Science.gov

Sample records for europe joule project

  1. Current and projected state of Joule-Thomson cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Robert G.

    1996-06-01

    The cooling of infrared sensors and electro-optical devices by Joule-Thomson cryostats has been a viable systems option for electro optical systems since the 1960's. Currently, other options such as thermal electric coolers, closed cycle coolers and non-cooled detector technology are available and present alternatives for the system designer. In specific applications, Joule-Thomson cryostats still prove to be the option of choice. This paper will discuss the current and projected applications for Joule-Thomson cryostats as well as define and discuss the advantages of Joule-Thomson cooling technology. The importance of contamination control, reliability, and `Total Quality Management' in the manufacturing of Joule-Thomson cryostats will be emphasized.

  2. Beam shaping in the MegaJoule laser project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Jacques

    2011-10-01

    The LMJ (Laser MegaJoule) is dedicated to inertial confinement fusion. To perform this type of experiment, 160 square beams are frequency converted and focused onto a target filled with a deuterium tritium mixture. We propose to review how these beams are shaped along their propagation through the LMJ. Going upstream from the target to the laser source, specific optics has been designed to meet the beam shaping requirement. A focusing grating and a pseudorandom phase plate concentrate the energy onto the target. A deformable mirror controls and compensates the spatial phase defect occurring during the propagation through the main slab amplifiers. A liquid crystal cell shapes the beam in order to compensate the gain profile of the main amplifiers. It also protects the growth of damages that take place in the final optics of the chain. At last, a phase mirror generates a square flat top mode from a gaussian beam within a regenerative amplifier. All these optical components have one common principle: they control the phase of the spatial laser field.

  3. The Shale Gas in Europe project (GASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hans-Martin; Horsfield, Brian; Gash-Team

    2010-05-01

    At the present time no shale gas play has been brought to the production level in Europe. While the opportunities appear abundant, there are still many challenges to be overcome in Europe such as land access and environmental issues. Costs per well are still higher than in the US, and mining regulations are tighter. As yet it remains unclear whether European shales can support commercial shale gas production. First, it will be essential to test the sub-surface and the potential deliverability of wells, supported by basic research. GASH is the first major scientific initiative in Europe that is focussed on shale gas; it is ambitious in that it is broad ranging in scientific scope and that it unites leading European research groups and geological surveys with industry. US know-how is also integrated into the programme to avoid reinventing the wheel, or, still worse, the flat tyre. GASH is currently funded by eight companies, and comprises two main elements: compilation of a European Black Shale Database (EBSD) and focussed research projects that are based on geochemical, geophysical and geomechanical investigations. The EBSD is being built by a team of more than 20 geological surveys, extending from Sweden in the north, through western Europe and the Baltic states down to southern Europe, and over to Romania, Hungary and the Czech Republic in the east. The research projects apply numerical modelling, process simulations and laboratory analyses to selected regional study areas or "natural laboratories" from both Europe and the USA - the goal: to predict gas-in-place and fracability based on process understanding. The European black shales selected as natural shale gas laboratories are the Cambrian Alum Shale from Sweden and Denmark, the Lower Jurassic Posidonia Shale from Central Germany, and Carboniferous black shales from the UK in the west via the Netherlands to Germany in the east. Fresh core material for detailed investigations will be recovered during the mid

  4. Joule Unlimited Technologies Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This March 29 letter from EPA approves the petition from Joule Unlimited Technologies, Inc. regarding ethanol produced through the Joule Helioculture Process under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel [D-code 5] RINs under the RFS program.

  5. Winter in Northern Europe (WINE) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific aims, work plan, and organization of the Middle Atmosphere Program winter in northern Europe (MAP/WINE) are described. Proposed contributions to the MAP/WINE program from various countries are enumerated. Specific atmospheric parameters to be examined are listed along with the corresponding measurement technique.

  6. The ELISE II Project: A Digital Image Library for Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunz, Bob; Waters, Mairead

    This paper describes the progress made under the ELISE II electronic image library project from a technical standpoint. The ELISE II project is a European-wide initiative that aims to provide a comprehensive electronic image library service for Europe. It is funded under the European Commission, DG XIII-E, Telematics for Libraries Initiative. The…

  7. Projected seasonal meteorological droughts over Europe until 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoni, Jonathan; Vogt, Jürgen; Naumann, Gustavo; Barbosa, Paulo; Dosio, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, droughts have become increasingly recurrent and intense over large areas of Europe. Due to the projected temperature increase and longer dry periods, meteorological droughts are expected to become more frequent and severe in the next decades, potentially causing relevant impacts in many economic sectors and the environment. To investigate future drought patterns over Europe, we computed a combined indicator based on the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), and the Reconnaissance Drought Indicator (RDI). All indicators were computed at a 3-month accumulation period to focus on seasonal droughts using temperature and precipitation from an ensemble of eleven bias-adjusted simulations from the EURO-CORDEX experiment as input data. The combined indicator focuses on the predominance of drought conditions over normal conditions and was applied to obtain frequency and severity of drought events at 0.11° spatial resolution over Europe from 1981 to 2100. The analysis was performed for two representative concentration pathways (RCP), the moderate emission scenario RCP4.5 and the extreme RCP8.5. Excluding winter droughts, which are likely to be less frequent and severe over Central and Northern Europe for both scenarios, the other seasons show increased drought frequency and severity over entire Europe, markedly larger as the century passes especially under the RCP8.5. The largest increases are projected for spring droughts over the Iberian Peninsula and North-Eastern Scandinavia and for summer droughts over Western Europe. Under the RCP8.5, at least six out of eleven simulations project a statistically significant positive trend from 1981 to 2100 of drought frequency for the Mediterranean area, the Iberian Peninsula, and Turkey. On an annual scale, most simulations project a continuous increase of both drought frequency and severity for entire Europe, excluding Iceland and Central

  8. James Joule and meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    1989 was the hundredth anniversary of the death of James Prescott Joule, the Prescott being his mother's family name and the Joule, rhyming with cool, originating from the Derbyshire village of Youlgreave. Joule is rightly famous for his experimental efforts to establish the law of conservation of energy, and for the fact that J, the symbol known as the mechanical equivalent of heat, is named after him. Astronomically his "light has been hidden under a bushel". James Joule had a major influence on the physics of meteors.

  9. Final year engineering projects in Australia and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Goh, S.

    2010-05-01

    The paper starts by emphasising that final year engineering projects are regarded important in the training and education of professional engineers in Australia and Europe. The sources of projects available to students were also mentioned. Some Australian universities insist on individual projects but some not, each with their own reasons. However, it can be argued that all European universities run individual projects. In most cases, whether it is in Australia or Europe, the total load for final year engineering projects is about 6.25% of the load of engineering programmes. Assessment methods were also described. They were all different whether in Australia or Europe but not very significant. It was discovered that literature reviews, oral presentations and written reports or dissertations were important elements in the assessment schemes. Many university staff, in both continents, encouraged students to publish their work in international conferences and journals if the originality of the projects was high. It can be argued that the individual project is most effective in learning outcome; however, the cost involved is also very high and its sustainability in smaller universities in Australia is in doubt.

  10. Developing financeable projects in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Chelberg, R.; Prerad, V.

    1995-12-01

    POWER`s engineering and development experience in the Czech Republic creating financeable projects within the power generation industry will be presented. POWER has been involved in the Czech Republic`s privatization process, environmental legislation as well as formation of the regulatory environment. Strategic methods for accomplishing the development of financeable projects often include ownership and financial restructuring of the projects. This is done by utilizing internal cash flows, external debt and equity placement (provided by international financial institutions) by restructuring the facility`s contractual relationships and operations (providing as least cost solution to engineering) and possibly using existing governmental guarantees. In order to make any recommendations on how to come into compliance with the country`s environmental legislation, it is necessary to begin with an analysis of the existing facility. This involves preparation of technical and economic feasibility study, evaluation of technology and preliminary engineering solutions. It further involves restructuring of power sales agreements, heat sales agreements, and fuel supply agreements. The goal is to provide suitable security for the equity and debt financing participants by mitigating risk and creating a single purpose business unit with predictable life and economics.

  11. Collaboration Networks in Applied Conservation Projects across Europe.

    PubMed

    Nita, Andreea; Rozylowicz, Laurentiu; Manolache, Steluta; Ciocănea, Cristiana Maria; Miu, Iulia Viorica; Popescu, Viorel Dan

    2016-01-01

    The main funding instrument for implementing EU policies on nature conservation and supporting environmental and climate action is the LIFE Nature programme, established by the European Commission in 1992. LIFE Nature projects (>1400 awarded) are applied conservation projects in which partnerships between institutions are critical for successful conservation outcomes, yet little is known about the structure of collaborative networks within and between EU countries. The aim of our study is to understand the nature of collaboration in LIFE Nature projects using a novel application of social network theory at two levels: (1) collaboration between countries, and (2) collaboration within countries using six case studies: Western Europe (United Kingdom and Netherlands), Eastern Europe (Romania and Latvia) and Southern Europe (Greece and Portugal). Using data on 1261 projects financed between 1996 and 2013, we found that Italy was the most successful country not only in terms of awarded number of projects, but also in terms of overall influence being by far the most influent country in the European LIFE Nature network, having the highest eigenvector (0.989) and degree centrality (0.177). Another key player in the network is Netherlands, which ensures a fast communication flow with other network members (closeness-0.318) by staying connected with the most active countries. Although Western European countries have higher centrality scores than most of the Eastern European countries, our results showed that overall there is a lower tendency to create partnerships between different organization categories. Also, the comparisons of the six case studies indicates significant differences in regards to the pattern of creating partnerships, providing valuable information on collaboration on EU nature conservation. This study represents a starting point in predicting the formation of future partnerships within LIFE Nature programme, suggesting ways to improve transnational

  12. Collaboration Networks in Applied Conservation Projects across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Manolache, Steluta; Ciocănea, Cristiana Maria; Miu, Iulia Viorica; Popescu, Viorel Dan

    2016-01-01

    The main funding instrument for implementing EU policies on nature conservation and supporting environmental and climate action is the LIFE Nature programme, established by the European Commission in 1992. LIFE Nature projects (>1400 awarded) are applied conservation projects in which partnerships between institutions are critical for successful conservation outcomes, yet little is known about the structure of collaborative networks within and between EU countries. The aim of our study is to understand the nature of collaboration in LIFE Nature projects using a novel application of social network theory at two levels: (1) collaboration between countries, and (2) collaboration within countries using six case studies: Western Europe (United Kingdom and Netherlands), Eastern Europe (Romania and Latvia) and Southern Europe (Greece and Portugal). Using data on 1261 projects financed between 1996 and 2013, we found that Italy was the most successful country not only in terms of awarded number of projects, but also in terms of overall influence being by far the most influent country in the European LIFE Nature network, having the highest eigenvector (0.989) and degree centrality (0.177). Another key player in the network is Netherlands, which ensures a fast communication flow with other network members (closeness—0.318) by staying connected with the most active countries. Although Western European countries have higher centrality scores than most of the Eastern European countries, our results showed that overall there is a lower tendency to create partnerships between different organization categories. Also, the comparisons of the six case studies indicates significant differences in regards to the pattern of creating partnerships, providing valuable information on collaboration on EU nature conservation. This study represents a starting point in predicting the formation of future partnerships within LIFE Nature programme, suggesting ways to improve transnational

  13. Projections of Horizontal Water Vapor Transport across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    With a warming Earth's atmosphere, the global water cycle is expected to intensify, a process that is likely to yield changes in the frequency and intensity of hydrological extremes. To quantify such changes over Europe, most previous research has been based upon precipitation scenarios. However, seldom has the horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport IVT) been investigated, a key variable responsible for heavy precipitation events and one that links water source and sink regions. It is hence the aim of this study to assess the projections of IVT across Europe. The Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is the source of the climate model projections. The historical simulations (1979-2005) and two emissions scenarios (2073-2099), or representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) from 22 global circulation models were retrieved and evaluated. In particular, at model grid points across Europe the mean, standard deviation, and the 95th percentile of IVT were calculated for December, January, and February (Boreal winter); and for June, July, and August (Austral winter). The CMIP5 historical multi-model mean closely resembles the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis. In the future under the two emissions scenarios, the IVT increases in magnitude, with the highest percentage changes occurring in the extreme emissions (RCP8.5) scenario; for example, multi-model mean IVT increases of 30% are found in the domain. An evaluation of the low-altitude moisture and winds indicates that higher atmospheric water vapor content is the primary cause of these projected changes.

  14. Does Europe need immigrants? Population and work force projections.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D A

    1992-01-01

    European countries defined as all Northern and Western Europe including the former East Germany had a population of 498.4 million in 1990. In 1990 Western Europe had 374.4 million people. The European Community (EC) makes u 92% of the total population. Projections forecast a peak of the EC population (excluding the former East Germany) in 2005 at 334.2 million compared with 327 million in 1989, then declining to 332.5 million in 2010, 329.0 million min 2015 and 324.5 million in 2020. In Europe outside the East, the 20-24 year old work force entrance age group will drop from 29,860,000 in 1990 to 26,400,000 in 1005 and 23,480,000 in 2000: decreasing by 6,380,000 or 21.3%. Fertility rose by 22% in Sweden between 1985 and 1990, the rise of negligible in France and Belgium, but 2% in the UK and Switzerland, 4% in the Netherlands, 13% in Norway, 16% in Denmark, and even 6% in Germany and Luxembourg. The Ec labor force was 145 million in 1990 (excluding East Germany); it is projected to peak at 146.9 million in 2000, decline slowly until 2010 and decline faster up to 2025 with the steepest decline occurring in Germany and Italy. Unemployment rates would change from the 1990 estimate of 15.7 million to 15.5 million in 1995. Net migration into the 12 EC countries was on average -4,800 from 1965 to 1969; 357,000 from 1970 to 1974; 164,400 from 1980 to 1984; and 533,000/year from 1985 to 1989 as a result of the rise of asylum applicants and migration of ethnic Germans into Germany. Increased immigration is not needed to satisfy work force shortages for the next 10-20 years in Western Europe or in the EC. Other issues addressed are the economic activity forecast, the hidden labor supply, skill shortages, Eastern Europe, and teenage shortage. High-level manpower movements, immigration of asylum seekers, and illegal immigration will continue, but in the long run the conditions of employment and welfare support have to be improved for the women of Europe.

  15. Ensemble projections of future streamflow drought in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyen, Luc; Dankers, Rutger

    2010-05-01

    Global warming - with higher temperatures, hence higher evaporative demands, but also with changes in the seasonality of precipitation patterns and an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events - is likely to favor conditions for the development of droughts in many regions of Europe. This study evaluates the impact of global warming on streamflow drought in Europe by examining changes in low-flow predictions of a hydrological model driven by a multi-model ensemble of climate projections. The ensemble consists of simulations from two regional climate models (HIRHAM and RCAO), both run with boundary conditions from two global models (HadAM3H and ECHAM4/OPYC3), and for two scenarios (SRES A2 and B2) of greenhouse gas emissions. We employed the methods of block maxima and partial duration series to obtain minimum flows and flow deficits and fitted extreme value distributions by the maximum likelihood method. In order not to mix drought events with different physical causes the analysis was performed separately for the frost and non-frost season. The ensemble analysis shows that in the frost-free season streamflow droughts will become more severe and persistent in most parts of Europe by the end of this century, except in the most northern and northeastern regions. In snow dominated regions winter droughts are projected to be less severe because a lower fraction of precipitation will fall as snow in warmer winters. Regions most prone to an increase in river flow drought are southern and south-eastern Europe. The decrease in summer precipitation over large parts of Europe, as well as the rise in winter temperature and precipitation over northern Europe is well established and fairly consistent between the various regional climate simulations. Therefore, the changes in streamflow drought are less sensitive to the decadal-scale internal variability that is usually present in climate simulations and that may partially or completely obscure the

  16. Future meteorological drought: projections of regional climate models for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagge, James; Tallaksen, Lena; Rizzi, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In response to the major European drought events of the last decade, projecting future drought frequency and severity in a non-stationary climate is a major concern for Europe. Prior drought studies have identified regional hotspots in the Mediterranean and Eastern European regions, but have otherwise produced conflicting results with regard to future drought severity. Some of this disagreement is likely related to the relatively coarse resolution of Global Climate Models (GCMs) and regional averaging, which tends to smooth extremes. This study makes use of the most current Regional Climate Models (RCMs) forced with CMIP5 climate projections to quantify the projected change in meteorological drought for Europe during the next century at a fine, gridded scale. Meteorological drought is quantified using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), which normalize accumulated precipitation and climatic water balance anomaly, respectively, for a specific location and time of year. By comparing projections for these two indices, the importance of precipitation deficits can be contrasted with the importance of evapotranspiration increases related to temperature changes. Climate projections are based on output from CORDEX (the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment), which provides high resolution regional downscaled climate scenarios that have been extensively tested for numerous regions around the globe, including Europe. SPI and SPEI are then calculated on a gridded scale at a spatial resolution of either 0.44 degrees (~50 km) or 0.11 degrees (~12.5km) for the three projected emission pathways (rcp26, rcp45, rcp85). Analysis is divided into two major sections: first validating the models with respect to observed historical trends in meteorological drought from 1970-2005 and then comparing drought severity and frequency during three future time periods (2011-2040, 2041-2070, 2071-2100) to the

  17. Joule Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Chung K. (Inventor); Gatewood, John R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A bi-directional Joule Thomson refrigerator is described, which is of simple construction at the cold end of the refrigerator. Compressed gas flowing in either direction through the Joule Thomson expander valve and becoming liquid, is captured in a container in direct continuous contact with the heat load. The Joule Thomson valve is responsive to the temperature of the working fluid near the valve, to vary the flow resistance through the valve so as to maintain a generally constant flow mass between the time that the refrigerator is first turned on and the fluid is warm, and the time when the refrigerator is near its coldest temperature and the fluid is cold. The valve is operated by differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of materials to squeeze and release a small tube which acts as the expander valve.

  18. Soil threats in Europe for the RECARE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Jannes; Tesfai, Mehretaeb; Oygarden, Lillian

    2015-04-01

    Soil is one of our most important natural resources that provides us with vital goods and services to sustain life. Nevertheless, soils functions are threatened by a wide range of processes and a number of soil threats have been identified in Europe. Although there is a large body of knowledge available on soil threats in Europe, the complexity and functioning of soil systems and their interaction with human activities, climate change, and ecosystem services (ESS), is still not fully understood. An extensive literature review was carried out by a group of experts on soil threats at the European level. In total, around 60 experts from the 17 case study sites of the RECARE project, were involved in the process of reviewing and drafting the report and 11 soil threats were identified. The objective of WP2 of the RECARE project was to provide an improved overview of existing information on soil threats and degradation at the European scale. These soil threats are soil erosion by water, soil erosion by wind, decline of organic matter (OM) in peat, decline of OM in minerals soils, soil compaction, soil sealing, soil contamination, soil salinization, desertification, flooding and landslides and decline in soil biodiversity. The final report of WP2 provides a comprehensive thematic information on the major soil threats of Europe with due attention given to the Driving force-Pressure-State-Impact-Response to soil threats. Interrelationships between soil threats, between soil threats and soil functions and between soil threats and Ecosystems Services are made, and will be presented. A synergy between the soil threats is made based on the given information in each of the chapters, where we tried to identify the interactions between the threats. We tried to identify in what way one threat acts as a threat for another threat. Also, the link between soil degradation and Ecosystem Services are identified. Again, based on the information given in each chapter, the major climate

  19. Strategies for financing energy projects in East Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Fortino, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses financing options available for energy (power/steam) projects in East Central Europe. It is intended to be an overview and practical guide to such options in today`s environment. A survey is made of the principal multilateral and other financial institutions providing funding and/or credit support in the region. These include the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, the export credit agencies, and the commercial banks. Specific guarantee and other support mechanisms which some of these institutions provide are covered, including the latest developments. In addition to loan financing, potential sources of equity financing are discussed. Next, a description of the credit rating process by such institutions as Standard and Poor`s, and an example of a successful rating effort in the Czech Republic, lead into a discussion of accessing foreign and domestic bond markets to finance energy projects in the region.

  20. Drought and heatwaves in Europe: historical reconstruction and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniego, Luis; Thober, Stephan; Kumar, Rohini; Rakovec, Olda; Wood, Eric; Sheffield, Justin; Pan, Ming; Wanders, Niko; Prudhomme, Christel

    2017-04-01

    Heat waves and droughts are creeping hydro-meteorological events that may bring societies and natural systems to their limits by inducing large famines, increasing health risks to the population, creating drinking and irrigation water shortfalls, inducing natural fires and degradation of soil and water quality, and in many cases causing large socio-economic losses. Europe, in particular, has endured large scale drought-heat-wave events during the recent past (e.g., 2003 European drought), which have induced enormous socio-economic losses as well as casualties. Recent studies showed that the prediction of droughts and heatwaves is subject to large-scale forcing and parametric uncertainties that lead to considerable uncertainties in the projections of extreme characteristics such as drought magnitude/duration and area under drought, among others. Future projections are also heavily influenced by the RCP scenario uncertainty as well as the coarser spatial resolution of the models. The EDgE project funded by the Copernicus programme (C3S) provides an unique opportunity to investigate the evolution of droughts and heatwaves from 1950 until 2099 over the Pan-EU domain at a scale of 5x5 km2. In this project, high-resolution multi-model hydrologic simulations with the mHM (www.ufz.de/mhm), Noah-MP, VIC and PCR-GLOBWB have been completed for the historical period 1955-2015. Climate projections have been carried out with five CMIP-5 GCMs: GFDL-ESM2M, HadGEM2-ES, IPSL-CM5A-LR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, NorESM1-M from 2006 to 2099 under RCP2.6 and RCP8.5. Using these multi-model unprecedented simulations, daily soil moisture index and temperature anomalies since 1955 until 2099 will be estimated. Using the procedure proposed by Samaniego et al. (2013), the probabilities of exceeding the benchmark events in the reference period 1980-2010 will be estimated for each RCP scenario. References http://climate.copernicus.eu/edge-end-end-demonstrator-improved-decision-making-water-sector-europe

  1. Alumni Go Europe: A Lifelong Learning Grundtvig Project--2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement and Support of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a two-year project to strengthen and enhance alumni relations programmes at European universities. Members of the "Alumni go Europe" partnership include CASE Europe, the University of Linz in Austria, the University of Navarra in Spain, and the University of Siegen in Germany. The project is funded…

  2. Projections of extreme storm surge levels along Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vousdoukas, Michalis I.; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Annunziato, Alessandro; Giardino, Alessio; Feyen, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Storm surges are an important coastal hazard component and it is unknown how they will evolve along Europe's coastline in view of climate change. In the present contribution, the hydrodynamic model Delft3D-Flow was forced by surface wind and atmospheric pressure fields from a 8-member climate model ensemble in order to evaluate dynamics in storm surge levels (SSL) along the European coastline (1) for the baseline period 1970-2000; and (2) during this century under the Representative Concentration Pathways RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Validation simulations, spanning from 2008 to 2014 and driven by ERA-Interim atmospheric forcing, indicated good predictive skill (0.06 m < RMSE < 0.29 m and 10 % < RMSE < 29 % for 110 tidal gauge stations across Europe). Peak-over-threshold extreme value analysis was applied to estimate SSL values for different return periods, and changes of future SSL were obtained from all models to obtain the final ensemble. Values for most scenarios and return periods indicate a projected increase in SSL at several locations along the North European coastline, which is more prominent for RCP8.5 and shows an increasing tendency towards the end of the century for both RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Projected SSL changes along the European coastal areas south of 50°N show minimal change or even a small decrease, with the exception of RCP8.5 under which a moderate increase is projected towards the end of the century. The present findings indicate that the anticipated increase in extreme total water levels due to relative sea level rise (RSLR), can be further enforced by an increase of the extreme SSL, which can exceed 30 % of the RSLR, especially for the high return periods and pathway RCP8.5. This implies that the combined effect could increase even further anticipated impacts of climate change for certain European areas and highlights the necessity for timely coastal adaptation and protection measures. The dataset is publicly available under this link: http://data.jrc.ec.europa.eu/collection/LISCOAST.

  3. Cycling Joule Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A symmetrical adsorption pump/compressor system having a pair of mirror image legs and a Joule Thomson expander, or valve, interposed between the legs thereof for providing a, efficient refrigeration cycle is described. The system further includes a plurality of gas operational heat switches adapted selectively to transfer heat from a thermal load and to transfer or discharge heat through a heat projector, such as a radiator or the like. The heat switches comprise heat pressurizable chambers adapted for alternate pressurization in response to adsorption and desorption of a pressurizing gas confined therein.

  4. Memoir of James Prescott Joule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Osborne

    2011-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Parentage and early life; 3. Joule's first research; 4. Second research; 5. Third research; 6. Efforts to convince the scientific world; 7. The year 1847; 8. Joule's views accepted by Thomson, Rankine, and Clausius; 9. Middle life; 10. Later life; Appendix to page 18; Note A to page 88; Index.

  5. Project DAFNE - Drilling Active Faults in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, I. T.; Ask, M. S. V.; Olesen, O.

    2012-04-01

    We are currently developing a new ICDP project 'Drillling Active Faults in Northern Europe' (DAFNE) which aims at investigating, via scientific drilling, the tectonic and structural characteristics of postglacial (PG) faults in northern Fennoscandia, including their hydrogeology and associated deep biosphere [1, 2]. During the last stages of the Weichselian glaciation (ca. 9,000 - 15,000 years B.P.), reduced ice load and glacially affected stress field resulted in active faulting in Fennoscandia with fault scarps up to 160 km long and 30 m high. These postglacial (PG) faults are usually SE dipping, SW-NE oriented thrusts, and represent reactivated, pre-existing crustal discontinuities. Postglacial faulting indicates that the glacio-isostatic compensation is not only a gradual viscoelastic phenomenon, but includes also unexpected violent earthquakes, suggestively larger than other known earthquakes in stable continental regions. The research is anticipated to advance science in neotectonics, hydrogeology and deep biosphere studies, and provide important information for nuclear waste and CO2 disposal, petroleum exploration on the Norwegian continental shelf and studies of mineral resources in PG fault areas. We expect that multidisciplinary research applying shallow and deep drilling of postglacial faults would provide significant scientific results through generating new data and models, namely: (1) Understanding PG fault genesis and controls of their locations; (2) Deep structure and depth extent of PG faults; (3) Textural, mineralogical and physical alteration of rocks in the PG faults; (4) State of stress and estimates of paleostress of PG faults; (5) Hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and hydraulic properties of PG faults; (6) Dating of tectonic reactivation(s) and temporal evolution of tectonic systems hosting PG faults; (7) Existence/non-existence of deep biosphere in PG faults; (8) Data useful for planning radioactive waste disposal in crystalline bedrock; (9) Data

  6. Watt and joule balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian A.

    2014-04-01

    The time is fast approaching when the SI unit of mass will cease to be based on a single material artefact and will instead be based upon the defined value of a fundamental constant—the Planck constant—h . This change requires that techniques exist both to determine the appropriate value to be assigned to the constant, and to measure mass in terms of the redefined unit. It is important to ensure that these techniques are accurate and reliable to allow full advantage to be taken of the stability and universality provided by the new definition and to guarantee the continuity of the world's mass measurements, which can affect the measurement of many other quantities such as energy and force. Up to now, efforts to provide the basis for such a redefinition of the kilogram were mainly concerned with resolving the discrepancies between individual implementations of the two principal techniques: the x-ray crystal density (XRCD) method [1] and the watt and joule balance methods which are the subject of this special issue. The first three papers report results from the NRC and NIST watt balance groups and the NIM joule balance group. The result from the NRC (formerly the NPL Mk II) watt balance is the first to be reported with a relative standard uncertainty below 2 × 10-8 and the NIST result has a relative standard uncertainty below 5 × 10-8. Both results are shown in figure 1 along with some previous results; the result from the NIM group is not shown on the plot but has a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6 and is consistent with all the results shown. The Consultative Committee for Mass and Related Quantities (CCM) in its meeting in 2013 produced a resolution [2] which set out the requirements for the number, type and quality of results intended to support the redefinition of the kilogram and required that there should be agreement between them. These results from NRC, NIST and the IAC may be considered to meet these requirements and are likely to be widely debated

  7. The SPACELAB Project: A Transatlantic challenge for Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottemeyer, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of Europe to the U.S. space program is related to the development of Spacelab. The Federal Republic of Germany is to contribute 53% and Italy 18% of the expenses. The industrial team conducting the development work for the Spacelab consists of experts from firms of the ten nations participating financially in the program. Attention is given to organizational problems, details on the development program, aspects of mission preparation, and future developments.

  8. Joule heating in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangohr, Hans; Chernyshenko, Dmitri S.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, Guido

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat are simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) silicon wafers, and (thick) diamond wafers. The spatially resolved increase in temperature as a function of time is computed. For effectively three-dimensional substrates (where the substrate thickness greatly exceeds the nanowire length), we identify three different regimes of heat propagation through the substrate: regime (i), where the nanowire temperature increases approximately logarithmically as a function of time. In this regime, the nanowire temperature is well described analytically by You [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2399441 89, 222513 (2006)]. We provide an analytical expression for the time tc that marks the upper applicability limit of the You model. After tc, the heat flow enters regime (ii), where the nanowire temperature stays constant while a hemispherical heat front carries the heat away from the wire and into the substrate. As the heat front reaches the boundary of the substrate, regime (iii) is entered, where the nanowire and substrate temperature start to increase rapidly. For effectively two-dimensional substrates (where the nanowire length greatly exceeds the substrate thickness), there is only one regime in which the temperature increases logarithmically with time for large times, before the heat front reaches the substrate boundary. We provide an analytical expression, valid for all pulse durations, that allows one to accurately compute this temperature increase in the nanowire on thin substrates.

  9. Projected prevalence of inadequate nutrient intakes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Roman Viñas, Blanca; Ribas Barba, Lourdes; Ngo, Joy; Gurinovic, Mirjana; Novakovic, Romana; Cavelaars, Adriënne; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van't Veer, Pieter; Matthys, Christophe; Serra Majem, Lluís

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of nutrient intake inadequacy in Europe, applying the Nordic Nutritional Recommendations in the context of the EURRECA Network of Excellence. Nutrient data was obtained from the European Nutrition and Health Report II. Those nutritional surveys using a validated food frequency questionnaire or diet history and a food diary/ register with at least 7 days of registers or with an adjustment for intraindividual variability were included. The nutrients analyzed were: vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin B(12), folic acid, calcium, iron, zinc, selenium, copper, and iodine. The estimated average requirement cut point was applied to estimate inadequacy. The Nordic and Institute of Medicine nutrient recommendations were used as references. The mean prevalence of inadequacy was below 11% for zinc, iron, and vitamin B(12) (only in the elderly), and it was 11-20% for copper in adults and the elderly and for vitamin B(12) in adults and vitamin C in the elderly. The prevalence was above 20% for vitamin D, folic acid, calcium, selenium, and iodine in adults and the elderly and for vitamin C in adults. Vitamin C, vitamin D, folic acid, calcium, selenium, and iodine were the nutrients showing a higher prevalence of inadequate intakes in Europe. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Joule heating at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. C.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Abreu, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations based on simultaneous observations of the electric field magnitude, and individual measurements of ion drift velocity and particle precipitation, over the lifetime of the AE-C satellite, are used to determine high latitude Joule heating. Conductivities produced by an averaged seasonal illumination were included with those calculated from particle precipitation. It is found that high latitude Joule heating occurs in an approximately oval pattern, and consists of dayside cleft, dawn and dusk sunward convection, and night sector heating regions. On average, heating in the cleft and dawn-dusk regions contributes the largest heat input, and there is no apparent difference between hemispheres for similar seasons. Joule heat input is 50 percent greater in summer than in winter, due primarily to the greater conductivity caused by solar production.

  11. Winter in Northern Europe (WINE). The project Winter in Northern Europe (MAP/WINE): Introduction and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1989-01-01

    The project Winter in Northern Europe (WINE) of the international Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) comprised a multinational study of the structure, dynamics and composition of the middle atmosphere in winter at high latitudes. Coordinated field measurements were performed during the winter 1983 to 1984 by a large number of ground-based, air-borne, rocket-borne and satellite-borne instruments. Many of the individual experiments were performed in the European sector of the high latitude and polar atmosphere. Studies of the stratosphere, were, in addition, expanded to hemispheric scales by the use of data obtained from remotely sensing satellites. Beyond its direct scientific results, which are reviewed, MAP/WINE has stimulated quite a number of follow-on experiments and projects which address the aeronomy of the middle atmosphere at high and polar latitudes.

  12. Climate Change and Aedes Vectors: 21st Century Projections for Dengue Transmission in Europe.

    PubMed

    Liu-Helmersson, Jing; Quam, Mikkel; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Stenlund, Hans; Ebi, Kristie; Massad, Eduardo; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-05-01

    Warming temperatures may increase the geographic spread of vector-borne diseases into temperate areas. Although a tropical mosquito-borne viral disease, a dengue outbreak occurred in Madeira, Portugal, in 2012; the first in Europe since 1920s. This outbreak emphasizes the potential for dengue re-emergence in Europe given changing climates. We present estimates of dengue epidemic potential using vectorial capacity (VC) based on historic and projected temperature (1901-2099). VC indicates the vectors' ability to spread disease among humans. We calculated temperature-dependent VC for Europe, highlighting 10 European cities and three non-European reference cities. Compared with the tropics, Europe shows pronounced seasonality and geographical heterogeneity. Although low, VC during summer is currently sufficient for dengue outbreaks in Southern Europe to commence-if sufficient vector populations (either Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus) were active and virus were introduced. Under various climate change scenarios, the seasonal peak and time window for dengue epidemic potential increases during the 21st century. Our study maps dengue epidemic potential in Europe and identifies seasonal time windows when major cities are most conducive for dengue transmission from 1901 to 2099. Our findings illustrate, that besides vector control, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions crucially reduces the future epidemic potential of dengue in Europe. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Tuning Project for Medicine--learning outcomes for undergraduate medical education in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Allan; Ross, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The Tuning Project is an initiative funded by the European Commission to develop learning outcomes/competences for degree programmes in Europe and to promote harmonisation in the Higher Education sector. It is closely linked to the Bologna Declaration and subsequent developments. Under the auspices of the MEDINE Thematic Network for Medical Education in Europe, the Tuning (Medicine) Task Force has generated a draft set of learning outcomes for primary medical degree qualifications in Europe. These take account of previous work on learning outcomes in medicine, have been generated through an iterative process of expert review and development, and have been the subject of a Europe-wide internet-based opinion survey and subsequent analysis. They have been approved by the MEDINE Network and validated (subject to some additional analysis) by an Expert Panel of the European Commission.

  14. Future scenarios for viticultural zoning in Europe: ensemble projections and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Fraga, H; Malheiro, A C; Moutinho-Pereira, J; Santos, J A

    2013-11-01

    Optimum climate conditions for grapevine growth are limited geographically and may be further challenged by a changing climate. Due to the importance of the winemaking sector in Europe, the assessment of future scenarios for European viticulture is of foremost relevance. A 16-member ensemble of model transient experiments (generated by the ENSEMBLES project) under a greenhouse gas emission scenario and for two future periods (2011-2040 and 2041-2070) is used in assessing climate change projections for six viticultural zoning indices. After model data calibration/validation using an observational gridded daily dataset, changes in their ensemble means and inter-annual variability are discussed, also taking into account the model uncertainties. Over southern Europe, the projected warming combined with severe dryness in the growing season is expected to have detrimental impacts on the grapevine development and wine quality, requiring measures to cope with heat and water stress. Furthermore, the expected warming and the maintenance of moderately wet growing seasons over most of the central European winemaking regions may require a selection of new grapevine varieties, as well as an enhancement of pest/disease control. New winemaking regions may arise over northern Europe and high altitude areas, when considering climatic factors only. An enhanced inter-annual variability is also projected over most of Europe. All these future changes pose new challenges for the European winemaking sector.

  15. Future scenarios for viticultural zoning in Europe: ensemble projections and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, H.; Malheiro, A. C.; Moutinho-Pereira, J.; Santos, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    Optimum climate conditions for grapevine growth are limited geographically and may be further challenged by a changing climate. Due to the importance of the winemaking sector in Europe, the assessment of future scenarios for European viticulture is of foremost relevance. A 16-member ensemble of model transient experiments (generated by the ENSEMBLES project) under a greenhouse gas emission scenario and for two future periods (2011-2040 and 2041-2070) is used in assessing climate change projections for six viticultural zoning indices. After model data calibration/validation using an observational gridded daily dataset, changes in their ensemble means and inter-annual variability are discussed, also taking into account the model uncertainties. Over southern Europe, the projected warming combined with severe dryness in the growing season is expected to have detrimental impacts on the grapevine development and wine quality, requiring measures to cope with heat and water stress. Furthermore, the expected warming and the maintenance of moderately wet growing seasons over most of the central European winemaking regions may require a selection of new grapevine varieties, as well as an enhancement of pest/disease control. New winemaking regions may arise over northern Europe and high altitude areas, when considering climatic factors only. An enhanced inter-annual variability is also projected over most of Europe. All these future changes pose new challenges for the European winemaking sector.

  16. Obesity and other health determinants across Europe: The EURALIM Project

    PubMed Central

    Beer-Borst, S; Morabia, A; Hercberg, S; Vitek, O; Bernstein, M; Galan, P; Galasso, R; Giampaoli, S; Houterman, S; McCrum, E; Panico, S; Pannozzo, F; Preziosi, P; Ribas, L; Serra-Majem, L; Verschuren, W; Yarnell, J; Northridge, M

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—EURALIM (EURope ALIMentation), a European collaborative study, aimed to determine and describe the extent to which European data on risk factor distributions from different populations could be pooled and harmonised in a common database for international comparisons.
SETTING—Seven independent population-based surveys from six European countries (France, Italy, Northern Ireland/United Kingdom, Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands). 
METHODS—Data for 18 381 women and 12 908 men aged 40-59 were pooled in a common database. Central statistical analyses on major cardiovascular risk factors were conducted with careful consideration of methodological issues, including differences in study designs, data assessment tools, and analytic techniques used.
MAIN RESULTS—Because of the detected variability among methods used, direct comparisons of risk factor distributions and prevalences between studies were problematic. None the less, comparisons of within population contrasts by sex, age group, and other health determinants were considered to be meaningful and apt, as illustrated here for obesity. Results were targeted and disseminated to both the general public and public health professionals and framed in the context of a European information campaign.
CONCLUSIONS—International and national comparisons between existing locally run studies are feasible and useful, but harmonisation methods need improvement. Development of an international risk factor surveillance programme based on decentralised data collection is warranted. In the meantime, risk factor contrasts across populations can be used as a basis for targeting needed public health intervention programmes.


Keywords: comparative study; obesity; risk factor surveillance PMID:10818117

  17. Record dry summer in 2015 challenges precipitation projections in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Orth, René; Zscheischler, Jakob; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-01-01

    Central Europe was characterized by a humid-temperate climate in the 20th century. Climate change projections suggest that climate in this area will shift towards warmer temperatures by the end of the 21st century, while projected precipitation changes are highly uncertain. Here we show that the 2015 summer rainfall was the lowest on record since 1901 in Central Europe, and that climate models that perform best in the three driest years of the historical time period 1901–2015 project stronger drying trends in the 21st century than models that perform best in the remaining years. Analyses of precipitation and derived soil moisture reveal that the 2015 event was drier than both the recent 2003 or 2010 extreme summers in Central Europe. Additionally there are large anomalies in satellite-derived vegetation greenness. In terms of precipitation and temperature anomalies, the 2015 summer in Central Europe is found to lie between historical climate in the region and that characteristic of the Mediterranean area. Even though the models best capturing past droughts are not necessarily generally more reliable in the future, the 2015 drought event illustrates that potential future drying trends have severe implications and could be stronger than commonly assumed from the entire IPCC AR5 model ensemble. PMID:27323864

  18. Joule heating in electrokinetic flow.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xiangchun

    2008-01-01

    Electrokinetic flow is an efficient means to manipulate liquids and samples in lab-on-a-chip devices. It has a number of significant advantages over conventional pressure-driven flow. However, there exists inevitable Joule heating in electrokinetic flow, which is known to cause temperature variations in liquids and draw disturbances to electric, flow and concentration fields via temperature-dependent material properties. Therefore, both the throughput and the resolution of analytic studies performed in microfluidic devices are affected. This article reviews the recent progress on the topic of Joule heating and its effect in electrokinetic flow, particularly the theoretical and experimental accomplishments from the aspects of fluid mechanics and heat/mass transfer. The primary focus is placed on the temperature-induced flow variations and the accompanying phenomena at the whole channel or chip level.

  19. Reduced Joule heating in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonard, François

    2011-03-01

    The temperature distribution in nanowires due to Joule heating is studied analytically using a continuum model and a Green's function approach. We show that the temperatures reached in nanowires can be much lower than that predicted by bulk models of Joule heating, due to heat loss at the nanowire surface that is important at nanoscopic dimensions, even when the thermal conductivity of the environment is relatively low. In addition, we find that the maximum temperature in the nanowire scales weakly with length, in contrast to the bulk system. A simple criterion is presented to assess the importance of these effects. The results have implications for the experimental measurements of nanowire thermal properties, for thermoelectric applications, and for controlling thermal effects in nanowire electronic devices.

  20. A Virial Treatment of the Joule and Joule-Thomson Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybolt, Thomas R.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background information designed to aid a physical chemistry student in using the virial equation of state in deriving expressions for other thermodynamic properties, such as writing the Joule and Joule-Thomson coefficients in terms of virial expansions. (CS)

  1. Changing pattern of landslide risk in Europe - The SafeLand project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, F.; Kalsnes, B. G.; SafeLand Research Consortium

    2011-12-01

    The changing pattern of landslide hazard and risk caused by climate change and changes in demography, the need to protect people and property, the reality for society in Europe to live with hazard and risk and the need to manage risk were the motives for the project SafeLand: "Living with landslide risk in Europe: Assessment, effects of global change, and risk management strategies." SafeLand is a large, integrating research project under the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme (FP7). It started on 1 May 2009 and will go on for 3 years, ending on 30 April 2012. There project involves 27 partners from 12 European countries, and has international collaborators and advisers from China, India, USA, Japan and Hong Kong. SafeLand also involves 25 End-Users from 11 countries. SafeLand is coordinated by the International Centre for Geohazards (ICG) at Norwegian Geotechnical Institute in Norway. Further information on the SafeLand project can be found at its web site http://www.safeland-fp7.eu/ . SafeLand is an ongoing project, which results will be finalized in 2012. This lecture summarizes the SafeLand's activities and achievements until November 2011. The main results achieved so far include: - Development and testing of several empirical methods for predicting the characteristics of threshold rainfall events for triggering of precipitation-induced landslides. - Identification of landslide hazard and risk hotspots by an objective, GIS-based analysis for Europe. The results show clearly where landslides pose the largest hazard in Europe and the objective approach allows a ranking of the countries by exposed area and population. - Different regional climate model simulations over Europe (from the EU FP6 project ENSEMBLES) at a spatial resolution of 25 x 25 km have been used to perform an extreme value analysis for trends in heavy precipitation events. In winter a general trend towards more heavy precipitation events across all analyzed regional climate model

  2. Comparing Emission Inventories and Model-Ready Emission Datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the...

  3. Comparing Emission Inventories and Model-Ready Emission Datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the...

  4. Projection of climatic suitability for Aedes albopictus Skuse (Culicidae) in Europe under climate change conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Dominik; Thomas, Stephanie Margarete; Niemitz, Franziska; Reineking, Björn; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2011-07-01

    During the last decades the disease vector Aedes albopictus ( Ae. albopictus) has rapidly spread around the globe. The spread of this species raises serious public health concerns. Here, we model the present distribution and the future climatic suitability of Europe for this vector in the face of climate change. In order to achieve the most realistic current prediction and future projection, we compare the performance of four different modelling approaches, differentiated by the selection of climate variables (based on expert knowledge vs. statistical criteria) and by the geographical range of presence records (native range vs. global range). First, models of the native and global range were built with MaxEnt and were either based on (1) statistically selected climatic input variables or (2) input variables selected with expert knowledge from the literature. Native models show high model performance (AUC: 0.91-0.94) for the native range, but do not predict the European distribution well (AUC: 0.70-0.72). Models based on the global distribution of the species, however, were able to identify all regions where Ae. albopictus is currently established, including Europe (AUC: 0.89-0.91). In a second step, the modelled bioclimatic envelope of the global range was projected to future climatic conditions in Europe using two emission scenarios implemented in the regional climate model COSMO-CLM for three time periods 2011-2040, 2041-2070, and 2071-2100. For both global-driven models, the results indicate that climatically suitable areas for the establishment of Ae. albopictus will increase in western and central Europe already in 2011-2040 and with a temporal delay in eastern Europe. On the other hand, a decline in climatically suitable areas in southern Europe is pronounced in the Expert knowledge based model. Our projections appear unaffected by non-analogue climate, as this is not detected by Multivariate Environmental Similarity Surface analysis. The generated risk maps

  5. The Joint CEDEFOP/ETF Project on 'Scenarios and Strategies for Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Europe': A Contribution to the Debate on the Future of Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellin, Burkart

    A project in Europe is working to improve the quality of work, promote equal opportunities, combat exclusion and poverty; promote lasting economic growth and a European Union economic policy; and promote sustainable development and quality of life. In order to achieve these goals, three main objectives for vocational education and training (VET)…

  6. Statistical multi-model climate projections of surface ocean waves in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jorge; Menendez, Melisa; Camus, Paula; Mendez, Fernando J.; Losada, Inigo J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the impact of climate change on sea surface waves has received increasingly more attention by the climate community. Indeed, ocean waves reaching the coast play an important role in several processes concerning coastal communities, such as inundation and erosion. However, regional downscaling at the high spatial resolution necessary for coastal studies has received less attention. Here, we present a novel framework for regional wave climate projections and its application in the European region. Changes in the wave dynamics under different scenarios in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean are analyzed. The multi-model projection methodology is based on a statistical downscaling approach. The statistical relation between the predictor (atmospheric conditions) and the predictand (multivariate wave climate) is based on a weather type (WT) classification. This atmospheric classification is developed by applying the k-means clustering technique over historical offshore sea level pressure (SLP) fields. Each WT is linked to sea wave conditions from a wave hindcast. This link is developed by associating atmospheric conditions from reanalysis with multivariate local waves. This predictor-predictand relationship is applied to the daily SLP fields from global climate models (GCMs) in order to project future changes in regional wave conditions. The GCMs used in the multi-model projection are selected according to skill criteria. The application of this framework uses CMIP5-based wave climate projections in Europe. The low computational requirements of the statistical approach allow a large number of GCMs and climate change scenarios to be studied. Consistent with previous works on global wave climate projections, the estimated changes from the regional wave climate projections show a general decrease in wave heights and periods in the Atlantic Europe for the late twenty-first century. The regional projections, however, allow a more detailed

  7. The SAFER-Project and Seismic Early Warning in Europe (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschau, J.; Gasparini, P.

    2009-12-01

    SAFER (Seismic EArly Warning For EuRope) is the first large scale scientific project in Europe on earthquake early warning. It is funded by the European Commission in the context of Framework Program 6 under the theme Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystems. Its general objective is to develop knowledge and tools for increasing the capability of effective earthquake early warning in Europe and to implement and test these tools in selected European cities. The SAFER project was carried out between 2006 and 2009 by a consortium formed by 20 institutes from 11 European and Mediterranean countries (Germany, Italy, Greece, Romania, Switzerland, Norway, France, the Netherlands, Iceland, Turkey and Egypt) and one each from Japan, Taiwan and USA. Five major earthquake prone cities were chosen as test areas: Athens, Bucharest, Cairo, Istanbul and Naples. The combined population of these cities is about 40 million inhabitants and all have experienced severe earthquakes in recent years. SAFER is strongly multi-disciplinary, calling upon expertise in seismology, structural and geotechnical engineering, informatics and statistics. Some of the specific problems addressed are related to - the rapid determination of earthquake size, complex earthquake features, and damage potential; - the implementation of a fully probabilistic framework for applications of earthquake early warning based on cost-benefit analysis; - the development of a new generation of early warning systems being decentralised and people-centred, and - the implementation of the real-time “shake map”-technology in large European cities. The presentation will review the major scientific findings, comment on the improvements of the earthquake early warning capabilities achieved by SAFER in the five test cities, and present some ideas for the future development of earthquake early warning in Europe.

  8. "Joule" Enjoy Using This Metric Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey

    1984-01-01

    Discusses advantages of using the joule as the focus of a teaching strategy to unify the concept of energy. Includes applications to various energy forms and use of the joule in converting constants. A set of worked problems, using relationships discussed in the article, are available from the author. (JM)

  9. Use of Optical and Imaging Techniques for Inspection of Off-Line Joule-Heated Melter at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M. J.; Jang, P-R; Long, Z.; Monts, D. L.; Philip, T.; Su, Y.

    2003-02-25

    The West Valley melter has been taken out of service. Its design is the direct ancestor of the current melter design for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Over its eight years of service, the West Valley melter has endured many of the same challenges that the Hanford melter will encounter with feeds that are similar to many of the Hanford double shell tank wastes. Thus, inspection of the West Valley melter prior to its disposal could provide valuable--even crucial--information to the designers of the melters to be used at the Hanford Site, particularly if quantitative information can be obtained. The objective of Mississippi State University's Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory's (DIAL) efforts is to develop, fabricate, and deploy inspection tools for the West Valley melter that will (i) be remotely operable in the West Valley process cell; (ii) provide quantitative information on melter refractory wear and deposits on the refractory; and (iii) indicate areas of heterogeneity (e.g., deposits) requiring more detailed characterization. A collaborative arrangement has been established with the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) to inspect their melter.

  10. Extreme events of perceived temperature over Europe: a projected northward extension of dangerous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gualdi, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that an increase of temperature over Europe, both in terms of averages and extremes, is expected within the current century. In order to consider health impacts under warm conditions, it is important to take into account the combined effect of temperature and humidity on the human body. To this aim a basic index - the humindex - representative of the perceived temperature, under different scenarios and periods, has been investigated in this study. A very low concomitance of extreme temperature events and extreme humindex events is found over the present climate, reinforcing the importance to investigate not only extreme temperature and relative humidity future projections but also the combination of the two parameters. A set of 10-km resolution regional climate simulations provided within the EUR-11 EURO-CORDEX multi-model effort, demonstrates ability in representing the intense and extreme events of the humindex over the present climate and to be eligible as a tool to quantify future changes in geographical patterns of exposed areas over Europe. An enlargement of the domain subject to dangerous conditions is found since the middle of the current century, reaching 60 degrees North when considering really extreme events. The most significant increase in humindex extreme events is found when comparing the 2066-2095 projections under rcp8.5 scenario, to the 1966-2005 period: bearing in mind that changes in relative humidity may either amplify or offset the health effects of temperature extremes, a less pronounced projected reduction of relative humidity intensity in the Northern part of the European domain, associated to extreme temperature and humindex, makes Northern Europe the most prone region to a local increase of the humindex extremes.

  11. Adria-Europe crustal structure relationship in the Eastern Alps (project EASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetényi, György; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Bianchi, Irene; Kampfová Exnerová, Hana

    2016-04-01

    Project EASI is the first implemented Complementary Experiment within the AlpArray program (http://www.alparray.ethz.ch) and stands for Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation. The seismological field experiment ran for one year, from Summer 2014 to Summer 2015, composed of 55 broadband stations deployed in zig-zag in a ca. 15 km-wide band along longitude 13.35°E, spanning 540 km from the Czech-German border to the Adriatic Sea. Here we present first results using P-to-S converted waves from teleseismic distances. The variation of Moho depth along the profile is analyzed and linked to the two colliding plates, Adria and Europe, as well as to the overlying lithospheric blocks of the Bohemian Massif. The suggested Moho "hole" between Adria and Europe is characterized. We investigate the anisotropic nature of the lower crust of both plates. We conclude on the structural relationship of Adria and Europe at the crustal level, and infer their respective positions at depth. Furthermore, preliminary S-to-P conversions illuminating the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary test the significant depth variation of this boundary along the EASI transect and complement our receiver function study.

  12. Eiatne and Flyklim, Two Projects Concerning Environmental Impacts From Air Transportation Over North Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pålsson, A.; Moldanová, J.; Bergström, R.; Langner, J.; Wyser, K.; Lindskog, A.

    Structure and methodology of two projects concerned with regional impact of air traf- fic on the atmosphere is presented. The EIATNE project aims to develop methods and decision support for environmental adaptation of air traffic and air traffic control in en- vironmentally sensitive regions. The FLYKLIM project is closely related to EIATNE, its objective is to study the effect of air traffic on the regional climate in Northern Europe and in particular its effect on high-altitude clouds. The environmental impacts from air traffic within a geographical area are evaluated through interdisciplinary co- operation. Aircraft emissions have been extracted from a four-dimensional analysis based on model calculations of the collected air traffic over Sweden during a limited duration. The project aims to combine model simulations of aircraft performance with model simulations of the dispersion of exhausts and their reactions in the atmosphere, both at cruise altitudes and around airports, in order to evaluate the environmental im- pacts. The project involves use of results from previous research projects, which will be integrated for a qualified analysis of the large-scale environmental effects.

  13. Understanding climate change projections for precipitation over Western Europe with a weather typing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, João A.; Belo-Pereira, Margarida; Fraga, Helder; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation over Western Europe (WE) is projected to increase (decrease) roughly northward (equatorward) of 50°N during the twenty first century. These changes are generally attributed to alterations in the regional large-scale circulation, e.g. jet stream, cyclone activity and blocking frequencies. A novel weather typing within the sector (30°W-10°E, 25-70°N) is used for a more comprehensive dynamical interpretation of precipitation changes. A k-means clustering on daily mean sea level pressure was undertaken for ERA-Interim reanalysis (1979-2014). Eight weather types are identified: S1, S2, S3 (summertime types), W1, W2, W3 (wintertime types), B1 and B2 (blocking-like types). Their distinctive dynamical characteristics allow identifying the main large-scale precipitation-driving mechanisms. Simulations with 22 CMIP5 models for recent climate conditions show biases in reproducing the observed seasonality of weather types. In particular, an overestimation of weather type frequencies associated with zonal airflow is identified. Considering projections following the RCP8.5 scenario over 2071-2100, the frequencies of the three driest types (S1, B2 and W3) are projected to increase (mainly S1, +4%) in detriment of the rainiest types, particularly W1 (-3%). These changes explain most of the precipitation projections over WE. However, a weather type-independent background signal is identified (increase/decrease in precipitation over northern/southern WE), suggesting modifications in precipitation-generating processes and/or model inability to accurately simulate these processes. Despite these caveats in the precipitation scenarios for WE, which must be taken into account, our approach permits a better understanding of the projected trends for precipitation over Western Europe.

  14. Cascade Joule-Thomson refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Steyert, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design criteria for cascade Joule-Thomson refrigerators for cooling in the temperature range from 300 K to 4.2 K were studied. The systems considered use three or four refrigeration stages with various working gases to achieve the low temperatures. Each stage results in cooling to a progressively lower temperature and provides cooling at intermediate temperatures to remove the substantial amount of parasitic heat load encountered in a typical dewar. With careful dewar design considerable cooling can be achieved with moderate gas flows. For many applications, e.g., in the cooling of sensitive sensors, the fact that the refrigerator contains no moving parts and may be remotely located from the gas source is of considerable advantage. A small compressor suitable for providing the gas flows required was constructed.

  15. Changing pattern of landslide risk in Europe - The SafeLand project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, F.; Kalsnes, B.

    2012-04-01

    The need to protect people and property with a changing pattern of landslide hazard and risk caused by climate change and changes in demography, and the reality for societies in Europe to live with the risk associated with natural hazards, were the motives for the project SafeLand: "Living with landslide risk in Europe: Assessment, effects of global change, and risk management strategies." SafeLand is a large, integrating research project under the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme (FP7). The project started on 1 May 2009 and will end on 30 April 2012. It involves 27 partners from 12 European countries, and has international collaborators and advisers from China, India, USA, Japan and Hong Kong. SafeLand also involves 25 End-Users from 11 countries. SafeLand is coordinated by the International Centre for Geohazards (ICG) at Norwegian Geotechnical Institute in Norway. Further information on the SafeLand project can be found at its web site http://safeland-fp7.eu/. Main results achieved in SafeLand include: - Various guidelines related to landslide triggering processes and run-out modelling. - Development and testing of several empirical methods for predicting the characteristics of threshold rainfall events for triggering of precipitation-induced landslides, and development of an empirical model for assessing the changes in landslide frequency (hazard) as a function of changes in the demography and population density. - Guideline for landslide susceptibility, hazard and risk assessment and zoning. - New methodologies for physical and societal vulnerability assessment. - Identification of landslide hazard and risk hotspots for Europe. The results show clearly where areas with the largest landslide risk are located in Europe and the objective approach allows a ranking of the countries by exposed area and population. - Different regional and local climate model simulations over selected regions of Europe at spatial resolutions of 10x10 km and 2.8x2.8 km

  16. Trends in mortality from leukemia in Europe: an update to 2009 and a projection to 2012.

    PubMed

    Bertuccio, Paola; Bosetti, Cristina; Malvezzi, Matteo; Levi, Fabio; Chatenoud, Liliane; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2013-01-15

    We considered trends in mortality from leukemia in Europe over the period 1970-2009 using data from the World Health Organization. We computed age-standardized (world population) mortality rates, at all ages and in selected age groups, in 11 selected European countries, the European Union (EU) and, for comparative purposes, in the USA and Japan. For the EU, we also provided projections of the mortality to 2012. Over the period considered, mortality from leukemia steadily declined in most European countries in children and young adults, as well as in western and southern Europe at middle-age (45-69 years); in central/eastern Europe, reductions at ages 45-69 started since the mid-late 1990s. In the EU, annual percent changes were -3.7% in males and -3.8% in females at age 0-14, -2% in both sexes at age 15-44, and -0.6% in males and -1% in females at middle-age and overall. No decline was observed at age 70 or more. Between 1997 and 2007, overall EU rates decreased from 5.4 to 4.8/100,000 males and from 3.4 to 2.9/100,000 females. Declines were from 6.2 to 5.5/100,000 males and from 3.7 to 3.2/100,000 females in the USA and from 3.9 to 3.5/100,000 males and from 2.5 to 2.0/100,000 females in Japan. Projected overall rates in the EU at 2012 are 4.3/100,000 males (-11% compared to 2007) and 2.6/100,000 females (-12%).

  17. Identifying critical nutrient intake in groups at risk of poverty in Europe: the CHANCE project approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Marina; Glibetić, Maria; Gurinović, Mirjana; Milešević, Jelena; Khokhar, Santosh; Chillo, Stefania; Abaravicius, Jonas Algis; Bordoni, Alessandra; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-04-02

    The aim of the CHANCE project is to develop novel and affordable nutritious foods to optimize the diet and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases among groups at risk of poverty (ROP). This paper describes the methodology used in the two initial steps to accomplish the project's objective as follows: 1. a literature review of existing data and 2. an identification of ROP groups with which to design and perform the CHANCE nutritional survey, which will supply new data that is useful for formulating the new CHANCE food. Based on the literature review, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, energy, fiber, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and C, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and zinc and a high intake of starchy foods, processed meat and sodium were apparent. However, the available data appeared fragmented because of the different methodologies used in the studies. A more global vision of the main nutritional problems that are present among low-income people in Europe is needed, and the first step to achieve this goal is the use of common criteria to define the risk of poverty. The scoring system described here represents novel criteria for defining at-risk-of-poverty groups not only in the CHANCE-participating countries but also all over Europe.

  18. The Cosmetics Europe strategy for animal-free genotoxicity testing: project status up-date.

    PubMed

    Pfuhler, S; Fautz, R; Ouedraogo, G; Latil, A; Kenny, J; Moore, C; Diembeck, W; Hewitt, N J; Reisinger, K; Barroso, J

    2014-02-01

    The Cosmetics Europe (formerly COLIPA) Genotoxicity Task Force has driven and funded three projects to help address the high rate of misleading positives in in vitro genotoxicity tests: The completed "False Positives" project optimized current mammalian cell assays and showed that the predictive capacity of the in vitro micronucleus assay was improved dramatically by selecting more relevant cells and more sensitive toxicity measures. The on-going "3D skin model" project has been developed and is now validating the use of human reconstructed skin (RS) models in combination with the micronucleus (MN) and Comet assays. These models better reflect the in use conditions of dermally applied products, such as cosmetics. Both assays have demonstrated good inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility and are entering validation stages. The completed "Metabolism" project investigated enzyme capacities of human skin and RS models. The RS models were shown to have comparable metabolic capacity to native human skin, confirming their usefulness for testing of compounds with dermal exposure. The program has already helped to improve the initial test battery predictivity and the RS projects have provided sound support for their use as a follow-up test in the assessment of the genotoxic hazard of cosmetic ingredients in the absence of in vivo data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inter-comparison of statistical downscaling methods for projection of extreme flow indices across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Sunyer, Maria A.; Lawrence, Deborah; Madsen, Henrik; Willems, Patrick; Bürger, Gerd; Kriaučiūnienė, Jurate; Loukas, Athanasios; Martinkova, Marta; Osuch, Marzena; Vasiliades, Lampros; von Christierson, Birgitte; Vormoor, Klaus; Yücel, Ismail

    2016-10-01

    The effect of methods of statistical downscaling of daily precipitation on changes in extreme flow indices under a plausible future climate change scenario was investigated in 11 catchments selected from 9 countries in different parts of Europe. The catchments vary from 67 to 6171 km2 in size and cover different climate zones. 15 regional climate model outputs and 8 different statistical downscaling methods, which are broadly categorized as change factor and bias correction based methods, were used for the comparative analyses. Different hydrological models were implemented in different catchments to simulate daily runoff. A set of flood indices were derived from daily flows and their changes have been evaluated by comparing their values derived from simulations corresponding to the current and future climate. Most of the implemented downscaling methods project an increase in the extreme flow indices in most of the catchments. The catchments where the extremes are expected to increase have a rainfall-dominated flood regime. In these catchments, the downscaling methods also project an increase in the extreme precipitation in the seasons when the extreme flows occur. In catchments where the flooding is mainly caused by spring/summer snowmelt, the downscaling methods project a decrease in the extreme flows in three of the four catchments considered. A major portion of the variability in the projected changes in the extreme flow indices is attributable to the variability of the climate model ensemble, although the statistical downscaling methods contribute 35-60% of the total variance.

  20. Joule-Thomson expander and heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Joule-Thomson Expander and Heat Exchanger Program was initiated to develop an assembly (JTX) which consists of an inlet filter, counterflow heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion device, and a low pressure jacket. The program objective was to develop a JTX which, when coupled to an open cycle supercritical helium refrigerating system (storage vessel), would supply superfluid helium (He II) at 2 K or less for cooling infrared detectors.

  1. Descriptive epidemiology of Kaposi sarcoma in Europe. Report from the RARECARE project.

    PubMed

    Stiller, C A; Trama, A; Brewster, D H; Verne, J; Bouchardy, C; Navarro, C; Chirlaque, M D; Marcos-Gragera, R; Visser, O; Serraino, D; Weiderpass, E; Dei Tos, A P; Ascoli, V

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a virus-related malignancy which most frequently arises in skin, though visceral sites can also be involved. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV or HHV-8) is required for development of KS. Nowadays, most cases worldwide occur in persons who are immunosuppressed, usually because of HIV infection or as a result of therapy to combat rejection of a transplanted organ, but classic Kaposi sarcoma is predominantly a disease of the elderly without apparent immunosuppression. We analyzed 2667 KS incident cases diagnosed during 1995-2002 and registered by 75 population-based European cancer registries contributing to the RARECARE project. Total crude and age-standardized incidence rate was 0.3 per 100,000 per year with an estimated 1642 new cases per year in the EU27 countries. Age-standardized incidence rate was 0.8 per 100,000 in Southern Europe but below 0.3 per 100,000 in all other regions. The elevated rate in southern Europe was attributable to a combination of classic Kaposi sarcoma in some Mediterranean countries and the relatively high incidence of AIDS in several countries. Five-year relative survival for 2000-2002 by the period method was 75%. More than 10,000 persons were estimated to be alive in Europe at the beginning of 2008 with a past diagnosis of KS. The aetiological link with suppressed immunity means that many people alive following diagnosis of KS suffer comorbidity from a pre-existing condition. While KS is a rare cancer, it has a relatively good prognosis and so the number of people affected by it is quite large. Thus it provides a notable example of the importance of networking in diagnosis, therapy and research for rare cancers.

  2. Research priorities for public mental health in Europe: recommendations of the ROAMER project.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Anna K; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Aarø, Leif Edvard; Alonso, Jordi; Barry, Margaret M; Brunn, Matthias; Cardoso, Graça; Cattan, Mima; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Fiorillo, Andrea; Hansson, Lars; Haro, Josep Maria; Hazo, Jean-Baptiste; Hegerl, Ulrich; Katschnig, Heinz; Knappe, Susanne; Luciano, Mario; Miret, Marta; Nordentoft, Merete; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Pilgrim, David; Ruud, Torleif; Salize, Hans Joachim; Stewart-Brown, Sarah L; Tómasson, Kristinn; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Ventus, Daniel B J; Vuori, Jukka; Värnik, Airi

    2015-04-01

    The ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe project aimed to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research. Leading mental health research experts across Europe have formulated consensus-based recommendations for future research within the public mental health field. Experts were invited to compile and discuss research priorities in a series of topic-based scientific workshops. In addition, a Delphi process was carried out to reach consensus on the list of research priorities and their rank order. Three web-based surveys were conducted. Nearly 60 experts were involved in the priority setting process. Twenty priorities for public mental health research were identified through the consensus process. The research priorities were divided into summary principles-encompassing overall recommendations for future public mental health research in Europe-and thematic research priorities, including area-specific top priorities on research topics and methods. The priorities represent three overarching goals mirroring societal challenges, that is, to identify causes, risk and protective factors for mental health across the lifespan; to advance the implementation of effective public mental health interventions and to reduce disparities in mental health. The importance of strengthening research on the implementation and dissemination of promotion, prevention and service delivery interventions in the mental health field needs to be emphasized. The complexity of mental health and its broader conceptualisation requires complementary research approaches and interdisciplinary collaboration to better serve the needs of the European population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding climate change projections for precipitation over western Europe with a weather typing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, João. A.; Belo-Pereira, Margarida; Fraga, Helder; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-02-01

    Precipitation over western Europe (WE) is projected to increase (decrease) roughly northward (equatorward) of 50°N during the 21st century. These changes are generally attributed to alterations in the regional large-scale circulation, e.g., jet stream, cyclone activity, and blocking frequencies. A novel weather typing within the sector (30°W-10°E, 25-70°N) is used for a more comprehensive dynamical interpretation of precipitation changes. A k-means clustering on daily mean sea level pressure was undertaken for ERA-Interim reanalysis (1979-2014). Eight weather types are identified: S1, S2, S3 (summertime types), W1, W2, W3 (wintertime types), B1, and B2 (blocking-like types). Their distinctive dynamical characteristics allow identifying the main large-scale precipitation-driving mechanisms. Simulations with 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 models for recent climate conditions show biases in reproducing the observed seasonality of weather types. In particular, an overestimation of weather type frequencies associated with zonal airflow is identified. Considering projections following the (Representative Concentration Pathways) RCP8.5 scenario over 2071-2100, the frequencies of the three driest types (S1, B2, and W3) are projected to increase (mainly S1, +4%) in detriment of the rainiest types, particularly W1 (-3%). These changes explain most of the precipitation projections over WE. However, a weather type-independent background signal is identified (increase/decrease in precipitation over northern/southern WE), suggesting modifications in precipitation-generating processes and/or model inability to accurately simulate these processes. Despite these caveats in the precipitation scenarios for WE, which must be duly taken into account, our approach permits a better understanding of the projected trends for precipitation over WE.

  4. The School Children Mental Health in Europe (SCMHE) Project: Design and First Results

    PubMed Central

    Kovess, Viviane; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Background : The School Children Mental Health in Europe (SCMHE) project aims to build up a set of indicators to collect and monitor children's mental health in an efficient and comparable methodology across the EU countries. It concerns primary schools children aged 6 to 11 years a range where few data are available whereas school interventions are promising. Methods : Three informants were used: parents, teachers and children. In selecting instruments language, instruments were selected according to the easiness to translate them: SDQ (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) for parents and teachers and DI (Dominic Interactive). A two-step procedure was used: schools randomization then six children by class in each grade. Results : 9084 children from seven countries (Italy, Netherlands, Germany, Romania, Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Turkey) completed the Dominic Interactive in their own language. 6563 teachers and 6031 parents completed their questionnaire, and a total of 5574 interviews have been completed by the 3 informants. The participation rate of the children with parents in the participating schools was about 66.4%. As expected teachers report more externalised problems and less internalised problems than parents. Children report more internalised problems than parents and teachers. Boys have consistently more externalised problems than girls and this is the reverse for internalised problems. Combining the diverse informants and impairment levels children with problems requiring some sort of mental health care were about 9.9%: 76% did not see any mental health professional: 78.7% In Eastern countries 63.1% in Western Europe. PMID:25834631

  5. Summary of the CARBOSOL project: Present and retrospective state of organic versus inorganic aerosol over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, M.; Puxbaum, H.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol is an important source of uncertainty concerning the role of the atmosphere in climate forcing. In particular, major gaps exist with respect to its carbonaceous fraction in terms of composition, source apportionment (natural versus anthropogenic), change over the past, and radiative impact. The CARBOSOL project contributes to reduce these uncertainties. CARBOSOL combines a 2-year study of present-day carbonaceous aerosol in air and precipitation in western/central Europe with the trends of climatically relevant species in Alpine ice cores. Comparisons between observed atmospheric distributions (present and proxy of past) and transport/chemistry model simulations allow to test the accuracy of present and past anthropogenic emission inventories and enable for the first time a comparison of the model results for individual components (primary, secondary, fossil fuel, and biogenic) against data derived from measurements. The net radiative effect of the aerosol load and composition (inorganic/organic) in Europe is evaluated using radiative/chemistry/transport models. This summary paper gives an overview of the CARBOSOL goals, and reports on the key findings as a guide to the results detailed in the papers that follow.

  6. Identifying Critical Nutrient Intake in Groups at Risk of Poverty in Europe: The CHANCE Project Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Marina; Glibetić, Maria; Gurinović, Mirjana; Milešević, Jelena; Khokhar, Santosh; Chillo, Stefania; Abaravicius, Jonas Algis; Bordoni, Alessandra; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the CHANCE project is to develop novel and affordable nutritious foods to optimize the diet and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases among groups at risk of poverty (ROP). This paper describes the methodology used in the two initial steps to accomplish the project’s objective as follows: 1. a literature review of existing data and 2. an identification of ROP groups with which to design and perform the CHANCE nutritional survey, which will supply new data that is useful for formulating the new CHANCE food. Based on the literature review, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, energy, fiber, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and C, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and zinc and a high intake of starchy foods, processed meat and sodium were apparent. However, the available data appeared fragmented because of the different methodologies used in the studies. A more global vision of the main nutritional problems that are present among low-income people in Europe is needed, and the first step to achieve this goal is the use of common criteria to define the risk of poverty. The scoring system described here represents novel criteria for defining at-risk-of-poverty groups not only in the CHANCE-participating countries but also all over Europe. PMID:24699195

  7. Undergraduate orthodontic & paediatric dentistry education in Europe--the DentEd project.

    PubMed

    Harzer, W; Oliver, R; Chadwick, B; Paganelli, C

    2001-03-01

    As a result of a European Union funded project (DentEd), a programme of visits to dental schools throughout Europe has been underway since 1998. This report describes the philosophy behind DentEd, gives a brief description of the features of a visitation, and covers the orthodontic and paediatric dentistry teaching as reported in 26 different dental schools in 16 different countries. It is based on a report submitted to DentEd from a small working group that looked at various aspects of educational provision within the two disciplines across Europe. The value of this information to teachers within the two disciplines and to the wider dental community is briefly discussed. The report recommends the adoption of an integrated course for orthodontics and paediatric dentistry. The main objectives are that the student should be able to understand orofacial and psychosocial growth and development of the child, recognize aberrant growth and development, and manage the behaviour of the child, their straightforward preventive, restorative and occlusal needs, and to make appropriate and timely referral.

  8. The School Children Mental Health in Europe (SCMHE) Project: Design and First Results.

    PubMed

    Kovess, Viviane; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Background : The School Children Mental Health in Europe (SCMHE) project aims to build up a set of indicators to collect and monitor children's mental health in an efficient and comparable methodology across the EU countries. It concerns primary schools children aged 6 to 11 years a range where few data are available whereas school interventions are promising. Methods : Three informants were used: parents, teachers and children. In selecting instruments language, instruments were selected according to the easiness to translate them: SDQ (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) for parents and teachers and DI (Dominic Interactive). A two-step procedure was used: schools randomization then six children by class in each grade. Results : 9084 children from seven countries (Italy, Netherlands, Germany, Romania, Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Turkey) completed the Dominic Interactive in their own language. 6563 teachers and 6031 parents completed their questionnaire, and a total of 5574 interviews have been completed by the 3 informants. The participation rate of the children with parents in the participating schools was about 66.4%. As expected teachers report more externalised problems and less internalised problems than parents. Children report more internalised problems than parents and teachers. Boys have consistently more externalised problems than girls and this is the reverse for internalised problems. Combining the diverse informants and impairment levels children with problems requiring some sort of mental health care were about 9.9%: 76% did not see any mental health professional: 78.7% In Eastern countries 63.1% in Western Europe.

  9. Gender Policies and Gender Inequalities in Health in Europe: Results of the SOPHIE Project.

    PubMed

    Palència, Laia; De Moortel, Deborah; Artazcoz, Lucía; Salvador-Piedrafita, María; Puig-Barrachina, Vanessa; Hagqvist, Emma; Pérez, Glòria; Ruiz, Marisol E; Trujillo-Alemán, Sara; Vanroelen, Christophe; Malmusi, Davide; Borrell, Carme

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explain the results of the SOPHIE project regarding the effect of gender policies on gender inequalities in health in Europe. We start with the results of a systematic review on how gender regimes and gender equality policies at the country level impact women's health and gender inequalities in health. Then, we report on three empirical analyses on the relationship between different family policy models existing in Europe and gender inequalities in health. Finally we present four case studies on specific examples of gender policies or determinants of gender inequalities in health. The results show that policies that support women's participation in the labor force and decrease their burden of care, such as public services and support for families and entitlements for fathers, are related to lower levels of gender inequality in terms of health. In addition, public services and benefits for disabled and dependent people can reduce the burden placed on family caregivers and hence improve their health. In the context of the current economic crisis, gender equality policies should be maintained or improved.

  10. Future flood risk in Europe under high-end climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc; Bianchi, Alessandra; Burek, Peter; Dottori, Francesco; Forzieri, Giovanni; Roudier, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Every year, new record-breaking hydrological extremes affect our society, fueling the debate between climate change and natural climate variability. A new generation of climate projections for the present century has recently become available, based on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) adopted by the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. A number of COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiments (CORDEX) were set up to provide high-resolution climatic scenarios over different areas of the world, where the European branch is referred to as EURO-CORDEX. In this work, an ensemble of EURO-CORDEX RCP 8.5 scenarios is used as input to a distributed hydrological model to assess the projected changes in flood hazard and flood risk in Europe through the current century. Statistical robustness is sought with the use of ensemble projections, through data aggregation over time (i.e., 30-year time slices) and space (i.e., country and river basin level), with the goal of detecting statistically significant trends over time and with regard to extreme events. A consistent method is proposed to evaluate the agreement of ensemble projections. Changes in the magnitude of average and extreme precipitation and streamflow are investigated through statistical tools and extreme value distribution fitting. A dedicated analysis on peaks over threshold is performed to evaluate changes in the frequency of extreme discharge peaks. The hazard component driven by the climate scenarios is then combined with exposure maps obtained from high resolution flood hazard maps and with vulnerability information, to estimate the overall flood risk in Europe under high-end climate projections. This work brings a number of novelties to address issues pointed out in previous flood risk assessments at continental scale: 1) flood hazard maps are derived by a 2D hydraulic model rather than through simplified approaches; 2) the frequency of extreme peak discharges is assessed more consistently through

  11. The Eurolight project: the impact of primary headache disorders in Europe. Description of methods.

    PubMed

    Andrée, C; Stovner, L J; Steiner, T J; Barré, J; Katsarava, Z; Lainez, J M; Lanteri-Minet, M; Mick, G; Rastenyte, D; Ruiz de la Torre, E; Tassorelli, C; Vriezen, P; Lampl, C

    2011-10-01

    The Eurolight project is the first at European Union level to assess the impact of headache disorders, and also the first of its scale performed by collaboration between professional and lay organizations and individuals. Here are reported the methods developed for it. The project took the form of surveys, by structured questionnaire, conducted in ten countries of Europe which together represented 60% of the adult population of the European Union. In Lithuania, the survey was population-based. Elsewhere, truly population-based studies were impractical for reasons of cost, and various compromises were developed. Closest to being population-based were the surveys in Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain. In Austria, France and UK, samples were taken from health-care settings. In addition in the Netherlands, Spain and Ireland, samples were drawn from members of national headache patient organizations and their relatives. Independent double data-entry was performed prior to analysis. Returned questionnaires from 9,269 respondents showed a moderate female bias (58%); of respondents from patients' organizations (n = 992), 61% were female. Mean age of all respondents was 44 years; samples from patients' organizations were slightly older (mean 47 years). The different sampling methods worked with differing degrees of effectiveness, as evidenced by the responder-rates, which varied from 10.8 to 90.7%. In the more population-based surveys, responder-rates varied from 11.3 to 58.8%. We conclude that the methodology, although with differences born of necessity in the ten countries, was sound overall, and will provide robust data on the public ill-health that results from headache in Europe.

  12. Projections of heat waves with high impact on human health in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Homar, V.; Romero, R.; Brooks, H. E.; Ramis, C.; Gordaliza, M.; Alonso, S.

    2014-08-01

    Climate change will result in more intense, more frequent and longer lasting heat waves. The most hazardous conditions emerge when extreme daytime temperatures combine with warm night-time temperatures, high humidities and light winds for several consecutive days. Here, we assess present and future heat wave impacts on human health in Europe. Present daily physiologically equivalent temperatures (PET) are derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. PET allows to specifically focus on heat-related risks on humans. Regarding projections, a suite of high-resolution regional climate models - run under SRES A1B scenario - has been used. A quantile-quantile adjustment is applied to the daily simulated PET to correct biases in individual model climatologies and a multimodel ensemble strategy is adopted to encompass model errors. Two types of heat waves differently impacting human health - strong and extreme stress - are defined according to specified thresholds of thermal stress and duration. Heat wave number, frequency, duration and amplitude are derived for each type. Results reveal relatively strong correlations between the spatial distribution of strong and extreme heat wave amplitudes and mortality excess for the 2003 European summer. Projections suggest a steady increase and a northward extent of heat wave attributes in Europe. Strong stress heat wave frequencies could increase more than 40 days, lasting over 20 days more by 2075-2094. Amplitudes might augment up to 7 °C per heat wave day. Important increases in extreme stress heat wave attributes are also expected: up to 40 days in frequency, 30 days in duration and 4 °C in amplitude. We believe that with this information at hand policy makers and stakeholders on vulnerable populations to heat stress can respond more effectively to the future challenges imposed by climate warming.

  13. Advanced reprocessing developments in Europe contribution of European projects ACSEPT and ACTINET-I3

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C.; Geist, A.; Cassayre, L.; Rhodes, C.; Ekberg, C.

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear energy has more than ever to demonstrate that it can contribute safely and on a sustainable way to answer the international increase in energy needs. Actually, in addition to an increased safety of the reactors themselves, its acceptance is still closely associated to our capability to reduce the lifetime of the nuclear waste, to manage them safely and to propose options for a better use of the natural resources. Spent fuel reprocessing can help to reach these objectives. But this cannot be achieved only by optimizing industrial processes through engineering studies. It is of a primary importance to increase our fundamental knowledge in actinide sciences in order to build the future of nuclear energy on reliable and scientifically-founded results, and therefore meet the needs of the future fuel cycles in terms of fabrication and performance of fuels, reprocessing and waste management. At the European level, both the collaborative project ACSEPT and the Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3 work together to improve our knowledge in actinides chemistry and therefore develop advanced separation processes. These tools are complementary and work in close connection on some specific issues such as the understanding of the selectivity of extracting organic ligands. By offering trans-national access to the main nuclear research facility in Europe, ACTINET-I3 aims at increasing the knowledge in actinide sciences by gathering all the expertise available in European nuclear research institutes or university and giving them the opportunity to come and work in hot-labs (ITU, Atalante...) or beamlines (ESFR, ANKA, PSI) ACSEPT is focused on the development of advanced separation processes, both aqueous and pyrochemical. Head-end steps, fuel re-fabrication, solvent treatment, waste management are also taken into account. In aqueous process development, the SANEX and innovative SANEX flowsheets demonstration were successfully achieved. Chemical systems were

  14. Climate change projections of heat stress in Europe: From meteorological variables to impacts on productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanueva, Ana; Kotlarski, Sven; Liniger, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    Future climate change is likely to have important impacts in many socio-economic sectors. In particular, higher summer temperatures or more prolonged heat waves may be responsible for health problems and productivity losses related to heat stress, especially affecting people exposed to such situations (e.g. working under outside settings or in non-acclimatized workplaces). Heat stress on the body under work load and consequently their productivity loss can be described through heat stress indices that are based on multiple meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, wind and radiation. Exploring the changes of these variables under a warmer climate is of prime importance for the Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability communities. In particular, the H2020 project HEAT-SHIELD aims at analyzing the impact of climate change on heat stress in strategic industries in Europe (manufacturing, construction, transportation, tourism and agriculture) within an inter-sectoral framework (climate scientists, biometeorologists, physiologists and stakeholders). In the present work we explore present and future heat stress over Europe using an ensemble of the state-of-the-art RCMs from the EURO-CORDEX initiative. Since RCMs cannot be directly used in impact studies due to their partly substantial biases, a standard bias correction method (empirical quantile mapping) is applied to correct the individual variables that are then used to derive heat stress indices. The objectives of this study are twofold, 1) to test the ability of the separately bias corrected variables to reproduce the main characteristics of heat stress indices in present climate conditions and 2) to explore climate change projections of heat stress indices. We use the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) as primary heat stress index, considering two different versions for indoor (or in the shade, based on temperature and humidity conditions) and outdoor settings (including also wind and radiation). The WBGT

  15. What Secondary Education for a Changing Europe? Trends, Challenges and Prospects. Report of the Final Conference of the project "A Secondary Education for Europe," (Strasbourg, France, December 2-5, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luisoni, Pierre

    The final conference of the Council for Cultural Co-operation's project, "A Secondary Education for Europe," was held in Strasbourg, France, in December 1996. The conference was entitled "What Secondary Education for a Changing Europe?" and was attended by approximately 140 participants from European countries. The project…

  16. Past and future regional drought in Europe: corroborating global hydrological models and projecting drought characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, S.; Williamson, J.; Hannaford, J.; Prudhomme, C.; Goodsell, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent drought events in Europe have caused significant environmental and socio-economic impacts, and water resource managers are increasingly concerned with how hydrological drought characteristics are set to evolve in future under changing climatic conditions. Global hydrological models (GHMs) enable the projection of future runoff, but before such projections can be used with confidence, there is a need to assess how well models perform in reproducing historical droughts. This study presents an intercomparison of eight GHMs, validated against observed data, in terms of their ability to reproduce regional drought characteristics in Europe. The suite of models is then used to examine how drought characteristics may evolve under future climate change scenarios and the uncertainty associated with the simulations. In order to facilitate the validation, a Regional Deficiency Index (RDI) is used to compare regional drought characteristics derived from GHMs against observations. Drought 'catalogues' have been derived for 23 homogeneous European regions from 0.5° gridded total runoff outputs of eight GHMs (JULES, WaterGAP, MPI-HM, HTessel, H08, LPJml, Orchidee, and GWAVA) driven by WATCH Forcing Data (WFD). These catalogues, covering the period 1963-2000 on a daily time step, have been corroborated against drought catalogues produced by a previous study derived from observed daily streamflow data from >500 catchments across Europe, for the same 23 regions and across an identical period. The observed catalogues provide a benchmark to assess the extent to which GHMs are able to reproduce historical drought characteristics. Model performance in reproducing observed historical drought characteristics varies significantly between GHMs, regions, and drought characteristics considered. Nevertheless, there are many instances in which some of the GHMs generally perform well in reproducing regional drought duration, spatial coherence, onset and termination, as well as 'drought

  17. Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe: The ARISE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.; Bittner, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Ceranna, L.; Charlton-Perez, A. J.; Ripepe, M.; Evers, L.; Kvaerna, T.; Lastovicka, J.; Eliasson, L.; Crosby, N. B.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Le Pichon, A.; Marchetti, E.; Pilger, C.; Keckhut, P.; Schmidt, C.; Lee, C.; Smets, P.

    2013-12-01

    ARISE proposes to design a new infrastructure that integrates different station networks in order to provide a new "3D" image of the atmospheric dynamics from the ground up to the mesosphere with unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. These networks are: - the International infrasound network developed for the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This system is unique by its quality for infrasound and atmospheric wave observations, - the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes (NDACC) which uses Lidar to measure stratospheric dynamics, - the Network for the Detection of Mesopause Changes (NDMC), dedicated to airglow layer measurements in the mesosphere, and additional complementary stations and satellite data. The infrastructure extends across Europe and outlying regions, including polar and equatorial regions. The measurements will be used to improve the parameterization of gravity waves in the stratosphere to better resolve climate models. The project also concerns civil applications related to monitoring of natural hazards as volcanoes. The presentation will highlight the first results obtained in the frame of the project.

  18. Living kidney donation in Europe: legal and ethical perspectives--the EUROTOLD Project.

    PubMed

    Price, D

    1994-01-01

    The demand for organ replacement by transplantation continues to outstrip supply, leading to unnecessary morbidity and health care costs. "Space capacity" (i. e. cadaver organs not currently harvested for transplant) has been tackled within Western Europe in particular by many strategies--medical, social, educational and legal--but with varying degrees of success. Despite this, the use of living donors has not been fully exploided in many European countries to fill this gap. The total picture is, however, one of marked differences between countries and between centres within countries. In Turkey and Greece, living donors generally account for 60-90% of all renal donors. Countries within Scandinavia also have a high rate of living donor use, especially Norway. By contrast the percentage is far more modest, for example in Spain, Ireland, France and Germany. In the United Kingdom the rate is only 6% with a range of between 0 and 20%. Sources of living donors also show substantial variations between countries, notably the extent to which non-genetically related donors are used. A European Commission sponsored study has been established to acquire a broad understanding of the interaction of ethical values, cultural traditions and social customs on willingness to donate. It will also aim to assess the effect of national laws on professional attitudes to living donor transplantation. This is a collaborative project between the University Department of Surgery, Leicester General Hospital, the Department of Law, De Montfort University and the Department of Mathematics, Newcastle University. Transplant units throughout Europe, including France, Germany, Switzerland, Norway, The Netherlands, Eire and Turkey are collaborating to exchange information and views on living donor transplantation.

  19. Quality of illegally and informally produced alcohol in Europe: Results from the AMPHORA project.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Leitz, Jenny; Schoeberl, Kerstin; Kuballa, Thomas; Straub, Irene; Rehm, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    In the WHO region Europe, the average unrecorded adult per capita alcohol consumption was 2.67 L pure ethanol in 2005, which is 22% of the total consumption of 12.20 L. Despite concerns about potential health harms from the chemical composition of unrecorded alcohol, there are surprisingly few data on the problem in the European Region. This study reports the results from the Alcohol Measures for Public Health Research Alliance (AMPHORA) project, which assessed the quality of unrecorded alcohol in a Europe-wide study. Samples of unrecorded alcohol were collected in 16 European countries and chemically analyzed for potentially health-relevant parameters. Thresholds for parameters were defined based on potential health hazards of daily drinking. The average alcoholic strength of unrecorded wine products was 14.9% vol, and 47.8% vol in unrecorded spirits. One half of the samples (n=57) showed acceptable alcohol quality. The other half (n=58) showed one or several deficits with the most prevalent problem being ethyl carbamate contamination (n=29). Other problems included copper (n=20), manganese (n=16) and acetaldehyde (n=12). All other parameters (including methanol, higher alcohols, phthalates) were only seldom problematic (limit exceedance in less than 10 samples). The price of unrecorded alcohol was approximately 45% of the price of recorded alcohol. The major problem regarding unrecorded alcohol appears to be ethanol itself, as it is often higher in strength and its lower price may further contribute to higher drinking amounts. Compared to the health effects of ethanol, the contamination problems detected may be of minor importance as exposure will only in worst-case scenarios reach tolerable daily intakes of these substances.

  20. Uncertainties in Projecting Future Changes in Atmospheric Rivers and Their Impacts on Heavy Precipitation over Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Lu, Jian; Leung, L. Ruby

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the North Atlantic atmospheric rivers (ARs) making landfall over western Europe in the present and future climate from the multi-model ensemble of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Overall, CMIP5 captures the seasonal and spatial variations of historical landfalling AR days, with the large inter-model variability strongly correlated with the inter-model spread of historical jet position. Under RCP 8.5, AR frequency is projected to increase a few times by the end of this century. While thermodynamics plays a dominate role in the future increase of ARs, wind changes associated with the midlatitude jet shifts also significantly contribute to AR changes, resulting in dipole change patterns in all seasons. In the North Atlantic, the model projected jet shifts are strongly correlated with the simulated historical jet position. As models exhibit predominantly equatorward biases in the historical jet position, the large poleward jet shifts reduce AR days south of the historical mean jet position through the dynamical connections between the jet positions and AR days. Using the observed historical jet position as an emergent constraint, dynamical effects further increase AR days in the future above the large increases due to thermodynamical effects. In the future, both total and extreme precipitation induced by AR contribute more to the seasonal mean and extreme precipitation compared to present primarily because of the increase in AR frequency. While AR precipitation intensity generally increases more relative to the increase in integrated vapor transport, AR extreme precipitation intensity increases much less.

  1. A performance assessment framework for hospitals: the WHO regional office for Europe PATH project.

    PubMed

    Veillard, J; Champagne, F; Klazinga, N; Kazandjian, V; Arah, O A; Guisset, A-L

    2005-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe launched in 2003 a project aiming to develop and disseminate a flexible and comprehensive tool for the assessment of hospital performance and referred to as the performance assessment tool for quality improvement in hospitals (PATH). This project aims at supporting hospitals in assessing their performance, questioning their own results, and translating them into actions for improvement, by providing hospitals with tools for performance assessment and by enabling collegial support and networking among participating hospitals. PATH was developed through a series of four workshops gathering experts representing most valuable experiences on hospital performance assessment worldwide. An extensive review of the literature on hospital performance projects was carried out, more than 100 performance indicators were scrutinized, and a survey was carried out in 20 European countries. Six dimensions were identified for assessing hospital performance: clinical effectiveness, safety, patient centredness, production efficiency, staff orientation and responsive governance. The following outcomes were achieved: (i) definition of the concepts and identification of key dimensions of hospital performance; (ii) design of the architecture of PATH to enhance evidence-based management and quality improvement through performance assessment; (iii) selection of a core and a tailored set of performance indicators with detailed operational definitions; (iv) identification of trade-offs between indicators; (v) elaboration of descriptive sheets for each indicator to support hospitals in interpreting their results; (vi) design of a balanced dashboard; and (vii) strategies for implementation of the PATH framework. PATH is currently being pilot implemented in eight countries to refine its framework before further expansion.

  2. Review of EuCARD project on accelerator infrastructure in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of big infrastructural and research programs (like pan-European Framework Programs) and individual projects realized inside these programs in Europe is to structure the European Research Area - ERA in this way as to be competitive with the leaders of the world. One of this projects in EuCARD (European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development) with the aim to structure and modernize accelerator, (including accelerators for big free electron laser machines) research infrastructure. This article presents the periodic development of EuCARD which took place between the annual meeting, April 2012 in Warsaw and SC meeting in Uppsala, December 2012. The background of all these efforts are achievements of the LHC machine and associated detectors in the race for new physics. The LHC machine works in the regime of p-p, Pb-p, Pb-Pb (protons and lead ions). Recently, a discovery by the LHC of Higgs like boson, has started vivid debates on the further potential of this machine and the future. The periodic EuCARD conference, workshop and meetings concern building of the research infrastructure, including in this advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The aim of the discussion is not only summarize the current status but make plans and prepare practically to building new infrastructures. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. Accelerator technology is intensely developed in all developed nations and regions of the world. The EuCARD project contains a lot of subjects related directly and indirectly to photon

  3. Projected Changes in Northern Europe Storm and Precipitation Characteristics: Uncertainty and the Implications for Climate Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolowski, S.; Mesquita, M.; Keay, K.

    2012-04-01

    Future changes in storm characteristics and storm tracks over the eastern North Atlantic may have profound implications for energy providers, coastal communities and water resources availability across the European sector. Shifts in the storm tracks and the amount and intensity of precipitation are of particular concern to local/ municipal governments as they contemplate climate change adaptation/ mitigation strategies. Communicating the latest science to these end users is a two-pronged problem. On one prong the scientific community still has some way to go before fully understanding the physical mechanisms driving projected changes at local to regional scales and their associated uncertainties (which can be quite large). On the other prong planners require up-to-date, reliable information at just these scales as they seek to make decisions, which will resonate for decades. The present study investigates projected changes to storms and precipitation over Northern Europe and decomposes the sources of uncertainty surrounding these changes. Strategies for communicating these changes and uncertainties with planners are also discussed. The city of Bergen, which is a participant in the ECLISE project, is employed as a case study for how complex and often counterintuitive climate information can be made useful for end users. Some large-scale, robust changes in storm track statistics have been identified in the ensemble mean climate change response. However, there are often widely varying responses between models and little analysis on the role intra-model variability. A focus on the multi model ensemble mean response is useful in that it isolates externally forced (i.e. climate change) aspects of future variability. However, this approach underestimates the influence of internal variability (weather-related "noise") and its contribution to total uncertainty. Recent research suggests that internal variability can make a large contribution to overall uncertainty with clear

  4. Major risk from rapid, large-volume landslides in Europe (EU Project RUNOUT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Christopher R. J.; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2003-08-01

    Project RUNOUT has investigated methods for reducing the risk from large-volume landslides in Europe, especially those involving rapid rates of emplacement. Using field data from five test sites (Bad Goisern and Köfels in Austria, Tessina and Vajont in Italy, and the Barranco de Tirajana in Gran Canaria, Spain), the studies have developed (1) techniques for applying geomorphological investigations and optical remote sensing to map landslides and their evolution; (2) analytical, numerical, and cellular automata models for the emplacement of sturzstroms and debris flows; (3) a brittle-failure model for forecasting catastrophic slope failure; (4) new strategies for integrating large-area Global Positioning System (GPS) arrays with local geodetic monitoring networks; (5) methods for raising public awareness of landslide hazards; and (6) Geographic Information System (GIS)-based databases for the test areas. The results highlight the importance of multidisciplinary studies of landslide hazards, combining subjects as diverse as geology and geomorphology, remote sensing, geodesy, fluid dynamics, and social profiling. They have also identified key goals for an improved understanding of the physical processes that govern landslide collapse and runout, as well as for designing strategies for raising public awareness of landslide hazards and for implementing appropriate land management policies for reducing landslide risk.

  5. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-05-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  6. Adaptation of vulnerable regional agricultural systems in Europe to climate change - results from the ADAGIO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitzinger, J.; Kubu, G.; Alexandrov, V.; Utset, A.; Mihailovic, D. T.; Lalic, B.; Trnka, M.; Zalud, Z.; Semeradova, D.; Ventrella, D.; Anastasiou, D. P.; Medany, M.; Altaher, S.; Olejnik, J.; Lesny, J.; Nemeshko, N.; Nikolaev, M.; Simota, C.; Cojocaru, G.

    2009-10-01

    During 2007-2009 the ADAGIO project (http://www.adagio-eu.org) is carried out to evaluate regional adaptation options in agriculture in most vulnerable European regions (mediterranean, central and eastern European regions). In this context a bottom-up approach is used beside the top-down approach of using scientific studies, involving regional experts and farmers in the evaluation of potential regional vulnerabilities and adaptation options. Preliminary results of the regional studies and gathered feedback from experts and farmers show in general that (increasing) drought and heat are the main factors having impact on agricultural vulnerability not only in the Mediterranean region, but also in the Central and southern Eastern European regions. Another important aspect is that the increasing risk of pest and diseases may play a more important role for agricultural vulnerability than assumed before, however, till now this field is only rarely investigated in Europe. Although dominating risks such as increasing drought and heat are similar in most regions, the vulnerabilities in the different regions are very much influenced by characteristics of the dominating agroecosystems and prevailing socio-economic conditions. This will be even be more significant for potential adaptation measures at the different levels, which have to reflect the regional conditions.

  7. The creation and progress of the J Project in Eastern and Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Maródi, László

    2011-11-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have now become recognized as a worldwide health problem. Rapid development of immunological and genetic technologies has led to the discovery of more than 200 PIDs and more than 150 disease-related genes. Progress in the field is expected to take a new turn after the introduction of new-generation sequencing technologies that will enable searches for currently unknown PID-related genes. By contrast, even with progress in molecular genetics, many patients remain ill and die early because of the lack of diagnostic or treatment facilities, or both. Thus, the gap between the knowledge accumulated and the appropriate management of patients with PIDs in everyday clinical practice has widened, necessitating PID awareness, particularly in countries with poor socioeconomic conditions. The J Project, established as a physician education and research collaboration program in Eastern and Central Europe, demonstrates how professional responsibility and long-term joint efforts can make a beneficial difference for patients with inborn errors of immunity.

  8. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  9. Drug testing in Europe: monitoring results of the Trans European Drug Information (TEDI) project.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Tibor M; Nagy, Constanze; Bücheli, Alexander; Martins, Daniel; Ugarte, Miren; Beduwe, Cécile; Ventura Vilamala, Mireia

    2017-02-01

    Drug testing is a harm reduction strategy that has been adopted by certain countries in Europe. Drug users are able to hand in their drugs voluntarily for chemical analysis of composition and dose. Drug users will be alerted about dangerous test results by the drug testing systems directly and through warning campaigns. An international collaborative effort was launched to combine data of drug testing systems, called the Trans European Drug Information (TEDI) project. Drug testing systems of Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, Portugal, and the Netherlands participated in this project. This study presents results of some of the main illicit drugs encountered: cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamine and also comments on new psychoactive substances (NPS) detected between 2008 and 2013. A total of 45 859 different drug samples were analyzed by TEDI. The drug markets of the distinct European areas showed similarities, but also some interesting differences. For instance, purity of cocaine and amphetamine powders was generally low in Austria, whilst high in Spain and the Netherlands. And the market for ecstasy showed a contrast: whereas in the Netherlands and Switzerland there was predominantly a market for ecstasy tablets, in Portugal and Spain MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) crystals were much more prevalent. Also, some NPS appearing in ecstasy seemed more specific for one country than another. In general, prevalence of NPS clearly increased between 2008 and 2013. Drug testing can be used to generate a global picture of drug markets and provides information about the pharmacological contents of drugs for the population at risk. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project.

    PubMed

    Paget, W John; Balderston, Catherine; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone

    2010-08-01

    The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003-2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0-4 and 5-14 years in England, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0-4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47-83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making concerning

  11. Dietary exposure assessments for children in europe (the EXPOCHI project): rationale, methods and design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/purpose The number of dietary exposure assessment studies focussing on children is very limited. Children are however a vulnerable group due to their higher food consumption level per kg body weight. Therefore, the EXPOCHI project aims [1] to create a relational network of individual food consumption databases in children, covering different geographical areas within Europe, and [2] to use these data to assess the usual intake of lead, chromium, selenium and food colours. Methods EXPOCHI includes 14 food consumption databases focussed on children (1-14 y old). The data are considered representative at national/regional level: 14 regions covering 13 countries. Since the aim of the study is to perform long-term exposure assessments, only data derived from 24 hr dietary recalls and dietary records recorded on at least two non-consecutive days per individual were included in the dietary exposure assessments. To link consumption data and concentration data of lead, chromium and selenium in a standardised way, categorisation of the food consumption data was based on the food categorisation system described within the SCOOP Task report 3.2.11. For food colours, the food categorisation system specified in the Council Directive 94/36/EC was used. Conclusion The EXPOCHI project includes a pan-European long-term exposure assessment of lead, chromium, selenium and food colours among children living in 13 different EU countries. However, the different study methods and designs used to collect the data in the different countries necessitate an in-depth description of these different methods and a discussion about the resulting limitations. PMID:22958503

  12. Joule heating in the high-latitude mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The contribution made by Joule dissipation to heating of the daytime high-latitude upper mesosphere is discussed. During solar proton precipitation events in regions of large electric fields, Joule dissipation can be substantially larger than the local solar heating rate. Altitude profiles of Joule dissipation are presented for the polar cleft region for the August 4, 1972, solar proton event.

  13. Western Europe: Introduction and Geography. Grade Eleven. [Resource Unit I, Sub Unit 1.] Project Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This subunit on Western Europe is one of four resource units for an eleventh grade area studies course. One section of the subunit contains an introduction and the other the geography of Western Europe. The introduction contains objectives, an outline of content, teaching procedures, and instructional materials. The geography section focuses upon…

  14. Calculating Hemispheric Power and Joule Heating using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Emery, B. A.; Maute, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) simulates the thermosphere-ionosphere with self consistent electrodynamics. The Weimer 2005 ion convection model can be used with a parameterized model of the aurora based on the electron auroral hemispheric power. The spatial location and radius of the auroral model is adjusted with respect to the Weimer 2005 boundary for zero electric potential, but the resulting Joule heating may be an under or over estimation of the real magnetosphere-ionosphere energy transfer. To improve the auroral model so that the resulting Joule heating is relatively realistic is the ultimate aim of this project. To this end, we achieve a number of sub-goals using data from the DMSP-F13, which is in a dawn-dusk orbit. We use data from the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) to quantify the relative positions of the convection reversal boundary (CRB), the cross-track ion drift (Vy) sunward peaks, and the equatorward boundary of zero velocities (or zero electric potential) and compare them to Weimer 2005 positions for the same orbits. The electric field is estimated only from the cross-track ion velocity Vy in the dawn-dusk orbits, while the along-track ion velocity Vx is ignored. We also calculate auroral Pederson conductance using the auroral electron energy flux and mean electron energy measurements from the DMSP Special Sensor Precipitating Electron and Ion Spectrometer (SSJ/4). The hemispheric power is estimated from the electron energy flux. The Joule heating is approximately the product of the Pedersen conductance and the square of the electric field, where we include Pedersen conductance from EUV and from the aurora to estimate EUV Joule heating and particle Joule heating. Our results for a range of Bz Interplanetary Magnetic Fields (IMF Bz) values show that the hemispheric power is largest in the morning sector where the aurora is widest. The aurora mostly lies in the sunward ion flow region and thus the integrated

  15. e-Science and climate applications : The EELA (E-Infrastructure shared between Europe and Latin America) Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, A.; Richard, M.; Jose Manuel, G.; Claudio, B.; Mauricio, C.; Antonio, C.; Rafael, M.; Jesus, C.; Freddy, E.

    2007-05-01

    Several international projects and collaborations have emerged in the last years due to the increasing demand for computing resources. One important aspect of these initiatives deals with the gridification of computing intensive scientific applications otherwise difficult to run efficiently. The EELA Project (E-Infrastructure shared between Europe and Latin America) is a collaboration of diverse Latin America and Europe Institutions, funded by EU commission under the FP6 which has developed a performance e-infrastructure for e-Science applications in the fields of Biomedicine, High Energy Physics, e-Learning and Climate. Nowadays all the groups have already ported their applications on the EELA Grid and are obtaining first results. This presentation describes EELA, the objective and progress of the climate application, related to regional modeling of El Niño impacts, as well as the intentions for earth sciences applications.

  16. Future air quality in Europe: a multi-model assessment of projected exposure to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colette, A.; Granier, C.; Hodnebrog, Ø.; Jakobs, H.; Maurizi, A.; Nyiri, A.; Rao, S.; Amann, M.; Bessagnet, B.; D'Angiola, A.; Gauss, M.; Heyes, C.; Klimont, Z.; Meleux, F.; Memmesheimer, M.; Mieville, A.; Rouïl, L.; Russo, F.; Schucht, S.; Simpson, D.; Stordal, F.; Tampieri, F.; Vrac, M.

    2012-11-01

    In order to explore future air quality in Europe at the 2030 horizon, two emission scenarios developed in the framework of the Global Energy Assessment including varying assumptions on climate and energy access policies are investigated with an ensemble of six regional and global atmospheric chemistry transport models. A specific focus is given in the paper to the assessment of uncertainties and robustness of the projected changes in air quality. The present work relies on an ensemble of chemistry transport models giving insight into the model spread. Both regional and global scale models were involved, so that the ensemble benefits from medium-resolution approaches as well as global models that capture long-range transport. For each scenario a whole decade is modelled in order to gain statistical confidence in the results. A statistical downscaling approach is used to correct the distribution of the modelled projection. Last, the modelling experiment is related to a hind-cast study published earlier, where the performances of all participating models were extensively documented. The analysis is presented in an exposure-based framework in order to discuss policy relevant changes. According to the emission projections, ozone precursors such as NOx will drop down to 30% to 50% of their current levels, depending on the scenario. As a result, annual mean O3 will slightly increase in NOx saturated areas but the overall O3 burden will decrease substantially. Exposure to detrimental O3 levels for health (SOMO35) will be reduced down to 45% to 70% of their current levels. And the fraction of stations where present-day exceedences of daily maximum O3 is higher than 120 μg m-3 more than 25 days per year will drop from 43% down to 2 to 8%. We conclude that air pollution mitigation measures (present in both scenarios) are the main factors leading to the improvement, but an additional cobenefit of at least 40% (depending on the indicator) is brought about by the climate policy.

  17. Future air quality in Europe: a multi-model assessment of projected exposure to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colette, A.; Granier, C.; Hodnebrog, Ø.; Jakobs, H.; Maurizi, A.; Nyiri, A.; Rao, S.; Amann, M.; Bessagnet, B.; D'Angiola, A.; Gauss, M.; Heyes, C.; Klimont, Z.; Meleux, F.; Memmesheimer, M.; Mieville, A.; Rouïl, L.; Russo, F.; Schucht, S.; Simpson, D.; Stordal, F.; Tampieri, F.; Vrac, M.

    2012-06-01

    In order to explore future air quality in Europe at the 2030 horizon, two emission scenarios developed in the framework of the Global Energy Assessment including varying assumptions on climate and energy access policies are investigated with an ensemble of six regional and global atmospheric chemistry transport models. A specific focus is given in the paper to the assessment of uncertainties and robustness of the projected changes in air quality. The present work relies on an ensemble of chemistry transport models giving insight into the model spread. Both regional and global scale models were involved, so that the ensemble benefits from medium-resolution approaches as well as global models that capture long-range transport. For each scenario a whole decade is modelled in order to gain statistical confidence in the results. A statistical downscaling approach is used to correct the distribution of the model projection. Last, the modelling experiment is linked to a hind-cast study published earlier, where the performances of all participating models were extensively documented. The analysis is presented in an exposure-based framework in order to discuss policy relevant changes. According to the emission projections, ozone precursors such as NOx will drop to 30% to 50% of their current levels, depending on the scenario. As a result, annual mean O3 will slightly increase in NOx saturated areas but the overall O3 burden will decrease substantially. Exposure to detrimental O3 levels for health (SOMO35) will be reduced down to 45% to 70% of their current levels. And the fraction of stations where present-day exceedences of daily maximumO3 is higher than 120 μg m-3 more than 25 days per year will drop from 43% down to 2 to 8%. We conclude that air pollution mitigation measures (present in both scenarios) are the main factors leading to the improvement, but an additional cobenefit of at least 40% (depending on the indicator) is brought about by the climate policy.

  18. Metrology for Radiological Early Warning Networks in Europe ("METROERM")-A Joint European Metrology Research Project.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Stefan; Dombrowski, Harald; Kessler, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, all European countries have installed automatic dosimetry network stations as well as air sampling systems for the monitoring of airborne radioactivity. In Europe, at present, almost 5,000 stations measure dose rate values in nearly real time. In addition, a few hundred air samplers are operated. Most of them need extended accumulation times with no real-time capability. National dose rate data are provided to the European Commission (EC) via the EUropean Radiological Data Exchange Platform (EURDEP). In case of a nuclear emergency with transboundary implications, the EC may issue momentous recommendations to EU member states based on the radiological data collected by EURDEP. These recommendations may affect millions of people and could have severe economic and sociological consequences. Therefore, the reliability of the EURDEP data is of key importance. Unfortunately, the dose rate and activity concentration data are not harmonized between the different networks. Therefore, within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), 16 European institutions formed the consortium MetroERM with the aim to improve the metrological foundation of measurements and to introduce a pan-European harmonization for the collation and evaluation of radiological data in early warning network systems. In addition, a new generation of detector systems based on spectrometers capable of providing both reliable dose rate values as well as nuclide specific information in real time are in development. The MetroERM project and its first results will be presented and discussed in this article.

  19. Scintillations and TEC gradients from Europe to Africa: a picture by the MISW project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Lucilla; Spogli, Luca; Cesaroni, Claudio; Vadakke Veettil, Sreeja; Aquino, Marcio; Zin, Alberto; Wilhelm, Nicolas; Serant, Damien; Forte, Biagio; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Grzesiak, Marcin; Kos, Timoslav; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Zurn, Martin; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Haggstrom, Ingemar

    2016-04-01

    MISW (Mitigation of space weather threats to GNSS services) is an EU/FP7 project with the purpose of tackling the research challenges associated with Space Weather effects on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System). In particular, the objective of MISW is to develop suitable algorithms capable of enabling Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (e.g. EGNOS) in the low-latitude African sector. For this purpose, MISW has created a detailed picture of extreme space weather events that occurred in the past and in the current solar cycle. Despite its weakness, the current solar cycle exhibited two superstorms that happened during the descending phase, in March and in June 2015. The latter has been studied in detail through a careful analysis of GNSS data acquired by TEC (Total Electron Content) and scintillation monitors and by IGS and regional geodetic networks located in Europe and in Africa. The investigation enabled creating the actual scenarios of TEC gradients and scintillation that occurred over a wide latitudinal extent between 21 and 30 June 2015. The investigation is based on calibrated TEC from different receivers, aiming at the estimation of east-west and north-south TEC gradients and on the integration of calibrated TEC and TEC gradients with the scintillation data. The impact of the storm on GNSS performance has also been investigated in terms of losses of lock. The results of this study highlight the importance of assessing the latitudinal and the longitudinal TEC gradients as crucial information to identify to what extent different ionospheric sectors are severely affected by scintillation. On the other hand, this study also shows evidences of how TEC gradients are not always responsible for the observed scintillation. Finally, the outcomes of the study demonstrate the complex relation between scintillation, TEC gradients and losses of GNSS satellites lock.

  20. Joule heating effects on electroosmotic entry flow.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Rama Aravind; Zhou, Yilong; Patel, Saurin; Kale, Akshay; Song, Yongxin; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2017-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow is the transport method of choice in microfluidic devices over traditional pressure-driven flow. To date, however, studies on electroosmotic flow have been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. This work presents the first experimental study of Joule heating effects on electroosmotic fluid entry from the inlet reservoir (i.e., the well that supplies fluids and samples) to the microchannel in a polymer-based microfluidic chip. Electrothermal fluid circulations are observed at the reservoir-microchannel junction, which grow in size and strength with the increasing alternating current to direct current voltage ratio. Moreover, a 2D depth-averaged numerical model is developed to understand the effects of Joule heating on fluid temperature and flow fields in electrokinetic microfluidic chips. This model overcomes the problems encountered in previous unrealistic 2D and costly 3D models, and is able to predict the observed electroosmotic entry flow patterns with a good agreement.

  1. Nanowire transformation and annealing by Joule heating.

    PubMed

    Hummelgård, Magnus; Zhang, Renyun; Carlberg, Torbjörn; Vengust, Damjan; Dvorsek, Damjan; Mihailovic, Dragan; Olin, Håkan

    2010-04-23

    Joule heating of bundles of Mo(6)S(3)I(6) nanowires, in real time, was studied using in situ TEM probing. TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and conductivity measurements showed a complete transformation of Mo(6)S(3)I(6) into Mo via thermal decomposition. The resulting Mo nanowires had a conductivity that was 2-3 orders higher than the starting material. The conductivity increased even further, up to 1.8 x 10(6) S m( - 1), when the Mo nanowires went through annealing phases. These results suggest that Joule heating might be a general way to transform or anneal nanowires, pointing to applications such as metal nanowire fabrication, novel memory elements based on material transformation, or in situ improvement of field emitters.

  2. Joule-Thomson Expander Without Check Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooling effected by bidirectional, reciprocating flow of gas. Type of Joule-Thomson (J-T) expander for cryogenic cooling requires no check valves to prevent reverse flow of coolant. More reliable than conventional J-T expander, containing network of check valves, each potential source of failure. Gas flows alternately from left to right and right to left. Heat load cooled by evaporation of liquid from left or right compartment, whichever at lower pressure.

  3. Manganese Nitride Sorption Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed sorption refrigeration system of increased power efficiency combines MnxNy sorption refrigeration stage with systems described in "Regenerative Sorption Refrigerator" (NPO-17630). Measured pressure-vs-composition isotherms for reversible chemisorption of N2 in MnxNy suggest feasibility to incorporate MnxNy chemisorption stage in Joule-Thomson cryogenic system. Discovery represents first known reversible nitrogen chemisorption compression system. Has potential in nitrogen-isotope separation, nitrogen purification, or contamination-free nitrogen compression.

  4. Remote Joule heating by a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Kamal H; Voskanian, Norvik; Bronsgeest, Merijntje; Cumings, John

    2012-04-08

    Minimizing Joule heating remains an important goal in the design of electronic devices. The prevailing model of Joule heating relies on a simple semiclassical picture in which electrons collide with the atoms of a conductor, generating heat locally and only in regions of non-zero current density, and this model has been supported by most experiments. Recently, however, it has been predicted that electric currents in graphene and carbon nanotubes can couple to the vibrational modes of a neighbouring material, heating it remotely. Here, we use in situ electron thermal microscopy to detect the remote Joule heating of a silicon nitride substrate by a single multiwalled carbon nanotube. At least 84% of the electrical power supplied to the nanotube is dissipated directly into the substrate, rather than in the nanotube itself. Although it has different physical origins, this phenomenon is reminiscent of induction heating or microwave dielectric heating. Such an ability to dissipate waste energy remotely could lead to improved thermal management in electronic devices.

  5. Trial operation of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PC25) for CHP applications in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, M.; Droste, W.; Wolf, D.

    1996-12-31

    In Europe, ten 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) produced by ONSI (PC25) are currently in operation. Their operators collaborate closely in the European Fuel Cell Users Group (EFCUG). The experience gained from trial operation by the four German operators - HEAG, HGW/HEW, Thyssengas and Ruhrgas - coincides with that of the other European operators. This experience can generally be regarded as favourable. With a view to using fuel cells in combined heat and power generation (CHP), the project described in this report, which was carried out in cooperation with the municipal utility of Bochum and Gasunie of the Netherlands, aimed at gaining experience with the PC 25 in field operation under the specific operating conditions prevailing in Europe. The work packages included heat-controlled operation, examination of plant behavior with varying gas properties and measurement of emissions under dynamic load conditions. The project received EU funding under the JOULE programme.

  6. ScreenPro FH - Screening Project for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Central, Southern and Eastern Europe: Rationale and Design.

    PubMed

    Češka, Richard; Paragh, György; Reiner, Željko; Banach, Maciej; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Susekov, Andrey V; Rašlová, Katarína; Freiberger, Tomáš; Vohnout, Branislav; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Goudev, Assen; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gaiţă, Dan; Pojskić, Belma; Pećin, Ivan; Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Mitchenko, Olena; Ezhov, Marat V; Latkovskis, Gustavs; Petrulionienė, Žaneta; Fras, Zlatko; Tasić, Nebojsa; Mirrakhimov, Erkin M; Murataliev, Tolkun; Shek, Alexander B; Tuka, Vladimír; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Moubarak, Elie M; Rasadi, Khalid Al

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder with well-known genetic transmission and clinical course. Despite great recent progress, FH is still underestimated, under-diagnosed and thus undertreated. Furthermore it represents a significant healthcare challenge as a common risk factor for the premature development of coronary heart disease. The ScreenPro FH Project is an international network project aiming at improving complex care - from timely screening, through diagnosis to up-to-date treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. An important task for the project is to harmonise and unify diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in participating countries, where the situation differs from country to country. Countries with more experience should serve as a model for countries developing the FH network.Key words: diagnosis - familial hypercholesterolemia - screening - treatment optimization.

  7. Project INTEGRATE - a common methodological approach to understand integrated health care in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Rosenmoller, Magdalene

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of case studies in health services research has proven to be an excellent methodology for gaining in-depth understanding of the organisation and delivery of health care. This is particularly relevant when looking at the complexity of integrated healthcare programmes, where multifaceted interactions occur at the different levels of care and often without a clear link between the interventions (new and/or existing) and their impact on outcomes (in terms of patients health, both patient and professional satisfaction and cost-effectiveness). Still, integrated care is seen as a core strategy in the sustainability of health and care provision in most societies in Europe and beyond. More specifically, at present, there is neither clear evidence on transferable factors of integrated care success nor a method for determining how to establish these specific success factors. The drawback of case methodology in this case, however, is that the in-depth results or lessons generated are usually highly context-specific and thus brings the challenge of transferability of findings to other settings, as different health care systems and different indications are often not comparable. Project INTEGRATE, a European Commission-funded project, has been designed to overcome these problems; it looks into four chronic conditions in different European settings, under a common methodology framework (taking a mixed-methods approach) to try to overcome the issue of context specificity and limited transferability. The common methodological framework described in this paper seeks to bring together the different case study findings in a way that key lessons may be derived and transferred between countries, contexts and patient-groups, where integrated care is delivered in order to provide insight into generalisability and build on existing evidence in this field. Methodology To compare the different integrated care experiences, a mixed-methods approach has been adopted with the

  8. Project INTEGRATE - a common methodological approach to understand integrated health care in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Rosenmoller, Magdalene

    2014-10-01

    The use of case studies in health services research has proven to be an excellent methodology for gaining in-depth understanding of the organisation and delivery of health care. This is particularly relevant when looking at the complexity of integrated healthcare programmes, where multifaceted interactions occur at the different levels of care and often without a clear link between the interventions (new and/or existing) and their impact on outcomes (in terms of patients health, both patient and professional satisfaction and cost-effectiveness). Still, integrated care is seen as a core strategy in the sustainability of health and care provision in most societies in Europe and beyond. More specifically, at present, there is neither clear evidence on transferable factors of integrated care success nor a method for determining how to establish these specific success factors. The drawback of case methodology in this case, however, is that the in-depth results or lessons generated are usually highly context-specific and thus brings the challenge of transferability of findings to other settings, as different health care systems and different indications are often not comparable. Project INTEGRATE, a European Commission-funded project, has been designed to overcome these problems; it looks into four chronic conditions in different European settings, under a common methodology framework (taking a mixed-methods approach) to try to overcome the issue of context specificity and limited transferability. The common methodological framework described in this paper seeks to bring together the different case study findings in a way that key lessons may be derived and transferred between countries, contexts and patient-groups, where integrated care is delivered in order to provide insight into generalisability and build on existing evidence in this field. To compare the different integrated care experiences, a mixed-methods approach has been adopted with the creation of a common

  9. An analytical model of joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates Joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. Joule heating and thermal deflections are a major source of noise in such sensors. This work uses analytical and numerical techniques to characterise the Joule heating in 4-layer piezoresistive microcantilevers made of silicon and silicon dioxide substrates but with the same U-shaped silicon piezoresistor. A theoretical model for predicting the temperature generated due to Joule heating is developed. The commercial finite element software ANSYS Multiphysics was used to study the effect of electrical potential on temperature and deflection produced in the cantilevers. The effect of piezoresistor width on Joule heating is also studied. Results show that Joule heating strongly depends on the applied potential and width of piezoresistor and that a silicon substrate cantilever has better thermal characteristics than a silicon dioxide cantilever.

  10. Europe and US to Collaborate on the Design and Development of a Giant Radio Telescope Project in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    High Goals for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Representatives from the U.S. and Europe signed an agreement today in Washington to continue collaboration on the first phase of a giant new telescope project. The telescope will image the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity and sharpness at millimeter wavelengths (between the radio and infrared spectral regions). It will be a major step for astronomy, making it possible to study the origins of galaxies, stars and planets. This project is a prime example of a truly global project, an essential development in view of the ever-increasing complexity and cost of front-line astronomical facilities. The U.S. side of the project is run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) , operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The European side of the project is a collaboration between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) , the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) , the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (NFRA) and Nederlandse Onderzoekschool Voor Astronomie (NOVA) , and the United Kingdom Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC). The Europe-U.S. agreement signed today may be formally extended in the very near future to include Japan, following an already existing tripartite declaration of intent. Dr. Robert Eisenstein, NSF's Assistant Director Mathematical and Physical Sciences, called the project "a path-breaking international partnership that will open far-reaching opportunities for astronomical observations. This array would enable astronomers to explore the detailed processes through which the stars and planets form and give us a vastly improved understanding of the formation of the first galaxies in the very early universe." Eisenstein welcomed the collaboration with Europe and Japan's interest in becoming a major partner. Speaking on behalf of

  11. The Climate and Landscape of the Middle Part of the Weichselian Glaciation in Europe: The Stage 3 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Andel, Tjeerd H.

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen isotope stage 3 (OIS 3) was a mild interval between the two cold maxima of the last (Weichselian) glaciation marked by climate changes oscillating on a 100-1000 yr time scale between near-interglacial and peak-glacial conditions. During OIS 3, modern humans entered Europe, and somewhat later their Neanderthal predecessors became extinct. Our understanding of this momentous event depends on an answer to the question, Did the unstable environmental conditions of the time play a significant role in early human history? The Stage 3 Project is an interdisciplinary study with two main goals: (1) to describe with existing data and to simulate the climates and landscapes of typical warm and cold phases between 45,000 and 30,000 yr ago and (2) to compare the results with the spatial and temporal distribution of human beings in this context. This paper introduces the Stage 3 Project and provides background to a set of papers on the climate and landscape aspects of the Project that will appear in Quaternary Research and to studies of their relevance to the Early Upper Paleolithic of Europe to appear in journals yet to be determined.

  12. Mapping research activity on mental health disorders in Europe: study protocol for the Mapping_NCD project.

    PubMed

    Berg Brigham, Karen; Darlington, Meryl; Wright, John S F; Lewison, Grant; Kanavos, Panos; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle

    2016-05-26

    Mental health disorders (MHDs) constitute a large and growing disease burden in Europe, although they typically receive less attention and research funding than other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study protocol describes a methodology for the mapping of MHD research in Europe as part of Mapping_NCD, a 2-year project funded by the European Commission which seeks to map European research funding and impact for five NCDs in order to identify potential gaps, overlaps, synergies and opportunities, and to develop evidence-based policies for future research. The project aims to develop a multi-focal view of the MHD research landscape across the 28 European Union Member States, plus Iceland, Norway and Switzerland, through a survey of European funding entities, analysis of research initiatives undertaken in the public, voluntary/not-for-profit and commercial sectors, and expert interviews to contextualize the gathered data. The impact of MHD research will be explored using bibliometric analyses of scientific publications, clinical guidelines and newspaper stories reporting on research initiatives. Finally, these research inputs and outputs will be considered in light of various metrics that have been proposed to inform priorities for the allocation of research funds, including burden of disease, treatment gaps and cost of illness. Given the growing burden of MHDs, a clear and broad view of the current state of MHD research is needed to ensure that limited resources are directed to evidence-based priority areas. MHDs pose a particular challenge in mapping the research landscape due to their complex nature, high co-morbidity and varying diagnostic criteria. Undertaking such an effort across 31 countries is further challenged by differences in data collection, healthcare systems, reimbursement rates and clinical practices, as well as cultural and socioeconomic diversity. Using multiple methods to explore the spectrum of MHD research funding activity across Europe

  13. Joule-Thomson Cooler Produces Nearly Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, Jiunn-Jeng; Trimble, Curtis A.

    1992-01-01

    Improved Joule-Thomson cooler maintains nearly constant temperature. Absolute-pressure relief valve helps stabilize temperature of cold head despite variations in atmospheric pressure. Feedback-controlled electrical heater provides additional stabilization. Demand-flow Joule-Thomson valve requires less nitrogen than fixed-orifice Joule-Thomson valve providing same amount of cooling. Provides stable low temperatures required for operation of such devices as tunable diode lasers in laboratory and balloon-borne instruments detecting contaminants in atmosphere.

  14. Comparing MOOC Adoption Strategies in Europe: Results from the HOME Project Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Darco; Schuwer, Robert; Teixeira, Antonio; Aydin, Cengiz Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the literature and the academic discussion about institutional strategic planning of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) has been centred on the U.S. context. Literature on MOOCs in Europe is still developing and just recently some empirical studies were conducted. However, these studies are not comparable, and it is hard to learn about…

  15. Incidence of hematologic malignancies in Europe by morphologic subtype: results of the HAEMACARE project.

    PubMed

    Sant, Milena; Allemani, Claudia; Tereanu, Carmen; De Angelis, Roberta; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Visser, Otto; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Maynadié, Marc; Simonetti, Arianna; Lutz, Jean-Michel; Berrino, Franco

    2010-11-11

    Changing definitions and classifications of hematologic malignancies (HMs) complicate incidence comparisons. HAEMACARE classified HMs into groupings consistent with the latest World Health Organization classification and useful for epidemiologic and public health purposes. We present crude, age-specific and age-standardized incidence rates for European HMs according to these groupings, estimated from 66,371 lymphoid malignancies (LMs) and 21,796 myeloid malignancies (MMs) registered in 2000-2002 by 44 European cancer registries, grouped into 5 regions. Age-standardized incidence rates were 24.5 (per 100,000) for LMs and 7.55 for MMs. The commonest LMs were plasma cell neoplasms (4.62), small B-cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphatic leukemia (3.79), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (3.13), and Hodgkin lymphoma (2.41). The commonest MMs were acute myeloid leukemia (2.96), other myeloproliferative neoplasms (1.76), and myelodysplastic syndrome (1.24). Unknown morphology LMs were commonest in Northern Europe (7.53); unknown morphology MMs were commonest in Southern Europe (0.73). Overall incidence was lowest in Eastern Europe and lower in women than in men. For most LMs, incidence was highest in Southern Europe; for MMs incidence was highest in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Differences in diagnostic and registration criteria are an important cause of incidence variation; however, different distribution of HM risk factors also contributes. The quality of population-based HM data needs further improvement.

  16. Modelling eWork in Europe: Estimates, Models and Forecasts from the EMERGENCE Project. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, P.; Huws, U.

    A study combined results of a survey of employers in 18 European countries to establish the extent to which they are currently using eWork with European official statistics to develop models, estimates, and forecasts of the numbers of eWorkers in Europe. These four types of "individual" eWork were identified: telehomeworking;…

  17. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  18. Effect of Joule heating on electrokinetic transport.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Barbaros; Li, Dongqing

    2008-03-01

    The Joule heating (JH) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in electrokinetic flow due to the presence of electrical potential gradient and electrical current. JH may become pronounced for applications with high electrical potential gradients or with high ionic concentration buffer solutions. In this review, an in-depth look at the effect of JH on electrokinetic processes is provided. Theoretical modeling of EOF and electrophoresis (EP) with the presence of JH is presented and the important findings from the previous studies are examined. A numerical study of a fused-silica capillary PCR reactor powered by JH is also presented to extend the discussion of favorable usage of JH.

  19. Mega-joule experiment area study, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; Oirth, C.; Woodworth, J.

    1995-03-09

    This document contains Chapters 3 and 4 from the Mega-Joule Experiment Area Study, 1989. Water frost on the first containment wall is studied in detail in Chapter 3. Considered topics are the computer modeling of frost ablation and shock propagation and the experimental characterization of water frost. The latter is broken down into: frost crystal morphology, experiment configuration, growth rate results, density results, thermal conductivity, crush strength of frost, frost integrity, frost response to simulated soft x-rays. Chapter 4 presents information on surrounding shielding and structures to include: cryogenic spheres for first wall and coolant containment; shield tank concerning primary neutron and gamma ray shielding; and secondary shielding.

  20. Spring-Loaded Joule-Thomson Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Improved design reduces clogging and maintains constant pressure drop as flow rate varies. Spring-Loaded Joule-Thomson Valve pressure drop regulated by spring pushing stainless-steel ball against soft brass seat. Pressure drop remains nearly constant, regardless of helium flow rate and of any gas contaminants frozen on valve seat. Because springloaded J-T valve maintains constant pressure drop, upstream roomtemperature throttle valve adjusts flow rate precisely for any given upstream pressure. In addition, new valve relatively invulnerable to frozen gas contaminants, which clog fixed-orifice J-T valves.

  1. Comparing emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliot, George; Pierce, Thomas; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Schaap, Martijn; Moran, Michael; Nopmongcol, Uarporn

    2012-06-01

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the two domains. We focus specifically on the creation of “model-ready” gridded emission datasets for 2006 across the two continental study domains. The practice of creating and processing the two inventories is discussed with a focus on emission factors, spatial allocation, temporal variability, speciation of PM and VOCs, and the mechanics of distributing the data and supporting emission algorithms to the modeling community. The spatial and temporal distribution on common scales is compared for the pollutants of primary concern: NOx, VOCs, SO2, PM2.5, CO, and NH3. Because of differences of population distribution, emissions across North America tend to be more heterogeneous in spatial coverage than in Europe. The temporal patterns in the estimated emissions are largely the result of assumptions used to characterize human activity, with the exception of “natural” emissions, which are modulated by meteorological variability, and emissions from large electric generating units in the U.S., which have the benefit of continuous emission monitors that provide hourly resolved profiles. Emission estimates in both study domains are challenged by several important but poorly characterized emission source sectors, notably road dust, agricultural operations, biomass burning, and road transport. Finally, this paper provides insight on the strengths and weaknesses of emission inventory preparation practices on both continents. One important outcome of this comparison of 2006 emissions between Europe and North America is the greater understanding provided into how the emission estimates developed for the AQMEII project impact regional air quality model performance.

  2. Micro-scale heat-exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on developing a micro-scale counter flow heat exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling with the potential for both chip and wafer scale integration. This project is differentiated from previous work by focusing on planar, thin film micromachining instead of bulk materials. A process will be developed for fabricating all the devices mentioned above, allowing for highly integrated micro heat exchangers. The use of thin film dielectrics provides thermal isolation, increasing efficiency of the coolers compared to designs based on bulk materials, and it will allow for wafer-scale fabrication and integration. The process is intended to implement a CFHX as part of a Joule-Thomson cooling system for applications with heat loads less than 1mW. This report presents simulation results and investigation of a fabrication process for such devices.

  3. Regional Climate Change Scenarios in High Resolution for Impact Assessment in Central and Eastern Europe - Project CECILIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halenka, T.

    2009-09-01

    Resolution of regional climate simulation is an important factor affecting the accuracy of dynamical downscaling of the global changes. Especially the extremes are strongly dependent on the terrain patterns as shape of orography or land use, which can contribute to extreme temperatures or precipitation appearance and distribution. Project EC FP6 CECILIA (Central and Eastern Europe Climate Change Impact and Vulnerability Assessment) is studying the impact of climate change in complex topography of the Central and Eastern Europe in very high resolution of 10 km. The impacts on agriculture, forestry, hydrology and air-quality are studied within the project, and precise information from regional climate simulations is necessary. Basic validation and verification of ERA40 driven simulations by RegCM and ALADIN-Climate used for simulations in targeted regions as well as discussion of the climate change signal in these regions for time slices 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 is provided with respect to control period 1961-1990. Some impact applications in the sectors mentioned above will be shown as well.

  4. The History of European Health Project: a history of health in Europe from the late Paleolithic era to the present.

    PubMed

    Steckel, Richard H; Larsen, Clark S; Sciulli, Paul W; Walker, Philip L

    2009-01-01

    The United States National Science Foundation has recently funded a large collaborative project on "A History of Health in Europe from the Late Paleolithic Era to the Present," whose goal is to measure and analyzes the evolution of skeletal health by combining data from human remains with information gathered from sources in archaeology, climate history, geography, and history. The goal of this international collaborative project is to create a series of database that will allow researchers to reinterpret the history of human health in Europe from the late Paleolithic era to the early twentieth century. During this period, human health and welfare were transformed enormously by the transition from foraging to farming; the rise of cities and complex forms of social and political organization; European colonization; and industrialization. With a trans-Atlantic network of collaborators, we will undertake large-scale comparative studies of the causes and health consequences of these and other dramatic changes in arrangements for work, living, and human interaction.

  5. Final Report on the Joule-Scale Experimental Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M

    2008-10-01

    We describe the final results of the High Power Laser Pulse Recirculation project. We have developed and implementing a novel technique for picosecond, Joule-class laser pulse recirculation inside a passive cavity. The aim of this project was to develop technology compatible with increasing the efficiency of Compton based light sources by more than an order of magnitude. In year 1 of the project, we achieved a greater than 40 times average power enhancement of the mJ-scale laser pulses inside a passive cavity with internal focus. In year 2, we demonstrated recirculation of lasers pulses with energies up to 191 mJ at 532 nm, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 20 ps. In this high energy regime, we achieved up to 14 times average power enhancement inside the cavity. This enhancement factor is compatible with the new X-band based mono-energetic gamma-ray machine, Velociraptor, being constructed at LLNL. The demonstrated cavity enhancement is primarily limited by the poor spatial beam quality of the high power laser beam. We expect a nearly diffraction limited laser beam to achieve 40 times or better cavity enhancement, as demonstrated in low energy experiments in FY-07. The two primary obstacles to higher average brightness and conversion efficiency of laser pulse energy to gamma-rays are the relatively small Compton scattering cross-section and the typically low repetition rates of Joule-class interaction lasers (10 Hz). Only a small fraction (10{sup -10}) of the available laser photons is converted to gamma-rays, while the rest is discarded. To significantly reduce the average power requirements of the laser and increase the overall system efficiency, we can recirculate laser light for repeated interactions with electron bunches. Our pulse recirculation scheme is based on nonlinear frequency conversion, termed recirculation injection by nonlinear gating (RING), inside a passive cavity. The main objectives of the two year project were: (1) Validate

  6. Multicomponent gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Bard, Steven (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cryogenic Joule-Thomson refrigeration capable of pumping multicomponent gases with a single stage sorption compressor system. Alternative methods of pumping a multicomponent gas with a single stage compressor are disclosed. In a first embodiment, the sorbent geometry is such that a void is defined near the output of the sorption compressor. When the sorbent is cooled, the sorbent primarily adsorbs the higher boiling point gas such that the lower boiling point gas passes through the sorbent to occupy the void. When the sorbent is heated, the higher boiling point gas is desorbed at high temperature and pressure and thereafter propels the lower boiling point gas out of the sorption compressor. A mixing chamber is provided to remix the constituent gases prior to expansion of the gas through a Joule-Thomson valve. Other methods of pumping a multicomponent gas are disclosed. For example, where the sorbent is porous and the low boiling point gas does not adsorb very well, the pores of the sorbent will act as a void space for the lower boiling point gas. Alternatively, a mixed sorbent may be used where a first sorbent component physically adsorbs the high boiling point gas and where the second sorbent component chemically absorbs the low boiling point gas.

  7. Carbon Welding by Ultrafast Joule Heating.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yonggang; Fu, Kun Kelvin; Zhu, Shuze; Dai, Jiaqi; Wang, Yanbin; Pastel, Glenn; Chen, Yanan; Li, Tian; Wang, Chengwei; Li, Teng; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-09

    Carbon nanomaterials exhibit outstanding electrical and mechanical properties, but these superior properties are often compromised as nanomaterials are assembled into bulk structures. This issue of scaling limits the use of carbon nanostructures and can be attributed to poor physical contacts between nanostructures. To address this challenge, we propose a novel technique to build a 3D interconnected carbon matrix by forming covalent bonds between carbon nanostructures. High temperature Joule heating was applied to bring the carbon nanofiber (CNF) film to temperatures greater than 2500 K at a heating rate of 200 K/min to fuse together adjacent carbon nanofibers with graphitic carbon bonds, forming a 3D continuous carbon network. The bulk electrical conductivity of the carbon matrix increased four orders of magnitude to 380 S/cm with a sheet resistance of 1.75 Ω/sq. The high temperature Joule heating not only enables fast graphitization of carbon materials at high temperature, but also provides a new strategy to build covalently bonded graphitic carbon networks from amorphous carbon source. Because of the high electrical conductivity, good mechanical structures, and anticorrosion properties, the 3D interconnected carbon membrane shows promising applications in energy storage and electrocatalysis fields.

  8. Basics of Joule-Thomson Liquefaction and JT Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the basic operation of Joule-Thomson liquefiers and Joule-Thomson coolers. The discussion is based on the first law of thermodynamics mainly using hT-diagrams. It is limited to single-component fluids. A nitrogen liquefier and a helium cooler are discussed as important examples.

  9. Basics of Joule-Thomson Liquefaction and JT Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the basic operation of Joule-Thomson liquefiers and Joule-Thomson coolers. The discussion is based on the first law of thermodynamics mainly using hT-diagrams. It is limited to single-component fluids. A nitrogen liquefier and a helium cooler are discussed as important examples.

  10. Extended regional climate model projections for Europe until the mid-twentyfirst century: combining ENSEMBLES and CMIP3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Georg; Gobiet, Andreas; Mendlik, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at sharpening the existing knowledge of expected seasonal mean climate change and its uncertainty over Europe for the two key climate variables air temperature and precipitation amount until the mid-twentyfirst century. For this purpose, we assess and compensate the global climate model (GCM) sampling bias of the ENSEMBLES regional climate model (RCM) projections by combining them with the full set of the CMIP3 GCM ensemble. We first apply a cross-validation in order to assess the skill of different statistical data reconstruction methods in reproducing ensemble mean and standard deviation. We then select the most appropriate reconstruction method in order to fill the missing values of the ENSEMBLES simulation matrix and further extend the matrix by all available CMIP3 GCM simulations forced by the A1B emission scenario. Cross-validation identifies a randomized scaling approach as superior in reconstructing the ensemble spread. Errors in ensemble mean and standard deviation are mostly less than 0.1 K and 1.0 % for air temperature and precipitation amount, respectively. Reconstruction of the missing values reveals that expected seasonal mean climate change of the ENSEMBLES RCM projections is not significantly biased and that the associated uncertainty is not underestimated due to sampling of only a few driving GCMs. In contrast, the spread of the extended simulation matrix is partly significantly lower, sharpening our knowledge about future climate change over Europe by reducing uncertainty in some regions. Furthermore, this study gives substantial weight to recent climate change impact studies based on the ENSEMBLES projections, since it confirms the robustness of the climate forcing of these studies concerning GCM sampling.

  11. Z39.50 and the OPAC Network in Europe (ONE) Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Z39.50 standard for information retrieval in the British Library's efforts toward networked information retrieval and online public access catalogs in cooperation with the European Union and other countries. OSI (open systems interconnection) and project ONE (a collaborative project in the European Union) are explained.…

  12. Women and Training in Europe. Fifty Projects which Challenge Our Traditions. A Compendium of Good Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This document consists of descriptions of 50 projects that were selected as examples of good practice in providing relevant initial and continuing vocational training to women throughout the European Community regardless of their legal status, employment status, and geographic location. The projects are grouped under six key words (motivation,…

  13. Projection of occurrence of extreme dry-wet years and seasons in Europe with stationary and nonstationary Standardized Precipitation Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, S.; Dosio, A.; Sterl, A.; Barbosa, P.; Vogt, J.

    2013-07-01

    The probabilities of the occurrence of extreme dry/wet years and seasons in Europe are estimated by using two ways of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI and SPI-GEV) and the Standardized Nonstationary Precipitation Index (SnsPI). The latter is defined as the SPI by fitting precipitation data with a nonstationary Gamma distribution in order to model the precipitation time dependence under climate change. Bias-corrected daily precipitation outputs from five different regional climate models (RCMs) provided by the ENSEMBLES project are used. The five RCMs are selected so as to represent the main statistical properties of the whole ENSEMBLES set and the most extreme deviation from the ensemble mean. All indicators are calculated for the ensemble of the five models over the period 1971-2098. Results show that under global warming, climate in Europe will significantly change from its current state with the probability of the occurrence of extreme dry and wet years and seasons increasing, respectively, over southern dry and northern wet regions. Comparing nonstationary and stationary indices, the SnsPI is found to be more robust than the common SPI in the prediction of precipitation changes with multimodel ensembles.

  14. Exploring overweight, obesity and their behavioural correlates among children and adolescents: results from the Health-promotion through Obesity Prevention across Europe project.

    PubMed

    Brug, Johannes; Lien, Nanna; Klepp, Knut-Inge; van Lenthe, Frank J

    2010-10-01

    The Health-promotion through Obesity Prevention across Europe (HOPE) project aims to bring the European scientific knowledge on overweight, obesity and their determinants together and use the expertise of researchers across Europe to contribute to tackling the obesity epidemic. This special issue of Public Health Nutrition presents important results from one of the work packages of the HOPE project that aims at gaining and integrating knowledge on the determinants of nutrition, physical activity and obesity among schoolchildren and adolescents (aged 10-18 years) in different European regions. It includes contributions from Northern Europe (Norway), Central and Eastern Europe (Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic), Southern Europe (Greece) and Western Europe (Belgium and The Netherlands), as well as an overview of the availability of good-quality data on prevalence rates and trends in overweight (including obesity) among adolescents in European Union (EU) countries. The studies that are included report prevalence differences, data on relevant nutrition and physical activity behaviours, as well as potential physical and environmental behavioural determinants. These papers provide further evidence on differences in obesity and overweight prevalence among different EU regions and countries, and contribute to the further exploration of risk factors that may or should be addressed in obesity prevention efforts for school-aged children and adolescents in EU countries.

  15. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  16. Minimal Joule dissipation models of magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    This paper gives a topical review of theoretical models of magnetospheric convection based on the concept of minimal Joule dissipation. A two-dimensional slab model of the ionosphere featuring an enhanced conductivity auroral oval is used to compute high-latitude electric fields and currents. Mathematical methods used in the modeling include Fourier analysis, fast Fourier transforms, and variational calculus. Also, conformal transformations are introduced in the analysis, which enable the auroral oval to be represented as a nonconcentric, crescent-shaped figure. Convection patterns appropriate to geomagnetic quiet and disturbed conditions are computed, the differentiating variable being the relative amount of power dissipated in the magnetospheric ring current. When ring current dissipation is small, the convection electric field is restricted to high latitudes (shielding regime), and when it is large, a significant penetration of the field to low latitudes occurs, accompanied by an increase in the ratio of the region I current to the region 2 current.

  17. Welding dissimilar metal microwires by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunagawa, Takuya; Tohmyoh, Hironori

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we report on the Joule heat welding of dissimilar metal microwires. The current required for successful welding was investigated. Various combinations of 25 µm diameter Cu, Au and Al microwires were welded together using this technique. The welded dissimilar metal wire systems were then cut by supplying a higher current, and it was found that the position at which the wires cut was not at the midpoint, i.e., the position of the weld, of the wire system. This is because the temperature distributions formed in the dissimilar metal systems were asymmetrical. The positions at which the wires cut were in good agreement with those predicted by a heat conduction model. The lower limit for successful welding of the dissimilar metal microwire system was found to be determined by the lower of the two currents required to cut microwires of the individual materials.

  18. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  19. Minimal Joule dissipation models of magnetospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a topical review of theoretical models of magnetospheric convection based on the concept of minimal Joule dissipation. A two-dimensional slab model of the ionosphere featuring an enhanced conductivity auroral oval is used to compute high-latitude electric fields and currents. Mathematical methods used in the modeling include Fourier analysis, fast Fourier transforms, and variational calculus. Also, conformal transformations are introduced in the analysis, which enable the auroral oval to be represented as a nonconcentric, crescent-shaped figure. Convection patterns appropriate to geomagnetic quiet and disturbed conditions are computed, the differentiating variable being the relative amount of power dissipated in the magnetospheric ring current. When ring current dissipation is small, the convection electric field is restricted to high latitudes (shielding regime), and when it is large, a significant penetration of the field to low latitudes occurs, accompanied by an increase in the ratio of the region I current to the region 2 current.

  20. On the integral Joule-Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal, B.-Z.; Shavit, A.

    In this paper, the integral inversion curve concept is developed, involving the locus of all points with a vanishing integral Joule-Thomson (J-T) effect ΔTh and isothermal enthalpy change. The structure of the ΔhT surface over the plane of ( pr,T r) is explored. The maximum isothermal J-T effect ΔhT is related to the normal boiling temperature of the gas. The correlation of the integral effect based on real gas data with a low acentric factor is compared with Van der Waals' equation of state closed form predictions. The maximum integral isenthalpic J-T effect ΔTh which does not undergo a phase change during the expansion, is studied via Van der Waals' equation of state.

  1. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  2. Joule-Thomson microcooling developments at University of Twente

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H. S.; Vanapalli, S.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Lerou, P. P. P. M.; Tirolien, T.

    2017-02-01

    The development of Joule-Thomson microcoolers has been an on-going and successful research project at the University of Twente for many years. The aim of the research is to develop small and fully integrated cryogenic cooling systems for cooling small electronic devices such as pre-amplifiers and infrared sensors, in order to improve their performance. In the foregoing years, we have successfully developed single-stage microcoolers (typically cooling to 100 K) and two-stage microcoolers (typically 30 K) using standard micromachining technologies. In the present paper, we emphatically discuss recent developments in the Twente microcooling project among which microcoolers with a double expansion of the high pressure flow (reducing the 100 K to 83 K operating temperature), microcoolers operating with hydrocarbon gas mixtures, and microcoolers with an ejector, the three new developments aiming at lower cold end temperatures, lower operating pressure ratios and/or higher efficiency. Besides, utilization of microcoolers for cooling electronics and clogging phenomenon in microcoolers will also be introduced.

  3. Preventing socioeconomic inequalities in health behaviour in adolescents in Europe: Background, design and methods of project TEENAGE

    PubMed Central

    van Lenthe, Frank J; de Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Klepp, Knut-Inge; Lien, Nanna; Moore, Laurence; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Kunst, Anton E; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2009-01-01

    Background Higher prevalence rates of unhealthy behaviours among lower socioeconomic groups contribute substantially to socioeconomic inequalities in health in adults. Preventing the development of these inequalities in unhealthy behaviours early in life is an important strategy to tackle socioeconomic inequalities in health. Little is known however, about health promotion strategies particularly effective in lower socioeconomic groups in youth. It is the purpose of project TEENAGE to improve knowledge on the prevention of socioeconomic inequalities in physical activity, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption among adolescents in Europe. This paper describes the background, design and methods to be used in the project. Methods/design Through a systematic literature search, existing interventions aimed at promoting physical activity, a healthy diet, preventing the uptake of smoking or alcohol, and evaluated in the general adolescent population in Europe will be identified. Studies in which indicators of socioeconomic position are included will be reanalysed by socioeconomic position. Results of such stratified analyses will be summarised by type of behaviour, across behaviours by type of intervention (health education, environmental interventions and policies) and by setting (individual, household, school, and neighbourhood). In addition, the degree to which effective interventions can be transferred to other European countries will be assessed. Discussion Although it is sometimes assumed that some health promotion strategies may be particularly effective in higher socioeconomic groups, thereby increasing socioeconomic inequalities in health-related behaviour, there is little knowledge about differential effects of health promotion across socioeconomic groups. Synthesizing stratified analyses of a number of interventions conducted in the general adolescent population may offer an efficient guidance for the development of strategies and interventions to prevent

  4. The range of regional climate change projections in central Europe: How to deal with the spread of climate model results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechid, D.; Jacob, D.; Podzun, R.

    2010-09-01

    The regional climate change projections for central Europe in the 21st century show a large spread of simulated temperature and precipitation trends due to natural variability and modelling uncertainties. The questions are how to extract robust climate change signals and how to transfer the range of possible temperature and precipitation trends to climate change impact studies and adaptation strategies? Within the BMBF funded research priority "KLIMZUG - Managing Climate Change in the Regions of the Future", innovative strategies for adaptation to climate change are developed. The funding activity particularly stresses the regional aspect since the global problem climate change must be tackled by measures at regional and local level. The focus of the joint project "KLIMZUG-NORD - Strategic Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region" is to establish an interdisciplinary network between the research, administrative and economic sectors in this region. The regional climate change information is provided by the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology as input for climate change impact assessments. The cross-sectional task "climate change" is to prepare consistent regional climate data and to advise on its reasonable use. The project benefits from the results of the ENSEMBLES EU project, in which an extensive set of regional climate change simulations at 50 km horizontal resolution were performed for 1950 to 2100. For impact studies, higher horizontal resolutions are required. With the regional climate model REMO, three global climate change scenarios from ECHAM5-MPIOM were downscaled to 50 km with three ensemble members each. In a second step, some members were further downscaled to 10 km for central Europe. For the global and regional simulations, the trends were analysed and indicate a strong internal climate variability, which further increases the range of climate change simulation results. This all recommends the application of 1

  5. Analysis of the Emission Inventories and Model-Ready Emission Datasets of Europe and North America for Phase 2 of the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the development of the emission inventories and emission processing for Europe (EU) and North America (NA) in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project. The main purpose of the second phase of the AQMEII...

  6. Analysis of the Emission Inventories and Model-Ready Emission Datasets of Europe and North America for Phase 2 of the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the development of the emission inventories and emission processing for Europe (EU) and North America (NA) in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project. The main purpose of the second phase of the AQMEII...

  7. Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe, the PHEWE project: background, objectives, design

    PubMed Central

    Michelozzi, Paola; Kirchmayer, Ursula; Katsouyanni, Klea; Biggeri, Annibale; McGregor, Glenn; Menne, Bettina; Kassomenos, Pavlos; Anderson, Hugh Ross; Baccini, Michela; Accetta, Gabriele; Analytis, Antonis; Kosatsky, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Background The project "Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe" (PHEWE) had the aim of assessing the association between weather conditions and acute health effects, during both warm and cold seasons in 16 European cities with widely differing climatic conditions and to provide information for public health policies. Methods The PHEWE project was a three-year pan-European collaboration between epidemiologists, meteorologists and experts in public health. Meteorological, air pollution and mortality data from 16 cities and hospital admission data from 12 cities were available from 1990 to 2000. The short-term effect on mortality/morbidity was evaluated through city-specific and pooled time series analysis. The interaction between weather and air pollutants was evaluated and health impact assessments were performed to quantify the effect on the different populations. A heat/health watch warning system to predict oppressive weather conditions and alert the population was developed in a subgroup of cities and information on existing prevention policies and of adaptive strategies was gathered. Results Main results were presented in a symposium at the conference of the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology in Paris on September 6th 2006 and will be published as scientific articles. The present article introduces the project and includes a description of the database and the framework of the applied methodology. Conclusion The PHEWE project offers the opportunity to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in 16 European cities, representing a wide range of climatic, socio-demographic and cultural characteristics; the use of a standardized methodology allows for direct comparison between cities. PMID:17456236

  8. A 50-year precipitation analysis over Europe at 5.5km within the UERRA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazile, Eric; Abida, Rachid; Soci, Cornel; Verrelle, Antoine; Szczypta, Camille; Le Moigne, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The UERRA project is a 4-year project (2014-2017) financed by the European Union under its 7th Framework Programme SPACE. One of its main objectives is to provide a 50-year reanalysis dataset of surface essential climate variables (ECV) at 5.5km grid at European scale, together with, as much as possible, uncertainty estimates. One of the ECV is the precipitation and this variable is of essential interest in weather forecasting, climate study and to "drive" hydrological model for water management, or agrometeorology. After a brief description of the method used for the precipitation analysis (Soci et al. 2016)during this project, the preliminary results will be presented. The estimation of uncertainties will be also discussed associated with the problem of the evolution of the observation density network and its impact on the long term series. Additional information about the UERRA project can be found at http://www.uerra.eu The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union, Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2013-1) under grant agreement no 607193.

  9. Transatlantic Student Exchange between Canada and Europe: Experiences from the CEIHPAL Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherriff, Nigel Stuart; Jeffery, Amanda; Davies, John Kenneth; Hills, Marcia; Carroll, Simon; Jackson, Suzanne; Krupa, Gene; Goepel, Eberhard; Hofmeister, Arnd; Tountas, Yannis; Attorp, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    International student mobility amongst and between countries has become increasingly common and forms a central feature of the global higher education system. This paper examines the key learning experiences relating to the student mobility component of the Canadian-European Initiative for Health Promotion Advanced Learning (CEIHPAL) project.…

  10. A Community-University Exchange Project Modeled after Europe's Science Shops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryon, Elizabeth; Ross, J. Ashleigh

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project of the Morgridge Center for Public Service at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for a new structure for community-based learning and research. It is based on the European-derived science shop model for democratizing campus-community partnerships using shared values of mutual respect and validation of…

  11. Factorization of air pollutant emissions: projections versus observed trends in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rafaj, Peter; Amann, Markus; Siri, José G

    2014-10-01

    This paper revisits the emission scenarios of the European Commission's 2005 Thematic Strategy on Air Pollution (TSAP) in light of today's knowledge. We review assumptions made in the past on the main drivers of emission changes, i.e., demographic trends, economic growth, changes in the energy intensity of GDP, fuel-switching, and application of dedicated emission control measures. Our analysis shows that for most of these drivers, actual trends have not matched initial expectations. Observed ammonia and sulfur emissions in European Union in 2010 were 10% to 20% lower than projected, while emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter exceeded estimates by 8% to 15%. In general, a higher efficiency of dedicated emission controls compensated for a lower-than-expected decline in total energy consumption as well as a delay in the phase-out of coal. For 2020, updated projections anticipate lower sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions than those under the 2005 baseline, whereby the degree to which these emissions are lower depends on what assumptions are made for emission controls and new vehicle standards. Projected levels of particulates are about 10% higher, while smaller differences emerge for other pollutants. New emission projections suggest that environmental targets established by the TSAP for the protection of human health, eutrophication and forest acidification will not be met without additional measures.

  12. Comenius Project: Are e-Learning Collaborations of High School Students across Europe in Maths Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonovits, Reinhard; McElroy, Jim; O'Loughlin, James; Townsend, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The overall aim of the project is to allow for the collaboration of high school students of different European countries on small, selected maths topics. This involves the use of technology, student mobility and English language competency. Benefits are also expected to accrue to teachers of mathematics by providing the opportunity to work with…

  13. Comenius Project: Are e-Learning Collaborations of High School Students across Europe in Maths Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonovits, Reinhard; McElroy, Jim; O'Loughlin, James; Townsend, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The overall aim of the project is to allow for the collaboration of high school students of different European countries on small, selected maths topics. This involves the use of technology, student mobility and English language competency. Benefits are also expected to accrue to teachers of mathematics by providing the opportunity to work with…

  14. Transatlantic Student Exchange between Canada and Europe: Experiences from the CEIHPAL Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherriff, Nigel Stuart; Jeffery, Amanda; Davies, John Kenneth; Hills, Marcia; Carroll, Simon; Jackson, Suzanne; Krupa, Gene; Goepel, Eberhard; Hofmeister, Arnd; Tountas, Yannis; Attorp, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    International student mobility amongst and between countries has become increasingly common and forms a central feature of the global higher education system. This paper examines the key learning experiences relating to the student mobility component of the Canadian-European Initiative for Health Promotion Advanced Learning (CEIHPAL) project.…

  15. Suggested guidelines for the provision and assessment of orthodontic education in Europe. A report from the Professional Development Group of the EURO-QUAL BIOMED II Project.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Adamidis, J P; McDonald, J P; Seeholzer, H; Sieminska-Piekarczyk, B

    2000-12-01

    The suggested guidelines for the provision and assessment of Orthodontic education in Europe, which are introduced, set out, and discussed in this paper, resulted from the work of the Professional Development Group (PDG) of the EURO-QUAL BIOMED II project. They were published in the final report of the project, after comments had been received from a range of national and European bodies and societies, including the British and the European Orthodontic Societies, Royal Colleges, and the General Dental Council.

  16. ScreenPro FH - Screening Project for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Central, Southern and Eastern Europe: Basic Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Češka, Richard; Freiberger, Tomáš; Susekov, Andrey V; Paragh, György; Reiner, Željko; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Rašlová, Katarína; Banach, Maciej; Vohnout, Branislav; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Goudev, Assen; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gaiţă, Dan; Pojskić, Belma; Pećin, Ivan; Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Mitchenko, Olena; Ezhov, Marat V; Latkovskis, Gustavs; Petrulionienė, Žaneta; Fras, Zlatko; Tasić, Nebojsa; Mirrakhimov, Erkin M; Murataliev, Tolkun; Shek, Alexander B; Tuka, Vladimír; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Moubarak, Elie M; Al Rasadi, Khalid

    Despite great recent progress, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is still underestimated, under-diagnosed and thus undertreated worldwide. We have very little information on exact prevalence of patients with FH in the Central, Eastern and Southern Europe (CESE) region. The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiological situation in the CESE region from data available. All local leaders of the ScreenPro FH project were asked to provide local data on (a) expert guess of FH prevalence (b) the medical facilities focused on FH already in place (c) the diagnostic criteria used (d) the number of patients already evidenced in local database and (e) the availability of therapeutic options (especially plasma apheresis). With the guess prevalence of FH around 1 : 500, we estimate the overall population of 588 363 FH heterozygotes in the CESE region. Only 14 108 persons (2.4 %) were depicted in local databases; but the depiction rate varied between 0.1 % and 31.6 %. Only four out of 17 participating countries reported the the LDL apheresis availability. Our data point to the large population of heterozygous FH patients in the CESE region but low diagnostic rate. However structures through the ScreenPro FH project are being created and we can hope that the results will appear soon.Key words: diagnosis - epidemiology - familial hypercholesterolemia - screening.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Electroacoustic Logging Including Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Nikitin, Anatoly A.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    It is well known that electromagnetic field excites acoustic wave in a porous elastic medium saturated with fluid electrolyte due to electrokinetic conversion effect. Pride's equations describing this process are written in isothermal approximation. Update of these equations, which allows to take influence of Joule heating on acoustic waves propagation into account, is proposed here. This update includes terms describing the initiation of additional acoustic waves excited by thermoelastic stresses and the heat conduction equation with right side defined by Joule heating. Results of numerical modeling of several problems of propagation of acoustic waves excited by an electric field source with and without consideration of Joule heating effect in their statements are presented. From these results, it follows that influence of Joule heating should be taken into account at the numerical simulation of electroacoustic logging and at the interpretation of its log data.

  18. Joule-Thompson effect in a disperse medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmachev, E. M.

    1980-05-01

    An expression for the Joule-Thompson coefficient of a polydisperse medium subject to throttling is derived in the relaxation approximation of thermodynamics of irreversible processes, with both temperature and velocity relaxation in the phases taken into account.

  19. The impact of headache in Europe: principal results of the Eurolight project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background European data, at least from Western Europe, are relatively good on migraine prevalence but less sound for tension-type headache (TTH) and medication-overuse headache (MOH). Evidence on impact of headache disorders is very limited. Eurolight was a data-gathering exercise primarily to inform health policy in the European Union (EU). This manuscript reports personal impact. Methods The study was cross-sectional with modified cluster sampling. Surveys were conducted by structured questionnaire, including diagnostic questions based on ICHD-II and various measures of impact, and are reported from Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain and United Kingdom. Different methods of sampling were used in each. The full methodology is described elsewhere. Results Questionnaires were analysed from 8,271 participants (58% female, mean age 43.4 y). Participation-rates, where calculable, varied from 10.6% to 58.8%. Moderate interest-bias was detected. Unadjusted lifetime prevalence of any headache was 91.3%. Gender-adjusted 1-year prevalences were: any headache 78.6%; migraine 35.3%; TTH 38.2%, headache on ≥15 d/mo 7.2%; probable MOH 3.1%. Personal impact was high, and included ictal symptom burden, interictal burden, cumulative burden and impact on others (partners and children). There was a general gradient of probable MOH > migraine > TTH, and most measures indicated higher impact among females. Lost useful time was substantial: 17.7% of males and 28.0% of females with migraine lost >10% of days; 44.7% of males and 53.7% of females with probable MOH lost >20%. Conclusions The common headache disorders have very high personal impact in the EU, with important implications for health policy. PMID:24884549

  20. The sero-epidemiology of diphtheria in Western Europe. ESEN Project. European Sero-Epidemiology Network.

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, W. J.; Pebody, R. G.; Aggerback, H.; Baron, S.; Berbers, G.; Conyn-van Spaendonck, M. A.; Hallander, H. O.; Olander, R.; Maple, P. A.; Melker, H. E.; Olin, P.; Fievret-Groyne, F.; Rota, C.; Salmaso, S.; Tischer, A.; von-Hunolstein, C.; Miller, E.

    2000-01-01

    Seven countries in Western Europe collected large, representative serum banks across the entire age range and tested them for diphtheria anti-toxin (sample size ranged from 2991 to 7715). Although a variety of assays were used, the results were all standardized to those of a reference laboratory and expressed in international units. The standardization process, and the availability of similar, large data sets allowed comparative analyses to be performed in which a high degree of confidence could be ascribed to observed epidemiological differences. The results showed that there were large differences in the proportion of adults with insufficient levels of protection amongst different countries. For instance, roughly 35% of 50- to 60-year-olds were found to be seronegative (titre < or = 0.01 IU/ml) in Finland compared with 70-75% in the United Kingdom. Furthermore, the proportion of seronegative adults would be expected to increase in some countries, notably Italy and the western part of Germany. In those countries with vaccination of military recruits there was a marked sex-related difference in the proportion of seropositive individuals. All countries have high levels of infant vaccine coverage (> 90%) but the accelerated schedule in the United Kingdom appears to result in lower anti-toxin titres than elsewhere. In Sweden, booster doses are not offered until 10 years of age which results in large numbers of children with inadequate levels of protection. Although the United Kingdom and Sweden both have higher proportions of seronegative children than elsewhere the likelihood of a resurgence of diphtheria in these countries seems remote. PMID:11057967

  1. The sero-epidemiology of diphtheria in Western Europe. ESEN Project. European Sero-Epidemiology Network.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, W J; Pebody, R G; Aggerback, H; Baron, S; Berbers, G; Conyn-van Spaendonck, M A; Hallander, H O; Olander, R; Maple, P A; Melker, H E; Olin, P; Fievret-Groyne, F; Rota, C; Salmaso, S; Tischer, A; von-Hunolstein, C; Miller, E

    2000-08-01

    Seven countries in Western Europe collected large, representative serum banks across the entire age range and tested them for diphtheria anti-toxin (sample size ranged from 2991 to 7715). Although a variety of assays were used, the results were all standardized to those of a reference laboratory and expressed in international units. The standardization process, and the availability of similar, large data sets allowed comparative analyses to be performed in which a high degree of confidence could be ascribed to observed epidemiological differences. The results showed that there were large differences in the proportion of adults with insufficient levels of protection amongst different countries. For instance, roughly 35% of 50- to 60-year-olds were found to be seronegative (titre < or = 0.01 IU/ml) in Finland compared with 70-75% in the United Kingdom. Furthermore, the proportion of seronegative adults would be expected to increase in some countries, notably Italy and the western part of Germany. In those countries with vaccination of military recruits there was a marked sex-related difference in the proportion of seropositive individuals. All countries have high levels of infant vaccine coverage (> 90%) but the accelerated schedule in the United Kingdom appears to result in lower anti-toxin titres than elsewhere. In Sweden, booster doses are not offered until 10 years of age which results in large numbers of children with inadequate levels of protection. Although the United Kingdom and Sweden both have higher proportions of seronegative children than elsewhere the likelihood of a resurgence of diphtheria in these countries seems remote.

  2. Long-term projections and acclimatization scenarios of temperature-related mortality in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Joan; Robine, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, François Richard; Rodó, Xavier

    2011-06-21

    The steady increase in greenhouse gas concentrations is inducing a detectable rise in global temperatures. The sensitivity of human societies to warming temperatures is, however, a transcendental question not comprehensively addressed to date. Here we show the link between temperature, humidity and daily numbers of deaths in nearly 200 European regions, which are subsequently used to infer transient projections of mortality under state-of-the-art high-resolution greenhouse gas scenario simulations. Our analyses point to a change in the seasonality of mortality, with maximum monthly incidence progressively shifting from winter to summer. The results also show that the rise in heat-related mortality will start to completely compensate the reduction of deaths from cold during the second half of the century, amounting to an average drop in human lifespan of up 3-4 months in 2070-2100. Nevertheless, projections suggest that human lifespan might indeed increase if a substantial degree of adaptation to warm temperatures takes place.

  3. The Euro-lupus project: epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cervera, R; Khamashta, M A; Hughes, G R V

    2009-09-01

    The Euro-lupus project provides updated information on the epidemiologic characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the change of the millennium and defines several clinical and immunological prognostic factors. The Euro-lupus cohort is composed of 1000 patients with SLE who have been followed prospectively since 1991. Among other findings, this project has shown that a) the age at onset of the disease, the gender and the autoantibody pattern, among other factors, modify the disease expression and define some specific SLE subsets; b) most of the SLE inflammatory manifestations are less common after long-term evolution of the disease, thus probably reflecting the effect of therapy as well as the progressive remission of the disease in many patients and c) a more prominent role of thrombotic events is becoming evident affecting both morbidity and mortality in SLE.

  4. The Joule-Thomson expansion coefficient by formula manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Y.; Kitazawa, T. ); Yoshida, T. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    By use of formula manipulation, practical programs used to estimate the Joule-Thomson coefficients are presented in this paper. The available equations of state used include the following: van der Waals, Virial, BWR, RK, and SRK. The Joule-Thomson coefficients for nitrogen and ethane are estimated by the proposed programs, and their ability to reproduce experimental values is tested. It is found that the RK equation yields the best results for nitrogen and ethane despite its simplicity.

  5. Joule heating during solid tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Pliquett, U

    2003-03-01

    The application of high-voltage pulses to biological tissue causes not only electroporation, a non-thermal phenomenon of pore creation within a lipid membrane due to an elevated electric field, but also significant heating. Once a biological membrane is porated, the current density increases several times, causing Joule heating. A combined experimental and theoretical study is reported. The theoretical temperature rise for a 1.25 kV cm(-1), 6 ms pulse is about 11.2 K for a tissue conductivity of 0.5 S m(-1) (i.e. myocardial tissue) during high-voltage application. Owing to the inhomogeneous electric field obtained with the use of needle electrodes, the temperature rises first at the electrodes, where the field strength reaches a maximum. Only for highly conductive tissue such as muscle was a temperature effect primarily observed in the bulk. Even if the temperature effect is biologically insignificant, it can affect the creation of stabile aqueous pathways by electroporation. The calculation of temperature distribution during high-voltage application, taking the electric field strength and the heat transfer into account, can be a useful tool for electrode optimisation.

  6. Mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson sorption cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, Nir; Grossman, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (JT) sorption cryocooling is the most mature technology for cooling from a normal Room-Temperature (RT) down to temperatures below 100 K in the absence of moving parts. Therefore, high reliability and no vibrations are attainable, in comparison with other cryocoolers. Cooling to 80 - 100 K with JT cryocoolers is often implemented with pure nitrogen. Alternatively, mixed refrigerants have been suggested for reducing the operating pressures to enable closed cycle cryocooling. There is a variety of publications describing nitrogen sorption cryocoolers with different configurations of sorption compressors. In the present research we suggest a novel sorption JT cryocooler that operates with a mixed refrigerant. Merging of sorption cryocooling and a mixed refrigerant enables the use of a simple, single stage compressor for cooling to 80 - 100 K, lower operating temperatures of the sorption cycle, and thus - reduced power consumption. In previous studies we have analyzed sorption compressors for mixed gases and mixed refrigerants for JT cryocoolers, separately. In this paper the option of mixed refrigerant sorption JT cryocoolers is explored. The considerations for developing mixed refrigerants to be driven by sorption compressors and to be utilized with JT cryocoolers are provided. It appears that, unlike with pure nitrogen, mixed refrigerants can be suitable for JT cryocooling with a single stage sorption compressor.

  7. Optimizing charge breeding techniques for ISOL facilities in Europe: Conclusions from the EMILIE project

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P. Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Celona, L.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Koivisto, H.; Kolhinen, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Vondrasek, R.; Wenander, F.

    2016-02-15

    The present paper summarizes the results obtained from the past few years in the framework of the Enhanced Multi-Ionization of short-Lived Isotopes for Eurisol (EMILIE) project. The EMILIE project aims at improving the charge breeding techniques with both Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) and Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBISs) for European Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities. Within EMILIE, an original technique for debunching the beam from EBIS charge breeders is being developed, for making an optimal use of the capabilities of CW post-accelerators of the future facilities. Such a debunching technique should eventually resolve duty cycle and time structure issues which presently complicate the data-acquisition of experiments. The results of the first tests of this technique are reported here. In comparison with charge breeding with an EBIS, the ECRIS technique had lower performance in efficiency and attainable charge state for metallic ion beams and also suffered from issues related to beam contamination. In recent years, improvements have been made which significantly reduce the differences between the two techniques, making ECRIS charge breeding more attractive especially for CW machines producing intense beams. Upgraded versions of the Phoenix charge breeder, originally developed by LPSC, will be used at SPES and GANIL/SPIRAL. These two charge breeders have benefited from studies undertaken within EMILIE, which are also briefly summarized here.

  8. Coordination of research on internal dosimetry in Europe: the CONRAD project.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Etherington, G; Castellani, C M; Franck, D; Hurtgen, C; Marsh, J W; Nosske, D; Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Balashazy, I; Battisti, P; Bérard, P; Berkowski, V; Birchall, A; Blanchardon, E; Bonchuk, Y; de Carlan, L; Cantone, M C; Challeton-de Vathaire, C; Cruz-Suarez, R; Davis, K; Dorrian, D; Giussani, A; Le Guen, B; Hodgson, A; Jourdain, J R; Koukouliou, V; Luciani, A; Malatova, I; Molokanov, A; Moraleda, M; Muikku, M; Oeh, U; Puncher, M; Rahola, T; Ratia, H; Stradling, N

    2007-01-01

    The EUropean RAdiation DOSimetry Group (EURADOS) initiated in 2005 the CONRAD Project, a Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry funded by the European Commission (EC), within the 6th Framework Programme (FP). The main purpose of CONRAD is to generate a European Network in the field of Radiation Dosimetry and to promote both research activities and dissemination of knowledge. The objective of CONRAD Work Package 5 (WP5) is the coordination of research on assessment and evaluation of internal exposures. Nineteen institutes from 14 countries participate in this action. Some of the activities to be developed are continuations of former European projects supported by the EC in the 5th FP (OMINEX and IDEAS). Other tasks are linked with ICRP activities, and there are new actions never considered before. A collaboration is established with CONRAD Work Package 4, dealing with Computational Dosimetry, to organise an intercomparison on Monte Carlo modelling for in vivo measurements of (241)Am deposited in a knee phantom. Preliminary results associated with CONRAD WP5 tasks are presented here.

  9. Reducing burden of disease from residential indoor air exposures in Europe (HEALTHVENT project).

    PubMed

    Asikainen, Arja; Carrer, Paolo; Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Fernandes, Eduardo de Oliveira; Wargocki, Pawel; Hänninen, Otto

    2016-03-08

    The annual burden of disease caused indoor air pollution, including polluted outdoor air used to ventilate indoor spaces, is estimated to correspond to a loss of over 2 million healthy life years in the European Union (EU). Based on measurements of the European Environment Agency (EEA), approximately 90 % of EU citizens live in areas where the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for air quality of particulate matter sized < 2.5 mm (PM2.5) are not met. Since sources of pollution reside in both indoor and outdoor air, selecting the most appropriate ventilation strategy is not a simple and straightforward task. A framework for developing European health-based ventilation guidelines was created in 2010-2013 in the EU-funded HEALTHVENT project. As a part of the project, the potential efficiency of control policies to health effects caused by residential indoor exposures of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), outdoor bioaerosols, volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon oxide (CO) radon and dampness was estimated. The analysis was based on scenario comparison, using an outdoor-indoor mass-balance model and varying the ventilation rates. Health effects were estimated with burden of diseases (BoD) calculations taking into account asthma, cardiovascular (CV) diseases, acute toxication, respiratory infections, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The quantitative comparison of three main policy approaches, (i) optimising ventilation rates only; (ii) filtration of outdoor air; and (iii) indoor source control, showed that all three approaches are able to provide substantial reductions in the health risks, varying from approximately 20 % to 44 %, corresponding to 400 000 and 900 000 saved healthy life years in EU-26. PM2.5 caused majority of the health effects in all included countries, but the importance of the other pollutants varied by country. The present modelling shows, that combination of controlling the indoor air sources and

  10. Teenagers and young adults with cancer in Europe: from national programmes to a European integrated coordinated project.

    PubMed

    Stark, D; Bielack, S; Brugieres, L; Dirksen, U; Duarte, X; Dunn, S; Erdelyi, D J; Grew, T; Hjorth, L; Jazbec, J; Kabickova, E; Konsoulova, A; Kowalczyk, J R; Lassaletta, A; Laurence, V; Lewis, I; Monrabal, A; Morgan, S; Mountzios, G; Olsen, P R; Renard, M; Saeter, G; van der Graaf, W T; Ferrari, A

    2016-05-01

    Over 14 000 patients aged 15-24 are estimated to be diagnosed with cancer in the European Union (EU) each year. Teenagers and young adults (TYA) often fall down gaps between children's and adults cancer services. The specific challenges of providing optimal care to them are described, but we present a summary of recent progress. Progress to overcome these challenges is happening at different rates across Europe. We summarise the European national projects in this field but more recently we have seen the beginnings of European coordination. Within the EU 7th Funding Programme (FP7) European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents programme (ENCCA), a specific European Network for Teenagers and Young Adults with Cancer has held a series of scientific meetings, including professionals, patients and caregivers. This group has proposed unanswered research questions and agreed key features of a high-quality service that can improve outcomes for TYA with cancer, including the primacy of collaboration between adult and paediatric services to eliminate the gap in the management of TYA with cancer.

  11. Future snowfall in western and central Europe projected with a high-resolution regional climate model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vries, Hylke; Lenderink, Geert; Meijgaard, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Snowfall frequency and intensity are influenced strongly by climate change. Here we separate the basic frequency change resulting from a gradually warming climate, from the intensity changes, by focusing on snowfall on days where the mean temperature is below freezing (Hellmann days). Using an ensemble of simulations, obtained with the high-resolution regional climate model KNMI-RACMO2 driven by the EC-EARTH global climate model and RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 forcing scenarios, we show that in addition to the strong decrease in the number of Hellmann days, also a substantial reduction in the mean Hellmann-day snowfall can be expected over large parts of western and central Europe. Moreover, seasonal snowfall extremes display trends that are comparable or even larger. Projected intensity reductions are locally as large as -30% per degree warming, thus being in sharp contrast to mean winter precipitation, which increases in most future climate scenarios. Exceptions are the high Alps and parts of Scandinavia, which may see an increase of up to +10% per degree warming.

  12. A north-south divide in Europe: how projected changes in water quality differ depending on climate and land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Andrew; Skeffington, Richard; Couture, Raoul; Erlandsson, Martin; Groot, Simon; Halliday, Sarah; Harezlak, Valesca; Hejzlar, Joseph; Jackson-Blake, Leah; Lepistö, Ahti; Papastergiadou, Eva; Riera, Joan; Rankinen, Katri; Trolle, Dennis; Whitehead, Paul; Dunn, Sarah; Bucak, Tuba

    2016-04-01

    The key results from the application of catchment-scale biophysical models to eight river-systems across Europe to assess the effects of projected environmental change (change in climate, land use, nitrogen deposition and water use) on water quantity and quality will be presented. Together the eight sites represent a sample of key climate and land management types, and those aspects related to the Water Framework Directive were modelled: river flow, river and lake nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, and lake chlorophyll-a. The baseline period was 1981-2010 and the scenario period, 2031-2060. The robustness and uncertainty of the models was assessed. Long-term trends and seasonal variations in all the major modelled variables were simulated well in the baseline period. Dynamic models however typically produced results with lower variance than the observations. The predicted effects on water flows differed between northern and southern sites. In the north and mid-latitudes, the increased evaporation was balanced to some extent by increased precipitation, leading to relatively small effects on flows, though seasonal effects may still be important. In the south the increased temperatures and lower precipitation act to reduce water flows considerably. In general, the projected effects of climate change on nutrient concentrations were rather small. The effects of credible land use changes on nutrient concentrations were larger. However, there were exceptions and there were considerable differences in the response between sites dependent on the mixture of nutrient sources (agriculture versus wastewater). Modelled ecological changes were not generally proportional to the changes in nutrients.

  13. Assessing projected changes in heat waves over Northern Europe using two regional climate models at 8-km resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox Maule, Cathrine; Christensen, Ole B.; Mayer, Stephanie; Thejll, Peter

    2013-04-01

    As temperatures in Northern Europe increase due to climate change the occurrence of extreme events such as heat waves is likely to change. A higher occurrence rate of heat waves can have serious health consequences, in particular for the elderly, but also for very young children and the infirm. Not only the occurrence rate of heat waves, but also changes in the duration of individual heat waves, is of importance. It is therefore of relevance to investigate how the occurrence of heat waves is likely to increase in the future, to allow for adaptation. We have looked at the projected changes in the occurrence rate of heat waves in a part of northern Europe including southern Scandinavia, the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, according to two different greenhouse gas emission scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. In this study we have chosen to use the Danish Meteorological Institutes definition, in which a high temperature event is classified as a heat wave if the average of the maximum temperature of a period of at least 3 consecutive days exceeds 28°C. To estimate the change in the occurrence rate of heat waves we have used two different GCM-RCM combinations, NorESM-WRF (BCCR) and EC-EARTH-HIRHAM5 (DMI). Both regional models have down-scaled the global models to a resolution of about 8 km, and hourly values of several parameters including temperature, precipitation and wind have been stored. We compare the climate model data from three different time slices, 1981-2010 run with historical greenhouse gas concentrations, 2021-2050 (RPC4.5 and RCP 8.5) and 2071-2100 (RPC4.5 and RCP 8.5), to see the time evolution in the occurrence rate of heat waves for the two RCP scenarios. Our results indicate that the occurrence rate of heat waves in this region will increase as a consequence of global warming, and that individual heat waves will tend to last longer.

  14. Socioeconomic inequalities in stillbirth rates in Europe: measuring the gap using routine data from the Euro-Peristat Project.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Mortensen, Laust; Prunet, Caroline; Macfarlane, Alison; Hindori-Mohangoo, Ashna D; Gissler, Mika; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; van der Pal, Karin; Bolumar, Francisco; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Ólafsdóttir, Helga Sól; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Blondel, Béatrice; Alexander, Sophie

    2016-01-19

    Previous studies have shown that socioeconomic position is inversely associated with stillbirth risk, but the impact on national rates in Europe is not known. We aimed to assess the magnitude of social inequalities in stillbirth rates in European countries using indicators generated from routine monitoring systems. Aggregated data on the number of stillbirths and live births for the year 2010 were collected for three socioeconomic indicators (mothers' educational level, mothers' and fathers' occupational group) from 29 European countries participating in the Euro-Peristat project. Educational categories were coded using the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) and analysed as: primary/lower secondary, upper secondary and postsecondary. Parents' occupations were grouped using International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO-08) major groups and then coded into 4 categories: No occupation or student, Skilled/ unskilled workers, Technicians/clerical/service occupations and Managers/professionals. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for stillbirth by each occupational group as well as the percentage population attributable risks using the most advantaged category as the reference (post-secondary education and professional/managerial occupations). Data on stillbirth rates by mothers' education were available in 19 countries and by mothers' and fathers' occupations in 13 countries. In countries with these data, the median RR of stillbirth for women with primary and lower secondary education compared to women with postsecondary education was 1.9 (interquartile range (IQR): 1.5 to 2.4) and 1.4 (IQR: 1.2 to 1.6), respectively. For mothers' occupations, the median RR comparing outcomes among manual workers with managers and professionals was 1.6 (IQR: 1.0-2.1) whereas for fathers' occupations, the median RR was 1.4 (IQR: 1.2-1.8). When applied to the entire set of countries with data about mothers' education, 1606 out of 6337 stillbirths (25

  15. Development of strategies for effective communication of food risks and benefits across Europe: design and conceptual framework of the FoodRisC project.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Julie; McConnon, Aine; Kennedy, Jean; Raats, Monique; Shepherd, Richard; Verbeke, Wim; Fletcher, Jon; Kuttschreuter, Margôt; Lima, Luisa; Wills, Josephine; Wall, Patrick

    2011-05-13

    European consumers are faced with a myriad of food related risk and benefit information and it is regularly left up to the consumer to interpret these, often conflicting, pieces of information as a coherent message. This conflict is especially apparent in times of food crises and can have major public health implications. Scientific results and risk assessments cannot always be easily communicated into simple guidelines and advice that non-scientists like the public or the media can easily understand especially when there is conflicting, uncertain or complex information about a particular food or aspects thereof. The need for improved strategies and tools for communication about food risks and benefits is therefore paramount. The FoodRisC project ("Food Risk Communication - Perceptions and communication of food risks/benefits across Europe: development of effective communication strategies") aims to address this issue. The FoodRisC project will examine consumer perceptions and investigate how people acquire and use information in food domains in order to develop targeted strategies for food communication across Europe. This project consists of 6 research work packages which, using qualitative and quantitative methodologies, are focused on development of a framework for investigating food risk/benefit issues across Europe, exploration of the role of new and traditional media in food communication and testing of the framework in order to develop evidence based communication strategies and tools. The main outcome of the FoodRisC project will be a toolkit to enable coherent communication of food risk/benefit messages in Europe. The toolkit will integrate theoretical models and new measurement paradigms as well as building on social marketing approaches around consumer segmentation. Use of the toolkit and guides will assist policy makers, food authorities and other end users in developing common approaches to communicating coherent messages to consumers in Europe. The

  16. Development of strategies for effective communication of food risks and benefits across Europe: Design and conceptual framework of the FoodRisC project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background European consumers are faced with a myriad of food related risk and benefit information and it is regularly left up to the consumer to interpret these, often conflicting, pieces of information as a coherent message. This conflict is especially apparent in times of food crises and can have major public health implications. Scientific results and risk assessments cannot always be easily communicated into simple guidelines and advice that non-scientists like the public or the media can easily understand especially when there is conflicting, uncertain or complex information about a particular food or aspects thereof. The need for improved strategies and tools for communication about food risks and benefits is therefore paramount. The FoodRisC project ("Food Risk Communication - Perceptions and communication of food risks/benefits across Europe: development of effective communication strategies") aims to address this issue. The FoodRisC project will examine consumer perceptions and investigate how people acquire and use information in food domains in order to develop targeted strategies for food communication across Europe. Methods/Design This project consists of 6 research work packages which, using qualitative and quantitative methodologies, are focused on development of a framework for investigating food risk/benefit issues across Europe, exploration of the role of new and traditional media in food communication and testing of the framework in order to develop evidence based communication strategies and tools. The main outcome of the FoodRisC project will be a toolkit to enable coherent communication of food risk/benefit messages in Europe. The toolkit will integrate theoretical models and new measurement paradigms as well as building on social marketing approaches around consumer segmentation. Use of the toolkit and guides will assist policy makers, food authorities and other end users in developing common approaches to communicating coherent messages to

  17. Observations of joule and particle heating in the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Observational data from the Chatanika, Alaska incoherent scatter radar have been used to deduce atmospheric heating rates associated with particle precipitation and joule dissipation. During periods when Chatanika is in the vicinity of the auroral oval the height-integrated heat input to the lower thermosphere can be as large as 100 ergs per sq cm per sec with joule and particle heating rates of comparable magnitude. Altitude profiles of these heat inputs are also obtained, showing that the energy liberated by joule dissipation tends to peak at a substantially higher altitude (about 130 km) than that due to particles (100-120 km). As a consequence, it follows that joule heating can be expected to provide a rapid means for creating thermospheric disturbances. It is also pointed out that joule and particle heating are permanent features of the auroral oval and polar cap. As such, expansion of the auroral oval leads to an increase in the total global heating and, hence, to the close relationship between magnetic disturbances and thermospheric perturbation.

  18. Adaptation response surfaces from an ensemble of wheat projections under climate change in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Ferrise, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    preliminary ARSs show some adaptation options allow recover up to ca. 2000 kg/ha. Compared to the historical yields recorded at Lleida province (2550 kg/ha in 1981-2010) our results indicate that adaptation is feasible and may help to reduce detrimental effects of CC. Our analysis evaluates if the explored adaptations fulfill the biophysical requirements to become a practical adaptive solution. This study exemplifies how adaptation options and their impacts can be analyzed, evaluated and communicated in a context of high regional uncertainty for current and future conditions and for short to long-term perspective. This work was funded by MACSUR project within FACCE-JPI. References Abeledo, L.G., R. Savin and G.A. Slafer (2008). European Journal of Agronomy 28:541-550. Cartelle, J., A. Pedró, R. Savin, G.A. Slafer (2006) European Journal of Agronomy 25:365-371. Pirttioja, N., T. Carter, S. Fronzek, M. Bindi, H. Hoffmann, T. Palosuo, M. Ruiz-Ramos, F. Tao, M. Acutis, S. Asseng, P. Baranowski, B. Basso, P. Bodin, S. Buis, D. Cammarano, P. Deligios, M.-F. Destain, B. Dumont, R. Ewert, R. Ferrise, L. François, T. Gaiser, P. Hlavinka, I. Jacquemin, K.C. Kersebaum, C. Kollas, J. Krzyszczak, I.J. Lorite, J. Minet, M.I. Minguez, M. Montesino, M. Moriondo, C. Müller, C. Nendel, I. Öztürk, A. Perego, A. Rodríguez, A.C. Ruane, F. Ruget, M. Sanna, M.A. Semenov, C. Slawinski, P. Stratonovitch, I. Supit, K. Waha, E. Wang, L. Wu, Z. Zhao, and R.P. Rötter, 2015: A crop model ensemble analysis of temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect using impact response surfaces. Clim. Res., 65, 87-105, doi:10.3354/cr01322. IRS2 TEAM: Alfredo Rodríguez(1), Ignacio J. Lorite(3), Fulu Tao(4), Nina Pirttioja(5), Stefan Fronzek(5), Taru Palosuo(4), Timothy R. Carter(5), Marco Bindi(2), Jukka G Höhn(4), Kurt Christian Kersebaum(6), Miroslav Trnka(7,8), Holger Hoffmann(9), Piotr Baranowski(10), Samuel Buis(11), Davide Cammarano(12), Yi Chen(13,4), Paola Deligios

  19. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well.

  20. Non-joule heating of ice in an electric field.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Victor F; Ryzhkin, Ivan A

    2011-06-16

    We theoretically predict and calculate non-Joule heating/cooling caused by a direct electric current in ordinary crystalline ice Ih. The cause of this effect is related to partial ordering/disordering occurring in the proton subsystem of ice when protons either drift or diffuse in the ice. Depending on relative directions of the electric current and the configuration vector of ice, the non-Joule effect can be either positive, that is, heat generation, or negative, that is, heat absorption, and its absolute magnitude is usually comparable with that of normal Joule heating. The magnitude of this phenomenon is also approximately inversely proportional to the ice temperature and, thus, is more pronounced at low temperatures.

  1. Global and local Joule heating effects seen by DE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    In the altitude region between 350 and 550 km, variations in the ion temperature principally reflect similar variations in the local frictional heating produced by a velocity difference between the ions and the neutrals. Here, the distribution of the ion temperature in this altitude region is shown, and its attributes in relation to previous work on local Joule heating rates are discussed. In addition to the ion temperature, instrumentation on the DE 2 satellite also provides a measure of the ion velocity vector representative of the total electric field. From this information, the local Joule heating rate is derived. From an estimate of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity it is also possible to estimate the global (height-integrated) Joule heating rate. Here, the differences and relationships between these various parameters are described.

  2. Declines in stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates in Europe between 2004 and 2010: results from the Euro-Peristat project

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Mortensen, Laust; Cuttini, Marina; Lack, Nicholas; Nijhuis, Jan; Haidinger, Gerald; Blondel, Béatrice; Hindori-Mohangoo, Ashna D

    2016-01-01

    Background Stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates declined in Europe between 2004 and 2010. We hypothesised that declines might be greater for countries with higher mortality in 2004 and disproportionally affect very preterm infants at highest risk. Methods Data about live births, stillbirths and neonatal deaths by gestational age (GA) were collected using a common protocol by the Euro-Peristat project in 2004 and 2010. We analysed stillbirths at ≥28 weeks GA in 22 countries and live births ≥24 weeks GA for neonatal mortality in 18 countries. Per cent changes over time were assessed by calculating risk ratios (RR) for stillbirth, neonatal mortality and preterm birth rates in 2010 vs 2004. We used meta-analysis techniques to derive pooled RR using random-effects models overall, by GA subgroups and by mortality level in 2004. Results Between 2004 and 2010, stillbirths declined by 17% (95% CI 10% to 23%), with a range from 1% to 39% by country. Neonatal mortality declined by 29% (95% CI 23% to 35%) with a range from 9% to 67%. Preterm birth rates did not change: 0% (95% CI −3% to 3%). Mortality declines were of a similar magnitude at all GA; mortality levels in 2004 were not associated with RRs. Conclusions Stillbirths and neonatal deaths declined at all gestational ages in countries with both high and low levels of mortality in 2004. These results raise questions about how low-mortality countries achieve continued declines and highlight the importance of improving care across the GA spectrum. PMID:26719590

  3. Communication: Ab initio Joule-Thomson inversion data for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebke, Jonas; Senn, Florian; Pahl, Elke; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The Joule-Thomson coefficient μH(P, T) is computed from the virial equation of state up to seventh-order for argon obtained from accurate ab initio data. Higher-order corrections become increasingly more important to fit the low-temperature and low-pressure regime and to avoid the early onset of divergence in the Joule-Thomson inversion curve. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for temperatures T > 250 K. The results also illustrate the limitations of the virial equation in regions close to the critical temperature.

  4. Program For Joule-Thomson Analysis Of Mixed Cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Lund, Alan

    1994-01-01

    JTMIX computer program predicts ideal and realistic properties of mixed gases at temperatures between 65 and 80 K. Performs Joule-Thomson analysis of any gaseous mixture of neon, nitrogen, various hydrocarbons, argon, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. When used in conjunction with DDMIX computer program of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), JTMIX accurately predicts order-of-magnitude increases in Joule-Thomson cooling capacities occuring when various hydrocarbons added to nitrogen. Also predicts boiling temperature of nitrogen depressed from normal value to as low as 60 K upon addition of neon. Written in Turbo C.

  5. Communication: Ab initio Joule-Thomson inversion data for argon.

    PubMed

    Wiebke, Jonas; Senn, Florian; Pahl, Elke; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2013-02-21

    The Joule-Thomson coefficient μ(H)(P, T) is computed from the virial equation of state up to seventh-order for argon obtained from accurate ab initio data. Higher-order corrections become increasingly more important to fit the low-temperature and low-pressure regime and to avoid the early onset of divergence in the Joule-Thomson inversion curve. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for temperatures T > 250 K. The results also illustrate the limitations of the virial equation in regions close to the critical temperature.

  6. Nonlinear phenomena in multiferroic nanocapacitor: Joule heating and electromechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach for probing nonlinear electromechanical responses in BiFeO3 thin film nanocapacitors using half-harmonic band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Nonlinear PFM images of nanocapacitor arrays show clearly visible clusters of capacitors associated with variations of local leakage current through the BiFeO3 film. Strain spectroscopy measurements and finite element modeling point to significance of the Joule heating and show that the thermal effects caused by the Joule heating can provide nontrivial contributions to the nonlinear electromechanical responses in ferroic nanostructures. This approach can be further extended to unambiguous mapping of electrostatic signal contributions to PFM and related techniques.

  7. Nonlinear phenomena in multiferroic nanocapacitors: joule heating and electromechanical effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Han, Hee; Vrejoiu, Ionela; Lee, Woo; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-11-22

    We demonstrate an approach for probing nonlinear electromechanical responses in BiFeO(3) thin film nanocapacitors using half-harmonic band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Nonlinear PFM images of nanocapacitor arrays show clearly visible clusters of capacitors associated with variations of local leakage current through the BiFeO(3) film. Strain spectroscopy measurements and finite element modeling point to significance of the Joule heating and show that the thermal effects caused by the Joule heating can provide nontrivial contributions to the nonlinear electromechanical responses in ferroic nanostructures. This approach can be further extended to unambiguous mapping of electrostatic signal contributions to PFM and related techniques.

  8. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-11-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat—once thought to be disjointed concepts—it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei constructed an early thermometer. Independently, Julius Robert Mayer and James Prescott Joule found the connection between heat and work, the Mayer-Joule principle.

  9. James Prescott Joule and the idea of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardwell, Donald

    1989-05-01

    To commemorate the centenary of Joule's death, this article offers a brief account of the origins and development of his ideas and their incorporation into mainstream physics. The scientific, technological and social importance of his work is explained and he is shown to be a quintessential physicist.

  10. Comparison between GITM simulation and JOULE rocket observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Ridley, A. J.; Zhan, T.; Larsen, M.; Pfaff, R.

    2006-12-01

    The JOULE sounding rocket experiment was carried out at the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska on March 27, 2003. Two instrumented rockets and one chemical tracer rocket were lauched around 12:00UT, which followed many hours of geomagnetically active conditions. They measured the in-situ small-scale electric field, ion velocity and electric density in the upper mesosphere and low thermosphere. From the released trimethyl aluminum (TMA) trails, neutral wind profiles were provided. Since the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) has a flexible grid structure, sub-degree resolution around the JOULE rocket position can be applied and relatively reasonable results in such a small-scale can be achived. Not only will the simulation results be compared with JOULE observations, but also the comparsion between simulations using different high-latitude drivers will be conducted. It will be shown that using AMIE results produces more accurate neutral wind patterns than empirical models, although the auroral precipitation pattern may be too wide in AMIE, producing too much E- region electron density within GITM. In order to show the significance of spatial variability, GITM will also be run with different resolutions. This study will help us validate the GITM model and understand the significance of small-scale structure to the Joule heating.

  11. The similarity law for the Joule-Thomson inversion line.

    PubMed

    Apfelbaum, E M; Vorob'ev, V S

    2014-10-23

    We show that the expression for the Joule-Thomson inversion temperature following from the van der Waals equation and recorded in a form reduced to the Boyle values has a universal character and can be applied to many real substances and model systems.

  12. Mixed-Gas Sorption Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Petrick, S. Walter; Bard, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Proposed mixed-gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigerator provides cooling down to temperature of 70 K. Includes only one stage and no mechanical compressor. Simpler, operates without vibrating, and consumes less power in producing same amount of cooling. Same sorption principle of operation applicable in compressor that chemisorbs oxygen or hydrogen from mixture with helium, neon, and/or other nonreactive gases.

  13. Nanofocus of tenth of joules and a portable plasma focus of few joules for field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Tarifeno, Ariel; Pedreros, Jose; Altamirano, Luis

    2009-01-21

    A repetitive pinch plasma focus that works with stored energy less than 1 J per shot has be developed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The main features of this device, repetitive Nanofocus, are 5 nF of capacity, 5 nH of inductance, 5-10 kV charging voltage, 60-250 mJ stored energy, 5-10 kA current peak, per shot. The device has been operated at 20 Hz in hydrogen and deuterium. X-ray radiographs of materials of different thickness were obtained. Neutrons were detected using a system based upon {sup 3}He proportional counter in chare integrated mode. However, the reproducibility of this miniaturized device is low and several technological subjects have to be previously solved in order to produce neutrons for periods greater than minutes. Further studies in the Nanofocus are being carried out. In addition, a device with a stored energy of a few joules is being explored. A preliminary compact, low weight (3 kg), portable PF device (25 cmx5 cmx5 cm) for field applications has been designed. This device was designed to operate with few kilovolts (10 kV or less) with a stored energy of 2 J and a repetition rate of 10 Hz without cooling. A neutron flux of the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} n/s is expected.

  14. Joule-Thomson coefficient of ideal anyons within fractional exclusion statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Fang; Chen Jisheng

    2011-02-15

    The analytical expressions of the Joule-Thomson coefficient for homogeneous and harmonically trapped three-dimensional ideal anyons which obey Haldane fractional exclusion statistics are derived. For an ideal Fermi gas, the Joule-Thomson coefficient is negative, which means that there is no maximum Joule-Thomson inversion temperature. With careful study, it is found that there exists a Joule-Thomson inversion temperature in the fractional exclusion statistics model. Furthermore, the relations between the Joule-Thomson inversion temperature and the statistical parameter g are investigated.

  15. Joule-Thomson coefficient of ideal anyons within fractional exclusion statistics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fang; Chen, Ji-sheng

    2011-02-01

    The analytical expressions of the Joule-Thomson coefficient for homogeneous and harmonically trapped three-dimensional ideal anyons which obey Haldane fractional exclusion statistics are derived. For an ideal Fermi gas, the Joule-Thomson coefficient is negative, which means that there is no maximum Joule-Thomson inversion temperature. With careful study, it is found that there exists a Joule-Thomson inversion temperature in the fractional exclusion statistics model. Furthermore, the relations between the Joule-Thomson inversion temperature and the statistical parameter g are investigated.

  16. Assessing the Risk of Ecosystem Disruption in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by CMIP5 Regional Climatic Projections from EURO-CORDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dury, Marie; François, Louis; Hambuckers, Alain; Henrot, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Ingrid; Munhoven, Guy

    2016-04-01

    While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climate variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Ecosystems could not be in a condition to adapt to these new conditions and might be disrupted. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyze how future climate and extreme events will affect European ecosystems. To quantify the uncertainties in the climatic projections and in their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models (RCMs), nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project: ALADIN53 (Météo-France/CNRM), RACMO22E (KNMI), RCA4 (SMHI) and REMO2009 (MPI-CSC) RCMs. These climatic projections are at a high spatial resolution (0.11-degree, ˜12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1951-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analyzed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. None of these climatic models can reproduce accurately the present natural climatic variability. Then, to assess the risk of ecosystem disruption in the future and to identify the vulnerable areas in Europe, we created an index combining several CARAIB outputs: runoff, mean NPP, soil turnover, burned area, appearance and disappearance of species. We evaluated the severity of change projected for these variables (period 2070

  17. Fast Ignition Realization Experiment with High-Contrast Kilo-Joule Peta-Watt Laser ``LFEX'' and Strong External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We report on progresses of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project that has been curried out at the Institute of Laser Engineering to assess the feasibility of high density core heating with a high-power, short-pulse laser including the construction of the Kilo-Joule, Petawatt class LFEX laser system. Our recent studies identify three scientific challenges to achieve high heating efficiency in the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser systems: (i) control of energy distribution of relativistic electron beam (REB), (ii) guiding and focusing of REB to a fuel core, and (iii) formation of a high areal-density core. The control of the electron energy distribution has been experimentally confirmed by improving the intensity contrast of the LFEX laser up to >109 and an ultra-high contrast of 1011 with a plasma mirror. After the contrast improvement, 50% of the total REB energy is carried by a low energy component of the REB, which slope temperature is close to the ponderomotive scaling value (~ 1 MeV). To guide the electron beam, we apply strong external magnetic field to the REB transport region. Guiding of the REB by 0.6 kT field in a planar geometry has already been demonstrated at LULI 2000 laser facility in a collaborative experiment lead by CELIA-Univ. Bordeaux. Considering more realistic FI scenario, we have performed a similar experiment using the Kilo-Joule LFEX laser to study the effect of guiding and magnetic mirror on the electron beam. A high density core of a laser-imploded 200 μm-diameter solid CD ball was radiographed with picosecond LFEX-produced K-alpha backlighter. Comparisons of the experimental results and integrated simulations using hydrodynamic and electron transport codes suggest that 10% of the efficiency can be achievable with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser system with the success of the above challenges. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR

  18. Operational Model Evaluation for Particulate Matter in Europe and North America in the Context of the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten state-of-the-science regional air quality (AQ) modeling systems have been applied to continental scale domains in North America and Europe for full-year simulations of 2006 in the context of Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII), whose main goals are ...

  19. Operational Model Evaluation for Particulate Matter in Europe and North America in the Context of the AQMEII Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten state-of-the-science regional air quality (AQ) modeling systems have been applied to continental scale domains in North America and Europe for full-year simulations of 2006 in the context of Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII), whose main goals are ...

  20. Assessing the Risk of Ecosystem Disruption in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by CMIP5 Regional Climatic Projections from EURO-CORDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dury, M.; Hambuckers, A.; Henrot, A.; Jacquemin, I.; Munhoven, G.; Francois, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climatic variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Ecosystems could not be in a condition to adapt to these new conditions and might be disrupted. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyze how future climate and extreme events will affect European ecosystems. To quantify the uncertainties in the climatic projections and in their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models (RCMs), nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project. We used the ALADIN version 5.3 (Météo-France/CNRM) and other EURO-CORDEX RCMs. These climatic projections are at a high spatial resolution (0.11-degree, ~12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1951-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analyzed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. None of these climatic models can reproduce accurately the present natural climatic variability. Then, to assess the risk of ecosystem disruption in the future and to identify the vulnerable areas in Europe, we created an index combining several CARAIB outputs: runoff, mean NPP, soil turnover, burned area, appearance and disappearance of species. We evaluated the severity of change projected for these variables (period 2071-2100) relative

  1. Cryogenic characterization of low-cost Joule-Thomson coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Jerome; Cottereau, Alain; Chazot, Dominique

    2000-12-01

    This paper highlights two main achievements which were performed by AIR LIQUIDE during the last decade in the field of low cost Joule-Thomson coolers. On one hand, in order to comply with new geometrical requirements, AIR LIQUIDE is able to propose a flat cooler. This compact geometry is enabled by a new, cheap, type of heat exchanger. It offers a better resistance to external vibrations. On the other hand AIR LIQUIDE has developed, in the frame of a commercial program, a complete cryogenic cooling system, composed of a dual flow Joule-Thomson cooler, a pressurized gas capacity equipped with a manifold block and a pyrotechnic actuator, and the requested pipes and connectors. The dual flow is enabled by flexion of a washer made of shape memory alloy.

  2. Comparative Exergetic Analysis of Joule-Thomson Liquefiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, Maciej

    2004-06-01

    The Joule-Thomson microliquefiers are very reliable and noiseless cryocoolers, specially well fitted for cryostating small electronic devices, IR detectors or cryosurgical probes. Their essential drawback is low thermodynamic efficiency imposing high supply gas pressure, usually above 10 MPa. An exergetic analysis of the microliquefier has been performed and exergy-loss sources identified. Some of the losses can be avoided if a pure gas is replaced with a proper gas mixture and in result the supply gas pressure can be lowered significantly. The efficiencies and working parameters of Joule-Thomson microliquefier fed with pure N2 and the mixtures N2 - CH4 and N2 - R13 have been estimated and measured. The mixture properties have been calculated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The possibility to use a liquid-solid phase transition in a cooling-power "on-off" control loop has been observed.

  3. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  4. Joule Heating Investigations Using the Sondrestrom Radar and DMSP Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    in particular, to validate Joule heating rates inferred from satellite data while the satellite was moving through the field of view of the...auroral arc around 75* which slowly moved to the north. The SSF Pedersen conductance curve shows a corresponding peak at 75* and a slight enhancement...covered with radar operation while moving through the Sondrestrom field of view. Under favorable conditions such an experiment could provide a

  5. Dynamical response of nanostructures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I; Muradov, M I

    2011-10-12

    We consider Joule heat release in a quantum wire joining two classical reservoirs under the action of a nonstationary periodic electric field. The rate of heat generation and its spatial distribution is discussed. The heat is spread over the lengths of electron mean free paths in the reservoirs. We find that the total rates of heat generation in both reservoirs that are joined by the nanostructure are the same.

  6. The Joule-Thomson effect in confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, Martin

    1999-08-01

    The Joule-Thomson effect is discussed for a fluid composed of spherically symmetric Lennard-Jones(12,6) molecules (of “diameter” σ) confined between two planar, rigid, structureless solid substrates separated by sz=10 and 20 σ. The effect of “strong” and “weak” of the substrate is studied by employing fluid-substrate potentials with and without attractive interactions, respectively. The focal point of this study is the confinement-induced depression of the inversion temperature Tinv with respect to the bulk value. It is defined such that during a Joule-Thomson expansion the temperature of a (confined or bulk) gas remains constant. In the limit of vanishing gas density, Tinv is computed from the second virial coefficient defined through a density expansion of the transverse stress T∥ in the gas. For higher densities Tinv is computed from the (transverse) expansion coefficient α∥ which is accessible through density and enthalpy fluctuations in mixed stress-strain ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. Results of these simulations are analyzed in terms of a mean-field theory which provides a qualitatively correct description of the Joule-Thomson effect in confined fluids. The smaller sz the more depressed (with respect to the bulk) is Tinv. The density dependence of Tinv is different for “strong” and “weak” substrates. Without attractive fluid-fluid interactions Tinv does not exist and the confined gas is always heated during a Joule-Thomson expansion. In this case α∥ is independent of the substrate material.

  7. The Joule heating problem in silver nanowire transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Khaligh, H H; Xu, L; Khosropour, A; Madeira, A; Romano, M; Pradére, C; Tréguer-Delapierre, M; Servant, L; Pope, M A; Goldthorpe, I A

    2017-10-20

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes have shown considerable potential to replace conventional transparent conductive materials. However, in this report we show that Joule heating is a unique and serious problem with these electrodes. When conducting current densities encountered in organic solar cells, the average surface temperature of indium tin oxide (ITO) and silver nanowire electrodes, both with sheet resistances of 60 ohms/square, remains below 35 °C. However, in contrast to ITO, the temperature in the nanowire electrode is very non-uniform, with some localized points reaching temperatures above 250 °C. These hotspots accelerate nanowire degradation, leading to electrode failure after 5 days of continuous current flow. We show that graphene, a commonly used passivation layer for these electrodes, slows nanowire degradation and creates a more uniform surface temperature under current flow. However, the graphene does not prevent Joule heating in the nanowires and local points of high temperature ultimately shift the failure mechanism from nanowire degradation to melting of the underlying plastic substrate. In this paper, surface temperature mapping, lifetime testing under current flow, post-mortem analysis, and modelling illuminate the behaviour and failure mechanisms of nanowires under extended current flow and provide guidelines for managing Joule heating.

  8. The Joule heating problem in silver nanowire transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaligh, H. H.; Xu, L.; Khosropour, A.; Madeira, A.; Romano, M.; Pradére, C.; Tréguer-Delapierre, M.; Servant, L.; Pope, M. A.; Goldthorpe, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes have shown considerable potential to replace conventional transparent conductive materials. However, in this report we show that Joule heating is a unique and serious problem with these electrodes. When conducting current densities encountered in organic solar cells, the average surface temperature of indium tin oxide (ITO) and silver nanowire electrodes, both with sheet resistances of 60 ohms/square, remains below 35 °C. However, in contrast to ITO, the temperature in the nanowire electrode is very non-uniform, with some localized points reaching temperatures above 250 °C. These hotspots accelerate nanowire degradation, leading to electrode failure after 5 days of continuous current flow. We show that graphene, a commonly used passivation layer for these electrodes, slows nanowire degradation and creates a more uniform surface temperature under current flow. However, the graphene does not prevent Joule heating in the nanowires and local points of high temperature ultimately shift the failure mechanism from nanowire degradation to melting of the underlying plastic substrate. In this paper, surface temperature mapping, lifetime testing under current flow, post-mortem analysis, and modelling illuminate the behaviour and failure mechanisms of nanowires under extended current flow and provide guidelines for managing Joule heating.

  9. Fluid flow and heat transfer in Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bingyan; Jia, Weimin

    2011-08-01

    Joule-Thomson coolers have been widely used in infrared detectors with respect to compact, light and low cost. For self-regulating Joule-Thomson cooler, its performance is required to be improved with the development of higher mass and larger diameter of focal plane infrared detectors. Self-regulating Joule-Thomson coolers use a limited supply of high pressure gas to support the cooling of infrared detectors. In order to develop Joule-Thomson coolers with a given volume of stored gas, it is important to study on fluid flow and heat transfer of Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with infrared detectors, especially the starting time of Joule-Thomson coolers. A serial of experiments of Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with 128×128 focal plane infrared detectors have been carried out. The exchanger of coolers are made of a d=0.5mm capillary finned with a copper wire. The coolers are self-regulated by bellows and the diameters are about 8mm. Nitrogen is used as working gas. The effect of pressure of working gas has been studied. The relation between starting time and pressure of working gas is proved to fit exponential decay. Error analysis has also been carried. It is crucial to study the performance of Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with infrared detectors. Deeper research on Joule-Thomson coolers will be carried on to improve the Joule-Thomson coolers for infrared detectors.

  10. Projected changes in surface solar radiation in CMIP5 global climate models and in EURO-CORDEX regional climate models for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartók, Blanka; Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris; Lüthi, Daniel; Kotlarski, Sven; Schär, Christoph; Vautard, Robert; Jerez, Sonia; Imecs, Zoltán

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present work is to compare the projections of surface solar radiation (SSR) simulated by four regional climate models (CCLM, RCA4, WRF, ALADIN) with the respective fields of their ten driving CMIP5 global climate models. First the annual and seasonal SSR changes are examined in the regional and in the global climate models based on the RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The results show significant discrepancies between the projected SSR, the multi-model mean of RCMs indicates a decrease in SSR of -0.60 W/m2 per decade over Europe, while the multi-model mean of the associated GCMs used to drive the RCMs gives an increase in SSR of +0.39 W/m2 per decade for the period of 2006-2100 over Europe. At seasonal scale the largest differences appear in spring and summer. The different signs of SSR projected changes can be interpreted as the consequence of the different behavior of cloud cover in global and regional climate models. Cloudiness shows a significant decline in GCMs with -0.24% per decade which explains the extra income in SSR, while in case of the regional models no significant changes in cloudiness can be detected. The reduction of SSR in RCMs can be attributed to increasing atmospheric absorption in line with the increase of water vapor content. Both global and regional models overestimate SSR in absolute terms as compared to surface observations, in line with an underestimation of cloud cover. Regional models further have difficulties to adequately reproduce the observed trends in SSR over the past decades.

  11. Pricing Policies And Control of Tobacco in Europe (PPACTE) project: cross-national comparison of smoking prevalence in 18 European countries.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Silvano; Lugo, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boffetta, Paolo; Chaloupka, Frank J; Colombo, Paolo; Currie, Laura; Fernandez, Esteve; Fischbacher, Colin; Gilmore, Anna; Godfrey, Fiona; Joossens, Luk; Leon, Maria E; Levy, David T; Nguyen, Lien; Rosenqvist, Gunnar; Ross, Hana; Townsend, Joy; Clancy, Luke

    2014-05-01

    Limited data on smoking prevalence allowing valid between-country comparison are available in Europe. The aim of this study is to provide data on smoking prevalence and its determinants in 18 European countries. In 2010, within the Pricing Policies And Control of Tobacco in Europe (PPACTE) project, we conducted a face-to-face survey on smoking in 18 European countries (Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Croatia, England, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Sweden) on a total of 18 056 participants, representative for each country of the population aged 15 years or older. Overall, 27.2% of the participants were current smokers (30.6% of men and 24.1% of women). Smoking prevalence was highest in Bulgaria (40.9%) and Greece (38.9%) and lowest in Italy (22.0%) and Sweden (16.3%). Smoking prevalence ranged between 15.7% (Sweden) and 44.3% (Bulgaria) for men and between 11.6% (Albania) and 38.1% (Ireland) for women. Multivariate analysis showed a significant inverse trend between smoking prevalence and the level of education in both sexes. Male-to-female smoking prevalence ratios ranged from 0.85 in Spain to 3.47 in Albania and current-to-ex prevalence ratios ranged from 0.68 in Sweden to 4.28 in Albania. There are considerable differences across Europe in smoking prevalence, and male-to-female and current-to-ex smoking prevalence ratios. Eastern European countries, lower income countries and those with less advanced tobacco control policies have less favourable smoking patterns and are at an earlier stage of the tobacco epidemic.

  12. A Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Project Developing Public Health Higher Education in Four Higher Education Institutes in Africa and Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haaranen, Ari; Saarti, Jarmo; Miettola, Juhani; Erkkilä, Arja T.

    2016-01-01

    The HEI-ICI project involves cooperation between the University of Eastern Finland (UEF) and three African partners. The main aim of the project, now in its fourth year, has been to develop education in health sciences and to improve the quality of teaching. The target has been to develop the skills of selected junior faculty from the Public…

  13. A Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Project Developing Public Health Higher Education in Four Higher Education Institutes in Africa and Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haaranen, Ari; Saarti, Jarmo; Miettola, Juhani; Erkkilä, Arja T.

    2016-01-01

    The HEI-ICI project involves cooperation between the University of Eastern Finland (UEF) and three African partners. The main aim of the project, now in its fourth year, has been to develop education in health sciences and to improve the quality of teaching. The target has been to develop the skills of selected junior faculty from the Public…

  14. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, L. L.; Skarda, R. J.; Crowder, R. S., III; Trent, D. S.; Reid, C. R.; Lessor, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable.

  15. Joule heating in packed capillaries used in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S; Reynolds, Kimberly J; Colón, Luis A

    2002-09-01

    Effective heat dissipation is critical for reproducible and efficient separations in electrically driven separation systems. Flow rate, retention kinetics, and analyte diffusion rates are some of the characteristics that are affected by variation in the temperature of the mobile phase inside the column. In this study, we examine the issue of Joule heating in packed capillary columns used in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). As almost all commonly used CEC packings are poor thermal conductors, it is assumed that the packing particles do not conduct heat and heat transfer is solely through the mobile phase flowing through the system. The electrical conductivity of various mobile phases was measured at different temperatures by a conductivity meter and the temperature coefficient for each mobile phase was calculated. This was followed by measurement of the electrical current at several applied voltages to calculate the conductivity of the solution within the column as a function of the applied voltage. An overall increase in the conductivity is attributed to Joule heating within the column, while a constant conductivity means good heat dissipation. A plot of conductivity versus applied voltage was used as the indicator of poor heat dissipation. Using theories that have been proposed earlier for modeling of Joule heating effects in capillary electrophoresis (CE), we estimated the temperature within CEC columns. Under mobile and stationary phase conditions typically used in CEC, heat dissipation was found to be not always efficient. Elevated temperatures within the columns in excess of 23 degrees C above ambient temperature were calculated for packed columns, and about 35 degrees C for an open column, under a given set of conditions. The results agree with recently published experimental findings with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) thermometry, and Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  16. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Skarda, R.J.; Crowder, R.S. III; Trent, D.S.; Reid, C.R.; Lessor, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable. 14 refs., 79 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. The school nutrition environment and its association with soft drink intakes in seven countries across Europe--the ENERGY project.

    PubMed

    Lien, Nanna; van Stralen, Maartje M; Androutsos, Odysseas; Bere, Elling; Fernández-Alvira, Juan M; Jan, Nataša; Kovacs, Eva; van Lippevelde, Wendy; Manios, Yannis; Te Velde, Saskia J; Brug, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    The school is an important setting for promoting healthy eating especially at the transition from childhood to adolescence. This study contributes to the literature by describing practices within physical, political and sociocultural aspects of the school nutrition environment in seven countries across Europe based on questionnaires to the school management, and exploring their associations with soft drink consumption reported on questionnaires by 10-12 year olds. Several of the commonly self-reported practices could be supportive of a healthy diet (time to eat, access to water, restriction on marketing), but some practices were underutilized (i.e. discussion with stakeholders, healthy foods at events). Only a few associations of practices with the pupils׳ soft drink consumption were found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of Saharan dust properties transported towards Europe in the frame of the FENNEC project: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnas, F.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, C.; Royer, P.; Sodemman, H.; Derimian, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the FENNEC experiment (6 to 30 June 2011) an effort has been dedicated to characterize Saharan dust plumes transported towards southern Europe. Hence, a multi instrumented field campaign has been conducted. Ground based nitrogen Raman LIDAR (GBNRL) has been deployed in southern Spain close to Marbella, simultaneously with airborne lidar (AL) performing measurements over both the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the western Africa (from 2 to 23 June). The GBNRL was equipped with co-polar and cross-polar channels to perform continuous measurements of the dust aerosols trapped in the troposphere. It was developed by LSCE with the support of the LEOSPHERE Company. The French FALCON 20 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE (Service des Avions Francais Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) carried the AL Leandre Nouvelle Generation (LNG) as well as a dropsonde releasing system and radiometers. A major, one week long, dust event has been sampled over Spain from 25 June to 1 July with high optical depth (>0.5 at 355nm) and particular depolarization ratios (15 to 25%). Backtrajectory studies suggest that the dust particles observed were from dust uplifts that occurred in Southern Morocco and Northern Mauritania. The event has been also documented 3 days before by the AL flying over Mauritania. AERONET sunphotometer measurements of aerosol properties, along the dust plume transport path appear to be coherent with both the lidar and the backtrajectory analysis. These analysis exhibit a likely major contribution from the Western Sahara sources to the Southern Europe. Such a contribution may impact the visibility and then the airtrafic, modify the tropospheric chemistry, and add nutrients to both the Mediterranean Sea and the continental surfaces. It can also affect the health of European populations. We will present strategy of the experiment and the case study built from measurements performed at the end of June.

  19. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  20. Shock-Wave Compression and Joule-Thomson Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Travis, Karl P.

    2014-04-01

    Structurally stable atomistic one-dimensional shock waves have long been simulated by injecting fresh cool particles and extracting old hot particles at opposite ends of a simulation box. The resulting shock profiles demonstrate tensor temperature, Txx≠Tyy and Maxwell's delayed response, with stress lagging strain rate and heat flux lagging temperature gradient. Here this same geometry, supplemented by a short-ranged external "plug" field, is used to simulate steady Joule-Kelvin throttling flow of hot dense fluid through a porous plug, producing a dilute and cooler product fluid.

  1. Joule heating in ferromagnetic nanowires: Prediction and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chul; Choe, Sug-Bong; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2008-05-01

    We present an analytic theory of the Joule heating in metallic nanowires. The steady state is calculated for heat conduction through the insulation layer and then the transient state is considered from the thermodynamics law. The temperature is predicted to exhibit a quick exponential decay to a steady state within a few tens of nanoseconds. The decay time is linearly dependent on the temperature coefficient and both increase to saturation values with the increasing wire width. The validity of the theory is experimentally confirmed by the in situ measurement of the temperature-dependent electric resistance.

  2. Joule heating of Io's ionosphere by unipolar induction currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, F.; Lichtenstein, B. R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical induction in Io's ionosphere, due to the corotating plasma bound to the Jovian magnetosphere, is one possible source for the attainment of the high temperatures suggested by the large scale height of Io's ionosphere. Unipolar induction models are constructed to calculate ionospheric joule heating numerically, whose heating rates lie between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -8th W/cu m. The binding and coupling of the ionosphere is due to the dense, and possibly ionized, neutral SO2 atmosphere, and there appears to be no need to postulate the existence of an intrinsic Ionian magnetic field in order to retain the observed ionnosphere.

  3. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  4. Shock-wave compression and Joule-Thomson expansion.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Wm G; Hoover, Carol G; Travis, Karl P

    2014-04-11

    Structurally stable atomistic one-dimensional shock waves have long been simulated by injecting fresh cool particles and extracting old hot particles at opposite ends of a simulation box. The resulting shock profiles demonstrate tensor temperature, Txx≠Tyy and Maxwell's delayed response, with stress lagging strain rate and heat flux lagging temperature gradient. Here this same geometry, supplemented by a short-ranged external "plug" field, is used to simulate steady Joule-Kelvin throttling flow of hot dense fluid through a porous plug, producing a dilute and cooler product fluid.

  5. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  6. Joule heating of Io's ionosphere by unipolar induction currents

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Lichtenstein, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical induction in Io's ionosphere, due to the corotating plasma bound to the Jovian magnetosphere, is one possible source for the attainment of the high temperatures suggested by the large scale height of Io's ionosphere. Unipolar induction models are constructed to calculate ionospheric joule heating numerically, whose heating rates lie between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -8th W/cu m. The binding and coupling of the ionosphere is due to the dense, and possibly ionized, neutral SO2 atmosphere, and there appears to be no need to postulate the existence of an intrinsic Ionian magnetic field in order to retain the observed ionnosphere.

  7. Miniature Joule - Thomson liquefier with sintered heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugeniusz, Bodio; Maciej, Chorowski; Marta, Wilczek; Arkadiusz, Bozek

    Conventional Joule-Thomson refrigerators are made with finned, capillary tubing for the heat exchanger and a throttling valve for reducing the pressure [1]. A new kind of recuperative miniature heat-exchanger can be developed if a powder metallurgy technology is used. A high pressure capillary tube is sintered with metal powder. The grains of metal should be ball shaped or similar. In result of sintering process a good thermal contact between an outside tube surface and powder grains is achieved. The heat exchange surface is well developed and a porous sinter acts as a low pressure gas canal.

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-10

    Europe Is Catching Up"] [Text] Pygmalion, ANNIE (Application of Neural Net- works for Industry in Europe), Galatea : These are the names of programs...three-year period within the Galatea project, which aims to develop a "general- purpose neural computer" (GPNC) capable of sup- porting a wide

  9. Short-term Associations between Fine and Coarse Particulate Matter and Hospitalizations in Southern Europe: Results from the MED-PARTICLES Project

    PubMed Central

    Samoli, Evangelia; Alessandrini, Ester; Cadum, Ennio; Ostro, Bart; Berti, Giovanna; Faustini, Annunziata; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Linares, Cristina; Pascal, Mathilde; Randi, Giorgia; Ranzi, Andrea; Stivanello, Elisa; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the short-term effects of fine and coarse particles on morbidity in Europe is scarce and inconsistent. Objectives: We aimed to estimate the association between daily concentrations of fine and coarse particles with hospitalizations for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions in eight Southern European cities, within the MED-PARTICLES project. Methods: City-specific Poisson models were fitted to estimate associations of daily concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ≤ 10 μm (PM10), and their difference (PM2.5–10) with daily counts of emergency hospitalizations for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. We derived pooled estimates from random-effects meta-analysis and evaluated the robustness of results to co-pollutant exposure adjustment and model specification. Pooled concentration–response curves were estimated using a meta-smoothing approach. Results: We found significant associations between all PM fractions and cardiovascular admissions. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5, 6.3 μg/m3 in PM2.5–10, and 14.4 μg/m3 in PM10 (lag 0–1 days) were associated with increases in cardiovascular admissions of 0.51% (95% CI: 0.12, 0.90%), 0.46% (95% CI: 0.10, 0.82%), and 0.53% (95% CI: 0.06, 1.00%), respectively. Stronger associations were estimated for respiratory hospitalizations, ranging from 1.15% (95% CI: 0.21, 2.11%) for PM10 to 1.36% (95% CI: 0.23, 2.49) for PM2.5 (lag 0–5 days). Conclusions: PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 were positively associated with cardiovascular and respiratory admissions in eight Mediterranean cities. Information on the short-term effects of different PM fractions on morbidity in Southern Europe will be useful to inform European policies on air quality standards. Citation: Stafoggia M, Samoli E, Alessandrini E, Cadum E, Ostro B, Berti G, Faustini A, Jacquemin B, Linares C, Pascal M, Randi G, Ranzi A, Stivanello E, Forastiere F, the MED-PARTICLES Study Group. 2013. Short

  10. Stabilization of Joule Heating in the Electropyroelectric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, R.; Hernández, M.; Marín, E.; Araujo, C.; Alaniz, D.; Araiza, M.; Martínez-Ordoñez, E. I.

    2012-11-01

    Recently the so-called electropyroelectric technique for thermal characterization of liquids has been proposed (Ivanov et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43, 225501 (2010)). In this method a pyroelectric sensor, in good thermal contact with the investigated sample, is heated by passing an amplitude-modulated electrical current through the electrical contacts. As a result of the heat dissipated to the sample, the pyroelectric signal measured as a voltage drop across the electrical contacts changes in a periodical way. The amplitude and phase of this signal can be measured by lock-in detection as a function of the electrical current modulation frequency. Because the signal amplitude and phase depend on the thermal properties of the sample, these can be determined straightforwardly by fitting the experimental data to a theoretical model based on the solution of the heat diffusion equation with proper boundary conditions. In general, the experimental conditions are selected so that the thermal effusivity becomes the measured magnitude. The technique has the following handicap. As the result of heating and wear of the metal coating layers (previously etched to achieve a serpentine form) with time, their electrical resistance changes with time, so that the heat power dissipated by the Joule effect can vary, and thermal effusivity measurement can become inaccurate. To avoid this problem in this study, a method is proposed that allows maintaining stable the Joule dissipated power. An electronic circuit is designed whose stability and characteristics are investigated and discussed.

  11. Joule heating and anomalous resistivity in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.

    2009-06-01

    Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as 2.5×109 Amperes (Spangler, 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al. (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of 3×105. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

  12. Joule heating effects on reservoir-based dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kale, Akshay; Patel, Saurin; Qian, Shizhi; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2014-03-01

    Reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP) is a recently developed technique that exploits the inherent electric field gradients at a reservoir-microchannel junction to focus, trap, and sort particles. However, the locally amplified electric field at the junction is likely to induce significant Joule heating effects that are not considered in previous studies. This work investigates experimentally and numerically these effects on particle transport and control in rDEP processes in PDMS/PDMS microchips. It is found that Joule heating effects can reduce rDEP focusing considerably and may even disable rDEP trapping. This is caused by the fluid temperature rise at the reservoir-microchannel junction, which significantly increases the local particle velocity due to fluid flow and particle electrophoresis while has a weak impact on the particle velocity due to rDEP. The numerical predictions of particle stream width and electric current, which are the respective indicators of rDEP manipulation and fluid temperature, are demonstrated to both match the experimental measurements with a good accuracy.

  13. Experiences from a pilot study on how to conduct a qualitative multi-country research project regarding use of antibiotics in Southeast Europe.

    PubMed

    Kaae, Susanne; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Wallach Kildemoes, Helle; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Jakupi, Arianit; Raka, Denis; Gürpinar, Emre Umut; Alkan, Ali; Hoxha, Iris; Malaj, Admir; Cantarero, Lourdes Arevalo

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a qualitative multi-country research project was launched to study the reasons behind the high use of antibiotics in regions of Southeast Europe by using previously untrained national interviewers (who were engaged in other antibiotic microbial resistance-related investigations) to conduct qualitative interviews with local patients, physicians and pharmacists. Little knowledge exists about how to implement qualitative multi-country research collaborations involving previously untrained local data collectors. The aim of this paper was therefore to contribute to the knowledge regarding how to conduct these types of research projects by evaluating a pilot study of the project. Local data collectors conducted the study according to a developed protocol and evaluated the study with the responsible researcher-team from University of Copenhagen. The pilot study focused on 'local ownership', 'research quality' and 'feasibility' with regard to successful implementation and evaluation. The evaluation was achieved by interpreting 'Skype' and 'face to face' meetings and email correspondence by applying 'critical common sense'. Local data collectors achieved a sense of joint ownership. Overall, the protocol worked well. Several minor challenges pertaining to research quality and feasibility were identified, in particular obtaining narratives when conducting interviews and recruiting patients for the study. Furthermore, local data collectors found it difficult to allocate sufficient time to the project. Solutions were discussed and added to the protocol. Despite the challenges, it was possible to achieve an acceptable scientific level of research when conducting qualitative multi-country research collaboration under the given circumstances. Specific recommendations to achieve this are provided by the authors.

  14. Masculinities in Organizational Cultures in Engineering Education in Europe: Results of the European Union Project WomEng

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagebiel, F.; Dahmen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes elements of engineering organizational cultures and structures in higher engineering education from the European project WomEng. Hypotheses, based on state of the art, refer to: women friendly presentation, attractiveness of interdisciplinary teaching methods, single sex education, perceptions of minority status, feelings of…

  15. Tackling the social determinants of inequalities in health during Phase V of the Healthy Cities Project in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ritsatakis, Anna; Ostergren, Per-Olof; Webster, Premila

    2015-06-01

    The WHO European Healthy Cities Network has from its inception aimed at tackling inequalities in health. In carrying out an evaluation of Phase V of the project (2009-13), an attempt was made to examine how far the concept of equity in health is understood and accepted; whether cities had moved further from a disease/medical model to looking at the social determinants of inequalities in health; how far the HC project contributed to cities determining the extent and causes of inequalities in health; what efforts were made to tackle such inequalities and how far inequalities in health may have increased or decreased during Phase V. A broader range of resources was utilized for this evaluation than in previous phases of the project. These indicated that most cities were definitely looking at the broader determinants. Equality in health was better understood and had been included as a value in a range of city policies. This was facilitated by stronger involvement of the HC project in city planning processes. Although almost half the cities participating had prepared a City Health Profile, only few cities had the necessary local level data to monitor changes in inequalities in health.

  16. Masculinities in Organizational Cultures in Engineering Education in Europe: Results of the European Union Project WomEng

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagebiel, F.; Dahmen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes elements of engineering organizational cultures and structures in higher engineering education from the European project WomEng. Hypotheses, based on state of the art, refer to: women friendly presentation, attractiveness of interdisciplinary teaching methods, single sex education, perceptions of minority status, feelings of…

  17. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat--once thought to be disjointed concepts--it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei…

  18. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat--once thought to be disjointed concepts--it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei…

  19. The role of PIXE in the AIRUSE project "testing and development of air quality mitigation measures in Southern Europe"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Chiari, M.; Calzolai, G.; Giannoni, M.; Nava, S.; Udisti, R.; Severi, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Alves, C.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2015-11-01

    The European AIRUSE LIFE+ project aims at testing existing and future mitigation measures and developing new strategies for the improvement of air quality in Southern European countries. The project involves public and private institutions of Spain, UK, Portugal, Italy and Greece. PM10 and PM2.5 daily samplings have been scheduled for one year (from January 2013) in four urban sites, Barcelona (Spain), Porto (Portugal), Athens (Greece), and Florence (Italy). The daily data set gives an overall representative picture of the PM composition in these urban sites. The project includes also samplings with hourly resolution for limited periods. Hourly samples give an easier identification of the different aerosol sources due to the capability of tracking rapid changes as the ones occurring in many particulate emissions as well as in atmospheric transport and dilution processes. The role of PIXE technique within the project has been described in this paper. The comparison of data obtained by different techniques (e.g. PIXE, IC and ICP) assured a quality assurance control on the huge quantity of data obtained in the project. PIXE data together with those obtained by other analytical techniques have been used to reconstruct the average aerosol chemical composition and in Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis to determine the aerosol sources and their impact on PM10 and PM2.5 mass. In particular the high sensitivity of PIXE for all the crustal elements (including Si which is not easily detected by ICP) allows the direct determination of the Saharan dust contribution. Finally, the 1-h resolution data, which can be obtained only by PIXE, confirmed and reinforced the identification of the aerosol sources obtained by the daily concentrations.

  20. JouleLabs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00301

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, D.

    2010-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Joule Labs Inc. (Joule Labs) will collaborate on creating a software platform for the development and distribution of renewable energy and energy efficiency analysis tools.

  1. The New Multi-HAzard and MulTi-RIsK Assessment MethodS for Europe (MATRIX) Project - An overview of its major findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Kevin; Zschau, Jochen; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Recent major natural disasters, such as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, tsunami and subsequent Fukushima nuclear accident, have raised awareness of the frequent and potentially far-reaching interconnections between natural hazards. Such interactions occur at the hazard level, where an initial hazard may trigger other events (e.g., an earthquake triggering a tsunami) or several events may occur concurrently (or nearly so), e.g., severe weather around the same time as an earthquake. Interactions also occur at the vulnerability level, where the initial event may make the affected community more susceptible to the negative consequences of another event (e.g., an earthquake weakens buildings, which are then damaged further by windstorms). There is also a temporal element involved, where changes in exposure may alter the total risk to a given area. In short, there is the likelihood that the total risk estimated when considering multiple hazard and risks and their interactions is greater than the sum of their individual parts. It is with these issues in mind that the European Commission, under their FP7 program, supported the New Multi-HAzard and MulTi-RIsK Assessment MethodS for Europe or MATRIX project (10.2010 to 12.2013). MATRIX set out to tackle multiple natural hazards (i.e., those of concern to Europe, namely earthquakes, landslides, volcanos, tsunamis, wild fires, storms and fluvial and coastal flooding) and risks within a common theoretical framework. The MATRIX work plan proceeded from an assessment of single-type risk methodologies (including how uncertainties should be treated), cascade effects within a multi-hazard environment, time-dependent vulnerability, decision making and support for multi-hazard mitigation and adaption, and an assessment of how the multi-hazard and risk viewpoint may be integrated into current decision making and risk mitigation programs, considering the existing single-hazard and risk focus. Three test sites were considered during the

  2. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  3. The New Faces of Europe. Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foucher, Michel

    This monograph, published as part of the project "A Secondary Education for Europe," offers some basic data on the contemporary human geography of the European continent, with a focus on central and eastern Europe. The document first describes civic issues in the teaching of geography and cartography of the new Europe. The basic…

  4. E-WIN Project 2016: Evaluating the Current Gender Situation in Neurosurgery Across Europe-An Interactive, Multiple-Level Survey.

    PubMed

    Steklacova, Anna; Bradac, Ondrej; de Lacy, Patricia; Benes, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    The proportion of women among neurosurgeons appears to be growing worldwide with time. Official data concerning the current situation across Europe have not yet been published. Thus, there are still concerns about gender inequality. The European Women in Neurosurgery Project 2016 was designed to recognize the current situation across Europe. The office holders of the national neurosurgical societies of 39 countries forming the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies were contacted to provide data stating the proportion of women in neurosurgery. Obtained data were supplied with the results of an online survey. The response rate of national office holders was 90%. The number of reported neurosurgeons was 12,985, and overall proportion of women represented was 12%. Two hundred thirty-seven responses to online questionnaire were taken into account. The overall proportion of female respondents was 30%. There was no intergender variability in responses regarding amount of working time per week, exposure to surgeries, or administrative work. Male respondents reported dedicating significantly more time to scientific work and feeling more confident dictating own career direction. Female respondents reported being less often married, having fewer children, a stronger perception of gender significance level, and a higher appreciation of personal qualities. Neurosurgery is a challenging field of medicine. The results of our survey did not imply an overall feeling of gender inequality among European respondents, although women believe that the gender issue to be more important than men do and that they have to sacrifice more of their personal lives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. On the Role of Hall and Pedersen Conductivities in Determination of Ionospheric Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric Joule heating is defined as the frictional heating which results from the collisions between the neutrals and charged particles at the ionospheric heights. These collisional processes gain importance around 120 km in the E and F regions of the ionosphere where there are more neutral atoms, and particularly at the auroral altitudes, where Hall and Pedersen conductivities are comparable to each other. The most conventional ways of calculating ionospheric Joule heating relies on the relationship between electric field and Pedersen conductivity. The role of Hall conductivity in the calculation of Joule heating still remains unclear, and in general its contribution is accepted to be minor when compared to the Pedersen currents at the first approximation. However, results from the MHD simulations show that Joule heating is reduced in the regions where Hall conductivity is close to or higher than Pedersen conductivity. These local variations also modify the global Joule heating pattern and distribution. MHD models take into account the magnetosphere and ionosphere interaction and incorporate with the ionospheric modules which include the interaction between the neutral winds and charged paricles. In this study, we have selected two isolated substorm events that occurred in March, 2008 to investigate the effects of Hall conductivity on the Joule heating. We run NASA/CCMC MHD models, e.g. SWMF/BATSRUS, during these times under concurrent solar wind and IMF conditions. The outputs from the models will be used to calculate Joule heating with the Hall conductivity effects properly included. In this presentation, we will show our preliminary results on the Joule heating rates from the models, quantify the degree of Pedersen and Hall conductivity contributions on the Joule heating, and address on their contributions on the global distribution of the Joule heating. We will also compare and discuss our findings with those available in the literature.

  6. Reliable electrophoretic mobilities free from Joule heating effects using CE.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Hruska, Vlastimil; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Miroslav; Gas, Bohuslav; Marriott, Philip J; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    Ionic electrophoretic mobilities determined by means of CE experiments are sometimes different when compared to generally accepted values based on limiting ionic conductance measurements. While the effect of ionic strength on electrophoretic mobility has been long understood, the increase in the mobility that results from Joule heating (the resistive heating that occurs when a current passes through an electrolyte) has been largely overlooked. In this work, a simple method for obtaining reliable and reproducible values of electrophoretic mobility is described. The electrophoretic mobility is measured over a range of driving powers and the extrapolation to zero power dissipation is employed to eliminate the effect of Joule heating. These extrapolated values of electrophoretic mobility can then be used to calculate limiting ionic mobilities by making a correction for ionic strength; this somewhat complicated calculation is conveniently performed by using the freeware program PeakMaster 5. These straightforward procedures improve the agreement between experimentally determined and literature values of limiting ionic mobility by at least one order of magnitude. Using Tris-chromate BGE with a value of conductivity 0.34 S/m and ionic strength 59 mM at a modest dissipated power per unit length of 2.0 W/m, values of mobility for inorganic anions were increased by an average of 12.6% relative to their values free from the effects of Joule heating. These increases were accompanied by a reduction in mobilities due to the ionic strength effect, which was 11% for univalent and 28% for divalent inorganic ions compared to their limiting ionic mobilities. Additionally, it was possible to determine the limiting ionic mobility for a number of aromatic anions by using PeakMaster 5 to perform an ionic strength correction. A major significance of this work is in being able to use CE to obtain reliable and accurate values of electrophoretic mobilities with all its benefits, including

  7. Evidence-based development of school-based and family-involved prevention of overweight across Europe: the ENERGY-project's design and conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Brug, Johannes; te Velde, Saskia J; Chinapaw, Mai J M; Bere, Elling; de Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Moore, Helen; Maes, Lea; Jensen, Jorgen; Manios, Yannis; Lien, Nanna; Klepp, Knut Inge; Lobstein, Tim; Martens, Marloes; Salmon, Jo; Singh, Amika S

    2010-05-25

    There is an urgent need for more carefully developed public health measures in order to curb the obesity epidemic among youth. The overall aim of the "EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth" (ENERGY)-project is the development and formative evaluation of a theory-informed and evidence-based multi-component school-based and family-involved intervention program ready to be implemented and evaluated for effectiveness across Europe. This program aims at promoting the adoption or continuation of health behaviors that contribute to a healthy energy balance among school-aged children. Earlier studies have indicated that school and family environments are key determinants of energy-balance behaviors in schoolchildren. Schools are an important setting for health promotion in this age group, but school-based interventions mostly fail to target and involve the family environment. Led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from eleven European countries and supported by a team of Australian experts, the ENERGY-project is informed by the Environmental Research Framework for Weight gain Prevention, and comprises a comprehensive epidemiological analysis including 1) systematic reviews of the literature, 2) secondary analyses of existing data, 3) focus group research, and 4) a cross European school-based survey. The theoretical framework and the epidemiological analysis will subsequently inform stepwise intervention development targeting the most relevant energy balance-related behaviors and their personal, family-environmental and school-environmental determinants applying the Intervention Mapping protocol. The intervention scheme will undergo formative and pilot evaluation in five countries. The results of ENERGY will be disseminated among key stakeholders including researchers, policy makers and the general population. The ENERGY-project is an international, multidisciplinary effort to develop and test an evidence-based and theory

  8. Evidence-based development of school-based and family-involved prevention of overweight across Europe: The ENERGY-project's design and conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for more carefully developed public health measures in order to curb the obesity epidemic among youth. The overall aim of the "EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth" (ENERGY)-project is the development and formative evaluation of a theory-informed and evidence-based multi-component school-based and family-involved intervention program ready to be implemented and evaluated for effectiveness across Europe. This program aims at promoting the adoption or continuation of health behaviors that contribute to a healthy energy balance among school-aged children. Earlier studies have indicated that school and family environments are key determinants of energy-balance behaviors in schoolchildren. Schools are an important setting for health promotion in this age group, but school-based interventions mostly fail to target and involve the family environment. Methods Led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from eleven European countries and supported by a team of Australian experts, the ENERGY-project is informed by the Environmental Research Framework for Weight gain Prevention, and comprises a comprehensive epidemiological analysis including 1) systematic reviews of the literature, 2) secondary analyses of existing data, 3) focus group research, and 4) a cross European school-based survey. Results and discussion The theoretical framework and the epidemiological analysis will subsequently inform stepwise intervention development targeting the most relevant energy balance-related behaviors and their personal, family-environmental and school-environmental determinants applying the Intervention Mapping protocol. The intervention scheme will undergo formative and pilot evaluation in five countries. The results of ENERGY will be disseminated among key stakeholders including researchers, policy makers and the general population. Conclusions The ENERGY-project is an international, multidisciplinary effort

  9. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Lamar, D.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Elliott, M.L.

    1998-05-12

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1,200 C in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof. 2 figs.

  10. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Lamar, David A.; Chapman, Chris C.; Elliott, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof.

  11. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-04-01

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear "super-Joule" self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  12. Stability improvement for coil position locking of joule balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Liu, Yongmeng; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Wang, Dawei; Li, Zhengkun; Tan, Jiubin; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2017-08-01

    The relative vertical position locking precision between the exciting and suspended coils is an important uncertainty for the Planck constant traceability in joule balance. In order to improve the relative vertical position locking precision, several stability experiments are conducted. The stability characteristics of the suspended and exciting coils are measured using a six-axis laser interferometer system; meanwhile, the effectiveness of the active vibration isolation table is measured using a vibration measurement sensor. The piezoelectric ceramic actuators with PID controller are used to compensate the relative vertical displacement drifts while a six-axis laser interferometer system is used to measure the positions of two coils. Experimental results show that the relative vertical position is stably locked.

  13. Ohm's Law, Fick's Law, Joule's Law, and Ground Water Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    1999-02-01

    Starting from the contributions of Ohm, Fick and Joule during the nineteenth century, an integral expression is derived for a steady-state groundwater flow system. In general, this integral statement gives expression to the fact that the steady-state groundwater system is characterized by two dependent variables, namely, flow geometry and fluid potential. As a consequence, solving the steady-state flow problem implies the finding of optimal conditions under which flow geometry and the distribution of potentials are compatible with each other, subject to the constraint of least action. With the availability of the digital computer and powerful graphics software, this perspective opens up possibilities of understanding the groundwater flow process without resorting to the traditional differential equation. Conceptual difficulties arise in extending the integral expression to a transient groundwater flow system. These difficulties suggest that the foundations of groundwater hydraulics deserve to be reexamined.

  14. Selective surface functionalization of silicon nanowires via nanoscale joule heating.

    PubMed

    Park, Inkyu; Li, Zhiyong; Pisano, Albert P; Williams, R Stanley

    2007-10-01

    In this letter, we report a novel approach to selectively functionalize the surface of silicon nanowires located on silicon-based substrates. This method is based upon highly localized nanoscale Joule heating along silicon nanowires under an applied electrical bias. Numerical simulation shows that a high-temperature (>800 K) with a large thermal gradient can be achieved by applying an appropriate electrical bias across silicon nanowires. This localized heating effect can be utilized to selectively ablate a protective polymer layer from a region of the chosen silicon nanowire. The exposed surface, with proper postprocessing, becomes available for surface functionalization with chemical linker molecules, such as 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilanes, while the surrounding area is still protected by the chemically inert polymer layer. This approach is successfully demonstrated on silicon nanowire arrays fabricated on SOI wafers and visualized by selective attachment of gold nanoparticles.

  15. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-15

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  16. One Joule per GFlop for BLAS2 Now!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Vincent; Gruber, Ralf

    2010-09-01

    Energy consumption is today one of the major topics that the HPC community tries to tackle. In this paper, the authors present a thought experiment aiming at building a node of a supercomputer based on a GPU (Nvidia GTX280). The paper concentrate on BLAS2 operations that dominate many scientific applications. They show that it is already possible today to build a node that is able to perform one GFlop while consuming only one Joule. This corresponds to an energy reduction by one to two orders of magnitude. Technical limitations imposed by computer manufacturers hinder the realisation of such ecological resources. In a second part of the paper a new FLOPS-driven governor is presented aiming at boosting the CPU performance for applications that are not main memory access bound, and showing results on an Intel mobile processor.

  17. Application of vanadium hydride compressors for Joule-Thomson cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Freeman, B. D.; Phillips, J. R.

    The Joule-Thomson expansion of hydrogen gas offers efficient and reliable cryocoolers to produce temperatures between 10 and 50 K. A critical component to the development of these devices is the metal hydride storage bed that provides a nonmechanical method to compress hydrogen gas via the reversible absorption by appropriate metals or alloys. A thermodynamic model has been used to calculate the impact of operational parameters such as input/output pressure ratios and bed temperature on energy balance and system efficiency. Detailed comparisons are reported for a compressor which utilizes vanadium metal as the sorbent for either hydrogen or deuterium where the unusually large isotope differences between the phase diagrams and thermal properties for VH(x) and VD(x) have been considered. The sensitivity of heat input requirements to the uncertainties in primary variables are described.

  18. Joule-Thomson cryogenic cooler with extremely high thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, J. J.; Trimble, Curt

    1991-01-01

    An 80-K Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooling system designed for the Probe Infrared Laser Spectrometer (PIRLS) proposed for the Huygens Titan Probe of the Cassini Saturn orbiter mission is presented. The cryogenic cooling requirements of the PIRLS instrument are listed, and the cooler system design including details of a J-T cryostat, cold head, and dewar design is described along with the results of a thermal modeling effort and lab cooler performance testing. It is shown that by using active feedback temperature control of the cold head in combination with the self-regulating action of the J-T cryostat, a temperature stability of less than 0.1 mK/min is achieved by the cooler weighting 1.8 kg.

  19. Joule-Thomson cryogenic cooler with extremely high thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, J. J.; Trimble, Curt

    1991-01-01

    An 80-K Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooling system designed for the Probe Infrared Laser Spectrometer (PIRLS) proposed for the Huygens Titan Probe of the Cassini Saturn orbiter mission is presented. The cryogenic cooling requirements of the PIRLS instrument are listed, and the cooler system design including details of a J-T cryostat, cold head, and dewar design is described along with the results of a thermal modeling effort and lab cooler performance testing. It is shown that by using active feedback temperature control of the cold head in combination with the self-regulating action of the J-T cryostat, a temperature stability of less than 0.1 mK/min is achieved by the cooler weighting 1.8 kg.

  20. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Okulov, I V; Soldatov, I V; Sarmanova, M F; Kaban, I; Gemming, T; Edström, K; Eckert, J

    2015-07-29

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties.

  1. The diffusion of health economics knowledge in Europe : The EURONHEED (European Network of Health Economics Evaluation Database) project.

    PubMed

    de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ulmann, Philippe; Nixon, John; Boulenger, Stéphanie; Glanville, Julie; Drummond, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper overviews the EURONHEED (EUROpean Network of Health Economics Evaluation Databases) project. Launched in 2003, this project is funded by the EU. Its aim is to create a network of national and international databases dedicated to health economic evaluation of health services and innovations. Seven centres (France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK) are involved covering 17 countries. The network is based on two existing databases, the French CODECS (COnnaissance et Decision en EConomie de la Sante) database, created in 2000 by the French Health Economists Association (College des Economistes de la Sante), and the UK NHS-EED (NHS Economic Electronic Database), run by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, England. The network will provide bibliographic records of published full health economic evaluation studies (cost-benefit, cost-utility and cost-effectiveness studies) as well as cost studies, methodological articles and review papers. Moreover, a structured abstract of full evaluation studies will be provided to users, allowing them access to a detailed description of each study and to a commentary stressing the implications and limits, for decision making, of the study. Access will be free of charge. The database features and its ease of access (via the internet: http://www.euronheed.org) should facilitate the diffusion of existing economic evidence on health services and the generalisation of common standards in the field at the European level, thereby improving the quality, generalisability and transferability of results across countries.

  2. Impacts of agricultural management practices on soil quality in Europe and China - an assessment within the framework of the EU iSQAPER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Abdallah; Schwilch, Gudrun; Barão, Lúcia; Basch, Gottlieb; Sukkel, Wijnand; Lemesle, Julie; Ferreira, Carla; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugan, Alicia; Mataix, Jorge; Kosmas, Costas; Glavan, Matjaž; Tóth, Brigitta; Petrutza Gate, Olga; Lipiec, Jerzy; Reintam, Endla; Xu, Minggang; Di, Jiaying; Fan, Hongzhu; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural soils are under a wide variety of pressures, including from increasing global demand for food associated with population growth, changing diets, land degradation, and associated productivity reductions potentially exacerbated by climate change. To manage the use of agricultural soils well, decision-makers need science-based, easily applicable, and cost-effective tools for assessing soil quality and soil functions. Since a practical assessment of soil quality requires the integrated consideration of key soil properties and their variations in space and time, providing such tools remains a challenging task. This study aims to assess the impact of innovative agricultural management practices on soil quality in 14 study sites across Europe (10) and China (4), covering the major pedo-climatic zones. The study is part of the European H2020 project iSQAPER, which involves 25 partners across Europe and China and is coordinated by Wageningen University, The Netherlands. iSQAPER is aimed at interactive soil quality assessment in Europe and China for agricultural productivity and environmental resilience. The study began with a thorough literature analysis to inform the selection of indicators for the assessment of soil structure and soil functions. A manual was then developed in order to standardize and facilitate the task of inventorying soil quality and management practices at the case study sites. The manual provides clear and precise instructions on how to assess the 11 selected soil quality indicators based on a visual soil assessment methodology. A newly developed infiltrometer was used to easily assess the soil infiltration capacity in the field and investigate hydrodynamic flow processes. Based on consistent calibration, the infiltrometer enables reliable prediction of key soil hydraulic properties. The main aim of this inventory is to link agricultural management practices to the soil quality status at the case study sites, and to identify innovative

  3. Light ion facility projects in Europe: methodological aspects for the calculation of the treatment cost per protocol.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Pascal; Zucca, Luciano; Näslund, Ingemar; Auberger, Thomas; Combs, Stephanie E; François, Guy; Heeren, Germaine; Rochat, Joël; Perrier, Lionel

    2004-12-01

    In the framework of the European Network for Research in Light Ion Hadron Therapy (ENLIGHT), the health economics group develops a methodology for assessing important investment and operating costs of this innovative treatment against its expected benefits. The main task is to estimate the cost per treated patient. The cost analysis is restricted to the therapeutic phase from the hospital point of view. An original methodology for cost assessment per treatment protocol is developed based on standard costs. Costs related to direct medical activity are based on the production process analysis, whereas indirect and non direct medical costs are allocated to each protocol using relevant cost-drivers. The resulting cost model will take into account the specificities of each therapeutic protocol as well as the particularities of each of the European projects.

  4. ULF Wave Electromagnetic Energy Flux into the Ionosphere: Joule Heating Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M.; Moldwin, M.; Zou, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves - such as standing Alfven waves - are one mechanism for coupling the inner magnetosphere to the Earth's ionosphere. For example, they transfer energy from the solar wind or ring current into the Earth's ionosphere via Joule heating. In this study, we use NASA Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite data to investigate the spatial, frequency, and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ULF wave Poynting vector (electromagnetic energy flux) mapped to the ionosphere. We use these measurements to estimate Joule heating rates. We compare these rates to empirical models of Joule heating associated with large scale, static (on ULF wave timescales) current systems, finding that ULF waves usually contribute little to the global, integrated Joule heating rate. However, there are extreme cases when ULF waves make significant contributions to global Joule heating. Finally, we find ULF waves routinely make significant contributions to local Joule heating rates near the noon and midnight local time sectors, where static current systems nominally contribute less to Joule heating; the most important contributions come from lower frequency (<7 mHz) waves.

  5. Analysis of fluid flow in Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bingyan; Hu, Yin; Wang, Zhan; Li, Xiuqiang

    2014-11-01

    Joule-Thomson cooler have its unique advantages with respect to compact, light and low cost. Joule-Thomson coolers have been widely used in HgCdTe infrared detectors, InSb infrared detectors and InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors. The performance of Joule-Thomson coolers is required to be improved with the development of higher mass and larger diameter focal plane infrared detectors. Joule-Thomson coolers use a limited supply of high pressure gas to support the cooling of infrared detectors. In order to maximize the usage time and minimize the cooling down time for a given volume of stored gas for Joule-Thomson coolers, it is important to study on fluid flow of Joule-Thomson coolers. Experiments were carried out to focus on the performance of Joule-Thomson coolers coupled with infrared detectors. The effect of ambient temperature, the state of supply gas pressure is considered. The relationship between volume rates and supply gas pressure was proved to fit some regulates while the other parameters are fixed. Moreover, the effects of ambient temperature are analyzed.

  6. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural GasReservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-04-21

    Depleted natural gas reservoirs are a promising target for Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). The focus of this study is on evaluating the importance of Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 injection into depleted natural gas reservoirs. Joule-Thomson cooling is the adiabatic cooling that accompanies the expansion of a real gas. If Joule-Thomson cooling were extreme, injectivity and formation permeability could be altered by the freezing of residual water,formation of hydrates, and fracturing due to thermal stresses. The TOUGH2/EOS7C module for CO2-CH4-H2O mixtures is used as the simulation analysis tool. For verification of EOS7C, the classic Joule-Thomson expansion experiment is modeled for pure CO2 resulting in Joule-Thomson coefficients in agreement with standard references to within 5-7 percent. For demonstration purposes, CO2 injection at constant pressure and with a large pressure drop ({approx}50 bars) is presented in order to show that cooling by more than 20 C can occur by this effect. Two more-realistic constant-rate injection cases show that for typical systems in the Sacramento Valley, California, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is minimal. This simulation study shows that for constant-rate injections into high-permeability reservoirs, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is not expected to create significant problems for CSEGR.

  7. ULF wave electromagnetic energy flux into the ionosphere: Joule heating implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Zou, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves—in particular, Alfvén waves-transfer energy into the Earth's ionosphere via Joule heating, but it is unclear how much they contribute to global and local heating rates relative to other energy sources. In this study we use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite data to investigate the spatial, frequency, and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ULF wave Poynting vector (electromagnetic energy flux) mapped to the ionosphere. We use these measurements to estimate Joule heating rates, covering latitudes at or below the nominal auroral oval and below the open/closed field line boundary. We find ULF wave Joule heating rates (integrated over 3-30 mHz frequency band) typically range from 0.001 to 1 mW/m2. We compare these rates to empirical models of Joule heating associated with large-scale, static (on ULF wave timescales) current systems, finding that ULF waves nominally contribute little to the global, integrated Joule heating rate. However, there are extreme cases with ULF wave Joule heating rates of ≥10 mW/m2—in these cases, which are more likely to occur when Kp ≥ 3, ULF waves make significant contributions to the global Joule heating rate. We also find ULF waves routinely make significant contributions to local Joule heating rates near the noon and midnight local time sectors, where static current systems nominally contribute less to Joule heating; the most important contributions come from lower frequency (<7 mHz) waves.

  8. Patient safety in external beam radiotherapy, results of the ACCIRAD project: Current status of proactive risk assessment, reactive analysis of events, and reporting and learning systems in Europe.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Julian; Bly, Ritva; Bulot, Mireille; Godet, Jean-Luc; Jahnen, Andreas; Krengli, Marco; Maingon, Philippe; Prieto Martin, Carlos; Przybylska, Kamila; Skrobała, Agnieszka; Valero, Marc; Jarvinen, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    To describe the current status of implementation of European directives for risk management in radiotherapy and to assess variability in risk management in the following areas: 1) in-country regulatory framework; 2) proactive risk assessment; (3) reactive analysis of events; and (4) reporting and learning systems. The original data were collected as part of the ACCIRAD project through two online surveys. Risk assessment criteria are closely associated with quality assurance programs. Only 9/32 responding countries (28%) with national regulations reported clear "requirements" for proactive risk assessment and/or reactive risk analysis, with wide variability in assessment methods. Reporting of adverse error events is mandatory in most (70%) but not all surveyed countries. Most European countries have taken steps to implement European directives designed to reduce the probability and magnitude of accidents in radiotherapy. Variability between countries is substantial in terms of legal frameworks, tools used to conduct proactive risk assessment and reactive analysis of events, and in the reporting and learning systems utilized. These findings underscore the need for greater harmonisation in common terminology, classification and reporting practices across Europe to improve patient safety and to enable more reliable inter-country comparisons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The SAFE project: 'plant food allergies: field to table strategies for reducing their incidence in Europe' an EC-funded study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K

    2005-04-01

    The true prevalence of food allergy as an IgE mediated reaction is still under discussion. Using apple as a model allergen source a multidisciplinary consortium worked together at developing various strategies for reducing the incidence of fruit allergies in an EC-funded project. Patient allergen profiles were established using in vitro and in vivo tests with respect to geographic area and mild or severe symptoms. Apple allergens (Mal d 1-Mal d 4) were characterised, variants identified, cloned and sequenced. These individual allergens were used to increase the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis. Furthermore, they provided better prognosis of disease severity. RT-PCR and ELISA were developed for determining the allergen specific mRNA and expressed allergenic protein in a large number of apple cultivars. Similarly, changes in allergen characteristics from harvest through storage to processing and the impact of agronomic practices were investigated. Allergen genes were mapped on a molecular linkage map of apple. The biological function of Mal d 1 was studied using the RNA interference strategy. Finally, consumer attitudes in Northern, Central and Southern Europe were gauged on the acceptability of low allergen cultivars or a GMO and its impact on product quality.

  10. Recent advances of the French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP) in the context of Europe funded projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, Vincent; Dufourg, Nicolas; Bouchemit, Myriam; Budnik, Elena; André, Nicolas; Cecconi, Baptiste; Gangloff, Michel; Durand, Joelle; Pitout, Frédéric; Jacquey, Christian; Rouillard, Alexis; Jourdane, Nathanael; Heulet, Dominique; Lavraud, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    The French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/) addresses for nearly 20 years all issues pertaining to natural plasma data distribution and valorization. Initially established by CNES and CNRS on the ground of a solid data archive, CDPP activities diversified with the advent of broader networks and interoperability standards, and through fruitful collaborations (e.g. with NASA/PDS): providing access to remote data, designing and building science driven analysis tools then became at the forefront of CDPP developments. For instance today AMDA helps scientists all over the world accessing and analyzing data from ancient to very recent missions (from Voyager, Galileo, Giotto, ... to Maven, Rosetta, MMS, ...) as well as results from models and numerical simulations. Other tools like the Propagation Tool or 3DView allow users to put their data in context and interconnect with other databases (CDAWeb, MEDOC) and tools (Topcat). This presentation will briefly review this evolution and demonstrate technical and science use cases. The presentation will ultimately show how CDPP activities have been accelerated by its involvement in past and ongoing collaborative european projects (IMPEx, HELIO, Europlanet H2020, HELCATS, ESA/SSA, ...) and how they will serve future missions (Bepicolombo, Solar Orbiter, THOR, ...).

  11. eHealth in integrated care programs for people with multimorbidity in Europe: Insights from the ICARE4EU project.

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Papa, Roberta; Rijken, Mieke; van Ginneken, Ewout; Hujala, Anneli; Barbabella, Francesco

    2017-08-12

    Care for people with multimorbidity requires an integrated approach in order to adequately meet their complex needs. In this respect eHealth could be of help. This paper aims to describe the implementation, as well as benefits and barriers of eHealth applications in integrated care programs targeting people with multimorbidity in European countries, including insights on older people 65+. Within the framework of the ICARE4EU project, in 2014, expert organizations in 24 European countries identified 101 integrated care programs based on selected inclusion criteria. Managers of these programs completed a related on-line questionnaire addressing various aspects including the use of eHealth. In this paper we analyze data from this questionnaire, in addition to qualitative information from six programs which were selected as 'high potential' for their innovative approach and studied in depth through site visits. Out of 101 programs, 85 adopted eHealth applications, of which 42 focused explicitly on older people. In most cases Electronic Health Records (EHRs), registration databases with patients' data and tools for communication between care providers were implemented. Percentages were slightly higher for programs addressing older people. eHealth improves care integration and management processes. Inadequate funding mechanisms, interoperability and technical support represent major barriers. Findings seems to suggest that eHealth could support integrated care for (older) people with multimorbidity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development of NO2 and NOx land use regression models for estimating air pollution exposure in 36 study areas in Europe - The ESCAPE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beelen, Rob; Hoek, Gerard; Vienneau, Danielle; Eeftens, Marloes; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Pedeli, Xanthi; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino; Schikowski, Tamara; Marcon, Alessandro; Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Stephanou, Euripides; Patelarou, Evridiki; Lanki, Timo; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Declercq, Christophe; Falq, Grégoire; Stempfelet, Morgane; Birk, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; von Klot, Stephanie; Nádor, Gizella; Varró, Mihály János; Dėdelė, Audrius; Gražulevičienė, Regina; Mölter, Anna; Lindley, Sarah; Madsen, Christian; Cesaroni, Giulia; Ranzi, Andrea; Badaloni, Chiara; Hoffmann, Barbara; Nonnemacher, Michael; Krämer, Ursula; Kuhlbusch, Thomas; Cirach, Marta; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Bellander, Tom; Korek, Michal; Olsson, David; Strömgren, Magnus; Dons, Evi; Jerrett, Michael; Fischer, Paul; Wang, Meng; Brunekreef, Bert; de Hoogh, Kees

    2013-06-01

    Estimating within-city variability in air pollution concentrations is important. Land use regression (LUR) models are able to explain such small-scale within-city variations. Transparency in LUR model development methods is important to facilitate comparison of methods between different studies. We therefore developed LUR models in a standardized way in 36 study areas in Europe for the ESCAPE (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects) project.Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were measured with Ogawa passive samplers at 40 or 80 sites in each of the 36 study areas. The spatial variation in each area was explained by LUR modelling. Centrally and locally available Geographic Information System (GIS) variables were used as potential predictors. A leave-one out cross-validation procedure was used to evaluate the model performance.There was substantial contrast in annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations within the study areas. The model explained variances (R2) of the LUR models ranged from 55% to 92% (median 82%) for NO2 and from 49% to 91% (median 78%) for NOx. For most areas the cross-validation R2 was less than 10% lower than the model R2. Small-scale traffic and population/household density were the most common predictors. The magnitude of the explained variance depended on the contrast in measured concentrations as well as availability of GIS predictors, especially traffic intensity data were important. In an additional evaluation, models in which local traffic intensity was not offered had 10% lower R2 compared to models in the same areas in which these variables were offered.Within the ESCAPE project it was possible to develop LUR models that explained a large fraction of the spatial variance in measured annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations. These LUR models are being used to estimate outdoor concentrations at the home addresses of participants in over 30 cohort studies.

  13. Science across Europe: key issues for society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Anabel

    1992-11-01

    Science across Europe is a new project linking secondary schools across Europe through the science curriculum. It focuses on issues in science, technology and society that have a European dimension. Students taking part gather information, reflect on their opinions and compare them with those of students in other countries. The project provides opportunities for using foreign languages and new communications technologies.

  14. Gestational age patterns of fetal and neonatal mortality in Europe: results from the Euro-Peristat project.

    PubMed

    Mohangoo, Ashna D; Buitendijk, Simone E; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Chalmers, Jim; Irgens, Lorentz M; Bolumar, Francisco; Nijhuis, Jan G; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The first European Perinatal Health Report showed wide variability between European countries in fetal (2.6-9.1‰) and neonatal (1.6-5.7‰) mortality rates in 2004. We investigated gestational age patterns of fetal and neonatal mortality to improve our understanding of the differences between countries with low and high mortality. Data on 29 countries/regions participating in the Euro-Peristat project were analyzed. Most European countries had no limits for the registration of live births, but substantial variations in limits for registration of stillbirths before 28 weeks of gestation existed. Country rankings changed markedly after excluding deaths most likely to be affected by registration differences (22-23 weeks for neonatal mortality and 22-27 weeks for fetal mortality). Countries with high fetal mortality ≥28 weeks had on average higher proportions of fetal deaths at and near term (≥37 weeks), while proportions of fetal deaths at earlier gestational ages (28-31 and 32-36 weeks) were higher in low fetal mortality countries. Countries with high neonatal mortality rates ≥24 weeks, all new member states of the European Union, had high gestational age-specific neonatal mortality rates for all gestational-age subgroups; they also had high fetal mortality, as well as high early and late neonatal mortality. In contrast, other countries with similar levels of neonatal mortality had varying levels of fetal mortality, and among these countries early and late neonatal mortality were negatively correlated. For valid European comparisons, all countries should register births and deaths from at least 22 weeks of gestation and should be able to distinguish late terminations of pregnancy from stillbirths. After excluding deaths most likely to be influenced by existing registration differences, important variations in both levels and patterns of fetal and neonatal mortality rates were found. These disparities raise questions for future research about the effectiveness

  15. Towards a greater understanding of the illicit tobacco trade in Europe: a review of the PMI funded 'Project Star' report.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Anna B; Rowell, Andy; Gallus, Silvano; Lugo, Alessandra; Joossens, Luk; Sims, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Following a legal agreement with the European Union (EU), Philip Morris International (PMI) commissions a yearly report ('Project Star', PS) on the European illicit cigarette trade from KPMG, the global accountancy firm. Review of PS 2010 report. Comparison with data from independent sources including a 2010 pan-European survey (N=18,056). Within PS, data covering all 27 EU countries are entered into a model. While the model itself seems appropriate, concerns are identified with the methodologies underlying the data inputs and thus their quality: there is little transparency over methodologies; interview data underestimate legal non-domestic product partly by failing to account for legal cross-border sales; illicit cigarette estimates rely on tobacco industry empty pack surveys which may overestimate illicit; and there is an over-reliance on data supplied by PMI with inadequate external validation. Thus, PMI sales data are validated using PMI smoking prevalence estimates, yet PMI is unable to provide sales (shipment) data for the Greek islands and its prevalence estimates differ grossly from independent data. Consequently, comparisons with independent data suggest PS will tend to overestimate illicit cigarette levels particularly where cross-border shopping is frequent (Austria, Finland, France) and in Western compared with Eastern European countries. The model also provides data on the nature of the illicit cigarette market independent of seizure data suggesting that almost a quarter of the illicit cigarette market in 2010 comprised PMI's own brands compared with just 5% counterfeited PMI brands; a finding hidden in PMI's public representation of the data. PS overestimates illicit cigarette levels in some European countries and suggests PMI's supply chain control is inadequate. Its publication serves the interests of PMI over those of the EU and its member states. PS requires greater transparency, external scrutiny and use of independent data. Published by the BMJ

  16. Implementation of patient blood management remains extremely variable in Europe and Canada: the NATA benchmark project: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Philippe; Hardy, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Preoperative anaemia is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patient blood management (PBM) is advocated to improve patient outcomes. NATA, the 'Network for the advancement of patient blood management, haemostasis and thrombosis', initiated a benchmark project with the aim of providing the basis for educational strategies to implement optimal PBM in participating centres. Prospective, observational study with online data collection in 11 secondary and tertiary care institutions interested in developing PBM. Ten European centres (Austria, Spain, England, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, Romania, Greece, France, and Germany) and one Canadian centre participated between January 2010 and June 2011. A total of 2470 patients undergoing total hip (THR) or knee replacement, or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), were registered in the study. Data from 2431 records were included in the final analysis. Primary outcome measures were the incidence and volume of red blood cells (RBC) transfused. Logistic regression analysis identified variables independently associated with RBC transfusions. The incidence of transfusion was significantly different between centres for THR (range 7 to 95%), total knee replacement (range 3 to 100%) and CABG (range 20 to 95%). The volume of RBC transfused was significantly different between centres for THR and CABG. The incidence of preoperative anaemia ranged between 3 and 40% and its treatment between 0 and 40%, the latter not being related to the former. Patient characteristics, evolution of haemoglobin concentrations and blood losses were also different between centres. Variables independently associated with RBC transfusion were preoperative haemoglobin concentration, lost volume of RBC and female sex. Implementation of PBM remains extremely variable across centres. The relative importance of factors explaining RBC transfusion differs across institutions, some being patient related whereas others are related to

  17. The interaction between the Adria and Europe plates at their boundary in the Eastern Alps (project EASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetényi, György; Bianchi, Irene; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Kampfová Exnerová, Hana

    2017-04-01

    Project EASI is the first implemented Complementary Experiment within the AlpArray program (http://www.alparray.ethz.ch) and stands for Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation. The seismological field experiment ran with 55 broadband stations deployed in zigzag in a ca. 15 km-wide band along longitude 13.35°E, spanning 540 km from the Czech-German border to the Adriatic Sea, for a duration of one year (Summer 2014-Summer 2015). Here we present the results obtained by P-to-S conversions from waveforms of teleseismic earthquakes. Depths of Moho and other interfaces, velocity structure and Vp/Vs are imaged with the use of different approaches - depth migrated receiver functions, manual time picks converted into interface depths, H-K method (Zhu and Kanamori, 2000), harmonic analysis, etc. - together with an estimate of their reliability. The Moho beneath the Bohemian Massif is relatively sharp and distinct until the Bavarian Shear Zone. Further to the south the Moho is less pronounced and several dipping segments can be followed between individual faults on the depth migrated images. In general, the European Moho deepens from north to south, i.e., from the Bohemian Massif to the Alps, until reaching a steeply dipping ramp-like structure beneath the Tauern Window. On the other hand, the Adriatic Moho deepens from south to north towards the Tauern Window, beneath which we observe weak conversions. There is no sign indicating the previously reported Moho gap. The size of this "gap" seen in active seismics (by PmP phases) will be investigated by further receiver function inversions to determine the characteristics of the crust-mantle velocity transition. At the boundary between the two plates, the whole crustal structure looks complex, holding several Ps converted phases. We isolate the signal generated by inclined interfaces and anisotropy through the application of the harmonics decomposition. At finer crustal scale, the presence of anisotropy is related to the

  18. Analysis of the emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets of Europe and North America for phase 2 of the AQMEII project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliot, George; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Kuenen, Jeroen; Zhang, Junhua; Moran, Michael D.; Makar, Paul A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper highlights the development of the emission inventories and emission processing for Europe (EU) and North America (NA) in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project. The main purpose of the second phase of the AQMEII project is to understand the importance of coupled meteorological-chemical models in our understanding of the feedback of chemistry on the meteorology. A second purpose of the second phase of the AQMEII project is to explore the differences between EU and NA in a dynamic evaluation of two modeling years (2006 and 2010). The first phase of AQMEII also considered the modeling year 2006. Comparing the two AQMEII phases, for the EU domain, there were substantial decreases in CO (-19%), NH3 (-11%), and SO2 (-12%) emissions between the phase 2 and phase 1 emissions used for 2006. For the NA domain, there were decreases in CO (-10%), non-methane hydrocarbons (-5%), PM2.5 (-8%), PM10 (-18%), SO2 (-12%), with an increase of 4% in NOx. For the 2010 modeling year, 2009 emissions were used as a proxy for 2010 emissions in the EU domain. Between 2006 and 2009, considerable emission reductions were achieved for 17 EU countries, Norway and Switzerland as well as EU-Non-Member States, for all emitted species aside from NH3, which remained almost stable. Non-EU countries showed little change in emissions levels, though this may be a result of poor data quality. Shipping emissions decreased for PM and SO2 due to Sulfur Emission Control Areas on the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, while increasing for other species. Overall for the EU domain between 2006 and 2009, estimated NOx emissions decreased by 10%, SO2 by 18%, CO by 12%, PM2.5 by 5%, PM10 by 6%, NMVOC by 11%, and NH3 by 1%. Between the 2006 and 2010 modeling years, estimated US NOx emissions decreased by 17%, SO2 by 29%, CO by 21%, PM2.5 by 12%, PM10 by 7%, NMHC by 4% and NH3 by 2% while Canadian and Mexican emissions were assumed to remain constant

  19. Quality assessment of expert answers to lay questions about cystic fibrosis from various language zones in Europe: the ECORN-CF project.

    PubMed

    d'Alquen, Daniela; De Boeck, Kris; Bradley, Judy; Vávrová, Věra; Dembski, Birgit; Wagner, Thomas O F; Pfalz, Annette; Hebestreit, Helge

    2012-02-06

    The European Centres of Reference Network for Cystic Fibrosis (ECORN-CF) established an Internet forum which provides the opportunity for CF patients and other interested people to ask experts questions about CF in their mother language. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a detailed quality assessment tool to analyze quality of expert answers, 2) evaluate the intra- and inter-rater agreement of this tool, and 3) explore changes in the quality of expert answers over the time frame of the project. The quality assessment tool was developed by an expert panel. Five experts within the ECORN-CF project used the quality assessment tool to analyze the quality of 108 expert answers published on ECORN-CF from six language zones. 25 expert answers were scored at two time points, one year apart. Quality of answers was also assessed at an early and later period of the project. Individual rater scores and group mean scores were analyzed for each expert answer. A scoring system and training manual were developed analyzing two quality categories of answers: content and formal quality. For content quality, the grades based on group mean scores for all raters showed substantial agreement between two time points, however this was not the case for the grades based on individual rater scores. For formal quality the grades based on group mean scores showed only slight agreement between two time points and there was also poor agreement between time points for the individual grades. The inter-rater agreement for content quality was fair (mean kappa value 0.232 ± 0.036, p < 0.001) while only slight agreement was observed for the grades of the formal quality (mean kappa value 0.105 ± 0.024, p < 0.001). The quality of expert answers was rated high (four language zones) or satisfactory (two language zones) and did not change over time. The quality assessment tool described in this study was feasible and reliable when content quality was assessed by a group of raters. Within

  20. Europe Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Gilbert T.

    1993-01-01

    A recent succession of landmark events have rendered world history textbooks out of date. Educators need to answer students' questions about the changes of the past few years and provide some context as to the causes of change. Lists a number of selected resources for information on eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. (MLF)

  1. Europe plans quantum technology flagship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission (EC) looks set to fund a €1bn flagship programme in quantum technologies starting in 2018. Similar to the EC's 10-year €1bn graphene flagship that began in 2013, the project was initiated by a group of researchers from across Europe in a “quantum manifesto” that was published in March and presented at the Quantum Europe 2016 conference in Amsterdam last month.

  2. Theoretical calculation of Joule-Thomson coefficient by using third virial coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar Akber; Somuncu, Elif; Askerov, Iskender M.

    2017-02-01

    The Joule-Thomson coefficient has been theoretical investigated by using third virial coefficient. Established expressions enable us accurate and rapid calculations of Joule-Thomson coefficient. As seen from numerical results the analytical expressions for third virial coefficients are a very useful, giving a very fast method to calculate other thermodynamics properties of gasses. As an example, the calculation results have been successfully tested by using various literature data.

  3. Coherent radar estimates of average high-latitude ionospheric Joule heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kosch, M.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1995-07-01

    The Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) and Sweden and Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE) bistatic coherent radar systems have been employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of the ionospheric Joule heating in the combined geographic latitude range 63.8 deg - 72.6 deg (corrected geomagnetic latitude 61.5 deg - 69.3 deg) over Scandinavia. The 173 days of good observations with all four radars have been analyzed during the period 1982 to 1986 to estimate the average ionospheric electric field versus time and latitude. The AE dependent empirical model of ionospheric Pedersen conductivity of Spiro et al. (1982) has been used to calculate the Joule heating. The latitudinal and diurnal variation of Joule heating as well as the estimated mean hemispherical heating of 1.7 x 10(exp 11) W are in good agreement with earlier results. Average Joule heating was found to vary linearly with the AE, AU, and AL indices and as a second-order power law with Kp. The average Joule heating was also examined as a function of the direction and magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field. It has been shown for the first time that the ionospheric electric field magnitude as well as the Joule heating increase with increasingly negative (southward) Bz.

  4. Analysis of two-stage Joule-Thomson expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    To cool far infrared detectors for infrared observation or superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for atmospheric observation, 1 K-class and 4 K-class coolers have been developed. These coolers consist of a two-stage Stirling cooler for pre-cooling and a Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler with a single JT valve. This paper presents descriptions of theoretical analyses based on enthalpy balance to elucidate the benefits of a two-stage JT valve type compared with those of a single JT valve type in a JT cooler. First, relational expressions for heat balance analysis of enthalpy for single-stage JT expansion are introduced. Then similar relational expressions for two-stage JT expansion are introduced under some assumptions. Results of heat balance analyses using several parameters demonstrated that, using two-stage JT expansion, the cooling capacity for a 1 K-class cooler is improved by 100%; that of a 4 K-class cooler is improved by about 30%.

  5. Toward reversing Joule heating with a phonon-absorbing heterobarrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungha; Kaviany, Massoud

    2015-02-01

    Using a graded heterobarrier placed along an electron channel, phonons emitted in Joule heating are recycled in situ by increasing the entropy of phonon-absorbing electrons. The asymmetric electric potential distribution created by alloy grading separates the phonon absorption and emission regions, and emission in the larger effective-mass region causes momentum relaxation with smaller electron kinetic energy loss. These lead to smaller overall phonon emission and simultaneous potential-gain and self-cooling effects. Larger potential is gained with lower current and higher optical-phonon temperature. The self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations complying with the lateral momentum conservation combined with the entropy analysis are applied to a GaAs:Al electron channel with a graded heterobarrier, and under ideal lateral thermal isolation from surroundings, the phonon recycling efficiency reaches 25% of the reversible limit at 350 K, and it increases with temperature. The lateral momentum contributes to the transmission across the barrier, so partially nonconserving lateral momentum electron scattering (rough interface) can improve efficiency.

  6. Characterization of a thermoelectric/Joule-Thomson hybrid microcooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H. S.; Vanapalli, S.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Micromachined Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers are attractive for cooling small electronic devices. However, microcoolers operated with pure gases, such as nitrogen gas require high pressures of about 9 MPa to achieve reasonable cooling powers. Such high pressures severely add complexity to the development of compressors. To overcome this disadvantage, we combined a JT microcooler with a thermoelectric (TE) pre-cooler to deliver an equivalent cooling power with a lower pressure or, alternatively, a higher cooling power when operating with the same pressure. This hybrid microcooler was operated with nitrogen gas as the working fluid at a low pressure of 0.6 MPa. The cooling power of the microcooler at 101 K operating with a fixed high pressure of 8.8 MPa increased from 21 to 60 mW when the precooling temperature was reduced by the thermoelectric cooler from 295 to 250 K. These tests were simulated using a dynamic numerical model and the accuracy of the model was verified through the comparison between experimental and simulation results. Based on the model, we found the high pressure of the microcooler can be reduced from 8.8 to 5.5 MPa by lowering the precooling temperature from 295 to 250 K. Moreover, the effect of TE cooler position on the performance of the hybrid microcooler was evaluated through simulation analysis.

  7. Joule Heating Resistance Can Differ from Ohmic Resistance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    1998-03-01

    For slow, steady discharge of a voltaic cell with more than one active charge-carrier, the cell's Joule heating resistance RJ differs from its Ohmic resistance R. Here RJ is determined by volume integration over the local rate of heating, J_1^2/σ1 + J_2^2/σ2 +dots (J1 is the part of the electric current due to carrier #1, σ1 is its conductivity). RJ involves only the current-carrying ions, whereas R=Δ V/I involves all of the ions because all ions contribute to the electric field and voltage Δ V across the cell. We explicitly study a well-charged lead-acid cell(W.M.Saslow, Phys.Rev.Lett. 76), 4849 (1996) and a Zn-Cu cell.(See Sect.8.1 of manuscript at http://physics.tamu.edu/ )saslow R/RJ can be greater than or less than unity.

  8. Miniature Piezoelectric Compressor for Joule-Thomson Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Sergey; Tzabar, Nir; Grossman, Gershon

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers operate with a continuous flow of the working fluid that enters the cooler at a high pressure and leaves it at a lower pressure. Ideally, the temperature of the outgoing fluid equals the temperature of the entering fluid. JT cryocoolers that operate with pure refrigerants require high pressure of a few tens of MPa where the low pressure is usually around 0.1 MPa. Circulation of the working fluid in such cases requires high pressure ratio compressors that evidently have large dimensions. JT cryocoolers can operate with much lower pressure ratios by using mixed-refrigerants. Cooling from 300 K to about 80 K in a single stage cryocooler normally requires a pressure ratio of about 1:25. In the present research a miniature compressor driven by piezoelectric elements is developed in collaboration between Rafael and the Technion. This type of compressor has the advantage of improved long life compared to other mechanical compressors, very low vibrations, and silent operation. In the current case, the design goal of the intake and discharge pressures has been 0.1 and 2.5 MPa, respectively, with a flow rate of 0.06 g/s. The compressor has two compression stages; 1:5 and 5:25. Several configurations have been considered, fabricated, and tested. The performance of the last configuration approaches the desired specification and is presented in the current paper together with the design concept.

  9. Improving Control in a Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, James; Pearson, David; Prina, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a modified design of a Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigerator under development to be incorporated into scientific instrumentation aboard a spacecraft. In most other JT refrigerators (including common household refrigerators), the temperature of the evaporator (the cold stage) is kept within a desired narrow range by turning a compressor on and off as needed. This mode of control is inadequate for the present refrigerator because a JT-refrigerator compressor performs poorly when the flow from its evaporator varies substantially, and this refrigerator is required to maintain adequate cooling power. The proposed design modifications include changes in the arrangement of heat exchangers, addition of a clamp that would afford a controlled heat leak from a warmer to a cooler stage to smooth out temperature fluctuations in the cooler stage, and incorporation of a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control system that would regulate the heat leak to maintain the temperature of the evaporator within a desired narrow range while keeping the amount of liquid in the evaporator within a very narrow range in order to optimize the performance of the compressor. Novelty lies in combining the temperature- and cooling-power-regulating controls into a single control system.

  10. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  11. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  12. Assessment of ionospheric Joule heating by GUMICS-4 MHD simulation, AMIE, and satellite-based statistics: towards a synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, M.; Janhunen, P.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Aksnes, A.; Lu, G.; Østgaard, N.; Watermann, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Germany, G. A.

    2005-09-01

    We investigate the Northern Hemisphere Joule heating from several observational and computational sources with the purpose of calibrating a previously identified functional dependence between solar wind parameters and ionospheric total energy consumption computed from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation (Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation, GUMICS-4). In this paper, the calibration focuses on determining the amount and temporal characteristics of Northern Hemisphere Joule heating. Joule heating during a substorm is estimated from global observations, including electric fields provided by Super Dual Auroral Network (SuperDARN) and Pedersen conductances given by the ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray imagers on board the Polar satellite. Furthermore, Joule heating is assessed from several activity index proxies, large statistical surveys, assimilative data methods (AMIE), and the global MHD simulation GUMICS-4. We show that the temporal and spatial variation of the Joule heating computed from the GUMICS-4 simulation is consistent with observational and statistical methods. However, the different observational methods do not give a consistent estimate for the magnitude of the global Joule heating. We suggest that multiplying the GUMICS-4 total Joule heating by a factor of 10 approximates the observed Joule heating reasonably well. The lesser amount of Joule heating in GUMICS-4 is essentially caused by weaker Region 2 currents and polar cap potentials. We also show by theoretical arguments that multiplying independent measurements of averaged electric fields and Pedersen conductances yields an overestimation of Joule heating. Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Modeling and forecasting; Electric fields and currents)

  13. Drilling and completion of the three CO2SINK boreholes in Europe's pilot CO2 storage and verification project in an onshore saline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevedel, P.,; Wohlgemuth, L.; Legarth, B.; Henninges, J.; Schütt, H.; Schmidt-Hattenberger, C.; Norden, B.; Förster, A.; Hurter, S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper reports the CO2SINK drilling and permanent monitoring completions, as well as the well testing techniques applied in Europe's first scientific carbon dioxide onshore storage test in a saline aquifer near the town of Ketzin, 40 km east of Berlin/Germany. Three boreholes, one injection and two observation wells have been drilled in 2007 to a total depth of about 800 m. The wells were completed as "smart" wells containing a variety of permanently installed down-hole sensors, which have successfully proven their functionality during over their first injection year and are the key instruments for the continuous monitoring of the CO2 inside the reservoir during the storage phase. Constructing three wells in close proximity of 50 to 100m distance to each other with a dense sensor and monitoring cable population requires detailed planning and employment of high-end project management tools. All wells were cased with stainless final casings equipped with pre-perforated sand filters in the pay-zone and wired on the outside with two fibre-optical, one multi-conductor copper, and a PU-heating cable to the surface. The reservoir casing section is externally coated with a fibre-glass-resin wrap for electrical insulation of the 15 geo-electrical toroid antennas in the open hole section. A staged cementation program was selected in combination with the application of a newly developed swellable rubber packer technology and specialized cementation down-hole tools. This technology was given preference over perforation work inside the final casing at the reservoir face, which would have created unmanageable risks of potential damage of the outside casing cables. Prior to the start of the injection phase, an extensive production and injection well test program as well as well-to-well interference tests were performed in order to determine the optimum CO2 injection regime.

  14. Strategies for Reforming Initial Vocational Education and Training in Europe. Final Report of the Project. Leonardo da Vinci/Transnational Pilot Projects: Multiplier Effect, Strand III.3.a. Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking (1997-2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Marja-Leena, Ed.; Lasonen, Johanna, Ed.

    This document contains 24 papers examining strategies for reforming initial vocational education and training (VET) in Europe. The following papers are included: "Reassessing VET Reform Strategies in a New Context: Implementation of the SPES-NET (Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking) Project"…

  15. Postglacial hillslope development in paraglacial tributary catchments (ESF-NFR SedyMONT-Norway Project, SedyMONT, Topo-Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.; Hansen, Louise; Vatne, Geir

    2010-05-01

    Topography and landforms of different spatial scales are generated by different operating processes and are characterized by different variables, evolved over different time periods. Changes in climate affect Earth surface systems and shapes Earth surface processes around the world and seem to have major impacts on sediment dynamics, especially in cold climate environments. Understanding climate and landform development from a Holocene to contemporary time perspective can contribute to document change of the Earth surface systems as well as to detect responsible processes for climatic and topographic change. Analyzing postglacial hillslope development and studying sediment transport within two small deglaciated, subarctic valley systems in Western Norway will improve the understanding of the complex response of mountain landscape formation. The innovative approach of this PhD research project is the combination of knowledge on Holocene process rates with data on subrecent to contemporary sedimentary fluxes, -budgets and process rates using different advanced methods and techniques. The PhD project is part of the NFR funded SedyMONT-Norway Project within the ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) Programme. Research is carried out within the Erdalen and Bødalen catchments of the Nordfjord valley-fjord system (inner Nordfjord, Western Norway). Both valleys can be described as steep U-shaped and glacier-fed tributary valleys. The runoff regime is complex with a high variability of discharge over the year. Instrumentation in both catchments includes an automatic weather station as well as five stationary stations for continuous and year-round monitoring of runoff, fluvial suspended sediment and solute transport. The main aims of the PhD project are to analyse (i) the spatial distribution of hillslopes, their contemporary structure, controls and current process rates, (ii) the

  16. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.D.

    1985-06-15

    The electric-field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating time scales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic-field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions on the acceleration process. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined. The major conclusions are: (1) The simple electric-field acceleration of electrons is found, in agreement with Spicer, to be incapable of producing a large enough electron flux to explain the bulk of the observed hard X-ray emission from solar flares as nonthermal bremsstrahlung. For the bulk of the X-ray emission to be nonthermal, at least 10/sup 4/ oppositely directed current channels are required, or an acceleration mechanism that does not result in a net current in the acceleration region is required. (2) lf the bulk of the X-ray emission is thermal, a single current sheet can yield the required heating and acceleration time scales and the required electron energies for the microwave emission. This is accomplished with an electric field that is much smaller than the Dreicer field (E/sub D//Eroughly-equal10--50). (3) The rise time of the nonthermal emission is determined by the time needed to generate the required number of runaway electrons rather than by the time needed to accelerate the electrons to the required energies, which is generally a much shorter time scale. (4) The acceleration of enough electrons to produce a microwave flare requires the resupply of electrons to both the current sheet and the runaway region of velocity space.

  17. Destabilization of a liquid metal by nonuniform Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaudière de Vaux, Sébastien; Zamansky, Rémi; Bergez, Wladimir; Tordjeman, Philippe; Haquet, Jean-François

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of an impressing AC magnetic field at the bottom of a liquid metal layer of thickness h . In this situation the fluid is set in motion by the buoyancy forces caused by internal heat sources. The heat sources, caused by the Joule effect induced by the AC field, present an exponentially decaying profile, with characteristic length δ . As the magnetic field is horizontal, the Lorentz force has no influence on the dynamics of the system since it contributes only to the magnetic pressure. We propose an analysis of both the transient and fully developed regimes using linear stability analysis (LSA) and direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The transient period is governed by the temporal evolution of the temperature field as well as the development of the convective instability, which can be concomitant and therefore requires adopting a transient LSA algorithm to track these two effects. The DNSs have been performed for various distributions of the heat sources and various total heat input. This corresponds to independently varying δ /h in the range 0.04 ≤δ /h ≤0.45 and a Rayleigh number 1.1 ×104≤Ra≤1.2 ×105 . We observe the relaxation of the temperature up to the steady conductive profile before the transition to the nonlinear regime when Ra is small, whereas for larger Ra, nonlinear effects appear during the relaxation of the temperature profile. The unsteadiness of the temperature field significantly alters the development of the instability because of a much smaller growth rate. Surprisingly, we observe that δ /h has only a limited influence on averaged quantities as well as on the patterns for both the linear and nonlinear regimes. This comes with the fact that the profiles present an apparent reflectional symmetry, despite the asymmetry of the governing equations.

  18. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Lekki, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center indicate that Joule-Thomson devices become clogged when transferring liquid hydrogen (LH2), operating at a temperature range from 20.5 to 24.4 K. Blockage does not exist under all test conditions but is found to be sensitive to the inlet temperature of the LH2. At a subcooled inlet temperature of 20.5 K blockage consistently appears but is dissipated when the fluid temperature is raised above 24.5 K. Clogging steadily reduced flow rate through the orifices, eventually resulting in complete blockage. This tendency poses a threat to spacecraft cryogenic propulsion systems that would utilize passive thermal control systems. We propose that this clogging is due to trace amounts of neon in the regular LH2 supply. Neon freezes at 24.5 K at one atmosphere pressure. It is postulated that between 20.5 and 24.5 K, neon remains in a meta-stable, supercooled liquid state. When impacting the face of an orifice, liquid neon droplets solidify and accumulate, blocking flow over time. The purpose of this test program was to definitively quantify the phenomena experimentally by obtaining direct visual evidence of orifice clogging by accretion from neon contaminates in the LH2 flow stream, utilizing state of the art imaging technology. Tests were conducted with LH2 flowing in the temperature range of 20.5 to 24.4 K. Additional imaging was also done at LH2 temperatures with no flow to verify clear view through the orifice.

  19. Aeronautical Wind Tunnels, Europe and Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    AERONAUTICAL WIND TUNNELS EUROPE AND ASIA Researchers: Katarina David Jenele Gorham Sarah Kim Patrick Miller... Wind Tunnels Europe and Asia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...18 Library of Congress – Federal Research Division Aeronautical Wind Tunnels Europe and Asia PREFACE 1 This catalog is a compilation of data on

  20. Gender-related differences in the multi-pathway effect of social determinants on quality of life in older age-the COURAGE in Europe project.

    PubMed

    Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Galas, Aleksander; Zawisza, Katarzyna; Chatterji, Somnath; Haro, Josep Maria; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Koskinen, Seppo; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-07-01

    Gender-related differences in life expectancy, prevalence of chronic conditions and level of disability in the process of ageing have been broadly described. Less is known about social determinants, which may have different impacts on quality of life in men and women. The investigation aims to reveal gender-related differences in social determinants on quality of life assessed by a multi-pathway model including health, social, demographic and living place characteristics. The study group consisted of 5099 participants aged 50+ representing general populations of three different European regions (Finland, Poland, Spain) who participated in COURAGE in EUROPE Project. Standardized tools were used to measure quality of life (WHOQOL-AGE) and social determinants (COURAGE Social Network Index, OSLO-3 Social Support Scale, UCLA Loneliness Scale, participation scale and trust). A multipath model considering exogenous predictors (demographic, economic), mediators (social) and endogenous outcome (QOL) was created to reveal the role of determinants. Gender-related differences were investigated across three age categories: 50-64; 65-79 and 80+. The model (RMSEA = 0.058; CFI = 0.939) showed the effects of all of the investigated determinants. Gender-related differences in the association between social constructs and QOL were observed for social networks in the group of 80+, for social support in the group of 50-64 and 65-79 years, and for social participation in the group of 65-79 years. Males benefited more (in QOL) from social networks and social support, and women from social participation. The research provides valuable knowledge about the role of social determinants in QOL considering complex relations between different social constructs. Additionally, the results showed gender-related differences in the associations between social networks, social support, social participation and QOL, suggesting that men might benefit more from the interventions in the first two

  1. Construction of Joule Thomson inversion curves for mixtures using equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, A. S.; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Joule-Thomson effect is at the heart of Joule-Thomson cryocoolers and gas liquefaction cycles. The effective harnessing of this phenomenon necessitates the knowledge of Joule-Thomson coefficient and the inversion curve. When the working fluid is a mixture, (in mix refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler, MRJT) the phase diagrams, equations of state and inversion curves of multi-component systems become important. The lowest temperature attainable by such a cryocooler depends on the inversion characteristics of the mixture used. In this work the construction of differential Joule-Thomson inversion curves of mixtures using Redlich-Kwong, Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations of state is investigated assuming single phase. It is demonstrated that inversion curves constructed for pure fluids can be improved by choosing an appropriate value of acentric factor. Inversion curves are used to predict maximum inversion temperatures of multicomponent systems. An application where this information is critical is a two-stage J-T cryocooler using a mixture as the working fluid, especially for the second stage. The pre-cooling temperature that the first stage is required to generate depends on the maximum inversion temperature of the second stage working fluid.

  2. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  3. Role of Joule heating on the free convection process in a batch electrophoretic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse Fuenzalida, Maria Angelica

    1998-12-01

    The problem of the effect of Joule heating generation on the hydrodynamic profiles and on solute transport found in electrophoretic devices has been studied in this thesis. The research has been focused on the following two problems: The first one is centered around the effect of the Joule heating on the hydrodynamic velocity profile only, and it is referred to as 'The Carrier Fluid Problem'. The other problem is related to the effect of the Joule heating on the solute transport inside electrophoretic cells, and it has been referred to as 'The Solute Problem'. The two problems identified above are sequentially coupled and, therefore, the carrier fluid problem was investigated first to yield the velocity profiles required in the analysis of the solute transport problem. The carrier fluid problem has been studied for both the Newtonian and the non-Newtonian fluids. To this end, the power-law model was used to study the effect of the rheology of the material in conjunction with the effect of Joule heating generation inside batch electrophoretic devices. The velocity profiles obtained in this study are all analytical results for both cases. This aspect of the research is then effectively used to study the effect of the Joule heating generation on the motion of solutes (such as macromolecules) under the influence of both type of carriers, mainly the Newtonian and the non Newtonian fluids described above. The study was performed by using an area-averaging approach that yielded analytical results for the effective diffusivity of the device.

  4. Effects of environmental temperature on performance of the Joule-Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; Kim, Hyobong; Park, Seong-Je

    2012-06-01

    Miniature Joule-Thomson refrigerators have been widely used for rapid cooling of infrared detectors, probes of cryosurgery, thermal cameras, missile homing head and guidance system, due to their special features of simple configuration, compact structure and rapid cool-down characteristics. Typical performance factors of the Joule-Thomson refrigerator are cool-down time, temperature of the cold end, running time and gas consumption. Those depend on operating conditions such as the pressure of the gas, thermal environment and etc.. In this study, experimental study of a miniature Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the gas pressure up to 12 MPa were performed to investigate the effects of the thermal environment (-40 ~ 50 °C). In experiments, to obtain the information of cool-down time, gas consumption and etc., the temperature of the cold end, mass flow rate and pressure of the argon gas are simultaneously measured. The Joule-Thomson refrigerator in cold thermal environment has rapid cool-down characteristics and small gas consumption. In the cold environmental condition, the Joule-Thomson refrigerator has high mass flow rate during cool-down process and in steady state.

  5. Joule Heating as a Signature of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    Since its first proposal by Birkeland in the early 1900s, the link between magnetosphere and ionosphere (M-I) has been immensely studied but there are still great variety of unsolved problems ranging from how to correctly balance the field aligned current (FAC) closure in the ionosphere to the resulting interactions between ions and neutrals in the ionosphere, and how the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind control the M-I feedback to the mapping of the ionospheric regions to the magnetotail. It is now well known that during magnetically disturbed periods, the energy deposited to the magnetosphere by the solar wind is partitioned mainly between three domains: the ring current, ionosphere (via auroral particle precipitation and Joule heating) and the plasmoid release in the magnetotail. It is previously found that large part of this transferred energy is in the form of Joule heating which is the increase in ion-neutral collisions due to the increased energy input. However, Joule heating is also affected by the enhanced neutral wind motion during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Thus, it is one of the key manifestations of the M-I-T coupling. In this talk, we first give a through review of the present studies and recent advancements in the M-I-T research area then show the link between the magnetosphere and ionosphere by investigating the activity-time Joule heating variations as well as paying special attention to the neutral wind effects on Joule heating.

  6. Analytical and numerical study of Joule heating effects on electrokinetically pumped continuous flow PCR chips.

    PubMed

    Gui, Lin; Ren, Carolyn L

    2008-03-18

    Joule heating is an inevitable phenomenon for microfluidic chips involving electrokinetic pumping, and it becomes a more important issue when chips are made of polymeric materials because of their low thermal conductivities. Therefore, it is very important to develop methods for evaluating Joule heating effects in microfluidic chips in a relatively easy manner. To this end, two analytical models have been established and solved using the Green's function for evaluating Joule heating effects on the temperature distribution in a microfluidic-based PCR chip. The first simplified model focuses on the understanding of Joule heating effects by ignoring the influences of the boundary conditions. The second model aims to consider practical experimental conditions. The analytical solutions to the two models are particularly useful in providing guidance for microfluidic chip design and operation prior to expensive chip fabrication and characterization. To validate the analytical solutions, a 3-D numerical model has also been developed and the simultaneous solution to this model allows the temperature distribution in a microfluidic PCR chip to be obtained, which is used to compare with the analytical results. The developed numerical model has been applied for parametric studies of Joule heating effects on the temperature control of microfluidic chips.

  7. Influence of moderate Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, retention, and efficiency in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guofang; Tallarek, Ulrich; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Zhang, Yukui

    2004-07-30

    The influence of Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention factor of neutral analytes, and separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A plot of electrical current against the applied electrical field strength was used to evaluate the Joule heating effect. When the mobile phase concentration of Tris buffer exceeded 5.0 mM in the studied capillary electrochromatography systems using particulate and monolithic columns (with an accompanying power level of heat dissipation higher than 0.35 W/m), the Joule heating effect became clearly noticeable. Theoretical models for describing the variation of electroosmotic flow velocity with increasing applied field strength and the change of retention factors for neutral analytes with electrical field strength at higher Tris buffer concentrations were analyzed to explain consequences of Joule heating in capillary electrochromatography. Qualitative agreement between experimental data and implications of the theoretical model analysis was observed. The decrease of separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography with macroporous octadecylsilica particles at high buffer concentration can be also attributed to Joule heating mainly via the increased axial diffusion of the analyte molecules and dispersion of solute bands by a nonuniform electroosmotic flow profile over the column cross-section. However, within a moderate temperature range, the contribution of the macroscopic velocity profile in the column arising from radial temperature gradients is insignificant.

  8. Numerical modeling of the Joule heating effect on electrokinetic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Da; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-05-01

    In electrokinetically driven microfluidic systems, the driving voltage applied during operation tends to induce a Joule heating effect in the buffer solution. This heat source alters the solution's characteristics and changes both the electrical potential field and the velocity field during the transport process. This study performs a series of numerical simulations to investigate the Joule heating effect and analyzes its influence on the electrokinetic focusing performance. The results indicate that the Joule heating effect causes the diffusion coefficient of the sample to increase, the potential distribution to change, and the flow velocity field to adopt a nonuniform profile. These variations are particularly pronounced under tighter focusing conditions and at higher applied electrical intensities. In numerical investigations, it is found that the focused bandwidth broadens because thermal diffusion effect is enhanced by Joule heating. The variation in the potential distribution induces a nonuniform flow field and causes the focused bandwidth to tighten and broaden alternately as a result of the convex and concave velocity flow profiles, respectively. The present results confirm that the Joule heating effect exerts a considerable influence on the electrokinetic focusing ratio.

  9. Statistical thermodynamics of aerosols and the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Robert A.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    1984-04-01

    Due to the adsorption of a gas by a solid, it is expected that an aerosol created by dispersing a fine powder in a gas would have unique thermodynamic properties not found in pure or mixed gases. The virial equation of state associated with an aerosol dusty gas is obtained from statistical thermodynamic considerations. In the theoretical model presented here, the aerosol is considered to be a two component fluid made up of solid particles and gas molecules. The aerosol virial equation of state is used to derive an expression for the Joule-Thomson effect associated with a gas-solid dispersion. The magnitude of the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect is expressed in terms of gas and gas-solid virial coefficients. Previous adsorption data for an argon-porous carbon system is used to obtain gas-solid virial coefficients and to predict the magnitude of the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect. A significant enhancement of the Joule-Thomson effect is predicted for gas-solid systems which display a strong interaction. For example, at a temperature of 300 K an argon-Saran 746 porous carbon aerosol system at a concentration of (0.4 g of powder/l of gas) is predicted to have a gas-solid Joule-Thomson coefficient of 3.6 K/atm which is ten times greater than the effect for pure argon.

  10. Estimation of Joule heating effect on temperature and pressure distribution in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Chein, Reiyu; Yang, Yeong Chin; Lin, Yushan

    2006-02-01

    In this study we present simple analytical models that predict the temperature and pressure variations in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flow under the Joule heating effect. For temperature prediction, a simple model shows that the temperature is related to the Joule heating parameter, autothermal Joule heating parameter, external cooling parameter, Peclet number, and the channel length to channel hydraulic diameter ratio. The simple model overpredicted the thermally developed temperature compared with the full numerical simulation, but in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The factors that affect the external cooling parameters, such as the heat transfer coefficient, channel configuration, and channel material are also examined based on this simple model. Based on the mass conservation, a simple model is developed that predicts the pressure variations, including the temperature effect. An adverse pressure gradient is required to satisfy the mass conservation requirement. The temperature effect on the pressure gradient is via the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and electroosmotic velocity.

  11. Decoupling electrocaloric effect from Joule heating in a solid state cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, M.; Ghivelder, L.; Gomez-Marlasca, F.; Parisi, F.

    2011-12-01

    We report a heat dynamics analysis of the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in commercial multilayer capacitors based on BaTiO3 dielectric, a promising candidate for applications as a solid state cooling device. Direct measurements of the time evolution of the sample's temperature changes under different applied voltages allow us to decouple the contributions from Joule heating and from the ECE. Heat balance equations were used to model the thermal coupling between different parts of the system. Fingerprints of Joule heating and the ECE could be resolved at different time scales. We argue that Joule heating and the thermal coupling of the device to the environment must be carefully taken in to account in future developments of refrigeration technologies employing the ECE.

  12. Remote joule heating assisted carrier transport in MWCNTs probed at nanosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek; Shrivastava, Mayank

    2016-10-19

    Quantum model of joule heating relies on electron-phonon scattering in the high field region (hot side contact), which locally increases phonon population and forms hot spots. Hot spots in the high field region are known to suffer carrier transport. In this work, for the first time we report remote joule heating of the cold side contact, i.e. zero electric field region, through multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), which is discovered to assist in carrier transport through the MWCNT channels. To precisely capture the dynamics of remote joule heating assisted carrier transport, MWCNTs are probed at nanosecond time scales. This leverages investigations at time scales comparable to characteristic thermal diffusion times and allows electron-phonon interactions and the nature of carrier transport to be probed under non-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Controlled Formation of Zigzag and Armchair Edges in Graphene Nanoribbons by Joule Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Meunier, Vincent; Romo Herrera, Jose M; Jia, Xiaoting; Hofmann, Mario; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Reina, Alfonso; Kong, Jing; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Son, Hyungbin

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate and monitor an efficient edge reconstruction process, at the atomic scale, for graphite nanoribbons by Joule heating inside an integrated transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling stage STM (TEM-STM system). During Joule annealing, sharp edges and step-edge arrays are formed, mostly with either zigzag or armchair edge configurations. Their formation is driven by both thermal and electric field related mechanisms. Model calculations show that the dominant annealing mechanisms involve point defect annealing and edge reconstruction. Joule heating is thus shown to provide an effective way to produce clean zigzag and armchair edges, which could be useful for both fundamental studies of edge reactivity, magnetism, and could provide a route for increasing carrier mobility and for the development of future electronics applications.

  14. Strongly coupled radiative transfer and Joule heating in the cathode of an arc heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgapal, P.; Palmer, Grant E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation and Joule heating in the electrode region of an arc heater are discussed. Radiative transport equations for a true axisymmetric geometry are used. A subsonic code is developed to numerically solve the fluid equations with strongly coupled radiation and Joule heating representative of a high pressure and high current arc heater. Analytic expression for the divergence of radiative heat flux derived previously is used. Jacobians of the radiation term are derived. The Joule heating term is computed using a previously developed code. The equilibrium gas model consists of seven species. The fluxes are differenced using Van Leer flux splitting. Using this code, the effects of radiative cooling on the thermodynamic parameters of the arc core are discussed.

  15. Measuring Joule heating and strain induced by electrical current with Moire interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bicheng; Basaran, Cemal

    2011-04-01

    This study proposes a new method to locate and measure the temperature of the hot spots caused by Joule Heating by measuring the free thermal expansion in-plane strain. It is demonstrated that the hotspot caused by the Joule heating in a thin metal film/plate structure can be measured by Phase shifting Moire interferometry with continuous wavelet transform (PSMI/CWT) at the microscopic scale. A demonstration on a copper film is conducted to verify the theory under different current densities. A correlation between the current density and strain in two orthogonal directions (one in the direction of the current flow) is proposed. The method can also be used for the measurement of the Joule heating in the microscopic solid structures in the electronic packaging devices. It is shown that a linear relationship exists between current density squared and normal strains.

  16. Direct observation of nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Xiong, Feng; Hong, Sungduk; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2013-05-01

    We measure power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM) with ˜50 nm spatial and 0.2 K temperature resolution. The temperature rise in the Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is dominated by Joule heating, but at the GST-TiW contacts it is a combination of Peltier and current crowding effects. Comparison of SJEM and electrical measurements with simulations of the PCM devices uncovers a thermopower of ˜350 μV K-1 and a contact resistance of ˜2.0 × 10-8 Ω m2 (to TiW) for 25 nm thick films of face centered-cubic crystalline GST. Knowledge of such nanometer-scale Joule, Peltier, and current crowding effects is essential for energy-efficient design of future PCM technology.

  17. Manipulation and Joule heat welding of Ag nanowires prepared by atomic migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Fukui, Satoru

    2012-09-01

    Ag nanowires (NWs) with diameters of about 200 nm and length of 2-7 μm are prepared on a substrate by an atomic migration called stress-induced migration and are picked up from the substrate with electrostatic forces. The Ag NWs are then offered for the welding experiment in a scanning electron microscope and successfully welded together using Joule heating introduced into the NWs by supplying the constant direct current. It is discovered that the welding of Ag NWs is achieved under the current supply in a self-completed manner. The conditions for successful Joule heat welding are analyzed by the parameter that governs the melting phenomenon at the nanocontacts of two NWs. From the experiment and the analysis, electromigration, i.e., another type of atomic migration due to higher electron flow, is found to be occurred during the welding and this is considered to enhance the welding performance of two NWs with Joule heat.

  18. Diffusion, Fluxes, Friction Forces, and Joule Heating in Two-Temperature Multicomponent Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between Joule heating, diffusion fluxes, and friction forces has been studied for both total and electron thermal energy equations, using general expressions for multicomponent diffusion in two-temperature plasmas with the velocity dependent Lorentz force acting on charged species in a magnetic field. It is shown that the derivation of Joule heating terms requires both diffusion fluxes and friction between species which represents the resistance experienced by the species moving at different relative velocities. It is also shown that the familiar Joule heating term in the electron thermal energy equation includes artificial effects produced by switching the convective velocity from the species velocity to the mass-weighted velocity, and thus should not be ignored even when there is no net energy dissipation.

  19. Hall and ion slip effects on peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses mixed convective peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with complaint walls. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Hall and ion slip effects are also taken into account. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating, Hall and ion slip parameters are investigated in detail. It is observed that velocity increases and temperature decreases with Hall and ion slip parameters. Further the thermal radiation on temperature has qualitatively similar role to that of Hall and ion slip effects.

  20. Experimental Investigation for 100-Joule-class TEA CO2 Laser and Gas Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhiguo; Yao, Honglin; Wang, Jun; Wen, Ming; Wang, Peng; Yang, Jan; Li, Chong

    2006-05-01

    Impulse coupling coefficient Cm is one of the most important performance parameters in laser propulsion. Cm is the impulse increment of lightcraft that per joule laser beam energy acts on. The TEA CO2 laser, whose single pulse energy is 100-Joule-class and wavelength is 10.6μm, is adopted by experimental research. In experimental environment cabin, the parabolic lightcraft is fixed on impact pendulum. Using Air, N2, He, CO2, N2-He and N2-CO2, different Cm is obtained. Experimental results indicate that Cm of the mixed gas is improved through changing gas component ratio.

  1. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter. PMID:26886919

  2. Selective domain wall depinning by localized Oersted fields and Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgaz, Dennis; Kläui, Mathias; Heyne, Lutz; Boulle, Olivier; Zinser, Fabian; Krzyk, Stephen; Fonin, Mikhail; Rüdiger, Ulrich; Backes, Dirk; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2008-09-01

    Using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, the possibility to selectively move a domain wall locally by applying current pulses through a Au nanowire adjacent to a permalloy element is studied. We find that the domain wall depinning field is drastically modified with increasing current density due to the Joule heating and the Oersted field of the current, and controlled motion due to the Oersted field without any externally applied fields is achieved. By placing the domain wall at various distances from the Au wire, we determine the range of the Joule heating and the Oersted field and both effects can be separated.

  3. Joule heating effects and the experimental determination of temperature during CE.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    Joule heating is ubiquitous in electrokinetic separations. This review is in two major parts. The first part documents the effects of Joule heating on the physical properties of the electrolyte and efficiency of separations and the second part focuses on advances in the determination of electrolyte temperatures that have been described in the literature over the past 5 years. The focus is on methods that can be applied by practitioners without the need for elaborate experimental requirements. Although the emphasis is on CE, many of the conclusions also apply to microfluidic formats.

  4. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter.

  5. Agricultural impacts: Europe's diminishing bread basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Holger

    2014-07-01

    Global demand for wheat is projected to increase significantly with continuing population growth. Currently, Europe reliably produces about 29% of global wheat supply. However, this might be under threat from climate change if adaptive measures are not taken now.

  6. Southern Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On November 3, 2001, MODIS collected this image of Western Europe. Starting at the lower-left corner of the image and moving clockwise are the countries of Spain, France, Germany, Austria, Italy, and Switzerland. The Alps, the crescent-shaped mountain range running from the center to the right side of the image, span a length of 750 miles and cover and area of 80,000 square miles. In this image, a gray cloud of aerosols, predominantly from Italy's northwestern region of Lombardy, are corralled by the massive heights of the Alps. One large source of aerosols is the city of Milan. Home to numerous international and local industrial plants, Milan is faced with many of the same air quality problems as other large metropolitan areas. Also visible in the image is a phytoplankton bloom in the Bay of Biscay (left), at the confluence of the Garonne and Dordogne rivers. The rivers form the Gironde Estuary, which is saturated with sediment that provides necessary nutrients for the phytoplankton. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  7. A Comparison of the USAF Projected A-10 Employment in Europe and the Luftwaffe Schlachtgeschwader Experience on the Eastern Front in World War II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    The invading armies of Charles XII, Napoleon I, Kaiser Wilhem II, and Hitler all shared this common characteristic, so does NATO. Nowhere is the...appears certain that the tank destroying aircraft can add increased effectiveness 35 Wolfe, T., Soviet Power and Europe 1945-1970, p. 201, John Hopkins...Strength Source: Erickson, John , Soviet-Warsaw Pact Force Levels, USSI Rpt 76-2. Suc E SOVIET MOTORIZED RIFLE DIVISION Divisional HQ 9 APCs Motorized

  8. Ionospheric Joule heating and Poynting flux in quasi-static approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanhamäKi, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Amm, O.; Fujii, R.

    2012-08-01

    Energy flow is an important aspect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Electromagnetic energy is transported as Poynting flux from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere, where it is dissipated as Joule heating. Recently Richmond derived an "Equipotential Boundary Poynting Flux (EBPF) theorem", that the Poynting flux within a flux tube whose boundary is an equipotential curve is dissipated inside the ionospheric foot point of the flux tube. In this article we study Richmond's EBPF theorem more closely by considering the curl-free and divergence-free parts as well as the Hall and Pedersen parts of the ionospheric current system separately. Our main findings are that i) divergence-free currents are on average dissipationless, ii) the curl-free Pedersen current is responsible for the whole ionospheric Joule heating and iii) pointwise match between vertical Poynting flux and ionospheric Joule heating is broken by gradients of Hall and Pedersen conductances. Results i) and ii) hold when integrated over the whole ionosphere or any area bounded by an equipotential curve. The present study is limited to quasi-static phenomena. The more general topic of electrodynamic Joule heating and Poynting flux, including inductive effects, will be addressed in a future study.

  9. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  10. Joule-Thomson expansion of the charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ökcü, Özgür; Aydıner, Ekrem

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study Joule-Thomson effects for charged AdS black holes. We obtain inversion temperatures and curves. We investigate similarities and differences between van der Waals fluids and charged AdS black holes for the expansion. We obtain isenthalpic curves for both systems in the T- P plane and determine the cooling-heating regions.

  11. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D.

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  12. Analytical study of Joule heating effects on electrokinetic transportation in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xiangchun; Li, Dongqing

    2005-02-04

    Electric fields are often used to transport fluids (by electroosmosis) and separate charged samples (by electrophoresis) in microfluidic devices. However, there exists inevitable Joule heating when electric currents are passing through electrolyte solutions. Joule heating not only increases the fluid temperature, but also produces temperature gradients in cross-stream and axial directions. These temperature effects make fluid properties non-uniform, and hence alter the applied electric potential field and the flow field. The mass species transport is also influenced. In this paper we develop an analytical model to study Joule heating effects on the transport of heat, electricity, momentum and mass species in capillary-based electrophoresis. Close-form formulae are derived for the temperature, applied electrical potential, velocity, and pressure fields at steady state, and the transient concentration field as well. Also available are the compact formulae for the electric current and the volume flow rate through the capillary. It is shown that, due to the thermal end effect, sharp temperature drops appear close to capillary ends, where sharp rises of electric field are required to meet the current continuity. In order to satisfy the mass continuity, pressure gradients have to be induced along the capillary. The resultant curved fluid velocity profile and the increase of molecular diffusion both contribute to the dispersion of samples. However, Joule heating effects enhance the sample transport velocity, reducing the analysis time in capillary electrophoretic separations.

  13. Investigation of Neutral Wind Effects on the Global Joule Heating Rate Using MHD and TI Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafatoglu, E.; Kaymaz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Precise calculation of global Joule heating rate is a long standing question in thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The absence of the complete and direct, in-situ measurements of the parameters involved in the calculation of Joule heating such as the conductivity of the medium, small-scale variations of electric fields, and neutral winds at the ionospheric heights poses a great uncertainty in its determination. In this work, we study the effects of the neutral wind on the global Joule heating rate. Most of the time, owing to above mentioned difficulties the effects of the neutral wind have been neglected in the calculations. We investigate their effects using BATSRUS MHD model, TIEGCM and GITM. Using horizontal current density, Cowling conductivity, and Pedersen conductivities from the MHD model, we calculate the joule heating rate with and without the neutral wind contribution. We apply the procedure for March 2008 magnetospheric substorm events and quantify the differences to show the neutral wind contribution. We compare the results with those obtained using neutral wind velocities from TIEGCM and GITM models. This way while we compare and demonstrate the discrepancies between the models, we also provide an assessment for the integration of thermospheric and magnetospheric models.

  14. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  15. A closed cycle cascade Joule Thomson refrigerator for cooling Josephson junction magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Sarwinski, R.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cycle cascade Joule Thomson refrigerator designed to cool Josephson Junction magnetometers to liquid helium temperature is being developed. The refrigerator incorporates 4 stages of cooling using the working fluids CF4 and He. The high pressure gases are provided by a small compressor designed for this purpose. The upper stages have been operated and performance will be described.

  16. Discretization of the Joule heating term for plasma discharge fluid models in unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Deconinck, T.; Mahadevan, S.; Raja, L.L.

    2009-07-01

    The fluid (continuum) approach is commonly used for simulation of plasma phenomena in electrical discharges at moderate to high pressures (>10's mTorr). The description comprises governing equations for charged and neutral species transport and energy equations for electrons and the heavy species, coupled to equations for the electromagnetic fields. The coupling of energy from the electrostatic field to the plasma species is modeled by the Joule heating term which appears in the electron and heavy species (ion) energy equations. Proper numerical discretization of this term is necessary for accurate description of discharge energetics; however, discretization of this term poses a special problem in the case of unstructured meshes owing to the arbitrary orientation of the faces enclosing each cell. We propose a method for the numerical discretization of the Joule heating term using a cell-centered finite volume approach on unstructured meshes with closed convex cells. The Joule heating term is computed by evaluating both the electric field and the species flux at the cell center. The dot product of these two vector quantities is computed to obtain the Joule heating source term. We compare two methods to evaluate the species flux at the cell center. One is based on reconstructing the fluxes at the cell centers from the fluxes at the face centers. The other recomputes the flux at the cell center using the common drift-diffusion approximation. The reconstructed flux scheme is the most stable method and yields reasonably accurate results on coarse meshes.

  17. Transfer of gaseous oxygen from high-pressure containers and the Joule-Thomson inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    From the experiments performed in study, it was determined that oxygen transferred at ambient temperature and pressures up to 10,000 psig consistently dropped in temperature. All results therefore indicate that gaseous oxygen transferred at ambient temperature does not exhibit Joule-Thomson inversion below 10,000 psig.

  18. Heat, work and subtle fluids: a commentary on Joule (1850) 'On the mechanical equivalent of heat'.

    PubMed

    Young, John

    2015-04-13

    James Joule played the major role in establishing the conservation of energy, or the first law of thermodynamics, as a universal, all-pervasive principle of physics. He was an experimentalist par excellence and his place in the development of thermodynamics is unarguable. This article discusses Joule's life and scientific work culminating in the 1850 paper, where he presented his detailed measurements of the mechanical equivalent of heat using his famous paddle-wheel apparatus. Joule's long series of experiments in the 1840s leading to his realisation that the conservation of energy was probably of universal validity is discussed in context with the work of other pioneers, notably Sadi Carnot, who effectively formulated the principle of the second law of thermodynamics a quarter of a century before the first law was accepted. The story of Joule's work is a story of an uphill struggle against a critical scientific establishment unwilling to accept the mounting evidence until it was impossible to ignore. His difficulties in attracting funding and publishing in reputable journals despite the quality of his work will resonate with many young scientists and engineers of the present day. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  19. Alcoholic Beverage Preference and Dietary Habits in Elderly across Europe: Analyses within the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) Project

    PubMed Central

    Sluik, Diewertje; Jankovic, Nicole; O’Doherty, Mark G.; Geelen, Anouk; Schöttker, Ben; Rolandsson, Olov; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Ferrieres, Jean; Bamia, Christina; Fransen, Heidi P.; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Eriksson, Sture; Martínez, Begoña; Huerta, José María; Kromhout, Daan; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Boffetta, Paolo; Kee, Frank; Feskens, Edith J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The differential associations of beer, wine, and spirit consumption on cardiovascular risk found in observational studies may be confounded by diet. We described and compared dietary intake and diet quality according to alcoholic beverage preference in European elderly. Methods From the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES), seven European cohorts were included, i.e. four sub-cohorts from EPIC-Elderly, the SENECA Study, the Zutphen Elderly Study, and the Rotterdam Study. Harmonized data of 29,423 elderly participants from 14 European countries were analyzed. Baseline data on consumption of beer, wine, and spirits, and dietary intake were collected with questionnaires. Diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI). Intakes and scores across categories of alcoholic beverage preference (beer, wine, spirit, no preference, non-consumers) were adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, self-reported prevalent diseases, and lifestyle factors. Cohort-specific mean intakes and scores were calculated as well as weighted means combining all cohorts. Results In 5 of 7 cohorts, persons with a wine preference formed the largest group. After multivariate adjustment, persons with a wine preference tended to have a higher HDI score and intake of healthy foods in most cohorts, but differences were small. The weighted estimates of all cohorts combined revealed that non-consumers had the highest fruit and vegetable intake, followed by wine consumers. Non-consumers and persons with no specific preference had a higher HDI score, spirit consumers the lowest. However, overall diet quality as measured by HDI did not differ greatly across alcoholic beverage preference categories. Discussion This study using harmonized data from ~30,000 elderly from 14 European countries showed that, after multivariate adjustment, dietary habits and diet quality did not differ greatly according to alcoholic beverage

  20. Alcoholic Beverage Preference and Dietary Habits in Elderly across Europe: Analyses within the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) Project.

    PubMed

    Sluik, Diewertje; Jankovic, Nicole; O'Doherty, Mark G; Geelen, Anouk; Schöttker, Ben; Rolandsson, Olov; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Ferrieres, Jean; Bamia, Christina; Fransen, Heidi P; Boer, Jolanda M A; Eriksson, Sture; Martínez, Begoña; Huerta, José María; Kromhout, Daan; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Franco, Oscar H; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Boffetta, Paolo; Kee, Frank; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    The differential associations of beer, wine, and spirit consumption on cardiovascular risk found in observational studies may be confounded by diet. We described and compared dietary intake and diet quality according to alcoholic beverage preference in European elderly. From the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES), seven European cohorts were included, i.e. four sub-cohorts from EPIC-Elderly, the SENECA Study, the Zutphen Elderly Study, and the Rotterdam Study. Harmonized data of 29,423 elderly participants from 14 European countries were analyzed. Baseline data on consumption of beer, wine, and spirits, and dietary intake were collected with questionnaires. Diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI). Intakes and scores across categories of alcoholic beverage preference (beer, wine, spirit, no preference, non-consumers) were adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, self-reported prevalent diseases, and lifestyle factors. Cohort-specific mean intakes and scores were calculated as well as weighted means combining all cohorts. In 5 of 7 cohorts, persons with a wine preference formed the largest group. After multivariate adjustment, persons with a wine preference tended to have a higher HDI score and intake of healthy foods in most cohorts, but differences were small. The weighted estimates of all cohorts combined revealed that non-consumers had the highest fruit and vegetable intake, followed by wine consumers. Non-consumers and persons with no specific preference had a higher HDI score, spirit consumers the lowest. However, overall diet quality as measured by HDI did not differ greatly across alcoholic beverage preference categories. This study using harmonized data from ~30,000 elderly from 14 European countries showed that, after multivariate adjustment, dietary habits and diet quality did not differ greatly according to alcoholic beverage preference.

  1. GEM-CEDAR Challenge: Poynting Flux at DMSP and Modeled Joule Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Emery, Barbara; Weimer, Daniel R.; Cosgrove, Russell; Wiltberger, Michael; Raeder, Joachim; Li, Wenhui; Toth, Gabor; Welling, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Poynting flux into the ionosphere measures the electromagnetic energy coming from the magnetosphere. This energy flux can vary greatly between quiet times and geomagnetic active times. As part of the Geospace Environment Modeling-coupling energetics and dynamics of atmospheric regions modeling challenge, physics-based models of the 3-D ionosphere and ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of magnetosphere models that specify Joule heat and empirical models specifying Poynting flux were run for six geomagnetic storm events of varying intensity. We compared model results with Poynting flux values along the DMSP-15 satellite track computed from ion drift meter and magnetic field observations. Although being a different quantity, Joule heat can in practice be correlated to incoming Poynting flux because the energy is dissipated primarily in high latitudes where Poynting flux is being deposited. Within the physics-based model group, we find mixed results with some models overestimating Joule heat and some models agreeing better with observed Poynting flux rates as integrated over auroral passes. In contrast, empirical models tend to underestimate integrated Poynting flux values. Modeled Joule heat or Poynting flux patterns often resemble the observed Poynting flux patterns on a large scale, but amplitudes can differ by a factor of 2 or larger due to the highly localized nature of observed Poynting flux deposition that is not captured by the models. In addition, the positioning of modeled patterns appear to be randomly shifted against the observed Poynting flux energy input. This study is the first to compare Poynting flux and Joule heat in a large variety of models of the ionosphere.

  2. Effect of Joule heating on isoelectric focusing of proteins in a microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kisoo; Shim, Jaesool; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-01-01

    Electric field-driven separation and purification techniques, such as isoelectric focusing (IEF) and isotachophoresis, generate heat in the system that can affect the performance of the separation process. In this study, a new mathematical model is presented for IEF that considers the temperature rise due to Joule heating. We used the model to study focusing phenomena and separation performance in a microchannel. A finite volume-based numerical technique is developed to study temperature-dependent IEF. Numerical simulation for narrow range IEF (6 < pH < 10) is performed in a straight microchannel for 100 ampholytes and two model proteins: staphylococcal nuclease and pancreatic ribonuclease. Separation results of the two proteins are obtained with and without considering the temperature rise due to Joule heating in the system for a nominal electric field of 100 V/cm. For the no Joule heating case, constant properties are used, while for the Joule heating case, temperature-dependent titration curves and thermo-physical properties are used. Our numerical results show that the temperature change due to Joule heating has a significant impact on the final focusing points of proteins, which can lower the separation performance considerably. In the absence of advection and any active cooling mechanism, the temperature increase is the highest at the mid-section of a microchannel. We also found that the maximum temperature in the system is a strong function of the ΔpK  value of the carrier ampholytes. Simulation results are also obtained for different values of applied electric fields in order to find the optimum working range considering the simulation time and buffer temperature. Moreover, the model is extended to study IEF in a straight microchip where pH is formed by supplying H+ and OH−, and the thermal analysis shows that the heat generation is negligible in ion supplied IEF. PMID:25553199

  3. GEM-CEDAR Challenge: Poynting Flux at DMSP and Modeled Joule Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Emery, Barbara; Weimer, Daniel R.; Cosgrove, Russell; hide

    2016-01-01

    Poynting flux into the ionosphere measures the electromagnetic energy coming from the magnetosphere. This energy flux can vary greatly between quiet times and geomagnetic active times. As part of the Geospace Environment Modeling-coupling energetics and dynamics of atmospheric regions modeling challenge, physics-based models of the 3-D ionosphere and ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of magnetosphere models that specify Joule heat and empirical models specifying Poynting flux were run for six geomagnetic storm events of varying intensity. We compared model results with Poynting flux values along the DMSP-15 satellite track computed from ion drift meter and magnetic field observations. Although being a different quantity, Joule heat can in practice be correlated to incoming Poynting flux because the energy is dissipated primarily in high latitudes where Poynting flux is being deposited. Within the physics-based model group, we find mixed results with some models overestimating Joule heat and some models agreeing better with observed Poynting flux rates as integrated over auroral passes. In contrast, empirical models tend to underestimate integrated Poynting flux values. Modeled Joule heat or Poynting flux patterns often resemble the observed Poynting flux patterns on a large scale, but amplitudes can differ by a factor of 2 or larger due to the highly localized nature of observed Poynting flux deposition that is not captured by the models. In addition, the positioning of modeled patterns appear to be randomly shifted against the observed Poynting flux energy input. This study is the first to compare Poynting flux and Joule heat in a large variety of models of the ionosphere.

  4. Effect of Joule heating on isoelectric focusing of proteins in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kisoo; Shim, Jaesool; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    Electric field-driven separation and purification techniques, such as isoelectric focusing (IEF) and isotachophoresis, generate heat in the system that can affect the performance of the separation process. In this study, a new mathematical model is presented for IEF that considers the temperature rise due to Joule heating. We used the model to study focusing phenomena and separation performance in a microchannel. A finite volume-based numerical technique is developed to study temperature-dependent IEF. Numerical simulation for narrow range IEF (6 < pH < 10) is performed in a straight microchannel for 100 ampholytes and two model proteins: staphylococcal nuclease and pancreatic ribonuclease. Separation results of the two proteins are obtained with and without considering the temperature rise due to Joule heating in the system for a nominal electric field of 100 V/cm. For the no Joule heating case, constant properties are used, while for the Joule heating case, temperature-dependent titration curves and thermo-physical properties are used. Our numerical results show that the temperature change due to Joule heating has a significant impact on the final focusing points of proteins, which can lower the separation performance considerably. In the absence of advection and any active cooling mechanism, the temperature increase is the highest at the mid-section of a microchannel. We also found that the maximum temperature in the system is a strong function of the [Formula: see text] value of the carrier ampholytes. Simulation results are also obtained for different values of applied electric fields in order to find the optimum working range considering the simulation time and buffer temperature. Moreover, the model is extended to study IEF in a straight microchip where pH is formed by supplying H(+) and OH(-), and the thermal analysis shows that the heat generation is negligible in ion supplied IEF.

  5. Joule heating hot spot at high latitudes in the afternoon sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    The afternoon Joule heating hot spot has been studied statistically by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) measurements at 75.4° Corrected Geomagnetic latitude (CGMLAT) and the OMNI solar wind data base. For a small subset of events, the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) field-aligned current distributions have been available. The main results are as follows. Afternoon Joule heating hot spots are associated with high values of ionospheric electric fields and slightly enhanced Pedersen conductances. The Joule heating hot spot values are larger in summer than in winter, which can be explained by the higher Pedersen conductances during summer than winter. The afternoon Joule heating hot spots are located close to the reversals of the large-scale field-aligned current systems. The most common location is close to the Region 1/Region 2 boundary and those events are associated with sunward convecting F region plasma. In a few cases, the hot spots take place close to the Region 1/Region 0 boundary and then the ionospheric plasma is convecting antisunward. The hot spots may occur both during slow (<450 km/s) and high (>450 km/s) speed solar wind conditions. During slow-speed solar wind events, the dominant interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction is southward, which is the general requirement for the low-latitude magnetic merging at the dayside magnetopause. During high-speed solar wind, also northward IMF conditions appear, but those are associated with large values of the IMF |By| component, making again the dayside magnetopause merging possible. Finally, the measured afternoon hot spot Joule heating rates are not a linear function of the solar wind energy coupling function.

  6. GEM-CEDAR challenge: Poynting flux at DMSP and modeled Joule heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastätter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Emery, Barbara; Weimer, Daniel R.; Cosgrove, Russell; Wiltberger, Michael; Raeder, Joachim; Li, Wenhui; Tóth, Gábor; Welling, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Poynting flux into the ionosphere measures the electromagnetic energy coming from the magnetosphere. This energy flux can vary greatly between quiet times and geomagnetic active times. As part of the Geospace Environment Modeling-coupling energetics and dynamics of atmospheric regions modeling challenge, physics-based models of the 3-D ionosphere and ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of magnetosphere models that specify Joule heat and empirical models specifying Poynting flux were run for six geomagnetic storm events of varying intensity. We compared model results with Poynting flux values along the DMSP-15 satellite track computed from ion drift meter and magnetic field observations. Although being a different quantity, Joule heat can in practice be correlated to incoming Poynting flux because the energy is dissipated primarily in high latitudes where Poynting flux is being deposited. Within the physics-based model group, we find mixed results with some models overestimating Joule heat and some models agreeing better with observed Poynting flux rates as integrated over auroral passes. In contrast, empirical models tend to underestimate integrated Poynting flux values. Modeled Joule heat or Poynting flux patterns often resemble the observed Poynting flux patterns on a large scale, but amplitudes can differ by a factor of 2 or larger due to the highly localized nature of observed Poynting flux deposition that is not captured by the models. In addition, the positioning of modeled patterns appear to be randomly shifted against the observed Poynting flux energy input. This study is the first to compare Poynting flux and Joule heat in a large variety of models of the ionosphere.

  7. Miniature Joule Thomson (JT) CryoCoolers for Propellant Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapat, Jay; Chow, Louis

    2002-01-01

    A proof-of-concept project is proposed here that would attempt to demonstrate how miniature cryocoolers can be used to chill the vacuum jacket line of a propellant transfer line and thus to achieve transfer line pre-chill, zero boil off and possible propellant densification. The project would be performed both at UCF and KSC, with all of the cryogenic testing taking place in the KSC cryogenic test bed. A LN2 line available in that KSC test facility would serve to simulate a LOX transfer line. Under this project, miniature and highly efficient cold heads would be designed. Two identical cold heads will be fabricated and then integrated with a JT-type cryogenic system (consisting of a common compressor and a common external heat exchanger). The two cold heads will be integrated into the vacuum jacket of a LN2 line in the KSC cryo lab, where the testing will take place.

  8. Miniature Joule Thomson (JT) CryoCoolers for Propellant Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapat, Jay; Chow, Louis

    2002-01-01

    A proof-of-concept project is proposed here that would attempt to demonstrate how miniature cryocoolers can be used to chill the vacuum jacket line of a propellant transfer line and thus to achieve transfer line pre-chill, zero boil off and possible propellant densification. The project would be performed both at UCF and KSC, with all of the cryogenic testing taking place in the KSC cryogenic test bed. A LN2 line available in that KSC test facility would serve to simulate a LOX transfer line. Under this project, miniature and highly efficient cold heads would be designed. Two identical cold heads will be fabricated and then integrated with a JT-type cryogenic system (consisting of a common compressor and a common external heat exchanger). The two cold heads will be integrated into the vacuum jacket of a LN2 line in the KSC cryo lab, where the testing will take place.

  9. Gas-phase evaluation of the online NMMB/BSC-CTM model over Europe for 2010 in the framework of the AQMEII-Phase2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, A.; Jorba, O.

    2015-08-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative Phase2 aims to intercompare online coupled regional-scale models over North America and Europe. The NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM) is a fully online integrated system for meso- to global-scale applications under development at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The NMMB/BSC-CTM is applied to Europe for the year 2010 in the framework of the AQMEII-Phase2 intercomparison exercise. This paper presents a spatial, temporal and vertical evaluation of the gas-phase model results. This is the first time that the model has been evaluated on a regional scale over a whole annual cycle. The model is compared with available ground-based monitoring stations for relevant reactive gases, ozonesondes, and OMI and MOPITT satellite retrievals of NO2 and CO. A comparative analysis of the present results and several European model evaluations is also presented here. The seasonal cycle for O3, NO2, SO2 and CO is successfully reproduced by the model. The O3 daily mean and daily maximum correlations for the analysed period are r = 0.68 and r = 0.75, respectively. The OMI tropospheric NO2 column retrievals are well reproduced, capturing the most polluted areas over Europe throughout the whole year. Modelled SO2 and CO surface concentrations are generally underestimated, especially during the winter months. Two different vertical configurations of the model (24 and 48 vertical layers) are also analysed. Although model results are very similar, the simulation configured with 48 vertical layers provides better results regarding surface O3 concentrations during summer. Compared to previous model evaluations, the NMMB/BSC-CTM's performance corresponds to state-of-the-art regional air quality models.

  10. Energy Balance Related Behaviour: Personal, Home- and Friend-Related Factors among Schoolchildren in Europe Studied in the ENERGY-Project

    PubMed Central

    te Velde, Saskia J.; Singh, Amika; Chinapaw, Mai; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Jan, Natasa; Kovacs, Eva; Bere, Elling; Vik, Froydis N.; Bringolf-Isler, Bettina; Manios, Yannis; Moreno, Luis; Brug, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Objective To design interventions that target energy balance-related behaviours, knowledge of primary schoolchildren's perceptions regarding soft drink intake, fruit juice intake, breakfast consumption, TV viewing and physical activity (PA) is essential. The current study describes personal beliefs and attitudes, home- and friend-related variables regarding these behaviours across Europe. Design Cross-sectional study in which personal, family and friend -related variables were assessed by validated questionnaires, and dichotomized as favourable versus unfavourable answers. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate proportions of children giving unfavourable answers and test between-country differences. Setting A survey in eight European countries. Subjects A total of 7903 10–12 year old primary schoolchildren. Results A majority of the children reported unfavourable attitudes, preferences and subjective norms regarding soft drink, fruit juice intake and TV viewing accompanied with high availability and accessibility at home. Few children reported unfavourable attitudes and preferences regarding breakfast consumption and PA. Many children reported unfavourable health beliefs regarding breakfast consumption and TV viewing. Substantial differences between countries were observed, especially for variables regarding soft drink intake, breakfast consumption and TV viewing. Conclusion The surveyed children demonstrated favourable attitudes to some healthy behaviours (PA, breakfast intake) as well as to some unhealthy behaviours (soft drink consumption, TV viewing). Additionally, many children across Europe have personal beliefs and are exposed to social environments that are not supportive to engagement in healthy behaviours. Moreover, the large differences in personal, family and friend-related variables across Europe argue for implementing different strategies in the different European countries. PMID:25372490

  11. Combined Reverse-Brayton Joule Thompson Hydrogen Liquefaction Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Shimko, Martin A.; Dunn, Paul M.

    2011-12-31

    The following is a compilation of Annual Progress Reports submitted to the DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office by Gas Equipment Engineering Corp. for contract DE-FG36-05GO15021. The reports cover the project activities from August 2005 through June 2010. The purpose of this project is to produce a pilot-scale liquefaction plant that demonstrates GEECO’s ability to meet or exceed the efficiency targets set by the DOE. This plant will be used as a model to commercialize this technology for use in the distribution infrastructure of hydrogen fuel. It could also be applied to markets distributing hydrogen for industrial gas applications. Extensive modeling of plant performance will be used in the early part of the project to identify the liquefaction cycle architecture that optimizes the twin goals of increased efficiency and reduced cost. The major challenge of the project is to optimize/balance the performance (efficiency) of the plant against the cost of the plant so that the fully amortized cost of liquefying hydrogen meets the aggressive goals set by DOE. This project will design and build a small-scale pilot plant (several hundred kg/day) that will be both a hardware demonstration and a model for scaling to larger plant sizes (>50,000 kg/day). Though an effort will be made to use commercial or near-commercial components, key components that will need development for either a pilot- or full-scale plant will be identified. Prior to starting pilot plant fabrication, these components will be demonstrated at the appropriate scale to demonstrate sufficient performance for use in the pilot plant and the potential to achieve the performance used in modeling the full-scale plant.

  12. Classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in South-eastern Europe: review of 632 cases from the international non-Hodgkin lymphoma classification project.

    PubMed

    Dotlic, Snjezana; Perry, Anamarija M; Petrusevska, Gordana; Fetica, Bogdan; Diebold, Jacques; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Nathwani, Bharat N; Boilesen, Eugene; Bast, Martin; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes varies around the world, but a systematic study of South-eastern Europe (SEEU) has never been done. Therefore, we evaluated the relative frequencies of NHL subtypes in three SEEU countries--Croatia, Romania and Macedonia. Five expert haematopathologists reviewed 632 consecutive cases of newly diagnosed NHL from the three SEEU countries using the World Health Organization classification. The results were compared to 399 cases from North America (NA) and 580 cases from Western Europe (WEU). The proportions of B- and T-cell NHL and the sex distribution in SEEU were similar to WEU and NA. However, the median ages of patients with low- and high-grade B-NHL in SEEU (60 and 59 years, respectively) were significantly lower than in NA (64 and 68 years, respectively; P < 0·05). SEEU had a significantly lower proportion of low-grade B-NHL (46·6%) and higher proportion of high-grade B-NHL (44·5%) compared to both WEU (54·5% and 36·4%, respectively) and NA (56·1% and 34·3%, respectively). There were no significant differences in the relative frequencies of T-NHL subtypes. This study provides new insights into differences in the relative frequencies of NHL subtypes in different geographic regions. Epidemiological studies are needed to better characterize and explain these differences.

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology: Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-06

    JUNE 1988 WEST EUROPE ADVANCED MATERIALS Italy’s Agusta To Develop Advanced Composites With Enichem [RASSEGNA PETROL1FERA, 1 Feb 88] 1 French...CNRS Discovers Metal Cation Absorbing Plastic [SCIENCES & AVENIR, Feb 88] 1 ICI of UK Develops New Polyester Film for Optical Data Storage AEROSPACE...HANDELSBLATT, 18-19 Mar 88] 24 Philips Develops Semiconductor Laser for Optical Disks [HANDELSBLATT, 16 Mar 88] 25 MICROELECTRONICS Italy: CNR Project

  14. Quality of life in people aged 65+ in Europe: associated factors and models of social welfare-analysis of data from the SHARE project (Wave 5).

    PubMed

    Conde-Sala, Josep L; Portellano-Ortiz, Cristina; Calvó-Perxas, Laia; Garre-Olmo, Josep

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the clinical, sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors that influence perceived quality of life (QoL) in a community sample of 33,241 people aged 65+ and to examine the relationship with models of social welfare in Europe. This was a cross-sectional study of data from Wave 5 (2013) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). The instruments used in the present study were as follows: sociodemographic data, CASP-12 (QoL), EURO-D (depression), indicators of life expectancy and suicide (WHO), and economic indicators (World Bank). Statistical analysis included bivariate and multilevel analyses. In the multilevel analysis, greater satisfaction in life, less depression, sufficient income, better subjective health, physical activity, an absence of functional impairment, younger age and participation in activities were associated with better QoL in all countries. More education was only associated with higher QoL in Eastern European and Mediterranean countries, and only in the latter was caring for grandchildren also related to better QoL. Socioeconomic indicators were better and QoL scores higher (mean = 38.5 ± 5.8) in countries that had a social democratic (Nordic cluster) or corporatist model (Continental cluster) of social welfare, as compared to Eastern European and Mediterranean countries, which were characterized by poorer socioeconomic conditions, more limited social welfare provision and lower QoL scores (mean = 33.5 ± 6.4). Perceived quality-of-life scores are consistent with the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of participants, as well as with the socioeconomic indicators and models of social welfare of the countries in which they live.

  15. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  16. Joule-Thief Circuit Performance for Electricity Energy Saving of Emergency Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryanto Budisusila, Eka; Arifin, Bustanul

    2017-04-01

    The alternative energy such as battery as power source is required as energy source failures. The other need is outdoor lighting. The electrical power source is expected to be a power saving, optimum and has long life operating. The Joule-Thief circuit is one of solution method for energy saving by using raised electromagnetic force on cored coil when there is back-current. This circuit has a transistor operated as a switch to cut voltage and current flowing along the coils. The present of current causing magnetic induction and generates energy. Experimental prototype was designed by using battery 1.5V to activate Light Emitting Diode or LED as load. The LED was connected in parallel or serial circuit configuration. The result show that the joule-thief circuit able to supply LED circuits up to 40 LEDs.

  17. Low-power concentration and separation using temperature gradient focusing via Joule heating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Sommer, Greg J; Burns, Mark A; Hasselbrink, Ernest F

    2006-12-01

    We present an experimental study of temperature gradient focusing (TGF) exploiting an inherent Joule heating phenomenon. A simple variable-width PDMS device delivers rapid and repeatable focusing of model analytes using significantly lower power than conventional TGF techniques. High electric potential applied to the device induces a temperature gradient within the microchannel due to the channel's variable width, and the temperature-dependent mobility of the analytes causes focusing at a specific location. The PDMS device also shows simultaneous separation and concentration capability of a mixture of two sample analytes in less than 10 min. An experiment combining Joule heating with external heating/cooling further supports the hypothesis that temperature is indeed the dominant factor in achieving focusing with this technique.

  18. Joule heating and determination of temperature in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S

    2004-05-28

    This article reviews the progress that has taken place in the past decade on the topic of estimation of Joule heating and temperature inside an open or packed capillary in electro-driven separation techniques of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC), respectively. Developments in theoretical modeling of the heat transfer in the capillary systems have focused on attempts to apply the existing models on newer techniques such as CEC and chip-based CE. However, the advent of novel analytical tools such as pulsed magnetic field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), NMR thermometry, and Raman spectroscopy, have led to a revolution in the area of experimental estimation of Joule heating and temperature inside the capillary via the various noninvasive techniques. This review attempts to capture the major findings that have been reported in the past decade.

  19. Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

  20. Breakdown of Richardson's Law in Electron Emission from Individual Self-Joule-Heated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xianlong; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2014-01-01

    Probing the validity of classical macroscopic physical laws at the nanoscale is important for nanoscience research. Herein, we report on experimental evidence that electron emission from individual hot carbon nanotubes (CNTs) heated by self-Joule-heating does not obey Richardson's law of thermionic emission. By using an in-situ multi-probe measurement technique, electron emission density (J) and temperature (T) of individual self-Joule-heated CNTs are simultaneously determined. Experimental ln(J/T2) − 1/T plots are found to exhibit an upward bending feature deviating from the straight lines in Richardson plots, and the measured electron emission density is more than one order of magnitude higher than that predicted by Richardson's law. The breakdown of Richardson's law implies a much better electron emission performance of individual CNTs as compared to their macroscopic allotropes and clusters, and the need of new theoretical descriptions of electron emission from individual low-dimensional nanostructures. PMID:24869719

  1. The effect of DC Joule-heating on magnetic structure of conventional amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aştefănoaei, Iordana; Stancu, Alexandru; Chiriac, Horia

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we determined the effect of DC Joule-heating on magnetic structure of conventional amorphous wires starting from the stresses that appear during preparation process. For a specified value of applied electrical DC current to some amorphous wires, we have analyzed the thermal stresses that appear during the thermal treatment and we calculated the radius of axial magnetic domain (cylindrical inner core) that results after the preparation and annealing processes. We have obtained that: (a) the total stresses (owing to the successive heating, crystallization and cooling) depend strongly on the applied electrical DC current and the radius of the wires; (b) the axial magnetic domain is bigger for the wire having a bigger radius; (c) the cylindrical inner core enlarges significantly after DC Joule-heating; and (d) smaller internal stresses are obtained at smaller values of the wire's radius.

  2. Quantum Joule-Thomson effect in a saturated homogeneous Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidutz, Tobias F; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L; Smith, Robert P; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-31

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>10(9)  K/bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases.

  3. Rotating ferro-nanofluid over stretching plate under the effect of hall current and joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahed, Mohamed S.

    2017-05-01

    The behavior of boundary layer over a stretching plate filled with ferromagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and subjected to magnetic field with hall current, joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation has been investigated. The modeling based on nonlinear partial differential equations due to continuity, momentum and heat equations, these equations transformed to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation technique then solved numerically. The effect of hall current, joule heating and thermal radiation on the physical quantities such as surface shear stress and heat flux have been investigated and discussed. Moreover, the velocities and temperature profiles of the boundary layer under the influence of the presented external forces plotted and discussed.

  4. Joule-Thomson inversion curves and related coefficients for several simple fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Peller, I. C.; Baron, A. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equations of state (PVT relations) for methane, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, neon, hydrogen, and helium were used to establish Joule-Thomson inversion curves for each fluid. The principle of corresponding states was applied to the inversion curves, and a generalized inversion curve for fluids with small acentric factors was developed. The quantum fluids (neon, hydrogen, and helium) were excluded from the generalization, but available data for the fluids xenon and krypton were included. The critical isenthalpic Joule-Thomson coefficient mu sub c was determined; and a simplified approximation mu sub c approximates T sub c divided by 6P sub c was found adequate, where T sub c and P sub c are the temperature and pressure at the thermodynamic critical point. The maximum inversion temperatures were obtained from the second virial coefficient (maximum (B/T)).

  5. Performance Analysis of Joule-Thomson Cooler Supplied with Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.; Dorosz, P.

    2017-02-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryo-coolers working in closed cycles and supplied with gas mixtures are the subject of intensive research in different laboratories. The replacement of pure nitrogen by nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures allows to improve both thermodynamic parameters and economy of the refrigerators. It is possible to avoid high pressures in the heat exchanger and to use standard refrigeration compressor instead of gas bottles or high-pressure oil free compressor. Closed cycle and mixture filled Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigerator providing 10-20 W of cooling power at temperature range 90-100 K has been designed and manufactured. Thermodynamic analysis including the optimization of the cryo-cooler mixture has been performed with ASPEN HYSYS software. The paper describes the design of the cryo-cooler and provides thermodynamic analysis of the system. The test results are presented and discussed.

  6. Initial Determinations of Ionospheric Electric Fields and Joule Heating from MAVEN Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Fogle, A. L.; Aleryani, O.; Dunn, P.; Lillis, R. J.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R.

    2015-12-01

    MAVEN provides in-situ measurements of the neutral and ion species as well as the magnetic field throughout the ionosphere of Mars. By combining these measurements, we are able to calculate both the ionospheric currents and the ionospheric conductivity. It is then straightforward to determine the electric field in the collisional ionosphere from a simplified Ohm's law. In addition, we can also estimate the amount of Joule heating in the ionosphere from j · E. Here, we show initial determinations of both ionospheric electric fields and Joule heating using MAVEN data. The electric fields are highly variable from orbit-to-orbit suggesting that the ionospheric electrodynamics can change on timescales of several hours. These changes may be driven by changes in the upstream solar wind and IMF or may result from dynamical variations of thermospheric neutral winds.

  7. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  8. Seebeck effect influence on joule heat evolution in electrically conductive silicate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Medved, Igor; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, silicate building materials are non-conductive matters that are not able to evolve heat when they are subjected to an external voltage. However, the electrical conductivity can be increased by addition of electrically conductive admixtures in appropriate amount which leads to generation of conductive paths in materials matrix. Such enhanced materials can evolve Joule heat and are utilizable as a core of self-heating or snow-melting systems. In this paper, Joule heat evolution together with Seebeck effect in electrically conductive silicate materials was taken into consideration and the model based on heat equation with included influence of DC electric field was proposed. Besides, a modeling example of heating element was carried out on FEM basis and time development of temperature in chosen surface points was expressed in order to declare ability of such system to be applicable.

  9. Joule heating effects on particle immobilization in insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices

    PubMed Central

    Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C.; Sano, Michael B.; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the temperature effects due to Joule heating obtained by application of a DC electric potential were investigated for a microchannel with cylindrical insulating posts employed for insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP). The conductivity of the suspending medium, the local electric field, and the gradient of the squared electric field, which directly affect the magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force exerted on particles, were computationally simulated employing COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that a temperature gradient is formed along the microchannel which redistributes the conductivity of the suspending medium leading to an increase of the dielectrophoretic force towards the inlet of the channel while decreasing towards the outlet. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations on the particle trapping zones anticipated. This study demonstrates the importance of considering Joule heating effects when designing iDEP systems. PMID:24002905

  10. Residual resistance and Joule heat generation in bulk samples and nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, V. L.

    2008-08-15

    The Joule heat generation under residual resistance conditions in bulk samples of metals and degenerate semiconductors is discussed. We assume that the conductance of the system is determined by elastic scattering of conduction electrons and consider the Ohmic regime. We come to conclusion that the amount of Joule heat generated in such a system is determined by the residual resistance provided that the length of phase coherence of the electron wave functions is smaller than the dimensions of the sample. For a quantum well, this condition is imposed on its lateral dimensions and does not concern its width. It is indicated that this is only a suf-ficient condition that can be relaxed by further investigations.

  11. Breakdown of Richardson's law in electron emission from individual self-Joule-heated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xianlong; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2014-05-29

    Probing the validity of classical macroscopic physical laws at the nanoscale is important for nanoscience research. Herein, we report on experimental evidence that electron emission from individual hot carbon nanotubes (CNTs) heated by self-Joule-heating does not obey Richardson's law of thermionic emission. By using an in-situ multi-probe measurement technique, electron emission density (J) and temperature (T) of individual self-Joule-heated CNTs are simultaneously determined. Experimental ln(J/T(2)) - 1/T plots are found to exhibit an upward bending feature deviating from the straight lines in Richardson plots, and the measured electron emission density is more than one order of magnitude higher than that predicted by Richardson's law. The breakdown of Richardson's law implies a much better electron emission performance of individual CNTs as compared to their macroscopic allotropes and clusters, and the need of new theoretical descriptions of electron emission from individual low-dimensional nanostructures.

  12. Chatanika radar observations relating to the latitudinal and local time variations of Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Foster, J. C.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of plasma convection made with the Chatanika incoherent scatter radar have been analyzed to give latitude/local time plots of the electric field contribution (E squared) to thermospheric Joule heating. The data, which plan the invariant latitude range 56 deg to 75 deg, show the presence of strong heating throughout the auroral regions. Of special interest are brief interludes of intense heating (greater than 50 mW/sq m) that are observed at nearly all local times and latitudes in response to magnetospheric disturbances. Further, there seem to be particular regions of the auroral oval where Joule heating seems to be continually enhanced above the broad background. The results of six 24-hour experiments are presented to illustrate summer and winter conditions. A shorter eight hour experiment is also given to show the characteristics of cleft heating, insofar as they are visible to the Chatanika radar.

  13. Joule heating effects on particle immobilization in insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; Sano, Michael B; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the temperature effects due to Joule heating obtained by application of a direct current electric potential were investigated for a microchannel with cylindrical insulating posts employed for insulator-based dielectrophoresis. The conductivity of the suspending medium, the local electric field, and the gradient of the squared electric field, which directly affect the magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force exerted on particles, were computationally simulated employing COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that a temperature gradient is formed along the microchannel, which redistributes the conductivity of the suspending medium leading to an increase of the dielectrophoretic force toward the inlet of the channel while decreasing toward the outlet. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations on the particle-trapping zones anticipated. This study demonstrates the importance of considering Joule heating effects when designing insulator-based dielectrophoresis systems.

  14. Joule heating and field-aligned currents: Preliminary results from DE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.

    1986-01-01

    There are three main processes by which energy is transferred from the magnetosphere to the thermosphere: (1) charge exchange of the ring current particles; (2) precipitation of charged particles; and (3) joule dissipation by the magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems. The importance of this last process has been recognized and the rate of joule heating has been estimated by many workers. Observations of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields from Dynamics Explorer Satellite 2 are providing a new set of data on field-aligned currents. One of the remarkable features found in these observations is the high correlation between an orthogonal pair of the E and B field components. In recent years, observational data have accrued concerning the relationship between the interplanetary magnetic field and the size of the polar cap and also about the evolution of a substorm or a magnetic storm. It is suggested that these findings be incorporated in future model calculations.

  15. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  16. Modeling Joule Heating Effect on Lunar O2 Generation via Electrolytic Reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Poizeau, Sophie; Sibille, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is leading research work on lunar O2 generation via electrolytic reduction of regolith; the metal oxide present in the regolith is dissociated in oxygen anions and metal cations leading to the generation of gaseous oxygen at the anode and liquid metal at the cathode. Electrical resistance of molten regolith is high, leading to heating of the melt when electrical current is applied between the electrodes (Joule heating). The authors have developed a 3D model using a rigorous approach for two coupled physics (thermal and electrical potential) to not only study the effect of Joule heating on temperature distribution throughout the molten regolith but also to evaluate and optimize the design of the electrolytic cells. This paper presents the results of the thermal analysis performed on the model and used to validate the design of the electrolytic cell.

  17. Experimental evidence in support of Joule heating associated with geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution accelerometer measurements in the altitude region 140 to 300 km from a satellite in a near-polar orbit during a period of extremely high geomagnetic activity indicate that Joule heating is the primary source of energy for atmospheric heating associated with geomagnetic activity. This conclusion is supported by the following observational evidence: (1) There is an atmospheric response in the auroral zone which is nearly simulataneous with the onset of geomagnetic activity, with no significant response in the equatorial region until several hours later; (2) The maximum heating occurs at geographic locations near the maximum current of the auroral electrojet; and (3) There is evidence of atmospheric waves originating near the auroral zone at altitudes where Joule heating would be expected to occur. An analysis of atmospheric response time to this heat shows time delays are apparently independent of altitude but are strongly dependent upon geomagnetic latitude.

  18. Direct imaging of Joule heating dynamics and temperature profiling inside a carbon nanotube interconnect.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M F J; Gautam, Ujjal K; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-08-09

    Understanding resistive (or Joule) heating in fundamental nanoelectronic blocks, such as carbon nanotubes, remains a major challenge, particularly in regard to their structural and thermal variations during prolonged periods of electrical stress. Here we show real-time imaging of the associated effects of Joule heating in the channel of carbon nanotube interconnects. First, electrical contacts to nanotubes entirely filled with a sublimable material are made inside a transmission electron microscope. On exposure to a high current density, resistive hotspots are identified on (or near) the contact points. These later migrate and expand along the carbon nanotube, as indicated by the localized sublimation of the encapsulated material. Using the hotspot edges as markers, it is possible to estimate the internal temperature profiles of the nanotube. Simple and direct, our method provides remarkable spatial and temporal insights into the dynamics of resistive hotspots and millisecond-paced thermal variations occurring inside nanoscaled tubular interconnects.

  19. Quantum Joule-Thomson Effect in a Saturated Homogeneous Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidutz, Tobias F.; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Smith, Robert P.; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>109 K /bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases.

  20. Selectively Tuning a Buckled Si/SiO2 Membrane MEMS through Joule Heating Actuation and Mechanical Restriction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    SELECTIVELY TUNING A BUCKLED SI/SIO2 MEMBRANE MEMS THROUGH JOULE HEATING ACTUATION AND MECHANICAL RESTRICTION THESIS Kyle K...A BUCKLED SI/SIO2 MEMBRANE MEMS THROUGH JOULE HEATING ACTUATION AND MECHANICAL RESTRICTION I. Introduction Background Springs are a well-known...investigated a buckled beam structure as a switching mechanism for several years [9]. This concept will be discussed comprehensively in this research

  1. From Joule to Caratheodory and Born: A Conceptual Evolution of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    In the years after Joule's experiment on the equivalence of heat and work, it was taken for granted that heat and work could be independently defined and that the change in energy for a change of state is the sum of the heat and the work. Only with the work of Caratheodory and Born did it become clear that heat cannot be measured independently,…

  2. From Joule to Caratheodory and Born: A Conceptual Evolution of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    In the years after Joule's experiment on the equivalence of heat and work, it was taken for granted that heat and work could be independently defined and that the change in energy for a change of state is the sum of the heat and the work. Only with the work of Caratheodory and Born did it become clear that heat cannot be measured independently,…

  3. Restrictions on linear heat capacities from Joule-Brayton maximum-work cycle efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Brown, F.; Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L. A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using the Joule-Brayton cycle to determine the accessible value range for the coefficients a and b of the heat capacity at constant pressure Cp, expressed as Cp=a+bT (with T the absolute temperature) by using the Carnot theorem. This is made for several gases which operate as the working fluids. Moreover, the landmark role of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency for this type of cycle is established.

  4. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  5. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  6. Solar Wind Effect on Joule Heating in the High-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygren, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) carried by solar wind affects strongly several key parameters in the high-latitude ionosphere. In this study, the solar wind effect on those parameters especially on Joule heating is conducted statistically based on the simultaneous measurements by the EISCAT radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat, mainly within the auroral oval on the nightside), and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4º cgmLat, mostly within the polar cap). The most important findings are as follows: (i) At TRO, the decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to neutral winds reported by Aikio et al. [2012] requires southward IMF conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper-E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F-region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of joule heating centred typically at 14-15 MLT is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz+/By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetopsheric electromagnetic energy input. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated Joule heating rate without neutral winds for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  7. The role of Joule heating in dispersive mixing effects in electrophoretic cells: hydrodynamic considerations.

    PubMed

    Bosse, M A; Arce, P

    2000-03-01

    The analysis described in this contribution is focused on the effect of Joule heating generation on the hydrodynamics of batch electrophoretic cells (i.e., cells that do not display a forced convective term in the motion equation). The hydrodynamics of these cells is controlled by the viscous forces and by the buoyancy force caused by the temperature gradients due to the Joule heating generation. The analysis is based on differential models that lead to analytical and/or asymptotic solutions for the temperature and velocity profiles of the cell. The results are useful in determining the characteristics of the temperature and velocity profiles inside the cell. Furthermore, the results are excellent tools to be used in the analysis of the dispersive-mixing of solute when Joule heating generation must be accounted for. The analysis is performed by identifying two sequentially coupled problems. Thus, the "carrier fluid problem" and the "solute problem" are outlined. The former is associated with all the factors affecting the velocity profile and the latter is related to the convective-diffusion aspects that control the spreading of the solute inside the cell. The analysis of this contribution is centered on the discussion of the "carrier fluid problem" only. For the boundary conditions selected in the contribution, the study leads to the derivation of an analytical temperature and a "universal" velocity profile that feature the Joule heating number. The Grashof number is a scaling factor of the actual velocity profile. Several characteristics of these profiles are studied and some numerical illustrations have been included.

  8. Joule-heating power dissipation in a type-II superconductor tube.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the Joule-heating power density in a specific hollow cylinder of a NbZr superconductor is presented. It is seen that the power density, which is the primary source of internal heating neglecting localized annihilation heating, can have a very complicated behavior, especially in the circular region. Rough estimates of the relative temperature changes are made, and the locations at which instabilities are more likely to initiate are considered.

  9. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures in Joule heating

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yusuke; Yoshida, Hideto; Takeda, Seiji; Kohno, Hideo

    2014-08-25

    Collapse of a carbon nanotube results in the formation of a nanoribbon, and a switching of the collapse direction yields a nanotetrahedron in the middle of a nanoribbon. Here, we report in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the behavior of carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures during Joule heating to reveal their thermal stability. In addition, we propose that the observed process is related to the formation process of the structure.

  10. Restrictions on linear heat capacities from Joule-Brayton maximum-work cycle efficiency.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Brown, F; Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L A

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using the Joule-Brayton cycle to determine the accessible value range for the coefficients a and b of the heat capacity at constant pressure C(p), expressed as C(p) = a + bT (with T the absolute temperature) by using the Carnot theorem. This is made for several gases which operate as the working fluids. Moreover, the landmark role of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency for this type of cycle is established.

  11. Programmable mechanical resonances in MEMS by localized joule heating of phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Manca, Nicola; Pellegrino, Luca; Kanki, Teruo; Yamasaki, Syouta; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Siri, Antonio Sergio; Marré, Daniele

    2013-11-26

    A programmable micromechanical resonator based on a VO2 thin film is reported. Multiple mechanical eigenfrequency states are programmed using Joule heating as local power source, gradually driving the phase transition of VO2 around its Metal-Insulator transition temperature. Phase coexistence of domains is used to tune the stiffness of the device via local control of internal stresses and mechanical properties. This study opens perspectives for developing mechanically configurable nanostructure arrays.

  12. Joule-assisted silicidation for short-channel silicon nanowire devices.

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Massimo; Spathis, Panayotis; Katsaros, Georgios; Gentile, Pascal; Sanquer, Marc; De Franceschi, Silvano

    2011-09-27

    We report on a technique enabling electrical control of the contact silicidation process in silicon nanowire devices. Undoped silicon nanowires were contacted by pairs of nickel electrodes, and each contact was selectively silicided by means of the Joule effect. By a real-time monitoring of the nanowire electrical resistance during the contact silicidation process we were able to fabricate nickel-silicide/silicon/nickel-silicide devices with controlled silicon channel length down to 8 nm.

  13. How to write a history of Europe: Europe, Europes, Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Peter

    2006-05-01

    This article looks at the history of European culture from three angles, those of European uniqueness, European variety and European consciousness. The first section discusses the question of whether the fundamental unit of study, for cultural as well as economic historians, is not Eurasia. The second section is concerned with cultural divisions within Europe, with Europes in the plural. It asks whether it is more illuminating to distinguish two Europes (like Leopold von Ranke), or three (like Jeno Szucs), or even five (like Hugo Hassinger), and examine both centripetal and centrifugal forces in early modern history. The final section deals with the history of the idea of Europe, or more exactly with the rise of consciousness of being European, as it is revealed in early modern histories, geographies, journals and newspapers.

  14. Micro-joule pico-second range Yb3+-doped fibre laser for medical applications in acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Rivera-Manrique, S. I.; Jacques, S. L.

    2011-08-01

    The work described here is based on the optical design, simulation and on-going implementation of a pulsed (Q-switch) Yb3+-doped, 1-um diffraction-limited fibre laser with pico-second, 10 micro-Joule-range energy pulses for producing the right energy pulses which could be of benefit for patients who suffer chronic headache, photophobia, and even nausea which could is sometimes triggered by a series of factors. The specific therapeutic effect known as acupunctural analgesia is the main objective of this medium-term project. It is a simple design on which commercially available software was employed for laser cavity design. Monte Carlo technique for skin light-transport, thermal diffusion and the possible thermal de-naturalization optical study and prediction will also be included in the presentation. Full optical characterization will be included and a complete set of recent results on the laser-skin interaction and the so called moxi-bustion from the laser design will be extensively described.

  15. Joule Heating and Thermal Denaturation of Proteins in Nano-ESI Theta Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Matt, Sarah M.; Bu, Jiexun; Rehrauer, Owen G.; Ben-Amotz, Dor; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-07-01

    Electro-osmotically induced Joule heating in theta tips and its effect on protein denaturation were investigated. Myoglobin, equine cytochrome c, bovine cytochrome c, and carbonic anhydrase II solutions were subjected to electro-osmosis in a theta tip and all of the proteins were denatured during the process. The extent of protein denaturation was found to increase with the applied square wave voltage and electrolyte concentration. The solution temperature at the end of a theta tip was measured directly by Raman spectroscopy and shown to increase with the square wave voltage, thereby demonstrating the effect of Joule heating through an independent method. The electro-osmosis of a solution comprised of myoglobin, bovine cytochrome c, and ubiquitin demonstrated that the magnitude of Joule heating that causes protein denaturation is positively correlated with protein melting temperature. This allows for a quick determination of a protein's relative thermal stability. This work establishes a fast, novel method for protein conformation manipulation prior to MS analysis and provides a temperature-controllable platform for the study of processes that take place in solution with direct coupling to mass spectrometry.

  16. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  17. Influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Simone Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo

    2016-06-07

    The domain wall depinning from a notch in a Permalloy nanostrip on top of a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate is studied theoretically under application of static magnetic fields and the injection of short current pulses. The influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning is explored self-consistently by coupling the magnetization dynamics in the ferromagnetic strip to the heat transport throughout the system. Our results indicate that Joule heating plays a remarkable role in these processes, resulting in a reduction in the critical depinning field and/or in a temporary destruction of the ferromagnetic order for typically injected current pulses. In agreement with experimental observations, similar pinning-depinning phase diagrams can be deduced for both current polarities when the Joule heating is taken into account. These observations, which are incompatible with the sole contribution of spin transfer torques, provide a deeper understanding of the physics underlying these processes and establish the real scope of the spin transfer torque. They are also relevant for technological applications based on current-induced domain-wall motion along soft strips.

  18. Joule Heating and Thermal Denaturation of Proteins in Nano-ESI Theta Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Matt, Sarah M.; Bu, Jiexun; Rehrauer, Owen G.; Ben-Amotz, Dor; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-osmotically induced Joule heating in theta tips and its effect on protein denaturation were investigated. Myoglobin, equine cytochrome c, bovine cytochrome c, and carbonic anhydrase II solutions were subjected to electro-osmosis in a theta tip and all of the proteins were denatured during the process. The extent of protein denaturation was found to increase with the applied square wave voltage and electrolyte concentration. The solution temperature at the end of a theta tip was measured directly by Raman spectroscopy and shown to increase with the square wave voltage, thereby demonstrating the effect of Joule heating through an independent method. The electro-osmosis of a solution comprised of myoglobin, bovine cytochrome c, and ubiquitin demonstrated that the magnitude of Joule heating that causes protein denaturation is positively correlated with protein melting temperature. This allows for a quick determination of a protein's relative thermal stability. This work establishes a fast, novel method for protein conformation manipulation prior to MS analysis and provides a temperature-controllable platform for the study of processes that take place in solution with direct coupling to mass spectrometry. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Improved Ionospheric Electrodynamic Models and Application to Calculating Joule Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    Improved techniques have been developed for empirical modeling of the high-latitude electric potentials and magnetic field aligned currents (FAC) as a function of the solar wind parameters. The FAC model is constructed using scalar magnetic Euler potentials, and functions as a twin to the electric potential model. The improved models have more accurate field values as well as more accurate boundary locations. Non-linear saturation effects in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling are also better reproduced. The models are constructed using a hybrid technique, which has spherical harmonic functions only within a small area at the pole. At lower latitudes the potentials are constructed from multiple Fourier series functions of longitude, at discrete latitudinal steps. It is shown that the two models can be used together in order to calculate the total Poynting flux and Joule heating in the ionosphere. An additional model of the ionospheric conductivity is not required in order to obtain the ionospheric currents and Joule heating, as the conductivity variations as a function of the solar inclination are implicitly contained within the FAC model's data. The models outputs are shown for various input conditions, as well as compared with satellite measurements. The calculations of the total Joule heating are compared with results obtained by the inversion of ground-based magnetometer measurements. Like their predecessors, these empirical models should continue to be a useful research and forecast tools.

  20. Joule heating in the mesosphere and thermosphere during the July 13, 1982, solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, R. G.; Emery, B. A.; Garcia, R. R.; Killeen, T. L.; Hays, P. B.; Reid, G. C.; Solomon, S.; Evans, D. S.; Spencer, N. W.; Brace, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    The solar proton event of July 13, 1982 produced considerable ionization in the polar-cap mesosphere. Energetic solar proton fluxes were measured by the NOAA-6 satellite. The DE-2 satellite measured the low-energy electrons, the ion drift velocity, and other atmospheric and ionospheric properties during the event in the region of the measured maximum electric field (189 mV/m at 2215 UT near 60 deg N), a Joule heating rate of 1-3 K/day is calculated between 70 and 80 km, exceeding the heating due to ozone absorption at noon in the summer hemisphere in that altitude range. The Joule heating rate above 90 km greatly exceeded 20 K/day. The calculated height-integrated Joule heating rate above 100 km in the same region exceeded 400 ergs/sq cm sec, and DE-2 near 350 km measured neutral winds of nearly 1000 m/s and neutral gas temperatures of over 2000 K. The overall ionospheric structure calculated below the DE-2 satellite is described.

  1. Temperature measurement of Joule heated silicon micro/nanowires using selectively decorated quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jeonghoon; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Bong Jae; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Inkyu

    2016-12-01

    We developed a novel method to measure local temperature at micro/nano-scale regions using selective deposition of quantum dots (QDs) as a sensitive temperature probe and measured the temperature of Joule heated silicon microwires (SiMWs) and silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by this method. The QDs are selectively coated only on the surface of the SiMWs and SiNWs by a sequential process composed of selective opening of a polymethyl methacrylate layer via Joule heating, covalent bonding of QDs, and lift-off process. The temperatures of the Joule-heated SiMWs and SiNWs can be measured by characterizing the temperature-dependent shift of photoluminescence peak of the selectively deposited QDs even with far-field optics. The validity of the extracted temperature has been also confirmed by comparing with numerical simulation results. The proposed method can potentially provide micro/nanoscale measurement of localized temperatures for a wide range of electrical and optical devices.

  2. Joule heating effects on electroosmotic flow in insulator-based dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Sriram; Zhu, Junjie; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2011-09-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is an emerging technology that has been successfully used to manipulate a variety of particles in microfluidic devices. However, due to the locally amplified electric field around the in-channel insulator, Joule heating often becomes an unavoidable issue that may disturb the electroosmotic flow and affect the particle motion. This work presents the first experimental study of Joule heating effects on electroosmotic flow in a typical iDEP device, e.g., a constriction microchannel, under DC-biased AC voltages. A numerical model is also developed to simulate the observed flow pattern by solving the coupled electric, energy, and fluid equations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry. It is observed that depending on the magnitude of the DC voltage, a pair of counter-rotating fluid circulations can occur at either the downstream end alone or each end of the channel constriction. Moreover, the pair at the downstream end appears larger in size than that at the upstream end due to DC electroosmotic flow. These fluid circulations, which are reasonably simulated by the numerical model, form as a result of the action of the electric field on Joule heating-induced fluid inhomogeneities in the constriction region.

  3. Improved Ionospheric Electrodynamic Models and Application to Calculating Joule Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    Improved techniques have been developed for empirical modeling of the high-latitude electric potentials and magnetic field aligned currents (FAC) as a function of the solar wind parameters. The FAC model is constructed using scalar magnetic Euler potentials, and functions as a twin to the electric potential model. The improved models have more accurate field values as well as more accurate boundary locations. Non-linear saturation effects in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling are also better reproduced. The models are constructed using a hybrid technique, which has spherical harmonic functions only within a small area at the pole. At lower latitudes the potentials are constructed from multiple Fourier series functions of longitude, at discrete latitudinal steps. It is shown that the two models can be used together in order to calculate the total Poynting flux and Joule heating in the ionosphere. An additional model of the ionospheric conductivity is not required in order to obtain the ionospheric currents and Joule heating, as the conductivity variations as a function of the solar inclination are implicitly contained within the FAC model's data. The models outputs are shown for various input conditions, as well as compared with satellite measurements. The calculations of the total Joule heating are compared with results obtained by the inversion of ground-based magnetometer measurements. Like their predecessors, these empirical models should continue to be a useful research and forecast tools.

  4. Temperature measurement of Joule heated silicon micro/nanowires using selectively decorated quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jeonghoon; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Bong Jae; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Inkyu

    2016-12-16

    We developed a novel method to measure local temperature at micro/nano-scale regions using selective deposition of quantum dots (QDs) as a sensitive temperature probe and measured the temperature of Joule heated silicon microwires (SiMWs) and silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by this method. The QDs are selectively coated only on the surface of the SiMWs and SiNWs by a sequential process composed of selective opening of a polymethyl methacrylate layer via Joule heating, covalent bonding of QDs, and lift-off process. The temperatures of the Joule-heated SiMWs and SiNWs can be measured by characterizing the temperature-dependent shift of photoluminescence peak of the selectively deposited QDs even with far-field optics. The validity of the extracted temperature has been also confirmed by comparing with numerical simulation results. The proposed method can potentially provide micro/nanoscale measurement of localized temperatures for a wide range of electrical and optical devices.

  5. Measurements and Electrical Equivalent Model of Polymer PTC as a Function of Joule Heating Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Zawam; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    In this paper, experiments were conducted to study the electrical I-V characteristics of the polymer Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC)resistor as a function of joule heating due to I2R. More than 80short-circuit tests were carried out on four samples (rated 60V/40A), and the results show that all PTC samples tripped when the thresholdinput energy nearly equaled 20 J. We propose a new mathematical modelfor the PTC in the fault current condition, a PTC-TACS (Transient Analysis of Control Systems) model, by using the Electro-Magnetic Transient Program (EMTP), which is a function of the input joule heatingenergy. A comparison between the experimental results and EMTPsimulation results has shown that the PTC-TACS model is valid and veryeffective to investigate the PTC under fault current conditions inelectrical circuits and to design an over-current limiter based on PTCmaterials for industrial applications. In the discussion about radiationpower loss in case that the applied voltage is greater than 50V or thetripped time is less than 4ms, it is shown that the radiation powerloss can be neglected and the PTC resistance can be expressed only bythe input joule heating energy.

  6. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.-E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D. J. D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer dielectric. Uncured polymer is then rinsed away, leaving a patterned dielectric layer that conforms to the shape of the grid lines. To enhance the accuracy of the alignment, heat conduction into the substrate and the transparent electrode is limited by using short current pulses instead of a constant current. Excellent alignment accuracy of the dielectric layer on printed metal grid lines has been achieved, with a typical 4-μm dielectric overhang. In addition to good accuracy, pulsed Joule heating significantly cuts down process time and energy consumption compared to heating with a constant current. The feasibility of using a printed current distribution grid and Joule heating was demonstrated in an OLED device.

  7. Hampson’s type cryocoolers with distributed Joule-Thomson effect for mixed refrigerants closed cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion

    2014-05-01

    Most previous studies on Joule-Thomson cryocoolers of mixed refrigerants in a closed cycle focus on the Linde kind recuperator. The present study focuses on four constructions of Hampson’s kind miniature Joule-Thomson cryocoolers based on finned capillary tubes. The frictional pressure drop along the tubes plays the role of distributed Joule-Thomson expansion so that an additional orifice or any throttle at the cold end is eliminated. The high pressure tube is a throttle and a channel of recuperation at the same time. These coolers are tested within two closed cycle systems of different compressors and different compositions of mixed coolants. All tests were driven by the same level of discharge pressure (2.9 MPa) while the associated suction pressures and the associated reached temperatures are dependent on each particular cryocooler and on the closed cycle system. The mixture of higher specific cooling capacity cannot reach temperatures below 80 K when driven by the smaller compressor. The other mixture of lower specific cooling capacity driven by the larger compressor reaches lower temperatures. The examined parameters are the cooldown period and the reachable temperatures by each cryocooler.

  8. Joule heating in the mesosphere and thermosphere during the July 13, 1982, solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, R. G.; Emery, B. A.; Garcia, R. R.; Killeen, T. L.; Hays, P. B.; Reid, G. C.; Solomon, S.; Evans, D. S.; Spencer, N. W.; Brace, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    The solar proton event of July 13, 1982 produced considerable ionization in the polar-cap mesosphere. Energetic solar proton fluxes were measured by the NOAA-6 satellite. The DE-2 satellite measured the low-energy electrons, the ion drift velocity, and other atmospheric and ionospheric properties during the event in the region of the measured maximum electric field (189 mV/m at 2215 UT near 60 deg N), a Joule heating rate of 1-3 K/day is calculated between 70 and 80 km, exceeding the heating due to ozone absorption at noon in the summer hemisphere in that altitude range. The Joule heating rate above 90 km greatly exceeded 20 K/day. The calculated height-integrated Joule heating rate above 100 km in the same region exceeded 400 ergs/sq cm sec, and DE-2 near 350 km measured neutral winds of nearly 1000 m/s and neutral gas temperatures of over 2000 K. The overall ionospheric structure calculated below the DE-2 satellite is described.

  9. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  10. Assessment of Joule heating and its effects on electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic transport of solutes in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gongyue; Yan, Deguang; Yang, Chun; Gong, Haiqing; Chai, John Chee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2006-02-01

    Joule heating is inevitable when an electric field is applied across a conducting medium. It would impose limitations on the performance of electrokinetic microfluidic devices. This article presents a 3-D mathematical model for Joule heating and its effects on the EOF and electrophoretic transport of solutes in microfluidic channels. The governing equations were numerically solved using the finite-volume method. Experiments were carried out to investigate the Joule heating associated phenomena and to verify the numerical models. A rhodamine B-based thermometry technique was employed to measure the solution temperature distributions in microfluidic channels. The microparticle image velocimetry technique was used to measure the velocity profiles of EOF under the influence of Joule heating. The numerical solutions were compared with experimental results, and reasonable agreement was found. It is found that with the presence of Joule heating, the EOF velocity deviates from its normal "plug-like" profile. The numerical simulations show that Joule heating not only accelerates the sample transport but also distorts the shape of the sample band.

  11. Europe's Second Demographic Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Kaa, Dirk J.

    1987-01-01

    By 1985, fertility rates in Europe were below the replacement level of 2.1 births per woman in all but Albania, Ireland, Malta, Poland, and Turkey, following a steady decline from a 1965 postwar peak well above 2.5 in Northern, Western, and Southern Europe and an erratic trend from a lower level in Eastern Europe. Natural decrease (fewer births…

  12. Europe's Second Demographic Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Kaa, Dirk J.

    1987-01-01

    By 1985, fertility rates in Europe were below the replacement level of 2.1 births per woman in all but Albania, Ireland, Malta, Poland, and Turkey, following a steady decline from a 1965 postwar peak well above 2.5 in Northern, Western, and Southern Europe and an erratic trend from a lower level in Eastern Europe. Natural decrease (fewer births…

  13. The foot in multistage ultra-marathon runners: experience in a cohort study of 22 participants of the Trans Europe Footrace Project with mobile MRI

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Frank; Billich, Christian; Schuetz, Uwe H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 67 runners participated in the Trans Europe FootRace 2009 (TEFR09), a 4487 km (2789 mi) multistage ultra-marathon covering the south of Europe (Bari, Italy) to the North Cape. Reports on ultra-marathons are lacking, but the literature reports overuse injuries in athletes, especially to the Achilles tendon (AT), ankle or hind foot. Bone oedema may be related to exposure and is present in fatigue fractures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine prospectively if sustained maximal load during an ultra-marathon leads to damage to the foot. Design and participants In a cohort study, repeated scanning of the 22 athletes participating in the study was performed before and during (approximately every 1000 km) the race. Using the obtained fat saturated inversion recovery sequence, two experienced readers blinded to the clinical data rated the images regarding foot lesions. Statistical analysis included regression analysis and computation of the inter-rater reliability. Setting The TEFR09 course. MRI scanning was performed according to prearranged schedules for every participant, using a mobile 1.5 Tesla MRI unit on a trailer following the race. Primary outcome measures MRI data such as AT diameter, bone or tendon lesions, subcutaneous, plantar fascia or intraosseous oedema. Results The 22 study participants did not differ significantly from the total of the 67 TEFR09 runners regarding height, weight and age. The AT diameter increased significantly from 6.8 to 7.8 mm as did intraosseous signal, bone lesions and subcutaneous oedema. However, finishers differed only regarding plantar aponeurosis and subcutaneous oedema from participants aborting the TEFR09. Inter-rater reliability was 0.88–0.98. Conclusion Under the extreme stress of the TEFR09, an increase of the AT diameter as well as bone signal are thought to be adaptive since only subcutaneous oedema and plantar fascia oedema were related to abortion of the race. Trial registration number

  14. Reforming Upper Secondary Education in Europe. The Leonardo da Vinci Project Post-16 Strategies. Surveys of Strategies for Post-16 Education To Improve the Parity of Esteem for Initial Vocational Education in Eight European Educational Systems. Theory into Practice 92. Institute for Educational Research Publication Series B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasonen, Johanna, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers on the Leonardo da Vinci project: "Looking for Post-16 Education Strategies for Parity of Esteem in Europe" (Lasonen); "Improving Parity of Esteem as a Policy Goal" (Makinen, Volanen); "Alternative Strategies for Parity of Esteem between General/Academic and Vocational Education in…

  15. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  16. Project Copernicus: Cooperation Programme in Europe on Nature and Industry through Coordinated University Study. Round Table. Unesco-Standing Conference of Rectors, Presidents, and Vice Chancellors of the European Universities (CRE) (Catania, Sicily, April 5-8, 1989). Number 32. Papers on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This Project COPERNICUS (Cooperation Programme in Europe for Research on Nature and Industry through Coordinated University Studies) Round Table report considers efforts to identify priorities and objectives of the new alliance between the higher education community, industry, and international organizations in addressing today's environmental…

  17. The Contribution of Local Experiments and Negotiation Processes to Field-Level Learning in Emerging (Niche) Technologies: Meta-Analysis of 27 New Energy Projects in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Rob P. J. M.; Heiskanen, Eva; Lovio, Raimo; Hodson, Mike; Brohmann, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how local experiments and negotiation processes contribute to social and field-level learning. The analysis is framed within the niche development literature, which offers a framework for analyzing the relation between projects in local contexts and the transfer of local experiences into generally applicable rules. The…

  18. The Contribution of Local Experiments and Negotiation Processes to Field-Level Learning in Emerging (Niche) Technologies: Meta-Analysis of 27 New Energy Projects in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Rob P. J. M.; Heiskanen, Eva; Lovio, Raimo; Hodson, Mike; Brohmann, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how local experiments and negotiation processes contribute to social and field-level learning. The analysis is framed within the niche development literature, which offers a framework for analyzing the relation between projects in local contexts and the transfer of local experiences into generally applicable rules. The…

  19. Interconnection of Europe`s power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Manos, P.

    1996-03-01

    More than six years have passed since the Berlin Wall fell during Christmas of 1989, and a unified pan-European electricity-supply system is still not a reality. Progress toward that goal has been certain but slow. Technical and political differences still block the final step in the integration process: a full hookup between the grids of western and northern Europe and the transmission networks of the former Warsaw Pact nations. It has fallen to unified Germany, as the bridge between East and West, to serve as the catalyst of Europe`s electrical congress. This paper discusses the existing and planned interconnection along with a historical perspective.

  20. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe & Latin America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-06

    Grissonnanche, consultant at XP Conseil , leader of the MAP 1009B and 1009D projects, and president of Teletrust: "Security Research of Europe’s...transferred to an information and organization advisory company, called XP Conseil , which the project leader designate, Andre Grissonnanche, joined. Among...Teletrust This project previously called OSIS and currently headed by Andre Grissonnanche/XP Conseil (France), aims at: • proposing a universal system

  1. Inpatient drug utilization in Europe: nationwide data sources and a review of publications on a selected group of medicines (PROTECT project).

    PubMed

    Sabaté, Mònica; Ferrer, Pili; Ballarín, Elena; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Amelio, Justyne; Schmiedl, Sven; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2015-03-01

    Drug utilization (DU) studies in inpatient settings at a national level are rarely conducted. The main objective of this study was to review the general information on hospital medicine management in Europe and to report on the availability and characteristics of nationwide administrative drug consumption databases. A secondary objective was to perform a review of published studies on hospital DU of a group of selected drugs, focusing on methodological characteristics (ATC/DDD). General information on hospital drug management was retrieved from several websites, nationwide administrative drug consumption databases and reports published by governmental organizations. A PubMed search was conducted using keywords related to the selected group of drugs AND 'hospital drug utilization'. The data sources for hospital DU information varied widely and included 14 databases from 25 reviewed countries. Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Latvia, Norway and Sweden obtain information on inpatient DU at a national level from wholesalers/manufacturers. In Belgium, Italy and Portugal, drugs dispensed to patients in hospitals are registered at a national level. Data are freely available online only for Denmark and Iceland. From the PubMed search, of a total of 868 retrieved studies, only 13 studies used the ATC/DDD methodology. Although the number of DDD/100 bed-days was used in four studies, other units of measure were also used. The type of information provided for the inpatient sector allowed primarily for conducting DU research at an aggregated data level. The existence of national administrative structures to monitor hospital DU would contribute to promoting the rational use of medicines and improving the safety and quality of prescribing. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. Communication in cross-cultural consultations in primary care in Europe: the case for improvement. The rationale for the RESTORE FP 7 project.

    PubMed

    van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; Burns, Nicola; O'Donnell, Catherine; Mair, Frances; Spiegel, Wolfgang; Lionis, Christos; Dowrick, Chris; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brun, Tomas; MacFarlane, Anne

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to substantiate the importance of research about barriers and levers to the implementation of supports for cross-cultural communication in primary care settings in Europe. After an overview of migrant health issues, with the focus on communication in cross-cultural consultations in primary care and the importance of language barriers, we highlight the fact that there are serious problems in routine practice that persist over time and across different European settings. Language and cultural barriers hamper communication in consultations between doctors and migrants, with a range of negative effects including poorer compliance and a greater propensity to access emergency services. It is well established that there is a need for skilled interpreters and for professionals who are culturally competent to address this problem. A range of professional guidelines and training initiatives exist that support the communication in cross-cultural consultations in primary care. However, these are commonly not implemented in daily practice. It is as yet unknown why professionals do not accept or implement these guidelines and interventions, or under what circumstances they would do so. A new study involving six European countries, RESTORE (REsearch into implementation STrategies to support patients of different ORigins and language background in a variety of European primary care settings), aims to address these gaps in knowledge. It uses a unique combination of a contemporary social theory, normalisation process theory (NPT) and participatory learning and action (PLA) research. This should enhance understanding of the levers and barriers to implementation, as well as providing stakeholders, with the opportunity to generate creative solutions to problems experienced with the implementation of such interventions.

  3. Crustal structure variation from the Precambrian to Palaeozoic platforms in Europe imaged by the inversion of teleseismic receiver functions-project TOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piórko, M.; Grad, M.

    2002-07-01

    The TOR experiment (Teleseismic TOmography TORnquist) carried out in winter 1996/97 across the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in Germany, Denmark and Sweden has collected new data to investigate the transition zone between Precambrian and Palaeozoic Europe. In this study, seismograms of teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the broad-band TOR stations have been used to calculate the receiver functions. The time-domain inversion method has been applied to the receiver functions to compute S-wave velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath each station. The results of inversion down to 60 km depth provide new, independent information about the distribution of S-wave velocity in this area. Beneath the Swedish stations on Baltica, the thickness of the crust varies from about 45 to 50 km with mostly gradually increasing S-wave velocity and no sharp discontinuities while for Danish and German stations the crust is thinner (29-38 km) with a sharp Moho discontinuity. A very distinct S-wave low velocity layer was found at depth of 8-16 km in the upper crust of Baltica, supported by the results of refraction/deep seismic sounding experiments using both P and S waves. The map of Vp/Vs ratio beneath the c. 1000 km long TOR `profile' was obtained using the Vp velocity model from previous investigations. The values of Vp/Vs= 1.73 were found in the uppermost crust of Baltica and upper Avalonian crust. The low velocity layer in the upper crust of Baltica is characterized by high value of Vp/Vs= 1.85. Relatively low S-wave velocities are observed in the lower crust of Variscides (Vp/Vs= 1.79), Baltica (Vp/Vs= 1.83) and Avalonia (Vp/Vs= 1.91); in the uppermost mantle Vp/Vs values are 1.77, 1.79 and 1.82, respectively.

  4. BiodivERsA project VineDivers: Analysing interlinkages between soil biota and biodiversity-based ecosystem services in vineyards across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Winter, Silvia; Strauss, Peter; Querner, Pascal; Kriechbaum, Monika; Pachinger, Bärbel; Gómez, José A.; Campos, Mercedes; Landa, Blanca; Popescu, Daniela; Comsa, Maria; Iliescu, Maria; Tomoiaga, Liliana; Bunea, Claudiu-Ioan; Hoble, Adela; Marghitas, Liviu; Rusu, Teodor; Lora, Ángel; Guzmán, Gema; Bergmann, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Essential ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from diverse communities of above- and belowground organisms and their interactions. For centuries traditional viticulture was part of a multifunctional agricultural system including low-input grasslands and fruit trees resulting in a high functional biodiversity. However, in the last decades intensification and mechanisation of vineyard management caused a separation of production and conservation areas. As a result of management intensification including frequent tilling and/or use of pesticides several ecosystem services are affected leading to high rates of soil erosion, degradation of soil structure and fertility, contamination of groundwater and high levels of agricultural inputs. In this transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project we will examine to what extent differently intensive managed vineyards affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (e.g. earthworms, collembola, soil microorganisms) and how this feed back on aboveground biodiversity (e.g. weeds, pollinators). We will also investigate ecosystem services associated with soil faunal activity and biodiversity such as soil structure, the formation of stable soil aggregates, water infiltration, soil erosion as well as grape quality. These effects will become increasingly important as more extreme precipitation events are predicted with climate change. The socio-economic part of the project will investigate the role of diversely structured, species-rich viticultural landscapes as a cultural heritage providing aesthetic values for human well-being and recreation. The project objectives will be analysed at plot, field (vineyard) and landscape scales in vineyards located in Spain, France, Romania and Austria. A detailed engagement and dissemination plan for stakeholder at the different governance levels will accompany scientific research and will contribute to the implementation of best-practice recommendations for policy and farmers.

  5. Effect of Joule heating and current crowding on electromigration in mobile technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, K. N.; Liu, Yingxia; Li, Menglu

    2017-03-01

    In the present era of big data and internet of things, the use of microelectronic products in all aspects of our life is manifested by the ubiquitous presence of mobile devices as i-phones and wearable i-products. These devices are facing the need for higher power and greater functionality applications such as in i-health, yet they are limited by physical size. At the moment, software (Apps) is much ahead of hardware in mobile technology. To advance hardware, the end of Moore's law in two-dimensional integrated circuits can be extended by three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs). The concept of 3D ICs has been with us for more than ten years. The challenge in 3D IC technology is dense packing by using both vertical and horizontal interconnections. Mass production of 3D IC devices is behind schedule due to cost because of low yield and uncertain reliability. Joule heating is serious in a dense structure because of heat generation and dissipation. A change of reliability paradigm has advanced from failure at a specific circuit component to failure at a system level weak-link. Currently, the electronic industry is introducing 3D IC devices in mainframe computers, where cost is not an issue, for the purpose of collecting field data of failure, especially the effect of Joule heating and current crowding on electromigration. This review will concentrate on the positive feedback between Joule heating and electromigration, resulting in an accelerated system level weak-link failure. A new driving force of electromigration, the electric potential gradient force due to current crowding, will be reviewed critically. The induced failure tends to occur in the low current density region.

  6. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Glocer, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvénic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvénic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvénic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvénic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  7. Solar wind effect on Joule heating in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygrén, T.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of solar wind on several electrodynamic parameters, measured simultaneously by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat) and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4° cgmLat), has been evaluated statistically. The main emphasis is on Joule heating rate QJ, which has been estimated by taking into account the neutral wind. In addition, a generally used proxy QE, which is the Pedersen conductance times the electric field squared, has been calculated. The most important findings are as follows. (i) The decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to winds reported by Aikio et al. (2012) requires southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of Joule heating centered typically at 14-15 magnetic local time (MLT) is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz + /By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetospheric electromagnetic energy input, and the median value is about 3 mW/m2. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated QE for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  8. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  9. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K-1. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  10. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  11. MHD stagnation point flow over a stretching cylinder with variable thermal conductivity and joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, Shah; Sakidin, Hamzah; Nazar, Roslinda Mohd

    2016-11-01

    The behavior of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow of viscous fluid near the stagnation point over a stretching cylinder with variable thermal conductivity is analyzed. Thermal conductivity is assumed to be linearly related with temperature. The joule heating effects due to magnetic field is also encountered here. Analytical solutions are developed for both momentum and energy equations by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The variations of different parameters on the velocity and temperature distributions along with the skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are displayed graphically. Numerical values for the skin friction coefficient are calculated and discussed

  12. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  13. Clogging in micromachined Joule-Thomson coolers: Mechanism and preventive measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H. S.; Vanapalli, S.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2013-07-01

    Micromachined Joule-Thomson coolers can be used for cooling small electronic devices. However, a critical issue for long-term operation of these microcoolers is the clogging caused by the deposition of water that is present as impurity in the working fluid. We present a model that describes the deposition process considering diffusion and kinetics of water molecules. In addition, the deposition and sublimation process was imaged, and the experimental observation fits well to the modeling predictions. By changing the temperature profile along the microcooler, the operating time of the microcooler under test at 105 K extends from 11 to 52 h.

  14. Revisit of Joule heating in CE: the contribution of surface conductance.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xiangchun

    2007-08-01

    We present in this short communication the true form of Joule heating in CE which considers the contribution of surface conductance. This increased conductivity of electrolyte solution within electrical double layer has never been discussed in previous studies. The resultant intensive heat generation near the capillary wall is demonstrated using numerical simulation to produce not a locally strong temperature rise, but an additional temperature elevation in the whole solution compared to the model neglecting surface conductance. The latter effect is, however, negligible in typical CE while it might become significant in very small channels.

  15. MHD Flow with Hall current and Joule Heating Effects over an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Jagadeeshwar, P.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of Hall current and Joule heating on flow, heat and mass transfer over an exponentially stretching sheet in a viscous fluid. Using similarity transformations the governing nonlinear coupled equations are converted into ordinary differential equations. These equations are linearized using the successive linearization method and then solved using the Chebyshev pseudo spectral method. The influence of magnetic parameter, Hall parameter, suction/injection parameter and slip parameter on the physical quantities are presented graphically. The obtained results are compared with the previously published results for special cases.

  16. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  17. Circulation in the high-latitude thermosphere due to electric fields and Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Megill, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Electric fields in the earth's upper atmosphere are capable of setting the neutral atmosphere in motion via ion-neutral collisions as well as pressure gradients from resultant Joule heating. By means of simple models for the high-latitude thermosphere and electric fields a simplified set of coupled equations is solved which show that moderate electric fields, when present for a period of several hours, are capable of displacing the neutral atmosphere of the order of 50 km in the vertical, a few hundred kilometers in the north-south direction and over 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  18. Circulation in the high-latitude thermosphere due to electric fields and Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Megill, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Electric fields in the earth's upper atmosphere are capable of setting the neutral atmosphere in motion via ion-neutral collisions as well as pressure gradients from resultant Joule heating. By means of simple models for the high-latitude thermosphere and electric fields a simplified set of coupled equations is solved which show that moderate electric fields, when present for a period of several hours, are capable of displacing the neutral atmosphere of the order of 50 km in the vertical, a few hundred kilometers in the north-south direction and over 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  19. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  20. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Levine, Edlyn V; Burns, Michael M; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  1. The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Teachers' Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Russian and East European Inst.

    Basic material on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe is presented in this teachers' guide in such a way that teachers can incorporate it into the daily curriculum or utilize it through special units or projects. The guide is divided into two sections, one covering the Soviet Union, the other Eastern Europe. The Soviet Union section discusses…

  2. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  3. Particle and Joule heating of the neutral polar thermosphere in cusp region using atmosphere Explorer-C satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffis, M.; Nisbet, J. S.; Bleuler, E.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that thermospheric heating in the auroral zone and polar cap is of great importance to the variations in the high-latitude neutral wind and the resulting global temperature and densities. The considered investigation is concerned with relating in a quantitative manner the energy inputs from the Joule heating and particle inputs with the thermospheric responses, taking into account the cusp region, and the region of the eastward auroral electrojet. The data used in the investigation were obtained by the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite in late December 1974. Attention is given to electric fields derived from ion drift measurements, electric field strength and particle energy flux measured by the low energy electron experiment for AE-C orbit 4708, electron density contours, Joule heating contours, and height integrated Joule heating and particle energy flux.

  4. Dynamically tracking the joule heating effect on the voltage induced metal-insulator transition in VO2 crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. M.; Chen, S.; Fan, L. L.; Chen, Y. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Ren, H.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zou, C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Insulator to metal phase transitions driven by external electric field are one of the hottest topics in correlated oxide study. While this electric triggered phenomena always mixes the electric field switching effect and joule thermal effect together, which are difficult to clarify the intrinsic mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical process of voltage-triggered metal-insulator transition (MIT) in a VO2 crystal film and observe the temperature dependence of the threshold voltages and switching delay times, which can be explained quite well based on a straightforward joule thermal model. By conducting the voltage controlled infrared transmittance measurement, the delayed infrared transmission change is also observed, further confirming the homogeneous switching process for a large-size film. All of these results show strong evidences that joule thermal effect plays a dominated role in electric-field-induced switching of VO2 crystal.

  5. Heterogeneous nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in sub-25 nm thin phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    We measure heterogeneous power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) films of 11 and 22 nm thin Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), with sub-50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. The heterogeneous Joule and Peltier effects are explained using a finite element analysis (FEA) model with a mixture of hexagonal close-packed and face-centered cubic GST phases. Transfer length method measurements and effective media theory calculations yield the GST resistivity, GST-TiW contact resistivity, and crystal fraction of the GST films at different annealing temperatures. Further comparison of SJEM measurements and FEA modeling also predicts the thermopower of thin GST films. These measurements of nanometer-scale Joule, thermoelectric, and interface effects in PCM films could lead to energy-efficient designs of highly scaled PCM technology.

  6. In situ bioremediation in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, A.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

  7. The Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) project--design, population and data harmonization of a large-scale, international study.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo; Bobak, Martin; Borsch-Supan, Axel; Brenner, Hermann; Eriksson, Sture; Grodstein, Fran; Jansen, Eugene; Jenab, Mazda; Juerges, Hendrik; Kampman, Ellen; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Park, Yikyung; Tjonneland, Anne; van Duijn, Cornelia; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wolk, Alicja; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia

    2014-12-01

    There is a public health demand to prevent health conditions which lead to increased morbidity and mortality among the rapidly-increasing elderly population. Data for the incidence of such conditions exist in cohort studies worldwide, which, however, differ in various aspects. The Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) project aims at harmonizing data from existing major longitudinal studies for the elderly whilst focussing on cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancer, fractures and cognitive impairment in order to estimate their prevalence, incidence and cause-specific mortality, and identify lifestyle, socioeconomic, and genetic determinants and biomarkers for the incidence of and mortality from these conditions. A survey instrument assessing ageing-related conditions of the elderly will be also developed. Fourteen cohort studies participate in CHANCES with 683,228 elderly (and 150,210 deaths), from 23 European and three non-European countries. So far, 287 variables on health conditions and a variety of exposures, including biomarkers and genetic data have been harmonized. Different research hypotheses are investigated with meta-analyses. The results which will be produced can help international organizations, governments and policy-makers to better understand the broader implications and consequences of ageing and thus make informed decisions.

  8. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  9. EWork in Southern Europe. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altieri, G.; Birindelli, L.; Bracaglia, P.; Tartaglione, C.; Albarracin, D.; Vaquero, J.; Fissamber, V.

    Part of the EMERGENCE project to measure and map employment relocation in a global economy in the new communications environment, this report on eWork in southern Europe (SE) combines results of a European employer survey, case studies, and data from other sources. Chapter 1 analyzes national and sector dimensions. Chapter 2 studies eWork practice…

  10. Science across Europe--Why It Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Gives background information on the development of the Science Across Europe (SAE) project and its goals, which include creating a global dimension to education, raising awareness of how science and technology affect society, and providing opportunities to communicate with other countries. Presents information for educators in the sciences,…

  11. Science across Europe--Why It Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Gives background information on the development of the Science Across Europe (SAE) project and its goals, which include creating a global dimension to education, raising awareness of how science and technology affect society, and providing opportunities to communicate with other countries. Presents information for educators in the sciences,…

  12. Impact of Joule Heating and pH on Biosolids Electro-Dewatering.

    PubMed

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Beton, Raphaël; Hill, Reghan J; Frigon, Dominic

    2015-05-05

    Electro-dewatering (ED) is a novel technology to reduce the overall costs of residual biosolids processing, transport, and disposal. In this study, we investigated Joule heating and pH as parameters controlling the dewaterability limit, dewatering rate, and energy efficiency. Temperature-controlled electrodes revealed that Joule heating enhances water removal by increasing evaporation and electro-osmotic flow. High temperatures increased the dewatering rate, but had little impact on the dewaterability limit and energy efficiency. Analysis of horizontal layers after 15-min ED suggests electro-osmotic flow reversal, as evidenced by a shifting of the point of minimum moisture content from the anode toward the cathode. This flow reversal was also confirmed by the pH at the anode being below the isoelectric point, as ascertained by pH titration. The important role of pH on ED was further studied by adding acid/base solutions to biosolids prior to ED. An acidic pH reduced the biosolids charge while simultaneously increasing the dewatering efficiency. Thus, process optimization depends on trade-offs between speed and efficiency, according to physicochemical properties of the biosolids microstructure.

  13. Thermographic NDT based on transient temperature field under Joule effect heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sakagami, Takahide; Ogura, Keiji

    1994-12-31

    The thermographic NDT based on the transient temperature distribution under the Joule effect heating by an electric current was discussed. Two different types of inspection methods, i.e., the singular method and the insulation method were examined. The singular method based on the heat concentration at the crack tip was successfully applied to the identification of the through-thickness and surface cracks embedded in steel plates. The resolution of the crack identification by the singular method was examined by the current intensity factor and the thermal diffusion length. The insulation method based on the temperature turbulence appears on the sample surface due to the thermal insulation of the defect was tested for the identification of the delaminated defect in CFRP. Two methods of the Joule effect heating, the direct current application and the induction heating, were successfully applied for the thermographic NDT of the delaminated defects in CFRP samples. The thermographic NDT developed in this study was found to be applicable to nondestructive flaw- and defect-inspection both in metallic and composite materials.

  14. Simple and strong: twisted silver painted nylon artificial muscle actuated by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M.; Rafie Ravandi, Ali; Hunter, Ian W.; Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Foroughi, Javad; Naficy, Sina; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Baughman, Ray H.; Madden, John D. W.

    2014-03-01

    Highly oriented nylon and polyethylene fibres shrink in length when heated and expand in diameter. By twisting and then coiling monofilaments of these materials to form helical springs, the anisotropic thermal expansion has recently been shown to enable tensile actuation of up to 49% upon heating. Joule heating, by passing a current through a conductive coating on the surface of the filament, is a convenient method of controlling actuation. In previously reported work this has been done using highly flexible carbon nanotube sheets or commercially available silver coated fibres. In this work silver paint is used as the Joule heating element at the surface of the muscle. Up to 29% linear actuation is observed with energy and power densities reaching 840 kJ m-3 (528 J kg-1) and 1.1 kW kg-1 (operating at 0.1 Hz, 4% strain, 1.4 kg load). This simple coating method is readily accessible and can be applied to any polymer filament. Effective use of this technique relies on uniform coating to avoid temperature gradients.

  15. The first determination of the Planck constant with the joule balance NIM-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Liu, Yongmeng; Xu, Jinxin; Bai, Yang; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Gang; You, Qiang; Wang, Dawei; Li, Shisong; He, Qing; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-10-01

    The National Institute of Metrology (NIM, China) proposed a joule balance method to measure the Planck constant in 2006, and built the first prototype NIM-1 to verify its principle with a relative uncertainty of 8.9  ×  10–6 by 2013. Since 2013, a new joule balance NIM-2 has been designed, with a series of improvements to reduce the measurement uncertainty. By April 2017, NIM-2 has been constructed and can be employed to measure the Planck constant in vacuum. A first measurement on NIM-2 yields a determination of the Planck constant is 6.626 069 2(16)  ×  10–34 Js with a relative uncertainty of 2.4  ×  10–7. The determination differs in relative terms by  ‑1.27  ×  10–7 from the CODATA 2014 value. Further improvement of NIM-2 is still in progress towards 10–8 level uncertainty in the future.

  16. Role of Joule heating in dispersive mixing effects in electrophoretic cells: convective-diffusive transport aspects.

    PubMed

    Bosse, M A; Arce, P

    2000-03-01

    This contribution addresses the problem of solute dispersion in a free convection electrophoretic cell for the batch mode of operation, caused by the Joule heating generation. The problem is analyzed by using the two-problem approach originally proposed by Bosse and Arce (Electrophoresis 2000, 21, 1018-1025). The approach identifies the carrier fluid problem and the solute problem. This contribution is focused on the latter. The strategy uses a sequential coupling between the energy, momentum and mass conservation equations and, based on geometrical and physical assumptions for the system, leads to the derivation of analytical temperature and velocity profiles inside the cell. These results are subsequently used in the derivation of the effective dispersion coefficient for the cell by using the method of area averaging. The result shows the first design equation that relates the Joule heating effect directly to the solute dispersion in the cell. Some illustrative results are presented and discussed and their implication to the operation and design of the device is addressed. Due to the assumptions made, the equation may be viewed as an upper boundary for applications such as free flow electrophoresis.

  17. Testing of a scanning adiabatic calorimeter with Joule effect heating of the sample.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Rodríguez, G; Yáñez-Limón, J M; Contreras-Servin, C A; Herrera-Gomez, A

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a scanning adiabatic resistive calorimeter (SARC) developed to measure the specific enthalpy of viscous and gel-type materials. The sample is heated employing the Joule effect. The cell is constituted by a cylindrical jacket and two pistons, and the sample is contained inside the jacket between the two pistons. The upper piston can slide to allow for thermal expansion and to keep the pressure constant. The pistons also function as electrodes for the sample. While the sample is heated through the Joule effect, the electrodes and the jacket are independently heated to the same temperature of the sample using automatic control. This minimizes the heat transport between the sample and its surroundings. The energy to the sample is supplied by applying to the electrodes an ac voltage in the kilohertz range, establishing a current in the sample and inducing electric dissipation. This energy can be measured with enough exactitude to determine the heat capacity. This apparatus also allows for the quantification of the thermal conductivity by reproducing the evolution of the temperature as heat is introduced only to one of the pistons. To this end, the system was modeled using finite element calculations. This dual capability proved to be very valuable for correction in the determination of the specific enthalpy. The performance of the SARC was evaluated by comparing the heat capacity results to those obtained by differential scanning calorimetry measurements using a commercial apparatus. The analyzed samples were zeolite, bauxite, hematite, bentonite, rice flour, corn flour, and potato starch.

  18. Testing of a scanning adiabatic calorimeter with Joule effect heating of the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro-Rodríguez, G.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Contreras-Servin, C. A.; Herrera-Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a scanning adiabatic resistive calorimeter (SARC) developed to measure the specific enthalpy of viscous and gel-type materials. The sample is heated employing the Joule effect. The cell is constituted by a cylindrical jacket and two pistons, and the sample is contained inside the jacket between the two pistons. The upper piston can slide to allow for thermal expansion and to keep the pressure constant. The pistons also function as electrodes for the sample. While the sample is heated through the Joule effect, the electrodes and the jacket are independently heated to the same temperature of the sample using automatic control. This minimizes the heat transport between the sample and its surroundings. The energy to the sample is supplied by applying to the electrodes an ac voltage in the kilohertz range, establishing a current in the sample and inducing electric dissipation. This energy can be measured with enough exactitude to determine the heat capacity. This apparatus also allows for the quantification of the thermal conductivity by reproducing the evolution of the temperature as heat is introduced only to one of the pistons. To this end, the system was modeled using finite element calculations. This dual capability proved to be very valuable for correction in the determination of the specific enthalpy. The performance of the SARC was evaluated by comparing the heat capacity results to those obtained by differential scanning calorimetry measurements using a commercial apparatus. The analyzed samples were zeolite, bauxite, hematite, bentonite, rice flour, corn flour, and potato starch.

  19. Joule-Heating-Induced Damage in Cu-Al Wedge Bonds Under Current Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Yu-Min; Ouyang, Fan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Copper wires are increasingly used to replace gold wires in wire-bonding technology owing to their better electrical properties and lower cost. However, not many studies have been conducted on electromigration-induced failure of Cu wedge bonds on Al metallization. In this study, we investigated the failure mechanism of Cu-Al wedge bonds under high current stressing from 4 × 104 A/cm2 to 1 × 105 A/cm2 at ambient temperature of 175°C. The resistance evolution of samples during current stressing and the microstructure of the joint interface between the Cu wire and Al-Si bond pad were examined. The results showed that abnormal crack formation accompanying significant intermetallic compound growth was observed at the second joint of the samples, regardless of the direction of electric current for both current densities of 4 × 104 A/cm2 and 8 × 104 A/cm2. We propose that this abnormal crack formation at the second joint is mainly due to the higher temperature induced by the greater Joule heating at the second joint for the same current stressing, because of its smaller bonded area compared with the first joint. The corresponding fluxes induced by the electric current and chemical potential difference between Cu and Al were calculated and compared to explain the failure mechanism. For current density of 1 × 105 A/cm2, the Cu wire melted within 0.5 h owing to serious Joule heating.

  20. A study of Joule heating-induced breakdown of carbon nanotube interconnects.

    PubMed

    Santini, C A; Vereecken, P M; Volodin, A; Groeseneken, G; De Gendt, S; Haesendonck, C Van

    2011-09-30

    We investigate breakdown of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects induced by Joule heating in air and under high vacuum conditions (10(-5) mbar). A CNT with a diameter of 18 nm, which is grown by chemical vapor deposition to connect opposing titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes, is able to carry an electrical power up to 0.6 mW before breaking down under vacuum, with a corresponding maximum current density up to 8 × 10(7) A cm(-2) (compared to 0.16 mW and 2 × 10(7) A cm(-2) in air). Decoration with electrochemically deposited Ni particles allows protection of the CNT interconnect against oxidation and improvement of the heat release through the surrounding environment. A CNT decorated with Ni particles is able to carry an increased electrical power of about 1.5 mW before breaking down under vacuum, with a corresponding maximum current density as high as 1.2 × 10(8) A cm(-2). The Joule heating produced along the current carrying CNT interconnect is able to melt the Ni particles and promotes the formation of titanium carbon nitride which improves the electrical contact between the CNT and the TiN electrodes.

  1. Nanoscale Joule heating and electromigration enhanced ripening of silver nanowire contacts.

    PubMed

    Song, Tze-Bin; Chen, Yu; Chung, Choong-Heui; Yang, Yang Michael; Bob, Brion; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Li, Gang; Tu, King-Ning; Huang, Yu; Yang, Yang

    2014-03-25

    Solution-processed metallic nanowire thin film is a promising candidate to replace traditional indium tin oxide as the next-generation transparent and flexible electrode. To date however, the performance of these electrodes is limited by the high contact resistance between contacting nanowires; so improving the point contacts between these nanowires remains a major challenge. Existing methods for reducing the contact resistance require either a high processing power, long treatment time, or the addition of chemical reagents, which could lead to increased manufacturing cost and damage the underlying substrate or device. Here, a nanoscale point reaction process is introduced as a fast and low-power-consumption way to improve the electrical contact properties between metallic nanowires. This is achieved via current-assisted localized joule heating accompanied by electromigration. Localized joule heating effectively targets the high-resistance contact points between nanowires, leading to the automatic removal of surface ligands, welding of contacting nanowires, and the reshaping of the contact pathway between the nanowires to form a more desirable geometry of low resistance for interwire conduction. This result shows the interplay between thermal and electrical interactions at the highly reactive nanocontacts and highlights the control of the nanoscale reaction as a simple and effective way of turning individual metallic nanowires into a highly conductive interconnected nanowire network. The temperature of the adjacent device layers can be kept close to room temperature during the process, making this method especially suitable for use in devices containing thermally sensitive materials such as polymer solar cells.

  2. GEM-CEDAR Study of Ionospheric Energy Input and Joule Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Shim, Jasoon

    2012-01-01

    We are studying ionospheric model performance for six events selected for the GEM-CEDAR modeling challenge. DMSP measurements of electric and magnetic fields are converted into Poynting Flux values that estimate the energy input into the ionosphere. Models generate rates of ionospheric Joule dissipation that are compared to the energy influx. Models include the ionosphere models CTIPe and Weimer and the ionospheric electrodynamic outputs of global magnetosphere models SWMF, LFM, and OpenGGCM. This study evaluates the model performance in terms of overall balance between energy influx and dissipation and tests the assumption that Joule dissipation occurs locally where electromagnetic energy flux enters the ionosphere. We present results in terms of skill scores now commonly used in metrics and validation studies and we can measure the agreement in terms of temporal and spatial distribution of dissipation (i.e, location of auroral activity) along passes of the DMSP satellite with the passes' proximity to the magnetic pole and solar wind activity level.

  3. Numerical modeling of Joule heating effects in insulator-based dielectrophoresis microdevices.

    PubMed

    Kale, Akshay; Patel, Saurin; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2013-03-01

    Insulator-based DEP (iDEP) has been established as a powerful tool for manipulating particles in microfluidic devices. However, Joule heating may become an issue in iDEP microdevices due to the local amplification of electric field around the insulators. This results in an electrothermal force that can manifest itself in the flow field in the form of circulations, thus affecting the particle motion. We develop herein a transient, 3D, full-scale numerical model to study Joule heating and its effects on the coupled transport of charge, heat, and fluid in an iDEP device with a rectangular constriction microchannel. This model is validated by comparing the simulation results with the experimentally obtained fluid flow patterns and particle images that were reported in our recent works. It identifies a significant difference in the time scales of the electric, temperature, and flow fields in iDEP microdevices. It also predicts the locations of electrothermal flow circulations in different halves of the channel at the upstream and downstream of the constriction.

  4. Stepwise compensation waveform generation by using Josephson voltage standards for joule balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Xu, Jinxin; You, Qiang; Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Flux linkage difference in the new joule balance can be obtained by the time integration of the induced voltage u(t) from the suspended coil relative to a moving magnet driven by a dc motor translation platform. Due to the finite acceleration of the dc motor, the transition and waveform of u(t) are finite and not regular. To accurately measure the time integration of u(t), a compensation waveform with precision time integration should be synthesized. In this paper, a stepwise compensation waveform is synthesized by a programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) according to u(t). The accuracy of measuring the stepwise waveform with multiple transitions can be improved by reducing the ratio of the time integrated value of the total transitions to the total waveform less than one part in 102 in the joule balance. The time integration of the rise/fall transition is measured by a synchronized reference square wave generated by another PJVS system. With the total time integration more than 20 Vs, the uncertainty of the generated stepwise waveform is within 5.2  ×  10-8 VsV-1s-1. The result confirms that the PJVS has the capability to generate a stepwise compensation voltage for flux linkage difference measurement.

  5. Applied Linguistics in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution developments in Applied Linguistics in Europe are linked to major social changes that have taken place over the last decades. These include: The decline of the USSR and the end of the cold war; The development of the EEC and the EU and fading of borders; The economic growth of Western Europe; Labor migration from the south to…

  6. Immigrant Languages in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extra, Guus, Ed.; Verhoeven, Ludo, Ed.

    Papers from a 1990 Dutch colloquium on immigrant language varieties in Europe are presented in four categories: (1) use of immigrant language varieties in Europe; (2) first language acquisition in a second language context; (3) code-switching; and (4) language maintenance and loss. Papers include: "Sweden Finnish" (Jarmo Lainio);…

  7. Applied Linguistics in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution developments in Applied Linguistics in Europe are linked to major social changes that have taken place over the last decades. These include: The decline of the USSR and the end of the cold war; The development of the EEC and the EU and fading of borders; The economic growth of Western Europe; Labor migration from the south to…

  8. Western Europe's America Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovits, Andrei S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Europe's anti-Americanism stance. He observes that Europe's aversion to America has become greater, louder, and more determined, and that it has unified Western Europeans more than any other political emotion (with the exception of a common hostility toward Israel). The author contends that the many disastrous…

  9. Immigrant Languages in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extra, Guus, Ed.; Verhoeven, Ludo, Ed.

    Papers from a 1990 Dutch colloquium on immigrant language varieties in Europe are presented in four categories: (1) use of immigrant language varieties in Europe; (2) first language acquisition in a second language context; (3) code-switching; and (4) language maintenance and loss. Papers include: "Sweden Finnish" (Jarmo Lainio);…

  10. Towards a greater understanding of the illicit tobacco trade in Europe: a review of the PMI funded ‘Project Star’ report

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Anna B; Rowell, Andy; Gallus, Silvano; Lugo, Alessandra; Joossens, Luk; Sims, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Following a legal agreement with the European Union (EU), Philip Morris International (PMI) commissions a yearly report (‘Project Star’, PS) on the European illicit cigarette trade from KPMG, the global accountancy firm. Methods Review of PS 2010 report. Comparison with data from independent sources including a 2010 pan-European survey (N=18 056). Findings Within PS, data covering all 27 EU countries are entered into a model. While the model itself seems appropriate, concerns are identified with the methodologies underlying the data inputs and thus their quality: there is little transparency over methodologies; interview data underestimate legal non-domestic product partly by failing to account for legal cross-border sales; illicit cigarette estimates rely on tobacco industry empty pack surveys which may overestimate illicit; and there is an over-reliance on data supplied by PMI with inadequate external validation. Thus, PMI sales data are validated using PMI smoking prevalence estimates, yet PMI is unable to provide sales (shipment) data for the Greek islands and its prevalence estimates differ grossly from independent data. Consequently, comparisons with independent data suggest PS will tend to overestimate illicit cigarette levels particularly where cross-border shopping is frequent (Austria, Finland, France) and in Western compared with Eastern European countries. The model also provides data on the nature of the illicit cigarette market independent of seizure data suggesting that almost a quarter of the illicit cigarette market in 2010 comprised PMI's own brands compared with just 5% counterfeited PMI brands; a finding hidden in PMI's public representation of the data. Conclusions PS overestimates illicit cigarette levels in some European countries and suggests PMI's supply chain control is inadequate. Its publication serves the interests of PMI over those of the EU and its member states. PS requires greater transparency, external scrutiny and

  11. One type of hydrodynamic instability in joule heating of a fluid near an ion-selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, N. V.; Khasmatulina, N. Yu.; Ganchenko, G. S.; Kalaidin, E. N.; Kiriy, V. A.; Demekhin, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    The stability of the equilibrium state of an electrolyte in a horizontal microgap between two ionselective surfaces in an electric field is studied with the Joule heating of the fluid taken into account. It is established that the Joule heating can lead to instability at the potential differences, which are several times smaller than those in the isothermal case. The effects of microscale thermal instability differ from the Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection: the destabilization occurs upon heating in the upper part of the gap.

  12. Large proportions of overweight and obese children, as well as their parents, underestimate children's weight status across Europe. The ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project.

    PubMed

    Manios, Yannis; Moschonis, George; Karatzi, Kalliopi; Androutsos, Odysseas; Chinapaw, Mai; Moreno, Luis A; Bere, Elling; Molnar, Denes; Jan, Natasha; Dössegger, Alain; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Singh, Amika; Brug, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the magnitude and country-specific differences in underestimation of children's weight status by children and their parents in Europe and to further explore its associations with family characteristics and sociodemographic factors. Children's weight and height were objectively measured. Parental anthropometric and sociodemographic data were self-reported. Children and their parents were asked to comment on children's weight status based on five-point Likert-type scales, ranging from 'I am much too thin' to 'I am much too fat' (children) and 'My child's weight is way too little' to 'My child's weight is way too much' (parents). These data were combined with children's actual weight status, in order to assess underestimation of children's weight status by children themselves and by their parents, respectively. Chi-square tests and multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the aims of the current study. Eight European countries participating in the ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project. A school-based survey among 6113 children aged 10-12 years and their parents. In the total sample, 42·9 % of overweight/obese children and 27·6 % of parents of overweight/obese children underestimated their and their children's weight status, respectively. A higher likelihood for this underestimation of weight status by children and their parents was observed in Eastern and Southern compared with Central/Northern countries. Overweight or obese parents (OR=1·81; 95 % CI 1·39, 2·35 and OR=1·78, 95 % CI 1·22, 2·60), parents of boys (OR=1·32; 95 % CI 1·05, 1·67) and children from overweight/obese (OR=1·60; 95 % CI 1·29, 1·98 and OR=1·76; 95 % CI 1·29, 2·41) or unemployed parents (OR=1·53; 95 % CI 1·22, 1·92) were more likely to underestimate children's weight status. Children of overweight or obese parents, those from Eastern and Southern Europe, boys, younger children and

  13. Which specific causes of death are associated with short term exposure to fine and coarse particles in Southern Europe? Results from the MED-PARTICLES project.

    PubMed

    Samoli, Evangelia; Stafoggia, Massimo; Rodopoulou, Sophia; Ostro, Bart; Alessandrini, Ester; Basagaña, Xavier; Díaz, Julio; Faustini, Annunziata; Gandini, Martina; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Kelessis, Apostolos G; Le Tertre, Alain; Linares, Cristina; Ranzi, Andrea; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Katsouyanni, Klea; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the short-term effects of particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10μm (PM2.5-10) and less than 10μm (PM10) on deaths from diabetes, cardiac and cerebrovascular causes, lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 10 European Mediterranean metropolitan areas participating in the MED-PARTICLES project during 2001-2010. In the first stage of the analysis, data from each city were analyzed separately using Poisson regression models, whereas in the second stage, the city-specific air pollution estimates were combined to obtain overall estimates. We investigated the effects following immediate (lags 0-1), delayed (lags 2-5) and prolonged exposure (lags 0-5) and effect modification patterns by season. We evaluated the sensitivity of our results to co-pollutant exposures or city-specific model choice. We applied threshold models to investigate the pattern of selected associations. For a 10μg/m(3) increase in two days' PM2.5 exposure there was a 1.23% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): -1.63%, 4.17%) increase in diabetes deaths, while six days' exposure statistically significantly increased cardiac deaths by 1.33% (95% CI: 0.27, 2.40%), COPD deaths by 2.53% (95% CI: -0.01%, 5.14%) and LRTI deaths by 1.37% (95% CI: -1.94%, 4.78%). PM2.5 results were robust to co-pollutant adjustments and alternative modeling approaches. Stronger effects were observed in the warm season. Coarse particles displayed positive, even if not statistically significant, associations with mortality due to diabetes and cardiac causes that were more variable depending on exposure period, co-pollutant and seasonality adjustment. Our findings provide support for positive associations between PM2.5 and mortality due to diabetes, cardiac causes, COPD, and to a lesser degree to cerebrovascular causes, in the European Mediterranean region, which seem to drive the particles short-term health effects.

  14. Employment and Occupations in Europe in the 1980s. Effects of Technical and Economic Changes on the Employment Situation. Project No. 1 of the CCC: "Preparation for Life." Preparation for Working Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacace, Nicole

    This paper is an attempt to forecast for 1990 the following: (1) employment structures in the member countries of the Council of Europe for all three major sectors of the economy; and (2) employment structures in the Council of Europe for the nine major sectors of the manufacturing industry (food, textiles, leather and clothing, wood and…

  15. Employment and Occupations in Europe in the 1980s. Effects of Technical and Economic Changes on the Employment Situation. Project No. 1 of the CCC: "Preparation for Life." Preparation for Working Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacace, Nicole

    This paper is an attempt to forecast for 1990 the following: (1) employment structures in the member countries of the Council of Europe for all three major sectors of the economy; and (2) employment structures in the Council of Europe for the nine major sectors of the manufacturing industry (food, textiles, leather and clothing, wood and…

  16. The TransEurope FootRace Project: longitudinal data acquisition in a cluster randomized mobile MRI observational cohort study on 44 endurance runners at a 64-stage 4,486 km transcontinental ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Uwe H W; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Knechtle, Beat; Machann, Jürgen; Wiedelbach, Heike; Ehrhardt, Martin; Freund, Wolfgang; Gröninger, Stefan; Brunner, Horst; Schulze, Ingo; Brambs, Hans-Jürgen; Billich, Christian

    2012-07-19

    The TransEurope FootRace 2009 (TEFR09) was one of the longest transcontinental ultramarathons with an extreme endurance physical load of running nearly 4,500 km in 64 days. The aim of this study was to assess the wide spectrum of adaptive responses in humans regarding the different tissues, organs and functional systems being exposed to such chronic physical endurance load with limited time for regeneration and resulting negative energy balance. A detailed description of the TEFR project and its implemented measuring methods in relation to the hypotheses are presented. The most important research tool was a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner mounted on a mobile unit following the ultra runners from stage to stage each day. Forty-four study volunteers (67% of the participants) were cluster randomized into two groups for MRI measurements (22 subjects each) according to the project protocol with its different research modules: musculoskeletal system, brain and pain perception, cardiovascular system, body composition, and oxidative stress and inflammation. Complementary to the diverse daily mobile MR-measurements on different topics (muscle and joint MRI, T2*-mapping of cartilage, MR-spectroscopy of muscles, functional MRI of the brain, cardiac and vascular cine MRI, whole body MRI) other methods were also used: ice-water pain test, psychometric questionnaires, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold thickness and limb circumference measurements, daily urine samples, periodic blood samples and electrocardiograms (ECG). Thirty volunteers (68%) reached the finish line at North Cape. The mean total race speed was 8.35 km/hour. Finishers invested 552 hours in total. The completion rate for planned MRI investigations was more than 95%: 741 MR-examinations with 2,637 MRI sequences (more than 200,000 picture data), 5,720 urine samples, 244 blood samples, 205 ECG, 1,018 BIA, 539 anthropological measurements and 150 psychological questionnaires. This

  17. Silicon photonics developments in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedeli, J. M.; Marti, J.; Van Thourhout, D.; Reed, G.; White, T.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon photonics have generated an increasing interest in the recent year, mainly for optical telecommunications or for optical interconnects in microelectronic circuits. The rationale of silicon photonics is the reduction of the cost of photonic systems through the integration of photonic components and an IC on a common chip, or in the longer term, the enhancement of IC performance with the introduction of optics inside a high performance chip. In order to build a Opto-Electronic Integrated circuit (OEIC), different European project has been launched in Europe. The PICMOS project demonstrated the full optical link on a silicon circuit with InP bonded devices. The following WADIMOS project goes a step further with the demonstration of an optical network on chip with WDM µlaser for on-chip intraconnection between IC cores. The UK silicon photonics project and the European HELIOS project are focalized on telecommunications devices with the aim of photonics and electronics integration which can be done either by wafer bonding of an SOI photonic circuit or by low temperature fabrication of a photonic layer at the metallization levels. Recent development on building blocks will be reported such as low loss couplers, Si and InP µdisk modulators, high speed Ge or InGaAs photodetectors.

  18. A New Space Strategy for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashford, D.

    This paper shows how there is a one-time opportunity for Europe to take the lead in reducing the cost of access to space by adopting an aviation approach to transport to and from low earth orbit. Such an approach, using launchers like aeroplanes to replace those like missiles, was widely promoted in the 1960s but has never happened, initially because of Cold War pressures and then because of established habits of thinking. SpaceShipOne has shown that it is now possible to catch up rapidly with what might have been, using technologies developed since the 1960s for other projects. Europe is well placed to lead this breakthrough.

  19. Project Physics Text 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Mechanical theories are presented in this unit of the Project Physics text for senior high students. Collisions, Newton's laws, isolated systems, and Leibniz' concept are discussed, leading to conservation of mass and momentum. Energy conservation is analyzed in terms of mechanical energy, heat energy, steam engines, Watt's engine, Joule's…

  20. Where Europe meets Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Data from a portion of the imagery acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera during 2000-2002 were combined to create this cloud-free natural-color mosaic of southwestern Europe and northwestern Morocco and Algeria. The image extends from 48oN, 16oW in the northwest to 32oN, 8oE in the southeast. It is displayed in Albers conic equal-area projection (a projection which is frequently used for equal-area maps of regions that are predominantly east-west in extent).

    From the northeast, the image traverses a portion of the Swiss Alps (partially snow-covered) and a small part of Italy's Po Valley. The northern portion of the image also includes the western coast of France and much of southern and southwestern France's undulating terrain, which continues until reaching the hills of the Pyrenees. The Pyrenees act as the natural frontier to the Iberian Peninsula -- a landmass comprised of Spain and Portugal. The Peninsular landscapes are extremely varied, with some almost desert-like, others green and fertile. About half of Spain is situated atop a high plain, known as the Central Plateau, and many mountain ranges, rivers, geological basement rock and vegetation types are found across this great plateau. The largest alluvial plain is Andalusia in the south, where the valley of the Guadalquivir River is shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the southwest, where the valley descends to the Atlantic. The islands of Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza are Spanish territories in the western Mediterranean. At the Strait of Gibralter, Spain and Morocco very nearly kiss, and Morocco appears relatively verdant along its northern coastal corner. The rugged Atlas Mountain ranges traverse northern Algeria and Morocco.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. This data

  1. Heat, work and subtle fluids: a commentary on Joule (1850) ‘On the mechanical equivalent of heat’

    PubMed Central

    Young, John

    2015-01-01

    James Joule played the major role in establishing the conservation of energy, or the first law of thermodynamics, as a universal, all-pervasive principle of physics. He was an experimentalist par excellence and his place in the development of thermodynamics is unarguable. This article discusses Joule's life and scientific work culminating in the 1850 paper, where he presented his detailed measurements of the mechanical equivalent of heat using his famous paddle-wheel apparatus. Joule's long series of experiments in the 1840s leading to his realisation that the conservation of energy was probably of universal validity is discussed in context with the work of other pioneers, notably Sadi Carnot, who effectively formulated the principle of the second law of thermodynamics a quarter of a century before the first law was accepted. The story of Joule's work is a story of an uphill struggle against a critical scientific establishment unwilling to accept the mounting evidence until it was impossible to ignore. His difficulties in attracting funding and publishing in reputable journals despite the quality of his work will resonate with many young scientists and engineers of the present day. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750152

  2. Joule heating induced transient temperature field and its effects on electroosmosis in a microcapillary packed with microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Yang, C; Huang, X

    2005-08-02

    The Joule heating induced transient temperature field and its effect on the electroosmotic flow in a capillary packed with microspheres is analyzed numerically using the control-volume-based finite difference method. The model incorporates the coupled momentum equation for the electroosmotic velocity, the energy equations for the Joule heating induced temperature distributions in both the packed column and the capillary wall, and the mass and electric current continuity equations. The temperature-dependent physical properties of the electrolyte solution are taken into consideration. The characteristics of the Joule heating induced transient development of temperature and electroosmotic flow fields are studied. Specifically, the simulation shows that the presence of Joule heating causes a noticeable axial temperature gradient in the thermal entrance region and elevates a significant temperature increment inside the microcapillary. The temperature changes in turn greatly affect the electroosmotic velocity by means of the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity, dielectric constant, and local electric field strength. Furthermore, the model predicts an induced pressure gradient to counterbalance the axial variation of the electroosmotic velocity so as to maintain the fluid mass continuity. In addition, under specific conditions, the present model is validated by comparing with the existing analytical model and experimental data from the literature.

  3. Holocene to contemporary fluvial sediment budgets in small glacier-fed valley-fjord systems (ESF-NRF SedyMONT - Norway Project, SedyMONT, TOPO-EUROPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, Susan; Beylich, Achim A.; Rubensdotter, Lena; Hansen, Louise

    2010-05-01

    A sediment budget study contains analysis and quantification of the processes of sediment production, storage and transfer. For constructing a sediment budget at a small-catchment scale (50-100 km2) it is necessary to integrate the temporal and spatial variations of supply of material from sediment sources, sediment transport and storage and to identify how far the different system components are coupled to each other. The analysis of sedimentary fluxes and budgets as well as their controls at different timescales (Holocene to contemporary) is a basis for the assessment of complex landscape responses to Holocene to recent changes in temperature, precipitation and runoff. This PhD project is part of the NFR funded Norwegian Individual Project within the ESF SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) TOPO-EUROPE Programme. Two neighbouring glacier-fed valley-fjord systems (Erdalen & Bødalen) with a different topographic inheritance from Pleistocene glaciations are compared. It is of special interest how the different valley morphometries have influenced Holocene to contemporary sediment fluxes and budgets. Different approaches for sediment budget studies are used to interpret and understand the spatial and temporal sediment flux variability during the Holocene with the main focus on i) the quantification and analysis of storage element volumes for estimation of Holocene sedimentation rates and sediment yields, ii) the analysis of the spatial and temporal sediment flux variability, iii) the analysis of the linkages between sediment transfer and storage, iv) the analysis of controlling factors for postglacial, subrecent and contemporary sediment fluxes and v) the construction of Holocene to contemporary sediment budgets for Erdalen and Bødalen. Both valleys are instrumented with a year-round monitoring system (runoff, suspended and solute transport) for analysing fluvial sediment fluxes. The results enable to

  4. Structural control and 3D modelling of a wrench rift basin: the Upper Rhine Graben of NW Europe as a case study - Contribution of the EU GeORG project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaletto, Laurent; Nitsch, Edgar; Anders, Birte; Dressmann, Horst; Rupf, Isabel; Tesch, Jörg; Zumsprekel, Heiko; Cruz-Mermy, Davy; Capar, Laure; GeORG Team

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) of NW Europe is a Cenozoic wrench rift basin about 300 km long and 30 to 40 km wide, with syn- to post-rift Eocene to Quaternary sedimentary fill up to 4 km thick. The EU transnational GeORG project aims to give a detailed knowledge of its deep geological structure, in order to assist the safe and successful use of its great geological potential (e.g. geothermal energy, CO2 sequestration...). Products are based on a Gocad 3D geological model of the URG (from the Variscan basement to the surface), mostly based on the interpretation of about 5400 km of reprocessed seismic lines (3900 km in Germany and 1500 km in France), and a database of about 2150 wells, from oil, mining and thermal water exploration. It's the first time that such an amount of subsurface data is gathered, studied and modelled in the URG. We put the emphasis on the inventory of the various observed structural features (e.g., normal and strike-slip faults, salt domes), and their implication regarding the structural evolution the URG. We demonstrate the predominant role of the Miocene-to-present NNE-SSW strike-slip regime of the URG, which is characterized by the development of transtensional faults and flower structures, local transpression and inversion of older normal fault planes. A remarkable feature is also the offset of reactivated Paleozoic basement faults, known outside the basin. Thus, the Neogene strike-slip deformation tends to obliterate the initial rift structure as well as its basement structural heritage, giving a distorted view of pre-Miocene structural styles. We finally present a new tectonic map of the subsurface of the URG, which unravels the imbricated structural pattern of the graben, and highlights the newly defined tectonic blocks, faults and fault zones.

  5. EPA Collaboration with Europe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    By working together to achieve common goals, the U.S. and Europe can enhance our respective environmental protection efforts while creating a cleaner environment on both continents and around the world.

  6. Where Europe meets Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-03-23

    Data from a portion of the imagery acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft during 2000-2002 were combined to create this cloud-free natural-color mosaic of southwestern Europe and northwestern Morocco and Algeria.

  7. Vegetation fire proneness in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Aranha, José; Amraoui, Malik

    2015-04-01

    Fire selectivity has been studied for vegetation classes in terms of fire frequency and fire size in a few European regions. This analysis is often performed along with other landscape variables such as topography, distance to roads and towns. These studies aims to assess the landscape sensitivity to forest fires in peri-urban areas and land cover changes, to define landscape management guidelines and policies based on the relationships between landscape and fires in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, the objectives of this study includes the: (i) analysis of the spatial and temporal variability statistics within Europe; and, (ii) the identification and characterization of the vegetated land cover classes affected by fires; and, (iii) to propose a fire proneness index. The datasets used in the present study comprises: Corine Land Cover (CLC) maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006) and burned area (BA) perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe, provided by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS). The CLC is a part of the European Commission programme to COoRdinate INformation on the Environment (Corine) and it provides consistent, reliable and comparable information on land cover across Europe. Both the CLC and EFFIS datasets were combined using geostatistics and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of shrubs and forest affected by fires. Obtained results confirms the usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index which allows to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire. As expected, differences between northern and southern Europe are notorious in what concern to land cover distribution, fire incidence and fire proneness of vegetation cover classes. This work was supported by national funds by FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project PEst-OE/AGR/UI4033/2014 and by

  8. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Nisar, Z.; Ahmad, B.; Yasmin, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  9. MHD Mixed Convective Peristaltic Motion of Nanofluid with Joule Heating and Thermophoresis Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaadi, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of present investigation is to introduce the novel aspect of thermophoresis in the mixed convective peristaltic transport of viscous nanofluid. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into account. Problem is modeled using the lubrication approach. Resulting system of equations is solved numerically. Effects of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration of nanoparticles and heat and mass transfer rates at the wall are studied through graphs. It is noted that the concentration of nanoparticles near the boundaries is enhanced for larger thermophoresis parameter. However reverse situation is observed for an increase in the value of Brownian motion parameter. Further, the mass transfer rate at the wall significantly decreases when Brownian motion parameter is assigned higher values. PMID:25391147

  10. Ceramic 3D printed Joule Thomson mini cryocooler intended for HOT IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A.; Fraiman, L.; Parahovnik, A.

    2017-05-01

    Joule Thomson (JT) Cryocooler is a well-known technology which is widely used in research and industry. The cooling effect is achieved by isenthalpic expansion of the cooling gas in an orifice. A JT cooler has two basic components: a counter flow heat exchanger and an orifice. Due to the fact that the cooler has no moving parts and contains relatively simple components it is a great candidate for miniaturization, and realization with the new additive manufacturing technologies. In the current work we discuss the implementation of 3D ceramic printing as a possible fabrication technology for a JT cooler intended for cooling IR detectors operated at temperature of about 150K. In this paper we present a comprehensive analysis including coolant considerations, heat transfer calculations and realization of the cooler.

  11. Design of a valved moving magnet type linear compressor for a Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. W.; Wang, L. Y.; Gan, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    For temperatures around 4-6 K, Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers can achieve a higher efficiency than Stirling or pulse tube cryocoolers thus have been widely used in space. It is crucial for a J-T compressor to obtain a relatively high pressure ratio. With this concept, a valved moving magnet type linear compressor has been designed. This paper describes the design method and component structure of the linear compressor in detail. The electromagnetic force of linear motor, stiffness and stress distribution of flexure springs were calculated based on finite element method (FEM). System resonance was specially considered to achieve a high efficiency, and system vibration and heat dissipation problems were discussed. The design goal of the linear compressor is to achieve an efficiency of 80% and a lifetime longer than 5 years.

  12. Ozone generation by negative corona discharge: the effect of Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanallah, K.; Pontiga, F.; Fernández-Rueda, A.; Castellanos, A.; Belasri, A.

    2008-10-01

    Ozone generation in pure oxygen using a wire-to-cylinder corona discharge reactor is experimentally and numerically investigated. Ozone concentration is determined by means of direct UV spectroscopy and the effects of Joule heating and ozone decomposition on the electrodes are analysed for different discharge gaps. The numerical model combines the physical processes in the corona discharge with the chemistry of ozone formation and destruction. The chemical kinetics model and the electrical model are coupled through Poisson's equation, and the current-voltage (CV) characteristic measured in experiments is used as input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to predict the radial distributions of electrons, ions, atoms and molecules for each applied voltage of the CV characteristic. In particular, the evolution of ozone density inside the discharge cell has been investigated as a function of current intensity and applied voltage.

  13. Interaction of magnetization and heat dynamics for pulsed domain wall movement with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed domain wall movement is studied here in Ni80Fe20 nanowires on SiO2, using a fully integrated electrostatic, thermoelectric, and micromagnetics solver based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation, including Joule heating, anisotropic magneto-resistance, and Oersted field contributions. During the applied pulse, the anisotropic magneto-resistance of the domain wall generates a dynamic heat gradient, which increases the current-driven velocity by up to 15%. Using a temperature-dependent conductivity, significant differences are found between the constant voltage-pulsed and constant current-pulsed domain wall movement: constant voltage pulses are shown to be more efficient at displacing domain walls whilst minimizing the increase in temperature, with the total domain wall displacement achieved over a fixed pulse duration having a maximum with respect to the driving pulse strength.

  14. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect

    Trosseille, C. Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.; Beck, T.; Gazave, J.

    2014-11-15

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  15. A new flaw inspection technique based on infrared thermal images under Joule effect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Ogura, Keiji

    1992-11-01

    A new nondestructive inspection technique using infrared thermography was proposed, in which the thermal image of the surface temperature on a heated sample was used to identify flaws and defects. Joule effect heating by an electric current was employed to heat the sample instantaneously. Both numerical and experimental studies were conducted on the resolution and the availability in the detection of the through-thickness and surface cracks embedded in steel plates. The results showed that a singular concentration was observed at the crack tips in the surface temperature field in the transient stage of heat conduction, and the cracks were found to be sensitively detected from such a singular temperature field in the early transient stage. This technique was also applied to the inspection of the delamination defect in carbon-fiber reinforced plastics.

  16. The role of Joule heating in the formation of nanogaps by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouwborst, M. L.; van der Molen, S. J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the formation of nanogaps in gold wires due to electromigration. We show that the breaking process will not start until a local temperature of typically 400 K is reached by Joule heating. This value is rather independent of the temperature of the sample environment (4.2-295 K). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the breaking dynamics can be controlled by minimizing the total series resistance of the system. In this way, the local temperature rise just before breakdown is limited and melting effects are prevented. Hence, electrodes with gaps <2 nm are easily made, without the need of active feedback. For optimized samples, we observe quantized conductance steps prior to the gap formation.

  17. The voltage limitation for phase coherence experiments: non-equilibrium effects versus Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, H.; Omling, P.; Xu, Hongqi; Lindelof, P. E.

    1996-12-01

    The breaking of phase coherence of electrons by a finite bias voltage is studied in a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas. Although the wire is longer than the energy relaxation length we find that Joule heating in the wire is not important for dephasing of non-equilibrium electrons. Instead, phase breaking occurs by electron-electron interaction due to the excess energy of the injected electrons with respect to the Fermi energy. The relevant limiting parameter for phase coherence is, therefore, the bias voltage, rather than the dissipated power. A model calculation suggests that our results are of general relevance for coherence experiments in one-dimensional geometry on length scales of the same order of magnitude as the energy relaxation length.

  18. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule.

    PubMed

    Trosseille, C; Aubert, D; Auger, L; Bazzoli, S; Beck, T; Brunel, P; Burillo, M; Chollet, C; Gazave, J; Jasmin, S; Maruenda, P; Moreau, I; Oudot, G; Raimbourg, J; Soullié, G; Stemmler, P; Zuber, C

    2014-11-01

    Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an "air-box" that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  19. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  20. Thermomigration in Pb-Sn solder joints under joule heating during electric current stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hua; Basaran, Cemal; Hopkins, Douglas

    2003-02-01

    Electromigration of solder joint under high dc current density is known as a reliability concern for the future high-density flip chip packaging and power packaging. Biased mass diffusion within solder joint from cathode to anode under high dc current density is observed in these experiments. In this letter, the experiments on flip chip solder joints under dc current stressing are conducted and thermomigration due to the thermal gradient in the solder joint caused by joule heating is reported. A three-dimensional coupled electric thermal finite-element (FE) simulation of a realistic flip chip module shows the existence of thermal gradient in the solder joint which is high enough to trigger thermomigration.