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Sample records for european heart rhythm

  1. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment.

  2. Executive Summary: European Heart Rhythm Association Consensus Document on the Management of Supraventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Josephson, Mark E; Keegan, Roberto; Knight, Bradley P; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory YH; Malmborg, Helena; Oral, Hakan; Pappone, Carlo; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Wood, Kathryn A.; Young-Hoon, Kim; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace. It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasis on new advances since the previous European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The EHRA consensus document is available to read in full at http://europace.oxfordjournals.org PMID:28116087

  3. Executive Summary: European Heart Rhythm Association Consensus Document on the Management of Supraventricular Arrhythmias: Endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE).

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Josephson, Mark E; Keegan, Roberto; Knight, Bradley P; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Yh; Malmborg, Helena; Oral, Hakan; Pappone, Carlo; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Wood, Kathryn A; Young-Hoon, Kim; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace. It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasis on new advances since the previous European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The EHRA consensus document is available to read in full at http://europace.oxfordjournals.org.

  4. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that trigger the heartbeat. Caffeine, Diet and Heart Arrhythmias Caffeine is the most common substance linked with abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ). Some people feel heart palpitations (fast heartbeats) when ...

  5. Current implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming in Europe: the results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Grazia Bongiorni, Maria; Etsner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to examine the current practice on the choice of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) type, use of defibrillation testing, and ICD programming for detection and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias. In accordance with recent guidelines and the results of observational studies, the majority of EHRA research network centres reported a high utilization rate of dual-chamber ICDs in the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic sinus node dysfunction, biventricular ICD in high-degree atrioventricular block and QRS duration <120 ms, and a limited use of defibrillation testing either in primary and secondary prevention settings. Activation of the long ventricular tachycardia (VT) detection window, slow VT zone, antitachycardia pacing before shock for slow and fast VT, and atrial tachyarrhythmia discrimination were considered useful in ICD programming for the majority of patients.

  6. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  7. Stroke prevention strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart valve abnormalities: perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben B; Madrid, Antonio; Dobreanu, Dan; Jędrzejczyk-Patej, Ewa; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Survey was to assess the perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation (AF) and management of AF patients with various heart valve abnormalities in daily clinical practice in European electrophysiology (EP) centres. Questionnaire survey was sent via the Internet to the EHRA-EP Research Network Centres. Of the 52 responding centres, 42 (80.8%) were university hospitals. Choosing the most comprehensive definition of valvular AF, a total of 49 centres (94.2%) encountered a mechanical prosthetic heart valve and significant rheumatic mitral stenosis, 35 centres (67.3%) also considered bioprosthetic valves, and 25 centres (48.1%) included any significant valvular heart disease, requiring surgical repair in the definition of valvular AF. Only three centres (5.8%) would define valvular AF as the presence of any (even mild) valvular abnormality. None of the centres would use non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in AF patients with mechanical prosthetic valves, only 5 centres (9.8%) would use NOACs in patients with significant mitral stenosis, 17 centres (32.7%) would consider the use of NOACs in patients with bioprosthetic valves, and 21 centres (41.2%) would use NOACs in patients with a non-recent transcatheter valve replacement/implantation, while 13 centres (25.5%) would never consider the use of NOACs in AF patients with even mild native heart valve abnormality. Our survey showed marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular AF and thromboprophylactic treatments, with the use of variable NOACs in patients with valvular heart disease other than prosthetic heart valves or significant mitral stenosis, indicating that this term may be misleading and should not be used.

  8. Recognizing an Irregular Heart Rhythm

    MedlinePlus

    ... workout, consider checking your rhythm as well. Atrial fibrillation, also referred to as AF, is a common ... chambers, or atria, of the heart. “While atrial fibrillation is not common among young people, it can ...

  9. Social rhythms of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Pantzar, Mika; Ruckenstein, Minna; Mustonen, Veera

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A long-term research focus on the temporality of everyday life has become revitalised with new tracking technologies that allow methodological experimentation and innovation. This article approaches rhythms of daily lives with heart-rate variability measurements that use algorithms to discover physiological stress and recovery. In the spirit of the ‘social life of methods’ approach, we aggregated individual data (n = 35) in order to uncover temporal rhythms of daily lives. The visualisation of the aggregated data suggests both daily and weekly patterns. Daily stress was at its highest in the mornings and around eight o’clock in the evening. Weekend stress patterns were dissimilar, indicating a stress peak in the early afternoon especially for men. In addition to discussing our explorations using quantitative data, the more general aim of the article is to explore the potential of new digital and mobile physiological tracking technologies for contextualising the individual in the everyday. PMID:28163655

  10. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice.

  11. Pradaxa Beats Warfarin After Heart Rhythm Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... correct the heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation. The risk of having a major bleeding event ... was funded by Pradaxa's maker, Boehringer Ingelheim. Atrial fibrillation affects more than 6 million people in the ...

  12. [Rhythm assimilation in the isolated canine heart under isovolumic conditions].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, M I

    2002-03-01

    Isolated canine heart has an expressed ability for autoregulation of bioelectrical and contractile functions irrespective of the neurohumoral factors influence on the work of the heart, and Frank-Starling law. Under the change of stimulation frequency, the autoregulation of heart functions is carried out as rhythm assimilation at organ (cell) level. The heart has a higher ability to bioelectrical rhythm assimilation rather than the mechanical rhythm assimilation. Incomplete rhythm assimilation is characterised by the alternation of contractions. The "Everything or nothing" law has no applicability to the work of the heart.

  13. [Assimilation of rhythm by the isolated dog heart during gradual raising of stimulation frequency].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, M I

    2003-12-01

    An ability for a forestalling regulation of contractility of the heart with calculation of the tendency of rhythm increasing was revealed under a gradual increasing of heart rhythm. A forestalling regulation of heart contractility occurs with rhythm assimilation at the cell level of the heart and irrespective of the influence of Frank-Starling law and neurohumoral factors on the work of the heart. A 5-10% increasing of heart rhythm is characterized by optimal rhythm assimilation. A 15-40% increasing of heart rhythm is not optimal and results in transformation of the rhythm. The following sequence of events take place in the process of transition from rhythm assimilation to rhythm transformation under a gradual increasing of heart rhythm: rhythm assimilation--rhythm by mechanical function--incomplete rhythm assimilation by electrical function-transformation of rhythm by electrical function.

  14. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation.

  15. Hospitalizations for Common Heart Rhythm Problem on the Rise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem on the Rise But those with atrial fibrillation are also more likely to live, study says ... with a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (AFib) are ending up in the hospital more ...

  16. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  17. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  18. Heart Failure Epidemiology: European Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Guha, K; McDonagh, T

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure poses an increasing problem for global healthcare systems. The epidemiological data which has been accrued over the last thirty years has predominantly been accumulated from experience within North America and Europe. Initial large cohort, prospective longitudinal studies produced the first publications; however latterly the focus has shifted onto epidemiological data governing hospitalisation and mortality. The emphasis behind this shift has been the resource implications with regards to repetitive, costly and prolonged hospitalisation. The European experience in heart failure, though similar to North America has recently demonstrated differences in hospitalisation which may underlie the differences between healthcare system configuration. Heart failure however remains an increasing global problem and the endpoint of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Allied with the fact of increasingly elderly populations and prior data demonstrating a steep rise in prevalent cases within more elderly populations, it is likely that the increasing burden of disease will continue to pose challenges for modern healthcare. Despite the predicted increase in the number of patients affected by heart failure, over the last thirty years, a clear management algorithm has evolved for the use of pharmacotherapies (neuro-hormonal antagonists), device based therapies (Implantable Cardioverting Defibrillator (ICD) and Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy (CRT)) and mechanical therapies including left ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplantation. Though the management of such patients has been clearly delineated in national and international guidelines, the underuse of all available and appropriate therapies remains a significant problem. When comparing various epidemiological studies from different settings and timepoints, it should be remembered that rates of prevalence and incidence may vary depending upon the definition used, methods of accumulating information (with

  19. The use of statistics in heart rhythm research: a review.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changyu; Yu, Zhangsheng; Liu, Ziyue

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we provide a brief review of key statistical concepts/methods that are commonly used in heart rhythm research, including concepts such as standard deviation, standard error, confidence interval, statistical/clinical significance, correlation coefficients, multiple comparisons, cohort and case-control studies, and missing data, as well as methods such as statistical hypothesis testing, receiver operating characteristic curve, binary vs time-to-event outcome, competing risk methods, and analysis of correlated data. We also make recommendations on how related statistical procedures should be applied and results should be reported.

  20. Predictability of normal heart rhythms and deterministic chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J. H.; Goodings, D. A.; Kamath, M. V.; Fallen, E. L.

    1993-04-01

    The evidence for deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms is examined. Electrocardiograms were recorded of 29 subjects falling into four groups—a young healthy group, an older healthy group, and two groups of patients who had recently suffered an acute myocardial infarction. From the measured R-R intervals, a time series of 1000 first differences was constructed for each subject. The correlation integral of Grassberger and Procaccia was calculated for several subjects using these relatively short time series. No evidence was found for the existence of an attractor having a dimension less than about 4. However, a prediction method recently proposed by Sugihara and May and an autoregressive linear predictor both show that there is a measure of short-term predictability in the differenced R-R intervals. Further analysis revealed that the short-term predictability calculated by the Sugihara-May method is not consistent with the null hypothesis of a Gaussian random process. The evidence for a small amount of nonlinear dynamical behavior together with the short-term predictability suggest that there is an element of deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms, although it is not strong or persistent. Finally, two useful parameters of the predictability curves are identified, namely, the `first step predictability' and the `predictability decay rate,' neither of which appears to be significantly correlated with the standard deviation of the R-R intervals.

  1. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function.

  2. Modeling the aging heart: from local respiratory defects to global rhythm disturbances.

    PubMed

    Khrapko, Konstantin; Trayanova, Natalia; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-05-05

    In this issue, Baris et al. (2015) describe cardiac rhythm abnormalities in a mouse model of mitochondrial dysfunction in widely distributed cells of the aging human heart. How do a few metabolically challenged cells disrupt cardiac rhythm? We suggest that these cells provide "crystallization centers" for latent dysfunctional zones to allow arrhythmia emergence.

  3. Proceedings from Heart Rhythm Society’s Emerging Technologies Forum

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Emily P.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Slotwiner, David; Kumar, Uday N.; Varosy, Paul; Van Wagoner, David R.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Kusumoto, Fred M.; Blum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are in an excellent position to significantly contribute to medical device innovation, but the process of bringing an idea to the bedside is complex. To begin to address these perceived barriers, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) convened a forum of stakeholders in medical device innovation in conjunction with the 2015 HRS Scientific Sessions. The forum facilitated open discussion about medical device innovation, including obstacles to physician involvement and possible solutions. This report is based on the themes that emerged. First, physician innovators must take an organized approach to identifying unmet clinical needs and potential solutions. Second, extensive funds, usually secured through solicitation for investment, are often required to achieve meaningful progress developing an idea into a device. Third, planning for regulatory requirements of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is essential. In addition to these issues, intellectual property and overall trends in health care, including international markets, are critically relevant considerations for the physician innovator. Importantly, there are a number of ways in which professional societies can assist physician innovators to navigate the complex medical device innovation landscape, bring clinically meaningful devices to market more quickly, and ultimately improve patient care. These efforts include facilitating interaction between potential collaborators through scientific meetings and other gatherings; collecting, evaluating, and disseminating state-of-the-art scientific information; and representing the interests of members in interactions with regulators and policy makers. PMID:26801401

  4. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms.

  5. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms.

  6. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2007 and Heart Failure 2007: CARISMA, PREPARE, DAVID II, SAVE-PACE, PROTECT and AREA-IN-CHF.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Abdellah, Ahmed Tageldien; Witte, Klaus K; Hobson, Neil; Clark, Andrew L

    2007-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at Heart Rhythm 2007 organised by the Heart Rhythm Society which was held in Denver, USA and Heart Failure 2007 organised by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Hamburg, Germany. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The CARISMA study suggests that non-invasive screening tests may help to identify post-MI patients who may benefit from ICD therapy. Data from the PREPARE study show that more conservative ICD programming can reduce morbidity at the cost of an increased risk of arrhythmic syncope. DAVID II indicates that atrial pacing may be a safe alternative to ventricular back-up pacing in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and standard indications for an ICD. The incidence of persistent atrial fibrillation in patients with sinus node disease in SAVE-PACE was reduced by dual chamber minimal ventricular pacing compared to conventional dual chamber pacing. The pilot phase of the PROTECT studies confirmed 30 mg as the dose of the selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist KW-3902 to be used in pivotal studies. AREA-IN-CHF failed to show a beneficial effect of canrenone on LV volumes compared to placebo however some beneficial effects on secondary clinical endpoints were observed.

  7. Estimation of Circadian Body Temperature Rhythm Based on Heart Rate in Healthy, Ambulatory Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Joo, Kwang Min; Kim, Han Byul; Jang, Seungjin; Kim, Beomoh; Hong, Seungbum; Kim, Sungwan; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-03-01

    Core body temperature is a reliable marker for circadian rhythm. As characteristics of the circadian body temperature rhythm change during diverse health problems, such as sleep disorder and depression, body temperature monitoring is often used in clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, the use of current thermometers in circadian rhythm monitoring is impractical in daily life. As heart rate is a physiological signal relevant to thermoregulation, we investigated the feasibility of heart rate monitoring in estimating circadian body temperature rhythm. Various heart rate parameters and core body temperature were simultaneously acquired in 21 healthy, ambulatory subjects during their routine life. The performance of regression analysis and the extended Kalman filter on daily body temperature and circadian indicator (mesor, amplitude, and acrophase) estimation were evaluated. For daily body temperature estimation, mean R-R interval (RRI), mean heart rate (MHR), or normalized MHR provided a mean root mean square error of approximately 0.40 °C in both techniques. The mesor estimation regression analysis showed better performance than the extended Kalman filter. However, the extended Kalman filter, combined with RRI or MHR, provided better accuracy in terms of amplitude and acrophase estimation. We suggest that this noninvasive and convenient method for estimating the circadian body temperature rhythm could reduce discomfort during body temperature monitoring in daily life. This, in turn, could facilitate more clinical studies based on circadian body temperature rhythm.

  8. The Korean Heart Rhythm Society's 2014 Statement on Antithrombotic Therapy for Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Korean Heart Rhythm Society

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ho; Nam, Gi Byung; Park, Hyung Wook; On, Young Keun; Lee, Young Soo; Lim, Hong Euy; Joung, Boyoung; Cha, Tae Joon; Hwang, Gyo Seung; Oh, Seil; Kim, June Soo

    2015-01-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF), the risk of stroke varies considerably according to individual clinical status. The CHA2DS2-VASc score is better than the CHADS2 score for identifying truly lower risk patients with AF. With the advent of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the strategy for antithrombotic therapy has undergone significant changes due to its superior efficacy, safety and convenience compared with warfarin. Furthermore, new aspects of antithrombotic therapy and risk assessment of stroke have been revealed: the efficacy of stroke prevention with aspirin is weak, while the risk of major bleeding is not significantly different from that of oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy, especially in the elderly. Reflecting these pivotal aspects, previous guidelines have been updated in recent years by overseas societies and associations. The Korean Heart Rhythm Society has summarized the new evidence and updated recommendations for stroke prevention of patients with nonvalvular AF. First of all, antithrombotic therapy must be considered carefully and incorporate the clinical characteristics and circumstances of each individual patient, especially with regards to balancing the benefits of stroke prevention with the risk of bleeding, recommending the CHA2DS2-VASc score rather than the CHADS2 score for assessing the risk of stroke, and employing the HAS-BLED score to validate bleeding risk. In patients with truly low risk (lone AF, CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0), no antithrombotic therapy is recommended, whereas OAC therapy, including warfarin (international normalized ratio 2-3) or NOACs, is recommended for patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 unless contraindicated. In patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1, OAC therapy should be preferentially considered, but depending on bleeding risk or patient preferences, antiplatelet therapy or no therapy could be permitted. PMID:25653698

  9. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and daily rhythms of expression of per1 gene in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are controlled by interlocked autoregulatory feedback loops consisting of interactions of a group of circadian clock genes and their proteins. The Period family is a group of genes that are essential components of the molecular clock. In the present study, we cloned a period gene (per1) of the European sea bass, a marine teleost of chronobiological interest. The cloned sequence encoded a protein consisting of 1436 amino acids that homology and phylogenic analyses showed to be related with fish PER1 proteins possessing very high identity with Oryzias latipes (Medaka) per1. Polymerase chain reaction screening of per1 expression showed that this gene is expressed in all the tissues analyzed (brain, heart, liver, gill, muscle, digestive tract, adipose tissue, spleen, and retina). In addition, a daily expression rhythm, with an acrophase (peak time) approximately ZT0 (lights-on), was found in the two tissue types investigated: neural (brain) and peripheral (liver and heart). In conclusion, identification and characterization of the gene encoding sea bass per1 provide valuable information for understanding the circadian mechanism at the molecular level in this species, although further research is needed to clarify the exact role that per1 plays in the circadian oscillator and the dual behavior of European sea bass.

  10. [Instantaneous alteration of the dog heart contractility under instantaneous change in the stimulation rhythm].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, M I

    2002-04-01

    Isolated canine heart has an expressed ability for an instantaneous alteration in the sense of re-tuning, of contractility (of the speed of mechanical restitution in diastolic period) under instantaneous change of stimulation rhythm. Postextrasystolic potentiation reflects instantaneous rising of the speed of mechanical restitution under the influence of extrasystole in the condition of instantaneous transition to a higher rhythm. Depression of contractility reflects instantaneous decreasing of the speed of mechanical restitution under the influence of delayed stimulus in the condition of instantaneous transition to a slower rhythm. Alteration (re-tuning) of heart contractility occurred irrespective of the influence of neurohumoral factor and Frank-Starling law on the work of the heart. Alteration (re-tuning) of contractility occurs at an organ (cell) level.

  11. Estimation of body temperature rhythm based on heart activity parameters in daily life.

    PubMed

    Sooyoung Sim; Heenam Yoon; Hosuk Ryou; Kwangsuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature contains valuable health related information such as circadian rhythm and menstruation cycle. Also, it was discovered from previous studies that body temperature rhythm in daily life is related with sleep disorders and cognitive performances. However, monitoring body temperature with existing devices during daily life is not easy because they are invasive, intrusive, or expensive. Therefore, the technology which can accurately and nonintrusively monitor body temperature is required. In this study, we developed body temperature estimation model based on heart rate and heart rate variability parameters. Although this work was inspired by previous research, we originally identified that the model can be applied to body temperature monitoring in daily life. Also, we could find out that normalized Mean heart rate (nMHR) and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability showed better performance than other parameters. Although we should validate the model with more number of subjects and consider additional algorithms to decrease the accumulated estimation error, we could verify the usefulness of this approach. Through this study, we expect that we would be able to monitor core body temperature and circadian rhythm from simple heart rate monitor. Then, we can obtain various health related information derived from daily body temperature rhythm.

  12. Nicotine-induced perturbations on heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity daily rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Pelissier, A L; Gantenbein, M; Bruguerolle, B

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nicotine on the daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity in unrestrained rats by use of implanted radiotelemetry transmitters. The study was divided into three seven-day periods: a control period, a treatment period and a recovery period. The control period was used for baseline measurement of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. During the treatment period three rats received nicotine (1 mg kg(-1), s.c.) at 0900 h. Three rats received saline under the same experimental conditions. Heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were continuously monitored and plotted every 10 min. During the three periods a power spectrum analysis was used to determine the dominant period of rhythmicity. If daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were detected, the characteristics of these rhythms, i.e. the mesors, amplitudes and acrophases, were determined by cosinor analysis, expressed as means +/- s.e.m. and compared by analysis of variance. Nicotine did not suppress daily rhythmicity but induced decreases of amplitudes and phase-advances of acrophases for heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. These perturbations might result from the effects of nicotine on the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the hypothalamic clock that co-ordinates biological rhythms.

  13. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  14. Differences in attitude, education, and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: result of a self-assessment patient survey conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Chen, Jian; Larsen, Torben B; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Sciaraffia, Elena; Proclemer, Alessandro; Cheggour, Saida; Amara, Walid; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this patient survey was to analyse the knowledge about blood thinning medications relative to gender, age, education, and region of residence in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from eight European countries responded to this survey. Most patients understood that the indication for anticoagulation therapy was to 'thin the blood', but 8.1% responded that the purpose of the medication was to treat the arrhythmia. Patients with college or university grades reported less frequent deviations from their target INR range compared with those without schooling (2.8% vs. 5.1%, P < 0.05). The awareness of anticoagulation-related risk of bleedings was lowest in patients without schooling (38.5%) and highest in those with college and university education (57.0%), P < 0.05. The same pattern was also observed regarding patient's awareness of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs): 56.5% of the patients with university education and only 20.5% of those without schooling (P < 0.05) knew about NOACs, indicating that information about new anticoagulation therapies remains well below the target. Bleeding events were statistically less frequent in patients on NOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists. The education level and patients' knowledge have a direct influence on the global management of the anticoagulation.

  15. [Quantitative estimation of connection of the heart rate rhythm with motor activity in rat fetuses].

    PubMed

    Vdovichenko, N D; Timofeeva, O P; Bursian, A V

    2014-01-01

    In rat fetuses at E17-20 with preserved placental circulation with use of mathematical analysis there were revealed value and character of connections of slow wave oscillations of the heart rhythm with motor activity for 30 min of observation. In the software "PowerGraph 3.3.8", normalization and filtration of the studied signals were performed at three frequency diapasons: D1 - 0.02-0.2 Hz (5-50 s), D2 - 0.0083-0.02 Hz (50 s-2 min), and D3 - 0.0017-0.0083 Hz (2-10 min). The EMG curves filtrated by diapasons or piezograms were compared with periodograms in the corresponding diapasons of the heart rhythm variations. In the software "Origin 8.0", quantitative estimation of the degree of intersystemic interrelations for each frequency diapason was performed by Pearson correlation of coefficient, by the correlation connection value, and by the time shift of maximum of cross-correlation function. It has been established that in the frequency D1, regardless of age, the connection of heart rhythm oscillations with motor activity is expressed weakly. In the frequency diapason D2, the connection in most cases is located in the zone of weak and moderate correlations. In the multiminute diapason (D3), the connection is more pronounced. The number of animals that have a significant value of the correlation connection rises. The fetal MA fires in the decasecond diapason in all age groups are accompanied by short-time decelerations of the heart rhythms. In the minute diapason, there is observed a transition from positive connections at E17 and E18 to the negative ones at E19-20. Results of the study are considered in association with age-related changes of ratios of positive and negative oscillations of the heart rhythm change depending on the character of motor activity.

  16. Reorganization of the brain and heart rhythm during autogenic meditation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Rhee, Jyoo-Hi; Kang, Seung Wan

    2014-01-13

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower (alpha) and higher (above beta) band coherence during 3~min epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3~min epochs of heart non-coherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher (above beta) band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state.

  17. The daily rhythm of body temperature, heart and respiratory rate in newborn dogs.

    PubMed

    Piccione, Giuseppe; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Mortola, Jacopo P

    2010-08-01

    We asked whether, during the postnatal period, the daily patterns of body temperature (Tb), heart rate (HR) and breathing frequency (f) begin and develop in synchrony. To this end, measurements of HR, f and Tb were performed weekly, on two consecutive days, for the first two postnatal months on puppies of three breeds of dogs (Rottweiler, Cocker Spaniel and Carlino dogs) with very different birth weights and postnatal growth patterns. Ambient conditions and feeding habits were constant for all puppies. The results indicated that (1) the 24-h average Tb increased and average HR and f decreased with growth, (2) the daily rhythms in Tb were apparent by 4 weeks, irrespective of the puppy's growth pattern, (3) the daily rhythm of Tb in the puppy was not necessarily following that of the mother; in fact, it could anticipate it. (4) The daily rhythms in HR and f were not apparent for the whole study period. We conclude that in neonatal dogs the onset of the daily rhythms of Tb has no obvious relationship with body size or rate of growth and is not cued by the maternal Tb rhythm. The daily rhythms of HR and f do not appear before 2 months of age. Hence, they are not in synchrony with those of Tb.

  18. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  19. [Heart rhythm indices during human solving of arithmetic tasks].

    PubMed

    Danilova, N N; Korshunova, S G; Sokolov, E N

    1994-01-01

    Heart rate and respiration were recorded in a group of 90 subjects (25 males and 65 females) aged 17-19 during rest and under informational load (arithmetical tasks) lasting 3 min each. Off-line spectral analysis was performed for all the subjects. Anxiety according to Spilberger and strength of excitation-inhibition according to Strelau were also tested. It was shown that heart rate increased significantly in the group as a whole, however, variability of RR-intervals remained unchanged. Then two subgroups of subjects who responded to information load by a decrease and increase of RR-interval variability were distinguished. These subgroups were characterized respectively by the high and low levels of personal anxiety. The decrease of RR-interval variability in the high-anxiety subgroup was associated with a decrease of power in all frequency bands of the rate spectrum. The increase of RR-interval variability in the low-anxiety subground was due to an increase of heart rate modulation in a low-frequency band of the heart rate spectrum. Fatigue is regarded as a cause of such heart rate modulation.

  20. Masking of the circadian rhythms of heart rate and core temperature by the rest-activity cycle in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Connell, Linda J.; Graeber, R. Curtis

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to estimate the magnitude of the masking effect produced in humans by alternate periods of physical activity and rest or sleep on the circadian rhythms of heart rate and core temperature. The heart rate, rectal temperature, and nondominant wrist activity were monitored in 12 male subjects during 6 days of normal routine at home and during 6 days of controlled bed-rest regimen. The comparisons of averaged waveforms for the activity, heart rate, and temperature indicated that about 45 percent of the range of the circadian heart rate rhythm during normal routine and about 14 percent of the range of the circadian temperature rhythm were attributable to the effects of activity. The smaller effect of activity on the temperature rhythm may be partially attributable to the fact that core temperature is being more rigorously conserved than heart rate, at least during moderate exercise.

  1. Effect of suprachiasmatic lesions on diurnal heart rate rhythm in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate and locomotor activity of rats kept under 12L/12D illumination regimen were recorded every six minutes for ten days using implantable radio transmitters. Some of the rats then received bilateral RF lesions into the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Control sham operations were performed on the rest of the animals. After recovery from surgery, recording of heart rate and locomotor activity was continued for ten days. SCN-lesioned rats showed no significant diurnal fluctuation in heart rate, while normal and sham-operated rats showed the normal diurnal rhythm in that function. The arrhythmic diurnal heart-rate pattern of SCN rats appeared to be correlated with their sporadic activity pattern. The integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is therefore necessary for the generation and/or expression of diurnal rhythmicity in heart rate in the rat.

  2. Black Holes Are The Rhythm at The Heart of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    The powerful black holes at the center of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters act as hearts to the systems, pumping energy out at regular intervals to regulate the growth of the black holes themselves, as well as star formation, according to new data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago A New Way To Weigh Giant Black Holes Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers Scientists from the University of Michigan, the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Jacobs University in Germany contributed to the results. The gravitational pull of black holes is so strong that not even light can escape from them. Supermassive black holes with masses of more than a billion suns have been detected at the center of large galaxies. The material falling on the black holes causes sporadic or isolated bursts of energy, by which black holes are capable of influencing the fate of their host galaxies. The insight gained by this new research shows that black holes can pump energy in a gentler and rhythmic fashion, rather then violently. The scientists observed and simulated how the black hole at the center of elliptical galaxy M84 dependably sends bubbles of hot plasma into space, heating up interstellar space. This heat is believed to slow both the formation of new stars and the growth of the black hole itself, helping the galaxy remain stable. Interstellar gases only coalesce into new stars when the gas is cool enough. The heating is more efficient at the sites where it is most needed, the scientists say. Alexis Finoguenov, of UMBC and the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, compares the central black hole to a heart muscle. "Just like our hearts periodically pump our

  3. Does visual fatigue from 3D displays affect autonomic regulation and heart rhythm?

    PubMed

    Park, S; Won, M J; Mun, S; Lee, E C; Whang, M

    2014-02-15

    Most investigations into the negative effects of viewing stereoscopic 3D content on human health have addressed 3D visual fatigue and visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). Very few, however, have looked into changes in autonomic balance and heart rhythm, which are homeostatic factors that ought to be taken into consideration when assessing the overall impact of 3D video viewing on human health. In this study, 30 participants were randomly assigned to two groups: one group watching a 2D video, (2D-group) and the other watching a 3D video (3D-group). The subjects in the 3D-group showed significantly increased heart rates (HR), indicating arousal, and an increased VLF/HF (Very Low Frequency/High Frequency) ratio (a measure of autonomic balance), compared to those in the 2D-group, indicating that autonomic balance was not stable in the 3D-group. Additionally, a more disordered heart rhythm pattern and increasing heart rate (as determined by the R-peak to R-peak (RR) interval) was observed among subjects in the 3D-group compared to subjects in the 2D-group, further indicating that 3D viewing induces lasting activation of the sympathetic nervous system and interrupts autonomic balance.

  4. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Hashimoto, F.; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G. B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory dynamics during 2.5 hours of sleep by fast Fourier transform analysis of beat to beat heart rate and of an electrocardiographically derived respiration signal. RESULTS--All subjects had resting hypoxaemia at high altitude, with an average oxyhaemoglobin saturation of 81% (5%). There was no significant change in mean heart rate, but low frequency (0.01-0.05 Hz) spectral power was increased (P < 0.01) at high altitude. Time series analysis showed a complex range of non-linear sinus rhythm dynamics. Striking low frequency (0.04-0.06 Hz) heart rate oscillations were observed during sleep in eight subjects at high altitude. Analysis of the electrocardiographically derived respiration signal indicated that these heart rate oscillations correlated with low frequency respiratory oscillations. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest (a) that increased low frequency power during high altitude exposure is not simply attributable to increased sympathetic modulation of heart rate, but relates to distinctive cardiopulmonary oscillations at approximately 0.05 Hz and (b) that the emergence of periodic heart rate oscillations at high altitude is consistent with an unstable cardiopulmonary control system that may develop on acute exposure to hypoxaemic stress.

  5. Seasonal alterations in circadian melatonin rhythms of the European wild boar and domestic gilt.

    PubMed

    Tast, A; Hälli, O; Ahlström, S; Andersson, H; Love, R J; Peltoniemi, O A

    2001-01-01

    The aims of the present study were: 1) to determine if the European wild boar exhibits a circadian pattern of melatonin secretion under its natural light environment; 2) to compare this pattern with the pattern in domestic pigs reared under the light environment typical for domesticity; and 3) to determine if there are seasonal alterations in melatonin rhythms. Four to six young, pure-bred, European wild boars and four to six cross-bred (Yorkshire x Finnish Landrace) domestic gilts were sampled at 2-hr intervals for 48 hr at the spring/autumn equinoxes and summer/winter solstices. Samples were obtained via saphenous arterial catheters from the wild boars and via ear vein catheters from the domestic gilts. The ambient light intensity was recorded simultaneously with sampling both outdoors and indoors. Following ether extraction, the serum samples were assayed for melatonin using a commercial RIA (Bühlman). All the experimental animals exhibited a distinct circadian pattern in melatonin secretion, with high concentrations occurring during the scotophase. There was no difference in scotophase melatonin response between the wild boars and domestic gilts in any season in terms of mean melatonin concentration or peak value. The mean duration of increased melatonin secretion (more than two standard deviations over a mean photophase concentration) in 24 hr in the wild boars in spring, summer, autumn and winter, was 10, 6, 11 and 17 hr, respectively, and in the domestic gilts, 9, 8, 12 and 11 hr, respectively. These results demonstrate the existence of circadian rhythm in melatonin secretion in both the European wild boar and domestic pig. In both groups, the duration of secretion is subject to seasonal alterations. The results suggest no difference in photoperiodic-melatonin transduction between the European wild boar and domestic pig whether due to altered genotype or reduced light environment.

  6. Alignment of R-R interval signals using the circadian heart rate rhythm.

    PubMed

    Gayraud, Nathalie T H; Manis, George

    2015-01-01

    R-R interval signals that come from different subjects are regularly aligned and averaged according to the horological starting time of the recordings. We argue that the horological time is a faulty alignment criterion and provide evidence in the form of a new alignment method. Our main motivation is that the human heart rate (HR) rhythm follows a circadian cycle, whose pattern can vary among different classes of people. We propose two novel alignment algorithms that consider the HR circadian rhythm, the Puzzle Piece Alignment Algorithm (PPA) and the Event Based Alignment Algorithm (EBA). First, we convert the R-R interval signal into a series of time windows and compute the mean HR per window. Then our algorithms search for matching circadian patterns to align the signals. We conduct experiments using R-R interval signals extracted from two databases in the Physionet Data Bank. Both algorithms are able to align the signals with respect to the circadian rhythmicity of HR. Furthermore, our findings confirm the presence of more than one pattern in the circadian HR rhythm. We suggest an automatic classification of signals according to the three most prominent patterns.

  7. Optogenetic Control of Heart Rhythm by Selective Stimulation of Cardiomyocytes Derived from Pnmt+ Cells in Murine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanwen; Lin, Wee Khang; Crawford, William; Ni, Haibo; Bolton, Emma L.; Khan, Huma; Shanks, Julia; Bub, Gil; Wang, Xin; Paterson, David J.; Zhang, Henggui; Galione, Antony; Ebert, Steven N.; Terrar, Derek A.; Lei, Ming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) was specifically introduced into murine cells expressing the Phenylethanolamine n-methyltransferase (Pnmt) gene, which encodes for the enzyme responsible for conversion of noradrenaline to adrenaline. The new murine model enabled the identification of a distinctive class of Pnmt-expressing neuroendocrine cells and their descendants (i.e. Pnmt+ cell derived cells) within the heart. Here, we show that Pnmt+ cells predominantly localized to the left side of the adult heart. Remarkably, many of the Pnmt+ cells in the left atrium and ventricle appeared to be working cardiomyocytes based on their morphological appearance and functional properties. These Pnmt+ cell derived cardiomyocytes (PdCMs) are similar to conventional myocytes in morphological, electrical and contractile properties. By stimulating PdCMs selectively with blue light, we were able to control cardiac rhythm in the whole heart, isolated tissue preparations and single cardiomyocytes. Our new murine model effectively demonstrates functional dissection of cardiomyocyte subpopulations using optogenetics, and opens new frontiers of exploration into their physiological roles in normal heart function as well as their potential application for selective cardiac repair and regeneration strategies. PMID:28084430

  8. Anatomic Localization and Autonomic Modulation of AV Junctional Rhythm in Failing Human Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Hucker, William J.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Moazami, Nader; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The structure-function relationship in the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) of various animal species has been investigated in detail, however less is known about the human AVJ. In this study, we performed high-resolution optical mapping of the human AVJ (n=6) to define its pacemaker properties and response to autonomic stimulation. Methods and Results Isolated, coronary-perfused AVJ preparations from failing human hearts (n=6, 53±6 years) were optically mapped using the near-infrared, voltage-sensitive dye, di-4-ANBDQBS, with isoproterenol (Iso, 1 μM) and acetylcholine (ACh, 1μM). An algorithm detecting multiple components of optical action potentials was used to reconstruct multi-layered intramural AVJ activation and to identify specialized slow and fast conduction pathways (SP and FP). The anatomical origin and propagation of pacemaker activity was verified via histology. Spontaneous AVJ rhythms of 29±11 bpm (n=6) originated in the nodal-His region (NH, n=3) and/or the proximal His bundle (H, n=4). Iso accelerated the AVJ rhythm to 69±12 bpm (n=5); shifted the leading pacemaker to the transitional cell (TC) regions near the FP and SP (n=4) and/or coronary sinus (n=2); and triggered reentrant arrhythmias (n=2). ACh (n=4) decreased the AVJ rhythm to 18±4 bpm; slowed FP/SP conduction leading to block between the AVJ and atrium; and shifted the pacemaker to either the TC or TC/NH (bifocal activation). Conclusions We have demonstrated that the AVJ pacemaker in failing human hearts is located in the NH or H-regions and can be modified with autonomic stimulation. Moreover, we found that both the FP and SP are involved in anterograde and retrograde conduction. PMID:21646375

  9. Serial heart rhythm complexity changes in patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Lin, Chen; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Lian-Yu; Wu, Cho-Kai; Chiang, Jiun-Yang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Daisy Liu, Li-Yu; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Lin, Yen-Hung; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-03-01

    Heart rhythm complexity analysis has been shown to have good prognostic power in patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze serial changes in heart rhythm complexity from the acute to chronic phase of acute myocardial infarction (MI). We prospectively enrolled 27 patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 42 control subjects. In detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the patients had significantly lower DFAα2 in the acute stage (within 72 hours) and lower DFAα1 at 3 months and 12 months after MI. In multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, the patients had a lower slope 5 in the acute stage, which then gradually increased during the follow-up period. The areas under the MSE curves for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were lower throughout the chronic stage. Area 6–20 had the greatest discriminatory power to differentiate the post-MI patients (at 1 year) from the controls. In both the net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of the linear parameters to differentiate the post-MI patients from the controls. In conclusion, the patients with STEMI had serial changes in cardiac complexity.

  10. Serial heart rhythm complexity changes in patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Lin, Chen; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Lian-Yu; Wu, Cho-Kai; Chiang, Jiun-Yang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Daisy Liu, Li-Yu; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Lin, Yen-Hung; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Heart rhythm complexity analysis has been shown to have good prognostic power in patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze serial changes in heart rhythm complexity from the acute to chronic phase of acute myocardial infarction (MI). We prospectively enrolled 27 patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 42 control subjects. In detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the patients had significantly lower DFAα2 in the acute stage (within 72 hours) and lower DFAα1 at 3 months and 12 months after MI. In multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, the patients had a lower slope 5 in the acute stage, which then gradually increased during the follow-up period. The areas under the MSE curves for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were lower throughout the chronic stage. Area 6–20 had the greatest discriminatory power to differentiate the post-MI patients (at 1 year) from the controls. In both the net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of the linear parameters to differentiate the post-MI patients from the controls. In conclusion, the patients with STEMI had serial changes in cardiac complexity. PMID:28252107

  11. Spotlight on fish: light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Preuer, Torsten; Kloas, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Flora and fauna evolved under natural day and night cycles. However, natural light is now enhanced by artificial light at night, particularly in urban areas. This alteration of natural light environments during the night is hypothesised to alter biological rhythms in fish, by effecting night-time production of the hormone melatonin. Artificial light at night is also expected to increase the stress level of fish, resulting in higher cortisol production. In laboratory experiments, European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to four different light intensities during the night, 0 lx (control), 1 lx (potential light level in urban waters), 10 lx (typical street lighting at night) and 100 lx. Melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24 hour period. This study revealed that the nocturnal increase in melatonin production was inhibited even at the lowest light level of 1 lx. However, cortisol levels did not differ between control and treatment illumination levels. We conclude that artificial light at night at very low intensities may disturb biological rhythms in fish since nocturnal light levels around 1 lx are already found in urban waters. However, enhanced stress induction could not be demonstrated.

  12. Prediction of Thromboembolic Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: The Hong Kong Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Jo-Jo; Chan, Pak-Hei; Chan, Yap-Hang; Fong, Carol-Ho-Yi; Huang, Duo; Li, Wen-Hua; Yin, Li-Xue; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Aim Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of thromboembolic events (TE). Study in a Caucasian population has shown that the CHA2DS2-VASc score predicts TE among HF patients without atrial fibrillation. We sought to assess the usefulness of the CHA2DS2-VASc score in predicting TE in an Asian population and refine the scoring system to improve its predictability of TE among HF patients in sinus rhythm. Methods A total of 1,202 consecutive patients who were admitted to our institution for new-onset HF from 2005 to 2012 and without atrial fibrillation or anticoagulation were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean age was 77.6 ± 12.2 years and 51.7% were female. After 36.2 ± 30.1 months, 113 (9.4%) developed TE. The annual incidence was 0.54%, 1.54%, 2.98% and 5.04% per year in those who had a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1, 2–3, 4–5 and ≥6, respectively. In multivariate analysis, age ≥75 years [Hazard ratio (HR) 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23–5.46, p = 0.012), chronic ischemic heart disease (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.02–2.31, p = 0.040) and chronic kidney disease (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.09–2.53, p = 0.018) independently predicted TE. Incorporation of chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic kidney disease into the CHA2DS2-VASc score significantly increased the area under the Receiver Operating Curve from 0.57 (95% CI 0.54–0.59) to 0.61 (95% CI 0.55–0.66; p = 0.022). Conclusion The CHA2DS2-VASc score is useful for stratification of the risk of TE among HF patients in sinus rhythm. Incorporation of chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic kidney disease into the score modestly improves its predictive value. PMID:28036365

  13. [Individual peculiarities of adaptation to long-term space flights: 24-hour heart rhythm monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baevskii, R. M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Gol'dberger, A. L.; Nikulina, G. A.; Charl'z, D. B.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator); Charles, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of studying 24-hr variability of the cardiac rhythm which characterizes individual difference in reactions of two crew members to the same set of stresses during a 115-day MIR mission. Spacelab (USA) cardiorecorders were used. Data of monitoring revealed significantly different baseline health statuses of the cosmonauts. These functional differences were also observed in the mission. In one of the cosmonauts, the cardiac regulation changed over to a more economic functioning with the autonomous balance shifted towards enhanced sympathetic activity. After 2-3 months on mission he had almost recovered pre-launch level of regulation. In the other, the regulatory system was appreciably strained at the beginning of the mission as compared with preflight baseline. Later on, on flight months 2-3, this strain kept growing till a drastic depletion of the functional reserve. On return to Earth, this was manifested by a strong stress reaction with a sharp decline in power of high-frequency and grow in power of very low frequency components of the heart rhythm. The data suggest that adaptation to space flight and reactions in the readaptation period are dependent on initial health status of crew members, and functional reserve.

  14. Inherited heart rhythm disease: negotiating the minefield for the practicing cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Andrew D; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gardner, Martin J; Arbour, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Inherited heart rhythm disorders are uncommon conditions that have emerged as a challenge to recognize and treat for the practicing clinician. The common electrical forms are long QT and Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic ventricular tachycardia, and early repolarization syndrome. Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction can also cause serious cardiac rhythm disturbances and sudden death. We review the key historic and diagnostic considerations to provide guidance for day-to-day management, and the resources accessible to health care professionals and patients including a Canadian network of expert clinics. This allows for the initiation of disease-specific treatments and enables family screening. These heterogenous conditions can be challenging to diagnose with equally difficult management decisions. However, some common measures can be applied that will assist health care providers and reduce risk for patients. Condition-specific treatment strategies that are deployed in regional clinics are discussed, including the role of the referring health care team.

  15. [Individual peculiarities of adaptation to long-term space flights: 24-hour heart rhythm monitoring].

    PubMed

    Baevskiĭ, R M; Bogomolov, V V; Gol'dberger, A L; Nikulina, G A; Charl'z, D B

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of studying 24-hr variability of the cardiac rhythm which characterizes individual difference in reactions of two crew members to the same set of stresses during a 115-day MIR mission. Spacelab (USA) cardiorecorders were used. Data of monitoring revealed significantly different baseline health statuses of the cosmonauts. These functional differences were also observed in the mission. In one of the cosmonauts, the cardiac regulation changed over to a more economic functioning with the autonomous balance shifted towards enhanced sympathetic activity. After 2-3 months on mission he had almost recovered pre-launch level of regulation. In the other, the regulatory system was appreciably strained at the beginning of the mission as compared with preflight baseline. Later on, on flight months 2-3, this strain kept growing till a drastic depletion of the functional reserve. On return to Earth, this was manifested by a strong stress reaction with a sharp decline in power of high-frequency and grow in power of very low frequency components of the heart rhythm. The data suggest that adaptation to space flight and reactions in the readaptation period are dependent on initial health status of crew members, and functional reserve.

  16. Calcium extrusion is critical for cardiac morphogenesis and rhythm in embryonic zebrafish hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, A. M.; Hume, G. L.; Warren, K. S.; Cook, N. P.; Burns, C. G.; Mohideen, M. A.; Siegal, G.; Yelon, D.; Fishman, M. C.; Garrity, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Calcium entry into myocytes drives contraction of the embryonic heart. To prepare for the next contraction, myocytes must extrude calcium from intracellular space via the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX1) or sequester it into the sarcoplasmic reticulum, via the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase2 (SERCA2). In mammals, defective calcium extrusion correlates with increased intracellular calcium levels and may be relevant to heart failure and sarcoplasmic dysfunction in adults. We report here that mutation of the cardiac-specific NCX1 (NCX1h) gene causes embryonic lethal cardiac arrhythmia in zebrafish tremblor (tre) embryos. The tre ventricle is nearly silent, whereas the atrium manifests a variety of arrhythmias including fibrillation. Calcium extrusion defects in tre mutants correlate with severe disruptions in sarcomere assembly, whereas mutations in the L-type calcium channel that abort calcium entry do not produce this phenotype. Knockdown of SERCA2 activity by morpholino-mediated translational inhibition or pharmacological inhibition causes embryonic lethality due to defects in cardiac contractility and morphology but, in contrast to tre mutation, does not produce arrhythmia. Analysis of intracellular calcium levels indicates that homozygous tre embryos develop calcium overload, which may contribute to the degeneration of cardiac function in this mutant. Thus, the inhibition of NCX1h versus SERCA2 activity differentially affects the pathophysiology of rhythm in the developing heart and suggests that relative levels of NCX1 and SERCA2 function are essential for normal development. PMID:16314582

  17. Mutations in SGOL1 cause a novel cohesinopathy affecting heart and gut rhythm.

    PubMed

    Chetaille, Philippe; Preuss, Christoph; Burkhard, Silja; Côté, Jean-Marc; Houde, Christine; Castilloux, Julie; Piché, Jessica; Gosset, Natacha; Leclerc, Séverine; Wünnemann, Florian; Thibeault, Maryse; Gagnon, Carmen; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hickson, Gilles R; El Amine, Nour; Boufaied, Ines; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; de Santa Barbara, Pascal; Faure, Sandrine; Jonzon, Anders; Cameron, Michel; Dietz, Harry C; Gallo-McFarlane, Elena; Benson, D Woodrow; Moreau, Claudia; Labuda, Damian; Zhan, Shing H; Shen, Yaoqing; Jomphe, Michèle; Jones, Steven J M; Bakkers, Jeroen; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2014-11-01

    The pacemaking activity of specialized tissues in the heart and gut results in lifelong rhythmic contractions. Here we describe a new syndrome characterized by Chronic Atrial and Intestinal Dysrhythmia, termed CAID syndrome, in 16 French Canadians and 1 Swede. We show that a single shared homozygous founder mutation in SGOL1, a component of the cohesin complex, causes CAID syndrome. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed accelerated cell cycle progression, a higher rate of senescence and enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling. Karyotypes showed the typical railroad appearance of a centromeric cohesion defect. Tissues derived from affected individuals displayed pathological changes in both the enteric nervous system and smooth muscle. Morpholino-induced knockdown of sgol1 in zebrafish recapitulated the abnormalities seen in humans with CAID syndrome. Our findings identify CAID syndrome as a novel generalized dysrhythmia, suggesting a new role for SGOL1 and the cohesin complex in mediating the integrity of human cardiac and gut rhythm.

  18. [Effect of change in levels of motor activity and innervation on basic and secondary rhythms of rat heart rate and respiration in ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Bursian, A V; Dmitrieva, L E; Sizonov, V A

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the heart basic rhythm, its rhythmical variations on periodograms, and level of spontaneos motor activity were studied on offspring of white rats from newborn to 3-week age at transition from the state of active wakefulness to narcosis as well as under conditions of blockade of M-cholinoreceptors with atropine. It is shown that the endogenous rhythmical activity can be regulated not only by a change in frequency of basic rhythms, but also by action on all parameters and properties of their rhythmical variations and secondary rhythms. The changes in power of the heart secondary rhythms exceed considerably the frequency oscillations of basic rhythms during blockade of cholinergic innervation or a change in the motor activity level that affects both the basic rhythm circulation and respiration and their variations--secondary rhythms. The atropine blockade of M-cholinoreceptors at the studied ages changes the heart beating rhythm within the limits of 10% of bradicardia in newborns to tachycardia in the 3-week old animals. At the same time, power of the cardiac rhythm secondary oscillations changes several times. These data indicate that the cholinergic mechanisms play the key role in formation of the secondary rhythms and their correlation with motor activity.

  19. The development of the circadian heart rate rhythm (CHR) in Asian infants☆

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Toke; Oliveira, Flavia; Sandarupa, Stanislaus; Khoo, Michael; Neuman, Michael; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that term-born Asian infants, at reduced risk to die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) exhibit a circadian heart rate rhythm (CHR) at a later age than non-Asian term infants. Method Repeated overnight heart rate (HR) traces obtained with a battery-operated Polar S810i heart-rate monitor at home in 17 Asian Torajan infants in Indonesia, were compared with those of 52 non-Asian infants monitored as part of the Collaborative Home Infant Monitoring Evaluation (CHIME). HR was determined using a moving window averaging technique. A comparison of median HR during quiet sleep (QS) episodes (identified by minimum HR variability), established the presence of CHR. Results Seventy three percent of non-Asian CHIME infants ≤ 7 weeks exhibited CHR compared to 45% of Asian Torajan infants. Between 8 and 12 weeks, 94% of non-Asian CHIME infants exhibited CHR, compared to 33% of Asian Torajan infants (p < 0.001). Forty seven and 56% of Asian Torajan infants exhibited the CHR at the age intervals of 16–20 weeks and 21–25 weeks respectively. Active wakefulness percentages as a function of the entire recording and median QS HR were not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion Despite the fact that Asian Torajan infants were on average a week older than non-Asian CHIME babies, between two and three months of age only one in three exhibited the CHR, compared to virtually all non-Asian CHIME infants. We speculate that the cause of this difference rests in the infants' environment rather than their genetic origin. PMID:22289413

  20. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, Doug; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Alexander, David

    2009-01-01

    There are currently several physiological monitoring requirements for EVA in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document. There are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations. Similarly, there are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm during a cabin depressurization scenario in the launch/landing space suit is necessary. This presentation seeks to inform space medicine personnel of recommendations made by an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine specialists regarding in-suit ECG heart rhythm monitoring requirements during lunar surface operations. After a review of demographic information and clinical cases and panel discussion, the panel recommended that ECG monitoring capability as a clinical tool was not essential in the lunar space suit; ECG monitoring was not essential in the launch/landing space suit for contingency scenarios; the current hear rate monitoring capability requirement for both launch/landing and lunar space suits should be maintained; lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG for IVA medical assessments; and, exercise stress testing for astronaut selection and retention should be changed from the current 85% maximum heart rate limit to maximal, exhaustive 'symptom-limited' testing to maximize diagnostic utility as a screening tool for evaluating the functional capacity of astronauts and their cardiovascular health.

  1. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, D.; Jones, J. A.; Alexander, D.

    2008-01-01

    Currently there are several physiological monitoring requirements for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document, including continuous heart rhythm monitoring. However, it is not known whether heart rhythm monitoring in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations or in launch/landing suit the event of a cabin depressurization enroute to or from the moon. Methods: Current US astronaut corps demographic information was provided to an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine experts, including specialists in electrophysiology, exercise physiology, interventional cardiology and arrhythmia. This information included averages for male/female age, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory markers, echocardiogram, ranges for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores for long duration astronauts, and ranges for heart rate (HR) and metabolic (MET) rates obtained during microgravity and lunar EVA. Results: The panel determined that no uncontrolled hazard was likely to occur in the suit during lunar surface or contingency microgravity ops that would require ECG monitoring in the highly screened US astronaut population. However having the capability for rhythm monitoring inside the vehicle (IVA) was considered critical to manage an astronaut in distress. Discussion: Heart rate (HR) monitoring alone allows effective monitoring of astronaut health and function. Consequently, electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring capability as a clinical tool is not essential in the lunar or launch/landing space suit. However, the panel considered that rhythm monitoring could be useful in certain clinical situations, it was not considered required for safe operations. Also, lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG (derived 12- lead) for IVA medical assessments.

  2. Endocardial Lead Extraction in the Polish Registry – clinical practice versus current Heart Rhythm Society consensus

    PubMed Central

    Kutarski, Andrzej; Mitkowski, Przemysław; Przybylski, Andrzej; Lewek, Joanna; Małecka, Barbara; Smukowski, Tomasz; Maciąg, Aleksander; Śmigielski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of patients with pacemaker (PM) and cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). This study is a retrospective analysis of indications for endocardial pacemaker and ICD lead extractions between 2003 and 2009 based on the experience of three Polish Referral Lead Extraction Centers. Material and methods Since 2003, the authors have consecutively retrospectively collected all cases and entered the information in the database. All patients which had indication for lead extraction according to Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines were included to final analyze. Between 2003 and 2005, the data were analyzed together. Since 2006, data have been collected and analyzed annually. Results In each year, a significant increase in lead extraction was observed. The main indications for LE were infections in 52.4% of patients. Nonfunctioning lead extraction constituted the second group of indications for LE in 29.7% of patients. During the registry period, the percentage of class I indications decreased from 80% in 2006 to only 47% in 2009. On the other hand, increasingly more leads were removed because of class 2, especially class 2b. In 2009, 40% of leads were extracted due to class 2b. Conclusions Polish Registry of Endocardial Lead Extraction 2003-2009, shows an increasing frequency of lead extraction. The main indication for LE is infection: systemic and pocket. An increase in class 2, especially 2b, LE indication in every center during the study period was found. PMID:24904658

  3. Effects of garlic (Allium sativum) extract on the heart rate, rhythm and force of contraction in frog: a dose-dependent study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Verma, Nar Singh

    2004-06-01

    Garlic juice (dose equivalent to 3.3 g to 33 g garlic) mainly caused bradycardia in frog Rana tigerina. The disturbance in ventricular rhythm was observed prior to than that of atria. Rhythm was specially disturbed at higher doses causing bizarre pattern. Force of contraction of the heart also decreased with higher dose of the garlic extract. The results suggest that garlic extract has some beneficial effect on heart rate modulating the rate, rhythm and force of contraction positively but very high doses may exert non-desirable effects as well.

  4. Long-term effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Frank C; Jacobson, Michael; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Adeghate, Ernest

    2008-03-01

    In vivo biotelemetry studies have demonstrated a variety of heart rhythm disturbances in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat, these disturbances have included reductions in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) and an electrocardiogram that displays prolonged QRS duration and Q-T interval. The aim of this study was to investigate the chronic effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat. Transmitter devices were surgically implanted in the peritoneal cavity of young male GK and age-matched Wistar control rats. Electrodes from the transmitter were arranged in Einthoven bipolar lead II configuration. Electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature data were recorded in rats from age 2 to 15 months. Data were acquired for 2 weeks each month. Non-fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance and body weight were measured periodically. In GK rats, growth rate and maximal attained body weight were significantly reduced and non-fasting blood glucose was progressively increased compared with age-matched Wistar control animals. Heart rate was significantly lower in GK compared with control rats at 2, 7 and 15 months of age. At 2 months of age, HR was 316 +/- 6 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 370 +/- 7 beats min(-1) in Wistar control animals. There was a progressive age-dependent decline in HRV in Wistar control rats; however, HRV in GK rats did not alter significantly with age. Heart rate variability was significantly reduced in GK compared with Wistar control rats at 2 and 7 months. At 2 months of age, HRV was 28 +/- 2 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 38 +/- 3 beats min(-1) in Wistar control rats. Reduced HR in GK rats may be an inherited characteristic. The absence of age-dependent reductions in HRV in GK rats may be a consequence of an underlying impairment of autonomic control which manifests at early age.

  5. [Anomalies in the development of the sinus venosus as a probable cause of heart rhythm disorders and fetal hydrops].

    PubMed

    Dudorkinová, D; Povýsilová, V; Skovránek, J

    1993-09-01

    Prenatal ultrasonic examination during the 28th week of gestation revealed a transient disorder of the cardiac rhythm in the foetus. Subsequently repeated echocardiographic examinations confirmed foetal hydrops which together with signs of EP gestosis of the mother was an indication to terminate pregnancy during the 29th week by Caesarean section. In the severely hydropic male foetus in the enlarged anterior wall of the right atrium an atypical vascular canal was found which was in the close vicinity of the sinoatrial node. The latter most probably caused intermittent intrauterine supraventricular tachycardia in a heart with a normal configuration in other respects.

  6. Melatonin rhythms in European sea bass plasma and eye: influence of seasonal photoperiod and water temperature.

    PubMed

    García-Allegue, R; Madrid, J A; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2001-08-01

    The transduction of seasonal information from the environment (i.e., photoperiod and water temperature) into melatonin rhythms was studied in sea bass. Plasma and ocular melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) was determined in autumn, winter, spring and summer (experiment 1) under natural culture conditions, and in the summer and winter solstices under both natural and "6-month out-of-phase" photoperiods (experiment 2). At each sampling, 48 sea bass were sacrificed at a rate of 6 fish every 3 hr and the level of melatonin was determined in plasma and eye cup samples by ELISA. In experiment 1, significant diel changes were observed in plasma melatonin, with nocturnal melatonin varying from 144 pg/mL (summer) to 23 pg/mL (autumn), while diurnal melatonin remained low, around 8 pg/mL throughout the year. In experiment 2, the photoperiod length was shown to control the duration of the nocturnal melatonin rise, while the water temperature determined the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm. Ocular melatonin peaked during daytime in autumn and winter, but no significant changes were detected in summer and spring. In conclusion, plasma melatonin rhythms in sea bass reflect the pineal capacity to integrate seasonal information and supply precise calendar information, which may synchronize different physiological processes such as annual reproduction and feeding rhythms.

  7. [The rhythms of arterial pressure and heart rate in individuals with arterial hypertension under the conditions of Far North].

    PubMed

    Gapon, L I; Shurkevich, N P; Vetoshkin, A S; Gubin, D G

    2006-01-01

    The circadian and ultradian rhythms of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were studied by means of 24-hour BP monitoring in patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and practically healthy people working in Far North shifts. The subjects were 418 men. The main group consisted of 177 men aged 18 to 59 working in trans-polar shifts in Yamburg, Tyumen region, latitude 57 North. The comparison group included 158 residents of a moderate climatic zone (Tyumen, latitude 57 North). The control group consisted of 83 practically healthy men, of whom 43 worked in Far North shifts, and 40 were residents of Tyumen. The groups were comparable by age, AH duration, and office systolic and diastolic BP (SBP; DBP). The study demonstrates that even healthy people working in Far North shifts display high BP variability and the decrease of the stability and power of SBP, DBP and HR circadian rhythms due to the reduction of the amplitude, contribution of the rhythm to the total variability, and the increase of the amplitude of high-frequency harmonics of the spectrum (a manifestation of extracircadian dissemination), which may be a sign of accelerated ageing and biological age increase, and may facilitate AH development. Development of AH under the extreme conditions of Far North shifts, unlike the conditions of moderate climatic zones, is accompanied by progressive BH variability increase, the worsening of the chronological structure of SBP and DBP, the increase of extracircadian dissemination, which can be of both clinical and prognostic significance.

  8. [The information value of indices of the mathematical analysis of heart rhythm in noise exposure].

    PubMed

    Danev, S

    1988-01-01

    The effect of noise on the vegetative nervous system is well-studied. In a laboratory room simulating operator's box 6 subjects were exposed fourfold to white noise with intensity 95 dB/A. The indices of the cardiac rhythm were measured for 10 minutes, threefold, during all exposures, except the first. The measurements were before the beginning of the noise exposure, from the 5th to the 15th minute after starting and at the end (the exposure continues 135 min.). It was established that the effect of noise on the cardiac rhythm indices is most strongly expressed in the beginning. At the end of the exposure the traced indices show a tendency towards level off with the initial data. A conclusion is made that the nearly unknown, in our country, indices of the mathematical analysis of the cardiac rhythm possess high information concerning the noise hazard.

  9. Major developments in the 2016 european guidelines for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Trullàs, J C; González-Franco, Á

    2017-03-15

    The European Society of Cardiology has recently published new guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure (HF). This article aims to review these recommendations and their level of scientific evidence and to present the most innovative aspects. The most significant deviations from the 2012 edition are: 1) the introduction of the concept of HF with midrange LVEF (40-49%); 2) a new diagnostic algorithm for chronic HF, initially considering the clinical probability; 3) recommendations on preventing or delaying the apparition of HF; 4) indications for the use of the new sacubitril-valsartan compound, the first angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor; 5) modification of indications for cardiac resynchronisation therapy; and 6) a new algorithm for a combined diagnostic and treatment strategy for acute HF based on the presence or absence of congestion and hypoperfusion.

  10. Valvular heart disease in the community: a European experience.

    PubMed

    Iung, Bernard; Baron, Gabriel; Tornos, Pilar; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Butchart, Eric G; Vahanian, Alec

    2007-11-01

    The Euro Heart Survey on valvular heart disease included 5001 patients from 92 centers in 25 European countries in 2001: 71.9% had native valve disease and 28.1% had previously undergone valve surgery. Aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) accounted for 43.1 and 33.6%, respectively, of single-valve diseases and were mostly caused by degenerative diseases. Mean age was 69 and 65 years, respectively, and at least one comorbidity was present in 36.3% of patients with AS and 41.7% with MR. Analysis of the therapeutic decision in patients with severe valve diseases showed that symptomatic patients were frequently denied surgery (32.3% in AS after the age of 75 and 51.3% in MR), more on the basis of age and left ventricular function than comorbidities. There was a better concordance between practice and guidelines concerning interventions in asymptomatic patients. These findings underline the need for better implementation of guidelines.

  11. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  12. Effects of European mistletoe (Viscum album L. subsp. album) extracts on activity rhythms of the Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Karakas, Alper; Turker, Arzu Ucar; Gunduz, Bulent

    2008-01-01

    Antitumor drugs may have some significant nervous system side-effects such as disrupted sleep, eating and drinking patterns. European Mistletoe has been investigated for many decades for its potential use against cancer. To test the hypothesis that the non-antineoplastic effects of mistletoe might be mediated by the actions on the circadian timing system, we have applied mistletoe extracts and vehicle and have measured locomotor activity, feeding and drinking rhythms under constant darkness. Four groups (vehicle, 20 mg kg(-1) ip injection, 40 mg kg(-1) ip injection and 6 g kg(-1) oral administration) were performed for both heat-treated and freeze-dried extracts. None of the administrations changed the locomotor activity, feeding and drinking rhythms in the groups except for 40 mg kg(-1) freeze-dried injected group. The locomotor activity levels decreased in 40 mg kg(-1) freeze-dried extract injected group. These results suggest that, side-effects of mistletoe on circadian timing system of the Syrian hamster depend on the dose and the preparation method of the extract.

  13. Ecstasy (MDMA) Alters Cardiac Gene Expression and DNA Methylation: Implications for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Hight, Robert S; Jiao, Zhe; Fields, Earl; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2015-11-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug that stimulates monoamine neurotransmitter release and inhibits reuptake. MDMA's acute cardiotoxicity includes tachycardia and arrhythmia which are associated with cardiomyopathy. MDMA acute cardiotoxicity has been explored, but neither long-term MDMA cardiac pathological changes nor epigenetic changes have been evaluated. Microarray analyses were employed to identify cardiac gene expression changes and epigenetic DNA methylation changes. To identify permanent MDMA-induced pathogenetic changes, mice received daily 10- or 35-day MDMA, or daily 10-day MDMA followed by 25-day saline washout (10 + 25 days). MDMA treatment caused differential gene expression (p < .05, fold change >1.5) in 752 genes following 10 days, 558 genes following 35 days, and 113 genes following 10-day MDMA + 25-day saline washout. Changes in MAPK and circadian rhythm gene expression were identified as early as 10 days. After 35 days, circadian rhythm genes (Per3, CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2) persisted to be differentially expressed. MDMA caused DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation that was independent of gene expression; hypermethylation of genes was found to be 71% at 10 days, 68% at 35 days, and 91% at 10 + 25 days washout. Differential gene expression paralleled DNA methylation in 22% of genes at 10-day treatment, 17% at 35 days, and 48% at 10 + 25 days washout. We show here that MDMA induced cardiac epigenetic changes in DNA methylation where hypermethylation predominated. Moreover, MDMA induced gene expression of key elements of circadian rhythm regulatory genes. This suggests a fundamental organism-level event to explain some of the etiologies of MDMA dysfunction in the heart.

  14. Ecstasy (MDMA) Alters Cardiac Gene Expression and DNA Methylation: Implications for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Koczor, Christopher A.; Ludlow, Ivan; Hight, Robert S.; Jiao, Zhe; Fields, Earl; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Torres, Rebecca A.; Lewis, William

    2015-01-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug that stimulates monoamine neurotransmitter release and inhibits reuptake. MDMA’s acute cardiotoxicity includes tachycardia and arrhythmia which are associated with cardiomyopathy. MDMA acute cardiotoxicity has been explored, but neither long-term MDMA cardiac pathological changes nor epigenetic changes have been evaluated. Microarray analyses were employed to identify cardiac gene expression changes and epigenetic DNA methylation changes. To identify permanent MDMA-induced pathogenetic changes, mice received daily 10- or 35-day MDMA, or daily 10-day MDMA followed by 25-day saline washout (10 + 25 days). MDMA treatment caused differential gene expression (p < .05, fold change >1.5) in 752 genes following 10 days, 558 genes following 35 days, and 113 genes following 10-day MDMA + 25-day saline washout. Changes in MAPK and circadian rhythm gene expression were identified as early as 10 days. After 35 days, circadian rhythm genes (Per3, CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2) persisted to be differentially expressed. MDMA caused DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation that was independent of gene expression; hypermethylation of genes was found to be 71% at 10 days, 68% at 35 days, and 91% at 10 + 25 days washout. Differential gene expression paralleled DNA methylation in 22% of genes at 10-day treatment, 17% at 35 days, and 48% at 10 + 25 days washout. We show here that MDMA induced cardiac epigenetic changes in DNA methylation where hypermethylation predominated. Moreover, MDMA induced gene expression of key elements of circadian rhythm regulatory genes. This suggests a fundamental organism-level event to explain some of the etiologies of MDMA dysfunction in the heart. PMID:26251327

  15. Effects of long-term microgravity exposure in space on circadian rhythms of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomune; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Kubo, Yutaka; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated their circadian rhythms using data from electrocardiographic records and examined the change in circadian period related to normal RR intervals for astronauts who completed a long-term (≥6-month) mission in space. The examinees were seven astronauts, five men and two women, from 2009 to 2010. Their mean ± SD age was 52.0 ± 4.2 years (47-59 yr). Each stayed in space for more than 160 days; their average length of stay was 172.6 ± 14.6 days (163-199 days). We conducted a 24-h Holter electrocardiography before launch (Pre), at one month after launch (DF1), at two months after launch (DF2), at two weeks before return (DF3), and at three months after landing (Post), comparing each index of frequency-domain analysis and 24-h biological rhythms of the NN intervals (normal RR intervals). Results show that the mean period of Normal Sinus (NN) intervals was within 24 ± 4 h at each examination. Inter-individual variability differed among the stages, being significantly smaller at DF3 (Pre versus DF1 versus DF3 versus Post = 22.36 ± 2.50 versus 25.46 ± 4.37 versus 22.46 ± 1.75 versus 26.16 ± 7.18 h, p < 0.0001). The HF component increased in 2 of 7 astronauts, whereas it decreased in 3 of 7 astronauts and 1 was remained almost unchanged at DF1. During DF3, about 6 months after their stay in space, the HF component of 5 of 7 astronauts recovered from the decrease after launch, with prominent improvement to over 20% in 3 astronauts. Although autonomic nervous functions and circadian rhythms were disturbed until one month had passed in space, well-scheduled sleep and wake rhythms and meal times served as synchronizers.

  16. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0 lx, 1 lx, 10 lx, 100 lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1 lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities.

  17. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail.

  18. The "Heart" of the European "Body Politic". British and German Perspectives on Europe's Central "Organ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musolff, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a corpus of British and German press coverage of European Union (EU) politics over the 1990s, the paper analyses uses of the geopolitical HEART metaphor. Over the course of the 1990s, successive British governments promised to work "at" the "heart of Europe". However, no one ever claimed that Britain was…

  19. [QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SLOW-WAVE OSCILLATIONS OF HEART RHYTHM AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN RAT FETUSES WITH FEMALE RESPIRATORY AND CARDIAC ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, O P; Vdovichenko, N D; Bursian, A V

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of correlation of slow-wave processes in the system during the last 4 days of bearing was performed in experiments on rat fetuses with retained placental connection with the female. The parallel recording of physiological indicators of the female and fetus state revealed the existence of a relationship between oscillations of heartbeat rhythms and breathing in about-one-minute and many-minute ranges. The highest values of connection between the heart rhythms of female and fetus are characteristic for days 17 and 20 of gestation. On day 18-19 the interrelationships are slightly weaker. The specific mechanism providing this synchronization between heartbeat oscillations of mother and fetus is unclear. There are two hypothetic possibilities: an oscillation driver close in parameters for mother and fetus, and the maternal rhythm directly affecting the fetus.

  20. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  1. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility.

  2. Circadian Rhythms of Heart Rate and Locomotion After Treatment With Low-Dose Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    on the barrier under the experimental conditions used in this heart pacemaker due to peripheral AChE inhibition, report ( Grauer et al., 2000...cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-833T 112 May 20061. Jenden DJ. 2005. Low-dose cholinesterase inhibitors do not induce Grauer E, Alkalai D, Kapon J, Cohen G

  3. Effects of electromagnetic radiation (bright light, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, infrared radiation) on the circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Griefahn, Barbara; Künemund, Christa; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lerchl, Alexander; Degen, Gisela H

    2002-10-01

    Electromagnetic spectra reduce melatonin production and delay the nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate. Seven healthy men (16-22 yrs) completed 4 permuted sessions. The control session consisted of a 24-hours bedrest at < 30 lux, 18 degrees C, and < 50 dBA. In the experimental sessions, either light (1500 lux), magnetic field (16.7 Hz, 0.2 mT), or infrared radiation (65 degrees C) was applied from 5 pm to 1 am. Salivary melatonin level was determined hourly, rectal temperature and heart rate were continuously recorded. Melatonin synthesis was completely suppressed by light but resumed thereafter. The nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate were delayed. The magnetic field had no effect. Infrared radiation elevated rectal temperature and heart rate. Only bright light affected the circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate, however, differently thus causing a dissociation, which might enhance the adverse effects of shiftwork in the long run.

  4. Activation and repolarization patterns in the ventricular epicardium under sinus rhythm in frog and rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Azarov, Jan E; Shmakov, Dmitry N; Vityazev, Vladimir A; Roshchevskaya, Irina M; Roshchevsky, Mikhail P

    2007-03-01

    Our study compared the contributions of activation sequence and local repolarization durations distribution in the organization of epicardial repolarization in animals with fast (rabbit) and slow (frog) myocardial activation under sinus rhythm. Activation times, repolarization times and activation-recovery intervals (ARI) were obtained from ventricular epicardial unipolar electrograms recorded in 13 Chinchilla rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and 10 frogs (Rana temporaria). In frogs, depolarization travels from the atrioventricular ring radially. ARIs increased progressively from the apex to the middle portion and finally to the base (502+/-75, 557+/-73, 606+/-79 ms, respectively; P<0.01). In rabbits, depolarization spread from two epicardial breakthroughs with the duration of epicardial activation being lower than that in frogs (17+/-3 vs. 44+/-18 ms; P<0.001). ARI durations were 120+/-37, 143+/-45, and 163+/-40 ms in the left ventricular apex, left, and right ventricular bases, respectively (P<0.05). In both species, repolarization sequence was directed from apex to base according to the ARI distribution with dispersion of repolarization being higher than that of activation (P<0.001). Thus, excitation spread sequence and velocity per se do not play a crucial role in the formation of ventricular epicardial repolarization pattern, but the chief factor governing repolarization sequences is the distribution of local repolarization durations.

  5. Noninvasive recovery of epicardial potentials in a realistic heart-torso geometry. Normal sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, B J; Rudy, Y

    1990-04-01

    The inverse problem in electrocardiography implies the reconstruction of electrical events within the heart from information measured noninvasively on the body surface. Deduction of these electrical events is possible from measured epicardial potentials, and, thus, a noninvasive method of recovering epicardial potentials from body surface data is useful in experimental and clinical studies. In the present study, an inverse method that uses Tikhonov regularization was shown to reconstruct, with good accuracy, important events in cardiac excitation. The inverse procedure was employed on data obtained from a human-torso tank in which a beating canine heart was placed in the correct anatomical position. Comparison with the actual, measured epicardial potentials indicates that positions and shapes of potential features (maxima, minima, zero potential line, saddles, etc.) are recovered with good accuracy throughout the QRS. An error in position of up to 1 cm is typical, while amplitudes are slightly diminished. In addition, application was extended from the above setting, in which the geometry was precisely known and potentials at a large number of leads were measured accurately, to a situation that is more representative of clinical and experimental settings. Effects of inaccuracy in location of the position of the heart were examined. A stylized torso that approximates the actual geometry was designed, and its performance in the inverse computations was evaluated. A systematic method of reduction of the number of leads on the body surface was proposed, and the resulting lead configurations were evaluated in terms of the accuracy of inverse solutions. The results indicate that the inverse problem can be stabilized with respect to different types of uncertainties in measured data and offer promise in the use of the inverse procedure in clinical and experimental situations.

  6. Effect of angiotensin II on rhythmic per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and heart and daily rhythm of activity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichová, Iveta; Šoltésová, Dorota; Szántóová, Kristína; Mravec, Boris; Neupauerová, Denisa; Veselá, Anna; Zeman, Michal

    2013-09-10

    Endogenous daily rhythms are generated by the hierarchically organized circadian system predominantly synchronized by the external light (L): dark (D) cycle. During recent years several humoral signals have been found to influence the generation and manifestation of daily rhythm. Since most studies have been performed under in vitro conditions, the mechanisms employed under in vivo conditions need to be investigated. Our study focused on angiotensin II (angII)-mediated regulation of Per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and heart and spontaneous locomotor activity in Wistar rats under synchronized conditions. Angiotensin II was infused (100ng/kg/min) via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 7 or 28days. Samples were taken in 4-h intervals during a 24hcycle and after a light pulse applied in the first and second part of the dark phase. Gene expression was measured using real time PCR. Locomotor activity was monitored using an infrared camera with a remote control installed in the animal facility. Seven days of angII infusion caused an increase in blood pressure and heart/body weight index and 28days of angII infusion also increased water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a distinct daily rhythm in Per2 expression in the SCN and heart of control rats and infused rats. Seven days of angII infusion did not influence Per2 expression in the heart. 28days of angII treatment caused significant phase advance and a decrease in nighttime expression of Per2 and influenced expression of clock controlled genes Rev-erb alpha and Dbp in the heart compared to the control. Four weeks of angII infusion decreased the responsiveness of Per2 expression in the SCN to a light pulse at the end of the dark phase of the 24hcycle. Expression of mRNA coding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) showed a daily rhythm in the heart of control rats. Four weeks of angII infusion caused a decrease in amplitude of rhythmic

  7. [Studying intermediatory regulation of heart rhythm using Daphnia magna as the alternative test object].

    PubMed

    Podosinovikova, N P; Beliaev, V A; Dolgo-Saburov, V B

    2009-01-01

    A functional test using Daphnia magna Straus hydrobionts is proposed for studying the role of intermediatory relationships in the heart rate (HR) regulation. It is established that the M-cholinomimetic carbamylcholine increases for two hours and decreases after 24 hours the HR in D. magna. Caffeine (a nonselective antagonist of adenosine receptors) potentiates the action of carbamylcholine during the first hour and then ceases to influence the drug effect. Caffeine normalizes the HR rate D magna, which was decreased by the cholinolytic atropine and the beta-adrenolytic atenolol. The possibilities of using the proposed test for the investigation of intermediatory relationships in the HR regulation, rapid analysis of the cardiothropic action of xenobiotics, and the primary screening of drugs for the pharmacological correction of HR disturbances are discussed.

  8. [Indication and timing of heart valve surgery - summery of the European guidelines].

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Simon H; Reser, Diana; Czerny, Martin; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-04-09

    Most common heart valve diseases in western industrialized nations are the aortic valve stenosis and the mitral valve regurgitation. More seldom are a regurgitation of the aortic valve and mitral valve stenosis. Even more seldom are heart valve diseases of the Tricuspid and the pulmonary valve. The only curative therapy in severe heart valve disease is a surgical intervention. The timing is crucial for the outcome. Especially in asymptomatic patients it's difficult to find the right point of time for intervention due to missing realization of the health status. In 2013, the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published guidelines according to the therapy in heart valve disease. Here we want to summarize the recommendations of these guidelines in regards of timing of the surgical intervention.

  9. The time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight may influence the diurnal rhythm of acute heart attack mortality.

    PubMed

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Bódis, József; Boncz, Imre; Koppan, Agnes; Koppan, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours have an effect on the seasonality, or the daily rhythm of heart attack mortality. We analyzed retrospectively data of patients admitted to hospitals with the diagnosis of heart attack (n=32,329) and patients who deceased of a heart attack (n=5142) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 in Hungary. Heart attack mortality was highest during winter, while lowest number of events was recorded during summer . The daily peak of diurnality was between 6:00 am and 12:00 pm (33.77%). A positive correlation was found between the time of sunrise, time of sunset and the mortality caused by myocardial infarction (p<0,01). In the analysis of the number of daylight hours and the heart attack mortality we found a negative correlation (r=-0.105, p<0.05). No significant difference was found between sexes and different age-groups in heart attack mortality. Our data suggest, that the occurrence and the mortality of heart attack may be related to the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours.

  10. [European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ancion, A; D'Orio, V; Lancellotti, P

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem in industrialized countries. Its prognosis remains poor. The new European recommendations for heart failure management allow validation of the latest advances in the field. This article focuses on the definition, classification and treatment of chronic heart failure. Indeed, there are new aspects to consider such as, a new classification, a new therapeutic class and new remote monitoring solutions. On the contrary, there is no change in initial drug therapy, integration of the patient in a multidisciplinary program and the importance of treatment of comorbidities.

  11. [Analysis of the Cochrane review: Anticoagulation versus placebo for heart failure in sinus rhythm. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;3:CD003336].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic and embolic events contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated to Chronic Heart Failure (HF). Differently from patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and HF, in which the benefit of anticoagulation is well documented, the use of these drugs in those with HF in sinus rhythm (without AF history) is controversial. In this systematic review from the Cochrane Collaboration, the authors evaluated the benefits and risks associated with oral anticoagulation (versus placebo) in this population. Only 2 randomized controlled trials were published (one with open-label design) enrolling a total of 324 patients. The results of the meta-analysis based on the best available evidence do not support the systematic use of oral anticoagulants in patients with HF and sinus rhythm for preventing death (overall or cardiovascular) or non-fatal cardiovascular events. Furthermore the major bleeding risk was significantly increased.

  12. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  13. Activity, sleep and ambient light have a different impact on circadian blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gubin, D G; Weinert, D; Rybina, S V; Danilova, L A; Solovieva, S V; Durov, A M; Prokopiev, N Y; Ushakov, P A

    2017-02-16

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of endogenous and exogenous factors for the expression of the daily rhythms of body temperature (BT), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). One hundred and seventy-three young adults (YA), 17-24 years old (y.o.), of both genders were studied under a modified constant-routine (CR) protocol for 26 h. Participants were assigned randomly to groups with different lighting regimens: CR-LD, n = 77, lights (>400 l×) on from 09:00 to 17:00 h and off (<10 l×) from 17:00 to 09:00 next morning; CR-LL, n = 81, lights on (>400 l×) during the whole experimental session; CR-DD, n = 15, constant dim light (<10 l×) during the whole experiment. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP, HR and BT were measured every 2 h. For comparison, the results of the former studies performed under conditions of regular life with an activity period from 07:00 to 23:00 h and sleep from 23:00 till 07:00 h (Control) were reanalyzed. Seven-day Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) records from 27 YA (16-38 y.o.) and BT self-measurement data from 70 YA (17-30 y.o.) taken on ≥ 3 successive days at 08:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, 20:00, 23:00 and 03:00 were available. The obtained daily patterns were different between Control and CR-DD groups, due to effects of activity, sleep and light. The comparison of Control and CR-LD groups allowed the effects of sleep and activity to be estimated since the lighting conditions were similar. The activity level substantially elevated SBP, but not DBP. Sleep, on the other hand, lowered the nighttime DBP, but has no effect on SBP. HR was affected both by activity and sleep. In accordance with previous studies, these results confirm that the steep BP increase in the morning is not driven by the circadian clock, but rather by sympathoadrenal factors related to awakening and corresponding anticipatory mechanisms. The effect on BT was not significant. To investigate the impact of light during the former

  14. Heart Rhythm Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Information Sheets Find a Specialist Glossary of Terms Share: About HRS Awards History Jobs with HRS Donate Now Governance Corporate Relations & Support Membership Join HRS Benefits My HRS ...

  15. TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K(+) channels are suppressed in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure and provide therapeutic targets for rhythm control.

    PubMed

    Lugenbiel, Patrick; Wenz, Fabian; Syren, Pascal; Geschwill, Pascal; Govorov, Katharina; Seyler, Claudia; Frank, Derk; Schweizer, Patrick A; Franke, Jennifer; Weis, Tanja; Bruehl, Claus; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Karck, Matthias; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Concomitant heart failure (HF) poses a particular therapeutic challenge and is associated with prolonged atrial electrical refractoriness compared with non-failing hearts. We hypothesized that downregulation of atrial repolarizing TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K(+) channels contributes to electrical remodeling during AF with HF, and that TREK-1 gene transfer would provide rhythm control via normalization of atrial effective refractory periods in this AF subset. In patients with chronic AF and HF, atrial TREK-1 mRNA levels were reduced by 82% (left atrium) and 81% (right atrium) compared with sinus rhythm (SR) subjects. Human findings were recapitulated in a porcine model of atrial tachypacing-induced AF and reduced left ventricular function. TREK-1 mRNA (-66%) and protein (-61%) was suppressed in AF animals at 14-day follow-up compared with SR controls. Downregulation of repolarizing TREK-1 channels was associated with prolongation of atrial effective refractory periods versus baseline conditions, consistent with prior observations in humans with HF. In a preclinical therapeutic approach, pigs were randomized to either atrial Ad-TREK-1 gene therapy or sham treatment. Gene transfer effectively increased TREK-1 protein levels and attenuated atrial effective refractory period prolongation in the porcine AF model. Ad-TREK-1 increased the SR prevalence to 62% during follow-up in AF animals, compared to 35% in the untreated AF group. In conclusion, TREK-1 downregulation and rhythm control by Ad-TREK-1 transfer suggest mechanistic and potential therapeutic significance of TREK-1 channels in a subgroup of AF patients with HF and prolonged atrial effective refractory periods. Functional correction of ionic remodeling through TREK-1 gene therapy represents a novel paradigm to optimize and specify AF management.

  16. Circadian rhythms of European and African-Americans after a large delay of sleep as in jet lag and night work

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Charmane I.; Tomaka, Victoria A.; Crowley, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Jet travel and night shift work produce large changes in when people sleep, work and eat; a challenge that was not encountered during most of our evolution. Successful adaptation would require the internal, master, circadian clock to make large phase shifts to reduce the circadian misalignment between circadian rhythms and the times for sleep, work and meals. We compared African-Americans and non-Hispanic European-Americans in how much their circadian clocks shifted after a 9 hour phase delay of the light/dark, sleep/wake and meal schedule, which has similarities to flying west or sleeping in the daytime after night shifts. We also measured their free-running circadian periods using a forced desynchrony protocol with a 5-h day. European-Americans had longer free-running periods and larger phase delays than African-Americans. Correlations (among all subjects, just African-Americans and just European-Americans) showed that longer circadian periods were associated with larger phase delays. Larger phase delays, facilitated by longer circadian periods, reduce jet lag after westward travel and make it easier to work night shifts and sleep during the daytime after night work. On the other hand, a shorter circadian period, which makes one more of a morning-type person, is better for most people given our early-bird dominated society. PMID:27819313

  17. Electrical excitation of the heart in a basal vertebrate, the European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Egginton, Stuart; Vornanen, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Hagfishes and lampreys (order Cyclostomata) are living representatives of an ancient group of jawless vertebrates (class Agnatha). Studies on cyclostome hearts may provide insights into the evolution of the vertebrate heart and thereby increase our understanding of cardiac function in higher vertebrates, including mammals. To this end, electrical excitability of the heart in a basal vertebrate, the European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), was examined. Ion currents of cardiac myocytes, action potentials (APs) of atrial and ventricular muscle, and electrocardiogram (in vivo) were measured using the patch-clamp method, intracellular microelectrodes, and trailing wires, respectively. The characteristic features of fairly high heart rate (28.4 ± 3 beats min(-1)) and short AP duration (550 ± 44 and 122.1 ± 28.5 for ventricle and atrium, respectively) at low ambient temperature (5°C) are shared with cold-active teleost fishes. However, the ion current basis of the ventricular AP differs from that of other fishes. For inward currents, sodium current density (INa) is lower and calcium current density (ICa) higher than in teleost ventricles, while the kinetics of INa is slow and that of ICa is fast in comparison. Among the ventricular repolarizing currents, the delayed rectifier K(+) current is smaller than in myocytes of several teleost species. Unlike mammalian hearts, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels are constitutively open under normoxic conditions, thus contributing to negative resting membrane potential and repolarization of APs. Upstroke velocity of AP (5.4 ± 0.9 and 6.3 ± 0.6 V s(-1) for ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively) is slower than in teleost hearts. Excitability of the lamprey heart seems to possess both primitive and advanced characteristics. Short APs are appropriate to support brief and vigorous contractions (in common with higher vertebrates), while relatively low AP upstroke velocities enable only relatively slow propagation of

  18. Painted Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastian, Duane

    1985-01-01

    In this art activity gifted students, ages 10 to 13, learn about internal and external rhythms and make a painting of an internal rhythm. The lesson can be expanded with a discussion of Kandinsky, Pollock, and other painters who have painted sound or have demonstrated rhythms. (RM)

  19. Thiamine pyrophosphate as an effector of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex from European bison heart.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S; Markiewicz, J

    1995-09-01

    The purified 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) from the European bison heart was near saturated with endogenous bound thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). Exogenous TPP added to the full OGDC reaction medium decreased S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate approximately 2.6-fold without any notable change in the maximum reaction rate. The TPP effect was observed in the presence of 1 mM ADP which alone is a strong positive allosteric effector of OGDC. At an unsaturating 2-oxoglutarate concentration the A50 value for TPP was approximately 0.05 mM. The ADP-like action of exogenous TPP was also found in the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1) reaction, determined in the presence of 2,6-dichlorophenoloindophenol as an electron acceptor.

  20. Cerebrovascular disease, associated risk factors and antithrombotic therapy in a population screening cohort: Insights from the Belgian Heart Rhythm Week programme.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Mairesse, Georges H; Goethals, Peter; Scavee, Christophe; Vijgen, Johan; Blankoff, Ivan; Vandekerckhove, Yves; Lip, Gregory Yh

    2017-02-01

    Background Cerebrovascular disease confers a major healthcare burden worldwide and is a major cause of death and disability. Several well-established risk factors, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), are associated with cerebrovascular disease and antithrombotic therapy reduces risk. Design This study was a subgroup analysis from the Belgian Heart Rhythm Week, a nationwide AF awareness programme. Methods We studied subjects screened between 2012 and 2014 with available data on clinical risk factors and antithrombotic treatment. Results Of the 38,034 subjects eligible for this analysis, 1513 (4.0%) reported a positive clinical history for cerebrovascular disease. Logistic regression analysis found that age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, history of vascular disease, history of heart failure and history of AF (all p < 0.001) were independently associated with cerebrovascular disease. Among subjects with history of cerebrovascular disease and AF, 1.7% were taking oral anticoagulant drugs only, while both oral anticoagulant drugs and aspirin were used in 61.5% of subjects, aspirin in 4.3% of patients and no antithrombotic therapy in 32.5% of subjects. Among those subjects without AF, the corresponding figures were 0.8, 9.5, 2.0 and 87.6%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in this contemporary population screening project was higher than that reported in the general population and was associated with the major known stroke risk factors. Sub-optimal antithrombotic therapy management was evident, with a low use of oral anticoagulant drugs among patients with AF and a low use of aspirin among subjects without AF.

  1. Disturbance of circadian rhythm in heart rate, blood pressure and locomotive activity at the stroke-onset in malignant stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, M; Umegaki, K; Ito, T; Suzuki, M; Ikeda, M; Tomita, T

    2001-02-01

    Malignant stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (M-SHRSP), separated from SHRSP, develop severe hypertension and spontaneously develop stroke at early ages. Using this model of cerebrovascular stroke, influence of stroke-onset on the autonomic nervous system was investigated. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP) and locomotive activity were monitored during development of stroke using a telemetry system. Stroke-onset was assessed by neurologic symptoms, changes in body weight, fluid intake and serum NOx level. The rat displayed a nocturnal pattern of circadian rhythms. At stroke-onset, mean HR over 24 h increased by 20 to 30 bpm and rapidly increased at post stroke, approximately 100 bpm higher than that at pre stroke. Circadian variation in HR, which was normally 50 bpm higher during night than during day, attenuated at stroke-onset, and it was blunted or reversed at post stroke. BP variation, which was approximately 7 mmHg higher at night than at day, decreased one or two days before stroke-onset and reversed at post stroke, especially in DBP. Insufficient falls in HR and BP during the day mainly accounted for the disturbed circadian variations. Variation of locomotive activity also decreased. These changes serve as reliable and accurate markers for stroke-onset in evaluation of drugs for the prevention and outcome predictions of stroke.

  2. Effect of forward rapidly rotating shift work on circadian rhythms of arterial pressure, heart rate and oral temperature in air traffic controllers.

    PubMed

    Stoynev, A G; Minkova, N K

    1998-02-01

    Twenty-four-hour records of arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), oral temperature (OT) and physical and mental performance were obtained in air traffic controllers during morning (n = 16), afternoon (n = 17) and night (n = 19) shifts. Data were analyzed by the cosinor method. The results obtained during the morning shift were as follows (mesor/amplitude/acrophase): systolic AP (mm Hg)--113.6/10.0/16:03 h; diastolic AP--71.1/8.2/15:19 h; mean AP--85.6/8.8/15:41 h; HR (beats/min)--77.5/8.9/16:00 h; OT (dg C)--36.71/0.21/15:49 h; right-hand grip strength (kg)--49.8/2.0/17:43 h; left-hand grip strength--46.1/2.0/16:08 h; mental performance (calculations/min)--14.9/1.1/16:39 h. During the night shift either no change of the circadian acrophases (HR, right-hand grip strength) or acrophase delays ranging from about 2 h (systolic AP, OT, mental performance) up to 3 h (diastolic and mean AP, left-hand grip strength) were observed. Our data suggest that the shift system studied does not significantly alter the circadian rhythms, and does not induce a desynchronization, particularly as concerns arterial pressure and oral temperature.

  3. Associations of adiponectin with individual European ancestry in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Choudhry, Shweta; Musani, Solomon K.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Liu, Jiankang; Rotimi, Charles N.; Wilson, James G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compared with European Americans, African Americans (AAs) exhibit lower levels of the cardio-metabolically protective adiponectin even after accounting for adiposity measures. Because few studies have examined in AA the association between adiponectin and genetic admixture, a dense panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) was used to estimate the individual proportions of European ancestry (PEA) for the AAs enrolled in a large community-based cohort, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). We tested the hypothesis that plasma adiponectin and PEA are directly associated and assessed the interaction with a series of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods: Plasma specimens from 1439 JHS participants were analyzed by ELISA for adiponectin levels. Using pseudo-ancestral population genotype data from the HapMap Consortium, PEA was estimated with a panel of up to 1447 genome-wide preselected AIMs by a maximum likelihood approach. Interaction assessment, stepwise linear and cubic multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to analyze the cross-sectional association between adiponectin and PEA. Results: Among the study participants (62% women; mean age 48 ± 12 years), the median (interquartile range) of PEA was 15.8 (9.3)%. Body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04) and insulin resistance (p = 0.0001) modified the association between adiponectin and PEA. Adiponectin was directly and linearly associated with PEA (β = 0.62 ± 0.28, p = 0.03) among non-obese (n = 673) and insulin sensitive participants (n = 1141; β = 0.74 ± 0.23, p = 0.001), but not among those obese or with insulin resistance. No threshold point effect was detected for non-obese participants. Conclusions: In a large AA population, the individual proportion of European ancestry was linearly and directly associated with plasma adiponectin among non-obese and non insulin-resistant participants, pointing to the interaction of genetic and metabolic factors influencing adiponectin levels. PMID:24575123

  4. Effects of music composed by Mozart and Ligeti on blood pressure and heart rate circadian rhythms in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Björn

    2008-11-01

    There is continuing discussion on the effect of music ("Mozart effect") on numerous functions in man and experimental animals. Radiotelemetry now allows one to monitor cardiovascular functions in freely-moving unrestrained experimental animals. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), and motor activity (MA) in male normotensive WKY and hypertensive SHR animals. Rats were synchronized to a 12 h light (L): 12 h dark (D) regimen in an isolated, ventilated, light-controlled, sound-isolated animal container. Music (Mozart, Symphony # 40; Ligeti, String Quartet # 2) were played for 2 h at 75 dB in the animal cabin starting at the onset of L or D in a cross-over design. Data were collected every 5 min for 24 h under control conditions and during and after music. In addition, plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) were determined in unrestrained animals at 3 h intervals over 24 h. In both WKY and SHR, highly significant circadian rhythms were obtained in SBP, DBP, HR, and MA under control conditions; HR was lower and BP higher in SHR than in WKY. NE was circadian rhythmic in both strains with higher values in D; the increase in NE with immobilization was much more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. The music of Mozart had no effect on either parameter in WKY, neither in L nor in D. In contrast, in SHR, the music of Mozart presented in L significantly decreased HR and left BP unaffected, leading to a small decrease in cardiac output. The music of Ligeti significantly increased BP both in L and in D and reflexively reduced HR in L, the effects being long-lasting over 24 h. Interestingly, white noise at 75 dB had no effect at all on either function in both strains. The effects of both Mozart and Ligeti cannot be attributed to a stress reaction, as stress due to cage switch increased HR and BP both in WKY and SHR. The study clearly demonstrates that music of different character (tempo, rhythm, pitch, tonality) can

  5. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients with Sinus Rhythm Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated with Warfarin or Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Siqin; Cheng, Bin; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Qian, Min; Mann, Douglas L.; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Mohr, J.P.; Graham, Susan; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.; Thompson, John L.P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    We sought to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as HAS-BLED or OBRI, in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) trial. Proportional hazards models were used to test whether each score predicted major bleeding, and comparison of different risk scores was performed using Harell’s c-statistic and net-reclassification improvement (NRI) index. For the warfarin arm, both scores predicted bleeding risk, with OBRI having significantly higher c-statistic (0.72 vs 0.61; p=0.03) compared to HAS-BLED, though the NRI for comparing OBRI to HAS-BLED was not significant (0.32, 95% CI - 0.18-0.37). Performance of the OBRI and HAS-BLED risk scores were similar for the aspirin arm. For participants with OBRI score of 0 to 1, warfarin compared with aspirin reduced ischemic stroke (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26-0.98, p=0.042) without significantly increasing major bleeding (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.66-2.30, p=0.51). For those with OBRI score of ≥2, there was a trend for reduced ischemic stroke with warfarin compared to aspirin (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.27-1.15, p=0.12), but major bleeding was increased (HR 4.04, 95% CI 1.99-8.22, p<0.001). In conclusion, existing bleeding risk scores can identify bleeding risk in HFrEF patients in SR, and could be tested for potentially identifying patients with a favorable risk / benefit profile for antithrombotic therapy with warfarin. PMID:26189039

  6. Quality of Anticoagulation Control in Preventing Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: A Warfarin Aspirin Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Qian, Min; Ye, Siqin; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between time in therapeutic range (TTR) and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin. Methods and Results We used data from the Warfarin vs. Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) to assess the relationship of TTR with the WARCEF primary outcome (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death); with death alone; ischemic stroke alone; major hemorrhage alone; and net clinical benefit (primary outcome and major hemorrhage combined). Multivariable Cox models were used to examine how the event risk changed with TTR and to compare the high TTR, low TTR, and aspirin patients, with TTR being treated as a time-dependent covariate. 2,217 patients were included in the analyses, among whom 1,067 were randomized to warfarin and 1,150 were randomized to aspirin. The median (IQR) follow-up duration was 3.6 (2.0–5.0) years. Mean (±SD) age was 61±11.3 years, with 80% being men. The mean (±SD) TTR was 57% (±28.5%). Increasing TTR was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (adjusted p<0.001), death alone (adjusted p=0.001), and improved net clinical benefit (adjusted p<0.001). A similar trend was observed for the other two outcomes but significance was not reached (adjusted p=0.082 for ischemic stroke, adjusted p=0.109 for major hemorrhage). Conclusions In HF patients in SR, increasing TTR is associated with better outcome and improved net clinical benefit. Patients in whom good quality anticoagulation can be achieved may benefit from the use of anticoagulants. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:25850425

  7. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people who can't tolerate ACE inhibitors. Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your ... rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, ...

  8. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  9. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology-Heart Failure meeting 2015: AUGMENT-HF, TITRATION, STOP-HF, HARMONIZE, LION HEART, MOOD-HF, and renin-angiotensin inhibitors in patients with heart and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Clark, Andrew L

    2015-09-01

    This article provides an overview on the key trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure (HF) presented at the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) annual meeting held in Seville, Spain in May 2015. Trials reported include AUGMENT-AF (myocardial injections of calcium-alginate hydrogel), a propensity score-matched study of renin-angiotensin system antagonists in patients with HF and severe renal dysfunction, HARMONIZE (sodium zirconium cyclosilicate used to bind potassium), TITRATION, comparing two regimes for introducing LCZ696, STOP-HF, a trial of intramyocardial stromal cell-derived factor-1, MOOD-HF (escitalopram for patients with heart failure and depression), and LION HEART, a trial of intermittent levosimendan therapy. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication.

  10. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  11. One year follow-up of the multi-centre European PARTNER transcatheter heart valve study

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Kappetein, Ari Pieter; Wolner, Ernst; Nataf, Patrick; Thomas, Martyn; Schächinger, Volker; De Bruyne, Bernard; Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Thielmann, Matthias; Himbert, Dominique; Romano, Mauro; Serruys, Patrick; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a new therapeutic option in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Aims PARTNER EU is the first study to evaluate prospectively the procedural and mid-term outcomes of transfemoral (TF) or transapical (TA) implantation of the Edwards SAPIEN® valve involving a multi-disciplinary approach. Methods and results Primary safety endpoints were 30 days and 6 months mortality. Primary efficacy endpoints were haemodynamic and functional improvement at 12 months. One hundred and thirty patients (61 TF, 69 TA), aged 82.1 ± 5.5 years were included. TA patients had higher logistic EuroSCORE (33.8 vs. 25.7%, P = 0.0005) and more peripheral disease (49.3 vs. 16.4%, P< 0.0001). Procedures were aborted in four TA (5.8%) and six TF cases (9.8%). Valve implantation was successful in the remaining patients in 95.4 and 96.4%, respectively. Thirty days and 6 months survival were 81.2 and 58.0% (TA) and 91.8 and 90.2% (TF). In both groups, mean aortic gradient decreased from 46.9 ± 18.1 to 10.9 ± 5.4 mmHg 6 months post-TAVI. In total, 78.1 and 84.8% of patients experienced significant improvement in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, whereas 73.9 and 72.7% had improved Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) scores in TA and TF cohorts, respectively. Conclusion This first team-based multi-centre European TAVI registry shows promising results in high-risk patients treated by TF or TA delivery. Survival rates differ significantly between TF and TA groups and probably reflect the higher risk profile of the TA cohort. Optimal patient screening, approach selection, and device refinement may improve outcomes. PMID:21075775

  12. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... searching for physicians in the United States, select 'USA only', type in a ZIP code and then ... in your area Search by Location All Locations USA Only Outside USA Country Outside USA Please select... ...

  13. Circadian rhythms in heart rate, motility, and body temperature of wild-type C57 and eNOS knock-out mice under light-dark, free-run, and after time zone transition.

    PubMed

    Arraj, M; Lemmer, B

    2006-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) system is involved in the regulation of the cardiovascular system in controlling central and peripheral vascular tone and cardiac functions. It was the aim of this study to investigate in wild-type C57BL/6 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice (eNOS-/-) the contribution of NO on the circadian rhythms in heart rate (HR), motility (motor activity [MA]), and body temperature (BT) under various environmental conditions. Experiments were performed in 12:12 h of a light:dark cycle (LD), under free-run in total darkness (DD), and after a phase delay shift of the LD cycle by -6 h (i.e., under simulation of a westward time zone transition). All parameters were monitored by radiotelemetry in freely moving mice. In LD, no significant differences in the rhythms of HR and MA were observed between the two strains of mice. BT, however, was significantly lower during the light phase in eNOS-/- mice, resulting in a significantly greater amplitude. The period of the free-running rhythm in DD was slightly shorter for all variables, though not significant. In general, rhythmicity was greater in eNOS-/- than in C57 mice both in LD and DD. After a delay shift of the LD cycle, HR and BT were resynchronized to the new LD schedule within 5-6 days, and resynchronization of MA occurred within 2-3 days. The results in telemetrically instrumented mice show that complete knock-out of the endothelial NO system--though expressed in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and in peripheral tissues--did not affect the circadian organization of heart rate and motility. The circadian regulation of the body temperature was slightly affected in eNOS-/- mice.

  14. Maximal oxygen consumption increases with temperature in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) through increased heart rate and arteriovenous extraction

    PubMed Central

    Claësson, Débora; Wang, Tobias; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Global warming results in increasing water temperature, which may represent a threat to aquatic ectotherms. The rising temperature affects ecology through physiology, by exerting a direct limiting effect on the individual. The mechanism controlling individual thermal tolerance is still elusive, but some evidence shows that the heart plays a central role, and that insufficient transport of oxygen to the respiring tissues may determine the thermal tolerance of animals. In this study, the influence of the heart in thermal limitation was investigated by measurements of aerobic scope in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) together with measurements of cardiac output during rest and activity. Aerobic capacity was not limited by an acutely increased temperature in the European eel. Oxygen demand was met by an increase in heart rate and arteriovenous extraction. These findings suggest that thermal tolerance during exposure to acute temperature changes is not defined by oxygen transport capacity in the eel, and other mechanisms may play a central role in limiting thermal tolerance in these fish. PMID:27766150

  15. Maximal oxygen consumption increases with temperature in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) through increased heart rate and arteriovenous extraction.

    PubMed

    Claësson, Débora; Wang, Tobias; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Global warming results in increasing water temperature, which may represent a threat to aquatic ectotherms. The rising temperature affects ecology through physiology, by exerting a direct limiting effect on the individual. The mechanism controlling individual thermal tolerance is still elusive, but some evidence shows that the heart plays a central role, and that insufficient transport of oxygen to the respiring tissues may determine the thermal tolerance of animals. In this study, the influence of the heart in thermal limitation was investigated by measurements of aerobic scope in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) together with measurements of cardiac output during rest and activity. Aerobic capacity was not limited by an acutely increased temperature in the European eel. Oxygen demand was met by an increase in heart rate and arteriovenous extraction. These findings suggest that thermal tolerance during exposure to acute temperature changes is not defined by oxygen transport capacity in the eel, and other mechanisms may play a central role in limiting thermal tolerance in these fish.

  16. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that make open-heart surgery very risky. Arrhythmia Treatment An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  17. Melatonin, the Pineal Gland, and Circadian Rhythms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    astrocytes in the chick visual suprachiasmatic nucleus . Trans, Soc. Res. Biol. Rhythms 4:118 4) Brooks, D.S., AJ. Mitchell and...W.S., T.H. Champney and V.M. Cassone ( in press) The suprachiasmatic nucleus controls circadian rhythms of heart-rate via the sympathetic nervous...sparrows. N•,u•.si.LAbs. 19: 1487 2) Warren, W.S., V.M. Cassone (1993) The regulation of multiple circadian outputs by the suprachiasmatic

  18. Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from ischaemic heart disease: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heart study

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Francesca L.; Roddam, Andrew W.; Key, Timothy J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Overvad, Kim; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Misirli, Gesthimani; Lagiou, Pagona; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Boer, Jolanda; van Gils, Carla H.; Beulens, Joline W.J.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rodríguez, Laudina; Larrañaga, Nerea; Sánchez, Maria-José; Tormo, María-José; Buckland, Genevieve; Lund, Eiliv; Hedblad, Bo; Melander, Olle; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Patrik; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Slimani, Nadia; Romieu, Isabelle; Jenab, Mazda; Danesh, John; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2011-01-01

    Aims A higher intake of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but there is some uncertainty about the interpretation of this association. The objective was to assess the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of mortality from IHD in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heart study. Methods and results After an average of 8.4 years of follow-up, there were 1636 deaths from IHD among 313 074 men and women without previous myocardial infarction or stroke from eight European countries. Participants consuming at least eight portions (80 g each) of fruits and vegetables a day had a 22% lower risk of fatal IHD [relative risk (RR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65–0.95] compared with those consuming fewer than three portions a day. After calibration of fruit and vegetable intake to account for differences in dietary assessment between the participating centres, a one portion (80 g) increment in fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 4% lower risk of fatal IHD (RR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92–1.00, P for trend = 0.033). Conclusion Results from this large observational study suggest that a higher intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of IHD mortality. Whether this association is causal and, if so, the biological mechanism(s) by which fruits and vegetables operate to lower IHD risks remains unclear. PMID:21245490

  19. Flight Modes in Migrating European Bee-Eaters: Heart Rate May Indicate Low Metabolic Rate during Soaring and Gliding

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; McCue, Marshall D.; Pinshow, Berry; Nathan, Ran

    2010-01-01

    Background Many avian species soar and glide over land. Evidence from large birds (mb>0.9 kg) suggests that soaring-gliding is considerably cheaper in terms of energy than flapping flight, and costs about two to three times the basal metabolic rate (BMR). Yet, soaring-gliding is considered unfavorable for small birds because migration speed in small birds during soaring-gliding is believed to be lower than that of flapping flight. Nevertheless, several small bird species routinely soar and glide. Methodology/Principal Findings To estimate the energetic cost of soaring-gliding flight in small birds, we measured heart beat frequencies of free-ranging migrating European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster, mb∼55 g) using radio telemetry, and established the relationship between heart beat frequency and metabolic rate (by indirect calorimetry) in the laboratory. Heart beat frequency during sustained soaring-gliding was 2.2 to 2.5 times lower than during flapping flight, but similar to, and not significantly different from, that measured in resting birds. We estimated that soaring-gliding metabolic rate of European bee-eaters is about twice their basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is similar to the value estimated in the black-browed albatross Thalassarche (previously Diomedea) melanophrys, mb∼4 kg). We found that soaring-gliding migration speed is not significantly different from flapping migration speed. Conclusions/Significance We found no evidence that soaring-gliding speed is slower than flapping flight in bee-eaters, contradicting earlier estimates that implied a migration speed penalty for using soaring-gliding rather than flapping flight. Moreover, we suggest that small birds soar and glide during migration, breeding, dispersal, and other stages in their annual cycle because it may entail a low energy cost of transport. We propose that the energy cost of soaring-gliding may be proportional to BMR regardless of bird size, as theoretically deduced by earlier studies

  20. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events.

  1. Metabolic circadian rhythms in embryonic turtles.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Fiona Kay; Spencer, Ricky-John; Strassmeyer, Alana; Harland, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Oviparous species are model organisms for investigating embryonic development of endogenous physiological circadian rhythms without the influence of maternal biorhythms. Recent studies have demonstrated that heart rates and metabolic rates of embryonic turtles are not constant or always maximal and can be altered in response to the presence of embryos at a more advanced stage of development within the nest. A first step in understanding the physiological mechanisms underpinning these responses in embryonic ectothermic organisms is to develop metabolic profiles (e.g., heart rate) at different temperatures throughout incubation. Heart beat and rhythmic patterns or changes in development may represent important signals or cues within a nest and may be vital to coordinate synchronous hatching well in advance of the final stages of incubation. We developed baseline embryonic heart-rate profiles of embryos of the short-necked Murray River turtle (Emydura macquarii) to determine the stage of embryogenesis that metabolic circadian rhythms become established, if at all. Eggs were incubated at constant temperatures (26°C and 30°C) and heart rates were monitored at 6-h intervals over 24 h every 7-11 days until hatching. Circadian heart rate rhythms were detected at the mid-gestation period and were maintained until hatching. Heart rates throughout the day varied by up to 20% over 24 h and were not related to time of day. This study demonstrated that endogenous metabolic circadian rhythms in developing embryos in turtle eggs establish earlier in embryogenesis than those documented in other vertebrate taxa during embryogenesis. Early establishment of circadian rhythms in heart rates may be critical for communication among embryos and synchrony in hatching and emergence from the nest.

  2. European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey II: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Normand, Camilla; Anker, Stefan D; Auricchio, Angelo; Blomström, Carina Lundqvist; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström; Bogale, Nigussie; Cleland, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gasparini, Maurizio; Gitt, Anselm; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellbrink, Christoph; Ruschitzka, Frank; Linde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe.

  3. What news in the 2010 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of grown-up congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    The new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) for the management of grown-up congenital heart disease were published in August 2010 and follow the first guidelines on this subject published by the society in 2003. This article discusses the rational for publishing this document and the difficulties of generating guidelines for this special field in cardiology. The concept of the new document is outlined and differences when compared with the previous version are summarized. In addition, the European guideline document is compared with the current guidelines of the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. Compared to previous documents the new guidelines provide more comprehensive information with more precise recommendations and update the knowledge in this field. They should help to improve the quality of care of grown-up congenital heart disease patients.

  4. Rhythm, Timing and the Timing of Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for rhythmic categorization that has emerged on the basis of rhythm metrics, and argues that the metrics are unreliable predictors of rhythm which provide no more than a crude measure of timing. It is further argued that timing is distinct from rhythm and that equating them has led to circularity and a psychologically questionable conceptualization of rhythm in speech. It is thus proposed that research on rhythm be based on the same principles for all languages, something that does not apply to the widely accepted division of languages into stress- and syllable-timed. The hypothesis is advanced that these universal principles are grouping and prominence and evidence to support it is provided. PMID:19390230

  5. Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm: History and Chronology of the Main Discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Andres Ricardo Perez; Barros, Raimundo Barbosa; de Sousa, Francisco Daniel; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination. It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease. It is usually seen during acute myocardial infarction reperfusion. This manuscript aims to review the history of the main discoveries that lead to the identification and comprehension of this fascinating arrhythmia. PMID:20084194

  6. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting: TNT subgroup analysis, darbepoetin alfa, FERRIC-HF and KW-3902.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Alison P; Tin, Lwin; Loh, P Huan; Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2006-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting held in June 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. In a sub-group analysis of the TNT study, intensive treatment with high-dose atorvastatin significantly reduced hospitalisations for heart failure in patients with stable coronary heart disease, compared with low-dose atorvastatin; this benefit was most evident in patients with a history of heart failure at baseline. In a combined analysis of two studies of darbepoetin alfa, which included 475 patients, treatment increased and maintained haemoglobin levels and produced non-significant improvements in symptoms and morbidity in anaemic heart failure patients compared to placebo. In the FERRIC-HF study (n=35), intravenous iron sucrose therapy improved exercise capacity and symptom status in iron-deficient heart failure patients. In a combined analysis of two studies (n=186), the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist KW-3902 showed diuretic properties and appeared to enhance response to loop diuretics in heart failure patients hospitalised with fluid overload.

  7. [Spectral analysis of the variability of heart rhythm in the analysis of changes in the autonomic regulation during treatment of hypertension with sodium chloride baths].

    PubMed

    Gribanov, A N; Dvornikov, V E

    2001-01-01

    Changes in spectral parameters of heart rate variability were assessed in patients with mild and moderate hypertension (n = 48) and healthy subjects (n = 34) taking sodium chloride bath and in active orthostatic test before and after balneotherapy. Significant changes were not registered. The course of balneotherapy stimulated sympathetic or parasympathetic activity (relative enhancement occurred in 67, absolute in 15% versus 8 and 10% patients, respectively).

  8. Specific inhibition of HCN channels slows rhythm differently in atria, ventricle and outflow tract and stabilizes conduction in the anoxic-reoxygenated embryonic heart model.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Alexandre; Pedretti, Sarah; Gardier, Stephany; Raddatz, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed in pacemaker cells very early during cardiogenesis. This work aimed at determining to what extent these channels are implicated in the electromechanical disturbances induced by a transient oxygen lack which may occur in utero. Spontaneously beating hearts or isolated ventricles and outflow tracts dissected from 4-day-old chick embryos were exposed to a selective inhibitor of HCN channels (ivabradine 0.1-10microM) to establish a dose-response relationship. The effects of ivabradine on electrocardiogram, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility of hearts submitted to anoxia (30min) and reoxygenation (60min) were also determined. The distribution of the predominant channel isoform, HCN4, was established in atria, ventricle and outflow tract by immunoblotting. Intrinsic beating rate of atria, ventricle and outflow tract was 164+/-22 (n=10), 78+/-24 (n=8) and 40+/-12bpm (n=23, mean+/-SD), respectively. In the whole heart, ivabradine (0.3microM) slowed the firing rate of atria by 16% and stabilized PR interval. These effects persisted throughout anoxia-reoxygenation, whereas the variations of QT duration, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility, as well as the types and duration of arrhythmias were not altered. Ivabradine (10microM) reduced the intrinsic rate of atria and isolated ventricle by 27% and 52%, respectively, whereas it abolished activity of the isolated outflow tract. Protein expression of HCN4 channels was higher in atria and ventricle than in the outflow tract. Thus, HCN channels are specifically distributed and control finely atrial, ventricular and outflow tract pacemakers as well as conduction in the embryonic heart under normoxia and throughout anoxia-reoxygenation.

  9. Cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapies: a position statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Eschenhagen, Thomas; Force, Thomas; Ewer, Michael S; de Keulenaer, Gilles W; Suter, Thomas M; Anker, Stefan D; Avkiran, Metin; de Azambuja, Evandro; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Brutsaert, Dirk L; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Hansen, Arne; Heymans, Stephane; Hill, Joseph A; Hirsch, Emilio; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Janssens, Stefan; de Jong, Steven; Neubauer, Gitte; Pieske, Burkert; Ponikowski, Piotr; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Sawyer, Douglas; Sugden, Peter H; Wojta, Johann; Zannad, Faiez; Shah, Ajay M

    2011-01-01

    The reductions in mortality and morbidity being achieved among cancer patients with current therapies represent a major achievement. However, given their mechanisms of action, many anti-cancer agents may have significant potential for cardiovascular side effects, including the induction of heart failure. The magnitude of this problem remains unclear and is not readily apparent from current clinical trials of emerging targeted agents, which generally under-represent older patients and those with significant co-morbidities. The risk of adverse events may also increase when novel agents, which frequently modulate survival pathways, are used in combination with each other or with other conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. The extent to which survival and growth pathways in the tumour cell (which we seek to inhibit) coincide with those in cardiovascular cells (which we seek to preserve) is an open question but one that will become ever more important with the development of new cancer therapies that target intracellular signalling pathways. It remains unclear whether potential cardiovascular problems can be predicted from analyses of such basic signalling mechanisms and what pre-clinical evaluation should be undertaken. The screening of patients, optimization of therapeutic schemes, monitoring of cardiovascular function during treatment, and the management of cardiovascular side effects are likely to become increasingly important in cancer patients. This paper summarizes the deliberations of a cross-disciplinary workshop organized by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology (held in Brussels in May 2009), which brought together clinicians working in cardiology and oncology and those involved in basic, translational, and pharmaceutical science.

  10. Activity in the ferret: oestradiol effects and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, E. R.; Albers, H. E.; Baum, M. J.; Wurtman, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether oestradiol increases activity in the European ferret (Mustela furo), whether this effect is sexually dimorphic, and whether a 24-h rhythm is present in the ferret's daily activity. The activity of male and female adult, postpubertally gonadectomized ferrets was monitored while they were maintained singly on a 13:11 light-dark cycle, before and after implantation with oestradiol-17 beta. Gonadectomized male and female ferrets exhibited equal levels of activity, and neither sex exhibited a significant change in activity following oestradiol implantation. None of the ferrets exhibited a strong circadian rhythm, although weak 24-h rhythms and shorter harmonic rhythms were present. Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), monitored in an identical manner, exhibited strong circadian rhythms. It was concluded that oestradiol administration may not cause an increase in activity in the ferret, and that this species lacks a strong circadian activity rhythm.

  11. Loci influencing lipid levels and coronary heart disease risk in 16 European population cohorts.

    PubMed

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ripatti, Samuli; Lindqvist, Ida; Boomsma, Dorret; Heid, Iris M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Wilson, James F; Spector, Tim; Martin, Nicholas G; Pedersen, Nancy L; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hofman, Albert; Freimer, Nelson B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Johansson, Asa; Marroni, Fabio; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Jonasson, Inger; Pattaro, Cristian; Wright, Alan; Hastie, Nick; Pichler, Irene; Hicks, Andrew A; Falchi, Mario; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Montgomery, Grant W; Whitfield, John; Magnusson, Patrik; Saharinen, Juha; Perola, Markus; Silander, Kaisa; Isaacs, Aaron; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Oostra, Ben A; Elliott, Paul; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sabatti, Chiara; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Kronenberg, Florian; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Smit, Johannes H; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lipids have been conducted in samples ascertained for other phenotypes, particularly diabetes. Here we report the first GWA analysis of loci affecting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides sampled randomly from 16 population-based cohorts and genotyped using mainly the Illumina HumanHap300-Duo platform. Our study included a total of 17,797-22,562 persons, aged 18-104 years and from geographic regions spanning from the Nordic countries to Southern Europe. We established 22 loci associated with serum lipid levels at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 x 10(-8)), including 16 loci that were identified by previous GWA studies. The six newly identified loci in our cohort samples are ABCG5 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-11); LDL, P = 2.6 x 10(-10)), TMEM57 (TC, P = 5.4 x 10(-10)), CTCF-PRMT8 region (HDL, P = 8.3 x 10(-16)), DNAH11 (LDL, P = 6.1 x 10(-9)), FADS3-FADS2 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-10); LDL, P = 4.4 x 10(-13)) and MADD-FOLH1 region (HDL, P = 6 x 10(-11)). For three loci, effect sizes differed significantly by sex. Genetic risk scores based on lipid loci explain up to 4.8% of variation in lipids and were also associated with increased intima media thickness (P = 0.001) and coronary heart disease incidence (P = 0.04). The genetic risk score improves the screening of high-risk groups of dyslipidemia over classical risk factors.

  12. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  13. Banking of the human heart valves and the arteries at the European homograft bank (EHB)--overview of a 14-year activity in this International Association in Brussels.

    PubMed

    Jashari, R; Van Hoeck, B; Tabaku, M; Vanderkelen, A

    2004-01-01

    Processing of the human heart valves and arteries has been carried out at the European Homograft Bank (EHB) in Brussels since 1989 and 1991, respectively. Heart valve donors of 0-65 years were classified in (1) Beating heart donors (BHD), of which recipients of heart transplantation (RHT) and multiorgan donors (MOD) after brain death, and (2) non-beating heart donors (NBHD) with warm ischaemic time (WIT) of less then 6 h. Past history of the donors has been checked for malignant and chronic diseases, as well as biology for transmissible and infectious diseases. Perfect collaboration has been established with the transplant coordinators and transplant teams of the implanting centres. Dissection, decontamination, cryopreservation and storing in fluid nitrogen has been carried out in accordance with the Belgian and European Standards of cardiovascular allografts. During this period, a total of 2.828 hearts, 28 predissected valves and 616 batches of arteries arrived in the EHB. 3.537 valves and 1.137 different arteries were accepted for implantation. The main reasons for tissue rejection were morphology, contamination and cuts during the tissue retrieval or dissection. A huge network of different hospitals in Belgium and elsewhere in Europe and Switzerland were included in this process. Pulmonary allografts were not sent for implantation in the left ventricular outflow tract after 1998, since the early and mid-term results after 76 implantations were disappointing. The number of implanted aortic and pulmonary allografts remains stable from year to year, however the number of the allografts used for Ross operation is still increasing. Since the results of the follow up were disappointing, we still only require the implantation and immediate postoperative results, whereas the follow-up information only for specific study purposes.

  14. The Study of Biobehavioral Rhythms in a Psychology Laboratory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David L.; Wesselhoft, Theresa

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a laboratory experiment where students measured their heart rate, blood pressure, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Measures showed significant circadian heart rhythm variations. They were strongly correlated and peaked at different times. Discusses the implications of this and students' reactions to the experiment. (MJP)

  15. The tracking of dietary intakes of children and adolescents in Sweden over six years: the European Youth Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The stability of dietary habits through various life-stages is not well understood. A better understanding of the tracking of diet over time could have implications for health promotion as well as for the planning of nutritional epidemiology studies. We examined the stability of dietary intakes of children and adolescents over six years. Methods As part of the European Youth Heart Study, in 1998-9, a 24-h dietary recall was performed on over one thousand 9- and 15-year-olds in Sweden. In 2004-5, 40% returned to the follow-up study. These 452 subjects (273 15- and 179 21-year-olds) were assigned to age- and gender-specific tertiles of intakes of food groups, energy, selected nutrients and energy density (low, mid and high) at each time point. The agreement between the classification of subjects into tertiles at both time points was examined using Cohen's weighted κ and other stability coefficients. We included a dropout analysis and considered the effect that energy mis-reporting might have on our results. Results Fair tracking was seen between childhood and adolescence for the milk, fil and yoghurt food group (κ = 0.30), and between adolescence and young adulthood for fruit (κ = 0.24). Slight tracking was observed for most other food groups and fair to slight tracking for all nutrients studied. Only membership of the high milk, fil and yoghurt tertile could be predicted from membership at baseline, in children. Excluding potential energy mis-reporters did not affect the results. Conclusions Despite the long time between data collections, and the method of dietary data collection used, evidence for slight tracking was observed for most food groups and nutrients over these six years. PMID:20003331

  16. Circahoralian (ultradian) metabolic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y

    2014-06-01

    This review presents data concerning metabolic rhythms with periods close to one hour (20 to 120 min): their occurrence, biochemical organization, nature, and significance for adaptations and age-related changes of cells and organs. Circahoralian (ultradian) rhythms have been detected for cell mass and size, protein synthesis, enzyme activities, concentration of ATP and hormones, cell respiration, and cytoplasm pH. Rhythms have been observed in bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa, as well as in many cells of metazoans, including mammals, in vivo and in cell cultures. In cell populations, the rhythms are organized by direct cell-cell communication. The biochemical mechanism involves membrane signal factors and cytoplasmic processes resulting in synchronization of individual oscillations to a common rhythm. Phosphorylation of proteins is the key process of coordination of protein synthesis and enzyme activity kinetics. The fractal nature of circahoralian rhythms is discussed as well as the involvement of these rhythms in adaptations of the cells and organs. Senescent decrease in rhythm amplitudes and correspondingly in cell-cell communication has been observed. The possibility of remodeling these changes through the intercellular medium has been predicted and experimentally shown. Perspectives for studies of the organizers and disorganizers of cell-cell communication in the intercellular medium along with appropriate receptors are discussed with special emphasis on aging and pathology. One perspective can be more precise definition of the range of normal biochemical and physiological state with the goal of correction of cellular functions.

  17. Rhythm in Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This research is an attempt at the elucidation of the significance of rhythmic in translations. According to Eugene A. Nada's functional equivalence, the comprehensive effect which the receptors of the versions get should be the same as the one the readers of the original get, and since rhythm is an integral part of the style, rhythm should be…

  18. Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection: Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Garcia-Dorado, David; Erik Bøtker, Hans; Davidson, Sean M; Downey, James; Engel, Felix B; Jennings, Robert; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Perrino, Cinzia; Prunier, Fabrice; Schulz, Rainer; Sluijter, Joost P G; Van Laake, Linda W; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; Yellon, Derek M; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Heusch, Gerd; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-17

    Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, novel therapies are required to protect the heart against the detrimental effects of acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. During the last three decades, a wide variety of ischaemic conditioning strategies and pharmacological treatments have been tested in the clinic - however, their translation from experimental to clinical studies for improving patient outcomes has been both challenging and disappointing. Therefore, in this Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart, we critically analyse the current state of ischaemic conditioning in both the experimental and clinical settings, provide recommendations for improving its translation into the clinical setting, and highlight novel therapeutic targets and new treatment strategies for reducing acute myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

  19. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  1. Visible Battle Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    2006 Oculus Info Inc. COP21 TD 1 Visible Battle Rhythm Brian Cort1, Alain Bouchard2, Denis Gouin2, Pascale Proulx1, Bill Wright1 June 21, 2006 1...Oculus Info Inc. 2 DRDC Valcartier www.oculusinfo.com www.drdc-rddc.gc.ca © 2006 Oculus Info Inc. COP21 TD 2 Battle Rhythm “Process where the...commander to make timely decisions.” −Duffy et al, 2004 © 2006 Oculus Info Inc. COP21 TD 3 Visible Battle Rhythm • Real-time coordination and synchronization

  2. Circadian rhythms of visual accommodation responses and physiological correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Use of a recently developed servocontrolled infrared optometer to continuously record the state of monocular focus while subjects viewed a visual target for which the stimulus to focus was systematically varied. Calculated parameters form recorded data - e.g., speeds of accommodation to approaching and receding targets, magnitude of accommodation to step changes in target distance, and amplitude and phase lag of response to sinusoidally varying stimuli were submitted to periodicity analyses. Ear canal temperature (ECT) and heart rate (HR) rhythms were also recorded for physiological correlation with accommodation rhythms. HR demonstrated a 24-hr rhythm, but ECT data did not.

  3. Effects of stressor controllability on diurnal physiological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Christianson, John P; Maslanik, Thomas M; Maier, Steve F; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-03-15

    Disruptions in circadian and diurnal rhythms are associated with stress-related psychiatric disorders and stressor exposure can disrupt these rhythms. The controllability of the stressor can modulate various behavioral and neurochemical responses to stress. Uncontrollable, but not controllable, stress produces behaviors in rats that resemble symptoms of anxiety and depression. Whether acute stress-induced disruptions in physiological rhythms are sensitive to controllability of the stressor, however, remains unknown. To examine the role of controllability in diurnal rhythm disruption, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with Data Sciences International (DSI) biotelemetry devices. Real-time measurements were obtained before, during and after exposure to a controllable or yoked uncontrollable stressor. Controllable and uncontrollable stress equally disrupted diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity and body temperature but not heart rate. The diurnal heart rate the day following stressor exposure was flattened to a greater extent and was significantly higher in rats with control over stress suggesting a relationship between stressor controllability and the heart rate response. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that acute stress-induced disruptions in diurnal physiological rhythms likely contribute little to the behavioral and affective consequences of stress that are sensitive to stressor controllability.

  4. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  5. Other Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... In addition to tachycardia, bradycardia, premature contraction and fibrillation, rhythm disorders include: ADAMS-STOKES DISEASE (also called ... can also occur in someone who has atrial fibrillation (or AFib/flutter), or it can be its ...

  6. [Circadian rhythm and stroke].

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the relationship between stroke incidence and alterations of circadian rhythm are scarce, while pathologically reduced or abolished circadian variation has been described to cause stroke since a long time ago. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulation balance including platelet function, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, autonomic function, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important.

  7. Current state of knowledge on Takotsubo syndrome: a Position Statement from the Taskforce on Takotsubo Syndrome of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Alexander R; Bossone, Eduardo; Schneider, Birke; Sechtem, Udo; Citro, Rodolfo; Underwood, S Richard; Sheppard, Mary N; Figtree, Gemma A; Parodi, Guido; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ruschitzka, Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Omerovic, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is an acute reversible heart failure syndrome that is increasingly recognized in modern cardiology practice. This Position Statement from the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association provides a comprehensive review of the various clinical and pathophysiological facets of Takotsubo syndrome, including nomenclature, definition, and diagnosis, primary and secondary clinical subtypes, anatomical variants, triggers, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, complications, prognosis, clinical investigations, and treatment approaches. Novel structured approaches to diagnosis, risk stratification, and management are presented, with new algorithms to aid decision-making by practising clinicians. These also cover more complex areas (e.g. uncertain diagnosis and delayed presentation) and the management of complex cases with ongoing symptoms after recovery, recurrent episodes, or spontaneous presentation. The unmet needs and future directions for research in this syndrome are also discussed.

  8. Clinical trials in acute heart failure: simpler solutions to complex problems. Consensus document arising from a European Society of Cardiology cardiovascular round-table think tank on acute heart failure, 12 May 2009.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Komajda, Michel; Maggioni, Aldo P; Zannad, Faiez; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Metra, Marco; Dargie, Henry J

    2011-12-01

    This European consensus document aims to identify the main reasons for the apparent lack of progress in the introduction of new medicines for acute heart failure. Relevant issues include not only the heterogeneity of the patient group but also the pharmacology of the medicines themselves and the design of the trials. Above all, this document attempts to provide some pragmatic solutions to this complex syndrome to simplify the execution of meaningful therapeutic endeavours in this area of undoubted unmet clinical need in the future.

  9. On the conscious control of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskii, Vladimir M; Polischuk, Lily V

    2012-06-01

    This study describes methods of volitional management of heart rhythms and proves that it is possible by means of management of its operations, subject to arbitrary control, which also has a strong functional connection to the center of the heart rhythm formation in the brain. Experiments demonstrate that it is possible for arbitrary changes in the heart rhythm to be made through conscious control of the breathing rhythm, and even a short-term cardiac arrest by means of contracting abdominal muscles. We postulate that the management of human heart rhythm is indirectly regulated through arbitrary controlled operations. The present article describes and analyzes ways that enable a human to consciously and purposefully manage the frequency of heart contractions. Common principles of arbitrary management of the heart rhythm in humans are uncovered through analysis.

  10. Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart?

    MedlinePlus

    ... new studies suggest. A woman's risk of atrial fibrillation -- an abnormal heart rhythm -- rises with each pregnancy, ... researchers found that 1,532 cases of atrial fibrillation had developed among the women. Atrial fibrillation is ...

  11. Extracellular matrix profiles in the progression to heart failure. European Young Physiologists Symposium Keynote Lecture-Bratislava 2007.

    PubMed

    Graham, H K; Horn, M; Trafford, A W

    2008-09-01

    The myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM), which preserves the geometry and integrity of the myocardium, is a dynamic structure whose component proteins are maintained by a finely controlled homeostatic balance between deposition and degradation. One of the key targets in cardiology is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms which mediate pathological remodelling of this matrix causing the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to congestive decompensated heart failure. In response to injury or increased workload, cardiac remodelling including myocyte hypertrophy, develops as the heart attempts to compensate for increased wall stresses. Persistence of these stresses over extended time periods leads to disruption of ECM homeostasis resulting in irreversible maladaptive cardiac remodelling, ventricular dilatation and finally heart failure. ECM remodelling is regulated by the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs). Clinical studies and experimental models of cardiac disease states have reported alterations in the balance between the MMPs and TIMPs in the failing heart and crucially at intermediate time points in the progression to failure. This article reviews the recent clinical, genetic and experimental approaches employed to compare ECM, MMP and TIMP profiles in healthy, compensated and failing hearts and identifies common themes in the perturbation of ECM homeostasis in the transition to heart failure.

  12. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  13. Rhythm on Your Lips

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Marcela; Langus, Alan; Gutiérrez, César; Huepe-Artigas, Daniela; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The Iambic-Trochaic Law (ITL) accounts for speech rhythm, grouping of sounds as either Iambs—if alternating in duration—or Trochees—if alternating in pitch and/or intensity. The two different rhythms signal word order, one of the basic syntactic properties of language. We investigated the extent to which Iambic and Trochaic phrases could be auditorily and visually recognized, when visual stimuli engage lip reading. Our results show both rhythmic patterns were recognized from both, auditory and visual stimuli, suggesting that speech rhythm has a multimodal representation. We further explored whether participants could match Iambic and Trochaic phrases across the two modalities. We found that participants auditorily familiarized with Trochees, but not with Iambs, were more accurate in recognizing visual targets, while participants visually familiarized with Iambs, but not with Trochees, were more accurate in recognizing auditory targets. The latter results suggest an asymmetric processing of speech rhythm: in auditory domain, the changes in either pitch or intensity are better perceived and represented than changes in duration, while in the visual domain the changes in duration are better processed and represented than changes in pitch, raising important questions about domain general and specialized mechanisms for speech rhythm processing. PMID:27877144

  14. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and contractile function; influence of workload and oleate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple extra-cardiac stimuli, such as workload and circulating nutrients (e.g., fatty acids), known to influence myocardial metabolism and contractile function exhibit marked circadian rhythms. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the rat heart exhibits circadian rhythms in its ...

  15. Clinical skills: cardiac rhythm recognition and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Joanna

    With technological advances, changes in provision of healthcare services and increasing pressure on critical care services, ward patients' severity of illness is ever increasing. As such, nurses need to develop their skills and knowledge to care for their client group. Competency in cardiac rhythm monitoring is beneficial to identify changes in cardiac status, assess response to treatment, diagnosis and post-surgical monitoring. This paper describes the basic anatomy and physiology of the heart and its conduction system, and explains a simple and easy to remember process of analysing cardiac rhythms (Resuscitation Council UK, 2000) that can be used in first-line assessment to assist healthcare practitioners in providing care to their patients.

  16. Exposure to aircraft and road traffic noise and associations with heart disease and stroke in six European countries: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although a number of studies have found an association between aircraft noise and hypertension, there is a lack of evidence on associations with other cardiovascular disease. For road traffic noise, more studies are available but the extent of possible confounding by air pollution has not been established. Methods This study used data from the Hypertension and Environmental Noise near Airports (HYENA) study. Cross-sectional associations between self-reported ‘heart disease and stroke’ and aircraft noise and road traffic noise were examined using data collected between 2004 and 2006 on 4712 participants (276 cases), who lived near airports in six European countries (UK, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Greece, Italy). Data were available to assess potential confounding by NO2 air pollution in a subsample of three countries (UK, Netherlands, Sweden). Results An association between night-time average aircraft noise and ‘heart disease and stroke’ was found after adjustment for socio-demographic confounders for participants who had lived in the same place for ≥ 20 years (odds ratio (OR): 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03, 1.51) per 10 dB (A)); this association was robust to adjustment for exposure to air pollution in the subsample. 24 hour average road traffic noise exposure was associated with ‘heart disease and stroke’ (OR: 1.19 (95% CI 1.00, 1.41), but adjustment for air pollution in the subsample suggested this may have been due to confounding by air pollution. Statistical assessment (correlations and variance inflation factor) suggested only modest collinearity between noise and NO2 exposures. Conclusions Exposure to aircraft noise over many years may increase risks of heart disease and stroke, although more studies are needed to establish how much the risks associated with road traffic noise may be explained by air pollution. PMID:24131577

  17. Rhythms that Speed You Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria, Daniel; Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Correa, Angel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates whether a rhythm can orient attention to specific moments enhancing people's reaction times (RT). We used a modified version of the temporal orienting paradigm in which an auditory isochronous rhythm was presented prior to an auditory single target. The rhythm could have a fast pace (450 ms Inter-Onset-Interval or IOI) or a…

  18. Measuring Child Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elinor; Post, Brechtje; Astruc, Lluisa; Prieto, Pilar; Vanrell, Maria del Mar

    2012-01-01

    Interval-based rhythm metrics were applied to the speech of English, Catalan and Spanish 2, 4 and 6 year-olds, and compared with the (adult-directed) speech of their mothers. Results reveal that child speech does not fall into a well-defined rhythmic class: for all three languages, it is more "vocalic" (higher %V) than adult speech and…

  19. Ageing and Circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.; Long, Dani M.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cell-autonomous molecular feedback loops that generate daily rhythms in gene expression, cellular functions, physiological processes and behavior. The mechanisms of circadian clocks are well understood in young fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, but less is known about how circadian system changes during organismal aging. Similar as in humans, rest/activity rhythms tend to weaken with age in fruit flies, suggesting conservation of aging-related changes in the circadian system. It has been shown that aging is associated with reduced expression of core clock genes in peripheral head clocks while similar reduction may not occur in central clock neurons regulating behavioral rhythms. Arrhythmic flies with mutations in core clock genes display accelerated aging and shortened lifespan suggesting that weakened circadian rhythms may contribute to aging phenotypes. To understand whether strong circadian clocks support organism’s healthspan and lifespan, future research needs to focus on age-related changes in clock genes as well as clock-controlled genes in specific organs and tissues. PMID:26000238

  20. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms.

  1. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  2. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep ‘prominence gradient’, i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a ‘stress-timed’ language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow ‘syntagmatic contrast’ between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke: The Evolving Role of Rhythm Control

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Taral K.; Passman, Rod S.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) remains a major risk factor for stroke. Unfortunately, clinical trials have failed to demonstrate that a strategy of rhythm control—therapy to maintain normal sinus rhythm (NSR)—reduces stroke risk. The apparent lack of benefit of rhythm control likely reflects the difficulty in maintaining NSR using currently available therapies. However, there are signals from several trials that the presence of NSR is indeed beneficial and associated with better outcomes related to stroke and mortality. Most electrophysiologists feel that as rhythm control strategies continue to improve, the crucial link between rhythm control and stroke reduction will finally be demonstrated. Therefore, AF specialists tend to be aggressive in their attempts to maintain NSR, especially in patients who have symptomatic AF. A step-wise approach from antiarrhythmic drugs to catheter ablation to cardiac surgery is generally used. In select patients, catheter ablation or cardiac surgery may supersede antiarrhythmic drugs. The choice depends on the type of AF, concurrent heart disease, drug toxicity profiles, procedural risks, and patient preferences. Regardless of strategy, given the limited effectiveness of currently available rhythm control therapies, oral anticoagulation is still recommended for stroke prophylaxis in AF patients with other stroke risk factors. Major challenges in atrial fibrillation management include selecting patients most likely to benefit from rhythm control, choosing specific antiarrhythmic drugs or procedures to achieve rhythm control, long-term monitoring to gauge the efficacy of rhythm control, and determining which (if any) patients may safely discontinue anticoagulation if long-term NSR is achieved. PMID:23397289

  4. Occupation and ischemic heart disease in the European Community: a comparative study of occupations at potential high risk.

    PubMed

    Tüchsen, F; Andersen, O; Costa, G; Filakti, H; Marmot, M G

    1996-10-01

    Four longitudinal studies of mortality and morbidity by occupation based on individual record linkage of information and two cross-sectional studies of mortality were compared in order to identify occupations at high risk of ischemic heart disease. In more than one country an increased risk of ischemic heart disease was found in drivers of buses, taxies, and lorries, in bakers, in naval officers and fishermen, in hotel and restaurant workers, in senior police, customs, and other uniformed men, in barbers and hairdressers, in warehouse and wholesale staff, as well as in laboratory assistants and in radio and telegraph operators. Occupations found at high risk in Denmark were also found at high risk in Great Britain and Italy. These occupations may be at genuine high risk. None of these groups work day-work only and several of the groups have psychologically demanding work but unsatisfactory decision authority. Identification of occupations at high risk may help to develop focused preventive strategies.

  5. Heart Devices 101: Guide to The Tools That Keep You Ticking

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart rhythm when the heart beats too slowly. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators : These deliver a shock to restore ... become blocked again. Ventricular assist devices : These mechanical pumps help weak hearts pump blood effectively. While originally ...

  6. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... go to the Health Topics Heart Failure article. Arrhythmia An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. When you have an arrhythmia, you may notice that your heart is skipping ...

  7. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  8. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  9. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  10. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  11. European Society of Cardiology-Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position paper on acute heart failure: A call for interdisciplinary care.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christian; Christ, Michael; Cowie, Martin; Cullen, Louise; Maisel, Alan S; Masip, Josep; Miro, Oscar; McMurray, John; Peacock, Frank W; Price, Susanna; DiSomma, Salvatore; Bueno, Hector; Zeymer, Uwe; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) continues to have unacceptably high rates of mortality and morbidity. This position paper highlights the need for more intense interdisciplinary cooperation as one key element to overcome the challenges associated with fragmentation in the care of AHF patients. Additional aspects discussed include the importance of early diagnosis and treatment, options for initial treatment, referral bias as a potential cause for treatment preferences among experts, considerable uncertainty regarding patient disposition, the diagnosis of accompanying acute myocardial infarction, the need for antibiotic therapy, as well as assessment of intravascular volume status.

  12. Molecular Approach to Hypothalamic Rhythms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-14

    in vitro to Targeted Cloning Strategy for reset or phase shift circadian rhythms of neuronal G Protein-Coupled Receptors activity in the SCN (Prosser...behavioral circadian rhythms . Light, serotonin and melatonin are the dominant stimuli which affect the phase of the endogenous clock. The grantee has devised...shifting the phase of circadian rhythms , and to rule out the prevailing alternative hypothesis that the effect was mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor coupled

  13. Iron deficiency and health-related quality of life in chronic heart failure: results from a multicenter European study.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, Cristina; Klip, Ijsbrand T; Bruguera, Jordi; Cladellas, Merce; Ponikowski, Piotr; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2014-06-15

    Patients affected by chronic heart failure (CHF) present significant impairment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Iron deficiency (ID) is a common comorbidity in CHF with negative impact in prognosis and functional capacity. The role of iron in energy metabolism could be the link between ID and HRQoL. There is little information about the role of ID on HRQoL in patients with CHF. We evaluate the impact of ID on HRQoL and the interaction with the anaemia status, iron status, clinical baseline information and HRQoL, measured with the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire (MLHFQ) was obtained at baseline in an international cohort of 1278 patients with CHF. Baseline characteristics were median age 68 ± 12, 882 (69%) were males, ejection fraction was 38% ± 15 and NYHA class was I/II/III/IV (156/247/487/66). ID (defined as ferritin level< 100 µg/L or serum ferritin 100-299 µg/L in combination with a TSAT<20%) was present in 741 patients (58%). 449 (35%) patients were anaemic. Unadjusted global scores of MLHFQ (where higher scores reflect worse HRQoL) were worse in ID and anaemic patients (ID+: 42 ± 25 vs. ID-: 37 ± 25; p-value=0.001 and A+: 46 ± 25 vs. A-: 37 ± 25; p-value<0.001). The combined influence of ID and anaemia was explored with different multivariable regression models, showing that ID but not anaemia was associated with impaired HRQoL. ID has a negative impact on HRQoL in CHF patients, and this is independent of the presence of anaemia.

  14. Chronotherapeutic strategy: Rhythm monitoring, manipulation and disruption.

    PubMed

    Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2010-07-31

    Mammalians circadian pacemaker resides in the paired suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and influences a multitude of biological processes, including the sleep-wake rhythm. Clock genes are the genes that control the circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. 24h rhythm is demonstrated for the function of physiology and the pathophysiology of diseases. The effectiveness and toxicity of many drugs vary depending on dosing time. Such chronopharmacological phenomena are influenced by not only the pharmacodynamics but also pharmacokinetics of medications. The underlying mechanisms are associated with 24h rhythms of biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes under the control of circadian clock. Thus, the knowledge of 24h rhythm in the risk of disease plus evidence of 24h rhythm dependencies of drug pharmacokinetics, effects, and safety constitutes the rationale for pharmacotherapy. Chronotherapy is especially relevant, when the risk and/or intensity of the symptoms of disease vary predictably over time as exemplified by allergic rhinitis, arthritis, asthma, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and peptic ulcer disease. Morning once-daily administration of corticosteroid tablet medications results in little adrenocortical suppression, while the same daily dose split into four equal administrations to coincide with daily meals and bedtime results in significant hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression. However, the drugs for several diseases are still given without regard to the time of day. Identification of a rhythmic marker for selecting dosing time will lead to improved progress and diffusion of chronopharmacotherapy. To monitor the rhythmic marker such as clock genes it may be useful to choose the most appropriate time of day for administration of drugs that may increase their therapeutic effects and/or reduce their side effects. Furthermore, to produce new rhythmicity by manipulating the conditions of living organs by using

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation and reliability testing of Polish adaptation of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale (EHFScBS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Łoboz-Rudnicka, Maria; Jaarsma, Tiny; Łoboz-Grudzień, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of simple instruments for determination of self-care levels in heart failure (HF) patients is a subject of ongoing research. One such instrument, gaining growing popularity worldwide, is the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale (EHFScBS). The aim of this study was to adapt and to test reliability of the Polish version of EHFScBS. Method A standard guideline was used for translation and cultural adaptation of the English version of EHFScBS into Polish. The study included 100 Polish HF patients aged between 24 and 91 years, among them 67 men and 33 women. Cronbach’s alpha was used for analysis of the internal consistency of EHFScBS. Results Mean total self-care score in the study group was 34.2±8.1 points. Good or satisfactory level of self-care were documented in four out of 12 analyzed EHFScBS domains. Cronbach’s alpha for the entire questionnaire was 0.64. The value of Cronbach’s alpha after deletion of specific items ranged from 0.55 to 0.65. Conclusion Polish HF patients present significant deficits of self-care, which are to a large extent associated with inefficacy of the public health care system. Apart from cultural characteristics, the socioeconomic context of the target population should be considered during language adaptation of EHFScBS, as well as during interpretation of data obtained with this instrument. A number of self-care–related behaviors may be optimized as a result of appropriate educational activities, also those offered by nursing personnel. PMID:25382973

  16. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  17. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  18. Keeping Your Heart Healthy After Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of heart problems that may result from cancer treatments: I The muscle cells of the heart may be damaged so that the heart doesn’t contract and relax normally ( left ventricular dysfunction, cardiomyopathy ). I The electrical pathways that conduct impulses to control heart rhythm may ...

  19. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  20. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  1. Immediate effect on cardiac output of reversion to sinus rhythm from rapid arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wright, J S; Fabian, J; Epstein, E J

    1970-08-08

    Cardiac output was estimated immediately before and after conversion to sinus rhythm in nine patients with rapid arrhythmias. Conversion was by synchronized direct-current shock in eight patients, and by direct atrial wall stimulation in the other. In seven patients there was an immediate increase in cardiac output after restoration of sinus rhythm. The percentage increase in output was directly proportional to the rate of the arrhythmia immediately before conversion (r=0.91, P<0.01). The critical heart rate, above which an immediate increase in cardiac output might be expected on conversion to sinus rhythm, appeared in these patients to be about 160 beats per minute.

  2. Biological rhythms and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2012-12-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis.

  3. How does the brain create rhythms?

    PubMed

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-01-30

    Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz micro-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central micro-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the "clock-mechanism" are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The "timer" function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/1(2), 1/2(2), 1/2(3), 1/2(4), 1/2(5)). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of conscious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octave-based. Musical

  4. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-07-25

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  5. Perceptual tests of rhythmic similarity: II. Syllable rhythm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Chris; Cutler, Anne

    2008-01-01

    To segment continuous speech into its component words, listeners make use of language rhythm; because rhythm differs across languages, so do the segmentation procedures which listeners use. For each of stress-, syllable- and mora-based rhythmic structure, perceptual experiments have led to the discovery of corresponding segmentation procedures. In the case of mora-based rhythm, similar segmentation has been demonstrated in the otherwise unrelated languages Japanese and Telugu; segmentation based on syllable rhythm, however, has been previously demonstrated only for European languages from the Romance family. We here report two target detection experiments in which Korean listeners, presented with speech in Korean and in French, displayed patterns of segmentation like those previously observed in analogous experiments with French listeners. The Korean listeners' accuracy in detecting word-initial target fragments in either language was significantly higher when the fragments corresponded exactly to a syllable in the input than when the fragments were smaller or larger than a syllable. We conclude that Korean and French listeners can call on similar procedures for segmenting speech, and we further propose that perceptual tests of speech segmentation provide a valuable accompaniment to acoustic analyses for establishing languages' rhythmic class membership.

  6. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination.

  7. Rhythms that speed you up.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Daniel; Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Correa, Angel

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates whether a rhythm can orient attention to specific moments enhancing people's reaction times (RT). We used a modified version of the temporal orienting paradigm in which an auditory isochronous rhythm was presented prior to an auditory single target. The rhythm could have a fast pace (450 ms Inter-Onset-Interval or IOI) or a slow pace (950 ms IOI). The target was presented after a variable foreperiod of either 200, 400, 900, 1400, or 1600 ms following the offset of the rhythm. In Experiment 1, the rhythmic pace validly predicted the moment of target appearance; i.e., the target appeared after a foreperiod that matched the rhythmic pace on 60% of the trials. The results showed an effect on RT performance of the fast rhythmic pace compared to the slow rhythmic pace at the 200 and 400 ms foreperiods, while no effects were found at the long foreperiods, probably due to a foreperiod effect. In Experiment 2, non-predictive rhythmic paces did not modulate the foreperiod effect. The addition of temporal uncertainty by including catch trials in Experiment 3 clearly unveiled the effect of non-predictive rhythmic pace at short and long foreperiods. Taken together, the results of the experiments reported here highlight the ability of rhythms to orient temporal attention enhancing participants' response speed not only at short intervals but also at long time intervals, suggesting the involvement of a flexible mechanism.

  8. Melatonin, Circadian Rhythms, and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Irina V.; Tucci, Valter

    2003-05-01

    Experimental data show a close relationship among melatonin, circadian rhythms, and sleep. Low-dose melatonin treatment, increasing circulating melatonin levels to those normally observed at night, promotes sleep onset and sleep maintenance without changing sleep architecture. Melatonin treatment can also advance or delay the phase of the circadian clock if administered in the evening or in the morning, respectively. If used in physiologic doses and at appropriate times, melatonin can be helpful for those suffering from insomnia or circadian rhythm disorders. This may be especially beneficial for individuals with low melatonin production, which is established by measuring individual blood or saliva melatonin levels. However, high melatonin doses (over 0.3 mg) may cause side effects and disrupt the delicate mechanism of the circadian system, dissociating mutually dependent circadian body rhythms. A misleading labeling of the hormone melatonin as a "food supplement" and lack of quality control over melatonin preparations on the market continue to be of serious concern.

  9. Biological rhythms and mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2012-01-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis. PMID:23393414

  10. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  11. Comparison of English Language Rhythm and Kalhori Kurdish Language Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghva, Nafiseh; Zadeh, Vahideh Abolhasani

    2016-01-01

    Interval-based method is a method of studying the rhythmic quantitative features of languages. This method use Pairwise Variability Index (PVI) to consider the variability of vocalic duration and inter-vocalic duration of sentences which leads to classification of languages rhythm into stress-timed languages and syllable-timed ones. This study…

  12. Circadian rhythms of pineal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Binkley, S A

    1983-01-01

    In pineal glands melatonin is synthesized daily. Melatonin synthesis in rats kept in most light-dark cycles occurs during the subjective night. This rhythm, which persists in constant dark, is a circadian rhythm which may be a consequence of another circadian rhythm in the pineal gland, of N-acetyltransferase activity (NAT). The NAT rhythm has been studied extensively in rats as a possible component of the system timing circadian rhythms. The NAT rhythm is driven by neural signals transmitted to the pineal gland by the sympathetic nervous system. Environmental lighting exerts precise control over the timing of the NAT rhythm. In rats, there is enough data to describe a daily time course of events in the pineal gland and to describe a pineal "life history." Hypothetical schemes for generation of the NAT rhythm and for its control by light are presented.

  13. Chaos control applied to cardiac rhythms represented by ECG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca; Amorim Savi, Marcelo; Souza de Paula, Aline

    2014-10-01

    The control of irregular or chaotic heartbeats is a key issue in cardiology. In this regard, chaos control techniques represent a good alternative since they suggest treatments different from those traditionally used. This paper deals with the application of the extended time-delayed feedback control method to stabilize pathological chaotic heart rhythms. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are employed to represent the cardiovascular behavior. A mathematical model is employed to generate ECG signals using three modified Van der Pol oscillators connected with time delay couplings. This model provides results that qualitatively capture the general behavior of the heart. Controlled ECG signals show the ability of the strategy either to control or to suppress the chaotic heart dynamics generating less-critical behaviors.

  14. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle.

  15. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harfmann, Brianna D.; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  16. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  17. Unexpected Complete Heart Block and Anesthetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Arturo G

    2015-08-01

    A healthy, active duty military 25-year-old female with a history of congenital complete heart block presented for a routine septorhinoplasty. During the preoperative interview, she did not disclose her heart condition. A preordered electrocardiogram was not available. During induction of anesthesia, she became extremely bradycardic, approaching asystole, requiring resuscitation. This case highlights the potential anesthetic risks in individuals with a history of congenital heart rhythm disease.

  18. Adaptation of sleep and circadian rhythms to the Antarctic summer - A question of zeitgeber strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Macdonald, John A.; Montgomery, John C.; Paulin, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    Adaptation of sleep and circadian rhythms was examined in three temperate zone dwellers arriving in Antarctica during summer. Rectal temperature, wrist activity, and heart rate were monitored continuously, sleep timing and quality noted on awakening, and mood and fatigue rated every 2 h while awake. Sleep was poorer in 2/3 subjects in Antarctica, where all subjects reported more difficulty rising. Sleep occurred at the same clock times in New Zealand and Antarctica, however, the rhythms of temperature, activity, and heart rate underwent a delay of about of 2 h. The subject with the most Antarctic experience had the least difficulty adapting to sleeping during constant daylight. The subject with the most delayed circadian rhythms had the most difficulty. The delay in the circadian system with respect to sleep and clock time is hypothesized to be due to differences in zeitgeber strength and/or zeitgeber exposure between Antarctica and New Zealand.

  19. Biochemical Oscillations and Cellular Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Berridge, Foreword by M. J.

    1997-04-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Glycolytic Oscillations: 2. Oscillatory enzymes: simple periodic behaviour in an allosteric model for glycolytic oscillations; Part II. From Simple to Complex Oscillatory Behaviour; 3. Birhythmicity: coexistence between two stable rhythms; 4. From simple periodic behaviour to complex oscillations, including bursting and chaos; Part III. Oscillations Of Cyclic Amo In Dictyostelium Cells: 5. Models for the periodic synthesis and relay of camp signals in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae; 6. Complex oscillations and chaos in the camp signalling system of Dictyostelium; 7. The onset of camp oscillations in Dictyostelium as a model for the ontogenesis of biological rhythms; Part IV. Pulsatile Signalling In Intercellular Communication: 8. Function of the rhythm of intercellular communication in Dictyostelium. Link with pulsatile hormone secretion; Part V. Calcium Oscillations: 9. Oscillations and waves of intracellular calcium; Part VI. The Mitotic Oscillator: 10. Modelling the mitotic oscillator driving the cell division cycle; Part VII. Circadian Rhythms: 11. Towards a model for circadian oscillations in the Drosophila period protein (PER); 12. Conclusions and perspectives; References.

  20. The International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Liz

    1987-01-01

    The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, a popular, long-lived, all-female jazz band of the 1940s, were the first racially integrated women's band in America. Their achievement has been largely neglected by music historians. A brief history of the band is presented, and their significance is discussed. (BJV)

  1. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  2. Concepts in human biological rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Reinberg, Alain; Ashkenazi, Israel

    2003-01-01

    Biological rhythms and their temporal organization are adaptive phenomena to periodic changes in environmental factors linked to the earth's rotation on its axis and around the sun. Experimental data from the plant and animal kingdoms have led to many models and concepts related to biological clocks that help describe and understand the mechanisms of these changes. Many of the prevailing concepts apply to all organisms, but most of the experimental data are insufficient to explain the dynamics of human biological clocks. This review presents phenomena thai are mainly characteristic ofand unique to - human chronobiology, and which cannot be fully explained by concepts and models drawn from laboratory experiments. We deal with the functional advantages of the human temporal organization and the problem of desynchronization, with special reference to the period (τ) of the circadian rhythm and its interindividual and intraindividual variability. We describe the differences between right- and left-hand rhythms suggesting the existence of different biological clocks in the right and left cortices, Desynchronization of rhythms is rather frequent (one example is night shift workers). In some individuals, desynchronization causes no clinical symptoms and we propose the concept of “allochronism” to designate a variant of the human temporal organization with no pathological implications. We restrict the term “dyschronism” to changes or alterations in temporal organization associated with a set of symptoms similar to those observed in subjects intolerant to shift work, eg, persisting fatigue and mood and sleep alterations. Many diseases involve chronic deprivation of sleep at night and constitute conditions mimicking thai of night shift workers who are intolerant to desynchronization. We also present a genetic model (the dian-circadian model) to explain interindividual differences in the period of biological rhythms in certain conditions. PMID:22033796

  3. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  4. The Pathophysiology of Circadian and Ultradian Rhythm Disturbances on Behavioral and Visceral Functions, Stress Response, and Disease Susceptibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    experiment is important in making the point that the disease- resisting properties of life in constant light hold for other processes besides innate heart...tained from Canadian Hybrid Farms (Halls Harbor. between cortisol and insulin rhythms may vary depend- Nova Scotia, Canada) where they had been...days in the current factor that directly affects all three. Melatonin secretion experiment and behavioral rhythms can persist in the by the pineal gland

  5. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  6. Recommendations for physical activity, recreation sport, and exercise training in paediatric patients with congenital heart disease: a report from the Exercise, Basic & Translational Research Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the European Congenital Heart and Lung Exercise Group, and the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Takken, T; Giardini, A; Reybrouck, T; Gewillig, M; Hövels-Gürich, H H; Longmuir, P E; McCrindle, B W; Paridon, S M; Hager, A

    2012-10-01

    All children have a natural need to move, play, and perform activities. Physical activity is necessary for optimal physical, emotional, and psychosocial development for healthy children as well as children with congenital heart disease (CHD). In this paper we provide recommendations for physical activity, recreational sport, and exercise training in children and adolescents with CHD. In general, children with CHD should be advised to comply with public health recommendations of daily participation in 60 min or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity that is developmentally appropriate and enjoyable and involves a variety of activities. While all patients with CHD can participate and benefit from physical activity and exercise, those with specific lesions or complications may require counselling regarding precautions and recommendations.

  7. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  8. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenyu; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of the genetic basis for circadian rhythms has expanded our knowledge of the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. The observations that the circadian gene network is present in most living organisms from eubacteria to humans, that most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks, and that disruption of clock genes results in metabolic dysregulation have revealed interactions between metabolism and circadian rhythms at neural, molecular, and cellular levels. A major challenge remains in understanding the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks and in determining how these interactions promote energy homeostasis across the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we evaluate how investigation of molecular timing may create new opportunities to understand and develop therapies for obesity and diabetes.

  9. Effects of pre-exercise listening to slow and fast rhythm music on supramaximal cycle performance and selected metabolic variables.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Ohkuwa, T; Itoh, H; Kitoh, M; Terasawa, J; Tsuda, T; Kitagawa, S; Sato, Y

    2003-07-01

    We examined the effect of listening to two different types of music (with slow and fast rhythm), prior to supramaximal cycle exercise, on performance, heart rate, the concentration of lactate and ammonia in blood, and the concentration of catecholamines in plasma. Six male students participated in this study. After listening to slow rhythm or fast rhythm music for 20 min, the subjects performed supramaximal exercise for 45 s using a cycle ergometer. Listening to slow and fast rhythm music prior to supramaximal exercise did not significantly affect the mean power output. The plasma norepinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to slow rhythm music was significantly lower than before listening (p < 0.05). The plasma epinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to fast rhythm music was significantly higher than before listening (p < 0.05). The type of music had no effect on blood lactate and ammonia levels or on plasma catecholamine levels following exercise. In conclusion, listening to slow rhythm music decreases the plasma norepinephrine level, and listening to fast rhythm music increases the plasma epinephrine level. The type of music has no impact on power output during exercise.

  10. [Fundamental bases of biological rhythms].

    PubMed

    Shabalin, V N; Shatokhina, S N

    2000-01-01

    The data and theoretical points given in the paper mould basically new views of molecular relationships underlying the function of living beings and biological rhythms. The authors' procedure for wedge biological fluid dehydration reveals a wide autowave spectrum that is clearly detectable when the fluid passes into the solid phase. A hypothesis of the autowave interaction of biologically active molecules is forwarded, which considers autowaves as a basis of organization of physiological and pathological processes occurring in the body.

  11. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  12. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-05-24

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin.

  13. Circadian rhythms and molecular noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Goldbeter, Albert

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms, characterized by a period of about 24h, are the most widespread biological rhythms generated autonomously at the molecular level. The core molecular mechanism responsible for circadian oscillations relies on the negative regulation exerted by a protein on the expression of its own gene. Deterministic models account for the occurrence of autonomous circadian oscillations, for their entrainment by light-dark cycles, and for their phase shifting by light pulses. Stochastic versions of these models take into consideration the molecular fluctuations that arise when the number of molecules involved in the regulatory mechanism is low. Numerical simulations of the stochastic models show that robust circadian oscillations can already occur with a limited number of mRNA and protein molecules, in the range of a few tens and hundreds, respectively. Various factors affect the robustness of circadian oscillations with respect to molecular noise. Besides an increase in the number of molecules, entrainment by light-dark cycles, and cooperativity in repression enhance robustness, whereas the proximity of a bifurcation point leads to less robust oscillations. Another parameter that appears to be crucial for the coherence of circadian rhythms is the binding/unbinding rate of the inhibitory protein to the promoter of the clock gene. Intercellular coupling further increases the robustness of circadian oscillations.

  14. Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Stöckl, Georg; Werdan, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A high resting heart rate (≥70–75 b.p.m.) is a risk factor for patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF), probably in the sense of accelerated atherosclerosis, with an increased morbidity and mortality. Beta-blockers not only reduce heart rate but also have negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects, and therefore, in many patients, they cannot be given in the recommended dose. Ivabradine specifically inhibits the pacemaker current (funny current, If) of the sinoatrial node cells, resulting in therapeutic heart rate lowering without any negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effect. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered to reduce the risk of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death in symptomatic patients with a reduced left ventricular EF ≤35% and sinus rhythm ≥70 b.p.m. despite treatment with an evidence-based dose of beta-blocker or a dose below the recommended dose (recommendation class “IIa” = weight of evidence/opinion is in favor of usefulness/efficacy: “should be considered”; level of evidence “B” = data derived from a single randomized clinical trial or large nonrandomized studies). Using a heart rate cutoff of ≥ 75 b.p.m., as licensed by the European Medicines Agency, treatment with ivabradine 5–7.5 mg b.i.d. reduces cardiovascular mortality by 17%, HF mortality by 39% and HF hospitalization rate by 30%. A high resting heart rate is not only a risk factor in HF with reduced EF but also at least a risk marker in HF with preserved EF, in acute HF and also in special forms of HF. In this review, we discuss the proven role of ivabradine in the validated indication “HF with reduced EF” together with interesting preliminary findings, and the potential role of ivabradine in further, specific forms of HF. PMID:27895488

  15. Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine.

    PubMed

    Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Stöckl, Georg; Werdan, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A high resting heart rate (≥70-75 b.p.m.) is a risk factor for patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF), probably in the sense of accelerated atherosclerosis, with an increased morbidity and mortality. Beta-blockers not only reduce heart rate but also have negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects, and therefore, in many patients, they cannot be given in the recommended dose. Ivabradine specifically inhibits the pacemaker current (funny current, If) of the sinoatrial node cells, resulting in therapeutic heart rate lowering without any negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effect. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered to reduce the risk of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death in symptomatic patients with a reduced left ventricular EF ≤35% and sinus rhythm ≥70 b.p.m. despite treatment with an evidence-based dose of beta-blocker or a dose below the recommended dose (recommendation class "IIa" = weight of evidence/opinion is in favor of usefulness/efficacy: "should be considered"; level of evidence "B" = data derived from a single randomized clinical trial or large nonrandomized studies). Using a heart rate cutoff of ≥ 75 b.p.m., as licensed by the European Medicines Agency, treatment with ivabradine 5-7.5 mg b.i.d. reduces cardiovascular mortality by 17%, HF mortality by 39% and HF hospitalization rate by 30%. A high resting heart rate is not only a risk factor in HF with reduced EF but also at least a risk marker in HF with preserved EF, in acute HF and also in special forms of HF. In this review, we discuss the proven role of ivabradine in the validated indication "HF with reduced EF" together with interesting preliminary findings, and the potential role of ivabradine in further, specific forms of HF.

  16. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  17. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome with restrictive atrial septum and advanced heart block documented with a novel fetal electrocardiographic monitor

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, H. K.; FIFER, W.; CARROLL, S.; KERN, J.; SILVER, E.; WILLIAMS, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoplastic left ventricle with congenital heart block has been reported previously in a fetus with concurrent left atrial isomerism and levo-transposition of the great arteries. We present the unusual case of an infant diagnosed in utero with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a restrictive atrial septum and advanced heart block but with D-looping of the ventricles and no atrial isomerism. In addition, fetal heart rhythm was documented with the assistance of a new fetal electrocardiographic monitor. PMID:21374749

  18. Nonlinear and Stochastic Dynamics in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhilin; Hu, Gang; Garfinkel, Alan; Weiss, James N.

    2014-01-01

    In a normal human life span, the heart beats about 2 to 3 billion times. Under diseased conditions, a heart may lose its normal rhythm and degenerate suddenly into much faster and irregular rhythms, called arrhythmias, which may lead to sudden death. The transition from a normal rhythm to an arrhythmia is a transition from regular electrical wave conduction to irregular or turbulent wave conduction in the heart, and thus this medical problem is also a problem of physics and mathematics. In the last century, clinical, experimental, and theoretical studies have shown that dynamical theories play fundamental roles in understanding the mechanisms of the genesis of the normal heart rhythm as well as lethal arrhythmias. In this article, we summarize in detail the nonlinear and stochastic dynamics occurring in the heart and their links to normal cardiac functions and arrhythmias, providing a holistic view through integrating dynamics from the molecular (microscopic) scale, to the organelle (mesoscopic) scale, to the cellular, tissue, and organ (macroscopic) scales. We discuss what existing problems and challenges are waiting to be solved and how multi-scale mathematical modeling and nonlinear dynamics may be helpful for solving these problems. PMID:25267872

  19. Nonlinear and Stochastic Dynamics in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhilin; Hu, Gang; Garfinkel, Alan; Weiss, James N

    2014-10-10

    In a normal human life span, the heart beats about 2 to 3 billion times. Under diseased conditions, a heart may lose its normal rhythm and degenerate suddenly into much faster and irregular rhythms, called arrhythmias, which may lead to sudden death. The transition from a normal rhythm to an arrhythmia is a transition from regular electrical wave conduction to irregular or turbulent wave conduction in the heart, and thus this medical problem is also a problem of physics and mathematics. In the last century, clinical, experimental, and theoretical studies have shown that dynamical theories play fundamental roles in understanding the mechanisms of the genesis of the normal heart rhythm as well as lethal arrhythmias. In this article, we summarize in detail the nonlinear and stochastic dynamics occurring in the heart and their links to normal cardiac functions and arrhythmias, providing a holistic view through integrating dynamics from the molecular (microscopic) scale, to the organelle (mesoscopic) scale, to the cellular, tissue, and organ (macroscopic) scales. We discuss what existing problems and challenges are waiting to be solved and how multi-scale mathematical modeling and nonlinear dynamics may be helpful for solving these problems.

  20. Instantaneous electrocardiographic changes and transient sinus rhythm restoration in severe hyperkalaemia.

    PubMed

    Gogas, Bill D; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Leftheriotis, Dionyssios I; Flevari, Panagiota G; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T

    2011-04-14

    Severe hyperkalaemia is a life threatening electrolyte abnormality that if not treated urgently, might cause electric death. Hyperkalaemia induced electrocardiogram (ECG) alterations vary according to the levels and rate of increase of potassium concentration ([K(+)]) in the extracellular milieu but the paradox is that not all these cases provide ECG changes. We describe the first case in the literature of transient sinus rhythm (SR) recovery despite severe hyperkalaemia in a 57-year-old (yo) male patient with impressive ECG changes considering the heart rhythm and QRS morphology. We also review the literature for the mechanism of ECG alterations induced by hyperkalaemia.

  1. Comparison of circadian rhythms in male and female humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Deroshia, C. W.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Rosenblatt, W. S.; Hetherington, N. W.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and rectal temperature (RT) data were obtained from 12 female and 27 male subjects. The subjects were housed in a facility where the environment was controlled. Human male and female RT and HR exhibit a circadian rhythm with an excursion of about 1.2 C and 30 beats/min, respectively. The acrophases, amplitudes, and level crossings are only slightly different between the sexes. The male HR and RT circadian wave forms are more stable than those of the females. However, the actual RT and HR of males were always lower than that of females at all time points around the clock. The HR during sleep in females is 15 per cent below the daily mean heart rate and in males, 22 per cent.

  2. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  3. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  4. Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Josephine

    2012-05-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with "normal" working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week

  5. Gravitational considerations with animal rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    As established in the laboratory and largely confirmed by others, simulated high-g environments influence growth and development of animals as small as or smaller than baby turtles, sometimes accelerating and sometimes decelerating these processes. High-g environments result in many functional changes or adjustments in feeding, metabolism, circulation, fluid balances, and structures for support, and influence life expectancy. An assembly of equipment suitable for measuring oxygen consumption of small mammals as influenced by chronic centrifugation and/or by day-night rhythms is discussed.

  6. The Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition that the coordinated timing of behavioral, physiologic, and metabolic circadian rhythms is a requirement for a healthy body and mind. In mammals, the primary circadian oscillator is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is responsible for circadian coordination throughout the organism. Temporal homeostasis is recognized as a complex interplay between rhythmic clock gene expression in brain regions outside the SCN and in peripheral organs. Abnormalities in this intricate circadian orchestration may alter sleep patterns and contribute to the pathophysiology of affective disorders.

  7. Using an algorithm to easily interpret basic cardiac rhythms.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Denise

    2005-11-01

    MANY NURSES STRUGGLE with identifying electrocardiogram (ECG) rhythms, but rapidly interpreting primary ECG rhythms is an essential skill that every nurse should master. THIS ARTICLE PROVIDES an algorithm that nurses can use to easily interpret basic ECG rhythms.

  8. Case report: an unusual heart rhythm associated with organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Can, Ilknur; Kusumoto, Fred M

    2012-09-01

    Organophosphate pesticides have emerged as a common cause of poisoning, particularly in developing countries. The most common electrocardiographic abnormalities observed in organophosphate poisoning are sinus tachycardia, QT interval prolongation, and, very rarely, ventricular arrhythmias. We report a case of organophosphate poisoning associated with atrial fibrillation, right bundle branch block, QT interval prolongation, and intermittent narrow QRS complexes that were most likely due to automaticity from the region of the left posterior fascicle.

  9. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea on heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina A; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2013-06-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been proven to be a risk factor for hypertension and vascular dysfunction, and has been proposed to be causally related with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Searches of bibliographical databases revealed that several mechanisms seem to underpin the association between OSA and cardiac arrhythmias: intermittent hypoxia associated with autonomic nervous system activation and increased oxidative stress, which may lead to cardiac cellular damage and alteration in myocardial excitability; recurrent arousals, resulting in sympathetic activation and coronary vasoconstriction; and increased negative intrathoracic pressure which may mechanically stretch the myocardial walls and, thus, promote acute changes in myocardial excitability as well as structural remodelling of the myocardium. Findings from cross-sectional studies suggest a high prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with OSA and a high prevalence of OSA in those with cardiac arrhythmias. Preliminary evidence from uncontrolled interventional studies suggests that treatment of OSA may prevent cardiac arrhythmias. In conclusion, there is preliminary evidence that OSA is associated with the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Data from randomised controlled studies are needed to definitively clarify the role of OSA in arrhythmogenesis.

  10. Diurnal rhythms of visual accommodation and blink responses - Implication for flight-deck visual standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Possible 24-h variations in accommodation responses were investigated. A recently developed servo-controlled optometer and focus stimulator were used to obtain monocular accommodation response data on four college-age subjects. No 24-h rhythm in accommodation was shown. Heart rate and blink rate also were measured and periodicity analysis showed a mean 24-h rhythm for both; however, blink rate periodograms were significant for only two of the four subjects. Thus, with the qualifications that college students were tested instead of pilots and that they performed monocular laboratory tasks instead of binocular flight-deck tasks, it is concluded that 24-h rhythms in accommodation responses need not be considered in setting visual standards for flight-deck tasks.

  11. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings.

  12. A Variation on Kodaly's Rhythm Syllable System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rhythm syllable system within Zoltan Kodaly's method that is often used to teach elementary students in general music classes. Offers background information about this method as well as an alternative technique for teaching students about the single sixteenth-note rhythm. (CMK)

  13. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  14. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  15. Detecting and Correcting Speech Rhythm Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Every language has its own rhythm. Unlike many other languages in the world, English depends on the correct pronunciation of stressed and unstressed or weakened syllables recurring in the same phrase or sentence. Mastering the rhythm of English makes speaking more effective. Experiments have shown that we tend to hear speech as more rhythmical…

  16. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods: Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were…

  17. The Incarnate Rhythm of Geometrical Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a fundamental dimension of human nature at both biological and social levels. However, existing research literature has not sufficiently investigated its role in mathematical cognition and behavior. The purpose of this article is to bring the concept of "incarnate rhythm" into current discourses in the field of mathematical learning and…

  18. Synchronous circadian voltage rhythms with asynchronous calcium rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Oda, Yoshiaki; Mieda, Michihiro; Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-07

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock, contains a network composed of multiple types of neurons which are thought to form a hierarchical and multioscillator system. The molecular clock machinery in SCN neurons drives membrane excitability and sends time cue signals to various brain regions and peripheral organs. However, how and at what time of the day these neurons transmit output signals remain largely unknown. Here, we successfully visualized circadian voltage rhythms optically for many days using a genetically encoded voltage sensor, ArcLightD. Unexpectedly, the voltage rhythms are synchronized across the entire SCN network of cultured slices, whereas simultaneously recorded Ca(2+) rhythms are topologically specific to the dorsal and ventral regions. We further found that the temporal order of these two rhythms is cell-type specific: The Ca(2+) rhythms phase-lead the voltage rhythms in AVP neurons but Ca(2+) and voltage rhythms are nearly in phase in VIP neurons. We confirmed that circadian firing rhythms are also synchronous and are coupled with the voltage rhythms. These results indicate that SCN networks with asynchronous Ca(2+) rhythms produce coherent voltage rhythms.

  19. [Biology and genetics of circadian rhythm].

    PubMed

    Bellivier, F

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of biological clocks has grown expontentially. This has helped to guide the choice of genes studied to explain inter-individual variations seen in circadian rhythms. In recent years analysis of circadian rhythms has advanced considerably into the study of pathological circadian rhythms in human beings. These findings, combined with those obtained from studying mice whose circadian genes have been rendered incapable, have revealed the role of genetic factors in circadian rhythms. This literature review presents an overview of these findings. Beyond our understanding of the functioning of these biological clocks, this knowledge will be extremely useful to analyse genetic factors involved in morbid conditions involving circadian rhythm abnormalities.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  1. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... including how to maximize your recovery at home. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defect Publications If Your Child Has a ...

  2. European Society of Cardiology - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association position paper on safe discharge of acute heart failure patients from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Miró, Òscar; Peacock, Frank W; McMurray, John J; Bueno, Héctor; Christ, Michael; Maisel, Alan S; Cullen, Louise; Cowie, Martin R; Di Somma, Salvatore; Martín Sánchez, Francisco J; Platz, Elke; Masip, Josep; Zeymer, Uwe; Vrints, Christiaan; Price, Susanna; Mebazaa, Alexander; Mueller, Christian

    2016-02-21

    Heart failure is a global public health challenge frequently presenting to the emergency department. After initial stabilization and management, one of the most important decisions is to determine which patients can be safely discharged and which require hospitalization. This is a complex decision that depends on numerous subjective factors, including both the severity of the patient's underlying condition and an estimate of the acuity of the presentation. An emergency department observation period may help select the correct option. Ideally, during an observation period, risk stratification should be carried out using parameters specifically designed for use in the emergency department. Unfortunately, there is little objective literature to guide this disposition decision. An objective and reliable definition of low-risk characteristics to identify early discharge candidates is needed. Benchmarking outcomes in patients discharged from the emergency department without hospitalization could aid this process. Biomarker determinations, although undoubtedly useful in establishing diagnosis and predicting longer-term prognosis, require prospective validation for emergency department disposition guidance. The challenge of identifying emergency department acute heart failure discharge candidates will only be overcome by future multidisciplinary research defining the current knowledge gaps and identifying potential solutions.

  3. Craniosacral rhythm: reliability and relationships with cardiac and respiratory rates.

    PubMed

    Hanten, W P; Dawson, D D; Iwata, M; Seiden, M; Whitten, F G; Zink, T

    1998-03-01

    Craniosacral rhythm (CSR) has long been the subject of debate, both over its existence and its use as a therapeutic tool in evaluation and treatment. Origins of this rhythm are unknown, and palpatory findings lack scientific support. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of the palpation of the rate of the CSR and the relationship between the rate of the CSR and the heart or respiratory rates of subjects and examiners. The rates of the CSR of 40 healthy adults were palpated twice by each of two examiners. The heart and respiratory rates of the examiners and the subjects were recorded while the rates of the subjects' CSR were palpated by the examiners. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of the palpation. Two multiple regression analyses, one for each examiner, were conducted to analyze the relationships between the rate of the CSR and the heart and respiratory rates of the subjects and the examiners. The intraexaminer reliability coefficients were 0.78 for examiner A and 0.83 for examiner B, and the interexaminer reliability coefficient was 0.22. The result of the multiple regression analysis for examiner A was R = 0.46 and adjusted R2 = 0.12 (p = 0.078) and for examiner B was R = 0.63 and adjusted R2 = 0.32 (p = 0.001). The highest bivariate correlation was found between the CSR and the subject's heart rate (r = 0.30) for examiner A and between the CSR and the examiner's heart rate (r = 0.42) for examiner B. The results indicated that a single examiner may be able to palpate the rate of the CSR consistently, if that is what we truly measured. It is possible that the perception of CSR is illusory. The rate of the CSR palpated by two examiners is not consistent. The results of the regression analysis of one examiner offered no validation to those of the other. It appears that a subject's CSR is not related to the heart or respiratory rates of the

  4. The effects of social defeat and other stressors on the expression of circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Meerlo, P; Sgoifo, A; Turek, F W

    2002-02-01

    Most biological functions display a 24 h rhythm that, in mammals, is under the control of an endogenous circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The circadian system provides an optimal temporal organization for physiological processes and behavior in relation to a cyclic environment imposed upon organisms by the regular alternation of day and night. In line with its function as a clock that serves to maintain a stable phase-relationship between endogenous rhythms and the light-dark cycle, the circadian oscillator appears to be well protected against unpredictable stressful stimuli. Available data do not provide convincing evidence that stress is capable of perturbing the central circadian oscillator in the SCN. However, the shape and amplitude of a rhythm is not determined exclusively by the SCN and certain stressors can strongly affect the output of the clock and the expression of the rhythms. In particular, social stress in rodents has been found to cause severe disruptions of the body temperature, heart rate and locomotor activity rhythms, especially in animals that are subject to uncontrollable stress associated with defeat and subordination. Such rhythm disturbances may be due to effects of stress on sub-oscillators that are known to exist in many tissues, which are normally under the control of the SCN, or due to other effects of stress that mask the output of the circadian system. These disturbances of peripheral rhythms represent an imbalance between normally precisely orchestrated physiological and behavioral processes that may have severe consequence for the health and well being of the organism.

  5. Daily NO rhythms in peripheral clocks in aging male Wistar rats: protective effects of exogenous melatonin.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Ch; Jagota, Anita

    2016-11-01

    In mammals suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), acts as a light entrainable master clock and by generation of temporal oscillations regulates the peripheral organs acting as autonomous clocks resulting in overt behavioral and physiological rhythms. SCN also controls synthesis and release of melatonin (hormonal message for darkness) from pineal. Nitric Oxide (NO) acts as an important neurotransmitter in generating the phase shifts of circadian rhythms and participates in sleep-wake processes, maintenance of vascular tone as well as signalling and regulating inflammatory processes. Aging is associated with disruption of circadian timing system and decline in endogenous melatonin leading to several physiological disorders. Here we report the effect of aging on NO daily rhythms in various peripheral clocks such as kidney, intestine, liver, heart, lungs and testis. NO levels were measured at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0, 6, 12 and 18 in these tissues using Griess assay in male Wistar rats. Aging resulted in alteration of NO levels as well as phase of NO in both 12 and 24 months groups. Correlation analysis demonstrated loss of stoichiometric interaction between the various peripheral clocks with aging. Age induced alterations in NO daily rhythms were found to be most significant in liver and, interestingly least in lungs. Neurohormone melatonin, an endogenous synchroniser and an antiaging agent decreases with aging. We report further differential restoration with exogenous melatonin administration of age induced alterations in NO daily rhythms and mean levels in kidney, intestine and liver and the stoichiometric interactions between the various peripheral clocks.

  6. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) mortality score

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; dos Santos, Cecília Andrade; Esmeraldo, Isaac Melo; Chaves, Mariana Leal; Lins, Ricardo Felipe de Albuquerque; Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score) fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality. Methods Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed. Results 360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1) - 1.3%, (2) - 11.4%, (3)-27.3%, (4) - 50 %, (P<0.001); Aristotle basic score (1) - 1.1%, (2) - 12.2%, (3) - 34%, (4) - 64.7%, (P<0.001); and STS-EACTS mortality score (1) - 5.5 %, (2) - 13.6%, (3) - 18.7%, (4) - 35.8%, (P<0.001). The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766. Conclusion The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality. PMID:26107445

  7. Heart period and heart period variability during sleep on the MIR space station.

    PubMed

    Gundel, A; Drescher, J; Spatenko, Y A; Polyakov, V V

    1999-03-01

    The long-term acclimation of cardiac rhythms to microgravity was studied in four astronauts aboard the Russian space station MIR during wakefulness and sleep. Sleep polygraphies were obtained between the third and the 30th day in space and, in addition, prior to mission on the ground. From each of the sleep polygraphies, beat-to-beat intervals of cardiac rhythms were determined. The response of heart period and heart period variability to the stimulus microgravity was tested during sleep across sleep stages and during waking. A lengthening of heart period by about 100 ms was found in space compared to measurements on the ground. The slowing of heart rate was more pronounced for non-REM sleep than for REM sleep. A systematic change in heart period in relation to the duration of the stay in space could not be detected. An analysis of heart period variability in the high frequency (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) band supports the hypothesis that the decrease of heart rate under microgravity is produced by an increase in parasympathetic activity. Testing the response of cardiac rhythms to microgravity across distinct behavioural states seems to be a powerful tool to investigate the cardiovascular system.

  8. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  9. Healthy Lifestyle Interventions to Combat Noncommunicable Disease—A Novel Nonhierarchical Connectivity Model for Key Stakeholders: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale.

  10. Healthy lifestyle interventions to combat noncommunicable disease-a novel nonhierarchical connectivity model for key stakeholders: a policy statement from the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Cherie Franklin, Nina; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter; Arena, Ross; Berra, Kathy; Dengel, Donald; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Hivert, Marie-France; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Myers, Jonathan; Whitsel, Laurie; Williams, Mark; Corra, Ugo; Cosentino, Francesco; Dendale, Paul; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Gielen, Stephan; Guazzi, Marco; Halle, Martin; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Piepoli, Massimo F; Pinto, Fausto J; Guthrie, George; Lianov, Liana; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-14

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale.

  11. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, Aİ; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, HO; Nas, O; Yılmaz, YK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). Results: There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Further, a significant correlation was found between biological rhythms and BDI scores (p < 0.001) and there were positive correlations between the VAS score and BRIAN total, sleep, and eating and BDI in patients with FMS (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: There are marked biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS. PMID:26426177

  12. The effect of restraining on the heart rate in guinea pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikiskova, H.

    1980-01-01

    The emotional effect of different applications of electrodes and the fixation for cariographic examination was investigated using guinea pigs. The effect of the stress is discussed in terms of heart rhythm and behavior.

  13. Neurobiology of food anticipatory circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2011-09-26

    Circadian rhythms in mammals can be entrained by daily schedules of light or food availability. A master light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is comprised of a population of cell autonomous, transcriptionally based circadian oscillators with defined retinal inputs, circadian clock genes and neural outputs. By contrast, the neurobiology of food-entrainable circadian rhythmicity remains poorly understood at the systems and cellular levels. Induction of food-anticipatory activity rhythms by daily feeding schedules does not require the SCN, but these rhythms do exhibit defining properties of circadian clock control. Clock gene rhythms expressed in other brain regions and in peripheral organs are preferentially reset by mealtime, but lesions of specific hypothalamic, corticolimbic and brainstem structures do not eliminate all food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting control by a distributed, decentralized system of oscillators, or the existence of a critical oscillator at an unknown location. The melanocortin system and dorsomedial hypothalamus may play modulatory roles setting the level of anticipatory activity. The metabolic hormones ghrelin and leptin are not required to induce behavioral food anticipatory rhythms, but may also participate in gain setting. Clock gene mutations that disrupt light-entrainable rhythms generally do not eliminate food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting a novel timing mechanism. Recent evidence for non-transcriptional and network based circadian rhythmicity provides precedence, but any such mechanisms are likely to interact closely with known circadian clock genes, and some important double and triple clock gene knockouts remain to be phenotyped for food entrainment. Given the dominant role of food as an entraining stimulus for metabolic rhythms, the timing of daily food intake and the fidelity of food entrainment mechanisms are likely to have clinical relevance.

  14. Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by multiple bouts of sleep within a 24-hour period. Patients present with symptoms of insomnia, including difficulty either falling or staying asleep, and daytime excessive sleepiness. The disorder is seen in a variety of individuals, ranging from children with neurodevelopmental disorders, to patients with psychiatric disorders, and most commonly in older adults with neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment of irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder requires a multimodal approach aimed at strengthening circadian synchronizing agents, such as daytime exposure to bright light, and structured social and physical activities. In addition, melatonin may be useful in some patients.

  15. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system. PMID:25526564

  16. Protecting the melatonin rhythm through circadian healthy light exposure.

    PubMed

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-12-17

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.

  17. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  18. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  19. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-06-15

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research.

  20. Circadian rhythm dysregulation in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Westrich, Ligia; Sprouse, Jeffrey

    2010-07-01

    When circadian rhythms - the daily oscillations of various physiological and behavioral events that are controlled by a central timekeeping mechanism - become desynchronized with the prevailing light:dark cycle, a maladaptative response can result. Animal data based primarily on genetic manipulations and clinical data from biomarker and gene expression studies support the notion that circadian abnormalities underlie certain psychiatric disorders. In particular, bipolar disorder has an interesting link to rhythm-related disease biology; other mood disturbances, such as major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder and the agitation and aggression accompanying severe dementia (sundowning), are also linked to changes in circadian rhythm function. Possibilities for pharmacological intervention derive most readily from the molecular oscillator, the cellular machinery that drives daily rhythms.

  1. Circadian rhythms and treatment implications in depression.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Martiadis, Vassilis; Maj, Mario

    2011-08-15

    In humans almost all physiological and behavioural functions occur on a rhythmic basis. Therefore the possibility that delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythms may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders is an interesting field of research. In particular mood disorders such as seasonal affective disorder and major depression have been linked to circadian rhythms alterations. Furthermore, the antidepressant efficacy of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies affecting endogenous circadian rhythms, such as new antidepressant medications, light-therapy and sleep deprivation, is consistent with the idea that circadian alterations may represent a core component of depression, at least in a subgroup of depressed patients. This paper briefly describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating the endogenous clock system, and reviews the literature supporting the relationships between depression, antidepressant treatments and changes in circadian rhythms.

  2. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  3. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  4. Management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate: Statement of the Second Consensus Conference endorsed by the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Casiglia, Edoardo; Chalmers, John; Ferrari, Roberto; Grassi, Guido; Inoue, Teruo; Jelakovic, Bojan; Jensen, Magnus T; Julius, Stevo; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Pauletto, Paolo; Stella, Andrea; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    In June 2015, a panel of experts gathered in a consensus conference to plan updating recommendations on the management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate (HR), previously released in 2006. The issues examined during that meeting and further discussed by the participants during the following months involved the assessment of HR, the relevance of HR as a cardiovascular risk factor, the definition of tachycardia and the treatment of the hypertensive patient with high HR. For the measurement of resting HR the panel experts recommended that scientific investigations focusing on HR should report information on length of resting period before measurement, information about temperature and environment, method of measurement, duration of measurement, number of readings, time interval between measurements, body position and type of observer. According to the panellists there is convincing evidence that HR is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and they suggest to routinely include HR measurement in the assessment of the hypertensive patient. Regarding the definition of tachycardia, the panellists acknowledged that in the absence of convincing data any threshold used to define tachycardia is arbitrary. Similarly, as there are no outcome studies of HR lowering in tachycardia hypertension, the panellists could not make practical therapeutic suggestions for the management of such patients. However, the experts remarked that absence of evidence does not mean evidence against the importance of tachycardia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that long-term exposure to a potentially important risk factor may impair the patient's prognosis. The main aims of the present document are to alert researchers and physicians about the importance of measuring HR in hypertensive patients, and to stimulate research to clarify unresolved issues.

  5. Combined effect of educational status and cardiovascular risk factors on the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in European cohorts: Implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Ferrario, Marco M; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Chambless, Lloyd E; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bobak, Martin; Ferrieres, Jean; Giampaoli, Simona; Jørgensen, Torben; Peters, Annette; Salomaa, Veikko; Soderberg, Stefan; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Cesana, Giancarlo

    2017-03-01

    Background The combined effect of social status and risk factors on the absolute risk of cardiovascular disease has been insufficiently investigated, but results provide guidance on who could benefit most through prevention. Methods We followed 77,918 cardiovascular disease-free individuals aged 35-74 years at baseline, from 38 cohorts covering Nordic and Baltic countries, the UK and Central Europe, for a median of 12 years. Using Fine-Gray models in a competing-risks framework we estimated the effect of the interaction of education with smoking, blood pressure and body weight on the cumulative risk of incident acute coronary heart disease and stroke. Results Compared with more educated smokers, the less educated had an added increase in absolute risk of cardiovascular disease of 3.1% (95% confidence interval + 0.1%, +6.2%) in men and of 1.5% (-1.9%, +5.0%) in women, consistent across smoking categories. Conversely, the interaction was negative for overweight: -2.6% (95% CI: -5.6%, +0.3%) and obese: -3.6% (-7.6%, +0.4%) men, suggesting that the more educated would benefit more from the same reduction in body weight. A weaker interaction was observed for body weight in women, and for blood pressure in both genders. Less educated men and women with a cluster of two or more risk factors had an added cardiovascular disease risk of 3.6% (+0.1%, +7.0%) and of 2.6% (-0.5%, +5.6%), respectively, compared with their more educated counterparts. Conclusions Socially disadvantaged subjects have more to gain from lifestyle and blood pressure modification, hopefully reducing both their risk and also social inequality in disease.

  6. Post-Acceleration Chaotic Atrial Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    atrial flutter or two discrete P-wave morphologies with the rate less fibrillation. than 100 bpm). and sinus bradycardia. An occasional The time...mulhilocal paroxysmal atrial tach.- cardia with cclic Wcnckchach phenomenon under observation examinations. The chaotic atrial rhythm in this case ji r 13...CHAOTIC ATRIAL RHYTHM Final Report 1 July 81 - 30 July 81 6. PERFORMING OIG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERS) r James E

  7. Neurophysiological Analysis of Circadian Rhythm Entrainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-24

    the newly discovered 5 - HT7 receptor have yet to be performed. These results demonstrate that serotonin acting through a 5 -HTIA-like receptor can...ANNUAL 1 Jan 93 TO 31 Dec 93 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM F49620-93-1-0089 ENTRAINMENT j...sensitivity of SCN cells to serotonin ( 5 -HT) and the effects of serotonin on rhythm entrainment. The evidence to date has suggested, however, that

  8. Biological Rhythms During Residence in Polar Regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within

  9. Leucomyosuppressin modulates cardiac rhythm in the cockroach Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Maestro, José L; Tobe, Stephen S; Belles, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Several lines of evidence point to leucomyosuppressin (LMS) and myosuppressin-related peptides as inhibitory modulators of heartbeat frequency in arthropods. Previous studies in Blattella germanica demonstrated that heartbeat frequency decreases after ootheca formation, and remains low during the period of ootheca transport. Subsequent work in this cockroach resulted in the characterization of LMS and the cloning and sequencing of its precursor. The present paper describes the activity of LMS on modulation of heartbeat in B. germanica. Assays using semi-isolated heart preparations revealed that LMS reduces heartbeat frequency in a dose dependent manner, at physiological concentrations. Additional experiments showed that LMS inhibits heartbeat rates in vivo. Finally, injection of dsRNA for LMS elicited a decrease in LMS mRNA to virtually undetectable levels and heartbeat frequency increased significantly in females carrying oothecae. These data suggest that LMS contributes to the modulation of cardiac rhythm in B. germanica during the reproductive cycle.

  10. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were obtained for speech samples from 55 speakers across 5 groups (hypokinetic, hyperkinetic, flaccid-spastic, ataxic dysarthrias, and controls). Segment durations were used to calculate standard and new rhythm metrics. Discriminant function analyses (DFAs) were used to determine which sets of predictor variables (rhythm metrics) best discriminated between groups (control vs. dysarthrias; and among the 4 dysarthrias). A cross-validation method was used to test the robustness of each original DFA. Results The majority of classification functions were more than 80% successful in classifying speakers into their appropriate group. New metrics that combined successive vocalic and consonantal segments emerged as important predictor variables. DFAs pitting each dysarthria group against the combined others resulted in unique constellations of predictor variables that yielded high levels of classification accuracy. Conclusions: This study confirms the ability of rhythm metrics to distinguish control speech from dysarthrias and to discriminate dysarthria subtypes. Rhythm metrics show promise for use as a rational and objective clinical tool. PMID:19717656

  11. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  12. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur. Try deep relaxation or breathing exercises. Practice yoga, meditation, or tai chi. Get regular exercise. Do ... M. Editorial team. Images Heart chambers Heart beat Yoga Arrhythmia Read more Atrial Fibrillation Read more Heart ...

  13. [Biological, behavioral and intellectual rhythms in pupils during the school-day].

    PubMed

    Montagner, H; Testu, F

    1996-06-01

    We report in this paper the data separately collected for 15 years by the research teams of Montagner and Testu on the daily fluctuations of the periodical type and ultradian and circadian rhythms of biological, behavioural and mental variables which are or could be linked to or correlated with the fluctuations of intellectual activity in pupils throughout the school-day. The variables under study are the behaviours which are considered to be indicators of vigilance and non vigilance (arousal and drowsiness), corporal activation, heart rate, blood pressure, performances in tests of vigilance, targeted attention, spatial structuration and logical construction, and also in usual school tasks. Studies were carried out on different children populations at all ages (in this article we only report data on children attending primary school and partly kindergarten) in different French schools and, with regard to Testu's studies, several european schools in England, Germany and Spain. The main data collected by both teams are comparable in many respects: 1) the vigilance level and intellectual performances of pupils of all ages are weak or relatively weak at the beginning of the school activities, i.e. from 8 to 9 or 9:30 according to the studies and measured variables, as the biological constraints are not at a high level (heart rate and blood pressure); 2) the same items or patterns significantly increase throughout school time up to 11:30 or noon according to the studies with the exception of the 11:00-11:30 span in Montagner's research in children attending the first level of primary school, as the biological constraints decrease; 3) in most studies the vigilance level and intellectual performances are weak or relatively weak at the beginning of the school-time following the lunch, and the biological constraints are the strongest of the day (from 13:30 to 15:00) ; 4) the vigilance level and intellectual performances are always higher in the middle of the school-day (i

  14. Structural and functional assessment of the brain in European Americans with mild-to-moderate kidney disease: Diabetes Heart Study-MIND

    PubMed Central

    Murea, Mariana; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Cox, Amanda J.; Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Xu, Jianzhao; Adams, Jeremy N.; Raffield, Laura M.; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Maldjian, Joseph A.; Bowden, Donald W.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with altered cerebral structure and function. Relationships between mild-to-moderate CKD and brain morphology and cognitive performance were evaluated in European Americans (EAs). Methods A total of 478 EAs with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) < 300 mg/g, most with type 2 diabetes (T2D), were included. Measures of total intracranial volume (TICV), cerebrospinal fluid volume, total white matter volume (TWMV), total gray matter volume (TGMV), total white matter lesion volume (TWMLV), hippocampal white matter volume (HWMV) and hippocampal gray matter volume (HGMV) were obtained with magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive testing included memory (Rey Auditory Visual Learning Test), global cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination) and executive function (Stroop Task, Semantic Fluency, Digit Symbol Substitution Test). Associations with CKD were assessed using log-transformed eGFR and UACR, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, diabetes duration, cardiovascular disease and education. Results Participants were 55.2% female, 78.2% had T2D; mean ± SD age 67.6 ± 9.0 years, T2D duration 16.4 ± 6.5 years, eGFR 92.0 ± 22.3 mL/min/1.73 m2 and UACR 23.8 ± 39.6 mg/g. In adjusted models, eGFR was negatively associated with TICV only in participants with T2D [parameter estimate (β): −72.2, P = 0.002]. In non-diabetic participants, inverse relationships were observed between eGFR and HGMV (β: −1.0, P = 0.03) and UACR and normalized TWMLV (β: −0.2, P = 0.03). Kidney function and albuminuria did not correlate with cognitive testing. Conclusions In EAs with mild CKD enriched for T2D, brain structure and cognitive performance were generally not impacted. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine when cerebral structural changes and cognitive dysfunction develop with progressive CKD in

  15. Lateral Atrial Tunnel Fontan Operation Predisposes to the Junctional Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Januszewska, Katarzyna; Schuh, Anna; Lehner, Anja; Dalla-Pozza, Robert; Malec, Edward

    2017-02-10

    The goal of the study was to compare the early postoperative course after fenestrated lateral atrial tunnel (LT) and non-fenestrated extracardiac conduit (EC) Fontan operation (FO) in a single center where both techniques were parallelly used. Between 2004 and 2012, 56(32.7%) children underwent LT and 113(66.1%) EC FO. The mean age was 3.7 ± 2.9 years and mean weight was 14.6 ± 7.3 kg. The most common malformation was hypoplastic left heart syndrome (50.9%). The general approach was to perform LT in children after hemi-Fontan operation and EC in patients after Glenn anastomosis. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed. The hospital survival was 100%. In EC group, cardiopulmonary bypass time (CPB) was shorter (p = 0.004) and less patients needed aortic cross-clamping (p < 0.001). Children after EC stayed longer in the hospital (p = 0.016) and manifested more often prolonged effusions (p = 0.038). The incidence of all forms of junctional rhythm was higher in the LT group, early postoperatively (p < 0.001), during hospitalization (p = 0.004) and at discharge (p < 0.001). Children after LT required more often temporary pacemaker stimulation (p < 0.001). Patients without postoperative normofrequent sinus rhythm had longer CPB time (p = 0.008) and were more often operated on with aortic cross-clamping (p = 0.028). Lateral atrial tunnel Fontan operation with fenestration facilitates early adaptation to the total passive pulmonary flow, but predisposes the patients to the loss of sinus rhythm. The crucial role in the preservation of sinus rhythm plays the last step of the multistage surgery of the single ventricle malformations, probably not only the surgical technique but also factors associated with the cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. New procedure for treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Safaie, Naser; Maghamipour, Nasrollah; Jodati, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Dashtaki, Leila; Hakimzadeh, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease suffer from atrial fibrillation for more than 12 months after valve surgery and have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm. We performed an intra-operative procedure similar to surgical maze ІІІ procedure for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We did this study to evaluate the efficacy of this procedure to restore the sinus rhythm in patients with valvular heart disease. 28 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant reduction of left and right atrial size and resection of both atrial auricles in Shahid Madani cardiothoracic center from September 2004 to October 2008. The procedure for atrial fibrillation treatment was performed with cardiopulmonary bypass and after mitral valve replacement. There was one in-hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure, but no other complication till 6 months after the operation. Out of 28 patients, 23 were in sinus rhythm one week after the operation, one patient had junctional rhythm after the operation that restored to sinus rhythm and 4 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. During the 12-month follow up, atrial fibrillation was corrected in 82.14%. Doppler echocardiography in these patients with sinus rhythm demonstrated good atrial contractility. This procedure on both atria is effective and less invasive than the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be performed in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  17. [Therapy of terminal heart failure using heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Hummel, M; Warnecke, H; Schüler, S; Hempel, B; Spiegelsberger, S; Hetzer, R

    1991-08-16

    Heart transplantation (HTx) has now become an accepted treatment modality for end-stage heart disease. The limited supply of suitable donor organs imposes constraints upon the decision of who should be selected for transplantation. Usually patients are candidates for HTx, who remain NYHA functional class III or IV despite maximal medical therapy. Further criteria are low left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 20%) with heart rhythm disturbances class IIIA-V (LOWN), which are associated with poor prognosis. Additionally, the suffering of the patient and also the course of heart failure are essential for judging the urgency of HTx. Contraindications are absolute in patients with untreated infections, fixed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) above 8 WOOD-degrees, severe irreversible kidney and liver disease, active ventricular or duodenal ulcers and acute, psychiatric illness. HTx is relatively contraindicated in patients with diabetes mellitus, age over 60 years, PVR above 6 WOOD-degrees and an unstable psychosocial situation. To prevent rejection of the transplant heart, live-long immunosuppressive therapy is needed. Most immunosuppressive regimes consist of Cyclosporine A and Azathioprine (double drug therapy) or in combination (tripple drug therapy) with Prednisolone. For monitoring of this therapy, control of hole blood cyclosporine A level and white blood count is needed. Rejection episodes can be suspected if there is a greater than 20 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure, elevated body temperature, malaise, tachycardia or heart rhythm disturbance. The diagnosis of cardiac rejection can be established by endomyocardial biopsy. Measurement of the voltage of either the surface or intramyocardial ECG, echocardiography with special consideration to early left ventricular filling time as well as immunological methods are additionally used tools. Graft sclerosis as the main risk factor of the late transplant period remains an unsolved problem.

  18. Disruption of gene expression rhythms in mice lacking secretory vesicle proteins IA-2 and IA-2β.

    PubMed

    Punia, Sohan; Rumery, Kyle K; Yu, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Christopher M; Notkins, Abner L; Weaver, David R

    2012-09-15

    Insulinoma-associated protein (IA)-2 and IA-2β are transmembrane proteins involved in neurotransmitter secretion. Mice with targeted disruption of both IA-2 and IA-2β (double-knockout, or DKO mice) have numerous endocrine and physiological disruptions, including disruption of circadian and diurnal rhythms. In the present study, we have assessed the impact of disruption of IA-2 and IA-2β on molecular rhythms in the brain and peripheral oscillators. We used in situ hybridization to assess molecular rhythms in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of wild-type (WT) and DKO mice. The results indicate significant disruption of molecular rhythmicity in the SCN, which serves as the central pacemaker regulating circadian behavior. We also used quantitative PCR to assess gene expression rhythms in peripheral tissues of DKO, single-knockout, and WT mice. The results indicate significant attenuation of gene expression rhythms in several peripheral tissues of DKO mice but not in either single knockout. To distinguish whether this reduction in rhythmicity reflects defective oscillatory function in peripheral tissues or lack of entrainment of peripheral tissues, animals were injected with dexamethasone daily for 15 days, and then molecular rhythms were assessed throughout the day after discontinuation of injections. Dexamethasone injections improved gene expression rhythms in liver and heart of DKO mice. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that peripheral tissues of DKO mice have a functioning circadian clockwork, but rhythmicity is greatly reduced in the absence of robust, rhythmic physiological signals originating from the SCN. Thus, IA-2 and IA-2β play an important role in the regulation of circadian rhythms, likely through their participation in neurochemical communication among SCN neurons.

  19. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Richard; Bauer, Fabrice; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Damy, Thibaud; Donal, Erwan; Galinier, Michel; Hagège, Albert; Jourdain, Patrick; Leclercq, Christophe; Sabatier, Rémi; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Thromboembolism contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the main factors promoting this complication. As they share many risk factors, HF and AF frequently coexist, and patients with both conditions are at a particularly high risk of thromboembolism. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are direct antagonists of thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), and were designed to overcome the limitations of vitamin K antagonists. Compared with warfarin in non-valvular AF, NOACs demonstrated non-inferiority with better safety, most particularly for intracranial haemorrhages. Therefore, the European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend NOACs for most patients with non-valvular AF. Subgroups of patients with both AF and HF from the pivotal studies investigating the safety and efficacy of NOACs have been analysed and, for each NOAC, results were similar to those of the total analysis population. A recent meta-analysis of these subgroups has confirmed the better efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients with AF and HF - particularly the 41% decrease in the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages. The prothrombotic state associated with HF suggests that patients with HF in sinus rhythm could also benefit from treatment with NOACs. However, in the absence of clinical trial data supporting this indication, current guidelines do not recommend anticoagulant treatment of patients with HF in sinus rhythm. In conclusion, recent analyses of pivotal studies support the use of NOACs in accordance with their indications in HF patients with non-valvular AF.

  20. Daily Socs1 rhythms alter with aging differentially in peripheral clocks in male Wistar rats: therapeutic effects of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Ch; Jagota, Anita

    2017-03-22

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in synchronization with the peripheral clocks regulates the temporal oscillations leading to overt rhythms. Aging leads to attenuation of such circadian regulation, accompanied by increased inflammatory mediators prevalently the cytokines. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins such as SOCS 1, 3 and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS) negatively regulate the cytokine signaling pathway. The role of SOCS1 in aging and circadian system is obscure. We therefore studied the daily rhythms of rSocs1 mRNA expression at Zeitgeber time (ZT) -0, 6, 12 and 18 in peripheral clocks such as liver, kidney, intestine and heart of 3, 12 and 24 months (m) old male Wistar rats. Interestingly the peripheral clocks studied displayed a rhythmic rSocs1 gene expression in 3 months. In 12 months group, 12 h phase advance in liver and 12 h phase delay in kidney and heart was observed with abolition of rhythms in intestine. Aging (24 months group) resulted in a phase advance by 6 h in liver and heart with abolition of rhythms in intestine in 24 months group. Kidney was also significantly affected upon aging with significant decrease in the rSocs1 levels and abolition of rhythms. The decrease in melatonin levels with aging is associated with decreased immunity and increased oxidative stress. The exogenous administration of melatonin has been linked to play a role in re-synchronization of circadian rhythms, reducing oxidative stress and enhancing immune properties. We therefore had studied the effect of exogenous melatonin upon age induced changes in daily rSocs1 gene expression patterns. Melatonin treatment partially restored the rhythms and daily pulse (ratio of maximum:minimum levels) in liver and intestine in 12 months group. Melatonin administration resulted in a significant increase in mean 24 h rSocs1 expression in intestine and heart of 24 months group compared to that of 3 months. The melatonin administration

  1. Convergent Rhythm Generation from Divergent Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason C.; Blitz, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    Different modulatory inputs commonly elicit distinct rhythmic motor patterns from a central pattern generator (CPG), but they can instead elicit the same pattern. We are determining the rhythm-generating mechanisms in this latter situation, using the gastric mill (chewing) CPG in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric ganglion, where stimulating the projection neuron MCN1 (modulatory commissural neuron 1) or bath applying CabPK (C. borealis pyrokinin) peptide elicits the same gastric mill motor pattern, despite configuring different gastric mill circuits. In both cases, the core rhythm generator includes the same reciprocally inhibitory neurons LG (lateral gastric) and Int1 (interneuron 1), but the pyloric (food-filtering) circuit pacemaker neuron AB (anterior burster) is additionally necessary only for CabPK rhythm generation. MCN1 drives this rhythm generator by activating in the LG neuron the modulator-activated inward current (IMI), which waxes and wanes periodically due to phasic feedback inhibition of MCN1 transmitter release. Each buildup of IMI enables the LG neuron to generate a self-terminating burst and thereby alternate with Int1 activity. Here we establish that CabPK drives gastric mill rhythm generation by activating in the LG neuron IMI plus a slowly activating transient, low-threshold inward current (ITrans-LTS) that is voltage, time, and Ca2+ dependent. Unlike MCN1, CabPK maintains a steady IMI activation, causing a subthreshold depolarization in LG that facilitates a periodic postinhibitory rebound burst caused by the regular buildup and decay of the availability of ITrans-LTS. Thus, different modulatory inputs can use different rhythm-generating mechanisms to drive the same neuronal rhythm. Additionally, the same ionic current (IMI) can play different roles under these different conditions, while different currents (IMI, ITrans-LTS) can play the same role. PMID:24227716

  2. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

    PubMed

    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  3. The role of race and ethnicity in sleep, circadian rhythms and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kieren J; Knutson, Kristen L; Pereira, Alexandre C; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2016-06-03

    In recent years, strong evidence has emerged suggesting that insufficient duration, quality, and/or timing of sleep are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), and various mechanisms for this association have been proposed. Such associations may be related to endophenotypic features of the sleep homeostat and the circadian oscillator, or may be state-like effects of the environment. Here, we review recent literature on sleep, circadian rhythms and CVD with a specific emphasis on differences between racial/ethnic groups. We discuss the reported differences, mainly between individuals of European and African descent, in parameters related to sleep (architecture, duration, quality) and circadian rhythms (period length and phase shifting). We further review racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, and develop the hypothesis that racial/ethnic health disparities may, to a greater or smaller degree, relate to differences in parameters related to sleep and circadian rhythms. When humans left Africa some 100,000 years ago, some genetic differences between different races/ethnicities were acquired. These genetic differences have been proposed as a possible predictor of CVD disparities, but concomitant differences in culture and lifestyle between different groups may equally explain CVD disparities. We discuss the evidence for genetic and environmental causes of these differences in sleep and circadian rhythms, and their usefulness as health intervention targets.

  4. Biological clocks and rhythms in intertidal crustaceans.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Hsu, Yun-Wei A

    2010-06-01

    Animals with habitats within the intertidal zone are exposed to environmental cycles that include the ebb and flow of tidal waters, changes in tidal levels associated with the lunar month, the light-dark cycle and the alternation of seasons. This intricate temporal environment results in the selection of biological timing systems with endogenous clocks that can oscillate with this wide range of periodicities. Whereas great progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular and neural bases of circadian rhythms, that is, endogenous rhythms synchronized to the solar day, there is little understanding on how circatidal rhythms, namely endogenous rhythms synchronized to tides, are generated. Intertidal crustaceans have been a pivotal group for the demonstration of the endogenous nature of circatidal rhythms and their mechanisms of entrainment. We review here some of the classic work using intertidal crustaceans to unmask basic properties of circatidal systems, as well as work from our laboratory that aims to identify putative chemical signals that could be involved in the circatidal systems of decapod crustaceans.

  5. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G. B.; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals’ social networks. Further, women’s calls were longer than men’s calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  6. Unmasking ultradian rhythms in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Daan R.; Gerkema, Menno P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological oscillations with an ultradian time scale of 1 to several hours include cycles in behavioral arousal, episodic glucocorticoid release, and gene expression. Ultradian rhythms are thought to have an extrinsic origin because of a perceived absence of ultradian rhythmicity in vitro and a lack of known molecular ultradian oscillators. We designed a novel, non–spectral-analysis method of separating ultradian from circadian components and applied it to a published gene expression dataset with an ultradian sampling resolution. Ultradian rhythms in mouse hepatocytes in vivo have been published, and we validated our approach using this control by confirming 175 of 323 ultradian genes identified in a prior study and found 862 additional ultradian genes. For the first time, we now report ultradian expression of >900 genes in vitro. Sixty genes exhibited ultradian transcriptional rhythmicity, both in vivo and in vitro, including 5 genes involved in the cell cycle. Within these 60 genes, we identified significant enrichment of specific DNA motifs in the 1000 bp proximal promotor, some of which associate with known transcriptional factors. These findings are in strong support of instrinsically driven ultradian rhythms and expose potential molecular mechanisms and functions underlying ultradian rhythms that remain unknown.—Van der Veen, D. R., Gerkema, M. P. Unmasking ultradian rhythms in gene expression. PMID:27871062

  7. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  8. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  9. Circadian rhythm in QT interval is preserved in mice deficient of potassium channel interacting protein 2.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Lisa A; Lubberding, Anniek; Larsen, Anders Peter; Thomsen, Morten B

    2017-01-01

    Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is suggested to be responsible for the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the hypothesis that there is no circadian rhythm in QT interval in the absence of KChIP2. Implanted telemetric devices recorded electrocardiogram continuously for 5 days in conscious wild-type mice (WT, n = 9) and KChIP2(-/-) mice (n = 9) in light:dark periods and in complete darkness. QT intervals were determined from all RR intervals and corrected for heart rate (QT100 = QT/(RR/100)(1/2)). Moreover, QT intervals were determined from complexes within the RR range of mean-RR ± 1% in the individual mouse (QTmean-RR). We find that RR intervals are 125 ± 5 ms in WT and 123 ± 4 ms in KChIP2(-/-) (p = 0.81), and QT intervals are 52 ± 1 and 52 ± 1 ms, respectively(p = 0.89). No ventricular arrhythmias or sudden cardiac deaths were observed. We find similar diurnal (light:dark) and circadian (darkness) rhythms of RR intervals in WT and KChIP2(-/-) mice. Circadian rhythms in QT100 intervals are present in both groups, but at physiological small amplitudes: 1.6 ± 0.2 and 1.0 ± 0.3 ms in WT and KChIP2(-/-), respectively (p = 0.15). A diurnal rhythm in QT100 intervals was only found in WT mice. QTmean-RR intervals display clear diurnal and circadian rhythms in both WT and KChIP2(-/-). The amplitude of the circadian rhythm in QTmean-RR is 4.0 ± 0.3 and 3.1 ± 0.5 ms in WT and KChIP2(-/-), respectively (p = 0.16). In conclusion, KChIP2 expression does not appear to underlie the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration.

  10. Circadian rhythm disruption was observed in hand, foot, and mouth disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Zhou; Xiao, Guoguang; Cheng, Suting; Wen, Yang; Wan, Chaomin

    2015-03-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with central nerve system complications may rapidly progress to fulminated cardiorespiratory failure, with higher mortality and worse prognosis. It has been reported that circadian rhythms of heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate are useful in predicting prognosis of severe cardiovascular and neurological diseases. The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of the circadian rhythms of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature in HFMD patients with neurological complications. Hospitalized HFMD patients including 33 common cases (common group), 61 severe cases (severe group), and 9 critical cases (critical group) were contrasted retrospectively. Their HR, respiratory rate, and temperatures were measured every 4 hours during the first 48-hour in the hospital. Data were analyzed with the least-squares fit of a 24-hour cosine function by the single cosinor and population-mean cosinor method. Results of population-mean cosinor analysis demonstrated that the circadian rhythm of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature was present in the common and severe group, but absent in the critical group. The midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) (P = 0.016) and acrophase (P < 0.01) of temperature and respiratory rate were significantly different among 3 groups. But no statistical difference of amplitude in temperature and respiratory rate was observed among the 3 groups (P = 0.14). MESOR value of HR (P < 0.001) was significantly different in 3 groups. However, amplitude and acrophase revealed no statistical difference in circadian characteristics of HR among 3 groups. Compared with the common group, the MESOR of temperature and respiratory rate was significantly higher, and acrophase of temperature and respiratory rate was 2 hours ahead in the severe group, critical HFMD patients lost their population-circadian rhythm of temperature, HR, and respiratory rate. The high values of temperature and respiratory rate for

  11. Adjustment of sleep and the circadian temperature rhythm after flights across nine time zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Myhre, Grete; Graeber, R. Curtis; Lauber, John K.; Andersen, Harald T.

    1989-01-01

    The adjustment of sleep-wake patterns and the circadian temperature rhythm was monitored in nine Royal Norwegian Airforce volunteers operating P-3 aircraft during a westward training deployment across nine time zones. Subjects recorded all sleep and nap times, rated nightly sleep quality, and completed personality inventories. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. Adjustment was slower after the return eastward flight than after the outbound westward flight. The eastward flight produced slower readjustment of sleep timing to local time and greater interindividual variability in the patterns of adjustment of sleep and temperature. One subject apparently exhibited resynchronization by partition, with the temperature rhythm undergoing the reciprocal 15-h delay. In contrast, average heart rates during sleep were significantly elevated only after westward flight. Interindividual differences in adjustment of the temperature rhythm were correlated with some of the personality measures. Larger phase delays in the overall temperature waveform (as measured on the 5th day after westward flight) were exhibited by extraverts, and less consistently by evening types.

  12. Genetic basis of human circadian rhythm disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher R; Huang, Angela L; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-05-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health.

  13. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  14. Apparent motion enhances visual rhythm discrimination in infancy.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Melissa; Saffran, Jenny R

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that infants exhibit robust auditory rhythm discrimination, but research on infants' perception of visual rhythm is limited. In particular, the role of motion in infants' perception of visual rhythm remains unknown, despite the prevalence of motion cues in naturally occurring visual rhythms. In the present study, we examined the role of motion in 7-month-old infants' discrimination of visual rhythms by comparing experimental conditions with apparent motion in the stimuli versus stationary rhythmic stimuli. Infants succeeded at discriminating visual rhythms only when the visual rhythm occurred with an apparent motion component. These results support the view that motion plays a role in infants' perception of visual temporal information, consistent with the manner in which natural rhythms appear in the visual world.

  15. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: I. Mora Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Lalita; Otake, Takashi; Cutler, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Listeners rely on native-language rhythm in segmenting speech; in different languages, stress-, syllable- or mora-based rhythm is exploited. The rhythmic similarity hypothesis holds that where two languages have similar rhythm, listeners of each language should segment their own and the other language similarly. Such similarity in listening was…

  16. Toward an Effective Pedagogy for Teaching Rhythm: Gordon and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Rhythm is arguably the most important component of music. In all musics of all cultures, past and present, rhythm is central to musical experience and understanding. Given the enormous diversity of rhythm, perhaps it is no surprise that there is a wide range of opinion about how to teach it. It seems that every approach to music education…

  17. A rhythm landscape approach to the developmental dynamics of birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Tchernichovski, Ofer; Takahasi, Miki; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Unlike simple biological rhythms, the rhythm of the oscine bird song is a learned time series of diverse sounds that change dynamically during vocal ontogeny. How to quantify rhythm development is one of the most important challenges in behavioural biology. Here, we propose a simple method, called ‘rhythm landscape’, to visualize and quantify how rhythm structure, which is measured as durational patterns of sounds and silences, emerges and changes over development. Applying this method to the development of Bengalese finch songs, we show that the rhythm structure begins with a broadband rhythm that develops into diverse rhythms largely through branching from precursors. Furthermore, an information-theoretic measure, the Jensen–Shannon divergence, was used to characterize the crystallization process of birdsong rhythm, which started with a high rate of rhythm change and progressed to a stage of slow refinement. This simple method provides a useful description of rhythm development, thereby helping to reveal key temporal constraints on complex biological rhythms. PMID:26538559

  18. The Features and Training of English Stress and Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Cui-yun

    2008-01-01

    In second language learning, to possess a perfect pronunciation, the importance of stress and rhythm should not be ignored. This articles explores the nature of sentence and word stress as well as rhythm, thus putting forward some feasible ways of training and acquiring a good English stress and rhythm in EFLT (English as Foreign Language…

  19. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  20. Does Melody Assist in the Reproduction of Novel Rhythm Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Daryl W.; Forsythe, Jere L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined music education majors' ability to reproduce rhythmic stimuli presented in melody and rhythm only conditions. Participants reproduced rhythms of two-measure music examples by immediately echo-performing through a method of their choosing (e.g., clapping, tapping, vocalizing). Forty examples were presented in melody and rhythm only…

  1. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  2. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  3. Modeling heart rate variability by stochastic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the question of how the cardiac rhythm spontaneously self-regulates and propose a new mechanism as a possible answer. We model the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate as a stochastic feedback system and find that the model successfully accounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the 1/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations of the interbeat intervals, and the correlations in the Fourier phases which indicate nonlinear dynamics.

  4. The Rhythm of Perception: Entrainment to Acoustic Rhythms Induces Subsequent Perceptual Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Gregory; Farahbod, Haleh; Saberi, Kourosh

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic rhythms are pervasive in speech, music, and environmental sounds. Recent evidence for neural codes representing periodic information suggests that they may be a neural basis for the ability to detect rhythm. Further, rhythmic information has been found to modulate auditory-system excitability, which provides a potential mechanism for parsing the acoustic stream. Here, we explored the effects of a rhythmic stimulus on subsequent auditory perception. We found that a low-frequency (3 Hz), amplitude-modulated signal induces a subsequent oscillation of the perceptual detectability of a brief nonperiodic acoustic stimulus (1-kHz tone); the frequency but not the phase of the perceptual oscillation matches the entrained stimulus-driven rhythmic oscillation. This provides evidence that rhythmic contexts have a direct influence on subsequent auditory perception of discrete acoustic events. Rhythm coding is likely a fundamental feature of auditory-system design that predates the development of explicit human enjoyment of rhythm in music or poetry.

  5. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  6. Running for time: circadian rhythms and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markova-Car, Elitza P; Jurišić, Davor; Ilić, Nataša; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Circadian timing system includes an input pathway transmitting environmental signals to a core oscillator that generates circadian signals responsible for the peripheral physiological or behavioural events. Circadian 24-h rhythms regulate diverse physiologic processes. Deregulation of these rhythms is associated with a number of pathogenic conditions including depression, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Melanoma is a less common type of skin cancer yet more aggressive often with a lethal ending. However, little is known about circadian control in melanoma and exact functional associations between core clock genes and development of melanoma skin cancer. This paper, therefore, comprehensively analyses current literature data on the involvement of circadian clock components in melanoma development. In particular, the role of circadian rhythm deregulation is discussed in the context of DNA repair mechanisms and influence of UV radiation and artificial light exposure on cancer development. The role of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme and impact of melatonin, as a major output factor of circadian rhythm, and its protective role in melanoma are discussed in details. We hypothesise that further understanding of clock genes' involvement and circadian regulation might foster discoveries in the field of melanoma diagnostics and treatment.

  7. Case study of psychophysiological diary: infradian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Slover, G P; Morris, R W; Stroebel, C F; Patel, M K

    1987-01-01

    A 4-year case study was made of a 42-year-old white woman as seen through the psychophysiological diary. There was an awakening diary and a bedtime diary composed of 125 variables. The data are divided into two series: series I containing a manic episode, and series II as a control. Spectral analysis shows infradian rhythms in hypoglycemia and fear (11 days) and time to fall asleep (5 days). Depressed feelings showed a circatrigintan (28-day) rhythm, which was not correlated with menses. Mania had an annual rhythm (spring) but no circatrigintan or less rhythm. The following correlations have a P value less than or equal to 0.01: mania was directly correlated with number of sleeping pills, time to really wake up, need for rest, moodiness, and helplessness, and indirectly with expectations, pressure at work, sense of time, and emotional state. Interestingly, awakening pulse is directly correlated with awakening temperature, number of sleeping pills, bedtime pulse, tiredness at bedtime, hypoglycemia, and fear. Bedtime pulse is directly correlated with awakening pulse and awakening temperature. Both pulse and temperature at bedtime are directly correlated with negative variables such as tiredness, moodiness, helplessness, and depression, and inversely correlated with positive variables such as happiness, loving, performance at work, and thinking efficiency. This study demonstrates a significant correlation between physiological variables.

  8. Circadian Rhythms in Adipose Tissue Physiology.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Jana-Thabea; Tsang, Anthony H; Heyde, Isabel; Leinweber, Brinja; Kolbe, Isa; Leliavski, Alexei; Oster, Henrik

    2017-03-16

    The different types of adipose tissues fulfill a wide range of biological functions-from energy storage to hormone secretion and thermogenesis-many of which show pronounced variations over the course of the day. Such 24-h rhythms in physiology and behavior are coordinated by endogenous circadian clocks found in all tissues and cells, including adipocytes. At the molecular level, these clocks are based on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of a set of clock genes/proteins. Tissue-specific clock-controlled transcriptional programs translate time-of-day information into physiologically relevant signals. In adipose tissues, clock gene control has been documented for adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, lipid metabolism as well as endocrine function and other adipose oscillations are under control of systemic signals tied to endocrine, neuronal, or behavioral rhythms. Circadian rhythm disruption, for example, by night shift work or through genetic alterations, is associated with changes in adipocyte metabolism and hormone secretion. At the same time, adipose metabolic state feeds back to central and peripheral clocks, adjusting behavioral and physiological rhythms. In this overview article, we summarize our current knowledge about the crosstalk between circadian clocks and energy metabolism with a focus on adipose physiology. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:383-427, 2017.

  9. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  10. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  11. Circadian temperature rhythms of older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of studies had the aim of exploring whether older (77+ years) men and women have circadian body temperature rhythms different from those of younger adults. A total of 20 older men and 28 older women were compared with either 22 young men or 14 middle-aged men in four protocols; all but the first protocol using a subset of the sample. The four protocols were: 1) 24 h, and 2) 72 h data collections on a normal laboratory routine (sleeping at night); 3) between 36 h and 153 h of field data collection at home; and 4) 36 h of a constant conditions routine (wakeful bedrest under temporal isolation) in the laboratory. There was some evidence for an age-related phase advance in temperature rhythm, especially for the older men on a normal routine, though this was not present in the constant conditions protocol, where 5 of the older subjects showed major delays in the timing of the body temperature trough (10:00 or later). There was no statistically significant evidence from any of the protocols that older subjects generally had lower temperature rhythm amplitudes than younger adults. Only when older men were compared with younger men in 24-h rhythm amplitude by simple t-test did any comparison involving amplitude achieve statistical significance (p < 0.05).

  12. Characterization of neurospora circadian rhythms in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, James S.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether the circadian rhythm of conidiation in neurospora crassa is endogenously derived or is driven by some geophysical time cue, an experiment was conducted on space shuttle flight STS-9, where inoculated race tubes were exposed to the microgravity environment of space. The results demonstated that the rhythm can persist in space. However, there were several minor alterations noted; an increase in the period of the oscillation and the variability of the growth rate and a diminished rhythm amplitude, which eventually damped out in 25% of the flight tubes. On day seven of the flight, the tubes were exposed to light while their growth fronts were marked. It appears that some aspects of this marking process reinstated a robust rhythm in all the tubes which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. It was hypothesized that the damping found prior to the marking procedure on STS-9 may have been a result of the hypergravity pulse of launch and not due to the microgravity of the orbital lab; furthermore, that the marking procedure, by exposing the samples to light, had reinstated rhythmicity. To test this, an investigation was conducted into the effects of acute and chronic exposure to hypergravity.

  13. Respiratory rhythm generation: triple oscillator hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tatiana M.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is vital for survival but also interesting from the perspective of rhythm generation. This rhythmic behavior is generated within the brainstem and is thought to emerge through the interaction between independent oscillatory neuronal networks. In mammals, breathing is composed of three phases – inspiration, post-inspiration, and active expiration – and this article discusses the concept that each phase is generated by anatomically distinct rhythm-generating networks: the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the post-inspiratory complex (PiCo), and the lateral parafacial nucleus (pF L), respectively. The preBötC was first discovered 25 years ago and was shown to be both necessary and sufficient for the generation of inspiration. More recently, networks have been described that are responsible for post-inspiration and active expiration. Here, we attempt to collate the current knowledge and hypotheses regarding how respiratory rhythms are generated, the role that inhibition plays, and the interactions between the medullary networks. Our considerations may have implications for rhythm generation in general. PMID:28299192

  14. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  15. From Biological Rhythms to Social Rhythms: Physiological Precursors of Mother-Infant Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Links between neonatal biological rhythms and the emergence of interaction rhythms were examined in 3 groups (N=71): high-risk preterms (HR; birth weight less than 1,000 g), low-risk preterms (LR; birth weight=1,700-1,850 g), and full-term (FT) infants. Once a week for premature infants and on the 2nd day for FT infants, sleep-wake cyclicity was…

  16. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 37. Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  17. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  18. The Validity and Reliability of Rhythm Measurements in Automatically Scoring the English Rhythm Proficiency of Chinese EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Lin, Jianghao; Li, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to find out the validity of rhythm measurements to capture the rhythmic features of Chinese English. Besides, the reliability of the valid rhythm measurements applied in automatically scoring the English rhythm proficiency of Chinese EFL learners is also explored. Thus, two experiments were carried out. First, thirty students of…

  19. Temperature rhythm reentrains faster than locomotor rhythm after a light phase shift.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoko; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2006-07-30

    Mammalian endogenous circadian rhythms are entrained to the environmental light-dark (LD) cycle. Although the circadian rhythms of core body temperature (Tb) and spontaneous locomotor activity (LA) are well synchronized under stable LD conditions, it is thought that these two parameters are regulated by distinct mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to examine the adaptability of these two rhythms to an abrupt change in the environmental light phase. Tb and LA were simultaneously recorded in individual mice kept under 12:12-h LD cycle conditions before and after an 8-h photic phase advance. The onset of LA required 8 days to reentrain to the new LD cycle, whereas 6 days were required for reentrainment of the acrophase of Tb. Resting Tb, i.e., the Tb level independent of LA, was extracted from the same data source. The resting Tb level exhibited a robust daily rhythm with a difference of 1.0 degrees C between LD phases. After the photic phase advance, the resting Tb rapidly reached a stable level within 4 days, whereas the uncorrected Tb required 6 days for reentrainment. Based on these findings, we revealed that, independent of LA, the adaptability of the Tb rhythm to a new light cycle is half as rapid as that of LA. These results therefore suggest that the circadian rhythms of Tb and LA are intrinsically regulated by different pacemaker or effector mechanisms.

  20. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    SciTech Connect

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  1. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  2. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds.

  3. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  4. [Research advances in circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Qi; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The time phase of epileptic seizures has attracted more and more attention. Epileptic seizures have their own circadian rhythm. The same type of epilepsy has different seizure frequencies in different time periods and states (such as sleeping/awakening state and natural day/night cycle). The circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures has complex molecular and endocrine mechanisms, and currently there are several hypotheses. Clarification of the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures and prevention and administration according to such circadian rhythm can effectively control seizures and reduce the adverse effects of drugs. The research on the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures provides a new idea for the treatment of epilepsy.

  5. Photic entrainment of the mammalian rhythm in melatonin production.

    PubMed

    Illnerová, H; Sumová, A

    1997-12-01

    This review summarizes studies on the photic entrainment of the circadian rhythm in the rat pineal melatonin production, namely of the rhythm in N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, and compares the NAT rhythm resetting with preliminary results on the resetting of an intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, namely with the entrainment of the rhythm in the light-induced c-fos gene expression. Phase delaying of the NAT rhythm after various light stimuli proceeds within 1 day with almost no transients, whereas during phase advancing of the rhythm only the morning NAT decline is phase advanced within 1 day and the evening rise phase shifts through transients. A light stimulus encompassing the middle of the night may phase delay the evening NAT rise, phase advance the morning decline, compress the rhythm waveform, and eventually lower its amplitude. Similarly, a long photoperiod compresses the NAT rhythm waveform. The magnitude of phase shifts of the NAT rhythm, as well as their direction, depends on a previous photoperiod. Phase shifts of the evening rise in c-fos gene photoinduction in the SCN and of the morning decline are similar to those of the pineal NAT rhythm after all light stimuli studied so far. The data indicate that the resetting of the rhythm in melatonin production in the rat pineal gland reflects changes in the SCN functional state and suggest that the underlying SCN pacemaking system is complex.

  6. Towards Active Tracking of Beating Heart Motion in the Presence of Arrhythmia for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Liu, Taoming; Bebek, Özkan; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    In robotic assisted beating heart surgery, the control architecture for heart motion tracking has stringent requirements in terms of bandwidth of the motion that needs to be tracked. In order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy, feed-forward control algorithms, which rely on estimations of upcoming heart motion, have been proposed in the literature. However, performance of these feed-forward motion control algorithms under heart rhythm variations is an important concern. In their past work, the authors have demonstrated the effectiveness of a receding horizon model predictive control-based algorithm, which used generalized adaptive predictors, under constant and slowly varying heart rate conditions. This paper extends these studies to the case when the heart motion statistics change abruptly and significantly, such as during arrhythmias. A feasibility study is carried out to assess the motion tracking capabilities of the adaptive algorithms in the occurrence of arrhythmia during beating heart surgery. Specifically, the tracking performance of the algorithms is evaluated on prerecorded motion data, which is collected in vivo and includes heart rhythm irregularities. The algorithms are tested using both simulations and bench experiments on a three degree-of-freedom robotic test bed. They are also compared with a position-plus-derivative controller as well as a receding horizon model predictive controller that employs an extended Kalman filter algorithm for predicting future heart motion. PMID:25048462

  7. Circadian Rhythms and Hormonal Homeostasis: Pathophysiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gnocchi, Davide; Bruscalupi, Giovannella

    2017-01-01

    Over recent years, a deeper comprehension of the molecular mechanisms that control biological clocks and circadian rhythms has been achieved. In fact, many studies have contributed to unravelling the importance of the molecular clock for the regulation of our physiology, including hormonal and metabolic homeostasis. Here we will review the structure, organisation and molecular machinery that make our circadian clock work, and its relevance for the proper functioning of physiological processes. We will also describe the interconnections between circadian rhythms and endocrine homeostasis, as well as the underlying consequences that circadian dysregulations might have in the development of several pathologic affections. Finally, we will discuss how a better knowledge of such relationships might prove helpful in designing new therapeutic approaches for endocrine and metabolic diseases. PMID:28165421

  8. Circadian Rhythms and Obesity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Froy, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem and a major risk factor for the development of illnesses, such as insulin resistance and hypertension. Attempts to understand the causes of obesity and develop new therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on caloric intake and energy expenditure. Recent studies have shown that the circadian clock controls energy homeostasis by regulating the circadian expression and/or activity of enzymes, hormones, and transport systems involved in metabolism. Moreover, disruption of circadian rhythms leads to obesity and metabolic disorders. Therefore, it is plausible that resetting of the circadian clock can be used as a new approach to attenuate obesity. Feeding regimens, such as restricted feeding (RF), calorie restriction (CR), and intermittent fasting (IF), provide a time cue and reset the circadian clock and lead to better health. In contrast, high-fat (HF) diet leads to disrupted circadian expression of metabolic factors and obesity. This paper focuses on circadian rhythms and their link to obesity. PMID:24527263

  9. Dissimilar ventricular rhythms: implications for ICD therapy.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Kucher, Andreas; Nägele, Herbert; Buenfil Medina, José Carlos; Brodsky, Michael; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic E; Stroobandt, Roland X

    2013-04-01

    Sensing of left ventricular (LV) activity in some devices used for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was designed primarily to prevent the delivery of an LV stimulus into the LV vulnerable period. Such a sensing function of the LV channel is not universally available in contemporary CRT devices. Recordings of LV electrograms may provide special diagnostic data unavailable solely from the standard right ventricular electrogram and corresponding marker channel. We used the LV sensing function of Biotronik CRT defibrillators to find 3 cases of dissimilar ventricular rhythms or tachyarrhythmias. Such arrhythmias are potentially important because concomitant slower right ventricular activity may prevent or delay implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy for a life-threatening situation involving a faster and more serious LV tachyarrhythmia. Dissimilar ventricular rhythms may not be rare and may account for cases of unexplained sudden death with a normally functioning implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and no recorded terminal arrhythmia.

  10. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues.

  11. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  12. Endocannabinoid signalling: has it got rhythm?

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Linda K; Denning, Gerene; Stuhr, Kara L; de Wit, Harriet; Hill, Matthew N; Hillard, Cecilia J

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous cannabinoid signalling is widespread throughout the body, and considerable evidence supports its modulatory role in many fundamental physiological processes. The daily and seasonal cycles of the relationship of the earth and sun profoundly affect the terrestrial environment. Terrestrial species have adapted to these cycles in many ways, most well studied are circadian rhythms and hibernation. The purpose of this review was to examine literature support for three hypotheses: (i) endocannabinoid signalling exhibits brain region-specific circadian rhythms; (ii) endocannabinoid signalling modulates the rhythm of circadian processes in mammals; and (iii) changes in endocannabinoid signalling contribute to the state of hibernation. The results of two novel studies are presented. First, we report the results of a study of healthy humans demonstrating that plasma concentrations of the endocannabinoid, N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide), exhibit a circadian rhythm. Concentrations of anandamide are threefold higher at wakening than immediately before sleep, a relationship that is dysregulated by sleep deprivation. Second, we investigated differences in endocannabinoids and congeners in plasma from Marmota monax obtained in the summer and during the torpor state of hibernation. We report that 2-arachidonoylglycerol is below detection in M. monax plasma and that concentrations of anandamide are not different. However, plasma concentrations of the anorexigenic lipid oleoylethanolamide were significantly lower in hibernation, while the concentrations of palmitoylethanolamide and 2-oleoylglycerol were significantly greater in hibernation. We conclude that available data support a bidirectional relationship between endocannabinoid signalling and circadian processes, and investigation of the contribution of endocannabinoid signalling to the dramatic physiological changes that occur during hibernation is warranted. This article is part of a themed issue on

  13. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  14. Speech timing and linguistic rhythm: on the acoustic bases of rhythm typologies.

    PubMed

    Rathcke, Tamara V; Smith, Rachel H

    2015-05-01

    Research into linguistic rhythm has been dominated by the idea that languages can be classified according to rhythmic templates, amenable to assessment by acoustic measures of vowel and consonant durations. This study tested predictions of two proposals explaining the bases of rhythmic typologies: the Rhythm Class Hypothesis which assumes that the templates arise from an extensive vs a limited use of durational contrasts, and the Control and Compensation Hypothesis which proposes that the templates are rooted in more vs less flexible speech production strategies. Temporal properties of segments, syllables and rhythmic feet were examined in two accents of British English, a "stress-timed" variety from Leeds, and a "syllable-timed" variety spoken by Panjabi-English bilinguals from Bradford. Rhythm metrics were calculated. A perception study confirmed that the speakers of the two varieties differed in their perceived rhythm. The results revealed that both typologies were informative in that to a certain degree, they predicted temporal patterns of the two varieties. None of the metrics tested was capable of adequately reflecting the temporal complexity found in the durational data. These findings contribute to the critical evaluation of the explanatory adequacy of rhythm metrics. Acoustic bases and limitations of the traditional rhythmic typologies are discussed.

  15. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Badra, L J; Cooke, W H; Hoag, J B; Crossman, A A; Kuusela, T A; Tahvanainen, K U; Eckberg, D L

    2001-06-01

    We studied the influence of three types of breathing [spontaneous, frequency controlled (0.25 Hz), and hyperventilation with 100% oxygen] and apnea on R-R interval, photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic rhythms in nine healthy young adults. We integrated fast Fourier transform power spectra over low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory (0.15-0.3 Hz) frequencies; estimated vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex gain at low frequencies with cross-spectral techniques; and used partial coherence analysis to remove the influence of breathing from the R-R interval, systolic pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve spectra. Coherence among signals varied as functions of both frequency and time. Partialization abolished the coherence among these signals at respiratory but not at low frequencies. The mode of breathing did not influence low-frequency oscillations, and they persisted during apnea. Our study documents the independence of low-frequency rhythms from respiratory activity and suggests that the close correlations that may exist among arterial pressures, R-R intervals, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity at respiratory frequencies result from the influence of respiration on these measures rather than from arterial baroreflex physiology. Most importantly, our results indicate that correlations among autonomic and hemodynamic rhythms vary over time and frequency, and, thus, are facultative rather than fixed.

  16. Brain Networks for Integrative Rhythm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Thaut, Michael H.; Demartin, Martina; Sanes, Jerome N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Performance of externally paced rhythmic movements requires brain and behavioral integration of sensory stimuli with motor commands. The underlying brain mechanisms to elaborate beat-synchronized rhythm and polyrhythms that musicians readily perform may differ. Given known roles in perceiving time and repetitive movements, we hypothesized that basal ganglia and cerebellar structures would have greater activation for polyrhythms than for on-the-beat rhythms. Methodology/Principal Findings Using functional MRI methods, we investigated brain networks for performing rhythmic movements paced by auditory cues. Musically trained participants performed rhythmic movements at 2 and 3 Hz either at a 1∶1 on-the-beat or with a 3∶2 or a 2∶3 stimulus-movement structure. Due to their prior musical experience, participants performed the 3∶2 or 2∶3 rhythmic movements automatically. Both the isorhythmic 1∶1 and the polyrhythmic 3∶2 or 2∶3 movements yielded the expected activation in contralateral primary motor cortex and related motor areas and ipsilateral cerebellum. Direct comparison of functional MRI signals obtained during 3∶2 or 2∶3 and on-the-beat rhythms indicated activation differences bilaterally in the supplementary motor area, ipsilaterally in the supramarginal gyrus and caudate-putamen and contralaterally in the cerebellum. Conclusions/Significance The activated brain areas suggest the existence of an interconnected brain network specific for complex sensory-motor rhythmic integration that might have specificity for elaboration of musical abilities. PMID:18509462

  17. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badra, L. J.; Cooke, W. H.; Hoag, J. B.; Crossman, A. A.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of three types of breathing [spontaneous, frequency controlled (0.25 Hz), and hyperventilation with 100% oxygen] and apnea on R-R interval, photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic rhythms in nine healthy young adults. We integrated fast Fourier transform power spectra over low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory (0.15-0.3 Hz) frequencies; estimated vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex gain at low frequencies with cross-spectral techniques; and used partial coherence analysis to remove the influence of breathing from the R-R interval, systolic pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve spectra. Coherence among signals varied as functions of both frequency and time. Partialization abolished the coherence among these signals at respiratory but not at low frequencies. The mode of breathing did not influence low-frequency oscillations, and they persisted during apnea. Our study documents the independence of low-frequency rhythms from respiratory activity and suggests that the close correlations that may exist among arterial pressures, R-R intervals, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity at respiratory frequencies result from the influence of respiration on these measures rather than from arterial baroreflex physiology. Most importantly, our results indicate that correlations among autonomic and hemodynamic rhythms vary over time and frequency, and, thus, are facultative rather than fixed.

  18. Subjective alertness rhythms in elderly people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in the circadian rhythm of subjective alertness and to explore the circadian mechanisms underlying such changes. Using a visual analogue scale (VAS) instrument, 25 older men and women (71 y and older; 15 female, 10 male) rated their subjective alertness about 7 times per day during 5 baseline days of temporal isolation during which habitual bedtimes and waketimes were enforced. Comparisons were made with 13 middle-aged men (37-52 y) experiencing the same protocol. Advancing age (particularly in the men) resulted in less rhythmic alertness patterns, as indicated by lower amplitudes and less reliability of fitted 24-h sinusoids. This appeared in spite of the absence of any reliable age-related diminution in circadian temperature rhythm amplitude, thus suggesting the effect was not due to SCN weakness per se, but to weakened transduction of SCN output. In a further experiment, involving 36 h of constant wakeful bedrest, differences in the amplitude of the alertness rhythm were observed between 9 older men (79 y+), 7 older women (79 y+), and 17 young controls (9 males, 8 females, 19-28 y) suggesting that with advancing age (particularly in men) there is less rhythmic input into subjective alertness from the endogenous circadian pacemaker. These results may explain some of the nocturnal insomnia and daytime hypersomnia that afflict many elderly people.

  19. Tonic Neuromodulation of the Inspiratory Rhythm Generator

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (“tonic”) neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea) as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity. PMID:22934010

  20. Regularity of Cardiac Rhythm as a Marker of Sleepiness in Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Vilaseca, Isabel; Montserrat, Josep M.; Gaig, Carles; Salamero, Manel; Santamaria, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study aimed to analyse the autonomic nervous system activity using heart rate variability (HRV) to detect sleep disordered breathing (SDB) patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) before sleep onset. Methods Two groups of 20 patients with different levels of daytime sleepiness -sleepy group, SG; alert group, AG- were selected consecutively from a Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) research protocol. The first waking 3-min window of RR signal at the beginning of each nap test was considered for the analysis. HRV was measured with traditional linear measures and with time-frequency representations. Non-linear measures -correntropy, CORR; auto-mutual-information function, AMIF- were used to describe the regularity of the RR rhythm. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Results Non-linear dynamic of the RR rhythm was more regular in the SG than in the AG during the first wakefulness period of MSLT, but not during MWT. AMIF (in high-frequency and in Total band) and CORR (in Total band) yielded sensitivity > 70%, specificity >75% and an area under ROC curve > 0.80 in classifying SG and AG patients. Conclusion The regularity of the RR rhythm measured at the beginning of the MSLT could be used to detect SDB patients with and without EDS before the appearance of sleep onset. PMID:25860587

  1. The Scorpion An ideal animal model to study long-term microgravity effects on circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riewe, Pascal C.; Horn, Eberhard R.

    2000-01-01

    The temporal pattern of light and darkness is basic for the coordination of circadian rhythms and establishment of homoeostasis. The 24th frequency of zeitgebers is probably a function of the Earth's rotation. The only way to eliminate its influence on organisms is to study their behavior in space because the reduced day length during orbiting the Earth might disrupt synchronizing mechanisms based on the 24th rhythm. The stability of microgravity induced disturbances of synchronization as well as the extent of adaptation of different physiological processes to this novel environment can only be studied during long-term exposures to microgravity, i.e., on the International Space Station. Biological studies within the long-term domain on ISS demand the use of experimental models which can be exposed to automatic handling of measurements and which need less or no nutritional care. Scorpions offer these features. We describe a fully automatic recording device for the simultaneous collection of data regarding the sensorimotor system and homoeostatic mechanisms. In particular, we record sensitivity changes of the eyes, motor activity and heart beat and/or respiratory activity. The advantage of the scorpion model is supported by the fact that data can be recorded preflight, inflight and postflight from the same animal. With this animal model, basic insights will be obtained about the de-coupling of circadian rhythms of multiple oscillators and their adaptation to the entraining zeitgeber periodicity during exposure to microgravity for at least three biological parameters recorded simultaneously. .

  2. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  3. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  4. Lucky Rhythms in Orbitofrontal Cortex Bias Gambling Decisions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sacré, Pierre; Kerr, Matthew S. D.; Kahn, Kevin; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Bulacio, Juan; Park, Hyun-Joo; Johnson, Matthew A.; Thompson, Susan; Jones, Jaes; Chib, Vikram S.; Gale, John T.; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that emotions influence our decisions, yet the neural basis of this biasing effect is not well understood. Here we directly recorded local field potentials from the OrbitoFrontal Cortex (OFC) in five human subjects performing a financial decision-making task. We observed a striking increase in gamma-band (36–50 Hz) oscillatory activity that reflected subjects’ decisions to make riskier choices. Additionally, these gamma rhythms were linked back to mismatched expectations or “luck” occurring in past trials. Specifically, when a subject expected to win but lost, the trial was defined as “unlucky” and when the subject expected to lose but won, the trial was defined as “lucky”. Finally, a fading memory model of luck correlated to an objective measure of emotion, heart rate variability. Our findings suggest OFC may play a pivotal role in processing a subject’s internal (emotional) state during financial decision-making, a particularly interesting result in light of the more recent “cognitive map” theory of OFC function. PMID:27830753

  5. Circadian rhythms and fractal fluctuations in forearm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the circadian pacemaker --- an internal body clock located in the brain which is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake behavioral cycles --- influences key physiologic functions such as the body temperature, hormone secretion and heart rate. Surprisingly, no previous studies have investigated whether the circadian pacemaker impacts human motor activity --- a fundamental physiologic function. We investigate high-frequency actigraph recordings of forearm motion from a group of young and healthy subjects during a forced desynchrony protocol which allows to decouple the sleep/wake cycles from the endogenous circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We investigate both static properties (mean value, standard deviation), dynamical characteristics (long-range correlations), and nonlinear features (magnitude and Fourier-phase correlations) in the fluctuations of forearm acceleration across different circadian phases. We demonstrate that while the static properties exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a broad peak in the afternoon, the dynamical and nonlinear characteristics remain invariant with circadian phase. This finding suggests an intrinsic multi-scale dynamic regulation of forearm motion the mechanism of which is not influenced by the circadian pacemaker, thus suggesting that increased cardiac risk in the early morning hours is not related to circadian-mediated influences on motor activity.

  6. Circadian Rhythms and Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dubowy, Christine; Sehgal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    The advantages of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, including low genetic redundancy, functional simplicity, and the ability to conduct large-scale genetic screens, have been essential for understanding the molecular nature of circadian (∼24 hr) rhythms, and continue to be valuable in discovering novel regulators of circadian rhythms and sleep. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of these interrelated biological processes in Drosophila and the wider implications of this research. Clock genes period and timeless were first discovered in large-scale Drosophila genetic screens developed in the 1970s. Feedback of period and timeless on their own transcription forms the core of the molecular clock, and accurately timed expression, localization, post-transcriptional modification, and function of these genes is thought to be critical for maintaining the circadian cycle. Regulators, including several phosphatases and kinases, act on different steps of this feedback loop to ensure strong and accurately timed rhythms. Approximately 150 neurons in the fly brain that contain the core components of the molecular clock act together to translate this intracellular cycling into rhythmic behavior. We discuss how different groups of clock neurons serve different functions in allowing clocks to entrain to environmental cues, driving behavioral outputs at different times of day, and allowing flexible behavioral responses in different environmental conditions. The neuropeptide PDF provides an important signal thought to synchronize clock neurons, although the details of how PDF accomplishes this function are still being explored. Secreted signals from clock neurons also influence rhythms in other tissues. SLEEP is, in part, regulated by the circadian clock, which ensures appropriate timing of sleep, but the amount and quality of sleep are also determined by other mechanisms that ensure a homeostatic balance between sleep and wake. Flies have been useful

  7. Release of acetylcholine by chick embryo heart before innervation

    PubMed Central

    Coraboeuf, E.; Le Douarin, G.; Obrecht-Coutris, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. In chick embryo hearts, 3-day-old and not yet innervated, repetitive direct stimulation causes a transitory inhibition of the spontaneous rhythm. 2. The degree of post-stimulation inhibition depends on the frequency and duration of the artificial stimulation and on the concentration of K and Ca ions in the extracellular solution. 3. After treatment with atropine (10-5 g/ml.) post-stimulation inhibition is no longer observed. The spontaneous rhythm is accelerated by atropine. The findings therefore suggest that an ACh-like substance is released from the non-innervated embryonic heart during activity. 4. By use of the dorsal muscle of the leech for biological assay the liberation of an ACh-like substance from the non-innervated embryonic heart was confirmed. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:5498489

  8. Daily Melatonin Administration Attenuates Age-Dependent Disturbances of Cardiovascular Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gubin, Denis G; Gubin, Gennady D; Gapon, Ludmila I; Weinert, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Increased blood pressure and reduced robustness of circadian rhythms are frequently reported in elderly subjects. The present study was aimed to investigate whether such changes can be reversed by daily melatonin ingestion. 97 normotensive and hypertensive volunteers of both genders and 63 to 91 years old participated. They lived in the Tyumen Elderly Veteran House on a self-chosen sleep-wake regimen to suit their personal convenience. The experiment lasted for three weeks. After one control week, part of the group (n=63) received 1.5 mg melatonin (Melaxen(TM)) each day at 22:30 h for two weeks. The other 34 subjects were placebo-treated. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured using semi-automated devices at 03:00, 08:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, 23:00 h each day of the first and the third week. Specially trained personnel made the measurements, taking care not to disturb subjects' sleep. Rhythm characteristics were estimated by means of single and population-mean cosinor analyses. Bingham test was used to compare rhythm parameters between groups and investigated physiologic variables. The 24-h HR rhythm was monophasic as described in other studies for young subjects though with a steeper increase in the morning. The daily SBP and DBP rhythms were bimodal. In reference to previously reported data of younger subjects, mean blood pressure of our cohort was elevated, particularly the nocturnal fall was less pronounced. Also, the overall SBP variability was higher as was the percentage of the 12-h component. Both values and also the SBP and DBP levels were reduced during melatonin treatment. The hypotensive effect of melatonin was most pronounced between 3:00 and 8:00 in the morning, i.e. at the time of the highest risk of adverse cardiovascular events, and in subjects with highest BP values before treatment. Moreover, the morning increase of HR was gentler what could have been of additional benefit. Melatonin has a

  9. Nonlinear neurodynamics in representation of a rhythm of speech.

    PubMed

    Skljarov, O P

    1999-06-01

    The mathematical model is offered to describe an algorithm for functioning of a speech rhythm. The duration of a speech signal is divided into the numbered sequence of durations of voice and voiceless segments. All elements of this sequence will be considered as values normalized on the maximum element. We determine this sequence of the elements as a speech rhythm. 1) The model describes a speech rhythm as the recurrent relations between elements of a rhythm. 2) The model permits use of the concept of information entropy. 3) The model explains experimental findings obtained by our research group during comparative investigation of a rhythm in normal speech and stuttering. In particular, the model explains the existence of two classes of stutterers with various rhythms of speech.

  10. Evidence for a rhythm perception deficit in children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Elizabeth A.; McAuley, J. Devin; Dilley, Laura C.; Chang, Soo-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects the timing and rhythmic flow of speech production. When speech is synchronized with an external rhythmic pacing signal (e.g., a metronome), even severe stuttering can be markedly alleviated, suggesting that people who stutter may have difficulty generating an internal rhythm to pace their speech. To investigate this possibility, children who stutter and typically-developing children (n = 17 per group, aged 6–11 years) were compared in terms of their auditory rhythm discrimination abilities of simple and complex rhythms. Children who stutter showed worse rhythm discrimination than typically-developing children. These findings provide the first evidence of impaired rhythm perception in children who stutter, supporting the conclusion that developmental stuttering may be associated with a deficit in rhythm processing. PMID:25880903

  11. Evidence for a rhythm perception deficit in children who stutter.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Elizabeth A; McAuley, J Devin; Dilley, Laura C; Chang, Soo-Eun

    2015-05-01

    Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects the timing and rhythmic flow of speech production. When speech is synchronized with an external rhythmic pacing signal (e.g., a metronome), even severe stuttering can be markedly alleviated, suggesting that people who stutter may have difficulty generating an internal rhythm to pace their speech. To investigate this possibility, children who stutter and typically-developing children (n=17 per group, aged 6-11 years) were compared in terms of their auditory rhythm discrimination abilities of simple and complex rhythms. Children who stutter showed worse rhythm discrimination than typically-developing children. These findings provide the first evidence of impaired rhythm perception in children who stutter, supporting the conclusion that developmental stuttering may be associated with a deficit in rhythm processing.

  12. Independence of genetic geographical variation between photoperiodic diapause, circadian eclosion rhythm, and Thr-Gly repeat region of the period gene in Drosophila littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lankinen, P; Forsman, P

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila littoralis is a latitudinally widespread European species of the Drosophila virilis group. The species has ample genetic variation in photoperiodism (adult diapause) and circadian rhythmicity (pupal eclosion rhythm), with adaptive latitudinal clines in both of them. The possible common genetic basis between the variability of photoperiodism and circadian rhythms was studied by a long-term crossing experiment. A northern strain (65 degrees N) having long critical day length (CDL = 19.9 h) for diapause, early phase of the entrained rhythm in LD 3:21 (psi(LD3:21) = 12.3 h), and short period (tau= 18.8 h) of the free-running rhythm for the eclosion rhythm was crossed with a southern strain (42 degrees N) having short CDL (12.4 h), late eclosion phase (psi(LD3:21) = 20.2 h), and long period (tau= 22.8 h). After 54 generations, including free recombination, artificial selection, and genetic drift, a novel strain resulted, having even more "southern" diapause and more "northern" eclosion rhythm characteristics than found in any of the geographical strains. The observed complete separation of eclosion rhythm characteristics from photoperiodism is a new finding in D. littoralis; in earlier studies followed for 16 generations, the changes had been mostly parallel. Evidently, the genes controlling the variability of the eclosion rhythm and photoperiodism in D. littoralis are different but closely linked. To test for the possible gene loci underlying the observed geographical variability, the period gene was studied in 10 strains covering all the known clock variability in D. littoralis. The authors sequenced the most suspected Thr-Gly region, which is known to take part in the adaptive clock variability in Drosophila melanogaster. No coding differences were found in the strains, showing that this region is not included in the adaptive clock variability in D. littoralis.

  13. H2-blocker modulates heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ooie, T; Saikawa, T; Hara, M; Ono, H; Seike, M; Sakata, T

    1999-01-01

    The use of H2-blockers in the treatment of patients with peptic ulcer has become popular. However, this treatment has adverse cardiovascular effects. The aim of this study was to investigate proarrhythmic rhythm and autonomic nervous activity by analyzing heart rate variability in patients treated with omeprazole, ranitidine, and plaunotol. Nineteen patients (mean age 67.5 +/- 2.7 years) with active gastric ulcer were treated with omeprazole (20 mg/day) for 8 weeks, then ranitidine (300 mg/day) for the next 4 months, and finally plaunotol (240 mg/day). At each stage of the treatment, Holter electrocardiography was performed, and heart rate variability and arrhythmias analyzed. Heart rate variability yielded power in the low- (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency components (0.15-0.4 Hz). Although both ranitidine and omeprazole induced little change in cardiac rhythm, the high-frequency power was higher (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 ms, P < 0.05) and the ratio of low-to-high frequency power was lower (1.41 +/-0.10 vs 1.59 +/- 0.09. P < 0.05) during ranitidine than during plaunotol treatment. Cosinor analysis of heart rate variability revealed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency power during omeprazole compared with during ranitidine and plaunotol treatment. Ranitidine modulated high-frequency power which may be related to the adverse cardiovascular effects of H2-blocker.

  14. [Evaluation of the principles of distribution of electrocardiographic R-R intervals for elaboration of methods of automated diagnosis of cardiac rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsukerman, B M; Finkel'shteĭn, I E

    1987-07-01

    A statistical analysis of prolonged ECG records has been carried out in patients with various heart rhythm and conductivity disorders. The distribution of absolute R-R duration values and relationships between adjacent intervals have been examined. A two-step algorithm has been constructed that excludes anomalous and "suspicious" intervals from a sample of consecutively recorded R-R intervals, until only the intervals between contractions of veritably sinus origin remain in the sample. The algorithm has been developed into a programme for microcomputer Electronica NC-80. It operates reliably even in cases of complex combined rhythm and conductivity disorders.

  15. Experiment K-7-35: Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation During Spaceflight. Part 1; Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.

    1994-01-01

    Mammals have developed the ability to adapt to most variations encountered in their everyday environment. For example, homeotherms have developed the ability to maintain the internal cellular environment at a relatively constant temperature. Also, in order to compensate for temporal variations in the terrestrial environment, the circadian timing system has evolved. However, throughout the evolution of life on earth, living organisms have been exposed to the influence of an unvarying level of earth's gravity. As a result changes in gravity produce adaptive responses which are not completely understood. In particular, spaceflight has pronounced effects on various physiological and behavioral systems. Such systems include body temperature regulation and circadian rhythms. This program has examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite, COSMOS 2044, were exposed to 14 days of microgravity while constantly monitoring the circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity. This experiment has extended our previous observations from COSMOS 1514, as well as providing insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  16. Chronic phase advance alters circadian physiological rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Gretchen; Duncan, Marilyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Shifting the onset of light, acutely or chronically, can profoundly affect responses to infection, tumor progression, development of metabolic disease, and mortality in mammals. To date, the majority of phase-shifting studies have focused on acute exposure to a shift in the timing of the light cycle, whereas the consequences of chronic phase shifts alone on molecular rhythms in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle have not been studied. In this study, we tested the effect of chronic phase advance on the molecular clock mechanism in two phenotypically different skeletal muscles. The phase advance protocol (CPA) involved 6-h phase advances (earlier light onset) every 4 days for 8 wk. Analysis of the molecular clock, via bioluminescence recording, in the soleus and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles and lung demonstrated that CPA advanced the phase of the rhythm when studied immediately after CPA. However, if the mice were placed into free-running conditions (DD) for 2 wk after CPA, the molecular clock was not phase shifted in the two muscles but was still shifted in the lung. Wheel running behavior remained rhythmic in CPA mice; however, the endogenous period length of the free-running rhythm was significantly shorter than that of control mice. Core body temperature, cage activity, and heart rate remained rhythmic throughout the experiment, although the onset of the rhythms was significantly delayed with CPA. These results provide clues that lifestyles associated with chronic environmental desynchrony, such as shift work, can have disruptive effects on the molecular clock mechanism in peripheral tissues, including both types of skeletal muscle. Whether this can contribute, long term, to increased incidence of insulin resistance/metabolic disease requires further study. PMID:23703115

  17. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheterization Tests to look for cancer Tissue and blood typing , to help make sure your body will not reject the donated heart Ultrasound of your neck and legs You will ... heart pump enough blood to the body. Most often, this is a ...

  18. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  19. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm unmasking the brugada electrocardiographic pattern.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Conde, Diego; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been reported that a high-degree right bundle branch block (RBBB) may conceal the electrocardiographic manifestations of the Brugada ECG pattern. An 82-year-old with recent onset palpitations was seen in clinic. The resting ECG showed sinus rhythm, high-degree RBBB, and an irregular idioventricular rhythm. Some fusion beats between sinus rhythm and idioventricular rhythm occurred spontaneously depicting incomplete RBBB pattern and a clear cut elevation of the ST-segment was unveiled, giving rise to a suspicious Brugada ECG pattern. The mechanisms and implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-12-26

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at approximately 10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to approximately 10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5-9 p.m. ( approximately 9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at approximately 10 a.m.

  1. Effects of 9-hour time zone changes on fatigue and circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, P. H.; Myhre, G.; Graeber, R. C.; Andersen, H. T.; Lauber, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and psychological disruptions caused by transmeridian flights may affect the ability of flight crews to meet operational demands. To study these effects, 9 Royal Norwegian Airforces P3-Orion crewmembers flew from Norway to California (-9 hr), and back (+9 hr). Rectal temperature, heart rate and wrist activity were recorded every 2 min, fatigue and mood were rated every 2 hr during the waking day, and logs were kept of sleep times and ratings. Subjects also completed 4 personality inventories. The time-zone shifts produced negative changes in mood which persisted longer after westward flights. Sleep quality (subjective and objective) and duration were slightly disrupted (more after eastward flights). The circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and temperature both completed the 9-hr delay by day 5 in California, although temperature adjusted more slowly. The size of the delay shift was significantly correlated with scores on extraversion and achievement need personality scales. Response to the 9-hr advance were more variable. One subject exhibited a 15-hr delay in his temperature rhythm, and an atypical sleep/nap pattern. On average, the sleep/wake cycle (but not the temperature rhythm), completed the 9-hr advance by the end of the study. Both rhythms adapted more slowly after the eastward flight.

  2. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J; Brown, T E; Beightol, L A; Ha, C Y; Eckberg, D L

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  3. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  4. Device therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Boehmer, John P

    2003-03-20

    Although pharmacologic therapy has made impressive advances in the past decade and is the mainstay of therapy for heart failure (HF), there is still a large unmet need, because morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Implanted medical devices are gaining increasing utility in this group of patients and have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of HF. The majority of devices in clinical use or under active investigation in HF can be grouped into 1 of 4 categories: devices to monitor the HF condition, devices to treat rhythm disturbances, devices to improve the mechanical efficiency of the heart, and devices to replace part or all of the heart's function. There are several devices either approved or under development to monitor the HF condition, ranging from interactive weight scales to implantable continuous pressure monitors. The challenge is to demonstrate that this technology can improve patient outcomes. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are used to treat heart rhythms in a broad range of patients with heart disease, but they now have a special place in HF management with the prophylactic use of ICDs in patients who have advanced systolic dysfunction. The Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT) II study demonstrated a 29% reduction in all-cause mortality with ICDs in patients with a history of a myocardial infarction and a left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction <0.30. LV and multisite pacing are means of improving the mechanical efficiency of the heart. The concept is to create a more coordinated contraction of the ventricles to overcome the inefficiency associated with conduction system delays, which are common in HF. The acute hemodynamic effect can be impressive and is immediate. Several studies of intermediate duration (3 to 6 months) have consistently demonstrated that biventricular pacing improves symptoms and exercise capacity. Mechanical methods of remodeling the heart into a more

  5. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-08-23

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in the circadian and circatidal rhythms of A. asahinai using RNAi. After injection of double-stranded RNA of per, most crickets did not show the circadian modulation of activity but the circatidal rhythm persisted without a significant difference in the period from controls. Thus, per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm but plays no role, or a less important role, in the circatidal rhythm. We conclude that the circatidal rhythm in A. asahinai is controlled by a circatidal clock whose molecular mechanism is different from that of the circadian clock.

  6. Heart Rate and Electrocardiography Monitoring in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of current cardiovascular research involves studies in genetically engineered mouse models. The measurement of heart rate is central to understanding cardiovascular control under normal conditions, with altered autonomic tone, superimposed stress or disease states, both in wild type mice as well as those with altered genes. Electrocardiography (ECG) is the “gold standard” using either hard wire or telemetry transmission. In addition, heart rate is measured or monitored from the frequency of the arterial pressure pulse or cardiac contraction, or by pulse oximetry. For each of these techniques, discussions of materials and methods, as well as advantages and limitations are covered. However, only the direct ECG monitoring will determine not only the precise heart rates but also whether the cardiac rhythm is normal or not. PMID:21743842

  7. The effects of rhythm training on tennis performance.

    PubMed

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-06-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Group, General Rhythm Training Group and Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group. The experimental procedure lasted 8 weeks. During this period, all groups had the same tennis training twice a week. The Tennis Group had regular tennis training sessions. In addition to regular tennis training sessions, the General Rhythm Training Group followed the general rhythm training sessions and the Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group had tennis-specific rhythm training. The measurement instruments were ITN, Rhythmic Competence Analysis Test and Untimed Consecutive Rally Test. The results indicated that participation in tennis-specific or general rhythm training resulted in progress in tennis playing levels, forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence of the participants. On the other hand, attendance to the regular 8-week tennis training was enough to solely increase the tennis playing level but not sufficient to develop forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence. Although the participants in the TRTG had better improvement scores than the ones in the GRTG, no significant difference was found between the rhythm training groups. The results also revealed that participants exhibited higher rhythmic competence scores on fast tempo compared to slow tempo.

  8. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: pharmacological rate versus rhythm control.

    PubMed

    Sherman, David G

    2007-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia associated with increased risk for embolic stroke. Restoration of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation is a logical strategy to prevent the cardiovascular and thromboembolic complications of this dysrhythmia. The most common strategy for restoration of sinus rhythm is pharmacological antiarrhythmic therapy with or without electrical cardioversion. Five randomized clinical trials compared rhythm to rate-control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation. These trials examined mortality, thromboembolic complications, exercise tolerance, quality of life, hospital admissions and drug-related adverse reactions. Mortality ranged from 2.9% to 23.8% among the trial subjects randomized to rhythm control versus 1.0% to 21.3% in the rate control subjects. The risk of thromboemboli was greater: 2.9% to 7.9% in the rhythm-control subjects compared with 0% to 5.5% in the rate control subjects. Hospital admissions and drug-related adverse events were increased in the rhythm-control subjects. Stroke and systemic emboli occurred more often in the rhythm-control subjects many of whom had been withdrawn from anticoagulation. Rhythm-control offered no advantage compared with rate control for patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk for stroke. One explanation for this finding is that those patients thought to have been successfully converted to sinus rhythm in fact had asymptomatic paroxysmal episodes of atrial fibrillation increasing their risk of stroke because they were unprotected by anticoagulation. Pharmacological attempts to restore atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm do not improve mortality or reduce thromboembolic events. All patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk for stroke should be continued on long-term anticoagulation even if they appear to have been successfully restored to sinus rhythm.

  9. The Effects of Rhythm Training on Tennis Performance

    PubMed Central

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Group, General Rhythm Training Group and Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group. The experimental procedure lasted 8 weeks. During this period, all groups had the same tennis training twice a week. The Tennis Group had regular tennis training sessions. In addition to regular tennis training sessions, the General Rhythm Training Group followed the general rhythm training sessions and the Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group had tennis-specific rhythm training. The measurement instruments were ITN, Rhythmic Competence Analysis Test and Untimed Consecutive Rally Test. The results indicated that participation in tennis-specific or general rhythm training resulted in progress in tennis playing levels, forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence of the participants. On the other hand, attendance to the regular 8-week tennis training was enough to solely increase the tennis playing level but not sufficient to develop forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence. Although the participants in the TRTG had better improvement scores than the ones in the GRTG, no significant difference was found between the rhythm training groups. The results also revealed that participants exhibited higher rhythmic competence scores on fast tempo compared to slow tempo. PMID:23486093

  10. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  11. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes.

  12. Patterns of body size and adiposity among UK children of South Asian, black African–Caribbean and white European origin: Child Heart And health Study in England (CHASE Study)

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Claire M; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Owen, Chris G; Cook, Derek G; Whincup, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine adiposity patterns in UK South Asian, black African–Caribbean and white European children using a range of adiposity markers. A cross-sectional survey in London, Birmingham and Leicester primary schools was conducted. Weight, height, waist circumference, skinfold thickness values (biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac) were measured. Fat mass was derived from bioimpedance; optimally height-standardized indices were derived for all adiposity markers. Ethnic origin was based on parental self-report. Multilevel models were used to obtain adjusted means and ethnic differences adjusted for gender, age, month, observer and school (fitted as a random effect). A total of 5887 children aged 9–10 years participated (response rate 68%), including 1345 white Europeans, 1523 South Asians and 1570 black African–Caribbeans. Results Compared with white Europeans, South Asians had a higher sum of all skinfolds and fat mass percentage, and their body mass index (BMI) was lower. South Asians were slightly shorter but use of optimally height-standardized indices did not materially affect these comparisons. At any given fat mass, BMI was lower in South Asians than white Europeans. In similar comparisons, black African–Caribbeans had a lower sum of all skinfolds but a higher fat mass percentage, and their BMI was higher. Black African–Caribbeans were markedly taller. Use of optimally height-standardized indices yielded markedly different findings; sum of skinfolds index was markedly lower, whereas fat mass index and weight-for-height index were similar. At any given fat mass, BMI was similar in black African–Caribbeans and white Europeans. Conclusions UK South Asian children have higher adiposity levels and black African–Caribbeans have similar or lower adiposity levels when compared with white Europeans. However, these differences are not well represented by comparisons based on BMI, which systematically

  13. Circadian rhythms in rheumatology - a glucocorticoid perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis plays an important role in regulating and controlling immune responses. Dysfunction of the HPA axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic diseases. The impact of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on HPA axis function also remains a matter of concern, particularly for longer treatment duration. Knowledge of circadian rhythms and the influence of GC in rheumatology is important: on the one hand we aim for optimal treatment of the daily undulating inflammatory symptoms, for example morning stiffness and swelling; on the other, we wish to disturb the HPA axis as little as possible. This review describes circadian rhythms in RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases, dysfunction of the HPA axis in RA and other rheumatic diseases and the recent concept of the hepato-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-renal axis, the problem of adrenal suppression by GC therapy and how it can be avoided, and evidence that chronotherapy with modified release prednisone effective at 02:00 a.m. can inhibit proinflammatory sequelae of nocturnal inflammation better compared with GC administration in the morning but does not increase the risk of HPA axis insufficiency in RA. PMID:25608777

  14. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  15. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  16. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease High Blood Pressure Send a link to NHLBI ... with the heart’s structure are present at birth. Heart valve disease . Occurs if one or more of your heart ...

  17. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  18. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: II. Syllable Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Chris; Cutler, Anne

    2008-01-01

    To segment continuous speech into its component words, listeners make use of language rhythm; because rhythm differs across languages, so do the segmentation procedures which listeners use. For each of stress-, syllable-and mora-based rhythmic structure, perceptual experiments have led to the discovery of corresponding segmentation procedures. In…

  19. Rhythm's Gonna Get You: Regular Meter Facilitates Semantic Sentence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothermich, Kathrin; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a phenomenon that fundamentally affects the perception of events unfolding in time. In language, we define "rhythm" as the temporal structure that underlies the perception and production of utterances, whereas "meter" is defined as the regular occurrence of beats (i.e. stressed syllables). In stress-timed languages such as German, this…

  20. Development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S

    2005-11-15

    Compared with birds and mammals, very little is known about the development and regulation of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates. The development and regulation of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) should provide insight into the evolution of these mechanisms. One useful model for examining the development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates has emerged from studies with the North American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). A major advantage of bullfrogs as a comparative model for respiratory rhythm generation is that respiratory output may be measured at all stages of development, both in vivo and in vitro. An emerging view of recent studies in developing bullfrogs is that many of the mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation are very similar to those seen in birds and mammals. The overall conclusion from these studies is that respiratory rhythm generation during development may be highly conserved during evolution. The development of respiratory rhythm generation in mammals may, therefore, reflect the antecedent mechanisms seen in ectothermic vertebrates. The main focus of this brief review is to discuss recent data on the development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates, with particular emphasis on the North American bullfrog (R. catesbeiana) as a model.

  1. Action-perception connection and the cortical mu rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hari, Riitta

    2006-01-01

    The rolandic mu rhythm consists of two main frequency components: one around 10 Hz and the other around 20 Hz. Reactivity of the mu rhythm, especially its motor cortex 20-Hz component, provides an illuminating window to the involvement of the human sensorimotor system in the loop that connects action and perception with the environment.

  2. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  3. Neglect of Biological Rhythms in High School Biology Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Nelson, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    This article developed from a survey of the five most popular biology texts which promote the theory of invariant homeostasis rather than biological rhythms. The popular fad of "birthdate biorhythms" is discussed in relation to providing education on biological rhythms and its legitimacy to the public. (SA)

  4. Interaction with Mass Media: The Importance of Rhythm and Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses that understanding the impact of interaction with mass media requires conceptualizing media as an institutionalized social form. A critical feature of this process is the grammatical character of media interaction in the form of rhythm and tempo, because these rhythms and tempos become established in everyday routine. (SKC)

  5. A Rhythm Recognition Computer Program to Advocate Interactivist Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Jean-Christophe

    2004-01-01

    This paper advocates the main ideas of the interactive model of representation of Mark Bickhard and the assimilation/accommodation framework of Jean Piaget, through a rhythm recognition demonstration program. Although completely unsupervised, the program progressively learns to recognize more and more complex rhythms struck on the user's keyboard.…

  6. A Circadian Rhythm Regulating Hyphal Melanization in Cercospora Kikuchii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms, biochemical or developmental processes with a period length of approximately 24 hours, are thoroughly documented in plants and animals. However, virtually all of what is currently known about circadian rhythms in fungi is derived from the model fungus, Neurospora crassa, including...

  7. Functional Synchronization of Biological Rhythms in a Tritrophic System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufang; Wei, Jianing; Guo, Xiaojiao; Liu, Tong-Xian; Kang, Le

    2010-01-01

    In a tritrophic system formed by a plant, an herbivore and a natural enemy, each component has its own biological rhythm. However, the rhythm correlations among the three levels and the underlying mechanisms in any tritrophic system are largely unknown. Here, we report that the rhythms exhibited bidirectional correlations in a model tritrophic system involving a lima bean, a pea leafminer and a parasitoid. From the bottom-up perspective, the rhythm was initiated from herbivore feeding, which triggered the rhythms of volatile emissions; then the rhythmic pattern of parasitoid activities was affected, and these rhythms were synchronized by a light switch signal. Increased volatile concentration can enhance the intensity of parasitoid locomotion and oviposition only under light. From the top-down perspective, naive and oviposition-experienced parasitoids were able to utilize the different volatile rhythm information from the damaged plant to locate host leafminers respectively. Our results indicated that the three interacting organisms in this system can achieve rhythmic functional synchronization under a natural light-dark photoperiod, but not under constant light or darkness. These findings provide new insight into the rhythm synchronization of three key players that contribute to the utilization of light and chemical signals, and our results may be used as potential approaches for manipulating natural enemies. PMID:20552008

  8. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  9. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Heart Failure High Blood Cholesterol High ... us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  10. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  11. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  12. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  13. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Rund, Samuel S. C.; O’Donnell, Aidan J.; Gentile, James E.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control. PMID:27089370

  14. Differential rescue of light- and food-entrainable circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Patrick M; Lu, Jun; Saper, Clifford B

    2008-05-23

    When food is plentiful, circadian rhythms of animals are powerfully entrained by the light-dark cycle. However, if animals have access to food only during their normal sleep cycle, they will shift most of their circadian rhythms to match the food availability. We studied the basis for entrainment of circadian rhythms by food and light in mice with targeted disruption of the clock gene Bmal1, which lack circadian rhythmicity. Injection of a viral vector containing the Bmal1 gene into the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus restored light-entrainable, but not food-entrainable, circadian rhythms. In contrast, restoration of the Bmal1 gene only in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus restored the ability of animals to entrain to food but not to light. These results demonstrate that the dorsomedial hypothalamus contains a Bmal1-based oscillator that can drive food entrainment of circadian rhythms.

  15. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission.

    PubMed

    Rund, Samuel S C; O'Donnell, Aidan J; Gentile, James E; Reece, Sarah E

    2016-04-14

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control.

  16. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang; Wu, Huijian

    2013-08-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer.

  17. [Music, pulse, heart and sport].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Leischik, R

    2017-01-23

    Music, with its various elements, such as rhythm, sound and melody had the unique ability even in prehistoric, ancient and medieval times to have a special fascination for humans. Nowadays, it is impossible to eliminate music from our daily lives. We are accompanied by music in shopping arcades, on the radio, during sport or leisure time activities and in wellness therapy. Ritualized drumming was used in the medical sense to drive away evil spirits or to undergo holy enlightenment. Today we experience the varied effects of music on all sensory organs and we utilize its impact on cardiovascular and neurological rehabilitation, during invasive cardiovascular procedures or during physical activities, such as training or work. The results of recent studies showed positive effects of music on heart rate and in therapeutic treatment (e. g. music therapy). This article pursues the impact of music on the body and the heart and takes sports medical aspects from the past and the present into consideration; however, not all forms of music and not all types of musical activity are equally suitable and are dependent on the type of intervention, the sports activity or form of movement and also on the underlying disease. This article discusses the influence of music on the body, pulse, on the heart and soul in the past and the present day.

  18. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion

  19. Inverse Correlation between Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Demonstrated by Linear and Nonlinear Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Henggui; Aziz, Wajid; Monfredi, Oliver; Abbas, Syed Ali; Shah, Saeed Arif; Kazmi, Syeda Sobia Hassan; Butt, Wasi Haider

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical fluctuations in the rhythms of biological systems provide valuable information about the underlying functioning of these systems. During the past few decades analysis of cardiac function based on the heart rate variability (HRV; variation in R wave to R wave intervals) has attracted great attention, resulting in more than 17000-publications (PubMed list). However, it is still controversial about the underling mechanisms of HRV. In this study, we performed both linear (time domain and frequency domain) and nonlinear analysis of HRV data acquired from humans and animals to identify the relationship between HRV and heart rate (HR). The HRV data consists of the following groups: (a) human normal sinus rhythm (n = 72); (b) human congestive heart failure (n = 44); (c) rabbit sinoatrial node cells (SANC; n = 67); (d) conscious rat (n = 11). In both human and animal data at variant pathological conditions, both linear and nonlinear analysis techniques showed an inverse correlation between HRV and HR, supporting the concept that HRV is dependent on HR, and therefore, HRV cannot be used in an ordinary manner to analyse autonomic nerve activity of a heart. PMID:27336907

  20. Ivabradine in Management of Heart Failure: a Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Orasanu, Gabriela; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2016-02-01

    Elevated resting heart rate has been linked to poor outcomes in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Blockade of funny current channel with ivabradine reduces heart rate without inotropic effects. Ivabradine was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration for patients with stable, symptomatic chronic heart failure (HF) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 %, who are in sinus rhythm with resting heart rate (HR) ≥ 70 bpm and either are on maximally tolerated doses of beta-blockers, or have a contraindication to beta-blockers. This article will review and evaluate the data supporting the use of ivabradine in patients with HF and explore its mechanisms and physiologic effects.

  1. Rhythms of locomotion expressed by Limulus polyphemus, the American horseshoe crab: II. Relationship to circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Watson, Winsor H; Bedford, Lisa; Chabot, Christopher C

    2008-08-01

    In the laboratory, horseshoe crabs express a circadian rhythm of visual sensitivity as well as daily and circatidal rhythms of locomotion. The major goal of this investigation was to determine whether the circadian clock underlying changes in visual sensitivity also modulates locomotion. To address this question, we developed a method for simultaneously recording changes in visual sensitivity and locomotion. Although every animal (24) expressed consistent circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity, rhythms of locomotion were more variable: 44% expressed a tidal rhythm, 28% were most active at night, and the rest lacked statistically significant rhythms. When exposed to artificial tides, 8 of 16 animals expressed circatidal rhythms of locomotion that continued after tidal cycles were stopped. However, rhythms of visual sensitivity remained stable and showed no tendency to be influenced by the imposed tides or locomotor activity. These results indicate that horseshoe crabs possess at least two biological clocks: one circadian clock primarily used for modulating visual sensitivity, and one or more clocks that control patterns of locomotion. This arrangement allows horseshoe crabs to see quite well while mating during both daytime and nighttime high tides.

  2. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  3. Seasonal changes of 24-hour intraocular pressure rhythm in healthy Shanghai population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingyi; Xiao, Ming; Xu, Huan; Fang, Shaobin; Chen, Xu; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythms in winter and summer in the healthy population of Shanghai, China. This is a cross-sectional study in which 24-hour IOP measurements were taken for all eligible healthy volunteers in winter and summer, respectively, and the temperature, hours of sunlight (sunlight time), and circulatory parameters, including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure, were also recorded. The 24-hour IOP curves and IOP parameters (mean, peak, trough, and fluctuation of IOP together with the diurnal-to-nocturnal IOP change) in winter and summer were obtained and compared. The magnitude of IOP changes from summer to winter was also calculated. A total of 29 participants (58 eyes), 14 (48.28%) male and 15 (51.72%) female, aged 43.66 ± 12.20 (19–61) years, were considered eligible for this study. Generally, IOP decreased progressively before noon, increased notably in the nocturnal period, and peaked at 12:00 am in winter and at 2:00 am in summer. The pattern of 24-hour IOP in winter and summer was significantly different (P = 0.002). The average IOPs from 4:00 pm to 8:00 am, except for 6:00 am, were significantly higher in winter (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were shown after adjusting for temperature and/or sunlight time. From summer to winter, the extent of IOP increase was mostly around 0 to 3 mm Hg, and the IOPs increased more significantly in the nocturnal period than in the diurnal period (P = 0.05). The 24-hour IOP rhythms were different in winter and summer, with higher IOP level in winter. Temperature and sunlight time, which are independent of heart rate and blood pressure, affected the 24-hour IOP rhythms in healthy people in Shanghai, China. Further investigations are expected for the rhythm of some endogenous substance secretion and the inner mechanism of regulation of IOP. PMID:27495076

  4. Circadian Rhythms in Acute Intermittent Porphyria—a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Larion, Sebastian; Caballes, F. Ryan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Rossman, Whitney Ellefson; Parsons, Judy; Steuerwald, Nury; Li, Ting; Maddukuri, Vinaya; Groseclose, Gale; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disorder of heme synthesis wherein a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen [PBG] deaminase [PBGD], with other factors may give rise to biochemical and clinical manifestations of disease. The biochemical hallmarks of active AIP are relative hepatic heme deficiency and uncontrolled up-regulation of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid [ALA] synthase-1 [ALAS1] with overproduction of ALA and PBG. The treatment of choice is intravenous heme, which restores the deficient regulatory heme pool of the liver and represses ALAS1. Recently, heme has been shown to influence circadian rhythms by controlling their negative feedback loops. We evaluated whether subjects with AIP exhibited an altered circadian profile. Over a 21 h period, we measured levels of serum cortisol, melatonin, ALA, PBG, and mRNA levels [in peripheral blood mononuclear cells] of selected clock-controlled genes and genes involved in heme synthesis in 10 Caucasian [European-American] women who were either post-menopausal or had been receiving female hormone therapy, 6 of whom have AIP and 4 do not and are considered controls. Four AIP subjects with biochemical activity exhibited higher levels of PBG and lower levels and dampened oscillation of serum cortisol, and a trend for lower levels of serum melatonin, than controls or AIP subjects without biochemical activity. Levels of clock-controlled gene mRNAs showed significant increases over baseline in all subjects at 5 am and 11 pm, whereas mRNA levels of ALAS1, ALAS2, and PBGD were increased only at 11 pm in subjects with active AIP. This pilot study provides evidence for disturbances of circadian markers in women with active AIP that may trigger or sustain some common clinical features of AIP. PMID:23650938

  5. Copula-based analysis of rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.; Viola, M. L. Lanfredi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we establish stochastic profiles of the rhythm for three languages: English, Japanese and Spanish. We model the increase or decrease of the acoustical energy, collected into three bands coming from the acoustic signal. The number of parameters needed to specify a discrete multivariate Markov chain grows exponentially with the order and dimension of the chain. In this case the size of the database is not large enough for a consistent estimation of the model. We apply a strategy to estimate a multivariate process with an order greater than the order achieved using standard procedures. The new strategy consist on obtaining a partition of the state space which is constructed from a combination of the partitions corresponding to the three marginal processes, one for each band of energy, and the partition coming from to the multivariate Markov chain. Then, all the partitions are linked using a copula, in order to estimate the transition probabilities.

  6. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Sleep:wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is underway, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26947521

  7. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    PubMed

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Circadian rhythms: mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Levi, Francis; Schibler, Ueli

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner in that a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain's hypothalamus synchronizes cellular circadian oscillators in most peripheral body cells. Fasting-feeding cycles accompanying rest-activity rhythms are the major timing cues in the synchronization of many, if not most, peripheral clocks, suggesting that the temporal coordination of metabolism and proliferation is a major task of the mammalian timing system. The inactivation of noxious food components by hepatic, intestinal, and renal detoxification systems is among the metabolic processes regulated in a circadian manner, with the understanding of the involved clock output pathways emerging. The rhythmic control of xenobiotic detoxification provides the molecular basis for the dosing time-dependence of drug toxicities and efficacy. This knowledge can in turn be used in improving or designing chronotherapeutics for the patients who suffer from many of the major human diseases.

  9. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Yang; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chang, Yu-Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance.

  10. Biological and psychological rhythms: an integrative approach to rhythm disturbances in autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Botbol, Michel; Cabon, Philippe; Kermarrec, Solenn; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Biological rhythms are crucial phenomena that are perfect examples of the adaptation of organisms to their environment. A considerable amount of work has described different types of biological rhythms (from circadian to ultradian), individual differences in their patterns and the complexity of their regulation. In particular, the regulation and maturation of the sleep-wake cycle have been thoroughly studied. Its desynchronization, both endogenous and exogenous, is now well understood, as are its consequences for cognitive impairments and health problems. From a completely different perspective, psychoanalysts have shown a growing interest in the rhythms of psychic life. This interest extends beyond the original focus of psychoanalysis on dreams and the sleep-wake cycle, incorporating central theoretical and practical psychoanalytic issues related to the core functioning of the psychic life: the rhythmic structures of drive dynamics, intersubjective developmental processes and psychic containment functions. Psychopathological and biological approaches to the study of infantile autism reveal the importance of specific biological and psychological rhythmic disturbances in this disorder. Considering data and hypotheses from both perspectives, this paper proposes an integrative approach to the study of these rhythmic disturbances and offers an etiopathogenic hypothesis based on this integrative approach.

  11. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  12. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  13. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  14. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  15. Distinct activation patterns of idioventricular rhythms and sympathetically-induced ventricular tachycardias in dogs with atrioventricular block.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, R; Scherlag, B J; Vermeulen, M; Armour, J A

    1992-09-01

    To investigate mechanisms of ventricular impulse formation in response to sympathetic stimulation in the healthy canine heart in situ, we compared the patterns of ventricular activation during the idioventricular rhythms arising after complete atrioventricular (AV) block and ventricular tachycardias induced by RSG or LSG stimulation. Isochronal maps were generated by computer from 116-127 unipolar electrograms recorded from the entire ventricular epicardium in 15 open chest, anesthetized dogs. In eight of these, bipolar electrograms were recorded with plunge electrodes from 11 selected endocardial sites located below epicardial breakthrough areas. Intracardiac recordings from the His-Purkinje system were made with electrode catheters. After electrograms were recorded during sinus rhythm, complete AV block was induced by injecting formaldehyde into the AV node and idioventricular rhythms occurred spontaneously at a rate of 37 +/- 12 beats/min (mean +/- SD, n = 25). During idioventricular rhythms, endocardial activation preceded the earliest epicardial breakthrough, which occurred in either the right anterior paraseptal region, antero-apical left ventricle, or postero-apical left ventricle. These sites were consistent with a focal origin in the subendocardial His-Purkinje system. Total epicardial activation times lasted for 47 +/- 13 msec (n = 40). Idioventricular rhythms were suppressed by overdrive pacing (intermittent trains of ten beats with decremental cycle length from 500 to 200 msec) or by intravenous calcium infusion (to plasma levels of 10.1-15.2 mM). Right or left stellate ganglion stimulation increased idioventricular rhythm rates (to 52 +/- 13 beats/min, n = 28) and also induced, in all preparations, ventricular tachycardias that had significantly faster rates (189 +/- 55 beats/min, n = 27, P less than 0.005). Ventricular fibrillation was induced after brief runs of ventricular tachycardia in five of the preparations. During ventricular tachycardias

  16. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Large, Edward W.; Herrera, Jorge A.; Velasco, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  17. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Herrera, Jorge A; Velasco, Marc J

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm.

  18. [The kidney and circadian rhythms: a whole new world?].

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Pala, Marco; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Chronobiology is a branch of biomedical sciences devoted to the study of biological rhythms. Biological rhythms exist at any level of living organisms and, according to their cycle length, may be divided into three main types: circadian, ultradian, and infradian rhythms. Circadian rhythms are the most commonly and widely studied. The principal circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and is supposed to regulate peripheral clocks via neurohumoral modulation. Circadian clocks have been identified within almost all mammalian cell types, and circadian clock genes seem to be essential for cardiovascular health. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids regulated by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock, comprising a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have also been found in the kidney.

  19. Chronotype and circadian rhythm in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Melo, Matias C A; Abreu, Rafael L C; Linhares Neto, Vicente B; de Bruin, Pedro F C; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2016-07-01

    Despite a complex relationship between mood, sleep and rhythm, the impact of circadian disruptions on bipolar disorder (BD) has not been clarified. The purpose of this systematic review was to define current evidence regarding chronotype and circadian rhythm patterns in BD patients. 42 studies were included, involving 3432 BD patients. Disruption of the biological rhythm was identified, even in drug-naïve BD patients and independently of mood status. Daily profiles of melatonin levels and cortisol indicated a delayed phase. Depression was more frequently associated with circadian alterations than euthymia. Few studies evaluated mania, demonstrating irregular rhythms. Evening type was more common in BD adults. Studies about the influence of chronotype on depressive symptoms showed conflicting results. Only one investigation observed the influences of chronotype in mania, revealing no significant association. Effects of psychoeducation and lithium on rhythm in BD patients were poorly studied, demonstrating no improvement of rhythm parameters. Studies about genetics are incipient. In conclusion, disruption in circadian rhythm and eveningness are common in BD. Prospective research evaluating the impact of circadian disruption on mood symptoms, metabolism, seasonality, the influence of age and the effects of mood stabilizers are needed.

  20. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H. T.

    2016-02-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle.

  1. Endogenous thermoregulatory rhythms of squirrel monkeys in thermoneutrality and cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine if the free-running circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb) results from coordinated changes in HP and HL rhythms in thermoneutrality (27 degrees C) as well as mild cold (17 degrees C). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of Tb and activity. Feeding was also measured. Rhythms of HP, HL, and conductance were tightly coupled with the circadian Tb rhythm at both ambient temperatures (TA). At 17 degrees C, increased HP compensated for higher HL at all phases of the Tb rhythm, resulting in only minor changes to Tb. Parallel compensatory changes of HP and HL were seen at all rhythm phases at both TA. Similar time courses of Tb, HP, and HL in their respective rhythms and the relative stability of Tb during both active and rest periods suggest action of the circadian timing system on Tb set point.

  2. Biological rhythms and melatonin in mood disorders and their treatments.

    PubMed

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Mongeau, Raymond; Hamon, Michel

    2013-05-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorders and seasonal affective disorders have been described as alterations of various neuronal systems. In addition to the classical monoaminergic hypotheses that have been long proposed to explain the pathophysiology of these disorders, a strong association between circadian rhythms and mood regulation has been suggested in the light of several clinical and preclinical findings. In this review, we summarize the different hypotheses on pathophysiology mechanisms underlying depressive disorders and put a special emphasis on the alterations of melatonin secretion and associated changes in biological rhythms that characterize mood disorders. Causal relationships between alterations in circadian rhythms and mood disorders are strongly supported by the antidepressant efficacy of innovative pharmacological treatments aimed at resynchronizing endogenous rhythms in depressed patients. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors generating desynchronization between endogenous biological rhythms and exogenous rhythms driven by environmental and societal constraints are very probably involved in the vulnerability to mood disorders. Further investigations of the molecular/cellular bases of the relationships between stress axis dysfunctions, endogenous biological rhythm dysregulations and associated functional and anatomical brain alterations should allow important progress in the knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms of affective disorders and the downstream development of innovative, more effective and better tolerated, therapies.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, we hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. We used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase response curve. We conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  4. The fractal organization of ultradian rhythms in avian behavior.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Diego A; Flesia, Ana G; Aon, Miguel A; Pellegrini, Stefania; Marin, Raúl H; Kembro, Jackelyn M

    2017-04-06

    Living systems exhibit non-randomly organized biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes that follow distinctive patterns. In particular, animal behavior displays both fractal dynamics and periodic rhythms yet the relationship between these two dynamic regimens remain unexplored. Herein we studied locomotor time series of visually isolated Japanese quails sampled every 0.5 s during 6.5 days (>10(6) data points). These high-resolution, week-long, time series enabled simultaneous evaluation of ultradian rhythms as well as fractal organization according to six different analytical methods that included Power Spectrum, Enright, Empirical Mode Decomposition, Wavelet, and Detrended Fluctuation analyses. Time series analyses showed that all birds exhibit circadian rhythms. Although interindividual differences were detected, animals presented ultradian behavioral rhythms of 12, 8, 6, 4.8, 4 h and/or lower and, irrespective of visual isolation, synchronization between these ultradian rhythms was observed. Moreover, all birds presented similar overall fractal dynamics (for scales ∼30 s to >4.4 h). This is the first demonstration that avian behavior presents fractal organization that predominates at shorter time scales and coexists with synchronized ultradian rhythms. This chronobiological pattern is advantageous for keeping the organism's endogenous rhythms in phase with internal and environmental periodicities, notably the feeding, light-dark and sleep-wake cycles.

  5. European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Badano, Luigi P; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Edvardsen, Thor; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Muraru, Denisa; Bacal, Fernando; Nieman, Koen; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Marcondes Braga, Fabiana G; Binder, Thomas; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent

  6. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  7. Unexpected diversity in socially synchronized rhythms of shorebirds.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Martin; Valcu, Mihai; Dokter, Adriaan M; Dondua, Alexei G; Kosztolányi, András; Rutten, Anne L; Helm, Barbara; Sandercock, Brett K; Casler, Bruce; Ens, Bruno J; Spiegel, Caleb S; Hassell, Chris J; Küpper, Clemens; Minton, Clive; Burgas, Daniel; Lank, David B; Payer, David C; Loktionov, Egor Y; Nol, Erica; Kwon, Eunbi; Smith, Fletcher; Gates, H River; Vitnerová, Hana; Prüter, Hanna; Johnson, James A; St Clair, James J H; Lamarre, Jean-François; Rausch, Jennie; Reneerkens, Jeroen; Conklin, Jesse R; Burger, Joanna; Liebezeit, Joe; Bêty, Joël; Coleman, Jonathan T; Figuerola, Jordi; Hooijmeijer, Jos C E W; Alves, José A; Smith, Joseph A M; Weidinger, Karel; Koivula, Kari; Gosbell, Ken; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Niles, Larry; Koloski, Laura; McKinnon, Laura; Praus, Libor; Klaassen, Marcel; Giroux, Marie-Andrée; Sládeček, Martin; Boldenow, Megan L; Goldstein, Michael I; Šálek, Miroslav; Senner, Nathan; Rönkä, Nelli; Lecomte, Nicolas; Gilg, Olivier; Vincze, Orsolya; Johnson, Oscar W; Smith, Paul A; Woodard, Paul F; Tomkovich, Pavel S; Battley, Phil F; Bentzen, Rebecca; Lanctot, Richard B; Porter, Ron; Saalfeld, Sarah T; Freeman, Scott; Brown, Stephen C; Yezerinac, Stephen; Székely, Tamás; Montalvo, Tomás; Piersma, Theunis; Loverti, Vanessa; Pakanen, Veli-Matti; Tijsen, Wim; Kempenaers, Bart

    2016-12-01

    The behavioural rhythms of organisms are thought to be under strong selection, influenced by the rhythmicity of the environment. Such behavioural rhythms are well studied in isolated individuals under laboratory conditions, but free-living individuals have to temporally synchronize their activities with those of others, including potential mates, competitors, prey and predators. Individuals can temporally segregate their daily activities (for example, prey avoiding predators, subordinates avoiding dominants) or synchronize their activities (for example, group foraging, communal defence, pairs reproducing or caring for offspring). The behavioural rhythms that emerge from such social synchronization and the underlying evolutionary and ecological drivers that shape them remain poorly understood. Here we investigate these rhythms in the context of biparental care, a particularly sensitive phase of social synchronization where pair members potentially compromise their individual rhythms. Using data from 729 nests of 91 populations of 32 biparentally incubating shorebird species, where parents synchronize to achieve continuous coverage of developing eggs, we report remarkable within- and between-species diversity in incubation rhythms. Between species, the median length of one parent's incubation bout varied from 1-19 h, whereas period length-the time in which a parent's probability to incubate cycles once between its highest and lowest value-varied from 6-43 h. The length of incubation bouts was unrelated to variables reflecting energetic demands, but species relying on crypsis (the ability to avoid detection by other animals) had longer incubation bouts than those that are readily visible or who actively protect their nest against predators. Rhythms entrainable to the 24-h light-dark cycle were less prevalent at high latitudes and absent in 18 species. Our results indicate that even under similar environmental conditions and despite 24-h environmental cues, social

  8. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  9. Patient perspective on the management of atrial fibrillation in five European countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term management of chronic conditions, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), require frequent interactions with the healthcare systems. The multinational EUropean Patient Survey in Atrial Fibrillation (EUPS-AF) was conducted to investigate patient satisfaction with AF management in different of five European healthcare systems at a time of changing treatment paradigms for stroke prophylaxis, prior to the advent of newer oral anticoagulants. Methods Adults (>18 years) were recruited at random from the total populations of France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK using a randomized telephone dialling system. At least 300 respondents per country reporting to have a diagnosis of AF or receiving oral anticoagulation therapy for suspected AF or to have a heart rhythm disturbance completed a structured telephone interview. Results Most respondents were satisfied with their treatment for AF over the previous 12 months, with 85.5% (n = 1289) rating their care as good or better. Suboptimal clinical practices, however, were identified in several key areas. Coordination of primary and secondary care and a lack of patient engagement and support were particular issues, especially for those patients likely to have extensive contact with their healthcare system. Conclusions In the context of Europe-wide guidelines for management of AF, most patients with AF were satisfied with their care, but for a greater proportion of patients, some aspects are unsatisfactory. Patient-centred surveys, such as the EUPS-AF, are crucial for understanding the factors that contribute to patient satisfaction and compliance with long-term treatment for chronic conditions. PMID:24289181

  10. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  11. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  12. CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS FROM MULTIPLE OSCILLATORS: LESSONS FROM DIVERSE ORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.; Golden, Susan S.; Hardin, Paul E.; Thomas, Terry L.; Zoran, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The organization of biological activities into daily cycles is universal in organisms as diverse as cyanobacteria, fungi, algae, plants, flies, birds and man. Comparisons of circadian clocks in unicellular and multicellular organisms using molecular genetics and genomics have provided new insights into the mechanisms and complexity of clock systems. Whereas unicellular organisms require stand-alone clocks that can generate 24-hour rhythms for diverse processes, organisms with differentiated tissues can partition clock function to generate and coordinate different rhythms. In both cases, the temporal coordination of a multi-oscillator system is essential for producing robust circadian rhythms of gene expression and biological activity. PMID:15951747

  13. Circadian rhythm in Alzheimer disease after trazodone use.

    PubMed

    Grippe, Talyta C; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Louzada, Luciana L; Quintas, Juliana L; Naves, Janeth O S; Camargos, Einstein F; Nóbrega, Otávio T

    2015-01-01

    A circadian rhythm is a cycle of approximately 24 h, responsible for many physiological adjustments, and ageing of the circadian clock contributes to cognitive decline. Rhythmicity is severely impaired in Alzheimer disease (AD) and few therapeutic attempts succeeded in improving sleep disorders in such context. This study evaluated sleep parameters by actigraphy in 30 AD patients before and after trazodone use for 2 weeks, and we show a significant improvement in relative rhythm amplitude (RRA), compatible with a more stable daytime behavioral pattern. So, trazodone appears to produce a stabilization of the circadian rhythms in individuals with AD.

  14. Rhythm as an affordance for the entrainment of movement.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Fred

    2009-01-01

    A general account of rhythm in human behaviour is provided, according to which rhythm inheres in the affordance that a signal provides for the entrainment of movement on the part of a perceiver. This generic account is supported by an explication of the central concepts of affordance and entrainment. When viewed in this light, rhythm appears as the correct explanandum to account for coordinated behaviour in a wide variety of situations, including such core senses as dance and the production of music. Speech may appear to be only marginally rhythmical under such an account, but several experimental studies reveal that speech, too, has the potential to entrain movement.

  15. Altered circadian rhythm reentrainment to light phase shifts in rats with low levels of brain angiotensinogen.

    PubMed

    Campos, Luciana A; Plehm, Ralph; Cipolla-Neto, José; Bader, Michael; Baltatu, Ovidiu C

    2006-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the adaptation of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (LA) circadian rhythms to light cycle shift in transgenic rats with a deficit in brain angiotensin [TGR(ASrAOGEN)]. BP, HR, and LA were measured by telemetry. After baseline recordings (bLD), the light cycle was inverted by prolonging the light by 12 h and thereafter the dark period by 12 h, resulting in inverted dark-light (DL) or light-dark (LD) cycles. Toward that end, a 24-h dark was maintained for 14 days (free-running conditions). When light cycle was changed from bLD to DL, the acrophases (peak time of curve fitting) of BP, HR, and LA shifted to the new dark period in both SD and TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats. However, the readjustment of the BP and HR acrophases in TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats occurred significantly slower than SD rats. The LA acrophases changed similarly in both strains. When light cycle was changed from DL to LD by prolonging the dark period by 12 h, the reentrainment of BP and LA occurred faster than the previous shift in both strains. The readjustment of the BP and HR acrophases in TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats occurred significantly slower than SD rats. In free-running conditions, the circadian rhythms of the investigated parameters adapted in TGR(ASrAOGEN) and SD rats in a similar manner. These results demonstrate that the brain RAS plays an important role in mediating the effects of light cycle shifts on the circadian variation of BP and HR. The adaptive behavior of cardiovascular circadian rhythms depends on the initial direction of light-dark changes.

  16. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain. PMID:25324790

  17. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  18. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  19. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  1. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  2. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the heart.Usually, a blockage starts with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fatty deposits (called plaque) ... Americans and native Hawaiians are at greater risk.Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)Lack of exerciseStressObesitySex (Gender)-- ...

  3. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and American Heart Association. Skip footer links and go to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | ... OIG | CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  4. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  5. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  6. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another type of heart surgery is called off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open- ... heart-lung bypass machine isn't used. Off-pump heart surgery is limited to CABG. Surgeons can ...

  7. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... picture of the outside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Exterior Figure A shows the location of ... picture of the inside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Interior Figure A shows the location of ...

  8. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  9. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  10. Assessment of Cardiac Rate and Rhythm in Fetuses with Arrhythmia via Maternal Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Hari K.; Vignola, Emilia F.; Fifer, William P.; Williams, Ismee A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to report our experience using the Monica AN24 (Monica Healthcare Ltd., Nottingham, United Kingdom), a maternal transabdominal fetal electrocardiographic monitor, in a case series of fetuses with arrhythmias. Study Design We recorded fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) on subjects with fetal arrhythmias diagnosed by fetal echocardiogram. Fetal heart rate and rhythm were determined via manual fECG analysis. Results Overall, 20 fECGs were recorded from a pool of 13 subjects. Fetal heart rate acquisition was determined to be high, medium, and poor quality in 10, 3, and 7 tracings, respectively. High-quality tracings were obtained in 9 of 11 subjects with gestational age < 26 or > 34 weeks. P waves were detectable in five tracings. Conclusion In subjects < 26 or > 34 weeks' gestational age, there was reasonable success in fetal heart rate acquisition. Further study is warranted to determine the potential role of this device in the monitoring of subjects with fetal arrhythmias. PMID:26495180

  11. Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in the heart failure population.

    PubMed

    Large, Stephen R; Nashef, Samer A M

    2013-10-01

    Surgery to correct a structural heart valve problem can restore sinus rhythm in approximately one-fifth of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), and the addition of a maze procedure will increase this proportion. Evidence shows that the maze procedure may restore atrial function in some patients and may have beneficial effects on functional symptoms and prognosis. The role of the maze procedure as an isolated treatment for lone AF in the context of heart failure with no structurally correctable cause is unknown. Future progress will determine the appropriate indications for treatment and the risks and benefits of any intervention.

  12. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S.

    2015-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  13. Physiological links between circadian rhythms, metabolism and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms, metabolism and nutrition are closely interlinked. A great deal of recent research has investigated not only how aspects of metabolic physiology are driven by circadian clocks, but also how these circadian clocks are themselves sensitive to metabolic change. At the cellular level, novel feedback loops have been identified that couple circadian 'clock genes' and their proteins to expression of nuclear receptors, regulation of redox state and other major pathways. Using targeted disruption of circadian clocks, mouse models are providing novel insight into the role of tissue-specific clocks in glucose homeostasis and body weight regulation. The relationship between circadian rhythms and obesity appears complex, with variable alteration of rhythms in obese individuals. However, it is clear from animal studies that the timing and nutritional composition of meals can regulate circadian rhythms, particularly in peripheral tissues. Translation of these findings to human physiology now represents an important goal.

  14. Speech rhythm sensitivity and musical aptitude: ERPs and individual differences.

    PubMed

    Magne, Cyrille; Jordan, Deanna K; Gordon, Reyna L

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the electrophysiological markers of rhythmic expectancy during speech perception. In addition, given the large literature showing overlaps between cognitive and neural resources recruited for language and music, we considered a relation between musical aptitude and individual differences in speech rhythm sensitivity. Twenty adults were administered a standardized assessment of musical aptitude, and EEG was recorded as participants listened to sequences of four bisyllabic words for which the stress pattern of the final word either matched or mismatched the stress pattern of the preceding words. Words with unexpected stress patterns elicited an increased fronto-central mid-latency negativity. In addition, rhythm aptitude significantly correlated with the size of the negative effect elicited by unexpected iambic words, the least common type of stress pattern in English. The present results suggest shared neurocognitive resources for speech rhythm and musical rhythm.

  15. Introduction: circadian rhythm and its disruption: impact on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F; Gladanac, Bojana

    2014-08-01

    Almost all forms of life have predictable daily or circadian rhythms in molecular, endocrine, and behavioral functions. In mammals, a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei coordinates the timing of these rhythms. Daily light exposure that affects the retina of the eye directly influences this area, which is required to align endogenous processes to the appropriate time of day. The present "Views and Reviews" articles discuss the influence of circadian rhythms, especially nightly secretion of melatonin, on reproductive function and parturition. In addition, an examination is made of problems that arise from recurrent circadian rhythm disruption associated with changes in light exposure patterns common to modern day society. Finally, a possible solution to prevent disruptions in circadian phase markers by filtering out short wavelengths from nocturnal light is reviewed.

  16. Age, circadian rhythms, and sleep loss in flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Nguyen, DE; Rosekind, Mark R.; Connell, Linda J.

    1993-01-01

    Age-related changes in trip-induced sleep loss, personality, and the preduty temperature rhythm were analyzed in crews from various flight operations. Eveningness decreased with age. The minimum of the baseline temperature rhythm occurred earlier with age. The amplitude of the baseline temperature rhythm declined with age. Average daily percentage sleep loss during trips increased with age. Among crewmembers flying longhaul flight operations, subjects aged 50-60 averaged 3.5 times more sleep loss per day than subjects aged 20-30. These studies support previous findings that evening types and subjects with later peaking temperature rhythms adapt better to shift work and time zone changes. Age and circadian type may be important considerations for duty schedules and fatigue countermeasures.

  17. Circadian rhythms and sleep in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Gena

    2010-04-01

    A growing body of research has identified significant sleep problems in children with autism. Disturbed sleep-wake patterns and abnormal hormone profiles in children with autism suggest an underlying impairment of the circadian timing system. Reviewing normal and dysfunctional relationships between sleep and circadian rhythms will enable comparisons to sleep problems in children with autism, prompt a reexamination of existing literature and offer suggestions for future inquiry. In addition, sleep and circadian rhythms continue to change over the course of development even in typical, healthy humans. Therefore, exploring the dynamic relationship between circadian rhythms and sleep throughout development provides valuable insight into those sleep problems associated with autism. Ultimately, a better understanding of sleep and circadian rhythms in children with autism may help guide appropriate treatment strategies and minimize the negative impact of these disturbances on both the children and their families.

  18. Preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultzman, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the function of the circadian timing system in space, the circadian rhythm of conidiation of the fungus Neurospora crassa was monitored in constant darkness on the STS 9 flight of the Space Shuttle Columbia. During the first 7 days of spaceflight many tubes showed a marked reduction in the apparent amplitude of the conidiation rhythm, and some cultures appeared arrhythmic. There was more variability in the growth rate and circadian rhythms of individual cultures in space than is usually seen on earth. The results of this experiment indicate that while the circadian rhythm of Neurospora conidiation can persist outside of the earth's environment, either the timekeeping process or its expression is altered in space.

  19. Reversal of theta rhythm flow through intact hippocampal circuits.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jesse; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Goutagny, Romain; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Manseau, Frédéric; Kortleven, Christian; Bressler, Steven L; Williams, Sylvain

    2014-10-01

    Activity flow through the hippocampus is thought to arise exclusively from unidirectional excitatory synaptic signaling from CA3 to CA1 to the subiculum. Theta rhythms are important for hippocampal synchronization during episodic memory processing; thus, it is assumed that theta rhythms follow these excitatory feedforward circuits. To the contrary, we found that theta rhythms generated in the rat subiculum flowed backward to actively modulate spike timing and local network rhythms in CA1 and CA3. This reversed signaling involved GABAergic mechanisms. However, when hippocampal circuits were physically limited to a lamellar slab, CA3 outputs synchronized CA1 and the subiculum using excitatory mechanisms, as predicted by classic hippocampal models. Finally, analysis of in vivo recordings revealed that this reversed theta flow was most prominent during REM sleep. These data demonstrate that communication between CA3, CA1 and the subiculum is not exclusively unidirectional or excitatory and that reversed inhibitory theta signaling also contributes to intrahippocampal synchrony.

  20. Keeping a Beat on the Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liehter, Michael J.; York, David W.; Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Feel the relief of a patient suffering from heart arrhythmia, who is able to return home while having her heart monitored by health professionals 24 hours a day, without the fear that she will miss an important indicator and suffer a fatal heart attack - using technology originally developed to conduct experiments on the Space Shuttle. Approximately 400,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks . Medical research revealed that patterns of electrical activity in the heart can act as predictors of these lethal cardiac events known as arrhythmias. Fortunately, certain arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (loss of regular heartbeat and subsequent loss of function) and ventricular tachycardia (rapid heartbeats), can be detected and appropriately treated. Today, patients at moderate risk of arrhythmias can benefit from technology that would permit long- term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment in the comfort of their own homes. Medical telemetry systems, also known as telemedicine, are evolving rapidly as wireless communication technology advances, evidenced by the commercial products and research prototypes for remote health monitoring that have appeared in recent years. Wireless systems allow patients to move freely in their home and work environment while being monitored remotely by health care professionals.

  1. Circadian hormonal rhythms in two new cases of fatal familial insomnia.

    PubMed

    Avoni, P; Cortelli, P; Montagna, P; Tinuper, P; Sforza, E; Contin, M; Parchi, P; Pierangeli, G; Maltoni, P; Pavani, A

    1991-12-01

    We used a chronobiological inferential statistical method to investigate circadian rhythms of hypophyseal hormones, cortisol, melatonin and catecholamines in two females of the same family affected by fatal familial insomnia. Case 1 (confirmed at autopsy) presented an absent or progressive loss of circadian rhythms of all hormones. In case 2 there was a loss of GH circadian rhythm and a less significant rhythm for melatonin, catecholamines and gonadotropins. These results confirm the role of the thalamus in regulating hormonal circadian rhythm.

  2. Circadian Rhythms in Stomatal Responsiveness to Red and Blue Light.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Williams, W. E.; Assmann, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Stomata of many plants have circadian rhythms in responsiveness to environmental cues as well as circadian rhythms in aperture. Stomatal responses to red light and blue light are mediated by photosynthetic photoreceptors; responses to blue light are additionally controlled by a specific blue-light photoreceptor. This paper describes circadian rhythmic aspects of stomatal responsiveness to red and blue light in Vicia faba. Plants were exposed to a repeated light:dark regime of 1.5:2.5 h for a total of 48 h, and because the plants could not entrain to this short light:dark cycle, circadian rhythms were able to "free run" as if in continuous light. The rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the 1.5-h light periods was caused both by a rhythm in sensitivity to light and by a rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the preceding 2.5-h dark periods. Both rhythms peaked during the middle of the subjective day. Although the stomatal response to blue light is greater than the response to red light at all times of day, there was no discernible difference in period, phase, or amplitude of the rhythm in sensitivity to the two light qualities. We observed no circadian rhythmicity in net carbon assimilation with the 1.5:2.5 h light regime for either red or blue light. In continuous white light, small rhythmic changes in photosynthetic assimilation were observed, but at relatively high light levels, and these appeared to be attributable largely to changes in internal CO2 availability governed by stomatal conductance. PMID:12231947

  3. Methods to Record Circadian Rhythm Wheel Running Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siepka, Sandra M.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches (phenotype to gene) are powerful methods to identify mouse circadian clock components. The success of these approaches, however, is highly dependent on the quality of the phenotype— specifically, the ability to measure circadian rhythms in individual mice. This article outlines the factors necessary to measure mouse circadian rhythms, including choice of mouse strain, facilities and equipment design and construction, experimental design, high-throughput methods, and finally methods for data analysis. PMID:15817291

  4. Persistence, entrainment, and function of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cory T; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2015-03-01

    Polar organisms must cope with an environment that periodically lacks the strongest time-giver, or zeitgeber, of circadian organization-robust, cyclical oscillations between light and darkness. We review the factors influencing the persistence of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates when the light-dark cycle is absent, the likely mechanisms of entrainment that allow some polar vertebrates to remain synchronized with geophysical time, and the adaptive function of maintaining circadian rhythms in such environments.

  5. Circadian rhythm of intraocular pressure in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Diana C; Hartwick, Andrew T E; Twa, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    Ocular hypertension is a risk factor for developing glaucoma, which consists of a group of optic neuropathies characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and subsequent irreversible vision loss. Our understanding of how intraocular pressure damages the optic nerve is based on clinical measures of intraocular pressure that only gives a partial view of the dynamic pressure load inside the eye. Intraocular pressure varies over the course of the day and the oscillator regulating these daily changes has not yet been conclusively identified. The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast the circadian rhythms of intraocular pressure and body temperature in Brown Norway rats when these animals are housed in standard light-dark and continuous dim light (40-90 lux) conditions. The results from this study show that the temperature rhythm measured in continuous dim light drifted forward relative to external time, indicating that the rhythm was free running and being regulated by an internal biological clock. Also, the results show that there is a persistent, but dampened, circadian rhythm of intraocular pressure in continuous dim light and that the circadian rhythms of temperature and intraocular pressure are not synchronized by the same central oscillator. We conclude that once- or twice-daily clinical measures of intraocular pressure are insufficient to describe intraocular pressure dynamics. Similarly, our results indicate that, in experimental animal models of glaucoma, the common practice of housing animals in constant light does not necessarily eliminate the potential influence of intraocular pressure rhythms on the progression of nerve damage. Future studies should aim to determine whether an oscillator within the eye regulates the rhythm of intraocular pressure and to better characterize the impact of glaucoma on this rhythm.

  6. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  7. Weightlessness and cardiac rhythm disorders: current knowledge from space flight and bed-rest studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiani, Enrico; Martin-Yebra, Alba; Landreani, Federica; Bolea, Juan; Laguna, Pablo; Vaïda, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Isolated episodes of heart rhythm disorders have been reported during 40 years of space flight, triggering research to evaluate the risk of developing life-threatening arrhythmias induced by prolonged exposure to weightlessness. In fact, these events could compromise astronaut performance during exploratory missions, as well as pose at risk the astronaut health, due to limited options of care on board the International Space Station. Starting from original observations, this mini review will explore the latest research in this field, considering results obtained both during space flight and on Earth, the latter by simulating long-term exposure to microgravity by head-down bed rest maneuver in order to elicit cardiovascular deconditioning on normal volunteers.

  8. Influences of horizontal hypokinesia on performance and circadian physiological rhythms in female humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Deroshia, C. W.; Sandler, H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight females from 35-45 yr of age were subjected to seven days of ambulatory control, seven days of bed rest, and a five day recovery period, with 30 min of centrifugation on day seven of bedrest to determine the effects of weightlessness on the circadian rhythms of females in that age group. Heart rate and rectal temperature (RT) were monitored and each subject was tested in a flight simulator twice a day in conditions of varying levels of turbulence. The flight simulations were run during the morning and acrophase of the circadian RT and performance errors wery monitored for 6 min. No significant differences were detected in the group performance data pre-, during, and post-bedrest, although better performance in the simulator was observed after the centrifuge exposure. An RT phase shift was statistically significant between pre- and during bedrest stages.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in children with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD, PPHVD-CHD). Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Hansmann, Georg; Bonnet, Damien; Schranz, Dietmar; Apitz, Christian; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a complex disease that presents with a broad spectrum of morphological and haemodynamic findings of varying severity. Recently, the aspect of paediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PPHVD) has been introduced to expand the understanding of the full spectrum of pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Evaluation and treatment of PAH-CHD/PPHVD-CHD can be divided into in different topics. First, defining criteria for operability and initiation of advanced therapies preoperatively and postoperatively is an unresolved issue. Second, management of Eisenmenger syndrome is still an important question, with recent evidence on the severity of the disease and a more rapidly progressive course than previously described. Third, the Fontan circulation with no subpulmonary ventricle requires a distinct discussion, definition and classification since even a mild rise in pulmonary vascular resistance may lead to the so-called failing Fontan situation. Patients with CHD and single-ventricle physiology (Fontan/total cavopulmonary anastomosis) require a particularly stepwise and individualised approach. This consensus statement is on the current evidence for the most accurate evaluation and treatment of increased pulmonary artery pressure and resistance, as well as ventricular dysfunction, in children with congenital heart defects, and provides according practical recommendations. To optimise preoperative and postoperative management in patients with PAH-CHD, diagnostic and treatment algorithms are provided.

  10. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  11. Monkey lipsmacking develops like the human speech rhythm.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Ryan J; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2012-07-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved de novo in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial expressions. We tested this idea by investigating the structure and development of macaque monkey lipsmacks and found that their developmental trajectory is strikingly similar to the one that leads from human infant babbling to adult speech. Specifically, we show that: (1) younger monkeys produce slower, more variable mouth movements and as they get older, these movements become faster and less variable; and (2) this developmental pattern does not occur for another cyclical mouth movement--chewing. These patterns parallel human developmental patterns for speech and chewing. They suggest that, in both species, the two types of rhythmic mouth movements use different underlying neural circuits that develop in different ways. Ultimately, both lipsmacking and speech converge on a ~5 Hz rhythm that represents the frequency that characterizes the speech rhythm of human adults. We conclude that monkey lipsmacking and human speech share a homologous developmental mechanism, lending strong empirical support to the idea that the human speech rhythm evolved from the rhythmic facial expressions of our primate ancestors.

  12. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  13. Circadian rhythms of hedonic drinking behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Bainier, Claire; Mateo, Maria; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the main circadian clock, synchronized by the light-dark cycle, which generates behavioral rhythms like feeding, drinking and activity. Notwithstanding, the main role of the SCN clock on the control of all circadian rhythms has been questioned due to the presence of clock activity in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of feeding and reward. Moreover, whether circadian rhythms of particular motivated behaviors exist is unknown. Here, we evaluated the spontaneous daily and circadian behavior of consumption of a sweet caloric solution (5-10% sucrose), and the effects of sucrose intake on the expression of clock genes in the mouse brain. Mice showed a daily (in a light-dark cycle) and a circadian (in constant darkness conditions) rhythm in the intake and sucrose preference with a rise for both parameters at night (or subjective night). In addition, we observed changes in the circadian day-night expression of the clock gene Per2 in the SCN, cortex and striatum of animals ingesting sucrose compared to control mice on pure water. Finally, daily rhythms of sucrose intake and preference were abolished in Per2(Brdm1)- and double Per1(-/-)Per2(Brdm1)-mutant animals. These data indicate that the expression of circadian rhythms of hedonic feeding behaviors may be controlled by brain circadian clocks and Per gene expression.

  14. Rhythm perception, production, and synchronization during the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Provasi, Joëlle; Anderson, David I.; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Sensori-motor synchronization (SMS) is the coordination of rhythmic movement with an external rhythm. It plays a central role in motor, cognitive, and social behavior. SMS is commonly studied in adults and in children from four years of age onward. Prior to this age, the ability has rarely been investigated due to a lack of available methods. The present paper reviews what is known about SMS in young children, infants, newborns, and fetuses. The review highlights fetal and infant perception of rhythm and cross modal perception of rhythm, fetal, and infant production of rhythm and cross modal production of rhythm, and the contexts in which production of rhythm can be observed in infants. A primary question is whether infants, even newborns, can modify their spontaneous rhythmical motor behavior in response to external rhythmical stimulation. Spontaneous sucking, crying, and leg movements have been studied in the presence or absence of rhythmical auditory stimulation. Findings suggest that the interaction between movement and sound is present at birth and that SMS can be observed in special conditions and within a narrow range of tempi, particularly near the infant’s own spontaneous motor tempo. The discussion centers on the fundamental role of SMS in interaction and communication at the beginning of life. PMID:25278929

  15. Human daily rhythms measured for one year.

    PubMed

    Binkley, S; Tome, M B; Crawford, D; Mosher, K

    1990-08-01

    Four human subjects recorded their wake-up and to-sleep times for one year each. The data were plotted to display individual circadian rhythms and the data were analyzed statistically. First, individuals had characteristic patterns in which visible changes in the patterns were observed mainly when time zones were changed because of travel. Second, the months with the latest wake-up and latest to-sleep times concentrated around the winter solstice; the months with the earliest wake-up and earliest to-sleep times concentrated around the fall equinox. Third, new moon versus full moon days were not different. Fourth, one-hour changes between standard and daylight savings time in the USA were reflected by near one-hour changes in two subjects, but not in a third. Fifth, weekend delays in wake-up time (0.8-1.6 hours), weekend delays in to-sleep time (0.1-0.5 hours), and shorter weekend awake time (0.8-1.3 hours) were observed. Sixth, throughout the year, wake-up times were close to the time of sunrise, but to-sleep times were several hours past sunset.

  16. [Circadian variations of performances and basic rhythms].

    PubMed

    Querrioux-Coulombier, G; Rossi, J P

    1995-12-01

    Difficulties with chronopsychology studies include a masking effect of variables, the combination of different rhythms and variations of strategies. An experiment is conducted to analyze the role of circadian variations of elementary processes in the variations of performance for a complex task. Twenty-four subjects solved anagrams and tried to find the rule of anagram construction, during two sessions, at 10 am and 5 pm. Responses were classified in three groups: (a) discovery of the anagram construction rule (R2 responses); (b) resolution of anagram without discovery of rule (R1 responses); (c) failure, no resolution of anagram (R0 responses). During the second session, R2 performances were better at 10 am than at 5 pm. In contrast, R1 performances were better at 5 pm than at 10 am. Rule application was faster at 10 am than at 5 pm. Results are discussed in terms of variations of short-term memory capacity (Folkard and Monk, 1980). Using chronopsychology to analyze the role of elementary processes in a complex task is discussed.

  17. Speech rate and rhythm in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Skodda, Sabine; Schlegel, Uwe

    2008-05-15

    Articulatory rate and pause time in a standardized reading task in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in correlation to disease duration and severity as compared to healthy controls were analyzed. In 121 PD patients and 70 healthy controls, an acoustical analysis was performed on the first and last sentence of a standardized 170-syllabic text, using a commercial audio software. Articulatory rate and speech to pause ratios were calculated by measuring the length of each syllable and each pause both at the end of words and within polysyllabic words. No significant difference in overall articulatory rate was found between PD patients and controls. Both groups showed an accelerated speech rate in the last sentence compared to the first; however, PD patients had a higher speech acceleration than did controls. PD patients exhibited a significantly reduced percental pause duration in relation to total speech time in the first sentence and a reduced percental pause time within polysyllabic words. PD patients made significantly less but longer pauses at the end of words and less pauses within polysyllabic words. UPDRS III showed an inverse relation to number and rate of intraword pauses, and disease duration was negatively correlated with articulatory rate. The characteristics of parkinsonian speech feature was not only a stronger acceleration of articulation rate in the course of speaking but also a significant reduction of the total numbers of pauses, indicating an impaired speech rhythm and timing organization.

  18. Circadian rhythm in anaerobic power and capacity.

    PubMed

    Hill, D W; Smith, J C

    1991-03-01

    Anaerobic power and capacity were measured in nine college-age men at four different times of day: 03.00 h, 09.00 h, 15.00 h, and 21.00 h. Modified Wingate tests were performed against a common resistance of 5.5 kg (0.074 +/- 0.004 kg per kg body mass). Peak power was defined as the highest power output during a 5-s period in the test, and anaerobic capacity was defined as the total external work during the 30-s test. Peak power tended to differ across testing times (F = 2.50, p = .10), with the mean at 21.00 h about 8% higher (p less than .05) than at 03.00 h. Anaerobic capacity differed across the times of day (F = 9.58, p less than .01), with the means at 15.00 h and 21.00 h about 5% higher (p less than .05) than at 03.00 h and 09.00 h. These results suggest that there are circadian rhythms in anaerobic power and capacity.

  19. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R.; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  20. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Janoušek, Jan; Kubuš, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for adult patients suffering heart failure due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy associated with electromechanical dyssynchrony. There is limited evidence suggesting similar efficacy of CRT in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Due to the heterogeneity of structural and functional substrates, CRT implantation techniques are different with a thoracotomy or hybrid approach prevailing. Efficacy of CRT in CHD seems to depend on the anatomy of the systemic ventricle with best results achieved in systemic left ventricular patients upgraded to CRT from conventional pacing. Indications for CRT in patients with CHD were recently summarized in the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Expert Consensus Statement on the Recognition and Management of Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease and are presented in the text.

  1. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S. P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm.MaterialsAll reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique.ResultsNo statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients.ConclusionThis study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  2. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  3. Optimized Treatment and Heart Rate Reduction in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Irineu Blanco; Del Carlo, Carlos Henrique; Pereira-Barretto, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome that leads to poor outcome in advanced forms. The neurohormonal blockade modifies this natural history; however, it is often suboptimal. Objective The aim of this study is to assess at what percentage cardiologists used to treating HF can prescribe target doses of drugs of proven efficacy. Methods A total of 104 outpatients with systolic dysfunction were consecutively enrolled, all under stabilized treatment. Demographic and treatment data were evaluated and the doses achieved were verified. The findings are shown as percentages and correlations are made between different variables. Results The mean age of patients was 64.1 ± 14.2 years, with SBP =115.4 ± 15.3, HR = 67.8 ± 9.4 bpm, weight = 76.0 ± 17.0 kg and sinus rhythm (90.4%). As for treatment, 93.3% received a RAS blocker (ACEI 52.9%), all received beta-blockers (BB), the most often prescribed being carvedilol (92.3%). As for the doses: 97.1% of those receiving an ARB were below the optimal dose and of those who received ACEI, 52.7% received an optimized dose. As for the BB, target doses were prescribed to 76.0% of them. In this group of patients, most with BB target dose, it can be seen that 36.5% had HR ≥ 70 bpm in sinus rhythm. Conclusion Cardiologists used to treating HF can prescribe target doses of ACEI and BB to most patients. Even though they receive the recommended doses, about one third of patients persists with HR > 70 bpm and should have their treatment optimized. PMID:24100693

  4. Current state of knowledge on aetiology, diagnosis, management, and therapy of peripartum cardiomyopathy: a position statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Petrie, Mark C; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Pieske, Burkert; Buchmann, Eckhart; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Watkins, Hugh; Shah, Ajay J; Seferovic, Petar M; Elkayam, Uri; Pankuweit, Sabine; Papp, Zoltan; Mouquet, Frederic; McMurray, John J V

    2010-08-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a cause of pregnancy-associated heart failure. It typically develops during the last month of, and up to 6 months after, pregnancy in women without known cardiovascular disease. The present position statement offers a state-of-the-art summary of what is known about risk factors for potential pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical presentation of, and diagnosis and management of PPCM. A high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis, as shortness of breath and ankle swelling are common in the peripartum period. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a distinct form of cardiomyopathy, associated with a high morbidity and mortality, but also with the possibility of full recovery. Oxidative stress and the generation of a cardiotoxic subfragment of prolactin may play key roles in the pathophysiology of PPCM. In this regard, pharmacological blockade of prolactin offers the possibility of a disease-specific therapy.

  5. A Neocortical Delta Rhythm Facilitates Reciprocal Interlaminar Interactions via Nested Theta Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Lucy M.; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Cunnington, Leonie; Jenkins, Alastair; Schofield, Ian; Cunningham, Mark O.; Davies, Ceri H.; Traub, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Delta oscillations (1–4 Hz) associate with deep sleep and are implicated in memory consolidation and replay of cortical responses elicited during wake states. A potent local generator has been characterized in thalamus, and local generators in neocortex have been suggested. Here we demonstrate that isolated rat neocortex generates delta rhythms in conditions mimicking the neuromodulatory state during deep sleep (low cholinergic and dopaminergic tone). The rhythm originated in an NMDA receptor-driven network of intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons in layer 5, activating a source of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition. In contrast, regular spiking (RS) neurons in layer 5 generated theta-frequency outputs. In layer 2/3 principal cells, outputs from IB cells associated with IPSPs, whereas those from layer 5 RS neurons related to nested bursts of theta-frequency EPSPs. Both interlaminar spike and field correlations revealed a sequence of events whereby sparse spiking in layer 2/3 was partially reflected back from layer 5 on each delta period. We suggest that these reciprocal, interlaminar interactions may represent a “Helmholtz machine”-like process to control synaptic rescaling during deep sleep. PMID:23804097

  6. Amerindian (but not African or European) ancestry is significantly associated with diurnal preference within an admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kieren J; Campos Santos, Hadassa; Beijamini, Felipe; Duarte, Núbia E; Horimoto, Andréa R V R; Taporoski, Tâmara P; Vallada, Homero; Negrão, André B; Krieger, José E; Pedrazzoli, Mário; Knutson, Kristen L; Pereira, Alexandre C; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    Significant questions remain unanswered regarding the genetic versus environmental contributions to racial/ethnic differences in sleep and circadian rhythms. We addressed this question by investigating the association between diurnal preference, using the morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ), and genetic ancestry within the Baependi Heart Study cohort, a highly admixed Brazilian population based in a rural town. Analysis was performed using measures of ancestry, using the Admixture program, and MEQ from 1,453 individuals. We found an association between the degree of Amerindian (but not European of African) ancestry and morningness, equating to 0.16 units for each additional percent of Amerindian ancestry, after adjustment for age, sex, education, and residential zone. To our knowledge, this is the first published report identifying an association between genetic ancestry and MEQ, and above all, the first one based on ancestral contributions within individuals living in the same community. This previously unknown ancestral dimension of diurnal preference suggests a stratification between racial/ethnic groups in an as yet unknown number of genetic polymorphisms.

  7. Fetal development of complex autonomic control evaluated from multiscale heart rate patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dirk; Nowack, Samuel; Bauer, Stephan; Tetschke, Florian; Rudolph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Jaenicke, Franziska; Heinicke, Esther; Götz, Theresa; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2013-03-01

    Development of the fetal autonomic nervous system's integrative capacity in relation to gestational age and emerging behavioral pattern is reflected in fetal heart rate patterns. Conventional indices of vagal and sympathetic rhythms cannot sufficiently reflect their complex interrelationship. Universal behavioral indices of developing complex systems may provide additional information regarding the maturating complex autonomic control. We investigated fetal magnetocardiographic recordings undertaken at 10-min intervals in active (n = 248) and quiet (n = 111) states between 22 and 39 wk gestational age. Standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, skewness, contribution of particular rhythms to the total power, and multiscale entropy were analyzed. The multiscale entropy methodology was validated for 10-min data sets. Age dependence was analyzed by linear regression. In the quiet state, contribution of sympathovagal rhythms and their complexity over a range of corresponding short scales increased with rising age, and skewness shifted from negative to positive values. In the active state, age dependencies were weaker. Skewness as the strongest parameter shifted in the same direction. Fluctuation amplitude and the complexity of scales associated with sympathovagal rhythms increased. We conclude that in the quiet state, stable complex organized rhythms develop. In the active state, however, increasing behavioral variability due to multiple internal coordinations, such as movement-related heart rate accelerations, and external influences develop. Hence, the state-selective assessment in association with developmental indices used herein may substantially improve evaluation of maturation age and early detection and interpretation of developmental problems in prenatal diagnosis.

  8. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Myles P.; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success. PMID:27148293

  9. Circadian rhythms of chicken brain temperatures.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, C; Aschoff, J; von Saint Paul, U

    1973-04-01

    1. Brain temperature was recorded continuously for up to 18 days in unanaesthetized adult male chickens. With the use of a guide box of plexiglas screwed into a trephine of the calvarium, several thermocouples could be inserted at various depths into the brain at the same time.2. While brain temperatures were being recorded, each chicken was placed in a small circular arena and kept either in a light-dark cycle (LD 12:12 hr) or in conditions of constant dim illumination (LL) within a soundproof chamber.3. Under LD-conditions, the range of oscillation (the difference between maximum and minimum within one period) in brain temperature at any one site was about 1.5 degrees C. During the 12 hr of light the temperature often reached a plateau for several hours. During darkness, a minimum of temperature was usually reached shortly after light-off. Brain temperature started to rise several hours before light-on.4. All eleven chickens tested under LL-conditions showed free running circadian rhythms of brain temperature, with mean periods varying between 22.75 and 25.00 hr (overall mean: 23.69 hr). The range of oscillation in LL-conditions was smaller than in LD-conditions, but was seldom less than 1.0 degrees C.5. In LD as well as in LL, continuous fluctuations of temperature with a much higher frequency were superimposed on the circadian cycle. The fluctuations occurred synchronously at all sites of the brain and were of the same order of magnitude (frequency and range) during wakefulness as during sleep.

  10. Brain rhythms reveal a hierarchical network organization.

    PubMed

    Steinke, G Karl; Galán, Roberto F

    2011-10-01

    Recordings of ongoing neural activity with EEG and MEG exhibit oscillations of specific frequencies over a non-oscillatory background. The oscillations appear in the power spectrum as a collection of frequency bands that are evenly spaced on a logarithmic scale, thereby preventing mutual entrainment and cross-talk. Over the last few years, experimental, computational and theoretical studies have made substantial progress on our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms underlying the generation of network oscillations and their interactions, with emphasis on the role of neuronal synchronization. In this paper we ask a very different question. Rather than investigating how brain rhythms emerge, or whether they are necessary for neural function, we focus on what they tell us about functional brain connectivity. We hypothesized that if we were able to construct abstract networks, or "virtual brains", whose dynamics were similar to EEG/MEG recordings, those networks would share structural features among themselves, and also with real brains. Applying mathematical techniques for inverse problems, we have reverse-engineered network architectures that generate characteristic dynamics of actual brains, including spindles and sharp waves, which appear in the power spectrum as frequency bands superimposed on a non-oscillatory background dominated by low frequencies. We show that all reconstructed networks display similar topological features (e.g. structural motifs) and dynamics. We have also reverse-engineered putative diseased brains (epileptic and schizophrenic), in which the oscillatory activity is altered in different ways, as reported in clinical studies. These reconstructed networks show consistent alterations of functional connectivity and dynamics. In particular, we show that the complexity of the network, quantified as proposed by Tononi, Sporns and Edelman, is a good indicator of brain fitness, since virtual brains modeling diseased states display lower

  11. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:28085104

  12. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  13. Archetype, adaptation and the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Meijler, F L; Meijler, T D

    2011-03-01

    Forty years ago, we started our quest for 'The Holy Grail' of understanding ventricular rate control and rhythm in atrial fibrillation (AF). We therefore studied the morphology and function of a wide range of mammalian hearts. From mouse to whale, we found that all hearts show similar structural and functional characteristics. This suggests that the mammalian heart remained well conserved during evolution and in this aspect it differs from other organs and parts of the mammalian body. The archetype of the mammalian heart was apparently so successful that adaptation by natural selection (evolution) caused by varying habitat demands, as occurred in other organs and many other aspects of mammalian anatomy, bypassed the heart. The structure and function of the heart of placental mammals have thus been strikingly conserved throughout evolution. The changes in the mammalian heart that did take place were mostly adjustments (scaling), to compensate for variations in body size and shape. A remarkable scaling effect is, for instance, the difference in atrioventricular (AV) conduction time, which is vital for optimal cardiac function in all mammals, small and large. Scaling of AV conduction takes place in the AV node (AVN), but its substrate is unknown. This sheds new light on the vital role of the AVN in health and disease. The AVN is master and servant of the heart at the same time and is of salient importance for our understanding of supraventricular arrhythmias in humans, especially AF. In Information Technology a software infra-structure called 'enterprise service bus' (ESB) may provide understanding of the mammalian heart's conservation during evolution. The ESB is quite unspecific (and thus general) when compared with the specialised components it has to support. For instance, one of the functions of an ESB is the routing of messages between system nodes. This routing is independent and unaware of the content of the messages. The function of the heart is likewise

  14. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    PubMed

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  15. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems. PMID:25694852

  16. Physical activity, obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors in 9- to 10-year-old UK children of white European, South Asian and black African-Caribbean origin: the Child Heart And health Study in England (CHASE)

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, C. M.; Rudnicka, A. R.; Sattar, N.; Cook, D. G.; Ekelund, U.; Whincup, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Physical inactivity is implicated in unfavourable patterns of obesity and cardiometabolic risk in childhood. However, few studies have quantified these associations using objective physical activity measurements in children from different ethnic groups. We examined these associations in UK children of South Asian, black African-Caribbean and white European origin. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 2,049 primary school children in three UK cities, who had standardised anthropometric measurements, provided fasting blood samples and wore activity monitors for up to 7 days. Data were analysed using multilevel linear regression and allowing for measurement error. Results Overall physical activity levels showed strong inverse graded associations with adiposity markers (particularly sum of skinfold thicknesses), fasting insulin, HOMA insulin resistance, triacylglycerol and C-reactive protein; for an increase of 100 counts of physical activity per min of registered time, levels of these factors were 12.2% (95% CI 10.2–14.1%), 10.2% (95% CI 7.5–12.8%), 10.2% (95% CI 7.5–12.8%), 5.8% (95% CI 4.0–7.5%) and 19.2% (95% CI 13.9–24.2%) lower, respectively. Similar increments in physical activity levels were associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (1.0 mmHg, 95% CI 0.6–1.5 mmHg) and LDL-cholesterol (0.04 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.01–0.07 mmol/l), and higher HDL-cholesterol (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.01–0.04 mmol/l). Moreover, associations were broadly similar in strength in all ethnic groups. All associations between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk factors were reduced (albeit variably) after adjustment for adiposity. Conclusions/interpretation Objectively measured physical activity correlates at least as well with obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors in South Asian and African-Caribbean children as in white European children, suggesting that efforts to increase activity levels in such groups would have equally beneficial

  17. A stochastic model of input effectiveness during irregular gamma rhythms.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Grégory; Northoff, Georg; Longtin, André

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-band synchronization has been linked to attention and communication between brain regions, yet the underlying dynamical mechanisms are still unclear. How does the timing and amplitude of inputs to cells that generate an endogenously noisy gamma rhythm affect the network activity and rhythm? How does such "communication through coherence" (CTC) survive in the face of rhythm and input variability? We present a stochastic modelling approach to this question that yields a very fast computation of the effectiveness of inputs to cells involved in gamma rhythms. Our work is partly motivated by recent optogenetic experiments (Cardin et al. Nature, 459(7247), 663-667 2009) that tested the gamma phase-dependence of network responses by first stabilizing the rhythm with periodic light pulses to the interneurons (I). Our computationally efficient model E-I network of stochastic two-state neurons exhibits finite-size fluctuations. Using the Hilbert transform and Kuramoto index, we study how the stochastic phase of its gamma rhythm is entrained by external pulses. We then compute how this rhythmic inhibition controls the effectiveness of external input onto pyramidal (E) cells, and how variability shapes the window of firing opportunity. For transferring the time variations of an external input to the E cells, we find a tradeoff between the phase selectivity and depth of rate modulation. We also show that the CTC is sensitive to the jitter in the arrival times of spikes to the E cells, and to the degree of I-cell entrainment. We further find that CTC can occur even if the underlying deterministic system does not oscillate; quasicycle-type rhythms induced by the finite-size noise retain the basic CTC properties. Finally a resonance analysis confirms the relative importance of the I cell pacing for rhythm generation. Analysis of whole network behaviour, including computations of synchrony, phase and shifts in excitatory-inhibitory balance, can be further sped up by orders of

  18. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction, and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  19. Circadian Rest-Activity Rhythm in Pediatric Type 1 Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Filardi, Marco; Pizza, Fabio; Bruni, Oliviero; Natale, Vincenzo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Pediatric type 1 narcolepsy is often challenging to diagnose and remains largely undiagnosed. Excessive daytime sleepiness, disrupted nocturnal sleep, and a peculiar phenotype of cataplexy are the prominent features. The knowledge available about the regulation of circadian rhythms in affected children is scarce. This study compared circadian rest-activity rhythm and actigraphic estimated sleep measures of children with type 1 narcolepsy versus healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-two drug-naïve type 1 narcolepsy children and 21 age- and sex- matched controls were monitored for seven days during the school week by actigraphy. Circadian activity rhythms were analyzed through functional linear modeling; nocturnal and diurnal sleep measures were estimated from activity using a validated algorithm. Results: Children with type 1 narcolepsy presented an altered rest-activity rhythm characterized by enhanced motor activity throughout the night and blunted activity in the first afternoon. No difference was found between children with type 1 narcolepsy and controls in the timing of the circadian phase. Actigraphic sleep measures showed good discriminant capabilities in assessing type 1 narcolepsy nycthemeral disruption. Conclusions: Actigraphy reliably renders the nycthemeral disruption typical of narcolepsy type 1 in drug-naïve children with recent disease onset, indicating the sensibility of actigraphic assessment in the diagnostic work-up of childhood narcolepsy type 1. Citation: Filardi M, Pizza F, Bruni O, Natale V, Plazzi G. Circadian rest-activity rhythm in pediatric type 1 narcolepsy. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1241–1247. PMID:27091539

  20. Rain reverses diel activity rhythms in an estuarine teleost

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nicholas L.; van der Meulen, Dylan E.; Gannon, Ruan; Semmens, Jayson M.; Suthers, Iain M.; Gray, Charles A.; Taylor, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Activity rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, and generally synchronized with the day–night cycle. Several taxa have been shown to switch between nocturnal and diurnal activity in response to environmental variability, and these relatively uncommon switches provide a basis for greater understanding of the mechanisms and adaptive significance of circadian (approx. 24 h) rhythms. Plasticity of activity rhythms has been identified in association with a variety of factors, from changes in predation pressure to an altered nutritional or social status. Here, we report a switch in activity rhythm that is associated with rainfall. Outside periods of rain, the estuarine-associated teleost Acanthopagrus australis was most active and in shallower depths during the day, but this activity and depth pattern was reversed in the days following rain, with diurnality restored as estuarine conductivity and turbidity levels returned to pre-rain levels. Although representing the first example of a rain-induced reversal of activity rhythm in an aquatic animal of which we are aware, our results are consistent with established models on the trade-offs between predation risk and foraging efficiency. PMID:23173211