the interactions of inorganic chemical species with solid-phase and dissolved organic matter, and also considers inorganic solution speciation and sorption reactions of fulvic acid. Of special significance is the treatment of aluminium chemistry; control of dissolved aluminium concentrations is assumed to be due primarily to complexation reactions with solid phase organic matter, whereas previous models have postulated equilibrium with mineral phases or simple ion-exchange. In addition, CHUM takes nitrogen transformations and weathering (dissolution) reactions into account. The catchment is conceptualised as a series of columns consisting of two soil horizons and an underlying permeable or fractured bedrock zone. Water flows are described with a hydrological submodel that distinguishes immobile water present in soil micropores (which is in chemical equilibrium with the soil solids) from mobile drainage water. The mobile water can move vertically from one horizon to another, from one column to the column immediately downslope, or as outflow from a column adjacent to a stream or lake. Solutes exchange between the mobile and immobile compartments. The model runs on a daily time-step. The fundamentals of the model are given, together with a description of its application to a site in the English Lake District.

  2. Catchment-scale fluorescence water quality determination.

    PubMed

    Baker, A; Inverarity, R; Ward, D

    2005-01-01

    Chemical water quality determinants and river water fluorescence were determined on the River Tyne, northeast England. Statistically significant relationships between nitrate (r = 0.87), phosphate (r = 0.80), ammonia (r = 0.70), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (r = 0.85) and dissolved oxygen (r = -0.65) and tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity were observed. The strongest correlations are between tryptophan-like intensity and nitrate and phosphate, which in the Tyne catchment derive predominantly from point and diffuse source sewage inputs. The correlation between BOD and the tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity suggests that this fluorescence centre is related to the bioavailable or fluorescence intensity and ammonia concentration and dissolved oxygen. The weaker correlation with ammonia is due to good ammonia treatment within the wastewater treatment plants within the catchment, and that with dissolved oxygen due to the natural aeration of the river such that this is not a good indicator of water quality. Mean annual tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, measured by both bench and portable spectrometers, agrees well with the General Water Quality Assessment as determined by the England and Wales environmental regulators, the Environment Agency.

  3. Lateral weathering gradients in glaciated catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S. W.; Ross, D. S.; Strahm, B. D.; Schreiber, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dissolution and the distribution of weathering products are fundamental processes that drive development and habitability of the Earth's critical zone; yet, the spatial configuration of these processes in some systems is not well understood. Feedbacks between hydrologic flows and weathering fluxes are necessary to understanding how the critical zone develops. In upland glaciated catchments of the northeastern USA, primary mineral dissolution and the distribution of weathering products are spatially distinct and predictable over short distances. Hillslopes, where shallow soils force lateral hydrologic fluxes through accumulated organic matter, produce downslope gradients in mineral depletion, weathering product accumulation, soil development, and solute chemistry. We propose that linked gradients in hydrologic flow paths, soil depth, and vegetation lead to predictable differences in the location and extent of mineral dissolution in regolith (soil, subsoil, and rock fragments) and bedrock, and that headwater catchments within the upland glaciated northeast show a common architecture across hillslopes as a result. Examples of these patterns and processes will be illustrated using observations from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire where laterally distinct soils with strong morphological and biogeochemical gradients have been documented. Patterns in mineral depletion and product accumulation are essential in predicting how ecosystems will respond to stresses, disturbance, and management.

  4. Catchments' hedging strategy on evapotranspiration for climatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Ding, Wei; Li, Yu; Tang, Yin; Wang, Dingbao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that natural catchments utilize hedging strategy for evapotranspiration and water storage carryover with uncertain future precipitation. The hedging strategy for evapotranspiration in catchments under different levels of water availability is analytically derived with marginal utility principle. It is found that there exists hedging between evapotranspiration for present and future only with a portion of water availability. Observation data sets of 160 catchments in the United States covering the period from 1983 to 2003 demonstrate the existence of hedging in catchment hydrology and validate the proposed hedging strategy. We also find that more water is allocated to carryover storage for hedging against the future evapotranspiration deficit in the catchments with larger aridity indexes or with larger variability in future precipitation, i.e., long-term climate and precipitation variability control the degree of hedging.

  5. Pesticide modelling for a small catchment using SWAT-2000.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Narayanan; White, Sue M; Worrall, Fred; Whelan, Mick J

    2006-01-01

    Pesticides in stream flow from the 142 ha Colworth catchment in Bedfordshire, UK were monitored from October 1999 to December 2000. About 47% of the catchment is tile-drained and different pesticides and cropping patterns have recently been evaluated in terms of their effect on nutrient and pesticide losses to the stream. The data from Colworth were used to test soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) 2000 predictions of pesticide concentrations at the catchment outlet. A sound model set-up to carry out pesticide modelling was created by means of hydrological modelling with proper simulation of crop growth and evapotranspiration. The pesticides terbuthylazine, terbutryn, cyanazine and bentazone were modelled. There was close agreement between SWAT-predicted pesticide concentration values and observations. Scenario trials were conducted to explore management options for reducing pesticide loads arriving at the catchment outlet. The results obtained indicate that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behavior at the catchment scale.

  6. Cross-scale interactions between surface components and rainfall properties. Non-linearities in the hydrological and erosive behavior of semiarid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cantón, Yolanda; Lazaro, Roberto; Solé-Benet, Albert

    2014-09-01

    Non-vegetated areas in arid and semiarid ecosystems are usually covered by biological soil crusts (BSCs), which modify many surface properties and reduce soil erosion at local spatial scales. Nevertheless, runoff generated in these areas could increase downstream erosion, or on the contrary, supply water to downslope plants, which act as surface obstructions slowing down runoff, trapping sediments and thus reducing water erosion. However, their buffer capacity might be overwhelmed during some torrential rains, increasing catchment connectivity and modifying the hydrological behavior and subsequent water erosion measured at the catchment outlet. To progress in the knowledge of the effect of the interactions between BSCs and vegetation on runoff generation and water erosion at catchment scale, the long term hydrological response of semiarid badlands with an important cover of BSCs has been studied. This effect has been analyzed using piecewise regression analysis to find any possible break point in the runoff response of the catchment to rainfall, attributable to variations in the hydrological connectivity of the catchment. Once we found this break point, we used it to divide the database in two sub-databases, and we built two structural equation models (SEM) to identify the main hydrological drivers controlling runoff generation and water erosion at sub-datasets, corresponding with different stages of catchment connection. Our results show that during low magnitude rainfall events, runoff and erosion measured at the catchment outlet come essentially from physically crusted areas directly connected to the channel network and are controlled by rainfall intensity, whereas runoff generated in areas with BSCs is reinfiltrated downstream into local vegetation patches. However, during high-magnitude events, vegetated buffers are saturated, connecting areas covered by BSCs with the channel network and increasing the catchment efficiency in exporting water out of the system

  7. Establishing fine-grained sediment budgets for the Pang and Lambourn LOCAR catchments, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walling, D. E.; Collins, A. L.; Jones, P. A.; Leeks, G. J. L.; Old, G.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryAn integrated approach to data collection, combining the use of 137Cs measurements, sediment source fingerprinting, bed sediment surveys and conventional river monitoring, has been successfully employed to establish the fine-grained sediment budgets of two lowland groundwater-fed catchments in the UK. Gross surface erosion is higher on cultivated land (Pang: 55 263 t yr -1 or 507 t km -2 yr -1; Lambourn: 79 997 t yr -1 or 437 t km -2 yr -1) than on pasture (Pang: 1960 t yr -1 or 140 t km -2 yr -1; Lambourn: 1425 t yr -1 or 95 t km -2 yr -1) in both study areas and a substantial proportion of the mobilized sediment is sequestered within the fields (Pang: 28 058 t yr -1 or 228 t km -2 yr -1; Lambourn: 55 575 t yr -1 or 281 t km -2 yr -1) and between the individual fields and the river channel network (Pang: 28 672 t yr -1 or 233 t km -2 yr -1; Lambourn: 24 782 t yr -1 or 125 t km -2 yr -1). The sediment contribution from banks and subsurface sources is relatively low and typically ca. 5 t yr -1 in the Pang and ca. 11 t yr -1 in the Lambourn, representing only about 1% of the suspended sediment output from each study catchment. The mean level of fine-grained sediment storage in the main channel system is equivalent to 38% (Pang) and 21% (Lambourn) of the respective mean annual suspended sediment yields of the two catchments. The estimated sediment delivery ratio for both study catchments is ca. 1%.

  8. Climate, runoff and landuse trends in the Owo River Catchment in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegun, O.; Odunuga, S.; Ajayi, O. S.

    2015-06-01

    The Owo River is an important surface water source in Lagos particularly to the western section. It is the source of direct water intake for water supply by Lagos State Water Corporation to Amuwo-Odofin, Ojo and parts of Badagry Local Government Areas. This paper examines the complex interactions and feedbacks between many variables and processes within that catchment and analyses the future ability of this semi-urban watershed in sustaining water supply in the face of cumulative environmental change. Stationarity analysis on rainfall, change detection analysis and morphometry analysis were combined to analyse the non-stationarity of Owo River catchment. On rainfall trend analysis, since the correlation coefficient (0.38) with test statistic of 2.17 did not satisfy the test condition we concluded that there is trend and that rainfall in the watershed is not stationary. The dominant land use impacting on the bio-geochemical fluxes is built up area (including structures and paved surfaces) which grew from about 142.92 km2 (12.20%) in 1984 to 367.22 km2 (31.36%) in 2013 recording gain of 224.3 km2 at average growth rate of 7.73 km2 per annum. Total length of streams within the catchment reduced from 622.24 km in 1964 to 556 km in 2010, while stream density reduced from 0.53 in 1964 to 0.47 in 2010 an indication of shrinking hydrological network. The observed trends in both natural and anthropogenic processes indicated non-stationarity of the hydrological fluxes within the Catchment and if this continues, the urban ecosystem services of water supply will be compromised.

  9. Root reinforcement and its implications in shallow landsliding susceptibility on a small alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, M. C.; Farabegoli, E.; Onorevoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Roots shear resistance offers a considerable contribution to hill-slope stability on vegetated terrains. Through the pseudo-cohesion of shrubs, trees and turf's roots, the geomechanical properties of soils can be drastically increased, exerting a positive influence on the hillslope stability. We analysed the shallow landsliding susceptibility of a small alpine catchment (Duron valley, Central Dolomites, Italy) that we consider representative of a wide altitude belt of the Dolomites (1800 - 2400 m a.s.l). The catchment is mostly mantled by grass (Nardetum strictae s.l.), with clustered shrubs (Rhododendron hirsutum and Juniperus nana), and trees (Pinus cembra, Larix decidua and Picea abies). The soil depth, investigated with direct and indirect methods, ranges from 0 to 180 cm, with its peak at the hollow axes. Locally, the bedrock, made of Triassic volcanic rocks, is deeply incised by the Holocene drainage network. Intensive grazing of cows and horses pervades the catchment area and cattle-trails occupy ca 20% of the grass cover. We used laboratory and field tests to characterize the geotechnical properties of these alpine soils; moreover we designed and tested an experimental device that measures, in situ, the shear strengths of the grass mantle. In the study area we mapped 18 shallow landslides, mostly related to road cuts and periodically reactivated as retrogressive landslides. The triggering mechanisms of these shallow landslides were qualitatively analysed at large scale and modelled at smaller scale. We used SHALSTAB to model the shallow landsliding susceptibility of the catchment at the basin scale and SLIDE (RocScience) to compute the Safety Factor at the versant scale. Qualitative management solutions are provided, in order to reduce the shallow landsliding susceptibility risk in this alpine context.

  10. A Comparison of Runoff Pathways and Nutrient Export in Small Tropical Forest Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, H. B.; Stallard, R. F.; Pullen, N. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Center for Tropical Forest Research (CTFS), a program of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), has coordinated a global network of 17 tropical forest dynamics plots of approximately 50 hectares in order to collect baseline information and to monitor forest changes. Missing from most past studies of these plots is an integrated soil hydrology and water chemistry component. To fill this gap, we have developed and are testing rapid assessment methods to measure soil and hydrological properties for tropical forest catchments. This assessment includes gaging and sampling first to third order headwater streams with high frequency over several storm events within a 2-4 week period. Detailed flow separations enable us to test Elsenbeer's (2001) functional classification continuum for tropical soils and allow us to test the hypothesis that forest sites with greater overland flow experience greater nutrient loss during storm events. Data from a storm event for the steep Lutz Creek Catchment on Barro Colorado Island, Panama in September 1990 demonstrate that Na+ and Si, typical of most solutes, decrease in concentration with increasing discharge. In contrast, the nutrients, K+ and NO3- increase in concentration with increasing discharge. Results from a 20 ha catchment in Yasuni National Park, Ecuador from November 2003 show a similar pattern during several small events on relatively impermeable soils. Data collected from a more permeable 20 ha catchment in Lambir Hills National Park, Malaysia in July 2004 also show nutrient export, but suggest that rainfall amount, intensity and duration may play a large role in the magnitude of nutrient concentrations. Elsenbeer, H., 2001. Hydrological flowpaths in tropical rain forest soilscapes-a review. Hydrological Processes, 15: 1751-1759.

  11. Linking nitrogen cycling and export with variable source area dynamics in forested and urbanizing catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, L. E.; Tague, C. E.; Groffman, P.; Belt, K.

    2001-05-01

    One of the goals of the Baltimore Urban LTER site is to investigate how interactions between ecological processes and urban land use effect ecosystem functions, such as the cycling and export of nutrients. As part of this project, nitrogen export from Pond Branch, a 41 hectare forested catchment in Baltimore County, has been monitored since 1998 and is compared with nitrogen export from neighboring agricultural and urbanizing catchments. To better understand the spatial structure of nitrogen cycling and export processes in this region, a GIS and physically based, hydro-ecological model is used to investigate the interactions between soil water levels, flowpath dynamics and nitrogen cycling and export in Pond Branch. Rates of key ecosystem processes including vegetation uptake, litterfall, decomposition, mineralization, nitrification and denitrification vary in regular spatial and temporal patterns in response to meteorologically driven variations in soil water, temperature and biological activity as well as decadal level variations in canopy composition and extent. Alteration in the distribution of nitrogen sinks and sources in the landscape are particularly manifest in the dynamics of riparian areas that result in peak nitrogen export during the active growing season in this catchment. Urbanization effects can be added to the simulation by altering irrigation and fertilization rates, vegetation patterns and by altering hydrologic flowpaths through the construction of roads and sewer networks. The model is used to investigate current nitrogen cycling and export patterns and scenarios for urbanization of the Pond Branch catchment. Variation in the pattern of land cover change and infrastructure development with respect to the existing pattern of vegetation and topographic controls on nitrogen cycling is shown by the model to influence the impact of urbanization on nitrogen export.

  12. Examining Sediment-bound Radiocesium Dynamics in Two Fukushima Coastal Catchments with Sediment Fingerprinting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Bonté, P.; Joron, J. L.; Onda, Y.; Lefèvre, I.; Ayrault, S.; Evrard, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in the significant fallout of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs) over the Fukushima region. After deposition on the soil surface, radiocesium is primarily bound to fine soil particles. Subsequently, rainfall and snow melt run-off events result in the downstream migration of radiocesium. Understanding the spatial distribution and relative contribution of different sediment sources is therefore fundamental to the management of radiocesium migration. Sediment fingerprinting techniques were used to determine the location and relative contributions of different sediment sources in the Mano and Niida Rivers, in the Fukushima region. First, we modelled the relative contributions of radiocesium from the upstream portions of the catchment, that received greater proportions of the fallout (e.g. >20 kBq kg-1), to sediment sampled in the downstream coastal regions. Second, we examined the elemental geochemistry of the major soil types (e.g. Andosols, Cambisols, Fluvisols) within these catchments and modelled their relative contribution to sediment sampled throughout these catchments. Elemental composition was measured with neutron activation analysis, radiocesium with gamma-spectrometry and a distribution modelling approach quantified source contributions. In the Mano River ~20% of the radiocesium sampled was modelled to be derived from the upstream area compared to ~50% in the Niida River. The highest contribution of upstream radiocesium was modelled after the typhoon seasons in 2011 and 2013. Fluvisols were found to be the dominant source of sediment (76%). The dominance of Fluvisols indicates that sediments are likely derived from sources that are highly connected to the river network (e.g. rice paddy fields). Understanding the relative contributions of these different sediment sources will allow for more direct management of sediment and thus radiocesium transfers in these Fukushima coastal catchments.

  13. Reach-scale geomorphic differences between headwater streams draining mountaintop mined and unmined catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Kristin L.

    2015-05-01

    Mountaintop surface mining (MTM) is a controversial coal extraction method commonly practiced in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, that drastically reengineers previously steep, forested landscapes and alters sediment and water delivery processes to and along headwater channels draining mined areas. Although sediment delivery and hydrologic response from MTM operations remain highly variable and poorly resolved, the inherent close coupling between hillslopes and headwater channels is expected to result in geomorphic differences in stream channels draining MTM landscapes relative to unmined landscapes. Dedicated geomorphic studies are severely lacking in comparison to extensive research on water quality impacts of MTM. This study reports moderate geomorphic differences between headwater (catchment area <~ 6 km2) stream channels draining MTM and unmined catchments in tributaries of the Mud River in southern West Virginia. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicate that MTM streams are characterized by deeper maximum channel depths, smaller width-to-depth ratios, increased bedrock exposure along the streambed, and increased frequency of very fine silt and sand deposition relative to channels draining unmined catchments. Geomorphic differences are most pronounced for streams draining the smallest catchment areas (< 3.5 km2). Collectively, geomorphic differences provide evidence for relatively rapid channel adjustment of accelerated bedrock incision attributed to potential increased hydraulic driving forces and altered sediment regimes in MTM channels, notably sustained delivery of very fine sediment and potentially reduced coarse sediment delivery. More rapid delivery and transfer of water in addition to excess delivery of very fine sediments to and through headwater channels will have consequences to flooding and water quality in the short term and landscape evolution processes over longer time scales. Given the extent of MTM operations in this

  14. Runoff Variability in Field-scale Catchments and the Implications for Rainffall-Runoff Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shuster, W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study long-term rainfall runoff records for two agricultural catchments (ca. 0.5 ha) in the USDA - Agricultural Research Service North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (Coshocton, OH) network were used to address the inter-event and inter-catchment variability of field-scale runoff processes. Through analyses of flood frequency and flow duration, the adjacent fallowed watersheds (WS106 and WS121) were found to be similar in terms of annual flood peaks, but less so in terms of the distribution of their discharge rates. Further investigation was focused on event-scale variations of runoff response and whether these variations can be effectively captured by rainfall-runoff models, which included: a) TR-20 (a lumped model); b) EPA-SWMM (a semi-distributed model); and c) GSSHA (a grid-based, fully distributed model). Each model was used to simulate 41 selected runoff episodes recorded in each of the two catchments, and subsequently calibrated to yield parameter values that maximize the correlation between the simulated and observed runoff peaks. Our results indicate that, despite calibration, the hydrographs derived from all models deviated considerably from actual observations, and on the basis of inter-event fluctuations, which furthermore lacked a conspicuous dependence on the magnitude of runoff peaks. Our findings suggest that, in the absence of information on rainfall distribution and soil moisture, distributed models may not be superior to lumped ones in forecasting runoff responses of field scale catchments; and the correspondence between runoff mechanisms and model representations needs to be better understood and accounted for in order to limit the uncertainties of model predictions.

  15. ANN modeling for flood prediction in the upstream Eure's catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroubi, Ouissem; masson, Eric; Blanpain, Olivier; Lallahem, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall-Runoff relationship at basin scale is strongly depending on the catchment complexity including multi-scale interactions. In extreme events cases (i.e. floods and droughts) this relationship is even more complex and differs from average hydrological conditions making extreme runoff prediction very difficult to achieve. However, flood warning, flood prevention and flood mitigation rely on the possibility to predict both flood peak runoff and lag time. This point is crucial for decision making and flood warning to prevent populations and economical stakes to be damaged by extreme hydrological events. Since 2003 in France, a dedicated state service is in charge of producing flood warning from national level (i.e. SCHAPI) to regional level (i.e. SPC). This flood warning service is combining national weather forecast agency (i.e. Meteo France) together with a fully automated realtime hydrological network (i.e. Rainfall-Runoff) in order to produce a flood warning national map online and provide a set of hydro-meteorological data to the SPC in charge of flood prediction from regional to local scale. The SPC is in fact the flood service delivering hydrological prediction at operational level for decision making about flood alert for municipalities and first help services. Our research in collaboration with the SPC SACN (i.e. "Seine Aval et fleuves Côtiers Normands") is focused on the implementation of an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) for flood prediction in deferent key points of the Eure's catchment and main subcatchment. Our contribution will focus on the ANN model developed for Saint-Luperce gauging station in the upstream part of the Eure's catchment. Prediction of extreme runoff at Saint-Luperce station is of high importance for flood warning in the Eure's catchment because it gives a good indicator on the extreme status and the downstream propagation of a potential flood event. Despite a good runoff monitoring since 27 years Saint Luperce flood

  16. Space-time modelling of catchment scale drought characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallaksen, Lena M.; Hisdal, Hege; Lanen, Henny A. J. Van

    2009-09-01

    SummaryDrought may affect all components of the water cycle and covers commonly a large part of the catchment area. This paper examines drought propagation at the catchment scale using spatially aggregated drought characteristics and illustrates the importance of catchment processes in modifying the drought signal in both time and space. Analysis is conducted using monthly time series covering the period 1961-1997 for the Pang catchment, UK. The time series include observed rainfall and groundwater recharge, head and discharge simulated by physically-based soil water and groundwater models. Drought events derived separately for each unit area and variable are combined to yield catchment scale drought characteristics. The study reveals relatively large differences in the spatial and temporal characteristics of drought for the different variables. Meteorological droughts cover frequently the whole catchment; and they are more numerous and last for a short time (1-2 months). In comparison, droughts in recharge and hydraulic head cover typically a smaller area and last longer (4-5 months). Hydraulic head and groundwater discharge exhibit similar drought characteristics, which can be expected in a groundwater fed catchment. Deficit volume is considered a robust measure of the severity of a drought event over the catchment area for all variables; whereas, duration is less sensitive, particular for rainfall. Spatial variability in drought characteristics for groundwater recharge, head and discharge are primarily controlled by catchment properties. It is recommended not to use drought area separately as a measure of drought severity at the catchment scale, rather it should be used in combination with other drought characteristics like duration and deficit volume.

  17. Energy versus Water balance in a small agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Martine; Hogan, Patrick; Foken, Thomas; Blöschl, Günter

    2013-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important process between vegetation, soil and the atmosphere and also the link between the surface energy balance and water balance. In the64 ha. HOAL experimental catchment at Petzenkirchen all the parameters of both the water and energy balance are measured. Discharge is measured along the small stream at all the incoming tributaries(springs, drainages and small tributaries) and at the catchment outlet. Throughout the catchment four precipitation scales are installed. Groundwater levels are measured in a transect perpendicular to the stream, which will give an indication of the storage change in the catchment. In the middle of the catchment a fully equipped Eddy-Flux station with radiation balance and soil heat flux measurement devices and a surface layer scintillometer are present in the catchment. This unique measurement setup enables us to compare the measured ET from the Eddy-Flux station with the residual of the water balance for the summer of 2012. Because the catchment and therefore the footprint of the Eddy-Flux measurements is very heterogeneous, the influence of the wind direction on the energy balance closure will also be investigated. By comparing the measured ET with the calculated ET from the water balance an estimate can be made of how representative the footprint is for the entire catchment. The surface layer scintillometer and the Eddy-Flux station both measure sensible heat flux and the latent heat flux can also be calculated from the scintillometer data. Therefore both sets of turbulent fluxes can be compared to give insight into the differences between both measurement devices. In addition more insight on the influence of the different shapes of both footprints(drop like from the Eddy-Flux station and oval for the scintillometer)in different wind directions can be gained. This study focuses on integrating measured data from different measurement stations in our catchment and is the first step in a broader

  18. Understanding hydrologic variability across Europe through catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, Anna; Arheimer, Berit; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    This study contributes to better understanding the physical controls on spatial patterns of pan-European flow signatures - taking advantage of large open datasets for catchment classification and comparative hydrology. Similarities in 16 flow signatures and 35 catchment descriptors were explored for 35 215 catchments and 1366 river gauges across Europe. Correlation analyses and stepwise regressions were used to identify the best explanatory variables for each signature. Catchments were clustered and analyzed for similarities in flow signature values, physiography and the combination of the two. We found the following. (i) A 15 to 33 % (depending on the classification used) improvement in regression model skills when combined with catchment classification versus simply using all catchments at once. (ii) Twelve out of 16 flow signatures were mainly controlled by climatic characteristics, especially those related to average and high flows. For the baseflow index, geology was more important and topography was the main control for the flashiness of flow. For most of the flow signatures, the second most important descriptor is generally land cover (mean flow, high flows, runoff coefficient, ET, variability of reversals). (iii) Using a classification and regression tree (CART), we further show that Europe can be divided into 10 classes with both similar flow signatures and physiography. The most dominant separation found was between energy-limited and moisture-limited catchments. The CART analyses also separated different explanatory variables for the same class of catchments. For example, the damped peak response for one class was explained by the presence of large water bodies for some catchments, while large flatland areas explained it for other catchments in the same class. In conclusion, we find that this type of comparative hydrology is a helpful tool for understanding hydrological variability, but is constrained by unknown human impacts on the water cycle and by

  19. Suspended sediment fluxes in the Humber catchment, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wass, Paul D.; Leeks, Graham J. L.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive sediment monitoring network was established within the LOIS programme, involving 10 of the main tributaries of the River Humber (UK). Its primary purpose was to measure the flux of suspended sediment to the estuary. A turbidity monitoring system was developed to provide a continuous record of suspended sediment concentration in the rivers, from which the fluxes were calculated. Linear relationships were established between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity (with slopes varying from 0·89 to 1·69) to enable the conversion of nephelometric turbidity [NTU] to suspended sediment concentration [mg l-1]. Potential uncertainties were identified and quantified. The suspended sediment flux to the Humber (November 1994-October 1997) was calculated to be 699 861 t, equivalent to a yield of 15 t km-2 yr-1. Large temporal and spatial variations in the flux were measured during the monitoring period, in response to factors such as climate, land use, catchment scale, deposition and reservoir trapment. The particle size composition of the suspended sediment was measured and found to vary little, except at very high discharges, when it coarsened. The organic content of the sediment was found to be directly related to the discharge of sewage effluent to the rivers.

  20. Towards catchment classification in data-scarce regions

    DOE PAGES

    Auerbach, Daniel A.; Buchanan, Brian P.; Alexiades, Alex V.; ...

    2016-01-29

    Assessing spatial variation in hydrologic processes can help to inform freshwater management and advance ecological understanding, yet many areas lack sufficient flow records on which to base classifications. Seeking to address this challenge, we apply concepts developed in data-rich settings to public, global data in order to demonstrate a broadly replicable approach to characterizing hydrologic variation. The proposed approach groups the basins associated with reaches in a river network according to key environmental drivers of hydrologic conditions. This initial study examines Colorado (USA), where long-term streamflow records permit comparison to previously distinguished flow regime types, and the Republic of Ecuador,more » where data limitations preclude such analysis. The flow regime types assigned to gages in Colorado corresponded reasonably well to the classes distinguished from environmental features. The divisions in Ecuador reflected major known biophysical gradients while also providing a higher resolution supplement to an existing depiction of freshwater ecoregions. Although freshwater policy and management decisions occur amidst uncertainty and imperfect knowledge, this classification framework offers a rigorous and transferrable means to distinguish catchments in data-scarce regions. The maps and attributes of the resulting ecohydrologic classes offer a departure point for additional study and data collection programs such as the placement of stations in under-monitored classes, and the divisions may serve as a preliminary template with which to structure conservation efforts such as environmental flow assessments.« less

  1. Towards catchment classification in data-scarce regions

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Daniel A.; Buchanan, Brian P.; Alexiades, Alex V.; Anderson, Elizabeth P.; Encalada, Andrea C.; Larson, Erin I.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Poe, Gregory L.; Walter, M. Todd; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2016-01-29

    Assessing spatial variation in hydrologic processes can help to inform freshwater management and advance ecological understanding, yet many areas lack sufficient flow records on which to base classifications. Seeking to address this challenge, we apply concepts developed in data-rich settings to public, global data in order to demonstrate a broadly replicable approach to characterizing hydrologic variation. The proposed approach groups the basins associated with reaches in a river network according to key environmental drivers of hydrologic conditions. This initial study examines Colorado (USA), where long-term streamflow records permit comparison to previously distinguished flow regime types, and the Republic of Ecuador, where data limitations preclude such analysis. The flow regime types assigned to gages in Colorado corresponded reasonably well to the classes distinguished from environmental features. The divisions in Ecuador reflected major known biophysical gradients while also providing a higher resolution supplement to an existing depiction of freshwater ecoregions. Although freshwater policy and management decisions occur amidst uncertainty and imperfect knowledge, this classification framework offers a rigorous and transferrable means to distinguish catchments in data-scarce regions. The maps and attributes of the resulting ecohydrologic classes offer a departure point for additional study and data collection programs such as the placement of stations in under-monitored classes, and the divisions may serve as a preliminary template with which to structure conservation efforts such as environmental flow assessments.

  2. Merging perspectives in the catchment sciences: the US-Japan Joint Seminar on catchment hydrology and forest biogeochemistry

    Treesearch

    Kevin J. McGuire; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Nobuhito Ohte; Emily M. Elliott; Takashi Gomi; Mark B. Green; Brian L. McGlynn; Naoko. Tokuchi

    2014-01-01

    Japan has strong research programmes in the catchment sciences that overlap with interests in the US catchment science community, particularly in experimental and field-based research. Historically, however, there has been limited interaction between these two hydrologic science communities because of differences in language, culture, and research approaches. These...

  3. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater quality for several

  4. Catchment tomography - An approach for spatial parameter estimation in catchment hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Dorina; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Kollet, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Though forecast accuracy of hydrological models has improved in the last decades due to the development of more powerful and distributed models, uncertainties in forcings and model parameters are still challenging issues limiting the forecast reliability. As the number of unknown model parameters is generally large for distributed models, batch calibration methods usually lead to different parameter sets resulting in the same model accuracy. Catchment tomography presents an approach to reduce this non-uniqueness problem in hydrological parameter estimation by applying a moving transmitter-receiver concept on a catchment. Radar based precipitation fields serve as the transmitters and stream water gauge observations, the receivers, are sequentially assimilated into the model. The integrated stream gauge signals are resolved by a joint state-parameter update with the Ensemble Kalman Filter. The uncertain parameters are continuously constrained by sequentially integrating new information. Forward simulations are performed with the variably saturated subsurface and overland flow model ParFlow, which has been coupled to the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (PDAF). In a first step in developing the method, catchment tomography was applied in a synthetic study of a simplified two dimensional catchment with pure overland flow (no subsurface flow) to estimate the spatially distributed Manning's roughness coefficient. The roughness coefficient was distributed in two and four zones and was updated applying different real radar precipitation time series and different initial parameter distributions. The parameters were successfully estimated with only 64 realizations over a simulation period of 30 days with hourly state and parameter updates. The error in the ensemble mean estimated parameters was reduced from up to 500% to less than 4% for all zones of both scenarios, independent from the initial ensemble mean value, if an appropriate initial ensemble spread was applied

  5. Transport of a nematicide in surface and ground waters in a farmed tropical catchment with volcanic substratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, J.-B.; Cattan, P.; Voltz, M.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    Assessment of water-pollution risks in agricultural regions requires studying pesticide transport processes in soil and water compartments at the catchment scale. In tropical regions, banana (Musa spp.) plantations are located in zones with abundant rainfalls and soils with high infiltration rates, which lead to washout and leaching of soil-applied pesticides, causing severe diffuse pollution of water resources. The aim of this paper is to determine how the nematicide cadusafos [S,S-di-sec-butyl O-ethyl phosphorodithioate], used in banana plantations, contaminates water and soils at the two scales of subcatchment and catchment. The study site was a small banana-growing catchment on the tropical volcanic island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean (FWI). The catchment is located in pedoclimatic conditions where rainfall is abundant (> 4000 mm/year), and soil permeable (saturated hydraulic conductivity of Andosol Ks > 30 mm/h). Two campaigns of nematicide application were conducted, one in 2003 over 40% of the catchment and one in 2006 over 12%. For 100 days after application, we monitored the surface water and groundwater flows and the cadusafos concentrations in the soil and in surface and ground waters in a 2400 m² subcatchment and a 17.8 ha catchment. The results show that at the subcatchment scale the high retention in the A horizon of the soil limited the transport of cadusafos by runoff, whereas the lower retention of the molecule in the B horizon favoured percolation towards the shallow groundwater. The contamination levels of surface water, as well as shallow and deep groundwaters, reflected the geological structure of the Féfé catchment: i.e. a shallow aquifer in the most recent volcanic deposits that is rapidly exposed to pollution and a deeper aquifer that is relatively protected from the pollution coming from the treated fields. Comparing the losses of cadusafos at the subcatchment and at the catchment scales revealed that the nematicide re-infiltrated in

  6. Pollution from urban development and setback outfalls as a catchment management measure for river water quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Deonie; Haynes, Heather; Arthur, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Urban development causes an increase in fine sediment and heavy metal stormwater pollution. Pollution load estimation theorises that stormwater pollutant load and type are strongly, directly influenced by contributing catchment land use. The research presented investigates the validity of these assumptions using an extensive novel field data set of 53 catchments. This research has investigated the relationships between land use and pollutant concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Ca, Ba, Sn, Mn) in urban stormwater outfall sediments. Cartographic and aerial photography data have been utilised to delineate the surface and subsurface contributing catchment land use. A zoned sub-catchment approach to catchment characterisation of stormwater pollutant concentration has been defined and tested. This method effectively describes the specific land use influence on pollutant concentrations at the stormwater outfall, showing strong dependency with road length, brake points, impervious area and open space. Road networks and open space are found to influence land use, and thus stormwater pollution, closer to stormwater outfall/receiving waterbody suggesting storage, treatment, assimilation, loss or dilution of the land use influence further away from stormwater outfall. An empirical description has been proposed with which to predict outfall pollutant contributions to the receiving urban waterbody based on catchment land use information. With the definition and quantification of contributing catchment specific fine sediment and urban heavy metal pollutants, the influence of urban stormwater outfall management on the receiving watercourse has been considered. The locations of stormwater outfalls, and their proximity to the receiving waterway, are known as key water quality and river health influences. Water quality benefits from the implementation of stormwater outfalls set back from the receiving waterway banks have been investigated using the catchment case study. Setback outfalls

  7. Testing an approach combining water balance and recession curve analysis to partition catchment storage in hydrological connected and disconnected storage compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, Gwenael; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    The questions of where and how much water is stored in the critical zone are recognized as a key question in hydrological processes research. Answering these questions is particularly challenging at catchment scale, due to the physiographic complexity on the one hand, and related challenges inherent to the required sensor networks on the other hand. From this perspective, we used a combined lumped approach that allows differentiating between two types of catchment storage: a hydrological connected storage (i.e. the storage that contributes to streamflow dynamic) and a hydrological disconnected storage (i.e. the remaining storage balance that describes storage dynamics in the vadose zone). Our approach combined water balance calculation and a recession curve analysis. The water balance calculation describes the total water stored in the catchment, while the recession curve analysis describes the hydrological connected storage. The disconnected storage was derived by subtracting the connected storage from total storage. We applied our combined approach in the forested Weierbach headwater catchment in Luxembourg (0.45 km2). Storage estimates were compared to measurements of a sensor network. Connected storage dynamics were compared to records from wells, whereas disconnected storage was compared to a dense soil moisture monitoring network. Preliminary results gave differences for both methods in their storage representations, ultimately impacting the results of the combined approach. In such circumstances, our approach could not be used to generate time series of disconnected storage. However, our combined approach seemed to be a good way to estimate storage ranges and to define where the water is stored in catchment following their connected or disconnected parts. For example, the connected and disconnected storage values were estimated at 100 mm and 150 mm for the Weierbach catchment, respectively. Furthermore, the combined approach gave information on how the

  8. Quantifying catchment water balances and their uncertainties by expert elicitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebok, Eva; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Warmink, Jord J.; Stisen, Simon; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    The increasing demand on water resources necessitates a more responsible and sustainable water management requiring a thorough understanding of hydrological processes both on small scale and on catchment scale. On catchment scale, the characterization of hydrological processes is often carried out by calculating a water balance based on the principle of mass conservation in hydrological fluxes. Assuming a perfect water balance closure and estimating one of these fluxes as a residual of the water balance is a common practice although this estimate will contain uncertainties related to uncertainties in the other components. Water balance closure on the catchment scale is also an issue in Denmark, thus, it was one of the research objectives of the HOBE hydrological observatory, that has been collecting data in the Skjern river catchment since 2008. Water balance components in the 1050 km2 Ahlergaarde catchment and the nested 120 km2 Holtum catchment, located in the glacial outwash plan of the Skjern catchment, were estimated using a multitude of methods. As the collected data enables the complex assessment of uncertainty of both the individual water balance components and catchment-scale water balances, the expert elicitation approach was chosen to integrate the results of the hydrological observatory. This approach relies on the subjective opinion of experts whose available knowledge and experience about the subject allows to integrate complex information from multiple sources. In this study 35 experts were involved in a multi-step elicitation process with the aim of (1) eliciting average annual values of water balance components for two nested catchments and quantifying the contribution of different sources of uncertainties to the total uncertainty in these average annual estimates; (2) calculating water balances for two catchments by reaching consensus among experts interacting in form of group discussions. To address the complex problem of water balance closure

  9. A distributed continuous simulation model to identify critical source areas of phosphorus at the catchment scale: model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B. K.; Dunn, S. M.; Ferrier, R. C.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents CAMEL (Chemicals from Agricultural Management and Erosion Losses), a distributed continuous simulation model to simulate daily phosphorus (P) transformations and transport at the catchment scale. CAMEL is a process-oriented mass-balance model that is based on both analytical and numerical approaches. In the model, a catchment is represented using a network of square grid cells each of which is comprised of various storages of water, sediment and P. Most of hydrological processes, soil erosion, sediment transport, and P transformations and transport are described using process-based equations. The P transformations between five P storages (active organic, stable organic, labile, active inorganic, and stable organic) are described using first-order kinetic equations. A comprehensive cascade routing scheme is used to simulate P retention and transport along the channel system. Dissolved P is also transported by groundwater flows, described using a two-dimensional Boussinesq equation. CAMEL simulates both surface and subsurface processes explicitly and therefore is suitable for catchment-scale applications. The distributed, process-oriented structure of CAMEL enables the model to be used for identifying critical source areas of P at the catchment-scale. CAMEL is also computationally efficient, allowing for long-term scale applications.

  10. Model‐based analysis of the influence of catchment properties on hydrologic partitioning across five mountain headwater subcatchments

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Thorsten; McGlynn, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ungauged headwater basins are an abundant part of the river network, but dominant influences on headwater hydrologic response remain difficult to predict. To address this gap, we investigated the ability of a physically based watershed model (the Distributed Hydrology‐Soil‐Vegetation Model) to represent controls on metrics of hydrologic partitioning across five adjacent headwater subcatchments. The five study subcatchments, located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest in central Montana, have similar climate but variable topography and vegetation distribution. This facilitated a comparative hydrology approach to interpret how parameters that influence partitioning, detected via global sensitivity analysis, differ across catchments. Model parameters were constrained a priori using existing regional information and expert knowledge. Influential parameters were compared to perceptions of catchment functioning and its variability across subcatchments. Despite between‐catchment differences in topography and vegetation, hydrologic partitioning across all metrics and all subcatchments was sensitive to a similar subset of snow, vegetation, and soil parameters. Results also highlighted one subcatchment with low certainty in parameter sensitivity, indicating that the model poorly represented some complexities in this subcatchment likely because an important process is missing or poorly characterized in the mechanistic model. For use in other basins, this method can assess parameter sensitivities as a function of the specific ungauged system to which it is applied. Overall, this approach can be employed to identify dominant modeled controls on catchment response and their agreement with system understanding. PMID:27642197

  11. Model-based analysis of the influence of catchment properties on hydrologic partitioning across five mountain headwater subcatchments.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Christa; Wagener, Thorsten; McGlynn, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ungauged headwater basins are an abundant part of the river network, but dominant influences on headwater hydrologic response remain difficult to predict. To address this gap, we investigated the ability of a physically based watershed model (the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model) to represent controls on metrics of hydrologic partitioning across five adjacent headwater subcatchments. The five study subcatchments, located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest in central Montana, have similar climate but variable topography and vegetation distribution. This facilitated a comparative hydrology approach to interpret how parameters that influence partitioning, detected via global sensitivity analysis, differ across catchments. Model parameters were constrained a priori using existing regional information and expert knowledge. Influential parameters were compared to perceptions of catchment functioning and its variability across subcatchments. Despite between-catchment differences in topography and vegetation, hydrologic partitioning across all metrics and all subcatchments was sensitive to a similar subset of snow, vegetation, and soil parameters. Results also highlighted one subcatchment with low certainty in parameter sensitivity, indicating that the model poorly represented some complexities in this subcatchment likely because an important process is missing or poorly characterized in the mechanistic model. For use in other basins, this method can assess parameter sensitivities as a function of the specific ungauged system to which it is applied. Overall, this approach can be employed to identify dominant modeled controls on catchment response and their agreement with system understanding.

  12. Exploring the added value of machine learning methods in predicting flow duration curves: a comparative analysis for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentel, E.; Dogulu, N.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding catchment hydrology is a fundamental concern for hydrologists and water resources planners. In this context, given the increasing demand for streamflow information at sparsely gauged or ungauged catchments, there has been great interest in estimating flow duration curve (FDC) due to its many practical applications. Statistical methods have been widely used for the modelling of FDCs at ungauged sites. These methods usually rely on estimation of flow quantiles, or quantitative characteristics of the FDCs representing their shape such as slope and parameters of statistical distribution, often in the context of regionalization. However, there are limited studies using methods of machine learning. Potential of various machine learning approaches for estimating FDCs is yet to be explored although these methods have successfully and extensively applied to solve various other water resources management and hydrological problems. This study addresses this gap by presenting a comparative performance evaluation of the methods: i) Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), ii) Regression Tree (RT), iii) Artificial Neural Network (ANN), iv) Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). Comparison of these methods is done for FDCs of the Western Black Sea catchment in Turkey modelled by relating flow quantiles to a number of variables representing catchment and climate characteristics. Accuracy of predicted FDCs is assessed by three different measures: the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and the Percent Bias (PBIAS).

  13. Improving Precipitation Forecast for Canadian Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. K.; Shrestha, D. L.; Walford, C.; Leong, D. N. S.; Friesenhan, E.; Campbell, D.; Rasmussen, P. F.

    2016-12-01

    In Canada, floods occur frequently along large river systems, causing devastation to lives and infrastructure. Flooding in Canada is often caused by heavy rainfall during the snowmelt period. The flood forecast centres are responsible for providing advanced flood warnings and rely heavily on forecasted precipitation from numerical weather prediction (NWP) model outputs produced by Environment Canada and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The uncertainties in NWP model output are enhanced by physiography and orographic effects over diverse landscapes, particularly in the western catchments of Canada. Therefore, post-processing of NWP model output is necessary to obtain better forecasts of rainfall amount, location, timing, and intensity; and to reliably quantify forecast uncertainty. The Rainfall Post Processing (RPP) approach (Robertson et al., 2013) has been successfully applied recently to remove rainfall forecast bias and quantify forecast uncertainty from NWP models in Australian catchments (Shrestha et al., 2015). In principle, the RPP method can be applied to other regions (e.g. cold regions) but has not been tested yet. In this study we will evaluate the performance of the RPP for improving the precipitation forecast in southern catchments in Alberta and British Columbia. The RPP relates raw quantitative precipitation forecasts and observed precipitation using a Bayesian joint probability (BJP) modeling approach, followed by the Schaake shuffle. Precipitation forecasts were analysed from two NWP models, Global Ensemble Forecasting System and Global Deterministic Prediction System. Observed data was collected from the provincial river forecast centres. The study period from Jan 2012 to Dec 2015 covered major flood events in Calgary, Alberta, and floods in coastal watersheds in British Columbia. Rain-gauge observations and forecast grid points were interpolated to obtain an aerial average precipitation in subareas to force the hydrological

  14. Comparison of drought occurrence in selected Slovak and Czech catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Porubska, Diana; Hanel, Martin; Horacek, Stanislav; Martinkova, Marta; Vizina, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The presented study is focused on the analysis and comparison of hydrological drought occurrence, development and duration in six small to middle sized catchments in the Czech Republic (CZ) and Slovakia. The main questions to be answered are: (1) are there correlations between the physical conditions in the catchments and drought occurrence, and (2) does the spatial trend of drought occurrence exist. The Žitava catchment is located in the central western part of Slovakia having runoff dominated by rainfall with the contribution of snow melting during the spring period. The Belá River catchment is located on the contact of Západné and Vysoké Tatry Mts. in the north of Slovakia. The runoff is snow to snow-rain combined type. The Ľupčianka catchment is located on the northern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts. in the northern part of the central Slovakia. The runoff regime is snow-rain combined in the upper part of the catchment, and of rain-snow type in the rest of catchment. The Rakovnický potok brook (CZ) has its spring in Rakovnická pahorkatina hilly land. Runoff is dominated by rainfall, quite heavily influenced by water uptakes in the catchment. The Teplá River (CZ) originates in peat meadows in the western part of the Czech Republic. Runoff is dominated by rainfall. The Metuje catchment (CZ) is formed by Adršsbach-Teplické stěny Upland. The headwater part is typical by deeply incest valleys, table mountains and pseudokarst caves. The discharge is fed dominantly by groundwater. The streamflow drought was characterized using discharge data, the groundwater drought using the base flow values. The local minimum method was used for base flow separation. The threshold level method (Q80, BF80) and the sequent peak algorithm were used for calculation of drought duration in discharge and base flow time series. The data of the same three decades of the common period (1971 - 1980, 1981 - 1990 and 1991 - 2000) were used. The resulting base flow values along with

  15. Inter-comparison of experimental catchment data and hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; Ibbitt, Richard; Srinivasan, M. S.; Shankar, Ude

    2017-07-01

    Hydrological models account for the storage, flow of water and water balance in a catchment, including exchanges of water and energy with the ground, atmosphere and oceans. Because of the need to simplify hydrological models, parameters are often included to help with modelling hydrological processes. Generally the parameters of lumped, semi or distributed hydrological models depend on the values estimated at a gauged location, generally at outlet of the catchment (mostly using discharge). In this approach it is hard to judge how well a model represents internal catchment processes of the hydrological cycle as well as also ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of the catchment. The purpose of the paper is to assess, and potentially improve, the ability of a physically-based semi-distributed hydrological model, TopNet, using a spatially and temporally detailed set of field measurements of catchment responses to diverse weather conditions. The TopNet rainfall-runoff model was applied to the Waipara catchment located in the South Island of New Zealand. Observations from field experiments were compared with the simulation results of uncalibrated TopNet model. The total amount of simulated runoff showed reasonable agreement with observations. However, the model overestimated baseflow and underestimated surface flow. The results show that soil moisture variation within the catchment is well represented by the model. However, comparison of the observed water balance with model results show that there is a deficiency in the calculation of evapotranspiration.

  16. Flow path and travel time dynamics in a lowland catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Ype; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of time it takes water from the moment of precipitation to reach the catchment outlet is widely used as a characteristic for catchment flow path contributions, catchment vulnerability to pollution spreading and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, this distribution tends to vary in time driven by variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration. Catchment scale mixing of water controls how dynamics in rainfall and evapotranspiration are translated into dynamics of travel time distributions. In this presentation we use the concept of StorAge selection (SAS) functions, that quantify catchment scale mixing of water, to describe chloride and nitrate flow. We will show how SAS functions relate to the topography and subsurface and how they are effective in describing nitrate and chloride transport. The presented analyses will combine unique datasets of high-frequency discharge and water quality concentrations with conceptual models of water flow and solute transport. Remarkable findings are the large contrasts in travel times between lowland and sloping catchments and the strong relationship between evapotranspiration and stream water nutrient concentration dynamics.

  17. Pesticide uses and transfers in urbanised catchments.

    PubMed

    Blanchoud, Hélène; Farrugia, Frédéric; Mouchel, Jean Marie

    2004-05-01

    An investigation on herbicide uses in two semi-urban catchments was performed simultaneously with sampling campaigns at six stations inside both watersheds from April to July 1998. Urban uses of herbicides exceeded agricultural uses, and transfer coefficients were also higher in urban areas. Therefore, the most used product in urban areas (diuron) was by far the most contaminating product. Householders accounted for 30% of all uses. The highest measured diuron concentration in water surface was 8.7 microg l(-1) due to its use on impervious surfaces. Compared to EEC standards for drinking water production (0.1 microg l(-1)), it is clear that suburban uses of herbicides may severely endanger drinking water production from river water.

  18. Assessing representative soil moisture at watershed scale of Maqu catchment using spatio-temporal statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, H. A.; Rientjes, T. H. M.; Verhoef, W.

    2012-04-01

    In this study the temporal stability concept by Vachaud et al. (1985) is selected to evaluate a soil moisture measuring network in the Maqu catchment (3200 km2) in the north eastern part of the Tibetan plateau. The network serves for validation of coarse scale (25-50 km) satellite soil moisture products and comprises 20 stations with probes installed at depths of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 cm. Besides identifying the Representative Mean Soil Moisture (RMSM) station for each respective probe depth, we applied the concept to a time series of satellite based moisture products from the Advance Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) to evaluate if a RMSM pixel can be identified from the pixels that overlay the catchment. Analysis in this study serve to evaluate how well the satellite based moisture estimates match to observation at the RMSM stations for respective depths. We aim to evaluate if the RMSM can be estimated by the satellite product so to broaden the procedure to validate satellite images. We used moisture data for the year 2009 for which data is available at 15 minutes interval using ECH2O EC-TM probes. For each probe depth a Mean Relative Difference (MRD) plot is created to identify stations that are characterized by mean, wet and dry moisture conditions. The spearman non-parametric test and pearson's correlation coefficient test are used to analyze the temporal persistence of the ranks of the measuring stations. The analysis is applied to each probe depth to evaluate the effect of the measuring depth on determining the catchment RMSM. Similar analysis is carried out on the satellite soil moisture observations that cover a full hydrological year to identify a RMSM pixel. The result of the analysis on the network showed that the station that indicates RMSM changes for each probe depth and thus a single station that indicates the catchment RMSM cannot be identified. Results on identifying a RMSM pixel shows that such pixel can be identified, however in our case, a

  19. Assessing the role of urban developments on storm runoff response through multi-scale catchment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Owen, Gareth; Geris, Josie; Soulsby, Chris; Quinn, Paul

    2015-04-01

    patterns in the timing and magnitude of the contributions of the different land use zones and their nested integrated runoff response at increasing scales. These can be clearly linked to variations in antecedent conditions and precipitation patterns. For low antecedent flow conditions, the main flood peak is dominated by urban origins (faster responding and larger in relative magnitude); for high antecedent flow conditions, rural (and peri-urban) sources are most dominant. A third type of response involves mixed events, where both rural and urban contributions interact and reinforce the peak flow response. Our analyses showed that the effectiveness of the GIs varied substantially between the different events, suggesting that their design could be improved by introducing variable drainage rates and strategic placements to allow for interactions with the stream network. However, more information is needed on the spatio-temporal variability in water sources, flow pathways and residence times. This is of particular importance to also assess other multiple benefits of GIs, including the impacts on water quality. These challenges are currently addressed in two new case study catchment in the North East of Scotland (10km2) which are undergoing major land use change from rural to urban. Here, integrated tracer and hydrometric data are being collected to characterise the integrated impacts of urbanisation and GIs on flow pathways (nature and length) and associated water quality.

  20. Estimation of Catchment Transit Time in Fuji River Basin by using an improved Tank model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenchao, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Wakiyama, Y.; Wang, P.

    2013-12-01

    As an important parameter that reflects the characteristics of catchments, the catchment transit time (CTT) has been given much more widely attentions especially in recent years. The CTT is defined as the time water spends travelling through a catchment to the stream network [1], and it describes how catchments retain and release water and solutes and thus control geochemical and biogeochemical cycling and contamination persistence [2]. The objectives of the present study are to develop a new approach for estimating CTT without prior information on such TTD functions and to apply it to the Fuji River basin in the Central Japan Alps Region. In this study, an improved Tank model was used to compute mean CTT and TTD functions simultaneously. It involved water fluxes and isotope mass balance. Water storage capacity in the catchment, which strongly affects CTT, is reflected in isotope mass balance more sensitively than in water fluxes. A model calibrated with observed discharge and isotope data is used for virtual age tracer computation to estimate CTT. This model does not only consider the hydrological data and physical process of the research area but also reflects the actual TTD with considering the geological condition, land use and the other catchment-hydrological conditions. For the calibration of the model, we used river discharge record obtained by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation, and are collecting isotope data of precipitation and river waters monthly or semi-weekly. Three sub-catchments (SC1~SC3) in the Fuji River basin was selected to test the model with five layers: the surface layer, upper-soil layer, lower-soil layer, groundwater aquifer layer and bedrock layer (Layer 1- Layer 5). The evaluation of the model output was assessed using Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean square error-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR), and percent bias (PBIAS). Using long time-series of discharge records for calibration, the simulated

  1. Biogeochemical and Hydrological Heterogeneity and Emergent Archetypical Catchment Response Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    What can stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals tell us about interactions among spatially heterogeneous hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment-scale? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with both stationary and nonstationary hydroclimatic drivers affect observed archetypes of concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These response patterns are the spatially integrated expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solutes exported from managed catchments, and can provide insight into likely ecological consequences of receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the spatial correlation between the structure of flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of archetypical C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We applied a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the type and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each archetype C-Q pattern can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. We compared observed multidecadal data to

  2. Hydroclimatic change disparity of Peruvian Pacific drainage catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Pedro; Bourrel, Luc; Labat, David; Frappart, Frédéric; Ruelland, Denis; Lavado, Waldo; Dewitte, Boris; Felipe, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    Peruvian Pacific drainage catchments only benefit from 2% of the total national available freshwater while they concentrate almost 50% of the population of the country. This situation is likely to lead a severe water scarcity and also constitutes an obstacle to economic development. Catchment runoff fluctuations in response to climate variability and/or human activities can be reflected in extreme events, representing a serious concern (like floods, erosion, droughts) in the study area. To document this crucial issue for Peru, we present here an insightful analysis of the water quantity resource variability of this region, exploring the links between this variability and climate and/or anthropogenic pressure. We first present a detailed analysis of the hydroclimatologic variability at annual timescale and at basin scale over the 1970-2008 period. In addition to corroborating the influence of extreme El Niño events over precipitation and runoff in northern catchments, a mean warming of 0.2 °C per decade over all catchments was found. Also, higher values of temperature and potential and actual evapotranspiration were found over northern latitudes. We chose to apply the Budyko-Zhang framework that characterizes the water cycle as a function of climate only, allowing the identification of catchments with significant climatic and anthropogenic influence on water balance. The Budyko-Zhang methodology revealed that 11 out of 26 initial catchments are characterized by low water balance disparity related to minor climatic and anthropogenic influence. These 11 catchments were suitable for identifying catchments with contrasting change in their hydroclimatic behavior using the Budyko trajectories. Our analysis further reveals that six hydrological catchment responses can be characterized by high sensitivity to climate variability and land use changes.

  3. Catchments of general practice in different countries– a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area. This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  4. Observational techniques for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in catchment scale flood impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Wilkinson, Mark; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    There is an increase in the use of Natural Flood Management (NFM) schemes to tackle excessive runoff in rural catchments, but direct evidence of their functioning during extreme events is often lacking. With the availability of low cost sensors, a dense nested monitoring network can be established to provide near continuous optical and physical observations of hydrological processes. This paper will discuss findings for a number of catchments in the North of England where land use management and NFM have been implemented for flood risk reduction; and show how these observations have been used to inform both a hydraulic and a rainfall-runoff model. The value of observations in understanding how measures function is of fundamental importance and is becoming increasingly viable and affordable. Open source electronic platforms such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi are being used with cheap sensors to perform these tasks. For example, a level gauge has been developed for approximately €110 and cameras capable of capturing still or moving pictures are available for approximately €120; these are being used to better understand the behaviour of NFM features such as ponds and woody debris. There is potential for networks of these instruments to be configured and data collected through Wi-Fi or other wireless networks. The potential to expand informative networks of data that can constrain models is now possible. The functioning of small scale runoff attenuation features, such as offline ponds, has been demonstrated at the local scale. Specifically, through the measurement of both instream and in-pond water levels, it has been possible to calculate the impact of storing/attenuating flood flows on the adjacent river flow. This information has been encapsulated in a hydraulic model that allows the extrapolation of impacts to the larger catchment scale, contributing to understanding of the scalability of such features. Using a dense network of level gauges located along the main

  5. Water and chemical recharge in subsurface catchment: observations and consequences for modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-odoux, C.; Aquilina, L.; Faucheux, M.; Merot, P.; Molenat, J.; de Monteti, V.; Sebilo, M.; Rouxel, M.; Ruiz, L.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow groundwater that develops on hillslopes is the main compartment in headwater catchments for flow and solute transport to rivers. Although spatial and temporal variations in its chemical composition are reported in the literature, there is no coherent description of the way these variations are organized, nor is there an accepted conceptual model for the recharge mechanisms and flows in the groundwater involved. We instrumented an intensive farming and subsurface dominant catchment located in Oceanic Western Europe (France), included in AgrHyS catchments (for Agro-Hydro-SyStem) and a part of the French network of catchments for environmental research (SOERE RBV dedicated to the Critical Zone). It is strongly constrained by anthropogenic pressures (agriculture) and is characterized by a clear non-equilibrium status. A network of 42 nested piezometers was installed along a 200 m hillslope allowing water sampling in the permanent water table as well as in what we call the fluctuating zone, characterized by seasonal alternance of saturated and unsaturated conditions. Water composition was monitored at high frequency (weekly) over a 3-year period for major anion composition and over a one year period for detailed 15N, CFC, SF6 and other dissolved gases composition. The results demonstrated that (i) the anionic composition in water table fluctuation zone varied significantly compared to deeper portions of the aquifer on the hillslope, confirming that this layer constitutes a main compartment for the mixing of new recharge water and old groundwater, (ii) seasonally, the variations of 15N and CFC are much higher during the recharge period than during the recession period, confirming the preferential flow during early recharge events, iii) variations of nitrate 15N and O18 composition was suggesting any significant denitrification process in the fluctuating zone, confirming the dominance of the mixing processes in the fluctuating zone, iv) deeper parts of the aquifer

  6. Impact of spatial climate variability on catchment streamflow predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sopan; Wigington, Jim; Leibowitz, Scott; Sproles, Eric; Comeleo, Randy

    2014-05-01

    The ability of hydrological models to predict a catchment's streamflow response serves several important needs of our society, such as flood protection, irrigation demand, domestic water supply, and preservation of fish habitat. However, spatial variability of climate within a catchment can negatively affect streamflow predictions if it is not explicitly accounted for in hydrological models. In this study, we examined the changes in streamflow predictability when a hydrological model is run with spatially variable (distributed) meteorological inputs instead of spatially uniform (lumped) meteorological inputs. Both lumped and distributed versions of the EXP-HYDRO model were implemented at 41 meso-scale (500 - 5000 km2) catchments in the Pacific Northwest region of USA (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho). We used two complementary metrics of long-term spatial climate variability, moisture homogeneity index (IM) and temperature variability index (ITV), to analyse the performance improvement with distributed model. Results showed that the distributed model performed better than the lumped model in 38 catchments, and noticeably better (>10% improvement) in 13 catchments. Furthermore, spatial variability of moisture distribution alone was insufficient to explain the observed patterns of model performance improvement. For catchments with low moisture homogeneity (IM < 80%), IM was a better predictor of model performance improvement than ITV; whereas for catchments with high moisture homogeneity (IM > 80%), ITV was a better predictor of performance improvement than IM. Based on the results, we conclude that: (1) catchments that have low homogeneity of moisture distribution are the obvious candidates for using spatially distributed meteorological inputs, and (2) catchments with homogeneous moisture distribution benefit from spatially distributed meteorological inputs if those catchments have high spatial variability of precipitation phase (rain vs. snow). Our use of spatially

  7. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  8. The distribution of catchment coverage by stationary rainstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of wetted rainstorm area within a catchment is modeled as a Poisson arrival process in which each storm is composed of stationary, nonoverlapping, independent random cell clusters whose centers are Poisson-distributed in space and whose areas are fractals. The two Poisson parameters and hence the first two moments of the wetted fraction are derived in terms of catchment average characteristics of the (observable) station precipitation. The model is used to estimate spatial properties of tropical air mass thunderstorms on six tropical catchments in the Sudan.

  9. Components of the total water balance of an urban catchment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, V Grace; McMahon, Thomas A; Mein, Russell G

    2003-12-01

    A daily model was used to quantify the components of the total urban water balance of the Curtin catchment, Canberra, Australia. For this catchment, the mean annual rainfall was found to be three times greater than imported potable water, and the sum of the output from the separate stormwater and wastewater systems exceeded the input of imported potable water by some 50%. Seasonal and annual variations in climate exert a very strong influence over the relative magnitude of the water balance components; this needs to be accounted for when assessing the potential for utilizing stormwater and wastewater within an urban catchment.

  10. Understanding Hydrologic Variability across Europe through Catchment Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, Anna; Arheimer, Berit; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is based on data-driven approaches using data from many different archives to better understand drivers to hydrologic variability across the European continent. We explored similarities in 16 flow signatures and 35 catchment descriptors across entire Europe. A database of catchment descriptors and selected flow signatures was compiled for 35 215 catchments and 1366 river gauges across Europe. Correlation analyses and stepwise regressions were used to identify the best explanatory variables for each signature resulting in a total of 480 regression models to predict signatures for similar catchments. Catchments were clustered and analyzed for similarities in flow signature values, physiography (including climatology) and for the combination of the two. From the statistical analysis, we found: (i) about 400 statistically significant correlations between flow signatures and physiography; (ii) a 15 to 33% (depending on the classification used) improvement in regression model skills using catchment classification vs the full domain; and (iii) 12 out of 16 flow signatures to be mainly controlled by climatic characteristics, while topography was the main control for flashiness of flow and low flow magnitude, and geology for the flashiness of flow. Classifying catchments based on flow signatures or on physiographic characteristics led to very different spatial patterns, but a classification and regression tree (CART) allowed us to predict flow signatures-based classes according to catchment physiographic characteristics with an average percentage of 60% of correctly classified catchments in each class. As a result, we show that Europe can be divided into ten classes with both similar flow signatures and physiography. We noted the importance of separating energy-limited catchments from moisture-limited catchment to understand catchment behavior. For improved understanding, we interpreted characteristics in hydrographs, flow signatures, physiography and

  11. Susceptibility analysis for landslides in the Xiangxi catchment (Three Gorges Reservoir area / China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohn, J.; Ehret, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-04-01

    The Xiangxi River is a tributary of the Yangtze River. In 2009 the Three Gorges Reservoir will reach its final retention water elevation level (175 m asl). Parts of the Xiangxi valley will then flooded. Especially Jurassic sedimentary layers are predestined for intense landslides in this area. As a first step a landslide inventory map is produced. All slopes influenced directly by impoundment are mapped geotechnically in detail to assess the spatial distribution of the landslides and their shape. Furthermore, two sub-catchments in the wide-stretched catchment area of the Xiangxi River were chosen for intense investigation. All in all, about 200 km2will finally be mapped geotechnically in detail to provide data for continuative investigations. The investigation fields are divided into test and training areas for further analysis using the neural networks method. By this means the susceptibility for landslides in dependency of different features, like lithology, slope angle, exposition, distance to the river, etc will be analysed. In a second step the results of the neural network analysis will be the base of a more regional landslide susceptibility analysis for the whole catchment area of the Xiangxi River. The performance of the method will be tested by additional inspections in areas that have been found to have a high susceptibility for landslides. These works are part of the joint research project "Yangtze: land use change - erosion - landslides" financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Joint aim of this project is to produce a landslide and erosion risk map for the whole region and to analyse the land use change caused by the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam in this area.

  12. Influence of hydrological connectivity on water, carbon and thermal dynamics in peat-dominated catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Extended peatlands are characteristic of many upland catchments. Peaty soils in riparian zones are an important interface between subsurface, terrestrial and aquatic environments that can regulate hydrological and biogeochemical fluxes between the hillslope and stream. This buffering potential is spatially and temporally variable due to both horizontal and vertical subsurface heterogeneity within the riparian area and is linked to soil type, hydrology and biogeochemical processes. It is important to understand how this heterogeneity affects the connectivity between landscapes and the river network and how this interacts with variability in hydrology, stream water quality and ecosystem function. Here, we present high resolution monitoring of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) and spatially distributed water temperature data from a 3.2 km2 upland watershed in the NE Scottish Highlands. This data will be coupled to understand how temporal and spatial variation in the connectivity of the riparian peat wetlands and the stream network modulates stream water chemistry and its thermal fingerprint. This potential to regulate water quality is deeply rooted in the different hydrological flow paths and stores water takes prior to entering stream flow. Initial results indicate a seasonally varying link between runoff and DOC, with lower base flows generally having lowest concentrations. Over the course of high-flow events, concentrations are high but decrease rapidly as the soils are depleted of DOC. Replenishment by subsurface biological processes occurs at short time scales in summer. Stream water temperature profiles show distinct differences in drivers with varying flow conditions; temperatures during low flows suggest strong atmospheric controls whereas during high flows an increasing influx of groundwater is evident. Furthermore, the dissolved oxygen data are used in modelling the stream metabolism to assess the eco-hydrological response

  13. CNMM: a Catchment Environmental Model for Managing Water Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Mitigating agricultural diffuse pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is a complicated task due to tempo-spatial lags between the field practices and the watershed responses. Spatially-distributed modeling is essential to the implementation of cost-effective and best management practices (BMPs) to optimize land uses and nutrient applications as well as to project the impact of climate change on the watershed service functions. CNMM (the Catchment Nutrients Management Model) is a 3D spatially-distributed, grid-based and process-oriented biophysical model comprehensively developed to simulate energy balance, hydrology, plant/crop growth, biogeochemistry of life elements (e.g., C, N and P), waste treatment, waterway vegetation/purification, stream water quality and land management in agricultural watersheds as affected by land utilization strategies such as BMPs and by climate change. The CNMM is driven by a number of spatially-distributed data such as weather, topography (including DEM and shading), stream network, stream water, soil, vegetation and land management (including waste treatments), and runs at an hourly time step. It represents a catchment as a matrix of square uniformly-sized cells, where each cell is defined as a homogeneous hydrological response unit with all the hydrologically-significant parameters the same but varied at soil depths in fine intervals. Therefore, spatial variability is represented by allowing parameters to vary horizontally and vertically in space. A four-direction flux routing algorithm is applied to route water and nutrients across soils of cells governed by the gradients of either water head or elevation. A linear channel reservoir scheme is deployed to route water and nutrients in stream networks. The model is capable of computing CO2, CH4, NH3, NO, N2O and N2 emissions from soils and stream waters. The CNMM can serve as an idea modelling tool to investigate the overwhelming critical zone research at various catchment scales.

  14. Validation of SMAP soil moisture over a complex agricultural catchment in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, Isabella Maria; Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Strauss, Peter; Oismueller, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2017-04-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January 2015. After an irrecoverable failure of the radar, the remaining passive L-band radiometer is now providing soil moisture in the upper layer of the soil as well as freeze-thaw state every 2-3 days on a 36 km Earth-fixed grid. The first aim of this work is to validate SMAP soil moisture data against in situ ground measurements from the soil moisture network at the Hydrological Open Air Laboratory in Petzenkirchen (Lower Austria), which was installed in 2013. A heterogeneous agricultural catchment, the HOAL is characteristic for a range of catchments around the world. The network consists of 20 permanent and 11 temporary soil moisture stations distributed over an area of 66 ha. The challenge is to find a suitable combination of the in situ stations to represent the SMAP footprint. Therefore, additional sensors were installed outside of the catchment to facilitate upscaling of the in situ data to the scale of SMAP. A validation at a similar spatial scale is performed using soil moisture data from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) on-board the Metop satellites and AMSR2 on-board GCOM-W1, respectively. Results show strong correspondence (Pearson R > 0.5) between SMAP and in situ and satellite soil moisture datasets. This investigation follows the work by Chan et al. (2016), using longer time series and validation data from a not yet investigated ground truthing site, and will help assess the performance of the SMAP mission.

  15. Approaches for quantifying and managing diffuse phosphorus exports at the farm/small catchment scale.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Richard W; Nash, David; George, Anja; Wang, Q J; Duncan, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying and managing diffuse P losses from small catchments or at the farm scale requires detailed knowledge of farming practices and their interaction with catchment processes. However, detailed knowledge may not be available and hence modeling is required. This paper demonstrates two approaches to developing tools that assist P losses from New Zealand or Australian dairy farms. The first is largely empirical and separates sources of P within a paddock into soil, fertilizer, dung, and treading impacts (including damage to grazed pasture). This information is combined with expert knowledge of hydrological processes and potential point sources (e.g., stream crossings) to create a deterministic model that can be used to evaluate the most cost and labor efficient method of mitigating P losses. For instance, in one example, 45% of annual P lost was attributed to the application of superphosphate just before a runoff event for which a mitigation strategy could be to use a less water soluble P fertilizer. The second approach uses a combination of interviews, expert knowledge and relationships to develop a Bayesian Network that describes P exports. The knowledge integration process helped stakeholders develop a comprehensive understanding of the problem. The Network, presented in the form of a "cause and effect", diagram provided a simple, visual representation of current knowledge that could be easily applied to individual circumstances and isolate factors having the greatest influence on P loss. Both approaches demonstrate that modeling P losses and mitigation strategies does not have to cover every process or permutation and that a degree of uncertainty can be handled to create a working model of P losses at a farm or small catchment scale.

  16. An ecohydrologic framework for simulating catchment constraints on smallholder irrigation systems in drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, D.; McCord, P. F.; Caylor, K. K.; Dell'Angelo, J.; Evans, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Community water projects (CWPs) in the Laikipia region of Central Kenya distribute river water to smallholder farmers who otherwise lack access to municipal systems or private water sources. Participating farmers are better able to withstand climatic conditions commonly found in drylands, including high potential evapotranspiration combined with low and variable rainfall. To provide these benefits, however, CWPs must be able to deliver water in sufficient quantities and with sufficient regularity to all farmers in the network. Factors such as variable river flow, aging infrastructure and increasing membership pose challenges to the CWP management in fulfilling this task. During the dry season, river levels typically decline, reducing water available for CWP and increasing the importance of intake position within the catchment. CWPs with intakes in upstream areas have first access to river water but rely on a smaller drainage network while those in downstream areas are affected by the opposite conditions. Such conditions have pushed CWPs to jointly regulate their water consumption by setting withdrawal limits and coordinating withdrawal schedules with one another. Regulations also ensure that river water is not completely consumed by CWPs, allowing some flow to exit the catchment for human or environmental reasons. This paper uses a simple numerical model to calculate the monetary benefit that individual farmers receive from membership in a CWP. In the model, the CWP provides water to a variable number of farmers in exchange for membership fees while farmers must grow sufficient crops to feed themselves and pay fees. The model shows that, under conditions similar to those in Laikipia, CWP can consistently provide adequate benefits to its members only with intakes at particular locations within the catchment or with specific regulations in place. Otherwise, the economic benefits of CWP membership will gradually fall below the cost of membership. This result may help

  17. Shuttle radar DEM hydrological correction for erosion modelling in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, Ben; Sidle, Roy; Bartley, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modelling of environmental processes. Catchment and hillslope scale runoff and sediment processes (i.e., patterns of overland flow, infiltration, subsurface stormflow and erosion) are all topographically mediated. In remote and data-scarce regions, high resolution DEMs (LiDAR) are often not available, and moderate to course resolution digital elevation models (e.g., SRTM) have difficulty replicating detailed hydrological patterns, especially in relatively flat landscapes. Several surface reconditioning algorithms (e.g., Smoothing) and "Stream burning" techniques (e.g., Agree or ANUDEM), in conjunction with representation of the known stream networks, have been used to improve DEM performance in replicating known hydrology. Detailed stream network data are not available at regional and national scales, but can be derived at local scales from remotely-sensed data. This research explores the implication of high resolution stream network data derived from Google Earth images for DEM hydrological correction, instead of using course resolution stream networks derived from topographic maps. The accuracy of implemented method in producing hydrological-efficient DEMs were assessed by comparing the hydrological parameters derived from modified DEMs and limited high-resolution airborne LiDAR DEMs. The degree of modification is dominated by the method used and availability of the stream network data. Although stream burning techniques improve DEMs hydrologically, these techniques alter DEM characteristics that may affect catchment boundaries, stream position and length, as well as secondary terrain derivatives (e.g., slope, aspect). Modification of a DEM to better reflect known hydrology can be useful, however, knowledge of the magnitude and spatial pattern of the changes are required before using a DEM for subsequent analyses.

  18. Analysis of catchment behavior using residence time distributions with application to the Thuringian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prykhodko, Vladyslav; Heße, Falk; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    Residence time distribution (RTD), as presented e.g. by Botter et al., are a novel mathematical framework for a quantitative characterization of hydrological systems. These distributions contain information about water storage, flow pathways and water sources and therefore improve the classical hydrograph methods by allowing both nonlinear as well as time-dependent dynamics. In our study we extend this previous works by applying this theoretical framework on real-world heterogeneous catchments. To that end we use a catchment-scale hydrological model (mHM) and apply the approach of Botter et al. to each spatial grid cell of mHM. To facilitate the coupling we amended Botter's approach by introducing additional fluxes (like runoff from unsaturated zone) and specifying the structure of the groundwater zone. By virtue of this coupling we could then make use of the realistic hydrological fluxes and state variables as provided by mHM. This allowed us to use both observed (precipitation, temperature, soil type etc.) and modeled data sets and asses their impact on the behavior of the resulting RTD's. We extended the aforementioned framework to analyze large catchments by including geomorphic effect due to the actual arrangement of subcatchments around the channel network using the flood routing algorithm of mHM. Additionally we study dependencies of the stochastic characteristics of RTD's on the meteorological and hydrological processes as well as on the morphological structure of the catchment. As a result we gained mean residence times (MRT) of base flow and groundwater flow on the mesoscale (4km x 4km). We compare the spatial distribution of MRT's with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and temperature. Results showed that land cover is a major predictor for MRT's whereas its impact on the mean evapotranspiration time was much lower. Additionally we determined the temporal evolution of mean travel times by using time series of

  19. Hydrological processes generating flash floods at hillslope scale in a small mountainous Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Christophe; Brunet, Pascal; Le Bourgeois, Olivier; Nguyen, Son; Borrell, Valérie; Ayral, Pierre-Alain; Didon-Lescot, Jean-François; Domergue, Jean-Marc; Grard, Nadine

    2015-04-01

    This work deals with the understanding at the hillslope scale of the hydrological process that generate flash floods. The Valescure small catchment (4km2) is a mountainous Mediterranean catchment, with steep slopes (30°) and granitic geology. An intensive survey of the catchment was displayed along a 4-years period (2011-2014) at the local and hillslope scale, in order to grab properties of the soil such as depths, clay content, water content, hydraulic conductivity and water retention, latelal flux velocity, bedrock permeability…. A simplified physically-based model was used to simulate vertical fluxes at both atmosphere/soil and sub-surface/bedrock interfaces, as well as the lateral fluxes of both surface and sub-surface. The model combines an adapted Green&Ampt model with finite depth of the soil with a kinematic wave model for the surface routing, and a Darcy model for the sub-surface routing. Most of the parameters of the model derive from the survey of the catchment: spatial distribution of the soil depth, vertical hydraulic conductivity at saturation, spatial and temporal variability of the soil moisture at various depths…. Some others are calibrated from observed rainfall and runoff data along a 10-years monitoring period (2005-2014): bedrock permeability, lateral hydraulic conductivity, initial water content in the soil. The model simulates quite well the observed floods over 30 events, based on the following assumptions : 1/ in spite of very high rainfall rates, most of the rainfall infiltrates in highly permeable soils (Ks ~ 200-300 mm.h-1), 2/ runoff only occurs when the soil is totally saturated, 3/ saturation of soil is highly amplified due to fast lateral flow, around 1m.h-1, that converge along a dense gully network, 4/ most of the flash flood runoff is due to exfiltration of the water in those gullies, 5/ the calibrated parameters of the model are in very close agreement with their experimental estimation. In addition, the model was proved to

  20. The application of time-lapse photography for the observation of snow processes in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvelmann, J.; Pohl, S.; Weiler, M.

    2012-04-01

    For the forecast of snowmelt flood events in mountainous catchments it is very important to know the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the snowcover. Topography and vegetation have the most important influence on the spatio-temporal variability of the snowcover. In order to accomplish a continuous observation of the quantity and the status of the snowcover, an extensive measurement network consisting of numerous standalone snow and meteorological sensors and time-lapse photography was established in three catchments in the Black Forest, a typical mid latitude medium elevation mountain range. Catchments with different topographic characteristic and areal extent were specifically chosen for this study. Within the catchments, a stratified sampling design was used to cover a wide range of altitudes and exposures. In order to investigate the influence of a vegetation cover on the snow processes beneath sensors and cameras have been installed under the forest canopy and on adjacent open field sites, respectively. In the presented study the application of spatially distributed time-lapse cameras for the observation of snow processes and snowcover properties at the catchment scale will be discussed. Image analysis software was applied to extract information about snowdepth, snow albedo and canopy interception from the digital images. A measurement scale with a black/white board was installed in the focus of every camera to allow a determination of the snowdepth at every camera location while the black/white board was used to provide a white balance for the albedo estimation. The albedo provides important information about the status of the snowcover and its temporal evolution is a crucial factor for the snowmelt energy balance. Furthermore the time-lapse images provided a continuous observation of the forest canopy allowing the estimation of the interception efficiency and the temporal evolution of the snow interception for different topographic situations

  1. Delineating wetland catchments and modeling hydrologic connectivity using lidar data and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiusheng; Lane, Charles R.

    2017-07-01

    In traditional watershed delineation and topographic modeling, surface depressions are generally treated as spurious features and simply removed from a digital elevation model (DEM) to enforce flow continuity of water across the topographic surface to the watershed outlets. In reality, however, many depressions in the DEM are actual wetland landscape features with seasonal to permanent inundation patterning characterized by nested hierarchical structures and dynamic filling-spilling-merging surface-water hydrological processes. Differentiating and appropriately processing such ecohydrologically meaningful features remains a major technical terrain-processing challenge, particularly as high-resolution spatial data are increasingly used to support modeling and geographic analysis needs. The objectives of this study were to delineate hierarchical wetland catchments and model their hydrologic connectivity using high-resolution lidar data and aerial imagery. The graph-theory-based contour tree method was used to delineate the hierarchical wetland catchments and characterize their geometric and topological properties. Potential hydrologic connectivity between wetlands and streams were simulated using the least-cost-path algorithm. The resulting flow network delineated potential flow paths connecting wetland depressions to each other or to the river network on scales finer than those available through the National Hydrography Dataset. The results demonstrated that our proposed framework is promising for improving overland flow simulation and hydrologic connectivity analysis.

  2. Development and Testing of an ANN Model for Estimation of Runoff from a Snow Covered Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, A.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Roy, S.; Kumar, T.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to develop an ANN model to estimate runoff from a snow covered catchment of eastern Himalaya using feed-forward back-propagation algorithm with Levenberg-Marquardt optimization technique. The ANN model was programmed in C++ whereas a user-friendly GUI was developed in VB. The effects of past days rainfall and present day temperature data was observed on the performance of the selected ANN architecture in modelling snowmelt and monsoon season runoff. For this purpose, 8 years' (2003-2010) daily data (rainfall, temperature, and discharge) were collected from CWC which were again divided into two parts (2003-2008 and 2009-2010) for training and testing of the ANN model, respectively. Initially it was found that the network can produce acceptable results with only rainfall data as input, but it needs at least past 3 days rainfall data to account for the antecedent moisture condition of the catchment. Networks 4-16-16-1 (with past 3 days rainfall) and 6-18-18-18-1 (with past 5 days rainfall) resulted modelling efficiency of 79.38 and 82.06% in training and 55.13 and 61.06% in validation, respectively. However, addition of present day temperature data as another input improved the performance in both training (ME 83.10 and 82.22%) and testing (ME 62.64 and 61.89%) marginally.

  3. Causal Relationships Among Time Series of the Lange Bramke Catchment (Harz Mountains, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufgebauer, Britta; Hauhs, Michael; Bogner, Christina; Meesenburg, Henning; Lange, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Convergent Cross Mapping (CCM) has recently been introduced by Sugihara et al. for the identification and quantification of causal relationships among ecosystem variables. In particular, the method allows to decide on the direction of causality; in some cases, the causality might be bidirectional, indicating a network structure. We extend this approach by introducing a method of surrogate data to obtain confidence intervals for CCM results. We then apply this method to time series from stream water chemistry. Specifically, we analyze a set of eight dissolved major ions from three different catchments belonging to the hydrological monitoring system at the Bramke valley in the Harz Mountains, Germany. Our results demonstrate the potentials and limits of CCM as a monitoring instrument in forestry and hydrology or as a tool to identify processes in ecosystem research. While some networks of causally linked ions can be associated with simple physical and chemical processes, other results illustrate peculiarities of the three studied catchments, which are explained in the context of their special history.

  4. Changes in the rates of floodplain and in-channel bench accretion in response to catchment disturbance, central Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew O.; Croke, Jacky C.; Pietsch, Timothy J.; Olley, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the changes in rates of catchment sediment storage can provide material evidence of the impact of landscape disturbance on catchment sediment flux. A number of studies have suggested increased sediment yields from the rivers draining to the Great Barrier Reef since European settlement in the mid-nineteenth century. Many of these predictions, which indicate increases between four to ten times the pre-disturbance estimates, are based on large-scale catchment modelling that make some critical assumptions about pre-disturbance erosion rates and/or sediment delivery ratios. In addition, the majority have not been validated by empirical data. This study uses single-grain OSL dating and 137Cs depth profiles to determine pre- and post-floodplain accretion rates in Theresa Creek, a subcatchment of the dry-tropical Fitzroy River basin. We demonstrate that floodplain accretion rates have increased by three to four times since European settlement ( ca. A.D. 1850). Decreased rates of floodplain accretion since the mid-twentieth century at sites contributed to by gullied terrain suggest a decrease in the supply of sediment derived from gully networks. In contrast, floodplain accretion rates from areas dominated by cultivation remain high. Widespread in-channel benches deposited since European settlement are stable and appear to be important stores of large volumes of sediment. Low magnitude increases in post-disturbance floodplain sedimentation rates (3 to 4 times), in comparison to those reported from mainly temperate climates (10 to 100 times), are attributed to the naturally high sediment loads typical of dry-tropical catchments. Consequently, previous predictions of large post-disturbance increases in sediment yields from large dry-tropical catchments draining to the Great Barrier Reef are likely to be overestimates.

  5. Catchment controls on water temperature and the development of simple metrics to inform riparian zone management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Wilby, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Water temperature is a key water quality parameter and is critical to aquatic life Therefore, rising temperatures due to climate and environmental change will have major consequences for river biota. As such, it is important to understand the environmental controls of the thermal regime of rivers. The Loughborough University TEmperature Network (LUTEN) consists of a distributed network of 25 sites along 40 km of two rivers in the English Peak District, from their source to confluence. As a result, the network covers a range of hydrological, sedimentary, geomorphic and land-use conditions. At each site, air and water temperature have been recorded at a 15-minute resolution for over 4 years. Water temperature is spatially patchy and temporally variable in the monitored rivers. For example, the annual temperature range at Beresford Dale is over 18° C, whereas 8 km downstream it is less than 8° C. This heterogeneity leads to some sites being more vulnerable to future warming than others. The sensitivity of sites to climate was quantified by comparing the parameters of logistic regression models, constructed at each site, that relate water temperature to air temperature. These analyses, coupled with catchment modelling suggest that reaches that are surface-water dominated with minimal shade and relatively low water volumes are most susceptible to warming. Such reaches tended to occur at intermediate distances from rivers source in the monitored catchments. Reaches that were groundwater dominated had relatively stable thermal regimes, which were relatively unaffected by inter-annual changes in climatic conditions. Such areas could provide important thermal refuge to many organisms, which is supported by monitoring of the invertebrate community in the catchment. The phenology (i.e. timing of life events) of some species remained consistent between years in a river reach with a stable thermal regime, but changed markedly in other areas of the river. Consequently, areas

  6. How does spatial variability of climate affect catchment streamflow predictions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial variability of climate can negatively affect catchment streamflow predictions if it is not explicitly accounted for in hydrologic models. In this paper, we examine the changes in streamflow predictability when a hydrologic model is run with spatially variable (distribute...

  7. How does spatial variability of climate affect catchment streamflow predictions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial variability of climate can negatively affect catchment streamflow predictions if it is not explicitly accounted for in hydrologic models. In this paper, we examine the changes in streamflow predictability when a hydrologic model is run with spatially variable (distribute...

  8. The random walk of tracers through river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    River catchments play critical roles in regional economies and in the global economy. In addition, rivers carry large volumes of nutrients, pollutants, and several other forms of tracers into the ocean. An intricate system of pathways and channels, both on the surface and in the subsurface of catchments, allows rivers to carry large volumes of tracers. However, scientists do not yet fully understand how pollutants and other tracers travel through the intricate web of channels in the catchment areas of rivers. In a new study, Cvetkovic et al show that the travel path of tracers through channels can be modeled as a random walk, which is mathematically similar to the path an animal would trace when foraging. Previous studies have applied the random walk approach to understand the behavior of fluids flowing through aquifers and soils but not to model the transport mechanism of tracers that travel passively with water flowing through catchments.

  9. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT AT THE catchment SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater runoff from extensive impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas has led to human safety risks and stream ecosystem impairment, triggering an interest in catchment-scale retrofit stormwater management. Such stormwater management is of multidisciplinary relevance, ...

  10. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT AT THE catchment SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater runoff from extensive impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas has led to human safety risks and stream ecosystem impairment, triggering an interest in catchment-scale retrofit stormwater management. Such stormwater management is of multidisciplinary relevance, ...

  11. Quantifying human impacts on catchment sediment yield: A continental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean; Govers, Gerard; Verstraeten, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Both from a scientific and environmental management perspective, there is a large need to assess the magnitude and controlling factors of human impacts on catchment sediment yield. Quantifying this impact is difficult, since it requires knowing both the actual sediment yield (SYa, [t km- 2 y- 1]) as well as the corresponding "pristine" value of a catchment (SYp, [t km- 2 y- 1]; i.e. the sediment yield that can be expected if the catchment was not affected by humans). Here we address this problem by comparing measured SYa values for 165 European catchments that were unaffected by dams or reservoirs with their corresponding SYp, which were predicted using a recently developed regression model. The ratio between these two values is expected to reflect the degree of human impact on catchment sediment yield (HIF). Correlation and partial correlation analyses showed that spatial variability in HIF is mainly explained by differences in land use (i.e. the fraction of arable land) and catchment area. The effect of these two factors was clearly linked in western and central Europe: whereas SYa can be easily 40 times higher than SYp in intensively cultivated small (≤ 1 km2) catchments, the difference is negligible for large (> 1000 km2) catchments with the same land use. While, this concurs with our knowledge that the effects of land use (change) on erosion rates can be buffered at the catchment scale, this study provides a first robust quantification of this effect. Apart from a potential climatic effect (i.e. a correlation between HIF and the average annual air temperature) no other factors could be identified that are significant in explaining observed differences in HIF. This indicates that HIF is mainly controlled by catchment scale and land use, while other factors may be only of secondary importance at an intra-continental scale. Nonetheless, more accurate quantifications of these HIF values and more refined characterizations of the catchments in terms of (historical

  12. Scale-dependent genetic structure of the Idaho giant salamander (Dicamptodon aterrimus) in stream networks.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lindy B; Arthur Woods, H; Schwartz, Michael K; Sepulveda, Adam J; Lowe, Winsor H

    2010-03-01

    The network architecture of streams and rivers constrains evolutionary, demographic and ecological processes of freshwater organisms. This consistent architecture also makes stream networks useful for testing general models of population genetic structure and the scaling of gene flow. We examined genetic structure and gene flow in the facultatively paedomorphic Idaho giant salamander, Dicamptodon aterrimus, in stream networks of Idaho and Montana, USA. We used microsatellite data to test population structure models by (i) examining hierarchical partitioning of genetic variation in stream networks; and (ii) testing for genetic isolation by distance along stream corridors vs. overland pathways. Replicated sampling of streams within catchments within three river basins revealed that hierarchical scale had strong effects on genetic structure and gene flow. amova identified significant structure at all hierarchical scales (among streams, among catchments, among basins), but divergence among catchments had the greatest structural influence. Isolation by distance was detected within catchments, and in-stream distance was a strong predictor of genetic divergence. Patterns of genetic divergence suggest that differentiation among streams within catchments was driven by limited migration, consistent with a stream hierarchy model of population structure. However, there was no evidence of migration among catchments within basins, or among basins, indicating that gene flow only counters the effects of genetic drift at smaller scales (within rather than among catchments). These results show the strong influence of stream networks on population structure and genetic divergence of a salamander, with contrasting effects at different hierarchical scales.

  13. Emergent Archetype Hydrological-Biogeochemical Response Patterns in Heterogeneous Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P.

    2013-12-01

    What can spatiotemporally integrated patterns observed in stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals generated in response to transient hydro-climatic and anthropogenic forcing tell us about the interactions between spatially heterogeneous soil-mediated hydrological and biogeochemical processes? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with hydrologic responses affect observed concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These patterns are expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solute loads exported from managed catchments, and their likely ecological consequences manifested in receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the correlation between flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of the observed archetype C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We introduce a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the types and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each of the archetype C-Q patterns can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. The model

  14. Automatic set up of SHETRAN for catchments in Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Kilsby, Chris; Fowler, Hayley

    2014-05-01

    Physically-based spatially-distributed (PBSD) models may provide a robust framework for simulating catchment processes in ungauged catchments and under climatic variability. However, they are often overlooked in catchment studies in favour of their conceptual or lumped counterparts. This is because conceptual models are easy and rapid to set up, and can be finely tuned using historic data to give excellent simulation results. On the other hand PBSD models, such as SHETRAN developed at Newcastle University, require much more input data and take weeks or months to set up. To overcome these problems and to promote the use of SHETRAN, this project has set up an easy-to-use, accessible system of hydrological models across Great Britain to be used for both catchment scale studies and countrywide analysis of river flows under present and future conditions. An interface for this system has been developed to make the usually long and tedious setup of PBSD models quick and easy. A non-expert user can now set up a robust and reliable model for a catchment within Great Britain within 10 seconds, a process which would usually take weeks. The user can select a catchment from one of the 1457 boundaries identified in the National River Flow Archive, or they can upload their own catchment boundary as a shapefile. The system therefore has great flexibility for use in setting up models of gauged and ungauged catchments. PBSD models require a lot of data (DEM, geology, soil, land cover), often available in only an inappropriate format. The data behind this system is freely accessible under an academic licence and downloadable from various publicly funded bodies. These data layers have been converted into the correct format for use with SHETRAN, which is also freely available and is provided with every model set up.

  15. Comparison of threshold hydrologic response across northern catchments

    Treesearch

    Genevieve Ali; Doerthe Tetzlaff; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Chris Soulsby; Sean Carey; Hjalmar Laudon; Kevin McGuire; Jim Buttle; Jan Seibert; Jamie. Shanley

    2015-01-01

    Nine mid-latitude to high-latitude headwater catchments – part of the Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) programme – were used to analyze threshold response to rainfall and snowmelt-driven events and link the different responses to the catchment characteristics of the nine sites. The North-Watch data include daily time-series of...

  16. Rainfall, runoff and sediment transport in a Mediterranean mountainous catchment.

    PubMed

    Tuset, J; Vericat, D; Batalla, R J

    2016-01-01

    The relation between rainfall, runoff, erosion and sediment transport is highly variable in Mediterranean catchments. Their relation can be modified by land use changes and climate oscillations that, ultimately, will control water and sediment yields. This paper analyses rainfall, runoff and sediment transport relations in a meso-scale Mediterranean mountain catchment, the Ribera Salada (NE Iberian Peninsula). A total of 73 floods recorded between November 2005 and November 2008 at the Inglabaga Sediment Transport Station (114.5 km(2)) have been analysed. Suspended sediment transport and flow discharge were measured continuously. Rainfall data was obtained by means of direct rain gauges and daily rainfall reconstructions from radar information. Results indicate that the annual sediment yield (2.3 t km(-1) y(-1) on average) and the flood-based runoff coefficients (4.1% on average) are low. The Ribera Salada presents a low geomorphological and hydrological activity compared with other Mediterranean mountain catchments. Pearson correlations between rainfall, runoff and sediment transport variables were obtained. The hydrological response of the catchment is controlled by the base flows. The magnitude of suspended sediment concentrations is largely correlated with flood magnitude, while sediment load is correlated with the amount of direct runoff. Multivariate analysis shows that total suspended load can be predicted by integrating rainfall and runoff variables. The total direct runoff is the variable with more weight in the equation. Finally, three main hydro-sedimentary phases within the hydrological year are defined in this catchment: (a) Winter, where the catchment produces only water and very little sediment; (b) Spring, where the majority of water and sediment is produced; and (c) Summer-Autumn, when little runoff is produced but significant amount of sediments is exported out of the catchment. Results show as land use and climate change may have an important

  17. Dispatch centres: what is the right population catchment size?

    PubMed

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Hugli, Olivier

    2015-04-09

    Literature on medical dispatch is growing, focusing mainly on efficiency (under and overtriage) and dispatch-assisted CPR. But the issue of population catchment size, functional costs and rationalization is rarely addressed. If we can observe a trend toward a decreasing number of dispatch centres in many European countries, there is today no evidence on what is the right catchment size to reach the best balance between quality of services and costs.

  18. An integrated modelling and multicriteria analysis approach to managing nitrate diffuse pollution: 2. A case study for a chalk catchment in England.

    PubMed

    Koo, B K; O'Connell, P E

    2006-04-01

    The site-specific land use optimisation methodology, suggested by the authors in the first part of this two-part paper, has been applied to the River Kennet catchment at Marlborough, Wiltshire, UK, for a case study. The Marlborough catchment (143 km(2)) is an agriculture-dominated rural area over a deep chalk aquifer that is vulnerable to nitrate pollution from agricultural diffuse sources. For evaluation purposes, the catchment was discretised into a network of 1 kmx1 km grid cells. For each of the arable-land grid cells, seven land use alternatives (four arable-land alternatives and three grassland alternatives) were evaluated for their environmental and economic potential. For environmental evaluation, nitrate leaching rates of land use alternatives were estimated using SHETRAN simulations and groundwater pollution potential was evaluated using the DRASTIC index. For economic evaluation, economic gross margins were estimated using a simple agronomic model based on nitrogen response functions and agricultural land classification grades. In order to see whether the site-specific optimisation is efficient at the catchment scale, land use optimisation was carried out for four optimisation schemes (i.e. using four sets of criterion weights). Consequently, four land use scenarios were generated and the site-specifically optimised land use scenario was evaluated as the best compromise solution between long term nitrate pollution and agronomy at the catchment scale.

  19. Water storage changes as a marker for base flow generation processes in a tropical humid basement catchment (Benin): Insights from hybrid gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Séguis, Luc; Hinderer, Jacques; Cohard, Jean-Martial; Wubda, Maxime; Descloitres, Marc; Benarrosh, Nathalie; Boy, Jean-Paul

    2015-10-01

    In basement catchments of subhumid West Africa, base flow is the main component of annual streamflow. However, the important heterogeneity of lithology hinders the understanding of base flow generation processes. Since these processes are linked with water storage changes (WSCs) across the catchment, we propose the use of hybrid gravity data in addition to neutron probe-derived water content and water levels to monitor spatiotemporal WSC of a typical crystalline basement headwater catchment (16 ha) in Benin. WSC behaviors are shown to provide insights into hydrological processes in terms of water redistribution toward the catchment outlet. Hybrid gravimetry produces gravity change observations from time-lapse microgravity surveys coupled with gravity changes monitored at a base station using a superconducting gravimeter and/or an absolute gravimeter. A dense microgravity campaign (70 surveys of 14 stations) covering three contrasted years was set up with a rigorous protocol, leading to low uncertainties (<2.5 μGal) on station gravity determinations (with respect to the network reference station). Empirical orthogonal function analyses of both gravity changes and WSCs from neutron probe data show similar spatial patterns in the seasonal signal. Areas where storage and water table show a capping behavior (when data reach a plateau during the wet season), suggesting threshold-governed fast subsurface redistribution, are identified. This observed storage dynamics, together with geological structures investigated by electrical resistivity tomography and drill log analysis, make it possible to derive a conceptual model for the catchment hydrology.

  20. Rainfall–Runoff Simulations to Assess the Potential of SuDS for Mitigating Flooding in Highly Urbanized Catchments

    PubMed Central

    Jato-Espino, Daniel; Charlesworth, Susanne M.; Bayon, Joseba R.; Warwick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) constitute an alternative to conventional drainage when managing stormwater in cities, reducing the impact of urbanization by decreasing the amount of runoff generated by a rainfall event. This paper shows the potential benefits of installing different types of SuDS in preventing flooding in comparison with the common urban drainage strategies consisting of sewer networks of manholes and pipes. The impact of these systems on urban water was studied using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which are useful tools when both delineating catchments and parameterizing the elements that define a stormwater drainage system. Taking these GIS-based data as inputs, a series of rainfall–runoff simulations were run in a real catchment located in the city of Donostia (Northern Spain) using stormwater computer models, in order to compare the flow rates and depths produced by a design storm before and after installing SuDS. The proposed methodology overcomes the lack of precision found in former GIS-based stormwater approaches when dealing with the modeling of highly urbanized catchments, while the results demonstrated the usefulness of these systems in reducing the volume of water generated after a rainfall event and their ability to prevent localized flooding and surcharges along the sewer network. PMID:26805864

  1. Rainfall-Runoff Simulations to Assess the Potential of SuDS for Mitigating Flooding in Highly Urbanized Catchments.

    PubMed

    Jato-Espino, Daniel; Charlesworth, Susanne M; Bayon, Joseba R; Warwick, Frank

    2016-01-21

    Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) constitute an alternative to conventional drainage when managing stormwater in cities, reducing the impact of urbanization by decreasing the amount of runoff generated by a rainfall event. This paper shows the potential benefits of installing different types of SuDS in preventing flooding in comparison with the common urban drainage strategies consisting of sewer networks of manholes and pipes. The impact of these systems on urban water was studied using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which are useful tools when both delineating catchments and parameterizing the elements that define a stormwater drainage system. Taking these GIS-based data as inputs, a series of rainfall-runoff simulations were run in a real catchment located in the city of Donostia (Northern Spain) using stormwater computer models, in order to compare the flow rates and depths produced by a design storm before and after installing SuDS. The proposed methodology overcomes the lack of precision found in former GIS-based stormwater approaches when dealing with the modeling of highly urbanized catchments, while the results demonstrated the usefulness of these systems in reducing the volume of water generated after a rainfall event and their ability to prevent localized flooding and surcharges along the sewer network.

  2. Overland flow computations in urban and industrial catchments from direct precipitation data using a two-dimensional shallow water model.

    PubMed

    Cea, L; Garrido, M; Puertas, J; Jácome, A; Del Río, H; Suárez, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation and the application to a real industrial catchment of a two-dimensional depth-averaged shallow water model used for the computation of rainfall-runoff transformation from direct precipitation data. Instead of using the common approach in flood inundation modelling, which consists in computing the water depth and velocity fields given the water discharge, in this study the rainfall intensity is imposed directly in the model, the surface runoff being generated automatically. The model considers infiltration losses simultaneously with flow simulation. Gullies are also included in the model, although the coupling between the surface runoff and the sewer network is not considered. Experimental validation of the model is presented in several simplified laboratory configurations of urban catchments, in which the surface runoff has been measured for different hyetographs. The application to a real industrial catchment includes a sewer network flow component, which is solved with the SWMM model. The numerical predictions of the discharge hydrograph generated by a 12 hours storm event are compared with field measurements, providing encouraging results.

  3. A view of annual water quality cycle and inter-annual variations in agricultural headwater catchment (Kervidy-Naizin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, A.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Merot, P.; Grimaldi, C.; Gruau, G.; Ruiz, L.

    2011-12-01

    Climatic conditions impact biotransformation and transfer of solutes. Therefore, they modify solute emissions in streams. Studying these modifications requires long term and detailed monitoring of both internal processes and river loads, which are rarely combined. The Kervidy-Naizin catchment, implemented in 1993, is part of the French network of catchment for environmental research (SOERE RBV, focused on the Critical Zone). It is an intensive agricultural catchment located in a temperate climate in Western France (Brittany) (Molenat et al., 2008; Morel et al., 2009). It presents shallow aquifers due to impervious bedrock. Both hydrology and water chemistry are monitored with a daily time step since 2000-01, as well as possible explanatory data (land use, meteorology, etc.). Concentrations in major anions in this catchment are extremely high, which make people call it a "saturated" catchment. We identified annual patterns for chloride, sulphate, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and nitrate concentration variations. First, we considered the complete set of concentration data as function of the time. From that, we foresaw 3 cyclic temporal patterns. Then, from representing the concentrations as function of meteorological parameters, intra-annual hysteretic variations and their inter-annual variations were clearly identified. Our driving question is to know if and how climatic conditions are responsible for variations of the patterns in and between years. In winter, i.e. rainy and cold period, rainfall is closely linked to discharge because of a direct recharge to the shallow groundwater. Reversely, in transition periods (spring and fall) and hot periods, both rainfall and temperature influences discharge in relation to their range of variations. Moreover, biological processes, driven by temperature and wetness, also act during these periods. On the whole, we can emphasize the specificity of water chemistry patterns for each element. Noticeable differences

  4. Simulating the influence of snow surface processes on soil moisture dynamics and streamflow generation in an alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, Nander; Comola, Francesco; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of flood risks in alpine, snow-covered catchments requires an understanding of the linkage between the snow cover, soil and discharge in the stream network. Here, we apply the comprehensive, distributed model Alpine3D to investigate the role of soil moisture in the predisposition of the Dischma catchment in Switzerland to high flows from rainfall and snowmelt. The recently updated soil module of the physics-based multilayer snow cover model SNOWPACK, which solves the surface energy and mass balance in Alpine3D, is verified against soil moisture measurements at seven sites and various depths inside and in close proximity to the Dischma catchment. Measurements and simulations in such terrain are difficult and consequently, soil moisture was simulated with varying degrees of success. Differences between simulated and measured soil moisture mainly arise from an overestimation of soil freezing and an absence of a groundwater description in the Alpine3D model. Both were found to have an influence in the soil moisture measurements. Using the Alpine3D simulation as the surface scheme for a spatially explicit hydrologic response model using a travel time distribution approach for interflow and baseflow, streamflow simulations were performed for the discharge from the catchment. The streamflow simulations provided a closer agreement with observed streamflow when driving the hydrologic response model with soil water fluxes at 30 cm depth in the Alpine3D model. Performance decreased when using the 2 cm soil water flux, thereby mostly ignoring soil processes. This illustrates that the role of soil moisture is important to take into account when understanding the relationship between both snowpack runoff and rainfall and catchment discharge in high alpine terrain. However, using the soil water flux at 60 cm depth to drive the hydrologic response model also decreased its performance, indicating that an optimal soil depth to include in surface simulations exists and

  5. Catchment controls on soil moisture dynamics: from site-specific hysteresis in event responses to temporal stability of patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle K.; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil moisture dynamics is a prerequisite for predicting hydrological response at the hillslope and catchment scale. Soil moisture is not only determined by its input characteristics such as rainfall, its redistribution by vegetation and evapotranspiration. Catchment characteristics resulting from the interplay of geology, topography, land cover and associated soil hydraulic properties also affect the distribution, storage and transport of water in the vadose zone. Successful process predictions and appropriate hydrological model structures thus rely on a good representation of soil moisture patterns and dynamics and benefit from insights into their dependence on catchment characteristics. In a unique measurement setup at the CAOS hydrological observatory in Luxemburg (http://www.caos-project.de) we record hydro-meteorological variables at 45 sensor cluster sites. These sites are distributed across the mesoscale Attert catchment and cover three different geological units (schist, marls and sandstone), two types of land use (forest and grassland), different topographical positions (up- and downslope with north- and south-facing aspects as well as plateau and floodplain locations). At each sensor cluster, each covering approximately an area of 30 m², soil moisture is measured in three profiles at three different depths, in piezometers groundwater levels are recorded, and rain gauges collect throughfall or gross precipitation. At near-stream locations we also measure stream water levels. This extensive sensor network enables us to study the influence of geology, land use and topography on soil moisture dynamics. In this study we focus on short-term hysteretic responses related to individual rainfall events and on longer-term temporal stability of soil moisture patterns. Similarities in the hysteresis loops of rainfall/soil moisture, soil moisture/groundwater levels and soil moisture/stream water levels can give some indication of the dominant catchment

  6. Groundwater head controls nitrate export from an agricultural lowland catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Rode, Michael; Lischeid, Gunnar; Weise, Stephan M.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2016-10-01

    Solute concentration variability is of fundamental importance for the chemical and ecological state of streams. It is often closely related to discharge variability and can be characterized in terms of a solute export regime. Previous studies, especially in lowland catchments, report that nitrate is often exported with an accretion pattern of increasing concentrations with increasing discharge. Several modeling approaches exist to predict the export regime of solutes from the spatial relationship of discharge generating zones with solute availability in the catchment. For a small agriculturally managed lowland catchment in central Germany, we show that this relationship is controlled by the depth to groundwater table and its temporal dynamics. Principal component analysis of groundwater level time series from wells distributed throughout the catchment allowed derivation of a representative groundwater level time series that explained most of the discharge variability. Groundwater sampling revealed consistently decreasing nitrate concentrations with an increasing thickness of the unsaturated zone. The relationships of depth to groundwater table to discharge and to nitrate concentration were parameterized and integrated to successfully model catchment discharge and nitrate export on the basis of groundwater level variations alone. This study shows that intensive and uniform agricultural land use likely results in a clear and consistent concentration-depth relationship of nitrate, which can be utilized in simple approaches to predict stream nitrate export dynamics at the catchment scale.

  7. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  8. Modelling of macropore flow and transport processes at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovdal Christiansen, Jesper; Thorsen, Mette; Clausen, Thomas; Hansen, Søren; Christian Refsgaard, Jens

    2004-11-01

    Macropores play a significant role as a preferential flow mechanism in connection with pesticide leaching to shallow groundwater in clayey and loamy soils. A macropore description based on some of the same principles as those of the MACRO code has been added to the coupled MIKE SHE/Daisy code, enabling a physically based simulation of macropore processes in a spatially distributed manner throughout an entire catchment. Simulation results from a small catchment in Denmark suggest that although the point scale macropore processes have no dominating effect on groundwater recharge or discharge at a catchment scale, they will have significant effects on pesticide leaching to groundwater at a catchment scale. The primary function of macropores in this area is that they rapidly transport a significant part of the infiltrating water and solutes from the plough pan at 20 cm depth some distance downwards before most of it flows back into the soil matrix. This has a very significant effect on the leaching of pesticides from the surface to the groundwater table, because some of the pesticides are transported rapidly downwards in the soil profile to zones with less sorption and degradation. It is concluded that the spatial variations of macropore flows caused by the variation in topography and depth to groundwater table within a catchment are so large that this has to be accounted for in up-scaling process descriptions and results from point scale to catchment scale.

  9. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  10. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  11. A catchment engineering approach to nutrient and sediment management: A case study from the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, N. J.; Quinn, P. F.; Bathurst, J. C.; Jonczyk, J.

    2011-12-01

    A rural catchment in the UK is being monitored in a multi-scaled, nested experiment to identify the parts of the landscape that contribute Diffuse Water Pollution from Agriculture (DWPA) by measuring phosphorus (P), nitrate (N) and suspended sediment (SS) losses across the river network. Results have been analysed spatially and temporally, with a focus on storm events and high flows, and it is conceptualised that the majority of polluted runoff is delivered via a relatively low number of diffuse flow pathways. It is therefore hypothesised that by targeting these distributed point sources and 'engineering' catchments, it is possible to mitigate the impacts of DWPA cost effectively without compromising agricultural productivity. Runoff Attenuation Features (RAFs) are examples of soft engineering measures, including small ponds, wetlands, sediment traps, filters, which are designed to intercept polluted flow pathways in order to slow, store and filter the runoff. A number of RAFs have been designed and constructed and their ability to trap SS and remove and recover P and N has been quantified. The interventions have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce certain pollutant concentrations (up to 90% SS and 65% total P), particularly during storm events, as well as attenuating flood flows and providing wider ecosystem services. RAFs function most effectively when applied to farm ditches and small streams, relatively close to pollution sources, and we propose that this is the most cost effective Best Management Practice methodology. Our work has shown, however, that P-rich fine sediment (<0.45μm) is difficult to remove from runoff when relying on settlement alone. Therefore, a series of physical filter features have been developed, comprising a range of filter media installed in ponds and ditch networks to test their efficacy. Catchment engineering provides the ability to sustainably manage water quality and quantity using a proactive, interventionist approach

  12. New insights in catchment processes via distributed soil moisture measurements and 3D hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, H. R.; Sciuto, G.; Rosenbaum, U.; Herbst, M.; Huisman, J. A.; Vereecken, H.; Diekkrueger, B.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological analysis is often limited by the number of data available. Usually, discharge data and only little point information concerning soil moisture status are available. This might give a good representation of the temporal variability of runoff, but it does not provide insights into the spatial dynamics of soil moisture and water fluxes within the catchment. The small forested Wüstebach catchment (~27 ha) has been instrumented with a wireless sensor network consisting of 150 nodes and more than 1200 soil moisture sensors in the framework of the Transregio32 and the Helmholtz initiative TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) [1]. This unique data set provides a consistent picture of the hydrological status of the catchment in a high spatial and temporal resolution. We present first results of a geostatistical analysis of the data and an application of the integrated surface/subsurface 3D finite element model HydroGeoSphere model to investigate the scale dependency of the temporal dynamics of soil moisture patterns. A variogram analysis showed that the sum of the sub-scale variability and the measurement error is close to time-invariant. Wet situations showed smaller spatial variability, which is attributed to saturated soil moisture, which poses an upper limit and is typically not strongly variable in headwater catchments with relatively homogeneous soil. The spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture at 50 cm depth was significantly lower than at 5 and 20 cm. This finding indicates that the considerable variability of the top soil is buffered deeper in the soil due to root water uptake, lateral and vertical water fluxes. Topographic features showed the strongest correlation with soil moisture during dry periods, indicating that the control of topography on the soil moisture pattern depends on the soil water status. The temporal patterns of runoff discharge were reproduced by the HydroGeoSphere model in a satisfying way. The observed soil

  13. Palaeo-fluvial origin for Jakobshavn Isbrae catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Michael; Michaelides, Katerina; Siegert, Martin; Bamber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Subglacial topography exerts strong controls on ice dynamics, influencing the nature of ice flow, and modulating the distribution of basal waters and sediment. Bed geometry can provide a long-term record of geomorphic processes, allowing insight into landscape evolution, the origin of which, in some cases, can pre-date ice sheet inception. Here, we present evidence from ice-penetrating radar data for a large dendritic drainage network, radiating inland from Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland's largest outlet glacier. The size of the drainage basin is ~450,000 km-squared, comparable with that of the Ohio River in the United States, and accounts for ~20% of the land area of Greenland. Topographic, and basin morphometric analysis of isostatically compensated (ice-free) bedrock topography suggests that this catchment pre-dates ice sheet inception (~3.5 Ma), and will have been instrumental in influencing flow from the island's interior to the margin. The geological setting, and glacial history of Greenland lends itself well to the preservation of such landscapes; the island is dominated by erosion-resistant, Precambrian crystalline rocks with few sedimentary deposits, and has only been extensively ice-covered for ~3.5 million years (Ma). Despite this, most analysis of subglacial geomorphology, and of 'pre-glacial' landscapes, has been focused on Antarctica (e.g. the Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands and, 'pre-glacial erosional surfaces' of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)), with little consideration for such associations in Greenland. However, a large subglacial 'mega-canyon' in northern Greenland, thought to of palaeo-fluvial origin, has recently been discovered.

  14. Soil organic carbon distribution in an agricultural catchment in Southern Brazil: from hillslope to catchment scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic carbon (SOC) distribution a few decades after conversion to cropland and plantations in a hilly catchment in southern Brazil is challenging due to scale-dependent controlling factors. Firstly, SOC, bulk density (BD) and texture were measured by depth intervals along 18 soil profiles located in three topographical positions (sloping plateau, central back slope and concave foot slope) in cropland and forest with contrasting slopes. SOC stocks in concave footslope position were not significantly different between fields on steep (11.1 kg C m-2) and gentle slopes (12.8 kg C m-2). However, in eroding profiles, SOC stocks are twice as high in fields on gentle slopes (17.6/12.6 kg C m-2) compared to steep slopes (8.3/7.1 kg C m-2). SOC stocks on steep slope on cropland (8.8 kg C m-2) are three times lower than SOC stocks on steep slope under undisturbed forest (23.7 kg C m-2). On gentle slopes, the effect of deforestation on SOC stocks was not so drastic (14.3 and 14.4 kg C m-2). Therefore, contrasting topography generates different patterns of SOC redistribution in the catchment. The effect of conversion to cropland is probably due to soil redistribution by water and tillage erosion aggravated by the steep terrain. Secondly, in order to assess the heterogeneity of SOC distribution at catchment scale, samples were collected at 10-20; 40-50 and 75-85 cm in 167 soil profiles sampled with an auger. SOC concentrations (gC kg-1 ) in numerous bulk soil samples (n = 378) were predicted by VIS-NIR spectroscopy and partial least-square regression models. SOC stocks were assessed by a mass preserving spline tool by interpolating SOC mass at the three non-contiguous depth intervals. Samples of calibration-validation dataset (n = 95) were used for physical SOC fractionation allowing the measurement of carbon associated with < 20 μm fraction. Multivariate linear regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the influence of

  15. Estimation of sediment residence times in subtropical highland catchments of central Mexico combining river gauging and fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Duvert, Clément; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Esteves, Michel; Bonté, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Subtropical regions of the world are affected by intense soil erosion associated with deforestation, overgrazing and cropping intensification. This land degradation leads to important on-site (e.g. decrease in soil fertility) and off-site impacts (e.g. reservoir sedimentation, water pollution). This study determined the mean sediment residence times in soils and rivers of three catchments (3 - 12 km²) with contrasted land uses (i.e. cropland, forests, rangelands, extended gully networks) located in highlands of the transvolcanic belt of central Mexico. Calculations were based on rainfall and river gauging as well as on fallout radionuclide measurements (Be-7, Cs-137, Pb-210). Atmospheric deposition of Be-7 and Pb-210 was estimated based on the analysis of rainfall precipitated samples. Rainfall samples were collected all throughout the rainy season in order to take account of the temporal variations of the radionuclide fluxes. Furthermore, sampling of suspended sediment was conducted at the outlet of each catchment during most of the storms that occurred throughout the 2009 rainy season. Be-7, Cs-137 and Pb-210 concentrations of this sediment were determined by gamma-spectrometry. A two-box balance model was then used to estimate the sediment residence time and the inventory of radionuclides in the three selected catchments. This model subdivided each catchment into two boxes: (i) a "soil-box" characterised by low transport velocities and hence long radionuclide residence times and (ii) a "river-box" covering the river surface and its surroundings characterised by quicker exchanges and shorter radionuclide residence times. Input and output fluxes of sediment and radionuclides were taken into account in each box. Radioactive decay during the residence time of sediment was also considered. The mean residence time of sediment in soils ranged between 13,300 - 28,500 years. In contrast, sediment residence time in rivers was much shorter, fluctuating between 28 and 393

  16. Demonstrating the viability and value of community-based monitoring schemes in catchment science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Eleanor; Parkin, Geoff; Quinn, Paul; Large, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological catchments are complex systems which need to be monitored over time in order to characterise their behaviour on a local level, model, implement mitigation measures and meet policy targets. Despite hydrometric monitoring techniques being well developed, data is often inadequate within rural areas. Local knowledge and experiences are also vital sources of information in this sector but they are not routinely harvested. Long-term evidence is required to provide stakeholders with confidence and innovation is required to fully engage with and inform the public. Citizen science and volunteered geographical information (VGI) projects are encouraging volunteers to participate in crowdsourcing activities and generate new knowledge, but they have not been fully investigated within catchment science. A citizen science approach has therefore been implemented within the 42km2 Haltwhistle Burn catchment (northern England) using effective engagement techniques. This catchment responds rapidly, experiences flash flood events, and like many, it does not benefit from any traditional monitoring equipment. Participation levels confirm that members of the public do want to monitor their local water environment, with flooding being a key driver. Regular 'River Watch' volunteers and passers-by are sharing their knowledge and monitoring rainfall, river levels, water quality parameters, sediment issues, flood events and performance of flood risk management features. This has enabled a variety of low-cost data collection and submission tools to be tested over a two year period. Training has encouraged good quality data to be collected and volunteers are ready to capture meaningful information during unexpected flood events. Although volunteers are capable of collecting quantitative information, photographs and videos are submitted more readily. Twitter has also been used to share real-time observations successfully. A traditional monitoring network has been running in parallel

  17. Catchment acidification-from the top down.

    PubMed

    Matschullat, J; Andreae, H; Lessmann, D; Malessa, V; Siewers, U

    1992-01-01

    Three main factors define the speed of catchment acidification: the total input of pollutants; the thickness and character of soils, including the nature of the bedrock; and the size of subcatchments. The aerial input of pollutants in the Harz is among the highest in Central Europe (e.g. SO4-S: 22-70 kg (ha year)(-1); NO3-N: 9-10 kg (ha year)(-1); NH4-N: 10-15 kg (ha year)(-1) and Cd: 2.6-8.7 g (ha year)(-1); Cu: 34-125 g (ha year)(-1); Pb: 150-380 g (ha year)(-1); Zn: 105-560 g (ha year)(-1)). Thick soil profiles (2-4 m) acidify from the top down. Whether the soils will neutralize incoming acids depends on their buffering capacity. The small headwater subcatchments acidify first and subsequently release acidic water with pH values down to < or = 40. Four brook zones can be divided by the composition of their biocoenoses. The latter depend on the degree of acidification. These zones are also characterized by different hydrochemical conditions.

  18. Predicting runoff-induced pesticide input in agricultural sub-catchment surface waters: linking catchment variables and contamination.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, James M; Peall, Sue K C; Van Niekerk, Adriaan; Reinecke, Adriaan J; Day, Jenny A; Schulz, Ralf

    2002-12-01

    An urgent need exists for applicable methods to predict areas at risk of pesticide contamination within agricultural catchments. As such, an attempt was made to predict and validate contamination in nine separate sub-catchments of the Lourens River, South Africa, through use of a geographic information system (GIS)-based runoff model, which incorporates geographical catchment variables and physicochemical characteristics of applied pesticides. We compared the results of the prediction with measured contamination in water and suspended sediment samples collected during runoff conditions in tributaries discharging these sub-catchments. The most common insecticides applied and detected in the catchment over a 3-year sampling period were azinphos-methyl (AZP), chlorpyrifos (CPF) and endosulfan (END). AZP was predominantly found in water samples, while CPF and END were detected at higher levels in the suspended particle samples. We found positive (p < 0.002) correlations between the predicted average loss and the concentrations of the three insecticides both in water and suspended sediments (r between 0.87 and 0.94). Two sites in the sub-catchment were identified as posing the greatest risk to the Lourens River mainstream. It is assumed that lack of buffer strips, presence of erosion rills and high slopes are the main variables responsible for the high contamination at these sites. We conclude that this approach to predict runoff-related surface water contamination may serve as a powerful tool for risk assessment and management in South African orchard areas.

  19. Where to measure point rainfall during extreme flash flood events in mountainous catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Volkmann, T.; Lyon, S. W.; Gupta, H.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km^2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges are still needed to accurately estimate storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events. This is especially true in mountainous catchments where estimating storm depth and intensity from radar data is more challenging than in flat terrain. Given economical limitations on the number of rain gauges, a long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is where to put the (limited amount of) rain gauges to best capture both storm rainfall depth and temporal variability of storm intensity during extreme events. This study addresses the question whether it is possible to predict the best locations for rain gauge installation given a basin's topography and dominant storm tracks. A network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges was deployed in the Sabino Canyon catchment near Tucson, AZ, during the summer monsoon season of 2006. An extreme, multi-day rainfall event during 27-31 July 2006 caused record flooding and an unprecedented series of slope failures and debris flows in the Santa Catalina Mountains. Geostatistics (kriging with external drift, KED) was used to combine the tipping bucket rain gauge observations with NEXRAD weather radar to create rasterized rainfall maps with high spatial (1 km^2) and temporal (15 min) resolution over the entire multi-day rainfall event. We use these KED rainfall maps to determine the optimized locations for an installation of 1 up to 4 rain gauges considering all possible subsets of 1 to 4 grid cells over the entire rainfall event. Our optimization method minimizes both the residual percent bias and the coefficient of correlation between the mean areal rainfall obtained using the KED rainfall maps and mean rainfall determined using each subset. This method was applied to the entire record of rainfall observations to identify networks consisting of 1 to 4 rain gauges which represent the

  20. Guiding soil conservation strategy in headwater mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimane, Abir; Raclot, Damien; Evrard, Olivier; Sanaa, Mustapha; Lefèvre, Irène; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir siltation due to water erosion is an important environmental issue in Mediterranean countries where storage of clear surface water is crucial for their economic and agricultural development. In order to reduce water erosion, this study aimed to design a methodology for guiding the implementation of efficient conservation strategies by identifying the dominant sediment sources in Mediterranean context. To this end, a fingerprinting method was combined with long-term field monitoring of catchment sediment yield in five headwater catchments (0.1-10 km2) equipped with a small reservoir between 1990 and 1995. The five catchments were chosen to cover the large diversity of environmental conditions found along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. The fingerprinting techniques based on measurements of cesium-137 and Total Organic Carbon within the catchments and in reservoir sediment deposits successfully identified the contribution of rill/interrill and gully/channel erosion to sediment yield at the outlet of five small headwater catchments during the last 15-20 years. Results showed the very large variability of erosion processes among the selected catchments, with rill/interrill erosion contributions to sediment accumulated in outlet reservoirs ranging from 20 to 80%. Overall, rill/interrill erosion was the dominant process controlling reservoir siltation in three catchments whereas gully/channel erosion dominated in the other two catchments. This demonstrates that the dominant erosion process in the Mediterranean regions highly depends on the local environmental context. The lowest rill/interrill erosion contribution (2.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1) in the five catchments remained significantly higher than the tolerable soil loss indicating the severe levels reached by soil erosion along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. This study also showed that although the implementation of improved topsoil management measures greatly reduced rill

  1. Modeling seasonal export and retention of nutrients in european catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Klein, J.

    2003-04-01

    In the abatement of eutrophication of standing waters management of sources and transport of nutrients in river catchments is crucial. However the transport of nitrogen and phosphorus can vary significantly among (sub) catchments as a result of different physical, chemical and biotic factors. Qualitative and quantitative differences in nutrient pathways within catchments hamper the application of common standards and reliable prediction of the effect of nutrient loads. The EU-project BUFFER is set up to provide a tool which describes the relation between catchment properties and activities resulting in nutrient loads on one hand, and the ecological state of the receiving lakes on the other hand. To support this a new model-concept is developed that describes the transport and retention of nutrients in running waters (De Klein, 2002). The calculation requires minimum input data and generates output on a seasonal basis. The model was so far applied to Dutch catchments. This paper presents the extension and verification of the model, based on data of intensively studied catchments within the BUFFER-project. This implies the method can be applied to a wider range of European catchments. Basic model inputs are total annual loads of nutrients from point and diffuse sources to the surface (head) waters. During transport nutrients are retained in the catchment. Retention coefficients vary over the seasons and are calculated from a) residence time, which can be approximated using rainfall data, size of drainage basin and morphological properties b) temperature. The model outputs retention and export from the catchment on a monthly basis, using a set of straightforward formulas. Coefficients are calibrated with a subset of the measured data in an optimization routine, and subsequently verified. The similarity of measured and calculated values was high (r2 > 0.8; p<0.01). With a rather simple calculation method with few input data it is possible to estimate monthly export

  2. Sediment flux dynamics as fingerprints of catchment rehabilitation: The case of western Rift Valley escarpment of northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaha, Tesfaalem G.; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Zenebe, Amanuel; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-12-01

    50) (R2 = 0.96, p < 0.01), and with reference to D84 (r84) (R2 = 0.93, p < 0.01). The relationships between event Max10 and event Qp in each catchment were also used to extrapolate the peak discharges that would have prevailed in the first half of the 1980s, and the results showed huge reductions in peak discharges (p < 0.01) as a result of the reforestation interventions. Overall, this study demonstrates that (i) the supply of bedload in steep tropical mountains is determined negatively by forest or vegetation cover and positively by the presence of scar networks in the sloping parts of the catchments and catchment size; (ii) entrainment of the coarsest bedload particles is determined positively by peak discharge, stream power, stream bed roughness, and most strongly by critical shear stress; and (iii) in steep mountain streams where direct measurement of bedload movement is difficult, yet simple in situ measurement of the coarsest bedload particles (Max10) supplied and entrained in each event helps for understanding the dynamics of sediment flux in relation to catchment rehabilitation.

  3. The Effect of Terrain Aspect on Interannual Variability of Hydrologic Response in Mountainous Catchments in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, X.; Troch, P. A.; McIntosh, J. C.; Broxton, P. D.; Brooks, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    The aspect of the land surface in mid and high latitudes control hydrological response through differences in energy fluxes, prevailing winds, snow processes, evaporation and transpiration. In the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) in northern New Mexico, recent research has shown that north facing terrains accumulate thicker snow packs, the snow cover duration is longer, the soil moisture content is higher and hillslopes have longer water transit times. These findings suggest that catchments with a predominant north facing aspect are expected to have more water available and consequently a different hydrological response than catchments characterized by a different land orientation. This poster presents four years (2008-2011) of hydrological data in the VCNP and shows the hydrological response to interannual climate variability in mountainous catchments draining along different aspects. This investigation focuses on three perennial catchments draining Redondo Peak (3435m): La Jara (LJ; 3.67 km2), History Grove (HG; 2.42 km2) and Upper Jaramillo (UJ; 3.06 km2). The three catchments range in elevation between 2680 m and 3429 m. They share similar topographic characteristics, climate, vegetation and a complex geology. The most predominant north facing catchment is UJ; HG and LJ have both a predominant east facing aspect. This study is based on empirical observations of basin response and it has been carried out by way of monitoring physical amount, intensity and timing of water entering and leaving the catchments using the available meteorological data in the region and the instrumented network installed by the Jemez River Basin and Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (http://www.czo.arizona.edu/). The climate in the region is semi-arid, continental and highly variable. For the water years (WY) 2008 and 2011 annual precipitation was 86% and 71% below the mean (P=711.5mm), and during WY 2009 and 2010, annual precipitation was 4% and 1% above the

  4. Preferential flow and mixing process in the chemical recharge in subsurface catchments: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Rouxel, M.; Molenat, J.; Ruiz, L.; Aquilina, L.; Faucheux, M.; Labasque, T.; Sebilo, M.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow groundwater that develops on hillslopes is the main compartment in headwater catchments for flow and solute transport to rivers. Although spatial and temporal variations in its chemical composition are reported in the literature, there is no coherent description of the way these variations are organized, nor is there an accepted conceptual model for the recharge mechanisms and flows in the groundwater involved. We instrumented an intensive farming and subsurface dominant catchment located in Oceanic Western Europe (Kerbernez, Brittany, France), a headwater catchment included in the Observatory for Research on Environment AgrHyS (Agro-Hydro-System) and a part of the French Network of catchments for environmental research (SOERE RBV focused on the Critical Zone). These systems are strongly constrained by anthropogenic pressures (agriculture) and are characterized by a clear non-equilibrium status. A network of 42 nested piezometers was installed along a 200 m hillslope allowing water sampling along two transects in the permanent water table as well as in what we call the "fluctuating zone", characterized by seasonal alternance of saturated and unsaturated conditions. Water composition was monitored at high frequency (weekly) over a 3-year period for major anion composition and over a one year period for detailed 15N, CFC, SF6 and other dissolved gases. The results demonstrated that (i) the anionic composition in water table fluctuation zone varied significantly compared to deeper portions of the aquifer on the hillslope, confirming that this layer constitutes a main compartment for the mixing of new recharge water and old groundwater, (ii) seasonally, the variations of 15N and CFC are much higher during the recharge period than during the recession period, confirming the preferential flow during early recharge events, iii) variations of nitrate 15N and O18 composition was suggesting any significant denitrification process in the fluctuating zone, confirming

  5. Sub-tropical freshwater storage catchments: major greenhouse gas sinks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The relatively unstudied catchments and freshwater storages of the sub-tropics represent a potentially important gap in understanding global greenhouse gas cycling. The low number of studies may bias attempts to include this region's contribution to global greenhouse gas cycling, as very few studies have examined the major drivers behind terrestrial and aquatic greenhouse cycling in such sub-tropical areas. In addition, the uncertainty associated in quantifying greenhouse gas emission rates is relatively unknown. This information is crucial to determine whether freshwater storages and their associated catchments are net sources or sinks of greenhouse gas. Here, we present a greenhouse gas audit of the catchment and freshwater storage of Little Nerang Dam to determine the greenhouse gas status of the system as a whole. Little Nerang Dam is a sub-tropical freshwater storage located in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The catchment is in a relatively pristine condition with over 85% native forest remaining dominated by carbon dense Eucalypt species trees. Aquatic surface area is approximately 0.5 km2 in contrast to the terrestrial surface area of 35 km2. This system is an ideal model to investigate drivers behind greenhouse cycling in a relatively undisturbed catchment. A comprehensive field survey was conducted to estimate the major pools of carbon including terrestrial above and belowground fractions as well as the aquatic sediment and water column fractions. Greenhouse rates of emissions and sequestration were monitored over an annual cycle; parameters included tree growth rates, soil respiration, forest litter fall rates and aquatic methane and nitrous oxide fluxes. Results demonstrated the terrestrial carbon pool exceeded the aquatic pool by at least 2 orders of magnitude. When emission and sequestration rates were expressed as CO2 equivalents per unit area catchment sequestration was approximately double that of catchment and storage emissions. When rates were

  6. Stormflow generation: A meta-analysis of field evidence from small, forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthold, Frauke K.; Woods, Ross A.

    2015-05-01

    Combinations of runoff characteristics are commonly used to represent distinct conceptual models of stormflow generation. In this study, three runoff characteristics: hydrograph response, time source of runoff water, and flow path are used to classify catchments. Published data from the scientific literature are used to provide evidence from small, forested catchments. Each catchment was assigned to one of the eight conceptual models, depending on the combination of quick/slow response, old/new water, and overland/subsurface flow. A standard procedure was developed to objectively diagnose the predominant conceptual model of stormflow generation for each catchment and assess its temporal and spatial support. The literature survey yielded 42 catchments, of which 30 catchments provide a complete set of qualitative runoff characteristics resulting in one of the eight conceptual models. The majority of these catchments classify as subsurface flow path dominated. No catchments were found for conceptual models representing combinations of quick response-new water-subsurface flow (SSF), slow-new-SSF, slow-old-overland flow (OF) nor new-slow-OF. Of the 30 qualitatively classified catchments, 24 provide a complete set of quantitative measures. In summary, the field support is strong for 19 subsurface-dominated catchments and is weak for 5 surface flow path dominated catchments (six catchments had insufficient quantitative data). Two alternative explanations exist for the imbalance of field support between the two flow path classes: (1) the selection of research catchments in past field studies was mainly to explain quick hydrograph response in subsurface dominated catchments; (2) catchments with prevailing subsurface flow paths are more common in nature. We conclude that the selection of research catchments needs to cover a wider variety of environmental conditions which should lead to a broader, and more widely applicable, spectrum of resulting conceptual models and process

  7. Hydroclimatic changes and drivers in the Sava River Catchment and comparison with Swedish catchments.

    PubMed

    Levi, Lea; Jaramillo, Fernando; Andričević, Roko; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigate long-term hydroclimatic changes and their possible relation to regional changes in climate, land-use and water-use over the twentieth century in the transboundary Sava River Catchment (SRC) in South Eastern Europe. In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers. Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments. Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations. This provides a useful basis for further assessment of possible future hydroclimatic changes, under different scenarios of climate change and land/water-use developments in the region.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Vertical Motions in the Congo River Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, E. P.; White, N.; Jones, S.

    2005-12-01

    Africa's 'basin and swell' topography is thought to be dynamically supported by mantle convection and correlates closely with long wavelength free-air gravity anomalies, which can be regarded as a proxy for the convective pattern. Seismic tomographic studies reveal a region of slow seismic velocity beneath sub-equatorial Africa. This region broadly correlates with a zone of anomalously high elevation, known as the 'African Superswell' that stretches from the South Atlantic Ocean across Africa to Afar. More recently temporal parameters such as uplift rate have been considered in dynamic topography modeling. However, theoretical predictions of dynamic topography have not been carefully tested against observations. The Congo River Catchment is of particular interest as its large catchment area drains from both negative and positive long wavelength free air gravity. The recent availability of global high-resolution topographic data (e.g. SRTM 90 meter) allows for detailed studies of geomorphological features of inaccessible areas such as the Congo Basin. DEMs show that drainage along the southern edge of the Congo River Catchment incises into a smooth, low relief surface. This surface slopes northwards from elevations of 1500m to 700m. Knickpoints on river profiles indicate that the drainage network is immature and may have experienced a recent change in base level. The low-relief surface represents the top of a group of fluviatile sediments, known as the sable ocres deposited in an aggrading environment. Topography of this surface correlates with long wavelength free-air gravity anomalies and is caused by mantle convection. This correlation is evident in an admittance analysis of gravity and topography in the frequency domain. The geology and geomorphology in this region can be used as a further test of uplift rates predicted from seismic tomographic data.

  9. Runoff of small rocky headwater catchments: Field observations and hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, C.; Degetto, M.; Bernard, M.; Crucil, G.; Pimazzoni, A.; De Vido, G.; Berti, M.; Simoni, A.; Lanzoni, S.

    2016-10-01

    In dolomitic headwater catchments, intense rainstorms of short duration produce runoff discharges that often trigger debris flows on the scree slopes at the base of rock cliffs. In order to measure these discharges, we placed a measuring facility at the outlet (elevation 1770 m a.s.l.) of a small, rocky headwater catchment (area ˜0.032 km2, average slope ˜320%) located in the Venetian Dolomites (North Eastern Italian Alps). The facility consists of an approximately rectangular basin, ending with a sharp-crested weir. Six runoff events were recorded in the period 2011-2014, providing a unique opportunity for characterizing the hydrological response of the catchment. The measured hydrographs display impulsive shapes, with an abrupt raise up to the peak, followed by a rapidly decreasing tail, until a nearly constant plateau is eventually reached. This behavior can be simulated by means of a distributed hydrological model if the excess rainfall is determined accurately. We show that using the Soil Conservation Service Curve-Number (SCS-CN) method and assuming a constant routing velocity invariably results in an underestimated peak flow and a delayed peak time. A satisfactory prediction of the impulsive hydrograph shape, including peak value and timing, is obtained only by combining the SCS-CN procedure with a simplified version of the Horton equation, and simulating runoff routing along the channel network through a matched diffusivity kinematic wave model. The robustness of the proposed methodology is tested through a comparison between simulated and observed timings of runoff or debris flow occurrence in two neighboring alpine basins.

  10. A catchment-wide assessment of bed sediment metal concentrations in the first industrial city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Rachel; Rothwell, James; Woodward, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Manchester is often heralded as the 'first industrial city'. Rapid industrialisation in the 18th and 19th centuries saw vast quantities of fine-grained sediments (e.g. boiler ash and cinders) and contaminants (e.g. dyes, bleaches, and chemicals) deposited into the river channels of the Irwell and Mersey in a manner largely unchecked until the 1970s. Although water quality has improved in recent decades, there is a paucity of information on fluvial sediment quality and the extent to which a legacy of historical contamination persists in the contemporary river network. Forty five sites were sampled across the Irwell and Mersey catchments during low flow conditions in spring/summer 2015. Fine-grained bed sediment was collected using the Lambert and Walling (1988) method. Wet sieving was used to isolate the <63 μm fraction for geochemical analysis. Heavy metal concentrations were obtained via XRF with a particular focus on As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. In order to explore controls on sediment-associated metal concentrations, additional characteristics of the bed sediment were also investigated, including particle size and organic matter content. Enrichment factors, based on mean concentrations obtained from pre-industrial floodplain deposits, were calculated. The enrichment factors reveal severe or very severe metal contamination across the whole catchment, including the headwater basins. Relationships between bed sediment quality and hotspots of historic industrial activity have been examined - these reveal complex spatial patterns associated with the high number and variety of historic contaminant inputs. These data form the first baseline assessment and will be used within a larger project investigating the impact of extreme hydrological events on bed sediment quality and transfer in these catchments.

  11. Cost-effective methods for reducing nitrogen load at a catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankinen, Katri; Kinnunen, Pekka; Huotari, Jussi; Granlund, Kirsti

    2017-04-01

    Croplands and forests of the boreal region supply a wide range of ecosystem services. The properties and processes of these ecosystems regulate water flow and climate, and retain nutrients and store carbon. The functioning of the ecosystem processes depends on ambient temperatures and precipitation patterns, which are likely to continue changing in the boreal zone. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409, 9/2013 - 9/2017) is an EU Life funded project about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone Applying Innovative Observation and Modeling Techniques. In this project, we calculated future changes of carbon storage in soil, and nutrient loading from soil to surface waters and drinking water supplies. We calculated the carbon storage of forests and croplands using the dynamic YASSO litter and soil carbon model. The simulated carbon budget estimates were upscaled to the river basin by combining them with gridded data of land cover. We simulated nutrient loading from two boreal catchments to the receiving waters using the dynamic, catchment scale model INCA. We calculated land use specific loading values for these two well monitored catchments that belong to the LTER (The Long Term Ecological Research) monitoring network, and upscaled these results to the larger river basin based on grid-scaled data of land cover. We used population projections as proxies for the societal demand for the services of climate regulation and water purification, and assessed thereby the vulnerability of society to climate-induced changes in these services. In this poster we present the technical frame of combining models and data.

  12. Controls on diurnal streamflow cycles in a high altitude catchment in the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzner, R.; Weijs, S. V.; Tarolli, P.; Calaf, M.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    The study of streamflow diurnal cycles is of primary importance to understand hydrological processes happening at various spatial scales. In high altitude alpine catchments, streamflow diurnal cycles are typically dominated by snow or icemelt. During a field campaign in the summer 2012 in a small catchment in the Swiss Alps (Val Ferret catchment, draining area of 20.4 km2, mean altitude of 2423 m above sea level (asl), ranging from 1773 m to 3206 m asl, glaciarized area: 2%), we observed streamflow diurnal cycles throughout the season in two monitored sub-basins of the watershed. To study in detail the diurnal cycles, we make use of a wireless network of meteorological stations, time-lapse photography, a fully equipped energy-balance station and water electrical conductivity monitored at the gauging stations. In the first sub-basin, we observed a transition from a snowmelt to an evapotranspiration induced diurnal streamflow cycle. In the second sub-basin, we observed a snowmelt/icemelt dominated diurnal cycle during the entire season due to the presence of a small glacier. Comparisons between icemelt and evapotranspiration cycles showed that the two processes were happening at the same times of day but with a different sign. The amplitude of the icemelt cycle decreased exponentially during the season and was larger than of the amplitude of the evapotranspiration cycle which was relatively constant during the season. A conceptual model was applied to estimate the effect of evapotranspiration on the diurnal streamflow cycle in the icemelt dominated sub-basin. The model makes use of the latent heat measured at the energy balance station, the streamflow loss due to evapotranspiration and the computation of active evapotranspiration areas. Our study suggests that evapotranspiration from the riparian area damps the icemelt-diurnal streamflow cycle resulting in a possible underestimation of glacier mass changes.

  13. Nitrate contamination of groundwater in the catchment of Goczałkowice reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Joanna; Witkowski, Andrzej J.

    2014-05-01

    Goczałkowice dammed reservoir (area - 26 km2 , volume - 100 million m3 at a typical water level) is a very important source of drinking water for Upper Silesian agglomeration. At the catchment of the reservoir there are many potential sources of groundwater pollution (agriculture, bad practices in wastewater management, intensive fish farming). Thus local groundwater contamination, mainly by nitrogen compounds. The paper presents groundwater monitoring system and preliminary results of the research carried on at Goczałkowice reservoir and its catchment in 2010 - 2014 within the project "Integrated system supporting management and protection of dammed reservoir (ZiZoZap)'. The main objective for hydrogeologists in the project is to assess the role of groundwater in total water balance of the reservoir and the influence of groundwater on its water quality. During research temporal variability of groundwater - surface water exchange has been observed. Monitoring Network of groundwater quality consists of 22 observation wells (nested piezometers included) located around the reservoir - 13 piezometers is placed in two transects on northern and southern shore of reservoir. Sampling of groundwater from piezometers was conducted twice - in autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Maximum observed concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium were 255 mg/L, 0,16 mg/L and 3,48 mg/L, respectively. Surface water in reservoir (8 points) has also been sampled. Concentrations of nitrate in groundwater are higher than in surface water. Nitrate and ammonium concentrations exceeding standards for drinking water were reported in 18% and 50% of monitored piezometers, respectively. High concentration of nitrate (exceeding more than 5 times maximal admissible concentration) have been a significant groundwater contamination problem in the catchment of the reservoir. Periodically decrease of surface water quality is possible. Results of hydrogeological research indicate substantial spatial

  14. Runoff sources and flowpaths in a partially burned, upland boreal catchment underlain by permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, Joshua C.; Kikuchi, Colin P.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Schuster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Boreal soils in permafrost regions contain vast quantities of frozen organic material that is released to terrestrial and aquatic environments via subsurface flowpaths as permafrost thaws. Longer flowpaths may allow chemical reduction of solutes, nutrients, and contaminants, with implications for greenhouse gas emissions and aqueous export. Predicting boreal catchment runoff is complicated by soil heterogeneities related to variability in active layer thickness, soil type, fire history, and preferential flow potential. By coupling measurements of permeability, infiltration potential, and water chemistry with a stream chemistry end member mixing model, we tested the hypothesis that organic soils and burned slopes are the primary sources of runoff, and that runoff from burned soils is greater due to increased hydraulic connectivity. Organic soils were more permeable than mineral soils, and 25% of infiltration moved laterally upon reaching the organic-mineral soil boundary on unburned hillslopes. A large portion of the remaining water infiltrated into deeper, less permeable soils. In contrast, burned hillslopes displayed poorly defined soil horizons, allowing rapid, mineral-rich runoff through preferential pathways at various depths. On the catchment scale, mineral/organic runoff ratios averaged 1.6 and were as high as 5.2 for an individual storm. Our results suggest that burned soils are the dominant source of water and solutes reaching the stream in summer, whereas unburned soils may provide longer term storage and residence times necessary for production of anaerobic compounds. These results are relevant to predicting how boreal catchment drainage networks and stream export will evolve given continued warming and altered fire regimes.

  15. Isotope tracers in catchment hydrology: How far can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes as tracers of water has fundamentally changed the way that we view catchment hydrology. Tracer-based mass balance mixing studies in the past decades have revealed that most of the water comprising the storm hydrograph (in humid areas) is dominated by pre-event water. Furthermore, using the convolution integral approach to long term isotopic time series, studies have revealed a wide range of streamwater residence times (focused mostly on baseflow), from months to decades, but with most on the order of 1-3 years. These findings have now matured to the point where such information is informing rainfall- runoff model testing. As a result, stable isotope tracers offer new and orthogonal data measures for rejecting model structures. Similarly, scaling relations detected in streamwater residence time data offer hope for a new pathway to understand and quantify multi-scale catchment response patterns. So how far can we go with stable isotope tracers in catchment hydrology? Here I offer some suggestions on new research avenues that capitalize on the use of laser spectrometers and how the resulting increased sample frequencies in time and space (with laser specs in the lab and in the field) may offer new hydrological insights. Examples are given that apply to ecohydrological studies in catchments to resolve how vegetation and streams appear to return different pools of water to the hydrosphere; virtual experiments with catchment models to assess the fundamental controls on catchment residence time distribution; multi-tracer approaches to streamwater residence time to reconcile the striking differences in residence time estimates between oxygen-18 and tritium; and labeled isotope additions at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale under controlled input conditions for resolving the age, origin and pathway of flow.

  16. Understanding catchment dynamics through a Space-Society-Water trialectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Catherine; Jewitt, Graham; Risko, Susan; Hay, Ducan; Stuart-Hill, Sabine; Browne, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Can healthy catchments be utilized to secure water for the benefit of society? This is a complex question as it requires an understanding of the connections and relations between biophysical, social, political, economic and governance dimensions over space and time in the catchment and must interrogate whether there is 'value' in investing in the catchment natural or ecological infrastructure (EI), how this should be done, where the most valuable EI is located, and whether an investment in EI will generate co-benefits socially, environmentally and economically. Here, we adopt a social ecological relations rather than systems approach to explore these interactions through development of a space-society-water trialectic. Trialectic thinking is challenging as it requires new epistemologies and it challenges conventional modes of thought. It is not ordered or fixed, but rather is constantly evolving, revealing the dynamic relations between the elements under exploration. The construction of knowledge, through detailed scientific research and social learning, which contributes to the understanding and achievement of sustainable water supply, water related resilient economic growth, greater social equity and justice in relation to water and the reduction of environmental risk is illustrated through research in the uMngeni Catchment, South Africa. Using four case studies as a basis, we construct the catchment level society-water-space trialectic as a way of connecting, assembling and comparing the understanding and knowledge that has been produced. The relations in the three elements of the trialectic are constructed through identifying, understanding and analysing the actors, discourses, knowledge, biophysical materialities, issues and spatial connections in the case studies. Together these relations, or multiple trajectories, are assembled to form the society-water-space trialectic, which illuminates the dominant relations in the catchment and hence reveal the leverage

  17. Modelling Cryptosporidium oocysts transport in small ungauged agricultural catchments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jialiang; McDonald, Stephen; Peng, Xinhua; Samadder, Sukha R; Murphy, Thomas M; Holden, Nicholas M

    2011-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an environmentally robust pathogen that has caused severe waterborne disease outbreaks worldwide. The main source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in human drinking water is likely to be from farm animals via catchment pathways with water as the main transport vector. The vast majority of small agricultural catchments are ungauged therefore it is difficult to use a process model to predict and understand the mechanisms and activities that regulate the risk of surface water contamination from agricultural areas. For this study, two ungauged agricultural catchments in Ireland were used to model Cryptosporidium oocyst transport using SWAT2005 on a daily basis with reference data from adjacent catchment gauging stations. The results indicated that SWAT2005 could simulate stream flow with good agreement between prediction and observation on a monthly basis (R(2) from 0.94 to 0.83 and E (efficiency) from 0.92 to 0.66), but Cryptosporidium oocyst concentration results were less reliable (R(2) from 0.20 to 0.37, P < 0.05; with poor E -0.37 to -2.57). A sensitivity analysis using independent parameter perturbation indicated that temperature was the most important parameter regulating oocyst transport in the study catchments and that the timing of manure application relative to the occurrence of water runoff event was critical. The results also showed that grazing management had little influence on predicted oocyst transport while fields fertilized with manure were the key critical source areas for microbial contaminations in the study catchments. It was concluded that the approach presented could be used to assist with understanding the epidemiology of waterborne cryptosporidiosis outbreaks and to improve catchment management for the safety of the general public health.

  18. Drought propagation and its relation with catchment biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Lara, A.; Garreaud, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Droughts propagate in the hydrological cycle from meteorological to soil moisture to hydrological droughts. To understand the drivers of this process is of paramount importance since the economic and societal impacts in water resources are directly related with hydrological droughts (and not with meteorological droughts, which have been most studied). This research analyses drought characteristics over a large region and identify its main exogenous (climate forcing) and endogenous (biophysical characteristics such as land cover type and topography) explanatory factors. The study region is Chile, which covers seven major climatic subtypes according to Köppen system, it has unique geographic characteristics, very sharp topography and a wide range of landscapes and vegetation conditions. Meteorological and hydrological droughts (deficit in precipitation and streamflow, respectively) are characterized by their durations and standardized deficit volumes using a variable threshold method, over 300 representative catchments (located between 27°S and 50°S). To quantify the propagation from meteorological to hydrological drought, we propose a novel drought attenuation index (DAI), calculated as the ratio between the meteorological drought severity slope and the hydrological drought severity slope. DAI varies from zero (catchment that attenuates completely a meteorological drought) to one (the meteorological drought is fully propagated through the hydrological cycle). This novel index provides key (and comparable) information about drought propagation over a wide range of different catchments, which has been highlighted as a major research gap. Similar drought indicators across the wide range of catchments are then linked with catchment biophysical characteristics. A thorough compilation of land cover information (including the percentage of native forests, grass land, urban and industrial areas, glaciers, water bodies and no vegetated areas), catchment physical

  19. Integrating observations and models to help understanding how flooding impacts upon catchments as a basis for decision making.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2014-05-01

    This paper explains how flood management projects might be better informed in the future by using more observations and a novel impact modelling tool in a simple transparent framework. The understanding of how local scale impacts propagate downstream to impact on the downstream hydrograph is difficult to determine using traditional rainfall runoff and hydraulic routing methods. The traditional approach to modelling essentially comprises selecting a fixed model structure and then calibrating to an observational hydrograph, which make those model predictions highly uncertain. Here, a novel approach is used in which the structure of the runoff generation is not specified a priori and incorporates expert knowledge. Rather than using externally for calibration, the observed outlet hydrographs are used directly within the model. Essentially the approach involves the disaggregation of the outlet hydrograph by making assumptions about the spatial distribution of runoff generated. The channel network is parameterised through a comparison of the timing of observed hydrographs at a number of nested locations within the catchment. The user is then encouraged to use their expert knowledge to define how runoff is generated locally and what the likely impact of any local mitigation is. Therefore the user can specify any hydrological model or flow estimation method that captures their expertise. Equally, the user is encouraged to install as many instruments as they can afford to cover the catchment network. A Decision Support Matrix (DSM) is used to encapsulate knowledge of the runoff dynamics gained from simulation in a simple visual way and hence to convey the likely impacts that arise from a given flood management scenario. This tool has been designed primarily to inform and educate landowners, catchment managers and decision makers. The DSM outlines scenarios that are likely to increase or decrease runoff rates and allows the user to contemplate the implications and

  20. River nutrient loads and catchment size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Scarsbrook, M.R.; Weatherhead, M.A.; Humborg, Christoph; Eriksson, H.; Hannerz, F.

    2005-01-01

    We have used a total of 496 sample sites to calibrate a simple regression model for calculating dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes via runoff to the ocean. The regression uses the logarithms of runoff and human population as the independent variables and estimates the logarithms of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loading with R 2 values near 0.8. This predictive capability is about the same as has been derived for total nutrient loading with process-based models requiring more detailed information on independent variables. We conclude that population and runoff are robust proxies for the more detailed application, landscape modification, and in-stream processing estimated by more process-based models. The regression model has then been applied to a demonstration data set of 1353 river catchments draining to the sea from the North American continent south of the Canadian border. The geographic extents of these basins were extracted from a 1-km digital elevation model for North America, and both runoff and population were estimated for each basin. Most of the basins (72% of the total) are smaller than 103 km2, and both runoff and population density are higher and more variable among small basins than among larger ones.While total load to the ocean can probably be adequately estimated from large systems only, analysis of the geographic distribution of nutrient loading requires consideration of the sma