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Sample records for european larch larix

  1. Pathogenicity of the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, to Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi, seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Y; Shoji, T

    2009-06-01

    Pathogenicity of the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, to Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi, seedlings was tested with inoculation experiments under nursery conditions. Water suspensions of nematodes (mixed stages cultured on Botrytis cinerea or dispersal fourth-stage juveniles (DJ4) extracted from the adult Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus) were injected into the stems of 2- and 3-year-old Japanese larch and Japanese black pine, Pinus thunbergii, seedlings growing in a nursery. In another treatment, Japanese pine sawyer adults holding DJ4 were released under a net that covered the upper half of the seedlings. Regardless of nematode inoculation method, Japanese larch seedlings were as susceptible as Japanese black pine seedlings to B. xylophilus under nursery conditions. The rate of disease development was similar on larch and pine seedlings. Nematode population densities were lower in the stems of dead larch seedlings than in the stems of dead pine seedlings. Histopathological observations revealed that the distribution of nematodes in the stems of dead larch seedlings was mostly limited to the cortex, phloem and cambial zone. Traumatic resin canal formation was one of the most characteristic symptoms in larch seedlings which was dissimilar to that in pine seedlings.

  2. Hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis Henry): a good candidate for cadmium phytoremediation?

    PubMed

    Moudouma, Chris Fabien Moussavou; Riou, Catherine; Gloaguen, Vincent; Saladin, Gaëlle

    2013-03-01

    Studies related to phytoremediation by conifers are still at their beginning. Thus, we investigated the ability of a hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis) to accumulate cadmium (Cd). One-month-old clonal plantlets grown in vitro were exposed for 1 week to a high Cd concentration (1.5 mM). No significant effect was observed on root and shoot biomass, root length, and needle number as a result of Cd treatment. Leaf photosynthetic pigment content and total soluble protein concentration in roots and shoots remained unchanged compared to control plantlets. Taken together, these results suggested that hybrid larch tolerated Cd in our conditions. The high Cd concentration in shoots (200 μg Cd gram(-1) dry weight) showed the good capacity of larch to translocate Cd and thus a potential use of this species for phytoremediation. Furthermore, under our conditions, phytochelatin biosynthesis pathway was slightly stimulated, suggesting that this pathway did not reach the threshold and/or another mechanism of Cd storage may be involved to explain larch tolerance to Cd.

  3. Structure and Composition of Natural Gmelin Larch (Larix gmelinii var. gmelinii) Forests in Response to Spatial Climatic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingli; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Guangsheng; Xiao, Chunwang

    2013-01-01

    Background Many theoretical researches predicted that the larch species would decrease drastically in China under future climatic changes. However, responses of the structural and compositional changes of Gmelin larch (Larix gmelinii var. gmelinii) forests to climatic changes have rarely been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Field survey was conducted to examine the structures and compositions of natural Gmelin larch forests along a climatic gradient. Stepwise linear regression analyses incorporating linear and quadratic components of climatic and non-climatic factors were performed on the structural and compositional attributes of those natural Gmelin larch forests. Isothermality, Max Temperature of Warmest Month (TempWarmestMonth), Precipitation of Wettest Month (PrecipWettestMonth), Precipitation Seasonality (PrecipSeasonality) and Precipitation of Driest Quarter (PrecipDriestQuarter) were observed to be effective climatic factors in controlling structure and composition of Gmelin larch forests. Isothermality significantly affected total basal area of larch, while TempWarmestMonth, PrecipWettestMonth and PrecipSeasonality significantly affected total basal area of Mongolian pine, and PrecipDriestQuarter significantly affected mean DBH of larch, stand density of larch and total basal area of spruce and fir. Conclusions/Significance The summer and winter temperatures and precipitations are all predicted to increase in future in Northeast China. Our results showed the increase of total basal area of spruce and fir, the suppression of regeneration and the decrease of stand density of larch under increased winter precipitation, and the decrease of total basal area of larch under increased summer temperature in the region of current Gmelin larch forest. Therefore, we suggest that larch would decrease and spruce and fir would increase in the region of future Gmelin larch forest. PMID:23824710

  4. Neural cell activation by phenolic compounds from the Siberian larch (Larix sibirica).

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Yashunsky, Dmitry V; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-07-25

    Small organic phenolic compounds from natural sources have attracted increasing attention due to their potential to ameliorate the serious consequences of acute and chronic traumata of the mammalian nervous system. In this contribution, it is reported that phenols from the knot zones of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) wood, namely, the antioxidant flavonoid (+)-dihydroquercetin (1) and the lignans (-)-secoisolariciresinol (2) and (+)-isolariciresinol (3), affect migration and outgrowth of neurites/processes from cultured neurons and glial cells of embryonic and early postnatal mice. Compounds 1-3, which were available in preparative amounts, enhanced neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule neurons, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and motoneurons, as well as process formation of Schwann cells in a dose-dependent manner in the low nanomolar range. Migration of cultured astrocytes was inhibited by 1-3, and migration of neurons out of cerebellar explants was enhanced by 1. These observations provide evidence for the neuroactive features of these phenolic compounds in enhancing the beneficial properties of neurons and reducing the inhibitory properties of activated astrocytes in an in vitro setting and encourage the further investigation of these effects in vivo, in animal models of acute and chronic neurological diseases.

  5. Monoterpene emissions from needles of hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × Larix kaempferi) grown under elevated carbon dioxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Tani, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We measured monoterpene emissions from needles of hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × Larix kaempferi) to evaluate the response of monoterpene emission rates and their composition to elevated CO2 (600 μmol mol-1) and O3 (60 nmol mol-1) conditions. The dominant monoterpenes were α-pinene and β-pinene. The emission rate of total monoterpenes significantly decreased under elevated CO2 conditions (P < 0.05). The ratio of carbon emission in the form of monoterpenes to photosynthetically fixed carbon also significantly decreased under elevated CO2 conditions. By contrast, elevated O3 did not significantly affect the emission rate of total monoterpenes. The ratios of α-pinene/β-pinene, limonene/β-pinene, and myrcene/β-pinene were all significantly decreased by O3 exposure (P < 0.05). High reactivity of α-pinene, limonene, and myrcene when combining with O3 may be able to mitigate oxidative damage inside the larch needles. No significant combined effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on individual or total monoterpene emissions were detected.

  6. Expression patterns of LmAP2L1 and LmAP2L2 encoding two-APETALA2 domain proteins during somatic embryogenesis and germination of hybrid larch (Larix x marschlinsii).

    PubMed

    Guillaumot, Damien; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne; Germot, Agnès; Meytraud, Fanny; Gastinel, Louis; Riou-Khamlichi, Catherine

    2008-06-16

    Two APETALA2 domain transcription factors were characterized first in angiosperms, and, recently, in several gymnosperms. These proteins are involved in several processes, from flowering to embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. We extrapolated this result to hybrid larch (Larixxmarschlinsii Coaz) resulting from a cross between European (Larix decidua) and Japanese (Larix kaempferi) larches. Somatic embryogenesis is well described and controlled for this Pinaceae. We characterized two-AP2 domain genes: LmAP2L1 and LmAP2L2. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that LmAP2L1 and LmAP2L2 were orthologous to Norway spruce PaAP2L1 and PaAP2L2 and that L1 forms appeared to be specific to Pinaceae. RT-PCR analysis showed that larch APETALA2 was differentially expressed during late somatic embryogenesis and during the first steps of germination. Whereas LmAP2L2 was constitutively expressed during this process, LmAP2L1 expression appeared only during late somatic embryogenesis, when embryos were able to germinate. Further, LmAP2L1 appeared to be the preferentially expressed form during embryo germination. Thus, LmAP2L1 seems to be a valuable molecular marker for hybrid larch late somatic embryogenesis and could play a role during post-embryonic development.

  7. Physiological responses of the hybrid larch (Larix × eurolepis Henry) to cadmium exposure and distribution of cadmium in plantlets.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Amandine; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne; Faugeron, Céline; Gloaguen, Vincent; Saladin, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction of Cd is a growing biotechnology although we currently know few Cd hyperaccumulators, i.e., plant species able to accumulate at least 0.1 mg Cd g(-1) dry weight in aerial organs. Owing their deep root system and high biomass, trees are more and more preferred to herbaceous species for phytoextraction. Assuming that conifers could be relevant models under cold climates, we investigated cadmium tolerance of the hybrid larch Larix × eurolepis Henry (Larix decidua × Larix kaempferi) and the efficiency of this species to store this metal. In vitro grown larches were chosen in order to reduce time of exposure and to more rapidly evaluate their potential efficiency to accumulate Cd. One-month-old plantlets were exposed for 2 and 4 weeks to 250 and 500 μM Cd. Results showed that they tolerated a 4-week exposure to 250 μM Cd, whereas the content of photosynthetic pigment strongly dropped in plantlets growing in the presence of 500 μM Cd. In the presence of 250 μM Cd, shoot growth slightly decreased but photosynthetic pigment and total soluble carbohydrate contents were not modified and no lipid peroxidation was detected. In addition, these plantlets accumulated proline, particularly in shoots (two to three times more than control). In roots, Cd concentration in the intracellular fraction was always higher than in the cell wall fraction contrary to shoots where Cd concentration in the cell wall fraction increased with time and Cd concentration in the medium. In shoots, Cd concentration was lower than in roots with a ratio of 0.2 after 4 weeks of exposure but stayed around 0.2 mg g(-1) dry weight, thus a value higher than the threshold requested for Cd hyperaccumulators. Hybrid larch would thus be a relevant candidate for field test of Cd phytoextraction.

  8. SR-XRFA in Biogeochemical Studies: Elemental Composition of Larch Tissues (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) of the Kuranakh Gold ore Field (Russia, Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, Svetlana Yu.; Zhuravskaya, Alla N.

    Technogenic impact on the elemental composition of larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) in the Kuranakh Gold ore field (Russia, Yakutia) is considered. Elemental composition of the larch tissues was determined by means of X-ray fluorescence measurements with synchrotron radiation at the "Siberian Synchrotron and Terahertz Radiation Center" based on VEPP-3 of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS. Comprehensive possibilities of the X-ray fluorescence measurements along with the simple preparation of biological samples, allowed us to carry out valuable biogeochemical studies. New data on the accumulation of macroelements K, Ca, Mn, Fe, biophilic microelements Cu, Zn, chalcophilous Mo, Pb, Ag, As, Sb, Ga, Cd, Tl, rare lithophilous Rb, Sr, Zr, Y, Nb, in the tissues of larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) of the natural taiga landscape and the tailing dump in the Kuranakh Gold ore field were obtained. The results allow us to assess both natural and technogenic biogeochemical anomalous aureole of gold mining areas.

  9. Larch (Larix kaempferi) xylem parenchyma cells respond to subfreezing temperature by deep supercooling.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Takata, Naoki; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    In previous studies, xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in the boreal softwood species larch, which has thick and rigid walls similar to those of XPCs in boreal hardwood species, were shown to respond to subfreezing temperature by deep supercooling during summer but change their freezing behavior to extracellular freezing during winter. In this study, we re-examined freezing behavior of XPCs in larch by observation of deep etching of frozen samples as well as observation of re-warmed samples after freezing using a cryo-scanning electron microscope. The results showed that XPCs in larch adapts to subfreezing temperature by deep supercooling throughout all seasons. Such freezing behavior is the same as that of XPCs in boreal hardwood species.

  10. 76 FR 81359 - European Larch Canker; Expansion of Regulated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 European Larch Canker; Expansion of Regulated Areas AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule...

  11. 76 FR 52543 - European Larch Canker; Expansion of Regulated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 European Larch Canker; Expansion of Regulated Areas AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule and request...

  12. In vivo assessment of an industrial waste product as a feed additive in dairy cows: Effects of larch (Larix decidua L.) sawdust on blood parameters and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, D; Garavaglia, L; Spagnuolo, M S; Pferschy-Wenzig, E M; Bauer, R; Franz, C

    2015-12-01

    When larch (Larix spp.) is processed in the wood industry, the sawdust is currently disposed of as waste or used as combustible material, even though it is rich in biologically active compounds. In this study the effect of larch sawdust supplementation on blood parameters as well as milk composition was examined in healthy mid-lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Italian Friesian dairy cows were assigned to groups receiving either 300 g/day/cow of larch sawdust or a control diet, and treatments were continued for a 20 day period. Milk parameters were unaffected by treatment. A lower plasma total protein concentration was observed and can be attributed to a decrease in globulin concentration. A lower plasma urea concentration was also detected in the larch group. Moreover, biomarkers of liver function were influenced by the treatment. Total bilirubin was lower in larch-treated animals, and cholesterol tended to be lower. In addition, an interaction between day and treatment was observed for very low density lipoprotein. The concentration of other parameters, including reactive oxygen metabolites, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and nitrotyrosine, did not differ between treatments. The observed benefits, together with the good palatability, make larch sawdust a promising candidate for the development of beneficial feed supplements for livestock. Further studies will be useful, particularly to evaluate its efficacy in different health conditions.

  13. Timing and duration of European larch growing season along altitudinal gradients in the Swiss Alps.

    PubMed

    Moser, Lea; Fonti, Patrick; Büntgen, Ulf; Esper, Jan; Luterbacher, Jürg; Franzen, Julia; Frank, David

    2010-02-01

    The 2007 European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) growing season was monitored along two elevational transects in the Lötschental valley in the Swiss Alps. Phenological observations and weekly microcore sampling of 28 larch trees were conducted between April and October 2007 at seven study sites regularly spaced from 1350 to 2150 m a.s.l. on northwest- and southeast-facing slopes. The developmental stages of nearly 75,000 individual cells assessed on 1200 thin sections were used to investigate the links between the trees' thermal regimes and growth phases including the beginning and ending of cell enlargement, wall thickening and maturation of the stem wood. Needles appeared approximately 3-4 weeks earlier than stem growth. The duration of ring formation lasted from mid-May to the end of October, with the length of the growing season decreasing along elevation from 137 to 101 days. The onset of the different growing seasons changed by 3-4 days per 100 m elevation; the ending of the growing season, however, appeared minimally related to altitude. If associated with the monitored altitudinal lapse rate of -0.5 degrees C per 100 m, these results translate into a lengthening of the growing season by approximately 7 days per degree Celsius. This study provides new data on the timing and duration of basic growth processes and contributes to quantification of the impacts of global warming on tree growth and productivity.

  14. Gene expression associated with increased supercooling capability in xylem parenchyma cells of larch (Larix kaempferi).

    PubMed

    Takata, Naoki; Kasuga, Jun; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in larch adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling, while cortical parenchyma cells (CPCs) undergo extracellular freezing. The temperature limits of supercooling in XPCs changed seasonally from -30 degrees C during summer to -60 degrees C during winter as measured by freezing resistance. Artificial deacclimation of larch twigs collected in winter reduced the supercooling capability from -60 degrees C to -30 degrees C. As an approach to clarify the mechanisms underlying the change in supercooling capability of larch XPCs, genes expressed in association with increased supercooling capability were examined. By differential screening and differential display analysis, 30 genes were found to be expressed in association with increased supercooling capability in XPCs. These 30 genes were categorized into several groups according to their functions: signal transduction factors, metabolic enzymes, late embryogenesis abundant proteins, heat shock proteins, protein synthesis and chromatin constructed proteins, defence response proteins, membrane transporters, metal-binding proteins, and functionally unknown proteins. All of these genes were expressed most abundantly during winter, and their expression was reduced or disappeared during summer. The expression of all of the genes was significantly reduced or disappeared with deacclimation of winter twigs. Interestingly, all but one of the genes were expressed more abundantly in the xylem than in the cortex. Eleven of the 30 genes were thought to be novel cold-induced genes. The results suggest that change in the supercooling capability of XPCs is associated with expression of genes, including genes whose functions have not been identified, and also indicate that gene products that have been thought to play a role in dehydration tolerance by extracellular freezing also have a function by deep supercooling.

  15. Southern montane populations did not contribute to the recolonization of West Siberian Plain by Siberian larch (Larix sibirica): a range-wide analysis of cytoplasmic markers.

    PubMed

    Semerikov, Vladimir L; Semerikova, Svetlana A; Polezhaeva, Maria A; Kosintsev, Pavel A; Lascoux, Martin

    2013-10-01

    While many species were confined to southern latitudes during the last glaciations, there has lately been mounting evidence that some of the most cold-tolerant species were actually able to survive close to the ice sheets. The contribution of these higher latitude outposts to the main recolonization thrust remains, however, untested. In the present study, we use the first range-wide survey of genetic diversity at cytoplasmic markers in Siberian larch (Larix sibirica; four mitochondrial (mt) DNA loci and five chloroplast (cp) DNA SSR loci) to (i) assess the relative contributions of southern and central areas to the current L. sibirica distribution range; and (ii) date the last major population expansion in both L. sibirica and adjacent Larix species. The geographic distribution of cpDNA variation was uninformative, but that of mitotypes clearly indicates that the southernmost populations, located in Mongolia and the Tien-Shan and Sayan Mountain ranges, had a very limited contribution to the current populations of the central and northern parts of the range. It also suggests that the contribution of the high latitude cryptic refugia was geographically limited and that most of the current West Siberian Plain larch populations likely originated in the foothills of the Sayan Mountains. Interestingly, the main population expansion detected through Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in all four larch species investigated here pre-dates the LGM, with a mode in a range of 220,000-1,340,000 years BP. Hence, L. sibirica, like other major conifer species of the boreal forest, was strongly affected by climatic events pre-dating the Last Glacial Maximum.

  16. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment.

    PubMed

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Weißenbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio

    2016-09-26

    Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone northeastern Austria. Tree ring data from larch provenances originating from across the species' natural range were used to estimate the drought reaction in four consecutive drought events (1977, 1981, 1990-1994, and 2003) with extremely low standardized precipitation- and evapotranspiration-index values that affected growth in all provenances. We found significant differences among provenances across the four drought periods for the trees' capacity to withstand drought (resistance) and for their capacity to reach pre-drought growth levels after drought (resilience). Provenances from the species' northern distribution limit in the Polish lowlands were found to be more drought resistant and showed higher stability across all drought periods than provenances from mountainous habitats at the southern fringe. The degree of genetic determination, as estimated by the repeatability, ranged up to 0.39, but significantly differed among provenances, indicating varying degrees of natural selection at the provenance origin. Generally, the relationship between the provenances' source climate and drought behavior was weak, suggesting that the contrasting patterns of drought response are a result of both genetic divergence out of different refugial lineages and local adaptation to summer or winter drought conditions. Our analysis suggests that European larch posseses high genetic variation among and within provenances that can be used for assisted migration and breeding programs.

  17. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    100 years in larch CWD. Consequently, the decay of Picea abies and Larix decidua is very low. Several uncertainties, however, remain: 14C dating of CWD from decay classes 4 and 5 and having a pre-bomb age is often difficult (large age range due to methodological constraints) and fall rates of both European larch and Norway spruce are missing.

  18. Within-Range Translocations and Their Consequences in European Larch

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefanie; Liepelt, Sascha; Gerber, Sophie; Petit, Rémy J.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to biological invasions, translocations of individuals within a species range are understudied, due to difficulties in systematically detecting them. This results in limited knowledge about the corresponding processes and uncertainties regarding the status of extant populations. European larch, a forest tree whose fragmented native distribution is restricted to the Alps and to other Central European mountains, has been massively planted for at least 300 years. Here we focus on the genetic characterization of translocations having taken place within its native range. Microsatellite variation at 13 nuclear loci and sequence data of two mitochondrial DNA fragments were analyzed on the basis of a comprehensive range-wide population sample. Two complementary methods (Geneclass and Structure) were used to infer translocation events based on nuclear data whereas mitochondrial data were used for validation of these inferences. Using Geneclass, we found translocation events in a majority of populations. Additional cases of translocation and many instances of admixture were identified using Structure, thanks to the clear-cut ancestral genetic structure detected in this species. In particular, a strong divide between Alpine and Central European populations, also apparent at mitochondrial markers, helped uncover details on translocation events and related processes. Translocations and associated admixture events were found to be heterogeneously distributed across the species range, with a particularly high frequency in Central Europe. Furthermore, translocations frequently involved multiple geographic sources, some of which were over-represented. Our study illustrates the importance of range-wide investigations for tracing translocations back to their origins and for revealing some of their consequences. It provides some first clues for developing suitable conservation and management strategies. PMID:26000791

  19. Release and retention patterns of organic compounds and nutrients after the cold period in foliar litterfall of pure European larch, common beech and red oak plantations in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čiuldienė, D.; Aleinikovienė, J.; Muraškienė, M.; Marozas, V.; Armolaitis, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out in alien warmth-tolerant forest plantations of red oak ( Quercus rubra), common beech ( Fagus sylvatica) and European larch ( Larix decidua). We compared the changes in foliar litterfall mass and biochemical composition after five months of cold period. The mean mass of fresh foliar litterfall collected in late autumn was 30% higher in red oak compared to the larch and beech plantations. After the cold period, the reduction of foliar litterfall mass did not exceed 10% in any of the studied plantations. The fresh foliar litterfall of red oak was the richest in cellular fibre and easily decomposable glucose and nutrients such as P and Mg, larch was distinguished by the highest lignin, N, K and Ca concentrations, while beech fresh foliar litterfall was the poorest in the aforementioned nutrients. After the cold period, the changes in the biochemical composition of foliar litterfall revealed different patterns. In the spring, the beech and red oak foliar litterfall was the richest in N, P and Ca, meanwhile the larch foliar litterfall still had the highest concentration of lignin but, in contrast to the autumn, was the poorest in nutrients. After the cold period Lignin: N, C: N and C: P ratios reached critical values indicating that the foliar litterfall of beech and red oak had started to decompose. The highest lignin concentration and the highest and most stable Lignin: N, C: N, C: P and N: P ratios after the cold period indicated that the slowest foliar litterfall decomposition took place in the larch plantation.

  20. Identification of a novel factor, vanillyl benzyl ether, which inhibits somatic embryogenesis of Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis Gordon).

    PubMed

    Umehara, Mikihisa; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sasamoto, Hamako; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Asami, Tadao; Fujioka, Shozo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Kamada, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    In contrast to angiosperms, some gymnosperms form well-developed suspensors in somatic embryogenesis. This characteristic makes it easy to study suspensor biology. In cultures with high cell densities, somatic embryogenesis of Japanese larch, especially the suspensor development, is strongly inhibited due to factor(s) that are released by the cells into the culture medium. In this study, we purified and identified one of the inhibitory factors present in high-cell-density conditioned medium (HCM) of larch cells. The factor with the strongest inhibitory activity was purified by dialysis, extraction by ethyl acetate, octadecylsilyl (ODS) column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The inhibitory factor was identified as vanillyl benzyl ether (VBE) by physicochemical analysis. This compound was first isolated from natural resources. Authentic VBE inhibited somatic embryo formation in Japanese larch, and the inhibitory effect in the suspensor was stronger than in the embryo proper. Furthermore, quantification of VBE by HPLC demonstrated that VBE accumulates at high concentrations in HCM. These results suggest that VBE is a novel negative regulator of somatic embryogenesis.

  1. European larch phenology in the Alps: can we grasp the role of ecological factors by combining field observations and inverse modelling?

    PubMed

    Migliavacca, M; Cremonese, E; Colombo, R; Busetto, L; Galvagno, M; Ganis, L; Meroni, M; Pari, E; Rossini, M; Siniscalco, C; Morra di Cella, U

    2008-09-01

    Vegetation phenology is strongly influenced by climatic factors. Climate changes may cause phenological variations, especially in the Alps which are considered to be extremely vulnerable to global warming. The main goal of our study is to analyze European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) phenology in alpine environments and the role of the ecological factors involved, using an integrated approach based on accurate field observations and modelling techniques. We present 2 years of field-collected larch phenological data, obtained following a specifically designed observation protocol. We observed that both spring and autumn larch phenology is strongly influenced by altitude. We propose an approach for the optimization of a spring warming model (SW) and the growing season index model (GSI) consisting of a model inversion technique, based on simulated look-up tables (LUTs), that provides robust parameter estimates. The optimized models showed excellent agreement between modelled and observed data: the SW model predicts the beginning of the growing season (B(GS)) with a mean RMSE of 4 days, while GSI gives a prediction of the growing season length (L(GS)) with a RMSE of 5 days. Moreover, we showed that the original GSI parameters led to consistent errors, while the optimized ones significantly increased model accuracy. Finally, we used GSI to investigate interactions of ecological factors during springtime development and autumn senescence. We found that temperature is the most effective factor during spring recovery while photoperiod plays an important role during autumn senescence: photoperiod shows a contrasting effect with altitude decreasing its influence with increasing altitude.

  2. Larix decidua δ(18)O tree-ring cellulose mainly reflects the isotopic signature of winter snow in a high-altitude glacial valley of the European Alps.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Giovanni; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Cherubini, Paolo; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Maugeri, Maurizio; Stenni, Barbara; Fusco, Stella; Maggi, Valter; Pelfini, Manuela

    2017-02-01

    We analyzed the chronologies of cellulose stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) and tree-ring widths from European larch (Larix decidua) in a high-altitude site (2190ma.s.l.) at the bottom of a glacial valley in the Italian Alps, and investigated their dependence on monthly meteorological variables and δ(18)O precipitation values. The δ(18)O of tree-ring cellulose appears to be strongly driven by the δ(18)O of winter snowfall (November to March), which suggests that larch trees mostly use the snow-melt water of the previous winter during the growing season. This water, which also comes from the slope streams and from the underground flow of nearby steep slopes, infiltrates the soil in the valley bottom. The tree-ring cellulose δ(18)O values were also found to be influenced by the August precipitation δ(18)O and mean temperature. The associated regression model shows that the δ(18)O chronology from the tree rings explains up to 34% of the variance in the winter precipitation δ(18)O record, demonstrating the potential for reconstructing the δ(18)O isotopic composition of past winter precipitation in the study region. Unlike most other tree-ring studies that focus on growing season signals, in our study the summer signal was small and the winter signal dominant due to the special conditions of the glacial valley. Site topography, geomorphology and soil characteristics in particular influence the stable isotope signal in tree-ring cellulose.

  3. Influence of long-term thinning on the biomass carbon and soil respiration in a larch (Larix gmelinii) forest in Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huimei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenjie; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Thinning management is used to improve timber production, but only a few data are available on how it influences ecosystem C sink capacity. This study aims to clarify the effects of thinning on C sinks of larch plantations, the most widespread forests in Northeastern China. Both C influx from biomass production and C efflux from each soil respiration component and its temperature sensitivity were determined for scaling-up ecosystem C sink estimation: microbial composition is measured for clarifying mechanism for respiratory changes from thinning treatment. Thinning management induced 6.23 mol C m⁻² yr⁻¹ increase in biomass C, while the decrease in heterotrophic respiration (R(h)) at the thinned sites (0.9 mol C m⁻²  yr⁻¹) has enhanced 14% of this biomass C increase. This decrease in R(h) was a sum of the 42% decrease (4.1 mol C m⁻²  yr⁻¹) in litter respiration and 3.2 mol C m⁻² yr⁻¹ more CO₂ efflux from mineral soil in thinned sites compared with unthinned control. Increases in temperature, temperature sensitivity, alteration of litters, and microbial composition may be responsible for the contrary changes in R h from mineral soil and litter respiration, respectively. These findings manifested that thinning management of larch plantations could enhance biomass accumulation and decrease respiratory efflux from soil, which resulted in the effectiveness improvement in sequestrating C in forest ecosystems.

  4. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  5. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Keith W.; Sherman, Christopher D.; Weber, Jill; Smith, Sandra Schiller; Singer, Patricia B.; Greenwood, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of maturation on the morphological and photosynthetic characteristics, as well as the expression of two genes involved in photosynthesis in the developing, current year foliage of Eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi]) is described. These effects were observed on foliage during the third growing season after grafting of scions from trees of different ages onto 2 year old rootstock. Specific leaf weight (gram dry weight per square meter), leaf cross-sectional area (per square millimeter), and chlorophyll content (milligram per gram dry weight) all increase with increasing age in long shoot foliage from both indoor- and outdoor-grown trees. Net photosynthesis (NPS) (mole of CO2 per square millimeter per second) increases with age on indoor- but not outdoor-grown trees. NPS also increases with increased chlorophyll content, but outdoor-grown scions of all ages had higher chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll does not appear to be limiting for NPS outdoors. To extend these studies of maturation-related differences in foliar morphology and physiology to the molecular genetic level, sequences were cloned from the cab and rbsS gene families of larch. Both cab and rbcS gene families are expressed in foliage but not in roots, and they are expressed in light-grown seedlings of larch but only at very low levels in dark-grown seedlings (~2% of light-grown seedlings). Steady-state cab mRNA levels are relatively higher (~40%) in newly expanding short shoot foliage from juvenile plants compared to mature plants. Unlike cab, the expression of the rbcS gene family did not seem to vary with age. These data show that the maturation-related changes in morphological and physiological phenotypes are associated with changes in gene expression. No causal relationship has been established, however. Indeed, we conclude that the faster growth of juvenile scions reported previously (MS Greenwood, CA Hopper, KW Hutchison [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 406-412) is not due to increased NPS

  6. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael S.; Hopper, Catherine A.; Hutchison, Keith W.

    1989-01-01

    The time course of maturation in eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi] K. Koch) was examined by grafting scions from trees of different ages onto 2-year-old root stock and following scion development for several years. Height, diameter, foliar chlorophyll content, and rooting ability of scion-derived cuttings all varied linearly as a function of log10 age. Chlorophyll content (milligrams per gram of dry weight) increased while height, diameter, and ability to root decreased with age (P < 0.01). The tendency toward orthotropic growth and branch formation per centimeter of main stem decreased abruptly between age 1 and 5 years (P < 0.01). Total chlorophyll content of both long and short shoot foliage increased by 30 to 50% with increasing age, but the chlorophyll a/b ratio did not change. Also, juvenile long shoot needles were significantly longer than mature (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, the juvenile scions produced more total strobili over two successive years, but the mature scions produced a significantly higher proportion of male strobili (P < 0.001 year 1; P < 0.02 year 2). The age-related changes in foliar traits were not associated with changes in DNA methylation between juvenile and mature scions. Using HPLC, we found that 20% of foliar DNA cytosine residues were methylated in both scion types. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666785

  7. Ophiostoma kryptum sp. nov. from Larix decidua and Picea abies in Europe, similar to O. minus.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karin; Kirisits, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    An unknown species of Ophiostoma was isolated from European larch (Larix decidua) infested by Tetropium gabrieli (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) infested by Tetropium sp. in Austria. The fungus is similar to O. minus, but distinguished from it by the ecology, colony morphologies on OA and MEA, and phylogenetic analysis of aligned DNA sequences of the ITS region of the rDNA operon and the partial beta-tubulin gene. It is described here as O. kryptum sp. nov. The new species readily produces perithecia with short necks and reniform ascospores, and has Hyalorhinocladiella and Leptographium-like anamorphs. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Tetropium spp. act as vectors of O. kryptum. O. minus and O. kryptum represent additional examples of morphologically similar, yet genetically and ecologically distinct species in the genus Ophiostoma. The new combination, O. crenulatum comb. nov. (syn. CeratocYstiopsis crenulata), is also made.

  8. Water Relation Parameters of Embryogenic Cultures and Seedlings of Larch

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Nigel J.; von Aderkas, Patrick; Fuchs, Edgar E.; Reaney, Martin J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the water relations parameters of developing somatic embryogenic and xygotic European larch (Larix decidua) were studied. Water release curves were generated by suspending tissue samples over unsaturated NaCl solutions until they reached vapor equilibration with the surrounding air. Twenty solutions were used whose water potentials ranged from −0.05 to −10 MPa. Water release curves were obtained by plotting paired values of tissue relative water content (RWC) and solution potential. Curves were derived for embryonic larch at various stages of development and for hypocotyls and roots from germinated zygotic and somatic embryos. The ability to resist dehydration increased markedly with development. Stage 1 tissue, which consisted of clusters of loosely associated nonchlorophyllous cells, had extremely low bulk elastic modulus (ε) (1.91 MPa) and apoplastic water content (A) (0.023), relatively high osmotic potential (Ψπ) (−0.53 MPa), and lost turgor at 0.56 RWC. In contrast, mature embryoids with primary roots, hypocotyl, and cotyledons (stage 3) had an almost 4-fold increase in A (0.089), significantly higher ε (3.49 MPa), and lower Ψπ (−0.88 MPa) and lost turgor at 0.66 RWC. Hypocotyl tissue from germinated somatic embryos lost turgor at 0.74 RWC and had higher ε, A, and solute accumulation than pregerminated tissue. Hypocotyl tissue resisted dehydration more strongly than root tissue, and differences between root and hypocotyl water relation parameters were more pronounced in xygotic than in somatic seedlings. Highest dehydration resistance was in zygotic hypocotyls. The characterization of the water relations of tissue cultures should allow the development of more consistent and reliable desiccation protocols to induce maturation of embryos and produce synchronously germinating seed. PMID:16653121

  9. Climate-Induced Larch Growth Response Within the Central Siberian Permafrost Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Il'ya A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: estimation of larch (Larix gmelinii) growth response to current climate changes. Location: permafrost area within the northern part of Central Siberia (approximately 65.8 deg N, 98.5 deg E). Method: analysis of dendrochronological data, climate variables, drought index SPEI, GPP (gross primary production) and EVI vegetation index (both Aqua/MODIS satellite derived), and soil water content anomalies (GRACE satellite measurements of equivalent water thickness anomalies, EWTA). Results: larch tree ring width (TRW) correlated with previous year August precipitation (r = 0.63), snow accumulation (r = 0.61), soil water anomalies (r = 0.79), early summer temperatures and water vapor pressure (r = 0.73 and r = 0.69, respectively), May and June drought index (r = 0.68-0.82). There are significant positive trends of TRW since late 1980s and GPP since the year 2000. Mean TRW increased by about 50%, which is similar to post-Little Ice Age warming. TRW correlated with GPP and EVI of larch stands (r = 0.68-0.69). Main conclusions: within the permafrost zone of central Siberia larch TRW growth is limited by early summer temperatures, available water from snowmelt, water accumulated within soil in the previous year, and permafrost thaw water. Water stress is one of the limiting factors of larch growth. Larch TRW growth and GPP increased during recent decades.

  10. Endurance of larch forest ecosystems in eastern Siberia under warming trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Iwahana, G.; Ohta, T.

    2015-12-01

    The larch (Larix spp.) forest in eastern Siberia is the world's largest coniferous forest. However, its existence depends on near-surface permafrost, which increases water availability for trees, and the boundary of the forest closely follows the permafrost zone. Therefore, the degradation of near-surface permafrost due to forecasted warming trends during the 21st century is expected to affect the larch forest in Siberia. However, predictions of how warming trends will affect this forest vary greatly, and many uncertainties remain about land-atmospheric interactions within the ecosystem. We developed an integrated land surface model to analyze how the Siberian larch forest will react to current warming trends. This model analyzed interactions between vegetation dynamics and thermo-hydrology and showed that, under climatic conditions predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 2.6 and 8.5, annual larch net primary production (NPP) increased about 2 and 3 times, respectively, by the end of 21st century compared with that in the 20th century. Soil water content during larch growing season showed no obvious trend, even after decay of surface permafrost and accompanying sub-surface runoff. A sensitivity test showed that the forecasted warming and pluvial trends extended leafing days of larches and reduced water shortages during the growing season, thereby increasing productivity.

  11. Comprehensive Spectral Signal Investigation of a Larch Forest Combining - and Satellite-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landmann, J. M.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; chmidtner, K.

    2016-06-01

    Collecting comprehensive knowledge about spectral signals in areas composed by complex structured objects is a challenging task in remote sensing. In the case of vegetation, shadow effects on reflectance are especially difficult to determine. This work analyzes a larch forest stand (Larix decidua MILL.) in Pinnis Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The main goal is extracting the larch spectral signal on Landsat 8 (LS8) Operational Land Imager (OLI) images using ground measurements with the Cropscan Multispectral Radiometer with five bands (MSR5) simultaneously to satellite overpasses in summer 2015. First, the relationship between field spectrometer and OLI data on a cultivated grassland area next to the forest stand is investigated. Median ground measurements for each of the grassland parcels serve for calculation of the mean difference between the two sensors. Differences are used as "bias correction" for field spectrometer values. In the main step, spectral unmixing of the OLI images is applied to the larch forest, specifying the larch tree spectral signal based on corrected field spectrometer measurements of the larch understory. In order to determine larch tree and shadow fractions on OLI pixels, a representative 3D tree shape is used to construct a digital forest. Benefits of this approach are the computational savings compared to a radiative transfer modeling. Remaining shortcomings are the limited capability to consider exact tree shapes and nonlinear processes. Different methods to implement shadows are tested and spectral vegetation indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Greenness Index (GI) can be computed even without considering shadows.

  12. Rockfall and snow avalanche impacts leave different anatomical signatures in tree rings of juvenile Larix decidua.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Markus; Hitz, Oliver M

    2008-11-01

    Rockfall and snow avalanche events often cause injury to European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) trees, giving rise to the formation of callus tissue and tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs). We analyzed and quantified anatomical reactions of juvenile trees injured before the start of the growing season by snow avalanches (15 trees, 324 cross sections) or rockfalls (18 trees, 270 cross sections). Traumatic resin ducts were observed in the growth ring formed following injury in 94.3% of the rockfall samples and 87.3% of the snow avalanche samples. Traumatic resin ducts were formed at the beginning of the new annual ring around wounds caused by rockfalls. In contrast, in trees injured by snow avalanches, TRDs were not formed until after the formation of several rows of early earlywood (EE) tracheids (mean +/- SD = 4.19 +/- 2.56 rows). The dimensions of the EE tracheids observed in the snow avalanche samples were greatly reduced in the tissues bordering the wound, with radial width reaching an average of only 50% and lumen cross-sectional area an average of only 46% of pre-event values. It is therefore possible to differentiate injuries due to past snow avalanches from injuries due to rockfall based on anatomical growth reactions in the tissues bordering scars.

  13. Introduced and Native Parasitoid Wasps Associated With Larch Casebearer (Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae) in Western Larch.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pierce, M; Shaw, D C; Demarco, A; Oester, P T

    2015-02-01

    The larch casebearer [Coleophora laricella (Hubner)], a non-native insect, continues to impact western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) through defoliation events in the Pacific Northwest. Biological control programs starting in the 1960s released seven species of parasitoid wasps to control C. laricella outbreaks. However, information about current population dynamics of C. laricella and associated parasitoids remains lacking. Therefore, the goal of this study was to document the presence, current distributions, densities, and parasitism rates of introduced and native parasitoid wasps occurring on C. laricella throughout the Northwestern U.S. range of L. occidentalis. We sampled L. occidentalis trees at multiple sites in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. C. laricella was present at all sites with average state densities ranging from 6.2 to 13.1 moths/100 buds. We recovered two introduced hymenopteran biological control agents; Agathis pumila (Ratzeburg: Braconidae) at 79% of the sites, and Chrysocharis laricinellae (Ratzeburg: Eulophidae) at 63% of the sites. Fourteen species of native parasitic wasps were also recovered. The most common species were: Bracon sp., Spilochalcis albifrons, and Mesopolobus sp. The average native species parasitism rate across the four states was 9.0%, which was higher than the introduced species Ch. laricinellae (2.9%), but not as high as A. pumila (19.3%). While survey results suggest that native species may be more important for the control of C. laricella than previously thought, A. pumila remains the major source of regional control. However, further research is needed to better understand how introduced and native parasitoids interact to control invasive pest populations.

  14. Fire Return Interval Within the Northern Boundary of the Larch Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Dvinskaya, M. L.; Ranson, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Larch (Larix spp.) dominant forests compose a large proportion of the forests of Russia (i.e., about 40% of forested areas). These forests range from the Yenisei ridge on the west to the Pacific Ocean on the east, and from Lake Baikal on the south to the 73rd parallel in the north. Larch stands comprise the world s northern most forest at Ary-Mas (72 deg 28' N, 102 deg 15' E). Larch dominated forests occupy about 70% of the permafrost areas in Siberia. Larch forms high closure stands as well as open forests, and is found mainly over permafrost, where other tree species barely survive. Wildfires are typical for this territory with the majority occurring as ground fires due to low crown closure. Due to the thin active layer in permafrost soils and a dense lichen-moss cover, ground fires may cause stand mortality. The vast areas of larch-dominant forests is generally considered as a "carbon sink"; however, positive long-term temperature trends at higher latitudes are expected to result in an increase of fire frequency, and thus may convert this area to a source for greenhouse gases. There are recent observations regarding the increase of fire frequency within non-protected territories. Surprisingly, there are few publications on fire chronoseqences for the huge forested territory between the Ural Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Also there is a general understanding that bimodal (late spring -- early summer and late summer-beginning of fall) fire seasonal distribution in the south becomes uni-modal (late spring -- early summer) in the north. The purpose of this study is to investigate the wildfire history at the northern edge of the zone of larch dominance.

  15. [Induction of androgenic cultures in Siberian larch].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, A N; Tret'iakova, I N; Viazovetskova, A S

    2006-01-01

    Male generative buds of the Siberian larch have no organic quiescence during the autumn-winter period and are capable of completing the development of male generative structures under favorable conditions. When microsporophylls of the Siberian larch were cultivated on medium MS with 0.2 mg/l 2,4-D, embryoids of two types were obtained: directly from the microspore body and via formation of organogenic callus. This means that in the Siberian larch, direct and indirect androgenesis in vitro is possible. The Siberian larch pollen was first germinated in vitro, which was enhanced by pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Climate-Driven Changes Within the Larch Forest of Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, V.

    2015-12-01

    Thanks to the support of NASA's Carbon Cycle and Ecosystem Focus Area programs, joint NASA/ Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences studies have been conducted throughout Siberia. The overall objective has been to obtain field and satellite measurements to examine carbon stocks and track changes in forests across this vast area. In this presentation, we discuss some of the finding from this 25+ year collaboration' i.e., observed climate-driven changes within larch communities in northern Siberia. Field measurements and satellite data, including Terra/MODIS, Landsat, GRACE and QuickBird were used for analysis of forest conditions. The following results will be discussed. (1). At the northern limit of larch (Larix gmelinii) range (i.e.,~72°N) tree mortality was observed during the cooling period from the 16th century to the beginning of the 19th century. Post- Little Ice Age (LIA) trees re-establishment followed warming temperatures by the middle of the19th century. The current tree line has recovered to the pre-LIA line location although tree heights and stand densities are comparatively lower. The mean rate of upward migration was found to be 0.35 m yr-1 (with a range of 0.21-0.58). (2) The migration of the "dark needle conifers" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica, Picea obovata) into the southern margin zone of larch dominated forest was documented. Meanwhile, within the traditional DNC range decline and mortality of both Siberian pine and fir were observed and attributed, primarily, due to an increased drought. (3) Within Central Siberia larch growth is limited by early summer temperatures and available water from thawing permafrost. Larch tree ring width (TRW) correlated with early summer temperatures and water vapor pressure (r = 0.73 and r = 0.69, respectively), drought (SPEI; r = 0.68-0.82), snow accumulation (r = 0.61), previous year precipitation (r = 0.63) and soil water anomalies (r = 0.79). Larch TRW growth and Gross Primary Productivity

  17. [Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium of adaptive significant genes in Larix (Pinaceae)].

    PubMed

    Semerikov, V L; Semerikova, S A; Polezhaeva, M A

    2013-09-01

    Nucleotide polymorphism in genes potentially responsible for the adaptation to the latitudinal gradient of climate was investigated in the Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). The genes were selected among those previously studied in Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), the variability of which indicates the influence of selection or shows the association with phenotypic traits that are important for adaptation to low temperatures and to geographically heterogeneous environment. Nucleotide sequences of eight genes, including coding and noncoding regions, were amplified and sequenced using newly developed primers specific to Larix. The sample size was 123 megagametophytes per locus in L. sibirica and 16.2 in L. occidentalis, which was taken as the out-group. The length of the sequenced fragments was 246-1700 bp. Nucleotide polymorphism π averaged 0.00536 (0.002 - 0.008), and haplotype diversity was H(d): 0.822 (0.625-0.948). Tajima's D was negative in all fragments and significant in three, while statistics D* and F* was significant in three and four segments, respectively, and F(s) was significant in three. This may indicate the presence of purifying selection on these genes or population growth. The HKA test revealed no significant deviations from the neutral model of evolution in all genes. The recombination parameter ρ/θ = 0.28 was close to the value obtained from P. menziesii. To investigate the association of polymorphic sites (factor) in these eight genes to the latitude of investigated individuals (trait), the generalized linear model (GLM) was used taking into account the population structure. After the False Discovery Rate correction no significant associations were found. The age of the split of American and Eurasian Larix lineages based on the nucleotide differences in the eight genes between L. sibirica and L. occidentalis is estimated to be 12 million years, which is much younger than the age of the most ancient Larix discoveries.

  18. Wildfires dynamic in the larch dominance zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, K. Jon; Dvinskaya, Maria L.

    2008-01-01

    A fire return intervals (FRI) for zone of larch dominance and ``larch-mixed taiga'' ecotone was studied. Extreme fire events were connected with summer air temperature deviations. Average FRI determined from stem fire scar dating was 82 +/- 7 years for the zone of larch dominance, and 77 +/- 20 for the ``larch-mixed taiga'' ecotone. For the zone of larch dominance FRI on north-east facing slopes was 86 +/- 11 years, for south-west facing slopes at 61 +/- 8 years, for flat terrain at 68 +/- 14 years, and for bogs 139 +/- 17 years. FRI decreased from 101 years in the 19th century to 65 years in the 20th century, for the zone of larch dominance, and from 97 years to 50 years for the ``larch-mixed taiga'' ecotone. A climate and anthropogenic impact on this phenomenon was analyzed. The decrease of FRI may interfere with climate-driven migration of competitor species into zone of larch dominance, affecting biodiversity at high latitudes.

  19. Characterization of condensed tannins and carbohydrates in hot water bark extracts of European softwood species.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Sauro; Kroslakova, Ivana; Janzon, Ron; Mayer, Ingo; Saake, Bodo; Pichelin, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    Condensed tannins extracted from European softwood bark are recognized as alternatives to synthetic phenolics. The extraction is generally performed in hot water, leading to simultaneous extraction of other bark constituents such as carbohydrates, phenolic monomers and salts. Characterization of the extract's composition and identification of the extracted tannins' molecular structure are needed to better identify potential applications. Bark from Silver fir (Abies alba [Mill.]), European larch (Larix decidua [Mill.]), Norway spruce (Picea abies [Karst.]), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) were extracted in water at 60°C. The amounts of phenolic monomers, condensed tannins, carbohydrates, and inorganic compounds in the extract were determined. The molecular structures of condensed tannins and carbohydrates were also investigated (HPLC-UV combined with thiolysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, anion exchange chromatography). Distinct extract compositions and tannin structures were found in each of the analysed species. Procyanidins were the most ubiquitous tannins. The presence of phenolic glucosides in the tannin oligomers was suggested. Polysaccharides such as arabinans, arabinogalactans and glucans represented an important fraction of all extracts. Compared to traditionally used species (Mimosa and Quebracho) higher viscosities as well as faster chemical reactivities are expected in the analysed species. The most promising species for a bark tannin extraction was found to be larch, while the least encouraging results were detected in pine. A better knowledge of the interaction between the various extracted compounds is deemed an important matter for investigation in the context of industrial applications of such extracts.

  20. L'Arche: Its Philosophy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumarah, John

    1986-01-01

    The L'Arche movement in mental retardation based upon the work of J. Vanier stresses the value of the disabled person, the importance of mutual relationships, the importance of a sense of community, and the spiritual dimension. (CL)

  1. Diverging climate trends in Mongolian taiga forests influence growth and regeneration of Larix sibirica

    PubMed Central

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Leuschner, Hanns Hubert; Leuschner, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Central and semiarid north-eastern Asia was subject to twentieth century warming far above the global average. Since forests of this region occur at their drought limit, they are particularly vulnerable to climate change. We studied the regional variations of temperature and precipitation trends and their effects on tree growth and forest regeneration in Mongolia. Tree-ring series from more than 2,300 trees of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) collected in four regions of Mongolia’s forest zone were analyzed and related to available weather data. Climate trends underlie a remarkable regional variation leading to contrasting responses of tree growth in taiga forests even within the same mountain system. Within a distance of a few hundred kilometers (140–490 km), areas with recently reduced growth and regeneration of larch alternated with regions where these parameters remained constant or even increased. Reduced productivity could be correlated with increasing summer temperatures and decreasing precipitation; improved growth conditions were found at increasing precipitation, but constant summer temperatures. An effect of increasing winter temperatures on tree-ring width or forest regeneration was not detectable. Since declines of productivity and regeneration are more widespread in the Mongolian taiga than the opposite trend, a net loss of forests is likely to occur in the future, as strong increases in temperature and regionally differing changes in precipitation are predicted for the twenty-first century. PMID:20571829

  2. Diverging climate trends in Mongolian taiga forests influence growth and regeneration of Larix sibirica.

    PubMed

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Hauck, Markus; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Leuschner, Hanns Hubert; Leuschner, Christoph

    2010-08-01

    Central and semiarid north-eastern Asia was subject to twentieth century warming far above the global average. Since forests of this region occur at their drought limit, they are particularly vulnerable to climate change. We studied the regional variations of temperature and precipitation trends and their effects on tree growth and forest regeneration in Mongolia. Tree-ring series from more than 2,300 trees of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) collected in four regions of Mongolia's forest zone were analyzed and related to available weather data. Climate trends underlie a remarkable regional variation leading to contrasting responses of tree growth in taiga forests even within the same mountain system. Within a distance of a few hundred kilometers (140-490 km), areas with recently reduced growth and regeneration of larch alternated with regions where these parameters remained constant or even increased. Reduced productivity could be correlated with increasing summer temperatures and decreasing precipitation; improved growth conditions were found at increasing precipitation, but constant summer temperatures. An effect of increasing winter temperatures on tree-ring width or forest regeneration was not detectable. Since declines of productivity and regeneration are more widespread in the Mongolian taiga than the opposite trend, a net loss of forests is likely to occur in the future, as strong increases in temperature and regionally differing changes in precipitation are predicted for the twenty-first century.

  3. Attraction of the gypsy moth to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of damaged Dahurian larch.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Valimaki, Sanna; Shi, Juan; Zong, Shixiang; Luo, Youqing; Heliovaara, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory responses of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), a major defoliator of deciduous trees, were examined in Inner Mongolia, China. We studied whether the gypsy moth adults are attracted by the major volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of damaged Larix gmelinii (Dahurian larch) foliage and compared the attractiveness of the plant volatiles with that of the synthetic sex pheromone. Our results indicated that the VOCs of the Dahurian larch were effective in attracting gypsy moth males especially during the peak flight period. The VOCs also attracted moths significantly better than the sex pheromone of the moth. Our study is the first trial to show the responses of adult gypsy moths to volatile compounds emitted from a host plant. Electroantennogram responses of L. gmelinii volatiles on gypsy moths supported our field observations. A synergistic effect between host plant volatiles and sex pheromone was also obvious, and both can be jointly applied as a new attractant method or population management strategy of the gypsy moth.

  4. Tracing fresh assimilates through Larix decidua exposed to elevated CO₂ and soil warming at the alpine treeline using compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Streit, Kathrin; Rinne, Katja T; Hagedorn, Frank; Dawes, Melissa A; Saurer, Matthias; Hoch, Günter; Werner, Roland A; Buchmann, Nina; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2013-02-01

    How will carbon source-sink relations of 35-yr-old larch trees (Larix decidua) at the alpine treeline respond to changes in atmospheric CO(2) and climate? We evaluated the effects of previously elevated CO(2) concentrations (9 yr, 580 ppm, ended the previous season) and ongoing soil warming (4 yr, + 4°C). Larch branches were pulse labeled (50 at% (13)CO(2)) in July 2010 to trace fresh assimilates through tissues (buds, needles, bark and wood) and non-structural carbon compounds (NCC; starch, lipids, individual sugars) using compound-specific isotope analysis. Nine years of elevated CO(2) did not lead to increased NCC concentrations, nor did soil warming increase NCC transfer velocities. By contrast, we found slower transfer velocities and higher NCC concentrations than reported in the literature for lowland larch. As a result of low dilution with older carbon, sucrose and glucose showed the highest maximum (13)C labels, whereas labels were lower for starch, lipids and pinitol. Label residence times in needles were shorter for sucrose and starch (c. 2 d) than for glucose (c. 6 d). Although our treatments showed no persistent effect on larch carbon relations, low temperature at high altitudes clearly induced a limitation of sink activities (growth, respiration, root exudation), expressed in slower carbon transfer and higher NCC concentrations.

  5. Magnesium isotopes in permafrost-dominated Central Siberian larch forest watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Viers, Jérôme; Korets, Mikhail A.

    2014-12-01

    To unravel the Mg isotope fractionation pathways within the continuous permafrost zone in the larch deciduous forest of Central Siberia, we measured the Mg isotopic composition of two large Siberian rivers (Nizhnaya Tunguska and Kochechum, which flow into the Yenisey), a small forested stream, and the major fluid and solid sources of Mg in the watershed: atmospheric precipitates, surface suprapermafrost flow, interstitial soil solutions, plant biomass, litter and mineral soils. The obtained results indicate a significant seasonal variation in riverine water Mg isotope signatures. During the winter baseflow, the Mg isotope composition of large rivers is significantly lighter than the source basaltic rocks and the atmospheric depositions. These differences support the presence of fluids enriched in lighter Mg isotopes, such as those affected by the mineral precipitation of secondary silicates or fluids that dissolve sedimentary carbonate rocks. During the spring flood and in the summer and fall seasons, the river fluid δ26Mg values increased by 0.2-0.3‰ and approached the Mg isotope composition of the ground vegetation (dwarf shrubs, mosses) and the soil organic horizon. Overall, the riverine waters were 0.3-0.7‰ lighter than the unaltered bedrock and the deep minerals soil horizons. The Mg isotopic compositions of Larix gmelinii organs (i.e., stem wood, roots and needles) exhibit a low variability. However, an enrichment of 0.2-0.3‰ in the δ26Mg of larch needles in the course of the growing season, from June to September can be observed. This enrichment most likely demonstrates uptake of isotopically heavier Mg by the plant in addition to the progressive thawing of the mineral soil (deepening of the active layer of the soil). Overall, the Mg isotope approach indicates the important contribution of vegetation (larch needles, mosses and dwarf shrubs) to the riverine Mg isotope signature and helps to reveal the contribution of isotopically light carbonate rocks

  6. Growth-climate relations of Larix decidua and Pinus cembra in an inner-alpine dry valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obojes, Nikolaus; Meurer, Armin; Tasser, Erich; Mayr, Stefan; Oberhuber, Walter; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Due to climate change, increasing temperatures and decreasing precipitation are expected for the southern part of the Alps. To estimate possible effects on growth conditions in mountain forests we investigated climate to tree growth relations along an elevation gradient in one of the driest regions in the Alps, the LTSER site Matsch/Mazia in South Tyrol, Italy. Besides Picea abies (27%), Larix decidua (42%) and Pinus cembra (25%) are the two most abundant tree species in the study area. While Pinus cembra is restricted to the sub-alpine zone, Larix decidua is ranging from the lowest parts of the study area up to the tree line, especially at lower elevations also due to reforestation efforts of heavily eroding pastures in the past 120 years and traditional silvopastural systems which promote Larch. The reaction of the two species to changing climatic conditions during the last 150 years were analyzed by relating tree ring width of Larix decidua from 8 sites at elevations from 1070 to 2430 m a.s.l. and of Pinus cembra from 5 sites ranging from 2030 to 2430 m a.s.l. at SE- and NW-exposed slopes to temperature and precipitation records from the nearby station at Marienberg (1310 m a.s.l.) dating back to 1860. Overall, basal area increment was highest at sites at about 2000 m a.s.l and decreased at higher and for Larch at lower sites. At lower elevations up to 1750 m a.s.l. growth rates of Larix decidua generally decreased during the last 15 years, especially during and after the 2003 heat wave, after increasing from the 1950s to the 1980s . On the contrary, at elevations of more than 2000 m a.s.l., growth of both Larch and Pinus cembra increased since the 1990s. Growth-climate correlations and extreme year analysis show a similar results: at low-elevation sites, growth was correlated positively to precipitation and reacted positively to wet and cold years and negatively to hot and dry years. On the other hand, growth was positively correlated to temperature at the

  7. Wildfires in Northern Siberian Larch Dominated Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaurk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Im, Sergey T.

    2011-01-01

    The fire history of the northern larch forests within the permafrost zone in a portion of northern Siberia (approx 66 deg N, 100 deg E) was studied. Since there is little to no human activities in this area fires within the study area were mostly caused by lightning. Fire return intervals (FRI) were estimated based on burn marks on tree stems and dates of tree natality. FRI values varied from 130 yr to 350 yr with 200 +/- 50 yr mean. In southerly larch dominated communities FRI was found to be shorter (77 +/- 20 yr at approx 61 deg. N, and 82 +/- 7 at 64 deg N), and longer at the northern boundary (approx 71 deg) of larch stands (320 +/- 50 yr). During the Little Ice Age period in the 16th to 18th centuries FRI was approximately twice as long as recorded in this study. Fire caused changes in the soil including increases in soil drainage and permafrost thawing depth and a radial growth increase of about 2 times (with more than 6 times observed). This effect may simulate the predicted warming impact on the larch growth in the permafrost zone.

  8. Carbon and nitrogen status of litterfall, litter decomposition and soil in even-aged larch, red pine and rigitaeda pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choonsig; Jeong, Jaeyeob; Cho, Hyun-Seo; Son, Yowhan

    2010-07-01

    The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) status in forest ecosystems can change upon establishment of plantations because different tree species have different nutrient cycling mechanisms. This study was carried out to evaluate C and N status of litterfall, litter decomposition and soil in three adjacent plantations consisting of one deciduous (larch: Larix leptolepis) and two evergreen (red pine: Pinus densiflora; rigitaeda pine: P. rigida x P. taeda) species planted in the same year (1963). Both the pine plantations showed comparatively higher C input from needle litter but significantly lower N concentration and input than the larch plantation (P < 0.05). During the decomposition process, the deciduous larch needle litter showed low C concentration and C remaining in soil, but high N concentration and N remaining in soil compared to the two evergreen pine needle litters. However, the soil C and N concentration and their content at a soil depth of 0-10 cm were not affected significantly (P > 0.05) by the plantation type. These results demonstrate the existence of considerable variation in C and N status resulting from needle litter input and litter decomposition in these three plantations grown at sites with similar environmental conditions.

  9. Climate effects on inter- and intra-annual larch stemwood anomalies in the Mongolian forest-steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Leuschner, Hanns Hubert; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Climate response of tree-ring width and intra-annual wood anomalies were studied in stands of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) on Mt. Bogd Uul in the forest-steppe ecotone of Mongolia. Climate on Mt. Bogd Uul is characterized by an increase of the annual mean temperature by 1.5 K between 1965 and 2007, the lack of a long-term trend for annual precipitation and, with it, an increase in aridity. Tree-ring width increases with increasing June precipitation of the current year (June) and increasing late summer precipitation of the previous year. In >100-year old trees, also a negative correlation of tree-ring width with the July temperature of the year prior to tree-ring formation was found. Decreasing tree-ring width with increasing snowfall in December can be explained with the protection of the frost-sensitive eggs of gypsy moth by snow cover, which is a major herbivore of larch in Mongolia and causes reduction in the annual stem increment. The most significant change in wood anatomy was the decline of wide latewood, which is attributable to the increase of summer days with a mean temperature > 15 °C and drought periods in summer without precipitation. Increasing summer drought is also thought to have caused the repeated occurrence of missing rings since the 1960s, which were not observed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity in Larix gmelinii (Pinaceae) with RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H G; Li, X F

    2013-01-24

    Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii), a deciduous conifer, is the northernmost tree, native to eastern Siberia and nearby regions of China. We used growth traits and molecular markers to assess genetic variation in different L. gmelinii growing regions; 105 individual samples were collected from seven regions of the Qingshan Forestry Centre, Heilongjiang Province, China. The greatest genetic regional variation was seen in the Youhao area, based on coefficients of variation for tree height, diameter and volume (14.73, 28.25, and 55.27%, respectively). Analysis using molecular markers showed rich genetic diversity. The RAPD and ISSR methods both indicated that most variation came from within populations. The seven regions were divided into two groups (Daxing'an and Xiaoxing'an Mountain ranges) by RAPD cluster analysis: Tianchi, Xiaojiuya, Yuanjiang, and Taiping regions were placed in the first group at a genetic distance of 0.08; while the other regions were in the second group. The correlation between RAPD markers and geographical distance was significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.752.

  11. Characterization of Siberia Larch Forest from Palsar L-Band Radar and Landsat Vcf Data Trained by High-Resolution Stereo and Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranson, J.; Sun, G.; Montesano, P. M.; Cook, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Larch (Larix spp.) dominant forests occupy about 70% of the permafrost areas in Siberia. Improved understanding of the fate of the larch forests in the face of climate change requires a concerted long term research effort to detect and quantify ecosystem responses. Satellite data analysis offers much improved information on changes in the forest-tundra transitional zone and on forest structure in this area. The LANDSAT data and radar data such as ALOS/PALSAR provide extensive coverage at high resolution (30m pixel). In this study, the utilization of these data for regional canopy height and biomass mapping was examined. The major challenge for characterization of forest in a remote area such as Siberia is the lack of adequate number of training and validation data. The results of using GLAS waveform data to extend field measurements which has been successful in other ecosystems were found to be poor because most of the waveforms were acquired when the deciduous larch tree had no needles. In this study, the stereo optical data from high resolution spaceborne imagery (HRSI) were used to a generate canopy height model (CHM) by identifying both tree top and ground surface in these sparse forests. The regression models between the field measured canopy height, biomass and the stereo CHM were developed and the field data were extended to the forested areas within the entire stereo images, providing more data for training and validation. We compare the mapping results from two methods. One uses GLAS waveform data and the other uses high resolution stereo imagery to extrapolate field measurements. Results demonstrate the potential and limitations using high resolution stereo imagery to provide training information of sparse larch forest in Siberia.

  12. Tissue-Specific and Development-Dependent Accumulation of Phenylpropanoids in Larch Mycorrhizas.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, M.; Mikolajewski, S.; Peipp, H.; Schmitt, U.; Schmidt, J.; Wray, V.; Strack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The tissue-specific and development-dependent accumulation of secondary products in roots and mycorrhizas of larch (Larix decidua Mill.; Pinaceae) was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography and histochemical methods. The compounds identified were soluble catechin, epicatechin, quercetin 3-O-[alpha]-rhamnoside, cyanidin- and peonidin 3-O-[beta]-glucoside, 4-O-[beta]-hydroxybenzoyl-O-[beta]-glucose, 4-hydroxybenzoate 4-O-[beta]-glucoside, maltol 3-O-[beta]-glucoside, and the wall-bound 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, and ferulate. In addition, we partially identified a tetrahydroxystilbene monoglycoside, a quercetin glycoside, and eight oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Comparison between the compounds accumulating in the apical tissue of fine roots, long roots, and in vitro grown mycorrhizas (L. decidua-Suillus tridentinus) showed elevated levels of the major compounds catechin and epicatechin as well as the minor compound 4-hydroxybenzoate 4-O-[beta]-glucoside specifically in the root apex of young mycorrhizas. The amounts of wall-bound 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin were increased in all of the mycorrhizal sections examined. During the early stages of mycorrhization the concentrations of these compounds increased rapidly, perhaps induced by the mycorrhizal fungus. In addition, studies of L. decidua-Boletinus cavipes mycorrhizas from a natural stand showed that the central part of the subapical cortex tissue and the endodermis both accumulate massive concentrations of catechin, epicatechin, and wall-bound ferulate compared with the outer part of the cortex, where the Hartig net is being formed. PMID:12223686

  13. Wildfires Dynamics in Siberian Larch Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Evgenii I.; Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire number and burned area temporal dynamics within all of Siberia and along a south-north transect in central Siberia (45deg-73degN) were studied based on NOAA/AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and Terra/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data and field measurements for the period 1996-2015. In addition, fire return interval (FRI) along the south-north transect was analyzed. Both the number of forest fires and the size of the burned area increased during recent decades (p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between forest fires, burned areas and air temperature (r = 0.5) and drought index (The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index, SPEI) (r = 0.43). Within larch stands along the transect, wildfire frequency was strongly correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = 0.91). Fire danger period length decreased linearly from south to north along the transect. Fire return interval increased from 80 years at 62 N to 200 years at the Arctic Circle (6633' N), and to about 300 years near the northern limit of closed forest stands (about 71+ N). That increase was negatively correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = 0.95). Keywords: wildfires; drought index; larch stands; fire return interval; fire frequency; burned area; climate-induced trends in Siberian wildfires

  14. Tree Line Structure and Dynamics at the Northern Limit of the Larch Forest: Anabar Plateau, Siberia, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Im, Sergey T.; Oskorbin, Pavel A.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitriy V.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was to provide an analysis of climate impact before, during, and after the Little Ice Age (LIA) on the larch (Larix gmelinii) tree line at the northern extreme of Siberian forests. Recent decadal climate change impacts on the tree line, regeneration abundance, and age structure were analyzed. The location of the study area was within the forest-tundra ecotone (elevation range 170-450 m) in the Anabar Plateau, northern Siberia. Field studies were conducted along elevational transects. Tree natality/mortality and radial increment were determined based on dendrochronology analyses. Tree morphology, number of living and subfossil trees, regeneration abundance, and age structure were studied. Locations of pre-LIA, LIA, and post-LIA tree lines and refugia boundaries were established. Long-term climate variables and drought index were included in the analysis. It was found that tree mortality from the 16th century through the beginning of the 19th century caused a downward tree line recession. Sparse larch stands experienced deforestation, transforming into tundra with isolated relict trees. The maximum tree mortality and radial growth decrease were observed to have occurred at the beginning of 18th century. Now larch, at its northern boundary in Siberia, is migrating into tundra areas. Upward tree migration was induced by warming in the middle of the 19th century. Refugia played an important role in repopulation of the forest-tundra ecotone by providing a seed source and shelter for recruitment of larch regeneration. Currently this ecotone is being repopulated mainly by tree cohorts that were established after the 1930s. The last two decades of warming did not result in an acceleration of regeneration recruitment because of increased drought conditions. The regeneration line reached (but did not exceed) the pre-LIA tree line location, although contemporary tree heights and stand densities are comparatively lower than in the pre-LIA period. The mean

  15. Age-related trends in genetic parameters for Larix kaempferi and their implications for early selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi) has been introduced in China at the end of the 19th century, and as one successful exotic species, is becoming the preferred coniferous in northern China and sub-tropical alpine region. The rotation age is about 25-28 years for L. kaempferi as pulpwood in Henan province. Waiting for even one-half rotation age for final evaluation will be inefficient due to accumulated testing costs and delayed return on investment, which suggests that selection at an early age is highly desirable for L. kaempferi improvement programs in Henan province. In this study, we determined age trends of genetic parameters and evaluated early selection efficiency for L. kaempferi in Henan province to find out the appropriate trait for early selection and its selection age. Results Growth traits of 78 clones were measured periodically from age 2 to age 15 in a clonal trial of Larix kaempferi establishted at Son town, Henan Province. The genetic variation among clones, age-age correlations, and age trends in genetic parameters for growth traits were analyzed. Variant analysis revealed that tree height (HGT) and diameter at breast (DBH) were significant (1% level) among clones at every ages. The clonal repeatability of growth traits varied year-by-year, reaching the highest levels at different ages for different traits (0.77 at age 2 for HGT, 0.70 at age 5 for DBH and 0.66 from age 8 to age 10 for volume, respectively). The age-age genetic correlations ranged from 0.904 to 1.000 for HGT, and from 0943 to 1.000 for DBH. DBH at different ages was more genetically correlated to volume-15 than HGT. At the phenotypic level, HGT was always less correlated to volume-15 than DBH. With the estimates of efficiencies of early selection, the recommendation from present study was that the optimum age of early selection was age 2 for HGT and age 5 for DBH. Conclusions Our study showed that there were significant (1% level) on growth traits among clones at every

  16. Relationships between root respiration rate and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuxia; McLaughlin, Neil B; Gu, Jiacun; Li, Xingpeng; Wang, Zhengquan

    2013-06-01

    Tree roots are highly heterogeneous in form and function. Previous studies revealed that fine root respiration was related to root morphology, tissue nitrogen (N) concentration and temperature, and varied with both soil depth and season. The underlying mechanisms governing the relationship between root respiration and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy along the root branch order have not been addressed. Here, we examined these relationships of the first- to fifth-order roots for near surface roots (0-10 cm) of 22-year-old larch (Larix gmelinii L.) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica L.) plantations. Root respiration rate at 18 °C was measured by gas phase O2 electrodes across the first five branching order roots (the distal roots numbered as first order) at three times of the year. Root parameters of root diameter, specific root length (SRL), tissue N concentration, total non-structural carbohydrates (starch and soluble sugar) concentration (TNC), cortical thickness and stele diameter were also measured concurrently. With increasing root order, root diameter, TNC and the ratio of root TNC to tissue N concentration increased, while the SRL, tissue N concentration and cortical proportion decreased. Root respiration rate also monotonically decreased with increasing root order in both species. Cortical tissue (including exodermis, cortical parenchyma and endodermis) was present in the first three order roots, and cross sections of the cortex for the first-order root accounted for 68% (larch) and 86% (ash) of the total cross section of the root. Root respiration was closely related to root traits such as diameter, SRL, tissue N concentration, root TNC : tissue N ratio and stele-to-root diameter proportion among the first five orders, which explained up to 81-94% of variation in the rate of root respiration for larch and up to 83-93% for ash. These results suggest that the systematic variations of root respiration rate within tree fine root system are possibly due to the

  17. The relationship between needle sugar carbon isotope ratios and tree rings of larch in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Rinne, K T; Saurer, M; Kirdyanov, A V; Loader, N J; Bryukhanova, M V; Werner, R A; Siegwolf, R T W

    2015-11-01

    Significant gaps still exist in our knowledge about post-photosynthetic leaf level and downstream metabolic processes and isotopic fractionations. This includes their impact on the isotopic climate signal stored in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of leaf assimilates and tree rings. For the first time, we compared the seasonal δ(13)C variability of leaf sucrose with intra-annual, high-resolution δ(13)C signature of tree rings from larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.). The trees were growing at two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with different growth conditions. Our results indicate very similar low-frequency intra-seasonal trends of the sucrose and tree ring δ(13)C records with little or no indication for the use of 'old' photosynthates formed during the previous year(s). The comparison of leaf sucrose δ(13)C values with that in other leaf sugars and in tree rings elucidates the cause for the reported (13)C-enrichment of sink organs compared with leaves. We observed that while the average δ(13)C of all needle sugars was 1.2‰ more negative than δ(13)C value of wood, the δ(13)C value of the transport sugar sucrose was on an average 1.0‰ more positive than that of wood. Our study shows a high potential of the combined use of compound-specific isotope analysis of sugars (leaf and phloem) with intra-annual tree ring δ(13)C measurements for deepening our understanding about the mechanisms controlling the isotope variability in tree rings under different environmental conditions.

  18. Long-term Impacts of Fire on Permafrost Vulnerability and C loss in Siberian Larch Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Natali, S.; Alexander, H. D.; Loranty, M. M.; Spawn, S.; Risk, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In Boreal forests, which contain large stocks of terrestrial carbon (C), fires have been increasing and are expected to continue to do so as the climate becomes warmer and dryer. Here we studied the indirect, long-term effects of fire on ecosystem C cycling via changes in stand density, organic layer and thaw depth in, in Siberian larch (Larix cajanderi) forests, underlain by continuous permafrost, near Chersky, Russia. Understory net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco) and thaw depth were measured for 3 growing seasons from density plots (related to fire severity) found within a 75-yr burn scar and from experimental burn plots. In 2015, Reco was partitioned, using a dual-isotope approach, to determine how fire severity alters the contribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Reco gas samples were collected from static chambers, and at the density gradient we also collected carbon dioxide (CO2) from Reco sources (organic and mineral layer soils, above and belowground vegetation). We expect that differences in thaw depth, vegetation and organic layer related to stand density, will impact the contribution of old C sources to Reco. In the experimental burn plots, the severity of the burn and thaw depth were positively correlated, and promoted loss of old C. Following the fires in 2012, higher intensity burns decreased Reco, but 3 years later, Reco was similar across burn treatments. In the 75-yr burn, stand density significantly impacted both thaw depth and understory CO2 exchange, where higher density stands, had lower thaw depths, higher understory NEE, and C loss from young C sources that have assimilated since the fire. Decades after fire, permafrost vulnerability and C accumulation are driven by stand density, where higher-density stands have higher rates of NEE, but C loss from relatively young C.

  19. Climate signal in d13C of wood lignin methoxyl groups from high-elevation alpine larch trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelmann, Dana; Greule, Markus; Treydte, Kerstin; Keppler, Frank; Esper, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Tree-rings of high alpine larch trees (Larix decidua) were investigated by a recently established method that measures d13C values of the wood lignin methoxyl groups (Greule et al. 2009). The resulting d13C time series were tested for their potential as a climate proxy. For this 37 larch trees were sampled at the tree line near Simplon Village (Southern Switzerland). They were analysed for their tree-ring width (TRW) and from five individuals d13C of the wood lignin methoxyl groups (d13Cmethoxyl) were measured at annual resolution from 1971-2009 and at pentadal resolution from 1747-2009. The d13Cmethoxyl chronologies were corrected for the anthropogenic change in atmospheric CO2 concentration and its decreasing d13C value. Further, the physiological response of the trees to these atmospheric changes was corrected using the flexible correction factor approach of Treydte et al. (2009), which minimise the residuals with the target climate data. This approach results in the highest so far reported correction factors of 0.032 - 0.036‰/ppmv CO2, which are explained by a low water-use efficiency of deciduous larch. The climate response of the new d13Cmethoxyl proxy shows a significant correlation of 0.75 for the annually and 0.87 for the pentadally resolved data with June to August temperatures. TRW shows also significant correlations with June to August temperatures, but they are lower than the correlations observed for the d13Cmethoxyl chronologies. These results indicate the potential of d13Cmethoxyl chronologies as a summer temperature proxy from high-elevation alpine trees with an even stronger signal than reported from earlier published tree-ring width and maximum latewood density temperature reconstructions. References: Greule, M., Mosandl, A., Hamilton, J.T.G., Keppler, F., 2009. A simple rapid method to precisely determine 13C/12C ratios of plant methoxyl groups. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 23(11): 1710-1714. Treydte, K.S., Frank, D.C., Saurer, M

  20. Early and late seasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    Despite large geographic extent of deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii, its seasonal photosynthetic activity and translocation of photoassimilated carbon within a tree remain poorly studied. To get better insight into productivity of larch trees growing on permafrost soils in Siberian larch biome we aimed to analyze dynamics of foliage parameters (i.e. leaf area, biomass, %N, %P etc.), seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity and apply whole tree labeling by 13CO2, which is powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree (Kagawa et al., 2006; Keel et al., 2012). Experimental plot has been established in mature 105 year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64o17'13" N, 100o11'55" E, 148 m a.s.l.). Trees selected for experiments represented mean tree of the stand. Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliar biomass sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013) until yellowing and senescence of needles on September 17, 2013. Labeling by 13C in whole tree chamber was conducted by three pulses ([CO2]max ≤ 2,500 ppmv, 13CO2 (30% v/v)) at the early (June) and late (August) phase of growing season for different trees in 3 replicates each time. Both early season and late season labeling experiments demonstrated high rate of 13CO2 assimilation and respective enrichment of needle tissues by 13C: δ13C increased from -28.7 up to +670‰ just after labeling. However, there was distinct post-labeling dynamics of needle δ13C among two seasonal experiments. At the early season 13C depletion in labeled needles was slower, and δ13C approached after 40 days ca. +110 ‰ and remained constant till senescence. In the late season (August) needles were losing labeled C with much faster rate and approached only +1.5 ‰ upon senescence (28 days exposition). These findings suggest that in early season ca. 20% of

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of mRNA and miRNA in Somatic Embryos of Larix leptolepis Subjected to Hydrogen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Han, Suying; Ding, Xiangming; Li, Xinmin; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Wanfeng; Xu, Haiyan; Li, Zhexin; Qi, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is a therapeutic antioxidant that has been used extensively in clinical trials. It also acts as a bioactive molecule that can alleviate abiotic stress in plants. However, the biological effects of hydrogen in somatic embryos and the underlying molecular basis remain largely unknown. In this study, the morphological and physiological influence of exogenous H2 treatment during somatic embryogenesis was characterized in Larix leptolepis Gordon. The results showed that exposure to hydrogen increased the proportions of active pro-embryogenic cells and normal somatic embryos. We sequenced mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) libraries to identify global transcriptome changes at different time points during H2 treatment of larch pro-embryogenic masses (PEMs). A total of 45,393 mRNAs and 315 miRNAs were obtained. Among them, 4253 genes and 96 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the hydrogen-treated libraries compared with the control. Further, a large number of the differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs were related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and cell cycle regulation. We also identified 4399 potential target genes for 285 of the miRNAs. The differential expression data and the mRNA-miRNA interaction network described here provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that determine the performance of PEMs exposed to H2 during somatic embryogenesis. PMID:27879674

  2. Larch: X-ray Analysis for Synchrotron Applications using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Larch is an open-source library and toolkit written in Python for processing and analyzing X-ray spectroscopic data. The primary emphasis is on X-ray spectroscopic and scattering data collected at modern synchrotron sources. Larch provides a wide selection of general-purpose processing, analysis, and visualization tools for processing X-ray data; its related target application areas include X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps, quantitative X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and X-ray standing waves and surface scattering. Larch provides a complete set of XAFS Analysis tools and has support for visualizing and analyzing XRF maps and spectra, and additional tools for X-ray spectral analysis, data handling, and general-purpose data modeling.

  3. Examining the response of larch needle carbohydrates to climate using compound-specific δ13C and concentration analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Saurer, Matthias; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Bryukhanova, Marina V.; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.; Churakova Sidorova, Olga V.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the dynamics of concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of individual carbohydrates in leaves in response to climatic and physiological factors. Improved knowledge of the isotopic ratio in sugars will enhance our understanding of the tree ring isotope ratio and will help to decipher environmental conditions in retrospect more reliably. Carbohydrate samples from larch (Larix gmelinii) needles of two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with differing growth conditions were analysed with the Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA). We compared concentrations and carbon isotope values (δ13C) of sucrose, fructose, glucose and pinitol combined with phenological data. The results for the variability of the needle carbohydrates show high dynamics with distinct seasonal characteristics between and within the studied years with a clear link to the climatic conditions, particularly vapour pressure deficit. Compound-specific differences in δ13C values as a response to climate were detected. The δ13C of pinitol, which contributes up to 50% of total soluble carbohydrates, was almost invariant during the whole growing season. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of compound-specific needle carbohydrate isotope variability, identifies involved mechanisms and shows the potential of such results for linking tree physiological responses to different climatic conditions.

  4. Antennal responses of the two host races of the larch bud moth, Zeiraphera diniana, to larch and cembran pine volatiles.

    PubMed

    Syed, Z; Guerin, P M; Baltensweiler, W

    2003-07-01

    The larch bud moth (LBM) Zeiraphera diniana Guenée causes defoliation on larch in the Alps at 8- to 10-year intervals, after which populations crash. There are two LBM host races, one on larch and the other on cembran pine. These host races are morphologically indistinguishable as adults but they differ genetically in larval color types. Furthermore, females of each host race produce distinct pheromone blends and show oviposition preferences for their respective hosts. It is not clear to what extent host choice contributes to assortative mating in the LBM. Here, we compare the olfactory sensitivities of the two host races to the odors of fresh foliage of the host plants using the electroantennogram (EAG) technique, and the responses of the two host races to volatiles collected from the two host plants as analyzed by gas-chromatography-linked antennographic detection (GC-EAD). Both sexes of the larch and cembran host races show the same EAG responses to vapors of fresh larch and cembran pine foliage. Fifteen plant volatiles identified as chemostimuli by GC-EAD from larch and cembran pine odors elicited the same antennogram responses from the two host races. However, the GC-EAD analyses indicate that the number and quantity of chemostimuli emanating from each host plant is different. It is, therefore, most probably the array of olfactory receptors responding to the bouquet of volatiles unique to each host plant that underlies the host preferences of the two races. What remains open is the extent to which the similarity of the olfactory systems may contribute to cross-attraction. The fact that LBM individuals with intermediate characteristics between the two host races exist, suggests that olfactory perception does not hinder gene flow and contributes to sustained genetic diversity within the species Z. diniana.

  5. q-deformations and the dynamics of the larch bud-moth population cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, Sudharsana V.; Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    The concept of q-deformation of numbers is applied here to improve and modify a tritrophic population dynamics model to understand defoliation of the coniferous larch trees due to outbreaks of the larch bud-moth insect population. The results are in qualitative agreement with observed behavior, with the larch needle lengths, bud-moth population and parasitoid populations all showing 9-period cycles which are mutually synchronized.

  6. Impact of climate change on larch budmoth cyclic outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sudharsana V; Balakrishnan, Janaki; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-13

    Periodic outbreaks of the larch budmoth Zeiraphera diniana population (and the massive forest defoliation they engender) have been recorded in the Alps over the centuries and are known for their remarkable regularity. But these have been conspicuously absent since 1981. On the other hand, budmoth outbreaks have been historically unknown in the larches of the Carpathian Tatra mountains. To resolve this puzzle, we propose here a model which includes the influence of climate and explains both the 8-9 year periodicity in the budmoth cycle and the variations from this, as well as the absence of cycles. We successfully capture the observed trend of relative frequencies of outbreaks, reproducing the dominant periodicities seen. We contend that the apparent collapse of the cycle in 1981 is due to changing climatic conditions following a tipping point and propose the recurrence of the cycle with a changed periodicity of 40 years - the next outbreak could occur in 2021. Our model also predicts longer cycles.

  7. Impact of climate change on larch budmoth cyclic outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, Sudharsana V.; Balakrishnan, Janaki; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Periodic outbreaks of the larch budmoth Zeiraphera diniana population (and the massive forest defoliation they engender) have been recorded in the Alps over the centuries and are known for their remarkable regularity. But these have been conspicuously absent since 1981. On the other hand, budmoth outbreaks have been historically unknown in the larches of the Carpathian Tatra mountains. To resolve this puzzle, we propose here a model which includes the influence of climate and explains both the 8–9 year periodicity in the budmoth cycle and the variations from this, as well as the absence of cycles. We successfully capture the observed trend of relative frequencies of outbreaks, reproducing the dominant periodicities seen. We contend that the apparent collapse of the cycle in 1981 is due to changing climatic conditions following a tipping point and propose the recurrence of the cycle with a changed periodicity of 40 years – the next outbreak could occur in 2021. Our model also predicts longer cycles.

  8. Effect of warming on larch trees in the Asian southern border of the boreal forest, Mongolia and China in the 20th century.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Caceres, Maximo Larry; Cho, Qiqin; Nobori, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Kazuo; Byambasuren, Mijidsuren; Zhang, Yandong; Sugimoto, Atsuko

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades air temperature (Ta) has been increasing steadily around the globe and it is reported that in the last 40 years Ta in Mongolia alone has increased by about 2.1 deg.C. The boreal region as a whole is expected to experience changes due to atmospheric drying, permafrost degradation, increases in the frequency of forest fires and other factors that will lead to a shift of the forest ecosystems northward. The southern border of the boreal forest distributes in northern Mongolia and northeast China, which as transition areas are more sensitive to changes. In a 500 km long south-north transect of larch forests extending in each of these two countries, larch forest sites were chosen (Larix sibirica in Mongolia and Larix gmeliini in China). Studies until now have used only tree-ring analysis to determined past and recent climate in Mongolia and China. However, isotope analysis has not been coupled with this analysis to give a wider overview of the environmental changes taking place in these regions. Therefore in this study tree core samples were collected for tree-ring and carbon isotope analysis to be coupled with available meteorological data. These data indicate that in the last four decades, the northernmost site of the selected transect has experienced the largest increase in Ta, but nevertheless the annual Ta in the southernmost site remained several degrees higher. On the other hand precipitation shows a very slight increase in the central and northernmost sites while an insignificant decrease is observed in the southernmost site. Tree-ring analysis shows that for most of the 20th century tree ring growth had lower inter-annual variability until the beginning of the 1970's but from then on the annual variability has increased. Unlike the results of the tree-ring analysis, the carbon isotope analysis revealed that until the 1970's the increases in the drying atmospheric conditions (higher temperature-no changes in rainfall) were not present but the

  9. Site-specific water-use strategies of mountain pine and larch to cope with recent climate change.

    PubMed

    Churakova Sidorova, Olga V; Saurer, Matthias; Bryukhanova, Marina V; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Bigler, Christof

    2016-08-01

    We aim to achieve a mechanistic understanding of the eco-physiological processes in Larix decidua and Pinus mugo var. uncinata growing on north- and south-facing aspects in the Swiss National Park in order to distinguish the short- and long-term effects of a changing climate. To strengthen the interpretation of the δ(18)O signal in tree rings and its coherence with the main factors and processes driving evaporative δ(18)O needle water enrichment, we analyzed the δ(18)O in needle, xylem and soil water over the growing season in 2013 and applied the mechanistic Craig-Gordon model (1965) for the short-term responses. We found that δ(18)O needle water strongly reflected the variability of relative humidity mainly for larch, while only δ(18)O in pine xylem water showed a strong link to δ(18)O in precipitation. Larger differences in offsets between modeled and measured δ(18)O needle water for both species from the south-facing aspects were detected, which could be explained by the high transpiration rates. Different soil water and needle water responses for the two species indicate different water-use strategies, further modulated by the site conditions. To reveal the long-term physiological response of the studied trees to recent and past climate changes, we analyzed δ(13)C and δ(18)O in wood chronologies from 1900 to 2013. Summer temperatures as well as summer and annual amount of precipitations are important factors for growth of both studied species from both aspects. However, mountain pine trees reduced sensitivity to temperature changes, while precipitation changes come to play an important role for the period from 1980 to 2013. Intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) calculated for larch trees since the 1990s reached a saturation point at elevated CO2 Divergent trends between pine WUEi and δ(18)O are most likely indicative of a decline of mountain pine trees and are also reflected in decoupling mechanisms in the isotope signals between needles and tree-rings.

  10. Intraseasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Siberia after (13)C labeling (two seasons of 2013-2014 observation).

    PubMed

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2016-12-01

    This research is an attempt to study seasonal translocation patterns of photoassimilated carbon within trees of one of the high latitudes widespread deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii (Rupr. Rupr). For this purpose, we applied whole-tree labeling by (13)CO2, which is a powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree. Experimental plot has been established in a mature 105-year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64°17'13″N, 100°11'55″E, 148 m a.s.l.). Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliage parameters (i.e., leaf length, area, biomass, etc.), and sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013; May 14, 2014) until yellowing and senescence of needles (September 17, 2013; September 14, 2014). Labeling by (13)C of the tree branch (June 2013, for 3 branch replicates in 3 different trees) and the whole tree was conducted at early (June 2014), middle (July 2014), and late (August 2013) phase of growing season (for different trees in 3 replicates each time) by three pulses [(CO2)max = 3000-4000 ppmv, (13)CO2 (30 % v/v)]. We found at least two different patterns of carbon translocation associated with larch CO2 assimilation depending on needle phenology. In early period of growing season (June), (13)C appearing in newly developed needles is a result of remobilized storage material use for growth purposes. Then approximately at the end of June, growth processes is switching to storage processes lasting to the end of growing season.

  11. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosols in a Larix kaempferi forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Ono, K.; Wada, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Saigusa, N.; Kawamura, K.; Tani, A.

    2015-04-01

    We conducted simultaneous measurements of concentrations and above-canopy fluxes of isoprene and α-pinene, along with their oxidation products in aerosols in a Larix kaempferi (Japanese larch) forest in summer 2012. Vertical profiles of isoprene showed the maximum concentration near the forest floor with a peak around noon, whereas oxidation products of isoprene, i.e., methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), showed higher concentrations near the canopy level of the forest. The vertical profile suggests large emissions of isoprene near the forest floor, likely due to Dryopteris crassirhizoma (a fern species), and the subsequent reaction within the canopy. The concentrations of α-pinene also showed highest values near the forest floor with maximums in the early morning and late afternoon. The vertical profiles of α-pinene suggest its large emissions from soil and litter in addition to emissions from L. kaempferi leaves at the forest site. Isoprene and its oxidation products in aerosols exhibited similar diurnal variations within the forest canopy, providing evidence for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation via oxidation of isoprene most likely emitted from the forest floor. Although high abundance of α-pinene was observed in the morning, its oxidation products in aerosols showed peaks in daytime, due to a time lag between the emission and atmospheric reactions of α-pinene to form SOA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated that anthropogenic influence is the most important factor contributing to the elevated concentrations of molecular oxidation products of isoprene- (> 64%) and α-pinene-derived SOA (> 57%). The combination of the measured fluxes and vertical profiles of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) suggests that the inflow of anthropogenic precursors/aerosols likely enhanced the formation of both isoprene- and α-pinene-SOA within the forest canopy even when the BVOC flux was relatively low. This study highlights

  12. Trace element concentrations in needles and bark of Larix Sibirica within the Mo-W ore field (Buryat Republic, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Ivan; Kosheleva, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to assess the changes in the trace element (TE) composition of Larix Sibirica species growing in the impact area of Dzhida Mo-W plant in the Zakamensk city. The objectives of the study were: (1) to reveal the biogeochemical background features and changes in the TE composition of larch needles and bark in the mining region; (2) to determine patterns of spatial distribution of TE content in larch organs; (3) to assess the ecological state of larch plantation in different land-use zones of the city. A landscape-geochemical survey of the territory was carried out in summer of 2013. Total of 21 mixed (taken from 3-5 trees) samples of needles and bark were collected in undisturbed and different land-use areas. The bulk contents of TEs in dry plant samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry with induced coupled plasma. Sixteen priority pollutants were selected for thorough analysis, including elements of hazard classes I (Zn, As, Pb, Cd), II (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Sb), III (V, Sr, Ba, W), and some others (Sn, Bi). Concentrations of TEs (C_b) in background trees were compared with the global clarks (C_g) for annual increment of terrestrial vegetation (Dobrovol'skii 2003) via calculating the global enrichment EF_g=C_b/Cg and dispersion factors DF_g=C_g/C_b}. The concentrations of the elements in the urban samples Ci were grouped depending on the type of land use and compared with the background (C_b) via calculating the local enrichment EF_l=C_i/Cb and dispersion factors DF_l=C_b/C_i. The ecological state of the urban plants was diagnosed using three TE ratios. The Fe/Mn ratio represents photosynthetic activity with optimum value 1.5-2.5. The Pb/Mn ratio characterizes balance between technogenic and biophilic elements, its value for unpolluted terrestrial plants is 0.006. The Cu/Zn ratio determines the proportionality in the provision of enzyme synthesis with these metals, its optimum value is 0.27. TE composition of needles of background larch is

  13. Tandem repeat DNA localizing on the proximal DAPI bands of chromosomes in Larix, Pinaceae.

    PubMed

    Hizume, Masahiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Matsumoto, Ayako; Maruyama, Yukie; Hayashi, Eiji; Kondo, Teiji; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Shozo; Hong, Deyuan

    2002-08-01

    Repetitive DNA was cloned from HindIII-digested genomic DNA of Larix leptolepis. The repetitive DNA was about 170 bp long, had an AT content of 67%, and was organized tandemly in the genome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and subsequent DAPI banding, the repetitive DNA was localized in DAPI bands at the proximal region of one arm of chromosomes in L. leptolepis and Larix chinensis. Southern blot hybridization to genomic DNA of seven species and five varieties probed with cloned repetitive DNA showed that the repetitive DNA family was present in a tandem organization in genomes of all Larix taxa examined. In addition to the 170-bp sequence, a 220-bp sequence belonging to the same DNA family was also present in 10 taxa. The 220-bp repeat unit was a partial duplication of the 170-bp repeat unit. The 220-bp repeat unit was more abundant in L. chinensis and Larix potaninii var. macrocarpa than in other taxa. The repetitive DNA composed 2.0-3.4% of the genome in most taxa and 0.3 and 0.5% of the genome in L. chinensis and L. potaninii var. macrocarpa, respectively. The unique distribution of the 220-bp repeat unit in Larix indicates the close relationship of these two species. In the family Pinaceae, the LPD (Larix proximal DAPI band specific repeat sequence family) family sequence is widely distributed, but their amount is very small except in the genus Larix. The abundant LPD family in Larix will occur after its speciation.

  14. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy using an attenuated total reflection probe to distinguish between Japanese larch, pine and citrus plants in healthy and diseased states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfo, D. S.; Mortimer, H.; Woodhall, J. W.; Boonham, N.

    2016-06-01

    FTIR spectroscopy coupled with an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) sampling probe has been demonstrated as a technique for detecting disease in plants. Spectral differences were detected in Japanese Larch (Larix kaempferi) infected with Phytophthora ramorum at 3403 cm-1 and 1730 cm-1, from pine (Pinus spp.) infected with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus at 1070 cm-1, 1425 cm-1, 1621 cm-1 and 3403 cm-1 and from citrus (Citrus spp.) infected with 'Candidatus liberibacter' at 960 cm-1, 1087 cm-1, 1109 cm-1, 1154 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1385 cm-1, 1462 cm-1, 1707 cm-1, 2882 cm-1, 2982 cm-1 and 3650 cm-1. A spectral marker in healthy citrus has been identified as Pentanone but is absent from the diseased sample spectra. This agrees with recent work by Aksenov, 2014. Additionally, the spectral signature of Cutin was identified in the spectra of Pinus spp. and Citrus spp. and is consistent with work by Dubis, 1999 and Heredia-Guerrero, 2014.

  15. Impact of climate change on larch budmoth cyclic outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Sudharsana V.; Balakrishnan, Janaki; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of the larch budmoth Zeiraphera diniana population (and the massive forest defoliation they engender) have been recorded in the Alps over the centuries and are known for their remarkable regularity. But these have been conspicuously absent since 1981. On the other hand, budmoth outbreaks have been historically unknown in the larches of the Carpathian Tatra mountains. To resolve this puzzle, we propose here a model which includes the influence of climate and explains both the 8–9 year periodicity in the budmoth cycle and the variations from this, as well as the absence of cycles. We successfully capture the observed trend of relative frequencies of outbreaks, reproducing the dominant periodicities seen. We contend that the apparent collapse of the cycle in 1981 is due to changing climatic conditions following a tipping point and propose the recurrence of the cycle with a changed periodicity of 40 years – the next outbreak could occur in 2021. Our model also predicts longer cycles. PMID:27293118

  16. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:26633380

  17. mRNA accumulation in the Cajal bodies of the diplotene larch microsporocyte.

    PubMed

    Smoliński, Dariusz Jan; Kołowerzo, Agnieszka

    2012-02-01

    In microsporocytes of the European larch, we demonstrated the presence of several mRNAs in spherical nuclear bodies. In the nuclei of microsporocytes, we observed up to 12 bodies, ranging from 0.5 to 6 μm in diameter, during the prophase of the first meiotic division. Our previous studies revealed the presence of polyadenylated RNA (poly(A) RNA) in these bodies, but did not confirm the presence of nascent transcripts or splicing factors of the SR family. The lack of these molecules precludes the bodies from being the sites of synthesis and early maturation of primary transcripts (Kołowerzo et al., Protoplasma 236:13-19, 2009). However, the bodies serve as sites for the accumulation of splicing machinery, including the Sm proteins and small nuclear RNAs. Characteristic ultrastructures and the molecular composition of the nuclear bodies, which contain poly(A) RNA, are indicative of Cajal bodies (CBs). Here, we demonstrated the presence of several housekeeping gene transcripts--α-tubulin, pectin methylesterase, peroxidase and catalase, ATPase, and inositol-3-phosphate synthase--in CBs. Additionally, we observed transcripts of the RNA polymerase II subunits RPB2 and RPB10 RNA pol II and the core spliceosome proteins mRNA SmD1, SmD2, and SmE. The co-localization of nascent transcripts and mRNAs indicates that mRNA accumulation/storage, particularly in CBs, occurs in the nucleus of microsporocytes.

  18. Wildfires Dynamics in Mid-Siberian Larch Dominated Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Ranson. K. J.; Dvinskaya, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    The longterm wildfire dynamics, including fire return interval (FRI), in Siberian larch communities were examined. A wildfire chronology encompassing the 15th through the 20th centuries was developed from analyzing tree stem fire scars. Two methods were used to calculate the time interval between fires: 1) direct counting of annual tree growth rings between stem fire scars and 2) the next earlier fire date was estimated from growth ring analysis and added to the first estimate. Average FRI determined from stem fire scar dating was 82 plus or minus 7 using Method I or 95 plus or minus 7 when age of the next earlier fire was inferred from observed larch regeneration structure (Method II). FRI was also found to be dependent on site topography. FRI on north-east facing slopes was 86 plus or minus 11 years (105 plus or minus 12). FRI on south-west facing slopes was significantly less at 61 plus or minus 8 (73 plus ot minus 8) years. Flat terrain showed little difference between methods 68 plus or minus 14 (70 plus or minus 13). This was also the case for bogs, but FRI was much longer; 139 plus or minus 17 (138 plus ot minus 18). The maximum number of annual fires occurred with periods of 36 and 82 years on average. The temporal trend in the FRI decreased from 101 years in the 19 th century to 65 years in the 20th century. The effect of post-fire forest recovery on depth to permafrost was also estimated. After initial melting from increased local temperatures permafrost depth decreased at a rate of 0.3 cm/yr on average as forest canopies developed.

  19. Effect of nursery nitrogen application of bare-root Larix olgensis seedlings on growth, nitrogen uptake and initial field performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo Lei; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Le; Shi, Wenhui; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Jiaxi; Cheng, Zhongqian

    2013-01-01

    Nursery nitrogen application has been used to improve seedling quality. The technique has received little attention with bare-root seedlings and their subsequent field performance on weed competition sites. Our research objective was to examine responses of one- and two- year-old bare-root Olga Bay larch (Larix olgensis Henry) seedlings to nursery nitrogen supplements and subsequent one-year field performance on a competitive site. The fertilizer levels (kg N ha(-1)) were 0 (control), 60 (conventional fertilization, 60 C), 120 (additional nitrogen applied two times, 120 L), 180 (additional nitrogen applied three times, 180 L) and N were applied in increments of 30 kg ha(-1 )at 15-day interval to maintain a base nutrient level Although pre-planting morphological attributes and nitrogen status of one-year-old (la) seedlings were more sensitive to 60 C than for two-year-old (2a) seedlings, the conventional application failed to enhance their field survival (15.6% vs 17.8%), relative height growth (89.0% vs 79.6%), and relative diameter growth (17.0% vs 22.9%). The la seedlings' field survival (15.6% for 0, 17.8% for 60 C) and 2a seedlings' relative height growth rate (11.0% for 0, 8.9% for 60 C) were not increased significantly until they were provided the 120 L (survival of 23.3% for la, relative height growth rate of 15.0% for 2a). According to pre-planting attributes and field performance, optimum nursery nitrogen application was 120 L for the 2a seedlings and 180 L for la seedlings. Except for component nitrogen concentration, pre-planting morphological attributes and component N content for the 2a seedlings were as much 3.3 to 37.7 times that of la seedlings. In conclusion, the contrasting survival of poor (15.6%-28.9%) for la seedlings and high (84.4%-91.1%) for 2a seedlings indicated that additional nitrogen fertilizer would not equal the benefits of an another year's growth in the nursery. Successful reforestation could not be fulfilled by la seedlings

  20. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosols in a Larix kaempferi forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Ono, K.; Wada, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Saigusa, N.; Kawamura, K.; Tani, A.

    2015-10-01

    We conducted simultaneous measurements of concentrations and above-canopy fluxes of isoprene and α-pinene, along with their oxidation products in aerosols in a Larix kaempferi (Japanese larch) forest in summer 2012. Vertical profiles of isoprene showed the maximum concentration near the forest floor with a peak around noon, whereas oxidation products of isoprene, i.e., methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), showed higher concentrations near the canopy level of the forest. The vertical profile suggests large emissions of isoprene near the forest floor, likely due to Dryopteris crassirhizoma (a fern species), and the subsequent reaction within the canopy. The concentrations of α-pinene also showed highest values near the forest floor, with maximums in the early morning and late afternoon. The vertical profiles of α-pinene suggest its large emissions from soil and litter in addition to emissions from L. kaempferi leaves at the forest site. Isoprene and its oxidation products in aerosols exhibited similar diurnal variations within the forest canopy, providing evidence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation via oxidation of isoprene most likely emitted from the forest floor. Although high abundance of α-pinene was observed in the morning, its oxidation products in aerosols showed peaks in daytime, due to a time lag between the emission and atmospheric reactions of α-pinene to form SOA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated that anthropogenic influence is the most important factor contributing to the elevated concentrations of molecular oxidation products of isoprene- (> 64 %) and α-pinene-derived SOA (> 57 %). The combination of the measured fluxes and vertical profiles of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) suggests that the inflow of anthropogenic precursors/aerosols likely enhanced the formation of both isoprene SOA and α-pinene SOA within the forest canopy even when the BVOC flux was relatively low. This study

  1. [Application of competition index in assessing intraspecific and interspecific spatial relations between manchurian ash and dahurian larch].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Wu, G; Wang, J

    2000-10-01

    The competition among trees within a stand includes aboveground and underground parts. How to determine the zone of competition influence is important for predicting tree growth. We divide the zone into two parts: one part is defined as inside radius, the distance from nearest competitors to subject tree, in which, the competition influence is the sum of both aboveground and underground; the another part is defined as outside radius, the distance of competitors to subject tree, where the competition influence comes mostly from underground. Thus, the competition index, based upon the divided two radii, could be decomposed into different components. We used the data of manchurian ash(MA) (Fraxinus mandshurica) and dahurian larch(DL) (Larix gmelini) from pure and mixed stands to analyze the competition influence of aboveground and underground in inside and of underground in outside radius. The results show that for MA in pure stand, the competition effect was 59.06% from inside radius, and 40.94% from outside radius. For DL in pure stand, the competition effects in both radii were 71.31% and 28.69%, respectively. There was a stronger competition influence in inside than in outside radius. Underground competitions were the important issues for both species in pure stands. In a mixed stand of MA and DL, there were two species in both radii, and the effects of competition came from intraspecific and interspecific competitors. For subject tree of MA, the effect of interspecific competition was 49.55%, and that of intraspecific was 50.45%. For subject tree of DL, the effects were 81.11% and 18.89%, respectively. DL displayed a stronger interspecific competition than MA in the zone of competition influence, and was a main effect of competition on MA. For subject tree of MA, the effect of competition from inside radius was 25.33%, which was the sum of competition influence from aboveground and underground, and about 74.67% was from outside radius. For subject tree of DL

  2. [CO2 flux characteristics and their influence on the carbon budget of a larch plantation in Maoershan region of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Wang, Wen-Jie; Sun, Wei; Su, Dong-Xue; Zheng, Guang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    From January to December 2008, the CO2 flux in a larch plantation (Larix gmeilinii) in Maoershan region of Shangzhi County, Heilongliang Province was measured by eddy covanance method, and the diurnal changes of leaf photosynthetic rate were measured in growth season (from May to October). There existed differences in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of the plantation in different time periods under the effects of environmental factors. In the afternoon (12:00-24:00), the NEE changed more slowly with the variation of vapor pressure deficit (VPD) than in the morning (0:00-12:00); and in the morning, tbe light use efficiency was 0.6284 mol x mol(-1), 14% more than that in afternoon. The NEE increased with increasing temperature, and the increment in the morning was 50% higher than that in the afternoon (air temperature > 15 degrees C). These differences in responding to environmental changes led to 88% NEE implemented in the morning, and only 12% NEE implemented in the afternoon. The annual gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) in the morning took a percentage of 60%, and that in afternoon took 40%. These findings were supported by the observation at leaf level, i.e., on average of whole growth season, the leaf photosynthetic capacity in the morning was over 2-fold higher than that in afternoon. Generally, the annual NEE, ecosystem respiration (Re), and GEP of the plantation in 2008 were 263-264 g C x m(-2), 718-725 g C x m(-2), and 981-989 g C x m(-2), respectively.

  3. Terpenoid emissions from fully grown East Siberian Larix cajanderi trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajos, M. K.; Hakola, H.; Holst, T.; Nieminen, T.; Tarvainen, V.; Maximov, T.; Petäjä, T.; Arneth, A.; Rinne, J.

    2013-03-01

    While emissions of many volatile compounds, such as terpenoids, have been studied quite intensively in North American and Scandinavian boreal forests, the vast Siberian boreal forests have remained largely unexplored by experimental emission studies. In this study the shoot scale terpenoid emission rates from mature Larix cajanderi trees growing in their natural habitat in Eastern Siberia were measured. Dynamic flow-through enclosure technique was applied for adsorbent sampling (Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B used as adsorbents), and the samples were analysed offline with a gas chromatograph. The emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, which constituted between 61 and 92% of the total emission. About half of the monoterpene emissions comprised of Δ3-carene; α- and β-pinene had significant emissions as well. Linalool emissions were also substantial, especially in June. Sesquiterpenes accounted for less than 3% and isoprene less than 1% of the total emissions. Based on the measured emission rates, the relative atmospheric concentration of each compound was estimated. Monoterpenes were the species with the highest relative concentration, while linalool and sesquiterpenes had a notably smaller contribution to the estimated atmospheric concentration than to the emission rates. Temperature dependent pool algorithm with a constant β (0.09 °C-1 for monoterpenes and 0.143 °C-1 for sesquiterpenes) was used to normalize the measured emission data. For monoterpenes the emission potential varied between 0.5-18.5 μg gdw-1 h-1 and for sesquiterpenes between 0.02 and 0.4 μg gdw-1 h-1.

  4. Larch Forests of Middle Siberia: Long-Term Trends in Fire Return Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Dvinskaya, Mariya L.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Im, Sergei T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Fire history within the northern larch forests of Central Siberia was studied (65+degN). Fires within this area are predominantly caused by lightning strikes rather than human activity. Mean fire return intervals (FRIs) were found to be 112 +/- 49 years (based on firescars) and 106 +/- 36 years (based on firescars and tree natality dates). FRIs were increased with latitude increase and observed to be about 80 years at 64N, about 200 years near the Arctic Circle and about 300 years nearby the northern range limit of larch stands (approx.71+degN). Northward FRIs increase correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = -0.95). Post- Little Ice Age (LIA) warming (after 1850) caused approximately a doubling of fire events (in comparison with a similar period during LIA). The data obtained support a hypothesis of climate-induced fire frequency increase. Keywords Fire ecology Fire history Fire frequency Siberian wildfires Larch forests Climate change

  5. Terpenoid emissions from fully grown east Siberian Larix cajanderi trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajos, M. K.; Hakola, H.; Holst, T.; Nieminen, T.; Tarvainen, V.; Maximov, T.; Petäjä, T.; Arneth, A.; Rinne, J.

    2013-07-01

    While emissions of many biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), such as terpenoids, have been studied quite intensively in North American and Scandinavian boreal forests, the vast Siberian boreal forests have remained largely unexplored by experimental emission studies. In this study the shoot-scale terpenoid emission rates from two mature Larix cajanderi trees growing in their natural habitat in eastern Siberia were measured at the Spasskaya Pad flux measurement site (62°15´18.4" N, 129°37´07.9" E) located on the western bank of the Lena river. The measurements were conducted during three campaigns: 3-24 June, 8-26 July, and 14-30 August, in the summer of 2009. A dynamic flow-through enclosure technique was applied for adsorbent sampling, and the samples were analysed offline with a gas chromatograph. Between 29 and 45 samples were taken from each shoot during all three campaigns. Seven different monoterpenes, six different sesquiterpenes, linalool isoprene, and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) were identified. The monthly median value of the total terpenoid emissions varied between 0.006 and 10.6 μg gdw-1 h-1. The emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, which constituted between 61 and 92% of the total emissions. About half of the monoterpene emissions were comprised of Δ 3-carene; α- and β-pinene had significant emissions as well. Linalool emissions were also substantial, comprising 3-37% of the total emissions, especially in June. Sesquiterpenes accounted for less than 3% and isoprene less than 1% of the total emissions. Based on the measured emission rates, the relative atmospheric concentration of each compound was estimated. Monoterpenes were the species with the highest relative concentration, while linalool and sesquiterpenes had a notably smaller contribution to the estimated atmospheric concentration than to the emission rates. A temperature-dependent pool algorithm with a constant β (0.09 °C-1 for monoterpenes and 0.143 °C-1 for

  6. Response of larch root development to annual changes of water conditions in eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Chisato; Miyahara, Mie; Ohta, Takeshi; Maximov, Trofim C.

    2016-06-01

    Eastern Siberia is characterized by continuous permafrost, and has recently been exposed to the effects of climate change. Larch, which is the dominant tree species, has been subject to major environmental changes including fluctuations in soil water content. The purpose of this study was to clarify the responses of mature larch tree roots to changes in soil water conditions. We established a treatment plot in a larch forest, and artificially changed the soil water conditions by covering the ground surface with a vinyl sheet, and from 2004 to 2006 monitored root development through root windows. The vinyl sheet maintained high levels of soil water content, even though the ambient conditions varied from dry in 2004 to wet in 2005 and dry in 2006. In the treatment plot the plants adapted to the wet conditions by decreasing vertical root development. In contrast, roots of plants in the control plot developed to the subsurface layer, even in 2005, and did not develop vertically in 2006 despite the drought. We conclude that larch adapted to the annual changes in soil water content by changing the vertical distribution of roots, and that this reflected a memory effect.

  7. Seasonal Changes in Remote Vegetation Indices and Net Photosynthesis of Japanese Larch Needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.; Nakaji, T.; Oguma, H.; Fujinuma, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the seasonal pattern of four kinds of remote vegetation indices (NDVI, PRI, [(1/rRedEdge)-(1/rNIR)] and [(1/rGreen)-(1/rNIR)]) and their correlation to photosynthetic activity in the needle leaves of Japanese larch. In the 42-year-old larch forest (Tomakomai, Japan), the diurnal courses of spectral reflectance and gas exchange rates of larch needles were periodically investigated during early June to late October in 2003. In the Tomakomai larch forest, expansion of short-shoot needles was started from mid-May, and yellow color change of the needle leaves was observed in late October. The seasonal pattern of index value differed among the vegetation indices. For example, daytime mean NDVI showed constant value from late June to early October. The [(1/rRedEdge)-(1/rNIR)] and PRI were increased during summer, and their peak were observed in July and August, respectively. Although the values of NDVI, PRI and [(1/rRedEdge)-(1/rNIR)] were depressed in late October with autumn senescence of the needles, the [(1/rGreen)-(1/rNIR)] in larch needles was not changed even in yellow colored needles. Consequently, correlation of these vegetation indices and seasonal changed photosynthetic parameters such as net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE) also differed among the indices. Although the PRI, NDVI and [(1/rRedEdge)-(1/rNIR)] positively correlated with daily maximum Pn and daily means of Pn and LUE, no correlation was found between [(1/rGreen)-(1/rNIR)] and the measured photosynthetic parameters. Based on the results of Pearson_fs correlation test, PRI and [(1/rRedEdge)-(1/rNIR)] were considered to be most useful index for the estimations of seasonal changes in Pn and LUE, respectively.

  8. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  9. [The intensity of phytodetrite decomposition in Larch Forest of the permafrost zone in central Siberia].

    PubMed

    Prokushkin, S G; Prokushkin, A S; Sorokin, N D

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of long-term investigations, quantitative assessment ofphytodetrite mineralization rates is provided. Their role in the biological cycle of larch stands growing in the permafrost zone of Central Evenkia is discussed. It is demonstrated that their destruction in the subshrub-sphagnum and cowberry-green moss larch stands is extremely slow, the plant litter contains the most cecalcitrant organic matter demonstrating the lowest decomposition coefficient of 0.03-0.04 year(-1), whereas fresh components of the plant litter have 3- to 4-fold higher values. An insignificant input of N and C from the analyzed mortmass to the soil has been registered. It has been revealed that the changes in N and C in the decomposition components are closely related to the quantitative dynamics (biomass) of microorganisms, such as hydrolytics and, especially, micromicetes.

  10. Siberian larch forests and the ion content of thaw lakes form a geochemically functional entity.

    PubMed

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Pestryakova, Luidmila A; Savelieva, Larissa A; Heinecke, Liv; Böhmer, Thomas; Biskaborn, Boris K; Andreev, Andrei; Ramisch, Arne; Shinneman, Avery L C; Birks, H John B

    2013-01-01

    Siberian larch forests growing on shallow permafrost soils have not, until now, been considered to be controlling the abiotic and biotic characteristics of the vast number of thaw-lake ecosystems. Here we show, using four independent data sets (a modern data set from 201 lakes from the tundra to taiga, and three lake-core records), that lake-water geochemistry in Yakutia is highly correlated with vegetation. Alkalinity increases with catchment forest density. We postulate that in this arid area, higher evapotranspiration in larch forests compared with that in the tundra vegetation leads to local salt accumulation in soils. Solutes are transported to nearby thaw lakes during rain events and snow melt, but are not fully transported into rivers, because there is no continuous groundwater flow within permafrost soils. This implies that potentially large shifts in the chemical characteristics of aquatic ecosystems to known warming are absent because of the slow response of catchment forests to climate change.

  11. [Aboveground biomass and nutrient distribution patterns of larch plantation in a montane region of eastern Liaoning Province, China].

    PubMed

    Yan, Tao; Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Yang, Kai; Yu, Li-Zhong

    2014-10-01

    Larch is the main timber species of forest plantations in North China. Imbalance in nutrient cycling in soil emerged due to single species composition and mono system structure of plantation. Thus it is necessary to grasp its biomass and nutrients allocation for scientific management and nutrient cycling studies of larch plantation. We measured aboveground biomass (stem, branch, bark and leaf) and nutrient concentrations (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn), and analyzed the patterns of accumulation and distribution of 19-year-old larch plantation with diameter at breast height of 12. 8 cm, tree height of 15. 3 m, and density of 2308 trees · hm(-2), in a montane region of eastern Liaoning Province, China. The results showed that aboveground biomass values were 70.26 kg and 162.16 t · hm(-2) for the individual tree of larch and the stand, respectively. There was a significant difference between biomass of the organs, and decreased in the order of stem > branch > bark > leaf. Nutrient accumulation was 749.94 g and 1730.86 kg · hm(-2) for the individual tree of larch and the stand, respectively. Nutrient accumulation of stem was significantly higher than that of branch, bark and leaf, whether it was macro-nutrient or micro-nutrient. Averagely, 749.94 g nutrient elements would be removed from the system when a 19-year-old larch tree was harvested. If only the stem part was removed from the system, the removal of nutrient elements could be reduced by 40.7%.

  12. Changing Boreal Fire Regimes: Impacts on Permafrost Soils and Forest Succession in Siberian Larch Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fire activity has increased across the boreal forest biome in conjuction with climate warming and drying. Because these forests contain a large proportion of global terrestrial carbon (C) stocks, there has been great interest in understanding feedbacks between a changing fire regime and climate warming. An important mechanism by which increased fire activity may alter boreal C balance is by consuming the soil organic layer (SOL). Fire removal of the SOL may alter germination microsites and tree recruitment, thereby altering forest successional trajectories and C accumulation and storage. In permafrost soils, loss of the insulating SOL can increase soil temperature and active layer depth, impacting growth and survival conditions for both soil microbes and vegetation. To assess fire severity effects on permafrost soils and tree recruitment, we conducted plot-level experimental burns in July 2012 in a larch forest near Cherskii, Siberia. We achieved four burn severity treatments based on residual SOL depths: control, low (> 8 cm), moderate (5-8 cm), and high severity (2-5 cm). For two growing seasons post-fire, we measured thaw depth, soil moisture, and soil temperature. We sowed larch seeds in fall 2012 and 2013 and quantified seedling establishment and vegetation re-growth for two growing seasons. Immediately post-fire, thaw depth increased rapidly with increasing fire severity, and this trend has persisted for two years. In 2013 and 2014, thaw depth was ~ 40 cm deeper in high severity plots compared to controls, likely due to lower summer soil insulation, higher black char cover, and higher surface soil temperatures. We observed little to no larch recruitment in unburned and low severity plots, but new seedling density was ~5 seedlings m-2 in moderate and high severity plots, which had low cover of other vegetation types and high soil moisture. Findings suggest that increased fire severity may increase larch recruitment and provide favorable soil conditions for

  13. Post-fire stand structure impacts carbon storage within Siberian larch forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, H. D.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.

    2015-12-01

    Increased fire severity within boreal forests of the Siberian Arctic has the potential to alter forest stand development thereby altering carbon (C) accumulation rates and storage during the post-fire successional interval. One potential change is increased stand density, which may result from fire consumption of the soil organic layer and changes to the seedbed that favor germination and establishment of larch trees during early succession. In this study, we evaluated above- and belowground C pools across 12 stands of varying tree density within a single 75-year old fire scar located near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, Russia. In each stand, we inventoried the size and density of larch trees and large shrubs (Salix and Betula spp.), and in combination with with allometric equations, estimated aboveground contribution to C pools. We quantified woody debris C pools using the line intercept method. We sampled belowground C pools in the soil organic layer + upper (0-10 cm) mineral soil and coarse roots (> 2 mm diameter) using sediment cores and 0.25 x 0.25-m trenches, respectively. We found that high density stands store ~ 20% more C (~7,500 g C m-2) than low density stands (~5,800 g C m-2). In high density stands, about 35% more C is stored aboveground within live larch trees (1650 g C m-2) compared to low density stands (940 g C m-2), and about 15% more C is stored in the soil organic layer and upper mineral soil. Coarse root C was 20% higher in high density stands (~475 g C m-2) compared to those with low density (~350 g C m-2). Less C was stored in large shrubs in high density stands, both in aboveground portions and coarse roots, but these amounts were relatively small (< 10% of total C pools). A fire-driven shift to denser larch stands could increase C storage, leading to a negative feedback to climate, but the combined effects of density on C dynamics, summer and winter albedo, and future fire regimes will interact to determine the magnitude of any vegetation

  14. Energy and carbon balances with phenology over the larch forests on the permafrost in northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Nachin, B.; Sodov, D.; Yamkhin, J.

    2012-12-01

    To clarify the heat, water carbon exchange process and dynamics by comprehensive approach, we've carried out the long term monitoring of the energy and carbon balances, the hydro-climatic, the phonological camera monitoring and sap flow measurement at the 25-m height tower and larch forest around the tower in the Udleg (48 15'43.7" N, 106 50'56.6"E, altitude: 1264m) in permafrost area of northern Mongolia since 2010. The annual range of air temperature and annual mean air temperature were about 60 degree C and -1 degree C, respectively. The annual precipitation was about 250 mm with about 90% of it from May to September. According to the image analysis of in situ camera and PAR albedo data, we clarified the seasonal variation of surface condition and phenology of larch forest. From January to March, November and December, there was continuous snow cover on the surface when the PAR albedo was about 0.15 to 0.2. In late May the leaf of larch emerged and attained the mature growth in July, and then the leaf senescence occurred in mid September. The PAR albedo shows abrupt decrease in late May and abrupt increase in mid September that coincides with the leaf emergence and senescence. The soil moisture at 10 cm depth was less than 10% before April, then it gradually increase in May to 20% in August, after that it decreases to less than 10% from October. The temporal variation of soil moisture matched to temporal variation of rainfall. The soil temperature below 3m was about -0.2 degree C in all year round that suggests that there is the permafrost. In late May the latent heat flux start to increase with soil moisture and become dominant component of energy fluxes from mid June to early September when the carbon uptake was active. From mid September to early June, the sensible heat flux was dominant component of energy fluxes when the surface was carbon source. We found that the close relationship between phenology (leaf emergence, growth and senescence) of larch trees

  15. Variation in susceptibility to wind along the trunk of an isolated Larix kaempferi (Pinaceae) tree.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-07-01

    • Premise of the study: The force of the wind is a significant hazard to the survival of trees and can affect tree morphology. However, the actual distribution of the stress that wind causes to a tree trunk is not well understood in spite of its expected importance to tree morphology. The uniform stress hypothesis (i.e., tree trunks take a form that equalizes the distribution of stress along the outer surface of the stem) has been tested indirectly as a model, placing high importance on the mechanical safety of a trunk, and rejected theoretically. But stress on a tree's trunk has not yet been measured directly.• Methods: Actual strains at the surface of the trunk of an isolated Larix kaempferi tree due to wind loads were measured at seven heights on the trunk for 1 yr.• Key results: During the measurement period, wind-induced stress was higher in the upper portions of the trunk than in the lower portions, regardless of wind speed, and the difference increased as wind speed increased. The deflection of the trunk recorded at each position was also larger in the upper portions than in the lower portions.• Conclusions: The results indicate that the upper portions of the trunk of an isolated Larix kaempferi tree are more susceptible to wind than are the lower portions. These results do not support the uniform stress hypothesis and suggest that another limitation (either mechanical or nonmechanical) acts on the morphology of the tree.

  16. [Effects of exotic Larix kaempferi on forest soil quality and bacterial diversity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Cao, Jing; Dong, Mao-Xing; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2008-10-01

    The study on the soil quality and bacterial diversity under 8-30 years old exotic Larix kaempferi, native Pinus tabulaeformis, and secondary deciduous broadleaf forest stands in Xiaolong-shan Mountains of Gansu, Northwest China showed that the soil pH under different forest stands had no distinct variation, but soil moisture content was increased with increasing age of forest stands. Soil organic matter and nitrogen contents were the highest under secondary deciduous forest, followed by under L. kaermpferi, and P. tabulaeformis. However, the soils under different ages of forest stands had no obvious variations in their organic matter and nitrogen contents, suggesting that tree species was the main factor affecting soil quality. Compared with P. tabulaeformis, exotic L. kaempferi could significantly increase soil organic matter and nitrogen contents. PCR-DGGE banding patterns suggested that the soil under secondary deciduous broadleaf forest had the highest bacterial diversity, followed by under L. kaempferi, and P. tabulaeformis. The sequenced DGGE bands were classified into three bacterial groups, i. e., Proteobacteria, Cytophaga - Flavobacterium - Bacteroides, and high G + C content gram-positive type, among which, Proteobacteria occurred most frequently. Further detailed analyses suggested that the soil bacterial compositions under exotic Larix stands were more similar to each other than those under pine and secondary deciduous broadleaf forests. It was concluded that exotic L. kaempferi induced the changes of microbial diversity in the forest soils of this region.

  17. Synthesis of nickel-incorporated larch-based carbon membranes with controllable porous structure for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Wei; Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin

    2015-11-01

    Ni-incorporated larch-based carbon membranes have been synthesized by introducing the Ni(NO3)2 into the liquefied larch using liquefied larch sawdust as precursors and F127 as the soft template. The porous structure can be tailored by the amount of Ni(NO3)2, and the Ni and NiO nanoparticles with a size of 10 nm incorporated in the carbon frameworks. The increase in Ni(NO3)2 content can lead to the formation of disordered porous structure and shrinkage of carbon frameworks. The Ni-incorporated carbon membranes with largest pores possess highest gas permeation for N2, CO2, and O2 of 37.5, 19.8, and 55.5 m3 cm/m2 h kPa, which is larger than that of the pure carbon membranes, respectively. However, the poor ordered porous structure caused by adding large amount of Ni(NO3)2 can reduce the gas separation performance, which is attributed to the weaken of the molecular sieve function. The results indicate that the incorporation of few nanoparticles into larch-based carbon membranes can improve molecular sieve function.

  18. Role of understory vegetation in decadal variation of water and carbon dioxide exchange over larch forest of eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Ayumi; Ohta, Takeshi; Iijima, Yoshihiro; Maximov, Trofim

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide exchange by the eddy covariance methods over larch-dominated forests in the middle part of the Lena basin, eastern Siberia. Forest ecosystem in this region is characterized by low precipitation, a short growing season, and extensive permafrost. Seasonal thawing permafrost supplies soil water, which is prevented to infiltrating by an impermeable frozen layer, and supports forest development. A decadal observation of hydro-meteorological variables shows inter-annual variability including extreme environmental conditions such as unusually wet active layer, which was maintained for a few years. Some mature larch trees locating poor drainage area suffered wet damage, while young birch and willow trees developed and herbs with water tolerance expanded. Compared to fluxes of the whole ecosystem, those based on the understory layer changed through the study period due to increase biomass and change of inside canopy environments; plentiful light and soil water, and enhanced turbulent mixing. Evapotranspiration from the understory layer increased and contribution to the whole forest flux reached 60%. Although this layer always acts as carbon dioxide source in seasonal average through the study period, source strength weaken and changed to temporal sink in the early summer. On contrast, contribution of the larch layer, in spite of remaining uncertainty in quantity, decreased in both of evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide uptake. Interactions between larch and understory support maintenance of this forest ecosystem. Decline of larch contribution is made up by understory growing, resulting in relatively stable whole forest exchange rate at least until this wet event.

  19. [Spatial distribution pattern and fractal analysis of Larix chinensis populations in Qinling Mountain].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Wang, Xiaoan; Xiao, Yaping

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, the fractal characters of Larix chinensis populations in Qinling Mountain were studied by contiguous grid quadrate sampling method and by boxing-counting dimension and information dimension. The results showed that the high boxing-counting dimension (1.8087) and information dimension (1.7931) reflected a higher spatial occupational degree of L. chinensis populations. Judged by the dispersal index and Morisita's pattern index, L. chinensis populations clumped at three different age stages (0-25, 25-50 and over 50 years). From Greig-Smiths' mean variance analysis, the figure of pattern scale showed that L. chinensis populations clumped in 128 m2 and 512 m2, and the different age groups clumped in different scales. The pattern intensities decreased with increasing age, and tended to reduce with increasing area when detected by Kershaw's PI index. The spatial pattern characters of L. chinensis populations may be their responses to environmental factors.

  20. Variability in Albedo Associated with Fire-Mediated Controls on Stand Density in Siberian Larch Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, M. M.; Fullmer, J.; Nguyen, C. L.; Alexander, H. D.; Natali, S.; Bunn, A. G.; Davydov, S. P.; Goetz, S. J.; Mack, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Fire is an integral component of boreal forests, and exerts strong control over ecosystem structure and function. The frequency and spatial extent of fire controls the age-class distribution of forests on the landscape. In addition, recent evidence from North American boreal forests has show that fire severity influences post-fire succession via impacts on seedling recruitment that manifest in mature ecosystems dominated by either deciduous or coniferous tree species. The effects of fire on ecosystem structure have important climate feedback implications; changes in forest density or leaf habit can influence surface net radiation by altering the snow-masking effects of vegetation. Although Siberian larch forests occupy a more than 2.8 million km2 of the boreal biome, and are the most prevalent forests in Russia, the influence of fire severity on succession and associated surface energy dynamics are less well understood in comparison to North American boreal forests. There is evidence suggesting that increased fire severity may lead to higher density of post-fire regrowth, but the influence of stand density on surface energy dynamics remains poorly quantified. Here, we quantify the effects of stand density on albedo across the Kolyma River basin using satellite-derived albedo and fire history in conjunction with maps and field observations of ecosystem structure. During snow-free periods albedo varies little with stand density. During periods of snow cover we find consistent negative correlations between multiple metrics of canopy cover and albedo. Albedo decreased with fire recovery over the forty-year fire record for the study area. However, the range of albedo observed within individual fire scars was similar to the magnitude of albedo recovery during the study period. This result indicates the importance of variability in post-fire regrowth within individual fire scars, potentially associated with fire severity, for understanding fire effects on surface energy

  1. Growth dynamics and biodiversity of larch forest after wildfire at the north of central Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Danilin, I.

    1996-12-31

    Investigations of qualitative and quantitative changes occurring in disturbed forest communities in Siberia are now recognized as important issues, since anthropogenic stress is increasingly affecting forests from year to year and often results in irreversible decomposition of forest ecosystems over large areas. In forests of central Siberia, fire accounts for the greatest disturbance. The level of fire-caused forest destruction is noticeably high. Space imagery analysis has revealed that, from 1980 throughout 1995, the average annual forest area covered by fires was more than 500,000 ha. In as much as this is a country with permafrost soils, fires promote swamping and treeless areas. However, forests regenerate naturally on some burned areas. Forest regeneration can occur either with stand replacement (through secondary birch) or without replacement when new forests are formed by the pre-fire edificators. The second way of succession is ecologically more preferable, because the larch population is more resistant to external influences and keeps its native biodiversity.

  2. Fire Effects on Microbial Enzyme Activities in Larch Forests of the Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, S.; Alexander, H. D.; Bulygina, E. B.; Mann, P. J.; Natali, S.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic forest ecosystems are warming at an accelerated rate relative to lower latitudes, with global implications for C cycling within these regions. As climate continues to warm and dry, wildfire frequency and severity are predicted to increase, creating a positive feedback to climate warming. Increased fire activity will also influence the microenvironment experienced by soil microbes in disturbed soils. Because soil microbes regulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, it is important to understand microbial response to fires, particularly in the understudied larch forests in the Siberian Arctic. In this project, we created experimental burn plots in a mature larch forest in the Kolyma River watershed of Northeastern Siberia. Plots were burned at several treatments: control (no burn), low, moderate, and severe. After, 1 and 8 d post-fire, we measured soil organic layer depth, soil organic matter (SOM) content, soil moisture, and CO2 flux from the plots. Additionally, we leached soils and measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), NH4, NO3, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Furthermore, we measured extracellular activity of four enzymes involved in soil C and nutrient cycling (leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), β-glucosidase, phosphatase, and phenol oxidase). One day post-fire, LAP activity was similarly low in all treatments, but by 8 d post-fire, LAP activity was lower in burned plots compared to control plots, likely due to increased nitrogen content with increasing burn severity. Phosphatase activity decreased with burn severity 1 d post-fire, but after 8 d, moderate and severe burn plots exhibited increased phosphatase activity. Coupled with trends in LAP activity, this suggests a switch in nutrient limitation from N to phosphorus that is more pronounced with burn severity. β-glucosidase activity similarly decreased with burn

  3. [Vegetation carbon storage in Larix gmelinii plantations in Great Xing' an Mountains].

    PubMed

    Qi, Guang; Wang, Qing-Li; Wang, Xin-Chuang; Qi, Lin; Wang, Qing-Wei; Ye, Yu-Jing; Dai, Li-Min

    2011-02-01

    Through sampling site investigation, this paper studied the carbon storage of arbor, herb, and whole vegetation in 10-, 12-, 15-, 26-, and 61-year old Larix gmelinii plantations in Huzhong Forestry Bureau of Great Xing' an Mountains, Northeast China, and 'temporal for spatial' method was employed to approach the variations of the vegetation carbon storage during the growth of the plantations. The results revealed that the vegetation carbon storage in the plantations increased with stand age, and reached 105.69 t x hm(-2) at age of 61 years, representing a marked role as a carbon sink. The L. gmelinii plantations at the ages from 15 to 26 years had the strongest capability in carbon sequestration, in which, the carbon storage in trunk occupied 54.3% -73.9% of the total carbon storage of arbor, and, with the increase of stand age, the trunk's carbon storage to the total carbon storage of arbor as well as the trunk's carbon density increased. As for the other organs, the rate of their carbon storage to the total carbon storage of arbor decreased with stand age, while their carbon density increased first but eventually leveled off or had a slight decrease till at age of 61 years. Based on these results, the rotation age for the L. gmelinii plantations in Great Xing' an Mountains would properly be lengthened to at least 60 years.

  4. Homogalacturonan deesterification during pollen-ovule interaction in Larix decidua Mill.: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rafińska, Katarzyna; Świdziński, Michał; Bednarska-Kozakiewicz, Elżbieta

    2014-07-01

    Studies on angiosperm plants have shown that homogalacturonan present in the extracellular matrix of pistils plays an important role in the interaction with the male gametophyte. However, in gymnosperms, knowledge on the participation of HG in the pollen-ovule interaction is limited, and only a few studies on male gametophytes have been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of HG in male gametophytes and ovules during their interaction in Larix decidua Mill. The distribution of HG in pollen grains and unpollinated and pollinated ovules was investigated by immunofluorescence techniques using monoclonal antibodies that recognise high methyl-esterified HG (JIM7), low methyl-esterified HG (JIM5) and calcium cross-linked HG (2F4). All studied categories of HG were detected in the ovule. Highly methyl-esterified HG was present in the cell walls of all cells throughout the interaction; however, the distribution of low methyl-esterified and calcium cross-linked HG changed during the course of interaction. Both of these categories of HG appeared only in the apoplast and the extracellular matrix of the ovule tissues, which interact with the male gametophyte. This finding suggests that in L. decidua, low methyl-esterified and calcium cross-linked HG play an important role in pollen-ovule interaction. The last category of HG is most likely involved in adhesion between the pollen and the ovule and might provide an optimal calcium environment for pollen grain germination and pollen tube growth.

  5. Extraction of dihydroquercetin from Larix gmelinii with ultrasound-assisted and microwave-assisted alternant digestion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhui; Yang, Lei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Fengjian; Zhao, Chunjian; Zu, Yuangang

    2012-01-01

    An ultrasound and microwave assisted alternant extraction method (UMAE) was applied for extracting dihydroquercetin (DHQ) from Larix gmelinii wood. This investigation was conducted using 60% ethanol as solvent, 1:12 solid to liquid ratio, and 3 h soaking time. The optimum treatment time was ultrasound 40 min, microwave 20 min, respectively, and the extraction was performed once. Under the optimized conditions, satisfactory extraction yield of the target analyte was obtained. Relative to ultrasound-assisted or microwave-assisted method, the proposed approach provides higher extraction yield. The effect of DHQ of different concentrations and synthetic antioxidants on oxidative stability in soy bean oil stored for 20 days at different temperatures (25 °C and 60 °C) was compared. DHQ was more effective in restraining soy bean oil oxidation, and a dose-response relationship was observed. The antioxidant activity of DHQ was a little stronger than that of BHA and BHT. Soy bean oil supplemented with 0.08 mg/g DHQ exhibited favorable antioxidant effects and is preferable for effectively avoiding oxidation. The L. gmelinii wood samples before and after extraction were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the UMAE method is a simple and efficient technique for sample preparation.

  6. Traumatic resin ducts in Larix decidua stems impacted by debris flows.

    PubMed

    Bollschweiler, Michelle; Stoffel, Markus; Schneuwly, Dominique M; Bourqui, Karin

    2008-02-01

    Following mechanical injury, stems of many conifers produce tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs), the distribution of which has been used to date geomorphic events. However, little is known about how far TRD formation extends tangentially and axially from the point of injury or what the time course of TRD appearance is. We analyzed 28 injuries in eight Larix decidua Mill. tree stems resulting from debris flows in October 2000 and November 2004. Injuries occurred outside the period of cambial activity, and TRD formation occurred in the first layers of the growth ring formed in the year following that of injury. The axial extent of TRD formation averaged 74 cm and was greater above the injury than below it. At the height of the wound center, TRDs extended horizontally to a mean of 18% of the stem circumference excluding that portion where the cambium had been destroyed. In subsequent growth rings, TRDs, if present, were confined mainly to the height of the center of injury. Both the vertical and horizontal extent of TRD formation was related to the injury size. Within growth rings, the position of TRD formation changed with increasing distance from the wound progressing from early earlywood to later portions of the growth ring.

  7. Fire effects on methane emissions from a larch forest in Northeastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, M. A.; Schade, J. D.; Natali, S.; Spawn, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how boreal forest fires affect the fate of soil carbon in northern permafrost regions is critical to our understanding of feedbacks from Arctic ecosystems on global climate change. The frequency and intensity of fires have been increasing across the northern boreal and tundra region. Fire makes permafrost vulnerable because it removes the insulating plant and organic layers. The removal of these insulating layers in Siberian larch forests underlain by ice and carbon rich permafrost can lead to ground subsidence and saturate soils. Saturated and anoxic soils are ideal conditions for the production of methane, which is ~30x more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. Most boreal ecosystems are currently considered to be sinks for methane, but not much research has been done to study how fire may affect methane production in these regions. We predict that fires will increase methane production in boreal ecosystems underlain by permafrost due to increases in thaw depth, ice wedge thawing, and ground subsidence. This study focused on a ten-year old burn site composed of mainly larch trees and tussocks located near the bank of the Kolyma River in Northeastern Siberia. The ground of the burn site was substantially more subsided and had larger areas of surface water and saturated soils than the nearby unburned forest. We investigated the flux of methane from the surfaces of small ponds that formed over thawing ice wedges and in the subsided depressions. While previous studies have reported low dissolved organic carbon concentrations in streams affected by fire in permafrost regions, we found high DOC concentrations in pond water (21-27 mg/L). Methane fluxes from ice wedge ponds ranged from 20 to 180 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. These values are comparable to fluxes from other permafrost ecosystems including bogs, wet tundra, and fens that are considered globally significant sources of CH4. Additionally, the burned forest contained some subsided areas that were

  8. 31. View of the French lot, looking southeast, with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of the French lot, looking southeast, with the summit of Mount Ascutney (elevation 3150 ft.) on the distant horizon at left. The meadow is flanked by a historic plantation of Norway spruce (Picea abies), dated 1887, at right; and a plantation of European larch (Larix decidua), also dated 1887, at left. - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  9. 63. View of the French lot, looking southeast, with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. View of the French lot, looking southeast, with the summit of Mount Ascutney (elevation 3150 ft.) on the distant horizon at left. The meadow is flanked by a historic plantation of Norway spruce (Picea abies), dated 1887, at right; and a plantation of European larch (Larix decidua), also dated 1887, at left. - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  10. Geographic variation, genetic structure and conservation unit designation in the larch mountain salamander( Plethodon larselli)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, R.S.; Miller, Mark P.; Crisafulli, Charles; Haig, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    The Larch Mountain salamander (Plethodon larselli Burns, 1954) is an endemic species in the Pacific northwestern United States facing threats related to habitat destruction. To facilitate development of conservation strategies, we used DNA sequences and RAPDs (random amplified polymorphic DNA) to examine differences among populations of this species. Phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome b revealed a clade of haplotypes from populations north of the Columbia River derived from a clade containing haplotypes from the river's southwestern region. Haplotypes from southeastern populations formed a separate clade. Nucleotide diversity was reduced in northern populations relative to southern populations. These results were corroborated by analyses of RAPD loci, which revealed similar patterns of clustering and diversity. Network analyses suggested that northern populations were colonized following a range expansion mediated by individuals from populations located southwest of the river. Changes in the Columbia River's location during the Pliocene and Pleistocene likely released distributional constraints on this species, permitting their northern range expansion. Based on the barrier presented by the Columbia River's present location and differences in haplotype diversity and population structure observed between northern and southern populations, we suggest that designation of separate management units encompassing each region may assist with mitigating different threats to this species.

  11. Diurnal and Seasonal Change in Stem Respiration of Larix principis-rupprechtii Trees, Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Zhao, Miao; Xu, Xiangtao; Sun, Zhenzhong; Yin, Guodong; Piao, Shilong

    2014-01-01

    Stem respiration is a critical and uncertain component of ecosystem carbon cycle. Few studies reported diurnal change in stem respiration as well as its linkage with climate. In this study, we investigated the diurnal and seasonal change in stem respiration and its linkage with environmental factors, in larch plantations of northern China from 2010 to 2012. The stem respiration per unit surface area (RS) showed clear diurnal cycles, ranging from 1.65±0.10 to 2.69±0.15 µmol m−2 s−1, increased after 6∶00, peaked at 15∶00 and then decreased. Both stem temperature and air temperature show similar diurnal pattern, while the diurnal pattern of air relative humidity is just the opposite to Rs. Similar to the diurnal cycles, seasonal change in RS followed the pattern of stem temperature. RS increased from May (1.28±0.07 µmol m−2 s−1) when the stem temperature was relatively low and peaked in July (3.02±0.10 µmol m−2 s−1) when the stem temperature was also the highest. Further regression analyses show that RS exponentially increases with increasing temperature, and the Q10 of Rs at mid daytime (1.97±0.17 at 12∶00 and 1.96±0.10 at 15∶00) is significantly lower than that of mid nighttime (2.60±0.14 at 00∶00 and 2.71±0.25 at 03∶00) Q10. This result not only implies that Rs is more sensitive to night than day warming, but also highlights that temperature responses of Rs estimated by only daytime measurement can lead to underestimated stem respiration increase under global warming, especially considering that temperature increase is faster during nighttime. PMID:24586668

  12. Hydraulic properties and fine root mass of Larix sibirica along forest edge-interior gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Hertel, Dietrich; Schuldt, Bernhard; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2015-02-01

    At its southernmost distribution limit in Inner Asia, the boreal forest disintegrates into forest fragments on moist sites (e.g. north-facing slopes), which are embedded in grasslands. This landscape mosaic is characterized by a much higher forest edge-to-interior ratio than in closed boreal forests. Earlier work in the forest-steppe ecotone of Mongolia has shown that Larix sibirica trees at forest edges grow faster than in the forest interior, as the more xeric environment at the edge promotes self-thinning and edges are preferentially targeted by selective logging and livestock grazing. Lowered stand density reduces competition for water in these semi-arid forests, where productivity is usually limited by summer drought. We studied how branch and coarse root hydraulic architecture and xylem conductivity, fine root biomass and necromass, and fine root morphology of L. sibirica respond to sites differing in water availability. Studying forest edge-interior gradients in two regions of western Mongolia, we found a significant reduction of branch theoretical (Kp) and empirical conductivity (Ks) in the putatively more drought-affected forest interior in the Mongolian Altai (mean precipitation: 120 mm yr-1), while no branch xylem modification occurred in the moister Khangai Mountains (215 mm yr-1). Kp and Ks were several times larger in roots than in branches, but root hydraulics were not influenced by stand density or mean annual precipitation. Very low fine root biomass: necromass ratios at all sites, and in the forest interior in particular, suggest that L. sibirica seeks to maintain a relatively high root conductivity by producing large conduits, which results in high root mortality due to embolism during drought. Our results suggest that L. sibirica is adapted to the semi-arid climate at its southernmost distribution limit by considerable plasticity of the branch hydraulic system and a small but apparently dynamic fine root system.

  13. Climate-induced landsliding within the larch dominant permafrost zone of central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Shushpanov, Alexandr S.; Im, Sergei T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-04-01

    Climate impact on landslide occurrence and spatial patterns were analyzed within the larch-dominant communities associated with continuous permafrost areas of central Siberia. We used high resolution satellite imagery (i.e. QuickBird, WorldView) to identify landslide scars over an area of 62 000 km2. Landslide occurrence was analyzed with respect to climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, drought index SPEI), and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite derived equivalent of water thickness anomalies (EWTA). Landslides were found only on southward facing slopes, and the occurrence of landslides increased exponentially with increasing slope steepness. Lengths of landslides correlated positively with slope steepness. The observed upper elevation limit of landslides tended to coincide with the tree line. Observations revealed landslides occurrence was also found to be strongly correlated with August precipitation (r = 0.81) and drought index (r = 0.7), with June-July-August soil water anomalies (i.e., EWTA, r = 0.68-0.7), and number of thawing days (i.e., a number of days with t max > 0 °C r = 0.67). A significant increase in the variance of soil water anomalies was observed, indicating that occurrence of landslides may increase even with a stable mean precipitation level. The key-findings of this study are (1) landslides occurrence increased within the permafrost zone of central Siberia in the beginning of the 21st century; (2) the main cause of increased landslides occurrence are extremes in precipitation and soil water anomalies; and (3) landslides occurrence are strongly dependent on relief features such as southward facing steep slopes.

  14. Species presence frequency and diversity in different patch types along an altitudinal gradient: Larix chinensis Beissn in Qinling Mountains (China).

    PubMed

    Huang, Minyi; Duan, Renyan; Wang, Shixiong; Wang, Zhigao; Fan, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    Forest communities are mosaic systems composed of patches classified into four different developmental patch types: gap patch (G), building patch (B), mature patch (M) and degenerate patch (D). To study the mechanisms maintaining diversity in subalpine coniferous forests, species presence frequency and diversity in the four distinct patch types (G, B, M and D) of Larix chinensis conifer forests at three altitudinal gradients in the Qinling Mountains were analyzed. Our results were as follows: (1) Different species (or functional groups) had distinct presence frequencies in the four different patch types along the altitudinal gradient; (2) Some species or functional groups (species groups sharing similar traits and responses to the environment) only occurred in some specific patches. For seed dispersal, species using wind mainly occurred in G and D, while species using small animals mainly occurred in B and M; (3) Species composition of adjacent patch types was more similar than non-adjacent patch types, based on the lower β diversity index of the former; (4) The maximum numbers of species and two diversity indices (D' and H') were found in the middle altitudes. Various gap-forming processes and dispersal limitation may be the two major mechanisms determining species diversity in Larix chinensis coniferous forests at the patch scale.

  15. Effects of climate and fire on short-term vegetation recovery in the boreal larch forests of Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the influence of climate variability and fire characteristics in shaping postfire vegetation recovery will help to predict future ecosystem trajectories in boreal forests. In this study, I asked: (1) which remotely-sensed vegetation index (VI) is a good proxy for vegetation recovery? and (2) what are the relative influences of climate and fire in controlling postfire vegetation recovery in a Siberian larch forest, a globally important but poorly understood ecosystem type? Analysis showed that the shortwave infrared (SWIR) VI is a good indicator of postfire vegetation recovery in boreal larch forests. A boosted regression tree analysis showed that postfire recovery was collectively controlled by processes that controlled seed availability, as well as by site conditions and climate variability. Fire severity and its spatial variability played a dominant role in determining vegetation recovery, indicating seed availability as the primary mechanism affecting postfire forest resilience. Environmental and immediate postfire climatic conditions appear to be less important, but interact strongly with fire severity to influence postfire recovery. If future warming and fire regimes manifest as expected in this region, seed limitation and climate-induced regeneration failure will become more prevalent and severe, which may cause forests to shift to alternative stable states. PMID:27857204

  16. Effects of climate and fire on short-term vegetation recovery in the boreal larch forests of Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihua

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the influence of climate variability and fire characteristics in shaping postfire vegetation recovery will help to predict future ecosystem trajectories in boreal forests. In this study, I asked: (1) which remotely-sensed vegetation index (VI) is a good proxy for vegetation recovery? and (2) what are the relative influences of climate and fire in controlling postfire vegetation recovery in a Siberian larch forest, a globally important but poorly understood ecosystem type? Analysis showed that the shortwave infrared (SWIR) VI is a good indicator of postfire vegetation recovery in boreal larch forests. A boosted regression tree analysis showed that postfire recovery was collectively controlled by processes that controlled seed availability, as well as by site conditions and climate variability. Fire severity and its spatial variability played a dominant role in determining vegetation recovery, indicating seed availability as the primary mechanism affecting postfire forest resilience. Environmental and immediate postfire climatic conditions appear to be less important, but interact strongly with fire severity to influence postfire recovery. If future warming and fire regimes manifest as expected in this region, seed limitation and climate-induced regeneration failure will become more prevalent and severe, which may cause forests to shift to alternative stable states.

  17. Interannual and seasonal variations in energy and carbon exchanges over the larch forests on the permafrost in northeastern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shin; Ishikawa, Mamoru; Baatarbileg, Nachin; Damdinsuren, Sodov; Ariuntuya, Nymsambuu; Jambaljav, Yamkhin

    2014-06-01

    The larch forests on the permafrost in northeastern Mongolia are located at the southern limit of the Siberian taiga forest, which is one of the key regions for evaluating climate change effects and responses of the forest to climate change. We conducted long-term monitoring of seasonal and interannual variations in hydrometeorological elements, energy, and carbon exchange in a larch forest (48°15‧24‧‧N, 106°51‧3‧‧E, altitude: 1338 m) in northeastern Mongolia from 2010 to 2012. The annual air temperature and precipitation ranged from -0.13 °C to -1.2 °C and from 230 mm to 317 mm. The permafrost was found at a depth of 3 m. The dominant component of the energy budget was the sensible heat flux (H) from October to May (H/available energy [Ra] = 0.46; latent heat flux [LE]/Ra = 0.15), while it was the LE from June to September (H/Ra = 0.28, LE/Ra = 0.52). The annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross primary production (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RE) were -131 to -257 gC m-2 y-1, 681-703 gC m-2 y-1, and 423-571 gC m-2 y-1, respectively. There was a remarkable response of LE and NEE to both vapor pressure deficit and surface soil water content.

  18. Importance of soil moisture and N availability to larch growth and distribution in the Arctic taiga-tundra boundary ecosystem, northeastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Maochang; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Tei, Shunsuke; Bragin, Ivan V.; Takano, Shinya; Morozumi, Tomoki; Shingubara, Ryo; Maximov, Trofim C.; Kiyashko, Serguei I.; Velivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the factors controlling the growth of larch trees in Arctic taiga-tundra boundary ecosystem, we conducted field measurements of photosynthesis, tree size, nitrogen (N) content, and isotopic ratios in larch needles and soil. In addition, we observed various environmental parameters, including topography and soil moisture at four sites in the Indigirka River Basin, near Chokurdakh, northeastern Siberia. Most living larch trees grow on mounds with relatively high elevations and dry soils, indicating intolerance of high soil moisture. We found that needle δ13C was positively correlated with needle N content and needle mass, and these parameters showed spatial patterns similar to that of tree size. These results indicate that trees with high needle N content achieved higher rates of photosynthesis, which resulted in larger amounts of C assimilation and larger C allocation to needles and led to larger tree size than trees with lower needle N content. A positive correlation was also found between needle N content and soil NH 4 + pool. Thus, soil inorganic N pool may indicate N availability, which is reflected in the needle N content of the larch trees. Microtopography plays a principal role in N availability, through a change in soil moisture. Relatively dryer soil of mounds with higher elevation and larger extent causes higher rates of soil N production, leading to increased N availability for plants, in addition to larger rooting space for trees to uptake more N.

  19. [Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Respiration in a Planted Larch Forest in Shanxi Plateau].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun-xia; Li, Hong-jian; Li, Jun-jian; Wu, Jiang-xing

    2015-05-01

    Based on the data from a planted larch forest in Panquangou Natural Reserve of Shanxi Province, at three sampling scales (4, 2, and 1 m, respectively), soil respiration (Rs) and its affecting factors including soil temperature at 5 cm (T5), 10 cm (T10), and 15 cm (T15) depths, soil water content (Ws), litter mass (Lw), litter moisture (Lm), soil total carbon (C), and soil total nitrogen ( N) were determined. The spatial heterogeneities of Rs and the environmental factors were further analyzed and their intrinsic correlations were established. The results of traditional statistics showed that the spatial variations of Rs and the all measured factors were in the middle range; Rs were highly significantly positively correlated with T10, T15, and N (P < 0.01); significantly positively correlated with Lm (P < 0.05); highly significantly negatively correlated with C/N ratio (P < 0.01); and not significantly correlated with T5, Ws, Lw and C (P > 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that the four factors of Lm, T10, N, and Ws together accounted for 36% of Rs heterogeneity. The results of geo-statistical analysis demonstrated that Rs was in a medium spatial autocorrelation; random and structural factors accounted for 39.5% and 60.5% of Rs heterogeneity, respectively. And the factors such as climate, landform, and soil played a leading role. The results also illustrated that the ranges for soil factors were different and the range for both Rs and T10 was 25 meters. The fractal dimension of the soil index was in the following order: Lw and C/N ratio (1.95) > N (1.91) > C (1.89) > Rs (1.78) > Lm (1.77 ) > Ws (1.69) > T10 (1.42). The spatial distribution of Rs was in consistent agreement with those of T10, Lm, C, and N; but different with those of Ws and C/N ratio. With a fixed cofidence level and certain estimated accuracy, the required sampling number of each item differed, corresponding to its spatial variation degree.

  20. The role of organic soil layer on the fate of Siberian larch forest and near-surface permafrost under changing climate: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SATO, H.; Iwahana, G.; Ohta, T.

    2013-12-01

    Siberian larch forest is the largest coniferous forest region in the world. In this vast region, larch often forms nearly pure stands, regenerated by recurrent fire. This region is characterized by a short and dry growing season; the annual mean precipitation for Yakutsk was only about 240 mm. To maintain forest ecosystem under such small precipitation, underlying permafrost and seasonal soil freezing-thawing-cycle have been supposed to play important roles; (1) frozen ground inhibits percolation of soil water into deep soil layers, and (2) excess soil water at the end of growing season can be carried over until the next growing season as ice, and larch trees can use the melt water. As a proof for this explanation, geographical distribution of Siberian larch region highly coincides with continuous and discontinuous permafrost zone. Recent observations and simulation studies suggests that existences of larch forest and permafrost in subsurface layer are co-dependent; permafrost maintains the larch forest by enhancing water use efficiency of trees, while larch forest maintains permafrost by inhibiting solar radiation and preventing heat exchanges between soil and atmosphere. Owing to such complexity and absence of enough ecosystem data available, current-generation Earth System Models significantly diverse in their prediction of structure and key ecosystem functions in Siberian larch forest under changing climate. Such uncertainty should in turn expand uncertainty over predictions of climate, because Siberian larch forest should have major role in the global carbon balance with its huge area and vast potential carbon pool within the biomass and soil, and changes in boreal forest albedo can have a considerable effect on Northern Hemisphere climate. In this study, we developed an integrated ecosystem model, which treats interactions between plant-dynamics and freeze-thaw cycles. This integrated model contains a dynamic global vegetation model SEIB-DGVM, which simulates

  1. Tree Growth and Competition in a Betula platyphylla–Larix cajanderi Post-fire Forest in Central Kamchatka

    PubMed Central

    DOLEŽAL, JIŘÍ; ISHII, HIROAKI; VETROVA, VALENTINA P.; SUMIDA, AKIHIRO; HARA, TOSHIHIKO

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Fire is the dominant disturbance in central Kamchatka boreal forests, yet patterns and mechanisms of stand recovery have not been investigated. • Methods Measurements were made of 1433 stems ≥1·3 m height and annual radial increments of 225 randomly selected trees in a 0·4-ha plot of a 53-year-old fire-origin mixed-species stand to examine the spatio-temporal variation in establishment, growth, size inequality and the mode of competition among individual trees. Growth variations were related to tree size, age and local interference with neighbours. • Key Results Betula platyphylla formed the main canopy following a fire in 1947, with Larix cajanderi and Pinus pumila progressively reinvading the lower tree and shrub stratum. Most B. platyphylla originated from sprouts in small patches (polycormons) during the first 15 post-fire years. Betula platyphylla had normal distributions of diameter and age classes, but negatively skewed height distribution, as expected from shade-intolerant, pioneer species. Larix cajanderi had fewer tall and many short individuals. The smaller and younger B. platyphylla grew disproportionately more in diameter than larger trees from 1950 to 1975, and hence stem size inequalities decreased. The reverse trend was observed from 1995 to 2000: larger trees grew more, indicating an increasing asymmetry of competition for light. Betula platyphylla had steady diameter growth in the first 25 post-fire years, after which the growth declined in smaller trees. Neighbourhood analysis showed that the decline resulted from increased competition from taller neighbours. • Conclusions The observed growth patterns suggest that mode of interactions altered during stand development from early stages of weak competition for soil resources released by fire to later stages of asymmetric competition for light. Asymmetric crown competition started later than reported in other studies, which can be attributed to the lower stem

  2. [Time lag effects of throughfall in natural Larix gmelinii forest in the north of Great Xing'an Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-jie; Man, Xiu-ling; Sheng, Hong-cai

    2015-11-01

    Based on a natural Larix gmelinii forest from Mohe Ecological Station, located in north of Great Xing' an Mountains, time lag effects of throughfall inside the Larix gmelinii forest were analyzed by measuring rainfall, throughfall and stemflow with the method of location observation. The result showed that forest throughfall, stemflow and canopy interception accounted for 76.5%, 2.6% and 20.9% of total rainfall, respectively. Time lag of rainfall inside L. gmelinii forest was found both in beginning and termination of rainfall compared to outside, and the higher the rainfall level, the shorter the time lag of throughfall. For throughfall and stemflow, variations of time lag were (67.8 ± 7.8)--(17.2 ± 3.9) min and (112.0 ± 38.8)--(48.3 ± 10.6) min, respectively. The time lag of throughfall decreased with the increasing rainfall intensity under the same rainfall level. When the rainfall intensity was greater than 2 mm · h(-1), the time lag of throughfall was shortened significantly, but it increased with prolonging the antecedent dry period before rainfall. Rainfall would be the critical factor to affect the time lag of throughfall when the antecedent dry period was longer than 48 h. Termination of throughfall also lagged when rainfall termination happened with a rainfall greater than 5.0 mm. The time lag of throughfall termination increased with increasing the rainfall intensity, but it had no significant relationship with the antecedent dry period before rainfall. However, the termination of stemflow occurred prior to rainfall, which was relevant to the rainfall level, and the smaller the rainfall level, the sooner the stemflow terminated.

  3. Key mechanisms of metabolic changes in mountain pine and larch under drought in the Swiss National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakova, Olga; Bigler, Christof; Bryukhanova, Marina; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Forests are of great ecological, economic and social importance worldwide. In many regions they have been recently affected by water deficits during summer droughts due to increasing temperatures and shortage of precipitation (Allen et al. 2010). Climate models predict that drought frequency will continue to increase during the 21st century and beyond (CH 2011). Since the foundation of the Swiss National Park (SNP) in 1914 these forests have not been managed any more, which allows to study natural processes in these forest ecosystems. Since the 1990s, annual and spring temperatures increased in the SNP up to 0.5 ºC and 1.02 ºC, respectively, and average summer temperature increased up to 0.6 ºC. Annual precipitation decreased by 81 mm compared to the mean values (927 mm) from 1917 to 1989. Therefore, detailed studies of drought effects on the physiological functioning of trees over the last decades are needed. Recently, mortality processes of mountain pines were observed in the Swiss National Park (Bigler, Rigling 2013). It is of great interest to investigate and compare the physiological responses of mountain pine and larch to drought and to understand the mechanisms behind the mortality processes. The goal of our study is to investigate the key mechanisms of tree physiological responses to drought in the SNP using state-of-the-art methods of classical dendrochronology, tree physiology, stable isotope, and compound-specific isotope analyses. Long-term responses of mountain pine and larch trees from north- and south-facing sites to drought will be inferred from tree-ring width data. Based on climatic data a drought index will be calculated and reconstructed back in time. New chronologies for stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios derived from both pine and larch tree-ring cellulose will provide retrospective insight into the long-term whole-plant physiological control of gas exchange derived from estimates of stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate and

  4. Fire Effects on Microbial Dynamics and C, N, and P Cycling in Larch Forests of the Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, S.; Alexander, H. D.; Mann, P. J.; Natali, S.; Schade, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic forest ecosystems are warming at an accelerated rate relative to lower latitudes, with global implications for C cycling within these regions. As climate continues to warm and dry, wildfire frequency and severity are predicted to increase, creating a positive feedback to climate warming. Because soil microbes regulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, it is important to understand microbial response to fires, particularly in the understudied larch forests in the Siberian Arctic. In this project, we created experimental burn plots in a mature larch forest in the Kolyma River watershed of Northeastern Siberia. Plots were burned at several treatments: control (no burn), low, moderate, and severe. After 1 day, 8 days and 1 year post-fire, we measured CO2 flux from the plots, and measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), NH4, NO3, PO4, and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from soil leachates. Furthermore, we measured extracellular activity of four enzymes involved in soil C and nutrient cycling (leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), β-glucosidase, phosphatase, and phenol oxidase). Both 1 day and 8 days post-fire DOC, TDN, NH4, and PO4 all increased with burn severity, but by 1 year they were similar to control plots. The aromaticity and molecular weight of DOM decreased with fire severity. One day post-fire we observed a spike in phenol oxidase activity in the severe burns only, and a decline in β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. By 8 days post-fire all enzyme activities were at the level of the control plots. 1 year post-fire LAP, β-glucosidase, and phosphatase all decreased with fire severity, parallel to a decrease in CO2 flux by fire severity. Ratios of enzymatic activity 1 year post-fire reflect a switch of resource allocation from P acquiring to N acquiring activities in more severe fires. Our results show an immediate microbial response to the short-term effects

  5. Diversity and community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Larix chinensis across the alpine treeline ecotone of Taibai Mountain.

    PubMed

    Han, Qisheng; Huang, Jian; Long, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-03-09

    Alpine treeline ecotones represent ecosystems that are vulnerable to climate change. We investigated the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community, which has potential to stabilize alpine ecosystems. ECM communities associated with Larix chinensis were studied in four zones along a natural ecotone from a mixed forest stand over pure forest stands, the timberline, and eventually, the treeline (3050-3450 m) in Tabai Mountain, China. Sixty operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of ECM fungi were identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer of ECM tips. The richness of ECM species increased with elevation. The soil C/N ratio was the most important factor explaining ECM species richness. The treeline zone harbored some unique ECM fungi whereas no unique genera were observed in the timberline and pure forest zone. Elevation and topography were equally important factors influencing ECM communities in the alpine region. We suggest that a higher diversity of the ECM fungal community associated with L. chinensis in the treeline zone could result from niche differentiation.

  6. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  7. Factors promoting larch dominance in central Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics at the boundary of evergreen and deciduous conifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The relative role of fire and of climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in central and eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in performance of the observed species along the transect. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix and of soil carbon. Of lesser influence were longitude as a proxy for climate, local hydrology and active-layer thickness. We can only partially explain fire return frequency, which is not only related to climate and land cover, but also to human behavior. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yrs between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yrs since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20%. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20% at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand biomass reached about 130 t C ha-1(equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yrs. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60% of old Larix and Picea and 30% of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are

  8. A multi-taxon approach reveals the effect of management intensity on biodiversity in Alpine larch grasslands.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Juri; Fontana, Veronika; Spitale, Daniel

    2014-07-15

    In the Alps, larch grasslands form one of the most pleasing aspects of the landscape. However, their effectiveness in contributing to biodiversity conservation may depend on the intensity of their management. We used a multi-taxon approach to evaluate the effects of the intensification of management practices and those of abandonment on the biodiversity of the main autotrophic organisms hosted in this habitat, including vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens. The study was carried out in the eastern part of South Tyrol, in the Italian Alps, where the diversity patterns of these three organismal groups were compared among intensively managed, extensively managed, and abandoned stands. The management intensity was found to strongly influence the biodiversity of the organisms, with a general pattern indicating the best conditions in extensively managed stands. Both abandonment and management intensification were detrimental to biodiversity through different mechanisms that led to species loss or to major shifts in species composition. However, the most negative effects were related to management intensification, mainly due to the high nitrogen supply, providing evidence for the increasing impact of eutrophication on Alpine environments.

  9. Physiological responses of three deciduous conifers (Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Taxodium distichum and Larix laricina) to continuous light: adaptive implications for the early Tertiary polar summer.

    PubMed

    Equiza, M Alejandra; Day, Michael E; Jagels, Richard

    2006-03-01

    Polar regions were covered with extensive forests during the Cretaceous and early Tertiary, and supported trees comparable in size and productivity to those of present-day temperate forests. With a winter of total or near darkness and a summer of continuous, low-angle illumination, these temperate, high-latitude forests were characterized by a light regime without a contemporary counterpart. Although maximum irradiances were much lower than at mid-latitudes, the 24-h photoperiod provided similar integrated light flux. Taxodium, Larix and Metasequoia, three genera of deciduous conifers that occurred in paleoarctic wet forests, have extant, closely related descendents. However, the contemporary relative abundance of these genera differs greatly from that in the paleoarctic. To provide insight into attributes that favor competitive success in a continuous-light environment, we subjected saplings of these genera to a natural photoperiod or a 24-h photoperiod and measured gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations, biomass production and carbon allocation. Exposure to continuous light significantly decreased photosynthetic capacity and quantum efficiency of photosystem II in Taxodium and Larix, but had minimal influence in Metasequoia. In midsummer, foliar starch concentration substantially increased in both Taxodium and Larix saplings grown in continuous light, which may have contributed to end-product down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity. In contrast, Metasequoia allocated photosynthate to continuous production of new foliar biomass. This difference in carbon allocation may have provided Metasequoia with a two fold advantage in the paleoarctic by minimizing depression of photosynthetic capacity and increasing photosynthetic surface.

  10. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Arabinogalactan and Dihydroquercetin Simultaneously from Larix gmelinii as a Pretreatment for Pulping and Papermaking

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunhui; Yang, Lei; Li, Wei; Yue, Jinquan; Li, Jian; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method using ethanol was applied for extracting arabinogalactan (AG) and dihydroquercetin (DHQ) simultaneously from larch wood, as a pretreatment for pulping and papermaking. The extraction parameters were optimized by a Box-Behnken experimental design with the yields of AG and DHQ as the response values. Under optimum conditions (three extractions, each using 40% ethanol, for 50 min, 200 W ultrasound power and 1∶18 solid-liquid ratio), the yields of AG and DHQ were 183.4 and 36.76 mg/g, respectively. After UAE pretreated, the wood chips were used for Kraft pulping (KP) and high boiling solvent pulping (HBSP). The pulping yield after pretreatment was higher than that of untreated (the pulping yields of untreated HBSP and KP were 42.37% and 39.60%, and the pulping yields of HBSP and KP after UAE-pretreated were 44.23% and 41.50% respectively), as indicated by a lower kappa number (77.91 and 27.30 for untreated HBSP and KP; 77.01 and 26.83 for UAE-pretreated HBSP and KP). Furthermore, the characteristics of paper produced from pretreated wood chips were superior to those from the untreated chips: the basis weight was lower (85.67 and 82.48 g·cm−2 for paper from untreated KP and HBSP; 79.94 and 80.25 g·cm−2 for paper from UAE-pretreated KP and HBSP), and the tensile strengths, tearing strengths, bursting strengths, and folding strengths were higher than these of paper after UAE-pretreated, respectively. PMID:25460911

  11. [Parameter sensitivity of simulating net primary productivity of Larix olgensis forest based on BIOME-BGC model].

    PubMed

    He, Li-hong; Wang, Hai-yan; Lei, Xiang-dong

    2016-02-01

    Model based on vegetation ecophysiological process contains many parameters, and reasonable parameter values will greatly improve simulation ability. Sensitivity analysis, as an important method to screen out the sensitive parameters, can comprehensively analyze how model parameters affect the simulation results. In this paper, we conducted parameter sensitivity analysis of BIOME-BGC model with a case study of simulating net primary productivity (NPP) of Larix olgensis forest in Wangqing, Jilin Province. First, with the contrastive analysis between field measurement data and the simulation results, we tested the BIOME-BGC model' s capability of simulating the NPP of L. olgensis forest. Then, Morris and EFAST sensitivity methods were used to screen the sensitive parameters that had strong influence on NPP. On this basis, we also quantitatively estimated the sensitivity of the screened parameters, and calculated the global, the first-order and the second-order sensitivity indices. The results showed that the BIOME-BGC model could well simulate the NPP of L. olgensis forest in the sample plot. The Morris sensitivity method provided a reliable parameter sensitivity analysis result under the condition of a relatively small sample size. The EFAST sensitivity method could quantitatively measure the impact of simulation result of a single parameter as well as the interaction between the parameters in BIOME-BGC model. The influential sensitive parameters for L. olgensis forest NPP were new stem carbon to new leaf carbon allocation and leaf carbon to nitrogen ratio, the effect of their interaction was significantly greater than the other parameter' teraction effect.

  12. [Temporal variation of soil greenhouse gases fluxes in a cold-temperate Larix gmelinii forest in Inner Mongolia, China].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiu-Zhi; Zhang, Qiu-Liang; Li, Chang-Sheng; Chen, Gao-Wa; Wang, Fei

    2012-08-01

    By using static chamber-gas chromatograph technique, an in situ measurement was conducted on the soil CH4, CO2, and N2O fluxes in a cold-temperate Larix gmelinii forest in Inner Mongolia from June to September 2007, aimed to understand the diurnal and seasonal variations of soil greenhouse gasses fluxes and their relations with the associated environmental factors in L. gmelinii forests in cold-temperate zone. In growth season, the soil in the L. gmelinii forest was the sink of atmospheric CH4, with the flux ranged from 22.3 to 107.8 microg CH4-C x m(-2) x h(-1). The mean monthly uptake of CH4 in June, July, August, and September was 34.0 +/- 7.1, 71.4 +/- 9.4, 86.3 +/- 7.9, and 40.7 +/- 6.2 microg x m(-2) x h(-1), respectively. The mean diurnal flux of soil CH4 from June to September showed the same variation trend, i. e., peaked at 10:00 am. The diurnal variation of soil CO2 flux showed an obvious double-peak, and the mean monthly CO2 flux was in the order of July > August > June > September. Soil N2O flux varied dramatically from -9.1 to 31.7 microg x m(-2) x h(-1). Soil temperature and humidity were the main factors affecting the CH4 and CO2 fluxes, and soil temperature mainly affected the N2O flux. In the L. gmelinii forest, the CH4, CO2, and N2O fluxes measured at 10:00 am could represent the diurnal CH4, CO2, and N2O fluxes on the same day.

  13. [Effects of controlled-release fertilizer and organic amendment on the construction of nutrients reserves in Larix olgensis container seedlings].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong-xu; Xu, Cheng-yang; Ma, Lü-yi; Jiang, Li-ni

    2011-07-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was conducted to study the effect of fertilization on Larix olgensis container seedlings. 36.36 or 18.18 mg controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) N and 0 or 1.82 g FM organic amendment (OA) per seedling were applied. There were no significant responses to fertilization in the seedling height, collar diameter, biomass, and potassium (K) uptake. Applying FM OA increased the number of first-order lateral roots with a length > 1 cm (P = 0.040), the tap root length (TRL) (P = 0.012), and the ratio of TRL to seedling height (P = 0.008). Comparing with low application rate CRF N, high application rate CRF N increased the N concentration in root (P = 0.035) as well as the N reserves in stem (P = 0.005), root (P = 0.037), and stem plus root (P = 0.030), and the P reserves in stem (P = 0.047). Applying 36.36 mg CRF N plus 1.82 g FM OA increased the N concentrations in leaf and in stem plus root by 137% (P = 0.040) and 21% (P = 0.013), respectively, and the N reserves in stem (P = 0.020), root (P = 0.017), and stem plus root (P = 0.013). Vector analysis revealed that high application rate of CRF N led to the excess of seedlings N and P, while applying FM OA alleviated the N and P deficiency but led to the K depletion. For nursing L. olgensis container seedlings, a solution of CRF 18 mg N combined with 1.82 g FM OA per seedling was recommended.

  14. Biogeochemistry of stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes in a larch-covered permafrost-dominated watershed of Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, Marie-Laure; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Chabaux, François; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Viers, Jérôme; Stille, Peter; Labolle, François; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.

    2013-08-01

    Stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotope compositions were measured in different compartments (stream water, soil solutions, rocks, soils and soil leachates and vegetation) of a small permafrost-dominated watershed in the Central Siberian Plateau. The Sr and Ca in the area are supplied by basalt weathering and atmospheric depositions, which significantly impact the Sr isotopic compositions. Only vegetation significantly fractionates the calcium isotopes within the watershed. These fractionations occur during Ca uptake by roots and along the transpiration stream within the larch trees and are hypothesised to be the result of chromatographic processes and Ca oxalate crystallisations during Ca circulation or storage within plant organs. Biomass degradation significantly influences the Ca isotopic compositions of soil solutions and soil leachates via the release of light Ca, and organic and organo-mineral colloids are thought to affect the Ca isotopic compositions of soil solutions by preferential scavenging of 40Ca. The imprint of organic matter degradation on the δ44/40Ca of soil solutions is much more significant for the warmer south-facing slope of the watershed than for the shallow and cold soil active layer of the north-facing slope. As a result, the available stock of biomass and the decomposition rates appear to be critical parameters that regulate the impact of vegetation on the soil-water system in permafrost areas. Finally, the obtained δ44/40Ca patterns contrast with those described for permafrost-free environments with a much lower δ44/40Ca fractionation factor between soils and plants, suggesting specific features of organic matter decomposition in permafrost environments. The biologically induced Ca isotopic fractionation observed at the soil profile scale is not pronounced at the scale of the streams and large rivers in which the δ44/40Ca signature may be controlled by the heterogeneity of lithological sources.

  15. [Prediction models for ground surface fuels moisture content of Larix gmelinii stand in Daxing'anling of China based on one-hour time step].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Zhou; Sen, Jin; Di, Xue-Ying

    2013-06-01

    By using the equilibrium moisture content-time lag methods of Nelson and Simard and the meteorological element regression method, this paper studied the dynamics of the moisture content of ground surface fine dead fuels under a Larix gmelinii stand on the sunny slope in Daxing' anling with a time interval of one hour, established the corresponding prediction models, and analyzed the prediction errors under different understory densities. The results showed that the prediction methods of the fuels moisture content based on one-hour time step were applicable for the typical Larix gmelinii stand in Daxing' anling. The mean absolute error and the mean relative error of Simard method was 1.1% and 8.5%, respectively, being lower than those of Nelson method and meteorological element regression method, and close to those of similar studies. On the same slopes and slope positions, the fuel moisture content varied with different understory densities, and thus, it would be necessary to select the appropriate equilibrium moisture content model for specific regional stand and position, or establish the fuel moisture content model based on specific stand when the dynamics of fuel moisture content would be investigated with a time interval of one hour.

  16. Mitigation of Drought Limitation in Photosynthesis of Larix gmelinii Saplings by Clear-cutting in East-Siberian Taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Suzuki, M.; Iijima, H.; Onoe, T.; Yamamuro, K.; Maximov, T. C.; Takahashi, K.

    2002-12-01

    Although Larix gmelinii forest ecosystem on permafrost is frequently disturbed by human activity like logging, regeneration system is not developed because of little understanding of the eco-physiological process. In the east-Siberian ecosystem, water cycle plays an important role in the regeneration, namely the annual precipitation is only 200-250mm approximately, and the melting of permafrost after the logging changes forest to wet land called as Alas where regeneration of tree is impossible. Thus we focus the drought stress in CO2 assimilation rate in the regenerated L. gmelinii sapling under canopy, and the effects of clear-cutting. In order to evaluate the drought limitation in the CO2 assimilation rate, in this study, irrigation treatment was conduced for 10 days in understory and clear-cut area. The clear-cutting was carried out in 2000, and this experiment was carried out in 2002. The light saturated CO2 assimilation rate (Amax) was measured in the morning and the afternoon. Volumetric soil moisture content at the 15 cm of the depth was approximately 10% under canopy and 30% in clear-cut area. The midday depression of Amax was larger in understory than that in clear-cut area, especially the understoried Amax was near 0 μmol m-2 s-1. During the irrigation treatment, i.e. 10 days, the volumetric soil moisture content was kept over 30% in the both areas. After the irrigation, the Amax increased to 3.2-fold in understoried and 1.3-fold in clear-cut area in morning. The Amax in afternoon increased to 50-fold in understory and 2.5-fold in clear-cut area after the irrigation. Thus the drought limitation of Amax was larger in understory than clear-cutting area. These results suggest that (1) drought stress is major factor to limit the CO2 assimilation of the regenerated L. gmelinii saplings under canopy, and (2) clear-cutting mitigates the drought limitation in the CO2 assimilation rate during the early stage of the disturbance of clear-cutting.

  17. A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesoporous structure prepared from larch sawdust for the gas-phase toluene adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shouxin; Huang, Zhanhua; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Network carbon foam containing a bimodal pore distribution was prepared from Larch. ► Liquefaction route was used for the preparation of morphology controllable carbon. ► Pore structure of carbon foam was controlled through KOH activation. - Abstract: A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesopore distribution, was prepared by submitting larch sawdust to liquefaction, resinification, foaming, carbonization and KOH activation. The morphology, pore texture and crystal microstructure was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. A honeycomb structure with adjacent cells was observed for the precursor of carbon foam. After KOH activation, the cell wall of precursor shrunk and broke. This lead to the formation of a well-connected 3D network and developed ligament pore structure (surface area of 554–1918 m{sup 2}/g) containing bimodal pores, 2.1 and 3.9 nm in diameter. The porous carbon foam prepared at 700 °C exhibited a much higher gas-phase toluene removal than commercial activated carbon fiber owing to the 3D network and bimodal pore structure.

  18. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg−1·year−1 for SOM, 438.9 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:P, 5.3 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:K, and −3.23 mg·cm−3·year−1 for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0–80-cm soil profile (P: −4.10 mg·kg−1·year−1; pH: −0.0061 unit·year−1; C:N: 167.1 mg·g−1·year−1; K:P: 371.5 mg·g−1 year−1; N:K: −0.242 mg·g−1·year−1; EC: 0.169 μS·cm−1·year−1), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance. PMID:24772281

  19. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-04-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg(-1)·year(-1) for SOM, 438.9 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:P, 5.3 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:K, and -3.23 mg·cm(-3)·year(-1) for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0-80-cm soil profile (P: -4.10 mg·kg(-1)·year(-1); pH: -0.0061 unit·year(-1); C:N: 167.1 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); K:P: 371.5 mg·g(-1) year(-1); N:K: -0.242 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); EC: 0.169 μS·cm(-1)·year(-1)), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance.

  20. Can climate variations be inferred from tree-ring parameters and stable isotopes from Larix decidua? Juvenile effects, budmoth outbreaks, and divergence issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daux, V.; Edouard, J. L.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Stievenard, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Pierre, M.; Mestre, O.; Danis, P. A.; Guibal, F.

    2011-09-01

    Larch wood has been used for centuries as a building material. Hence, the study of the tree-ring width, the latewood maximal density, and the oxygen and carbon isotope composition of the cellulose of this tree provides potential and valuable insights when reconstructing past climate variability. We explore the qualities and limitations of these proxies, focusing on a forest standing the Névache valley (French Alps). The analysis of 15 trees demonstrates a small intra-tree variability in comparison with the inter-tree variability of δ 13C and δ 18O, and shows that 6 trees, at least, must be pooled to make a population-representative sample. Our results show no juvenile effect for δ 13C. Unlike tree-ring width and density, δ 13C and δ 18O are not altered by budmouth outbreaks. These two parameters therefore appear well suited for climate reconstructions, and depict a strong correlation with July-August temperature and relative humidity. The δ 18O of larch cellulose is also strongly linked with the previous winter (December-March) oxygen isotopic composition of the precipitation. This is consistent with a winter water recharge of soil and ground. The past variations of July-August maximum temperature and relative humidity were established using two different combinations of the isotopic ratios. Uncertainties on the reconstructions are estimated respectively at ± 1.4 °C and 3.6%. Inter-annual variations of temperature and relative humidity are well reproduced. However, the reconstructed July-August temperature series diverges from the instrumental one, being lower, after ca. 1990. The effects of the variation through time of the depth of source water and of the ecophysiological response of trees to rising CO 2 on the isotope composition are discussed as possible causes of divergence. This 'divergence problem' strongly questions the possibility of producing appropriate isotope-based temperature calibration.The relationships between isotopes and the July

  1. Effect of light conditions on anatomical and biochemical aspects of somatic and zygotic embryos of hybrid larch (Larix × marschlinsii)

    PubMed Central

    von Aderkas, Patrick; Teyssier, Caroline; Charpentier, Jean-Paul; Gutmann, Markus; Pâques, Luc; Le Metté, Claire; Ader, Kevin; Label, Philippe; Kong, Lisheng; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In conifers, mature somatic embryos and zygotic embryos appear to resemble one another physiologically and morphologically. However, phenotypes of cloned conifer embryos can be strongly influenced by a number of in vitro factors and in some instances clonal variation can exceed that found in nature. This study examines whether zygotic embryos that develop within light-opaque cones differ from somatic embryos developing in dark/light conditions in vitro. Embryogenesis in larch is well understood both in situ and in vitro and thus provides a suitable system for addressing this question. Methods Features of somatic and zygotic embryos of hybrid larch, Larix × marschlinsii, were quantified, including cotyledon numbers, protein concentration and phenol chemistry. Somatic embryos were placed either in light or darkness for the entire maturation period. Embryos at different developmental stages were embedded and sectioned for histological analysis. Key Results Light, and to a lesser degree abscisic acid (ABA), influenced accumulation of protein and phenolic compounds in somatic and zygotic embryos. Dark-grown mature somatic embryos had more protein (91·77 ± 11·26 µg protein mg–1 f.wt) than either dark-grown zygotic embryos (62·40 ± 5·58) or light-grown somatic embryos (58·15 ± 10·02). Zygotic embryos never accumulated phenolic compounds at any stage, whereas somatic embryos stored phenolic compounds in the embryonal root caps and suspensors. Light induced the production of quercetrin (261·13 ± 9·2 µg g–1 d.wt) in somatic embryos. Mature zygotic embryos that were removed from seeds and placed on medium in light rapidly accumulated phenolics in the embryonal root cap and hypocotyl. Delaying germination with ABA delayed phenolic compound accumulation, restricting it to the embryonal root cap. Conclusions In larch embryos, light has a negative effect on protein accumulation, but a positive effect on phenol

  2. Effects of atmospheric and climate change at the timberline of the Central European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Gerhard; Matyssek, Rainer; Luzian, Roland; Zwerger, Peter; Pindur, Peter; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This review considers potential effects of atmospheric change and climate warming within the timberline ecotone of the Central European Alps. After focusing on the impacts of ozone (O3) and rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, effects of climate warming on the carbon and water balance of timberline trees and forests will be outlined towards conclusions about changes in tree growth and treeline dynamics. Presently, ambient ground-level O3 concentrations do not exert crucial stress on adult conifers at the timberline of the Central European Alps. In response to elevated atmospheric CO2 Larix decidua showed growth increase, whereas no such response was found in Pinus uncinata. Overall climate warming appears as the factor responsible for the observed growth stimulation of timberline trees. Increased seedling re-establishment in the Central European Alps however, resulted from invasion into potential habitats rather than upward migration due to climate change, although seedlings will only reach tree size upon successful coupling with the atmosphere and thus loosing the beneficial microclimate of low stature vegetation. In conclusion, future climate extremes are more likely than the gradual temperature increase to control treeline dynamics in the Central European Alps. PMID:21379395

  3. LaAP2L1, a heterosis-associated AP2/EREBP transcription factor of Larix, increases organ size and final biomass by affecting cell proliferation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai; Zhou, Yanan; Jin, Chuan; Song, Wenqin; Chen, Chengbin; Wang, Chunguo

    2013-11-01

    In Larix and in some crops, heterosis is prevalent and has been widely used in breeding to produce excellent varieties. However, the molecular basis of heterosis in Larix remains ambiguous. LaAP2L1, a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor family, has been suggested to be involved in heterosis in Larix hybrids. Here, the function and regulation of LaAP2L1 were further explored. Overexpression of LaAP2L1 led to markedly enlarged organs and heterosis-like traits in Arabidopsis. Fresh weight of leaves was almost twice as great as in vector controls. Likewise, seed yield of 35S::LaAP2L1 individual plants was >200% greater than that of control plants. The enlarged organs and heterosis-like traits displayed by 35S::LaAP2L1 plants were mainly due to enhanced cell proliferation and prolonged growth duration. At the molecular level, LaAP2L1 upregulated the expression of ANT, EBP1, and CycD3;1 and inhibited the expression of ARGOS in 35S::LaAP2L1 plants, suggesting an important molecular role of LaAP2L1 in regulating plant organ development. These findings provide new insights into the formation of heterosis in woody plants and suggest that LaAP2L1 has potential applications in breeding high-yielding crops and energy plants. In addition, 50 AP2/EREBP transcription factors, including LaAP2L1, in Larix were identified by transcriptome sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis was conducted. This provided information that will be important in further revealing the functions of these transcription factors.

  4. CO2 enrichment alters diurnal stem radius fluctuations of 36-yr-old Larix decidua growing at the alpine tree line.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Melissa A; Zweifel, Roman; Dawes, Nicholas; Rixen, Christian; Hagedorn, Frank

    2014-06-01

    To understand how trees at high elevations might use water differently in the future, we investigated the effects of CO2 enrichment and soil warming (separately and combined) on the water relations of Larix decidua growing at the tree line in the Swiss Alps. We assessed diurnal stem radius fluctuations using point dendrometers and applied a hydraulic plant model using microclimate and soil water potential data as inputs. Trees exposed to CO2 enrichment for 9 yr showed smaller diurnal stem radius contractions (by 46 ± 16%) and expansions (42 ± 16%) compared with trees exposed to ambient CO2 . Additionally, there was a delay in the timing of daily maximum (40 ± 12 min) and minimum (63 ± 14 min) radius values for trees growing under elevated CO2 . Parameters optimized with the hydraulic model suggested that CO2 -enriched trees had an increased flow resistance between the xylem and bark, representing a more buffered water supply system. Soil warming did not alter diurnal fluctuation dynamics or the CO2 response. Elevated CO2 altered the hydraulic water flow and storage system within L. decidua trees, which might have contributed to enhanced growth during 9 yr of CO2 enrichment and could ultimately influence the future competitive ability of this key tree-line species.

  5. Dynamics at the treeline: differential responses of Picea mariana and Larix laricina to climate change in eastern subarctic Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour-Tremblay, Geneviève; Lévesque, Esther; Boudreau, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    Treelines are known to be temperature-sensitive ecotones, and therefore could rapidly expand their range limits in response to climate warming. Observations of lack of range expansion, however, indicate that ecological constraints partly control the treeline ecotones. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate Picea mariana and Larix laricina recruitment and growth at and above the altitudinal treeline of Kangiqsualujjuaq (Nunavik), where warmer temperatures since the 1990s have already triggered shrub expansion. We mapped, harvested, dated and measured tree individuals along two altitudinal gradients from the forested stands below the treeline to hilltops. Since the 1990s, a pulse of L. laricina seedling establishment has occurred at and above the treeline. Dendrochronological analysis revealed that L. laricina underwent a rapid vertical growth and radial growth that accelerated from the 1990s. No recruitment was observed for P. mariana in response to the regional warming, suggesting a regeneration failure of this species. Our results indicated that the L. laricina colonization below and above the treeline in recent decades in response to the regional warming should modify the landscape physiognomy of the study area in the near future.

  6. [Effects of forest cutting on greenhouse gas emissions from Larix gmelini-Sphagnum swamps in Lesser Xing' an Mountains of Heilongjiang, China].

    PubMed

    Mu, Chang-Cheng; Wu, Yun-Xia; Li, Wan-Shu; Xu, Rui

    2010-02-01

    By using static chamber and gas chromatography methods, this paper studied the effects of clear cutting and selective cutting on the CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions from Larix gmelini-Sphagnum swamp in Lesser Xing' an Mountains. Dramatic changes in the seasonal dynamics of CH4 and N2O emissions were detected in different treatment sites. Control site absorbed CH4 in summer and emitted CH4 in autumn, and absorbed N2O in both summer and autumn; selective cutting site emitted CH4 and N2O mainly in summer; and clear cutting site emitted CH4 in summer and autumn, and absorbed N2O in summer but emitted it in autumn. Cutting pattern had less effects on the seasonal dynamics of CO2 emission. Both on the clear cutting site and on the selective cutting site, the CO2 emission was in order of summer > spring > autumn. Forest cutting altered the source and sink functions of the sites. Control site functioned as a source of CO2 and a weak sink of CH4 or N2O, while forest cutting sites had a decrease of CO2 emission by 25%, and became a weak source of N2O and a weak or strong source of CH4. Compared with that of control site, the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of selective cutting site and clear cutting site was reduced by 24.5% and increased by 3.2%, respectively.

  7. Reconstructed summer Palmer Drought Severity Index since 1850 AD based on δ13C of larch tree rings in eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tei, Shunsuke; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Ohta, Takeshi; Maximov, Trofim C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a tree-ring reconstruction of Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) in Ust-Maya region (60°00‧N, 133°49‧E), central part of eastern Siberia using total ring (TR) widths and latewood (LW) δ13C chronologies from larch trees (1850-2008 AD). Summer (JJA) PDSI was correlated positively and negatively with the TR widths and LW δ13C, respectively. Using a multiple liner regression approach, we reconstructed summer PDSI using the time series of TR widths and LW δ13C. The reconstruction showed an interannual to decadal wet/dry fluctuation with several moist periods before 1950s and a severe drought event from 1991 to 1993. Comparison of the reconstruction with reconstructed July PDSI for the Yakutsk region, 300 km northwest of Ust-Maya, showed heterogeneous changes in the mean states of soil moisture, but synchronous year-to-year changes. These results indicate that regional studies are quite important to precisely depict the spatio-temporal variability of hydrological changes in the central part of eastern Siberia.

  8. [Soil microorganisms, nutrients and enzyme activity of Larix kaempferi plantation under different ages in mountainous region of eastern Liaoning Province, China].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiao-yun; Sun, Xiao-mei; Chen, Dong-sheng; Zhang, Shou-gong

    2015-09-01

    We studied the community of soil microorganisms, enzyme activity and soil nutrients under 11-, 20-, 34-and 47-year-old Larix kaempferi plantations in mountainous region of eastern Liaoning Province to discuss the soil biological properties of L. kaempferi plantations of different stand ages and their relationships with soil nutrients. The results showed that the indexes reflecting soil micro-organisms, enzyme activity and soil nutrients of L. kaempferi plantations were the highest under the 11- or 47-year-old stand and the lowest in the 20- or 34-year-old stand. Soil productivity appeared in a decline trend with the increasing stand age, and the changes of soil microbial community structure and enzyme activity were responsive to soil degradation. The difference of fungi community was more noticeable than that of bacteria community among the plantations with different stand ages. The results of CCA showed soil nutrient and pH had no effect on seasonal difference of community structure, but had effects on community, structure among different stand ages. The total N, organic carbon, C/N, available nitrogen, exchangeable Mg2+ and pH had greater effects on bacteria community, while available P, total K and pH had greater effect on fungi community among different age forests. The main T-RFs of bacteria and fungi had higher correlation with N and P, and the fungi community had higher correlation with organic carbon and K than bacteria community. The microor-ganism community of the 11- and 47-year-old stands had greater correlation with soil nutrients and enzyme activity than that of 20- and 34-year-old stands. Consequently, soil organisms, in particular soil fungi, could be used to indicate soil degradation.

  9. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 μg SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  10. NPP changes of Larix chinensis estimated by tree-ring data and its response to climate change in the northern and southern slopes of Mt. Taibai, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, O.; Xuemei, S.

    2015-12-01

    Larix chinensis is mainly distributed in timberline of Mt. Taibai in the Qinling Mountains, a critical geographic demarcation for climate and vegetation distribution in China. Combined with biomass equations and the annual diameter at breast height calculated from tree-ring widths and investigation data of sampling plots, annual biomass and net primary productivity (NPP) of L. chinensis in northern and southern slopes were estimated. Correlation and response analyses were used to illustrate the relationship between the climate and NPP. The results show that from 1949 to 2014, the biomass of L. chinensis in the pure forests increases from 54.03 to 94.43 t/ha in the northern slope and 28.32 to 55.80 t/ha in the southern slope. The NPP of L. chinensis in northern and southern slopes has varied concordantly over the past 65 years, with an average value of 0.62 and 0.42 t/(ha·a) respectively. The difference in NPPs between the northern and southern slope is decreasing for the slight decrease trend of NPP in northern slope. Temperature plays an important role in the growth of L. chinensis. Low temperature before the growing seasons (from pervious November to April) and warm conditions in the growing seasons (mainly from June to July) can increase the growth of L. chinensis. However, the relationships between NPP and temperature are different in the northern and southern slope. The NPP in southern slope is more positively correlated with the temperature in the growing seasons and there is no significant correlation relationship between the NPP and the temperature in previous winter (from pervious November to January), while the NPP in northern slope is more negatively correlated with the temperature before the growing seasons. These results will provide useful information for the future research of forest carbon cycling.

  11. Does the Genotype Have a Significant Effect on the Formation of Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations? A Case Study Using Larix decidua from Northern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Klisz, Marcin; Koprowski, Marcin; Ukalska, Joanna; Nabais, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) can imprint environmental conditions within the growing season and most of the research on IADFs has been focused on their climatic signal. However, to our knowledge, the genetic influence on the frequency and type of IADFs has not been evaluated. To understand if the genotype can affect the formation of IADFs we have used a common garden experiment using eight families of Larix decidua established in two neighboring forest stands in northern Poland. Four types of IADFs were identified using X-ray density profiles: latewood-like cells within earlywood (IADF-type E), latewood-like cells in the transition from early- to latewood (IADF type E+), earlywood-like cells within latewood (IADF-type L), and earlywood-like cells in the border zone between the previous and present annual ring (IADF-type L+). The influence of explanatory variables i.e., families, sites, and years on identified density fluctuations was analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). We hypothesized that trees from different families will differ in terms of frequency and type of IADFs because each family will react to precipitation and temperature in a different way, depending on the origin of those trees. The most frequent fluctuation was E+ and L types on both sites. The most important factors in the formation of IADFs were the site and year, the last one reflecting the variable climatic conditions, with no significant effect of the family. However, the relation between the formation of IADFs and selected climate parameters was different between families. Although, our results did not give a significant effect of the genotype on the formation of IADFs, the different sensitivity to climatic parameters among different families indicate that there is a genetic influence. PMID:27242883

  12. [Impact of fire on carbon dynamics of Larix gmelinii forest in Daxing'an Mountains of North-East China: a simulation with CENTURY model].

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong-Ming; Zhou, Guang-Sheng; Jiang, Yan-Ling; Jia, Bing-Rui; Xu, Zhen-Zhu; Sui, Xing-Hua

    2012-09-01

    Fire is one of the important natural disturbances to forest ecosystem, giving strong impact on the ecosystem carbon dynamics. By using CENTURY model, this paper simulated the responses of the carbon budget of Larix gmelinii forest in Huzhong area of Daxing' an Mountains to different intensities of fire. The results indicated that after the fires happened, the soil total carbon pool of the forest had a slight increase in the first few years and then recovered gradually, while the stand biomass carbon pool increased after an initial decrease, with the recovery rate of carbon pool of the stand fine components being faster than that of the coarse components. The fluctuation of the carbon pools increased with the increase of fire intensity. After the fires, both the net primary productivity (NPP) of forest vegetation and the soil heterotrophic respiration increased after an initial decrease, but the recovery rate of the NPP was faster than that of soil heterotrophic respiration, resulting in the alternation of the stand functioned as a carbon source or sink. After light fire, the forest still functioned as a weak carbon sink, and quickly recovered as a carbon sink to the level before the fire happened. After other intensities fire, the forest functioned as a carbon source within 9-12 years, and then turned back to a carbon sink again. It was suggested that lower intensity forest fire could promote the regeneration of L. gmelinii forest, reduce the combustibles, and have no strong impact on the stand carbon budget, while higher intensity forest fire would lead to the serious loss of soil- and tree carbon sequestration, retard the recovery of the forest, and thereby, the forest would be a carbon source in a longer term.

  13. Soil sustainability study in Lithuanian alien forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čiuldiene, Dovile; Skridlaite, Grazina; Žalūdiene, Gaile; Askelsson, Cecilia; Armolaitis, Kestutis

    2016-04-01

    Tree species are shifting their natural ranges in response to climate changes (Saltré et al., 2013). Northern red oak has originated from North America, but was planted in Europe already in twentieth century. At present, it is considered as invasive species in Poland and at invasive stage in the Lithuanian forests (Riepsas and Straigyte, 2008). European larch naturally grows in Central Europe, but its range has been extended by planting it as far as the Nordic countries. According to a pollen study in peat soils, European larch naturally grew in Lithuania in the sixteenth century and was reintroduced 200 years ago (Jankauskas, 1954). Therefore, the global warming could accelerate the expansion of European larch and Northern red oak into Lithuanian forests. An urgent need appeared to evaluate an impact of those warmth-tolerant species on soil mineral chemistry and quality. New results on the determination of mineral weathering rates in alien forest stands using a PROFILE soil chemistry model were obtained during a doctoral study at the Institute of Forestry. Soil minerals were studied by a Scanning Electron Microscopy at the Institute of Geology and Geography. The results provided a lot of new information on soil weathering rates in Lithuania. The 47 and 157-year-old European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), 45 and 55-year-old Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) plantations and adjacent perennial grasslands were chosen for this study. The soils were classified as Luvisols and were developed from glaciofluvial deposits. The PROFILE model requires data of climate conditions (mean annual temperature and precipitation), chemical parameters of atmospheric deposition, forest plantation dendrometric and chemical (wood, foliage litter fall) characteristics, soil physical characteristics and mineral composition. A cation weathering rate (sum of Ca+Mg+ K) is 30% higher in a soil under the Northern red oak than in adjacent perennial grassland. Meanwhile, cation weathering rates

  14. The effects of cleared larch canopy and nitrogen supply on gas exchange and leaf traits in deciduous broad-leaved tree seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yoko; Koike, Takayoshi

    2009-12-01

    To understand the leaf-level responses of successional tree species to forest gap formation and nitrogen deposition, we performed canopy clearing and nitrogen-amendment treatments in larch plantations and investigated the changes in the light-use characteristics and the leaf structure of the invading deciduous broad-leaved tree seedlings. We hypothesized that the responses of the tree seedlings to clearing and nitrogen input would reflect specific traits in the shoot development that would be related to the species-specific successional characteristics. The gap phase species Magnolia hyporeuca Siebold et Zucc. and the mid-late successional tree species Quercus mongolica Fischer ex Ledeb. var. crispula (Blume) Ohashi., which grow in or near the forest gaps, had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates (Psat), enhanced mesophyll surface area (Smes) and increased leaf mass per area (LMA) under both the clearing treatment and the clearing with nitrogen-amendment treatment. These two species therefore increased their Psat via an increase in Smes and LMA. The LMA values of the late successional tree species Prunus ssiori F. Schmidt and Carpinus cordata Blume, which grow in the forest understory, were enhanced by the clearing treatment. However, they displayed lesser responses to the clearing treatment under which there were no marked increases in Psat or Smes values in the second year. These results indicate distinct and varied responses to disturbance regimes among the four seral tree seedlings. The Psat value largely increased in line with the increase in Smes value during the second year in M. hyporeuca and Q. mongolica. The nitrogen supply accelerated the change in LMA and increased the Smes value in the leaves of Q. mongolica.

  15. [Interannual variation patterns of heavy metals concentrations in tree rings of Larix gmelinii near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, Yichun of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Jin-Yan

    2013-06-01

    By using dendro-environmental methods, this paper measured and analyzed the variations of five heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn) concentrations in the tree rings of Larix gmelinii near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, Yichun of Northeast China. Among the test heavy metals, the Mn concentration in the tree rings was the highest, while the Cd concentration was the lowest. The Cd, Zn, and Cu concentrations in the tree rings near the ground (0.3 m high from the ground, D0.3) were significantly higher than those at breast height (1.3 m high from the ground, D1.3), while the Pb and Mn concentrations at the two heights had less difference. In 1987-2010, the Pb concentration in the tree rings had a slight increase, but the Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations presented a decreasing trend. The Cd concentration decreased most obviously, while the Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations decreased after an initial increase. With the increase of tree ring width, the Pb concentration decreased, while the Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations were in adverse. The relationships between the Pb and other four heavy metals concentrations in the tree rings near the ground and at breast height had definite differences. Near the ground, the Pb concentration showed a significant positive correlation with the other four heavy metals concentrations, but at breast height, less correlation was observed, and even, the Cd concentration decreased significantly with increasing Pb concentration. The variations of the heavy metals concentrations in the L. gmelinii tree rings could be affected by the production and mining activities of Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, an thus, it would be possible to use the Pb concentration in the tree rings to reconstruct the mining his tory of the study area. At present, the Pb concentration in the tailing wastes has polluted the surrounding environments near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine. Therefore, countermeasures should be adopted to manage the heavy metals in tailing wastes if the Mine would be

  16. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners.

  17. Environmental factors controlling forest evapotranspiration and surface conductance on a multi-temporal scale in growing seasons of a Siberian larch forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Megumi; Ohta, Takeshi; Kotani, Ayumi; Maximov, Trofim

    2010-12-01

    SummaryThe water and energy fluxes in forests fluctuate on different temporal scales, reflecting the impact of environmental factors. We examined the temporal fluctuation of the turbulent fluxes, surface conductance ( Gs), and four environmental factors (photosynthetic photon flux density [ Q], vapour pressure deficit [ D], air temperature [ T], and volumetric soil water content [ θ]) in a Siberian larch forest, using wavelet power spectra. The responses of the latent heat flux ( λE) and Gs to the environmental factors were analysed using the wavelet scale-wise correlation coefficient (SWCC) on multiple temporal scales. The observation site is characterised by underlying permafrost and a relatively short growing season. Analysis was conducted from May to September in each of 8 years during 1998-2007. The relationships between Gs and the environmental factors were evaluated with restrictive functions of a Jarvis-type surface conductance model because Gs usually has non-linear relationships to ambient factors. According to the power spectra of each factor, the largest variation was seen on a diurnal timescale for λE, the sensible heat flux ( H), Gs, and Q, whereas D and T fluctuated from diurnal to inter-seasonal timescales, and θ varied significantly over periods longer than the inter-seasonal timescales. The SWCC indicated that λE and Gs respond differently to the same ambient factors due to their respective processes; namely, λE is affected by both atmospheric demand and land surface regulation, whereas Gs is affected only by the latter. λE correlated well with Q at all timescales, as well as with D and T on intra-seasonal to interannual scales and with θ on inter-seasonal to interannual timescales. The SWCC of Gs and Q showed two peaks, on diurnal and inter-seasonal to interannual timescales, reflecting the physiological processes of plants, and D affected Gs only on an intra-seasonal timescale, which is related to meteorological changes. T and

  18. 7 CFR 301.91-3 - Regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES European Larch Canker Quarantine and Regulations § 301..., in which European larch canker has been found by an inspector or in which the Deputy Administrator has reason to believe that European larch canker is present, or any portion of a quarantined...

  19. 7 CFR 301.91-3 - Regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES European Larch Canker Quarantine and Regulations § 301..., in which European larch canker has been found by an inspector or in which the Deputy Administrator has reason to believe that European larch canker is present, or any portion of a quarantined...

  20. 7 CFR 301.91-3 - Regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES European Larch Canker Quarantine and Regulations § 301..., in which European larch canker has been found by an inspector or in which the Deputy Administrator has reason to believe that European larch canker is present, or any portion of a quarantined...

  1. 7 CFR 301.91-3 - Regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES European Larch Canker Quarantine and Regulations § 301..., in which European larch canker has been found by an inspector or in which the Deputy Administrator has reason to believe that European larch canker is present, or any portion of a quarantined...

  2. 7 CFR 301.91-3 - Regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES European Larch Canker Quarantine and Regulations § 301..., in which European larch canker has been found by an inspector or in which the Deputy Administrator has reason to believe that European larch canker is present, or any portion of a quarantined...

  3. European auxiliary propulsion, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    The chemical and electric auxiliary propulsion technology of the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany is discussed in detail, and the propulsion technology achievements of Italy, India, Japan, and Russia are reviewed. A comparison is presented of Shell 405 catalyst and a European spontaneous hydrazine catalyst called CNESRO I. Finally, conclusions are drawn regarding future trends in European auxiliary propulsion technology development.

  4. Carbon Allocation of 13CO2-labeled Photoassimilate in Larix gmelinii Saplings - A Physiological Basis for Isotope Dendroclimatology in Eastern Siberia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, A.; Sugimoto, A.; Maximov, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    also relied on stored material in some cases. Carbon isotope chronology of recent 100 years shows that the latewood 13C contains stronger climate signal than the earlywood and is significantly correlated to July temperature and July precipitation, corresponding to the timing of carbon incorporation that constitutes latewood. The results suggest the need for separating earlywood and latewood for isotope dendroclimatological study in Siberia. References: 1) Kagawa A., Sugimoto A., & Maximov, T.C. (2006) 13CO2 pulse-labelling of photoassimilates reveals carbon allocation within and between tree rings. Plant, Cell and Environment 29, 1571-1584. 2) Kagawa A., Sugimoto A., & Maximov, T. C. (2006) Seasonal course of translocation, storage, and remobilization of 13C pulse-labeled photoassimilate in naturally growing Larix gmelinii saplings. New Phytologist 171, 793-804. 3) Kagawa A., Naito D., Sugimoto A. & Maximov T. C. (2003) Effects of spatial and temporal variability in soil moisture on widths and 13C values of eastern Siberian tree rings. Journal of Geophysical Research 108 (D16), 4500, doi:10.1029/2002JD003019.

  5. Contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity for four conifers of Alpine European forests

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Elena; Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Wegrzyn, Jill L; La Porta, Nicola; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Neale, David B

    2012-01-01

    A candidate gene approach was used to identify levels of nucleotide diversity and to identify genes departing from neutral expectations in coniferous species of the Alpine European forest. Twelve samples were collected from four species that dominate montane and subalpine forests throughout Europe: Abies alba Mill, Larix decidua Mill, Pinus cembra L., and Pinus mugo Turra. A total of 800 genes, originally resequenced in Pinus taeda L., were resequenced across 12 independent trees for each of the four species. Genes were assigned to two categories, candidate and control, defined through homology-based searches to Arabidopsis. Estimates of nucleotide diversity per site varied greatly between polymorphic candidate genes (range: 0.0004–0.1295) and among species (range: 0.0024–0.0082), but were within the previously established ranges for conifers. Tests of neutrality using stringent significance thresholds, performed under the standard neutral model, revealed one to seven outlier loci for each species. Some of these outliers encode proteins that are involved with plant stress responses and form the basis for further evolutionary enquiries. PMID:23144662

  6. Contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity for four conifers of Alpine European forests.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Elena; Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Wegrzyn, Jill L; La Porta, Nicola; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Neale, David B

    2012-11-01

    A candidate gene approach was used to identify levels of nucleotide diversity and to identify genes departing from neutral expectations in coniferous species of the Alpine European forest. Twelve samples were collected from four species that dominate montane and subalpine forests throughout Europe: Abies alba Mill, Larix decidua Mill, Pinus cembra L., and Pinus mugo Turra. A total of 800 genes, originally resequenced in Pinus taeda L., were resequenced across 12 independent trees for each of the four species. Genes were assigned to two categories, candidate and control, defined through homology-based searches to Arabidopsis. Estimates of nucleotide diversity per site varied greatly between polymorphic candidate genes (range: 0.0004-0.1295) and among species (range: 0.0024-0.0082), but were within the previously established ranges for conifers. Tests of neutrality using stringent significance thresholds, performed under the standard neutral model, revealed one to seven outlier loci for each species. Some of these outliers encode proteins that are involved with plant stress responses and form the basis for further evolutionary enquiries.

  7. The European experience.

    PubMed

    Roels, Leo; Rahmel, Axel

    2011-04-01

    This mini-review on European experiences with tackling the problem of organ shortage for transplantation was based on a literature review of predominantly European publications dealing with the issue of organ donation from deceased donors. The authors tried to identify the most significant factors that have demonstrated to impact on donation rates from deceased donors and subsequent transplant successes. These factors include legislative measures (national laws and European Directives), optimization of the donation process, use of expanded criteria donors, innovative preservation and surgical techniques, organizational efforts, and improved allocation algorithms.

  8. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

    2011-04-20

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  9. European journals on microbiology.

    PubMed

    Ronda, C; Vázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    A survey on the scientific journals dealing with microbiology published in Europe has been carried out. Eighteen European countries publish microbiological journals with the United Kingdom. Netherlands and Germany leading in number of journals on this specialty. Most of the European journals on microbiology are published bimonthly (27%), and English is the most common language used (54%). Most of these journals (86%) are included in some database, but only 36 (25%) are indexed in the six databases studied. Out of the 146 journals registered, 71 (49%), published in 11 European countries, are included in the 1995 Journal Citation Reports (ISI, Philadelphia).

  10. European PTTI report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordara, Franco; Grimaldi, Sabrina; Leschiutta, Sigfrido

    1994-01-01

    Time and frequency metrology in Europe presents some peculiar features in its three main components: research on clocks, comparisons and dissemination methods, and dissemination services. Apart from the usual activities of the national metrological laboratories, an increasing number of cooperation between the European countries are promoted inside some European organizations, such as the ECC, EFTA, EUROMET, and WECC. Cooperation between these organizations is covered. The present, evolving situation will be further influenced by the recent political changes in Eastern Europe.

  11. European Composite Honeycomb Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschepe, Christoph; Sauerbrey, Martin; Klebor, Maximillian; Henriksen, Torben

    2014-06-01

    A European CFRP honeycomb material for high demanding structure applications like antenna reflectors and optical benches was developed in the frame of an ESA GSTP project.The composite honeycomb was designed according to requirements defined by the European space industry. A developed manufacturing technique based on prepreg moulding enables the production of homogeneous CFRP honeycomb blocks. All characteristic material properties, including compression, tension and shear strength and CTE, were determined in a comprehensive verification test campaign. Competitiveness to comparable products was further verified by a representative breadboard.

  12. European security and France

    SciTech Connect

    deRose, A.

    1985-01-01

    A French authority on security argues for new European initiatives in the face of the ''danger represented by Soviet military power deployed in support of an imperialistic ideology.'' His proposals, including the strengthening of conventional forces without abandoning the option of the first use of nuclear weapons, are meant to give substance to President Mitterrand's declaration in 1983: ''The European nations now need to realize that their defense is also their responsibility....'' A part of the increasingly important debate in France over defense policy in Europe.

  13. European Civilization. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppert, Ella C.; Halac, Dennis

    The instructional materials in this teaching guide for Course II, Unit IV, follow and build upon a previous sequential course described in SO 003 169 offering ninth grade students a study on the development of Western European Civilization. Focus is upon four periods of high development: The High Middle Ages (12th Century), The Renaissance (15th…

  14. The European VLBI network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilizzi, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities of the European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) network are summarized. The range of baseline parameters, sensitivities, and recording and other equipment available are included. Plans for upgrading the recording facilities and the use of geostationary satellites for signal transfer and clock synchronization are discussed.

  15. European Study Tour Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Vicki L.; Mitchell, Kenneth E.

    Guidelines are presented for planning and financing European study tours at the community college level. First, a rationale for incorporating study tours of Europe within the community college curriculum is presented and the benefits of such tours in providing students with experiences they could not normally have are outlined. Next, the paper…

  16. European Music Year 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  17. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  18. Teaching European Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raento, Pauliina

    2008-01-01

    The political, cultural and social make-up of Europe is changing fast. A new European identity is under construction, but old contradictions and diversity challenge its contents, forms and boundaries. Migration, the changing role of the nation-state and Europe's regions, the reshaping of politico-administrative and perceptional boundaries, the…

  19. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  20. Chestnut, European (Castanea sativa).

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Elena; Valladares, Silvia; Vieitez, Ana M; Ballester, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Development of a system for direct transfer of antifungal candidate genes into European chestnut (Castanea sativa) would provide an alternative approach to conventional breeding for production of chestnut trees that are tolerant to ink disease caused by Phytophthora spp. Overexpression of genes encoding PR proteins (such as thaumatin-like proteins), which display antifungal activity, may represent an important advance in control of the disease. We have used a chestnut thaumatin-like protein gene (CsTL1) isolated from European chestnut cotyledons and have achieved overexpression of the gene in chestnut somatic embryogenic lines used as target material. We have also acclimatized the transgenic plants and grown them on in the greenhouse. Here, we describe the various steps of the process, from the induction of somatic embryogenesis to the production of transgenic plants.

  1. Education and European integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, John

    1992-11-01

    The main purpose of this article is to discuss the implications for education and training of the movement towards integration in Europe in the historic context of the creation of a single market within the European Community (EC) and the end of the Communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. The experience of the EC is used to illustrate trends and problems in the development of international cooperation in education and training. Common concerns and priorities throughout the new Europe are then identified and discussed. These include the pursuit of quality in schooling, efforts to serve the interests of disadvantaged learners, and the treatment of European Studies in the curriculum, including the improvement of the teaching of foreign languages.

  2. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.; Satogata, T

    2011-03-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  3. Biophotonics: a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Thierry; Cochard, Jacques; Breussin, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to determine the opportunities and challenges for Biophotonics business development in Europe for the next five years with a focus on sensors and systems: for health diagnostics and monitoring; for air, water and food safety and quality control. The development of this roadmap was initiated and supported by EPIC (The European Photonics Industry Consortium). We summarize the final roadmap data: market application segments and trends, analysis of the market access criteria, analysis of the technology trends and major bottlenecks and challenges per application.

  4. Eastern European risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Here the authors assess Eastern European risk management practices through the evaluation of the nuclear power plants in the region. This evaluation is limited to the Soviet-designed and -built VVER-440 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) that are currently operating in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Russia, and the Ukraine and until recently operated at Greifswald in the former East Germany. This evaluation is based on the basic design of the plants, a safety evaluation of the Greifswald facility by representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany and personal visits by the author to Greifswald and Loviisa.

  5. Is European Defense a Bridge too Far?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-08

    Defense, European Security and Defense Policy (ESDP) CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified During the last several decades the European Union has not paid much...obvious European defense shortcomings. Then, after the Cologne European Council of June 1999, the European Union launched the European Security and...considerably and the military capabilities of the European Union have been strengthened with initiatives such as the battlegroup concept and the development of

  6. A New Impetus for European Youth. European Commission White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    Despite their highly divergent situations, young people largely share the same values, ambitions, and difficulties. Despite the more complex social and economic context in which young Europeans are currently living, they are well equipped to adapt. National and European policymakers must facilitate this process of change by making young people…

  7. Effects of climatic conditions on radial growth and sap-flow along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obojes, Nikolaus; Newesely, Christian; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Tassser, Erich; Oberhuber, Walter; Mayr, Stefan; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in mountain forests might change in the future due to rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns, affecting tree water relations and growth conditions. Changing temperature and precipitation along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley in South Tyrol-Italy were used to investigate possible effects of climate change on the transpiration and growth of European Larch (Larix decidua). Stem circumference variation of European Larch was measured for 4 years (2012-2015) with automatic band dendrometers and sap flow for 2 years (2013-2014) with trunk heat balance sensors at 3 sites at elevations of 1115 m, 1715 m, and 1990 m above sea level at a SE-exposed slope. During the first two, rather dry, years, transpiration and stem circumference were reduced during dry periods of one to three weeks at the two lower but not at the highest site. As a consequence, overall yearly radial growth was largest at the highest site in those two years. In 2014, with very high precipitation and colder summer temperatures no correlation of elevation, transpiration, and radial growth was observed. In 2015, with a dry and hot summer, initially high growth rates were strongly reduced after the end of May at the two lower sites. Overall the radial growth of Larix decidua seems to be limited by water scarcity up to an elevation of more than 1700 m a.s.l. in our study area except for unusually wet years. Our 4-year measurements were confirmed by dendro-climatic analysis of stem cores taken at five sites (the three original ones plus two additional sites at 1070 and at the forest line at 2250m) covering the last 50 to 150 years. Year ring widths were lower and highly correlated to precipitation at the lowest sites, and overall highest at the 1990 m site. Our results show that the growth of Larix decidua, which is often considered as more drought resistant than e.g. Picea abies, is limited by water availability at dry conditions in the Alps which might

  8. European Cenozoic rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Peter A.

    1992-07-01

    The European Cenozoic rift system extends from the coast of the North Sea to the Mediterranean over a distance of some 1100 km; it finds its southern prolongation in the Valencia Trough and a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic chain crossing the Atlas ranges. Development of this mega-rift was paralleled by orogenic activity in the Alps and Pyrenees. Major rift domes, accompanied by subsidence reversal of their axial grabens, developed 20-40 Ma after beginning of rifting. Uplift of the Rhenish Shield is related to progressive thermal lithospheric thinning; the Vosges-Black Forest and the Massif Central domes are probably underlain by asthenoliths emplaced at the crust/mantle boundary. Evolution of this rift system, is thought to be governed by the interaction of the Eurasian and African plates and by early phases of a plate-boundary reorganization that may lead to the break-up of the present continent assembly.

  9. Optranet: a European project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanjean, Marie

    2003-10-01

    In a situation where curricula did not adjust at the required pace and many students are getting attracted out of science and technology, the shortage of skilled workers at the technician and engineer level is known to be a threat to development. In spite of a serious crisis in 2001, the trend of an increased presence of optical technologies remains unchanged and is bound to remain part of the landscape for decades. The level of investment required and the markets make Europe the best scale to plan for unified curricula and a global analysis of the human resources needs. There is no agreement on the definition of a trained optician, and European countries differ in the way they educate opticians, source of a lack of clarity and visibility which is detrimental to attracting good students and to the job market. Through its closely work with companies, OPTRANET will propose measures to enhance the adequacy and the visibility of the training offer.

  10. An American Construction of European Education Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta; Brehm, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the European education space has typically been attributed to European education policy makers, institutions, and networks. Rarely do scholars consider the role of outside, non-European actors in shaping the terrain of European education thought and practice. This article considers the construction of the European education…

  11. European Schoolnet: Enabling School Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scimeca, Santi; Dumitru, Petru; Durando, Marc; Gilleran, Anne; Joyce, Alexa; Vuorikari, Riina

    2009-01-01

    School networking is increasingly important in a globalised world, where schools themselves can be actors on an international stage. This article builds on the activities and experience of the longest established European initiative in this area, European Schoolnet (EUN), a network of 31 Ministries of Education. First, we offer an introduction…

  12. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the…

  13. Brazilian Portuguese Ethnonymy and Europeanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    Delineates the incorporation and analyzes the impact of European borrowings in Brazilian racio-ethnic terminology. This overview covers French, Italian, Spanish, and English influences. Borrowings from European languages have had a small impact on the calculus of Brazilian racio-ethnic terms. (43 references) (Author/CK)

  14. Vascular surgery: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, P

    1999-09-01

    Isaac Newton, among others, observed that 'we see so far because we are standing upon the shoulders of giants'. In vascular surgery most of the giants have been European, and this is a heritage which we as Europeans can take pride in and build upon if we chose to do so. As in other areas of life, commitment is essential in order to influence the future. For vascular surgeons in Europe this means active participation in the European scientific societies for vascular surgery and in the UEMS. The main value of the EBSQ.VASC assessments to date has been to expose the uneven standards of training in vascular surgery within the European Union. Only if action follows to address these inequalities will the tactics of the European Board of Vascular Surgery be vindicated.

  15. A European perspective--the European clinical research infrastructures network.

    PubMed

    Demotes-Mainard, J; Kubiak, C

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating research outcomes requires multinational cooperation in clinical research for optimization of treatment strategies and comparative effectiveness research, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) is a distributed ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific potential. Servicing multinational trials started during its preparatory phase, and ECRIN will now apply for an ERIC (European Research Infrastructures Consortium) status by 2011. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this achievement will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of the research and education capacity, tackling the major societal challenges starting with the area of healthy ageing, and removing barriers to bring ideas to the market.

  16. North European Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korja, Annakaisa; Heikkinen, Pekka J.; Roslov, Yuri; Ivanova, Nina; Verba, Marc; Sakoulina, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    A nearly continuous, 3600 km long, NE-running North European Transect (NET) is combined from the existing deep seismic reflection data sets in the Baltic Sea (BABEL, 1600 km), Northern Finland (FIRE 4-4A, 580 km) and Barents Sea (1-AR, 1440 km;). The reflective image of the deep crust is highly dependent on the thickness of the sedimentary cover. The cover is few hundred meters in the Baltic sea, few tens of meters in the land areas and few kilometers in the Barents Sea area. In the Barents Sea area, the seismic image is dominated by the layered structure of the sedimentary basins and the middle and lower crust are poorly imaged. Therefore the Moho boundary in the Barents Sea has been determined from wide-angle reflections. Geologically the transect covers the transition from Phanerozoic Europe to Precambrian Europe and back to the Phanerozoic Barents Sea Shelf. It displays how Northern Europe grew around Baltica in several tectonic episodes involving the formation and destruction of Columbia/Hudsonland, Rodinia and Pangea supercontinents. The paleo plateboundaries are traversed by subvertical transparent zones suggesting transpressional and trantensional environments. The BABEL lines image how the core of Baltica was formed by sequential accretion of microcontinents and arc terranes at the old continental margin during the Svecofennian Orogeny ~1.9-1.8 Ga .When Baltica joined the Columbia supercontinent, new terranes were added to its southern edge in the Sveocbaltic Orogeny (~1.8 Ga). During the dispersal of the Columbia, the Baltic Sea failed rift was formed, rapakivi granitoids were intruded and sedimentary basins were developed. An extended plate margin structure has been imposed on the Rodinian (Sveconorwegian) and Pangean additions (Variscan-Caledonian). Major crustal thinning takes place along a series of subvertical faults across the Trans-European Suture Zone marking the transition from Phanerozoic to Proterozoic Europe. The FIRE lines in Northen Finland

  17. Short- and long-term efficacy of forest thinning to mitigate drought impacts in mountain forests in the European Alps.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Ché; Giuggiola, Arnaud; Rigling, Andreas; Bugmann, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In many regions of the world, drought is projected to increase under climate change, with potential negative consequences for forests and their ecosystem services (ES). Forest thinning has been proposed as a method for at least temporarily mitigating drought impacts, but its general applicability and longer-term impacts are unclear. We use a process-based forest model to upscale experimental data for evaluating the impacts of forest thinning in a drought-susceptible valley in the interior of the European Alps, with the specific aim of assessing (1) when and where thinning may be most effective and (2) the longer-term implications for forest dynamics. Simulations indicate that forests will be impacted by climate-induced increases in drought across a broad elevation range. At lower elevations, where drought is currently prevalent, thinning is projected to temporarily reduce tree mortality, but to have minor impacts on forest dynamics in the longer term. Thinning may be particularly useful at intermediate and higher elevations as a means of temporarily reducing mortality in drought-sensitive species such as Norway spruce and larch, which currently dominate these elevations. However, in the longer term, even intense thinning will likely not be sufficient to prevent a climate change induced dieback of these species, which is projected to occur under even moderate climate change. Thinning is also projected to have the largest impact on long-term forest dynamics at intermediate elevations, with the magnitude of the impact depending on the timing and intensity of thinning. More intense thinning that is done later is projected to more strongly promote a transition to more drought-tolerant species. We conclude that thinning is a viable option for temporarily reducing the negative drought impacts on forests, but that efficient implementation of thinning should be contingent on a site-specific evaluation of the near term risk of significant drought, and how thinning will

  18. European courts and old people.

    PubMed

    Mulley, Graham P

    2013-09-01

    There are two major European Courts, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The ECJ deals with legal matters, mainly involving the interpretation of EU law and ensuring that the law is applied evenly across all 27 EU member states. The ECHR aims to make certain that civil and political rights of citizens in the 46 member states of the Council of Europe are observed. Most cases involving older citizens are about social policy (such as pension arrangements, equality, age discrimination and mandatory retirement). There have been few cases dealing with patients' rights, long-term care or housing. Referrals of selected cases involving old people should be considered if their rights are not being protected. In this Commentary, there is an account of how these Courts have evolved, together with guidance on whom to refer, to which Court, and when and how referrals should be made.

  19. European Union a New Babylon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesch, F.

    2010-07-01

    The growing European Union faces growing problems in personal communication. These problems cannot be overcome only by more language courses in school. As important is a better mutual knowledge of the culture of other countries, a knowledge that can be gained only by a personal, professional stay in foreign countries. On university level, such stays are best organized by networks connecting European universities. In the broad field of measurement, this IMEKO symposium might offer a unique forum to thoroughly discuss structure and realization of such a network with all interested colleagues.

  20. [The European mouflon, Ovis musimon].

    PubMed

    Hermans, W A

    1996-09-15

    Until a couple of decades ago, the European mouflon found on the islands of Corsica, Sardinia, and Cyprus was considered an independent wild species and last representative of the European wild sheep. However, recent research has shown that there have not been wild sheep in Europe since the late Pleistocene. Archeological investigation in Corsica has shown that the mouflon is not a wild sheep but a primitive domestic sheep brought to the islands by farmers from the Near East and which then became wild (feral).

  1. Interactions between European Citizenship and Language Learning among Adolescent Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennebry, Mairin

    2011-01-01

    Recent enlargement of the European Union (EU) has created debate as to the suitability of current structures and policies for effectively engaging citizens and developing social cohesion. Education and specifically modern foreign language (MFL) teaching are argued by the literature to play a key role in equipping young people to interact and…

  2. Diagrams of Europeanization: European Education Governance in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decuypere, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    European education governance is increasingly affected by and effectuated through digital means. This article presents an analysis of the way in which Europe is increasingly deploying digital technologies, and more specifically websites, in order to shape and communicate its education policies. Drawing on the notion of the diagram as the…

  3. Mathematical Modelling in European Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri, Rita Borromeo

    2013-01-01

    Teaching and learning of mathematical modelling has become a key competence within school curricula and educational standards in many countries of the world. The term mathematical modelling, its meaning, and how it can be implemented in mathematics lessons have been intensively discussed during several Conferences of the European Society for…

  4. Reconstructing Indo-European Syllabification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Andrew Miles

    2010-01-01

    The chief concern of this dissertation is to investigate a fundamental, yet unsolved problem within the phonology of Proto-Indo-European (PIE): the process of syllabification. I show that by analyzing the much more easily reconstructable word-edge clusters we may predict which types of consonant clusters can occur word-medially, provided that we…

  5. Attitudes of Europeans toward Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ageing International, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Two Commission of European Communities surveys of people over age 15 and of those over 60 demonstrated a widespread belief that older people deserve public support and services and face employment discrimination. Socioeconomic factors influenced older people's sense of security and life satisfaction. Positive intergenerational attitudes appeared.…

  6. European Year of Languages, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This document is a folder full of brochures describing the activities of Council of Europe and the European Union to celebrate 2001 as a year of languages in order to celebrate the linguistic diversity of Europe and promote the many opportunities available for lifelong language learning. A number of facts and figures about the languages of Europe…

  7. Scholarships for European vet students.

    PubMed

    Egan, Jordon; Takacs, Daniella

    2017-02-25

    Every year, students from European vet schools can apply for $5000 scholarships, which aim to 'enhance the academic experience of students'. Among last year's recipients were Jordon Egan, from the Royal Veterinary College, and Daniella Takács, from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Budapest.

  8. European urology: quality, impact, online.

    PubMed

    Catto, James W F; Montorsi, Francesco; Schulman, Claude

    2013-10-01

    European Urology provides contemporary, cutting-edge urologic research, guidance, and discussion. The journal continues to invite collaborative reviews, to invest in rapid but fair peer review, to seek the best research, and to serve the needs of readers and patients.

  9. Beyond "Ability": Some European Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on European approaches to differentiation that do not entail fatalistic determinism. It describes two challenging initiatives in Denmark, where democratic learning and learning for democracy are enshrined in law. Other examples come from Germany, from the Bielefeld laboratory school and a sixth form college, where planning for…

  10. European tests on materials outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwaal, A.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to international coordination of spacecraft materials, a number of European firms and institutes performed outgassing tests on identical materials at 125 C in high vacuum. The outgassing data obtained with the different types of equipment is presented and both the results and the critical parameters are discussed.

  11. The European Location Framework - from National to European

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauknerova, E.; Sidlichovsky, P.; Urbanas, S.; Med, M.

    2016-06-01

    The European Location Framework (ELF) means a technical infrastructure which will deliver authoritative, interoperable geospatial reference data from all over Europe for analysing and understanding information connected to places and features. The ELF has been developed and set up through the ELF Project, which has been realized by a consortium of partners (public, private and academic organisations) since March 2013. Their number increased from thirty to forty in the year 2016, together with a project extension from 36 to 44 months. The project is co-funded by the European Commission's Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP) and will end in October 2016. In broad terms, the ELF Project will deliver a unique gateway to the authoritative reference geospatial information for Europe (harmonised pan-European maps, geographic and land information) sourced from the National Mapping and Cadastral Authorities (NMCAs) around Europe and including transparent licensing. This will be provided as an online ELF web service that will deliver an up-to-date topographic base map and also as view & download services for access to the ELF datasets. To develop and build up the ELF, NMCAs are accompanied and collaborate with several research & academia institutes, a standardisation body, system integrators, software developers and application providers. The harmonisation is in progress developing and triggering a number of geo-tools like edge-matching, generalisation, transformation and others. ELF will provide also some centralised tools like Geo Locator for searching location based on geographical names, addresses and administrative units, and GeoProduct Finder for discovering the available web-services and licensing them. ELF combines national reference geo-information through the ELF platform. ELF web services will be offered to users and application developers through open source (OSKARI) and proprietary (ArcGIS Online) cloud platforms. Recently, 29 NMCAs plus the

  12. New head picked for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The UK physicist John Womersley is to become the next director-general of the €1.8bn European Spallation Source (ESS), which is currently being built in Lund, Sweden, by a 17-member consortium of European countries.

  13. European physics impact - to a first approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starckx, Senne

    2013-05-01

    Physics-based industries contributed around 14%, or €3800bn, to the total value of the European economy in 2010 - exceeding that of the construction and retail sectors combined - according to a report by the European Physical Society (EPS).

  14. Meeting US and European supplier control requirements.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Medical device manufacturers operating under European quality system requirements are sometimes surprised to learn that their supplier control procedures do not fully meet United States (US) requirements. This article discusses important differences between US and European requirements for controlling suppliers.

  15. European Cargo Ship Launches to Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The European Space Agency's third Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV-3) launched atop an Ariane 5 rocket from the European space port in Kourou, French Guiana, at 12:34 a.m. EDT Friday, beginning a si...

  16. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roger

    2014-11-04

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was set up in 2005 to strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases. The centre is an independent agency of the European Union and is based in Stockholm, Sweden.

  17. European psychotraumatology – alongside the recent European history

    PubMed Central

    Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a personal reflection of experiences within the field of traumatic stress, especially in relation to specific events, which affected the author's professional life. Conclusions for further challenges for European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS) are delineated. ESTSS's role in the global network of traumatic stress societies is discussed. This is a personal view of Brigitte Lueger-Schuster, president of ESTSS on behalf of the 20th birthday of ESTSS. PMID:23755321

  18. Impact of climate warming-induced increase in drought stress on successional dynamic of a coniferous forest within a dry inner Alpine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, R.; Zeisler, B.; Oberhuber, W.

    2012-04-01

    Climate sensitivity of tree growth will effect the development of forest ecosystems under a warmer and drier climate by changing species composition and inducing shifts in forest distribution. We applied dendroclimatological techniques to determine impact of climate warming on radial stem growth of three native and widespread coniferous tree species of the central Austrian Alps (Norway spruce, Picea abies; European larch, Larix decidua; Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris), which grow intermixed at dry-mesic sites within a dry inner Alpine environment (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria). Time series of annual increments were developed from > 250 saplings and mature trees. Radial growth response to recent climate warming was explored by means of moving response functions (MRF) and evaluation of trends in basal area increment (BAI) for the period 1911 - 2009. Climate-growth relationships revealed significant differences among species in response to water availability. While precipitation in May - June favoured radial growth of spruce and larch, Scots pine growth mainly depended on April - May precipitation. Spruce growth was most sensitive to May - June temperature (inverse relationship). Although MRF coefficients indicated increasing drought sensitivity of all species, which is most likely related to intensified belowground competition for scarce water with increasing stand density and higher evapotranspiration rates due to climate warming, recent BAI trends strikingly differed among species. While BAI of larch was distinctly declining, spruce showed steadily increasing BAI and quite constant BAI was maintained in drought adapted Scots pine, although at lowest level of all species. Furthermore, more favourable growing conditions of spruce in recent decades are indicated by scattered natural regeneration and higher growth rates of younger trees during first decades of their lifespan. Because human interference and wildlife stock is negligible within the study area, results

  19. ETUDE - European Trade Union Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creanor, Linda; Walker, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Describes transnational distance learning activities among European trade union educators carried out as part of the European Trade Union Distance Education (ETUDE) project, supported by the European Commission. Highlights include the context of international trade union distance education; tutor training course; tutors' experiences; and…

  20. Europeanizing Education: Governing a New Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin; Grek, Sotiria

    2012-01-01

    The study of common and diverse effects in the field of education across Europe is a growing field of inquiry and research. It is the result of many actions, networks and programmes over the last few decades and the development of common European education policies. "Europeanizing Education" describes the origins of European education…

  1. European Initiatives in Postgraduate Education in Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijsselt, Rene J. T.; Parkatti, Terttu; Troisi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes three innovative European initiatives in postgraduate education in gerontology. The first is the European Masters Program in Gerontology (EuMaG), developed as an interdisciplinary joint program, supported and delivered by 22 European universities. Second, the Nordplus initiative to increase mobility of students and staff in…

  2. How Is European Governance Configuring the EHEA?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magalhães, António; Veiga, Amélia; Sousa, Sofia; Ribeiro, Filipa

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the interaction between the European dimension driven by the creation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the development of national reforms to fulfil that objective. On the basis of data gathered in eight countries involved in EuroHESC project TRUE (Transforming European Universities), the curricular and the…

  3. Making Citizens, Being European? European Symbolism in Slovenian Citizenship Education Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banjac, Marinko; Pušnik, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    Citizenship education has been an important part of the European Union's (EU) agenda to integrate a European dimension into schools' curricula. The usage of European symbolism in citizenship education curriculum material has been an especially important (yet understudied) means not only to promote a distinct European identity and increase…

  4. EST: The European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collados, M.

    2008-09-01

    The European Solar Telescope (EST) is a project for a 4 meter-class ground-based telescope, to be located in the Canary Islands. The project is promoted by the European Association for Solar Telescopes (EAST), a consortium formed by research organizations from 15 European countries. EST will be optimized for studies of magnetic coupling between the deep photosphere and upper chromosphere. The project has been approved for funds by the European Union, within the FP-7 framework, to produce the design of all systems and subsystems of the telescope during the next three years. This includes the optical and optomechanical design of the telescope itself and of the instruments and their control. MCAO will be included in the optical path in a natural way to compensate for atmospheric disturbances in an optimum way. The design of EST will strongly emphasize the use of a large number of visible and near-infrared instruments simultaneously which will influence the telescope design from the very beginning. This communication will center mainly on the scientific objectives that EST will address. Generally speaking, they involve understanding how the magnetic field emerges through the solar surface, interacts with the plasma dynamics to transfer energy between different regions, and finally releases it in the form of heat or as violent events in the solar chromosphere and corona. Among the many topics of interest, one may cite, as described in the EST Science Requirements Document: small-scale flux emergence in quiet sun regions, large-scale magnetic structures, magnetic flux cancellation processes, polar magnetic fields, magnetic topology of the photosphere and chromosphere, conversion of mechanical to magnetic energy in the photosphere, wave propagation from photosphere to chromosphere, energy dissipation in the chromosphere at small and large scales, etc. The present status and future perspectives of the project will also be outlined.

  5. European Seminar on Neural Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-31

    weights) There are three distinct approaches currently being of the connections between PE’s, analogous to synaptic taken for supporting neural ...for creation of dedicated re- * Connectionist models for artificial intelligence (Al) search centers, analogous to the Computer and Neural System...IONDOIL ONRL Report 8 Oo Ln 0In t m S D TIC European Seminar on Neural Computing 1 IELECTE is MAY 161990 L D % Claire Zomzely-Neurath 31 August 1988

  6. Evaluating the European Defense Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-31

    Union and the European Security and Defense Identity. From its inception following World War II, the WEU has shared a common birthright of sorts...for a merging of monetary, citizenship , and security affairs. The monetary policy is already in effect with the new Euro dollar entering...circulation in 2002. The most dramatic impact of citizenship policies is the idea of dual- citizenship of Europe and its respective states members. Finally

  7. European Science Notes Information Bulletin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Third European Conference on Diamond, Diamond-like, and Related Coatings .................. 427 M. N. Yoder, L. Kabacoff, J. E. Butler, K Doverspike, J...tions on the functionf will yield results on the the correlation E(dj[n], dk[m]) depends on H, j, k , analysis and synthesis operators. m, n and the number...structure of fully developed turbulence in the ho- goes like this: Define the functions ,•j..(x) = j , k (x) mogeneous and inhomogeneous, incompressible

  8. International Heliophysical Year: European Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.

    2007-08-01

    The First European General Assembly of the "International Heliophysical Year" (IHY) took place at the headquarters of the Centre Nationial de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Paris, France, 10-13 January 2006. There were 113 participants representing 27 nations. The science concerned with the International Heliophysical Year programme was first illustrated. Then, the status of current instruments as well as practical information on the campaign management policy was given. Twenty European National Coordinators described the progress of their IHY activities. Representatives from Egypt, Angola and the coordinator of the Balkan, Black and Caspian Sea Region also reported on the progress of IHY activities in their respective regions. People from the IHY Secretariat provided a summary of the global IHY efforts including the United Nations Basic Space Sciences Program. In the education and public outreach front, a variety of activities have been planned: TV and radio shows, board games on space weather, specific programmes for schools and universities, workshops for teachers are some of the actions that were presented by the delegates. Beyond of these national and individual initiatives, specific activities requiring European coordination were discussed. This paper provides an extended summary of the main talks and discussions that held during the meeting.

  9. Brain death: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Citerio, Giuseppe; Murphy, Paul G

    2015-04-01

    Some of the seminal steps toward the recognition and definition of brain death were European. There is a general consensus on both the medical concept of brain death in Europe as well as the minimum fundamental clinical standards that are required for its diagnosis-the absence of consciousness, brainstem reflexes, and the ability to breathe in the absence of reversible or confounding conditions. Two aspects of brain death determination are addressed in this article. The authors analyze how brain death is diagnosed across Europe, identifying both the similarities and differences that exist between countries (the latter mainly concerning ancillary tests, timing, and the number of physicians involved in the brain death determination). In addition, they describe the very considerable variations in when brain death determinations are made between and within individual European countries, and propose that they are due to differences in the end-of-life care practices in patients with irreversible brain injuries, medical attitudes, and organ donation practices. Although legislation is available to standardize the brain death diagnosis process in most individual European countries, there are still disparities across Europe as a whole. The current variation in practice makes a continental consensus for the definition of brain death imperative.

  10. European Nucleotide Archive in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, Ana Luisa; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tarrága, Ana; Clarke, Laura; Cleland, Iain; Fairley, Susan; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Martínez-Villacorta, Josué; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Reddy, Kethi; Rosello, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) offers a rich platform for data sharing, publishing and archiving and a globally comprehensive data set for onward use by the scientific community. With a broad scope spanning raw sequencing reads, genome assemblies and functional annotation, the resource provides extensive data submission, search and download facilities across web and programmatic interfaces. Here, we outline ENA content and major access modalities, highlight major developments in 2016 and outline a number of examples of data reuse from ENA. PMID:27899630

  11. European alchemy: some traditional beliefs.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, V

    1999-01-01

    Three important doctrines of European alchemy are discussed: the Emerald Table of Hermes, the idea of transmutation, and the Elixir of Life. The analysis of these problems is focused on the 16th century, the epoch of the high flourish of alchemy in Renaissance Europe. As typical examples two works are chosen: the treatises of Jean-Pierre Fabre (1588-1658) and Alexander von Suchten (? 1520 - ? 1590). The arguments of these authors illustrate the ways how alchemists tried to defend their position in face of repeated failures. Just the 16th century stood in the sign of dramatic development of crafts, but, simultaneously, of growing interest in alchemy.

  12. European perspectives of food safety.

    PubMed

    Bánáti, Diána

    2014-08-01

    Food safety has been a growing concern among European Union (EU) citizens over the last decades. Despite the fact that food has never been safer, consumers are considerably uncertain and increasingly critical about the safety of their food. The introduction of new principles, such as the primary responsibility of producers, traceability, risk analysis, the separation of risk assessment and risk management provided a more transparent, science-based system in Europe, which can help to restore consumers' lost confidence. The present EU integrated approach to food safety 'from farm to fork' aims to assure a high level of food safety within the EU.

  13. Policymaking in European healthy cities.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Evelyne; Green, Geoff; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    This paper assesses policy development in, with and for Healthy Cities in the European Region of the World Health Organization. Materials for the assessment were sourced through case studies, a questionnaire and statistical databases. They were compiled in a realist synthesis methodology, applying theory-based evaluation principles. Non-response analyses were applied to ascertain the degree of representatives of the high response rates for the entire network of Healthy Cities in Europe. Further measures of reliability and validity were applied, and it was found that our material was indicative of the entire network. European Healthy Cities are successful in developing local health policy across many sectors within and outside government. They were also successful in addressing 'wicked' problems around equity, governance and participation in themes such as Healthy Urban Planning. It appears that strong local leadership for policy change is driven by international collaboration and the stewardship of the World Health Organization. The processes enacted by WHO, structuring membership of the Healthy City Network (designation) and the guidance on particular themes, are identified as being important for the success of local policy development.

  14. Sprawl in European urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastacos, Poulicos; Lagarias, Apostolos

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the 2006 edition of the Urban Atlas database is used to tabulate areas of low development density, usually referred to as "sprawl", for many European cities. The Urban Atlas database contains information on the land use distribution in the 305 largest European cities. Twenty different land use types are recognized, with six of them representing urban fabric. Urban fabric classes are residential areas differentiated by the density of development, which is measured by the sealing degree parameter that ranges from 0% to 100% (non-developed, fully developed). Analysis is performed on the distribution of the middle to low density areas defined as those with sealing degree less than 50%. Seven different country groups in which urban areas have similar sprawl characteristics are identified and some key characteristics of sprawl are discussed. Population of an urban area is another parameter considered in the analysis. Two spatial metrics, average patch size and mean distance to the nearest neighboring patch of the same class, are used to describe proximity/separation characteristics of sprawl in the urban areas of the seven groups.

  15. The new European Hubble archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Arevalo, Maria; Merin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The European Hubble Archive (hereafter eHST), hosted at ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre, has been released for public use in October 2015. The eHST is now fully integrated with the other ESA science archives to ensure long-term preservation of the Hubble data, consisting of more than 1 million observations from 10 different scientific instruments. The public HST data, the Hubble Legacy Archive, and the high-level science data products are now all available to scientists through a single, carefully designed and user friendly web interface. In this talk, I will show how the the eHST can help boost archival research, including how to search on sources in the field of view thanks to precise footprints projected onto the sky, how to obtain enhanced previews of imaging data and interactive spectral plots, and how to directly link observations with already published papers. To maximise the scientific exploitation of Hubble's data, the eHST offers connectivity to virtual observatory tools, easily integrates with the recently released Hubble Source Catalog, and is fully accessible through ESA's archives multi-mission interface.

  16. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  17. The New European Wind Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    2013-04-01

    The New European Wind Atlas 1. European wind resource assessment through a ERA-NET Plus project 1.1 The new EU Atlas The Commission decided earlier this year to issue an ERA-NET Plus call for the creation and publication of a new EU wind atlas. The atlas will cover Member states as well as Member states' exclusive economic zones, both onshore and offshore. It involved the launch of a single joint call for proposals by promoters of national and/or regional programmes, thereby allowing a more efficient use of existing financial resources. Therefore the funding scheme is that of ERA-NET Plus which implies that at least 5 MS shall commit at least 1 million Euros each and the Commission tops up with on third of the MS contribution. Basically it is the MS research programmes that will execute the project but an important part of the project is to create "open project development platforms" with associated protocols allowing a wider range of scientists worldwide to contribute. The project has a duration of 5 years. The decision on the new wind atlas was taken after several years of work by the European Wind Energy Technology Platform and the European Energy Research Alliances' Joint programme for Wind Energy. 2. Structure of the project The project will be structured around three areas of work, to be implemented in parallel: 2.1 Creation and publication of a European wind atlas in electronic form, which will include the underlying data and a new EU wind climate database. The database will at a minimum include: Wind resources and their associated uncertainty; Extreme wind; Turbulence characteristics; Adverse weather conditions; Predictability for short term prediction; Guidelines. 2.2 Development of dynamical downscaling methodologies and open-source models. The developed downscaling methodologies and models will be fully documented and made public available and will be used to produce overview maps of wind resources and relevant data at several heights and a horizontal

  18. The Revised European Social Fund and Action to Combat Unemployment in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandamme, Francois

    1984-01-01

    The tasks of the European Social Fund, the European Economic Community's social policy instrument, were reviewed in l983 in the light of the worsening unemployment situation and the priority placed on employment and vocational training policies. (Author/SSH)

  19. Assessing European wild fire vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehler, F.; Oliveira, S.; Barredo, J. I.; Camia, A.; Ayanz, J. San Miguel; Pettenella, D.; Mavsar, R.

    2012-04-01

    Wild fire vulnerability is a measure of potential socio-economic damage caused by a fire in a specific area. As such it is an important component of long-term fire risk management, helping policy-makers take informed decisions about adequate expenditures for fire prevention and suppression, and to target those regions at highest risk. This paper presents a first approach to assess wild fire vulnerability at the European level. A conservative approach was chosen that assesses the cost of restoring the previous land cover after a potential fire. Based on the CORINE Land Cover, a restoration cost was established for each land cover class at country level, and an average restoration time was assigned according to the recovery capacity of the land cover. The damage caused by fire was then assessed by discounting the cost of restoring the previous land cover over the restoration period. Three different vulnerability scenarios were considered assuming low, medium and high fire severity causing different levels of damage. Over Europe, the potential damage of wild land fires ranges from 10 - 13, 732 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for low fire severity, 32 - 45,772 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for medium fire severity and 54 - 77,812 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for high fire severity. The least vulnerable are natural grasslands, moors and heathland and sclerophyllous vegetation, while the highest cost occurs for restoring broad-leaved forest. Preliminary validation comparing these estimates with official damage assessments for past fires shows reasonable results. The restoration cost approach allows for a straightforward, data extensive assessment of fire vulnerability at European level. A disadvantage is the inherent simplification of the evaluation procedure with the underestimation of non-markets goods and services. Thus, a second approach has been developed, valuing individual wild land goods and services and assessing their annual flow which is lost for a certain period of time in case of a fire event. However

  20. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de

  1. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  2. Equal Opportunities and European Educational/Vocational Policy [and] Equal Opportunities and the European Social Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brine, Jacky

    This document contains a symposium paper and a conference paper. "Equal Opportunities and European Educational and Vocational Policy" explores the symposium theme of concepts of difference as it relates directly to the European discourse of equal opportunities and its influence on European educational and vocational policy. It outlines…

  3. EERA and Its European Conferences on Educational Research: A Patchwork of Research on European Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiner, Edwin; Hofbauer, Susann

    2014-01-01

    The process of Europeanisation is closely linked to the process of an emerging European Educational Research Area and an education research identity. The European Conferences on Educational Research (ECER), European Educational Research Association (EERA) and its networks are involved in new directions and strands of educational research in…

  4. Status of European appliance standards

    SciTech Connect

    Turiel, I.; Lebot, B.

    1992-05-01

    The European Community (EC) recently commissioned a study of the impact of potential appliance standards on electricity consumption in the twelve EC nations. This study looks at refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The impact of minimum efficiency standards on electricity use over the time period from 1995--2010 is estimated. The results of this study were presented to the EC in September of 1991. Revisions were made to the draft report and final copies sent to all interested parties. The member nations of the EC will soon consider whether they wish to implement uniform energy efficiency standards that would take effect in 1995. The results of the study described above will be presented and the political considerations will be discussed. In addition, data describing the appliance market in Europe will be presented.

  5. Postfledging survival of European starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that mass at fledging and fledge date within the breeding season affect postfledging survival in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Nestlings were weighed on day 18 after hatch and tagged with individually identifiable patagial tags. Fledge date was recorded. Marked fledglings were resighted during weekly two-day intensive observation periods for 9 weeks postfledging. Post-fledging survival and sighting probabilities were estimated for each of four groups (early or late fledging by heavy or light fledging mass). Body mass was related to post-fledging survival for birds that fledged early. Results were not clear-cut for relative fledge date, although there was weak evidence that this also influenced survival. Highest survival probability estimates occurred in the EARLY-HEAVY group, while the lowest survival estimate occurred in the LATE-LIGHT group. Sighting probabilities differed significantly among groups, emphasizing the need to estimate and compare survival using models which explicitly incorporate sighting probabilities.

  6. Carbon sequestration in European croplands.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pete; Falloon, Pete

    2005-01-01

    The Marrakech Accords allow biospheric carbon sinks and sources to be included in attempts to meet emission reduction targets for the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. Forest management, cropland management, grazing land management, and re-vegetation are allowable activities under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol. Soil carbon sinks (and sources) can, therefore, be included under these activities. Croplands are estimated to be the largest biospheric source of carbon lost to the atmosphere in Europe each year, but the cropland estimate is the most uncertain among all land-use types. It is estimated that European croplands (for Europe as far east as the Urals) lose 300 Tg (C) per year, with the mean figure for the European Union estimated to be 78 Tg (C) per year (with one SD=37). National estimates for EU countries are of a similar order of magnitude on a per-area basis. There is significant potential within Europe to decrease the flux of carbon to the atmosphere from cropland, and for cropland management to sequester soil carbon, relative to the amount of carbon stored in cropland soils at present. The biological potential for carbon storage in European (EU 15) cropland is of the order of 90-120 Tg (C) per year, with a range of options available that include reduced and zero tillage, set-aside, perennial crops, deep rooting crops, more efficient use of organic amendments (animal manure, sewage sludge, cereal straw, compost), improved rotations, irrigation, bioenergy crops, extensification, organic farming, and conversion of arable land to grassland or woodland. The sequestration potential, considering only constraints on land use, amounts of raw materials and available land, is up to 45 Tg (C) per year. The realistic potential and the conservative achievable potentials may be considerably lower than the biological potential because of socioeconomic and other constraints, with a realistically achievable potential estimated to be about 20% of the

  7. Eddy covariance measurements of annual carbon dioxide exchange in two natural ecosystems of the northwestern Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, Marta; Migliavacca, Mirco; Cremonese, Edoardo; Busetto, Lorenzo; Cogliati, Sergio; Colombo, Roberto; Manca, Giovanni; Meroni, Michele; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Rossini, Micol

    2010-05-01

    In consequence of the relationship between climate change and atmospheric greenhouse gases concentrations, a prime issue of recent researches is the quantification of the carbon balance of terrestrial biomes. In the last decades an increasing number of monitoring sites has recently been implemented worldwide, with the aim to better understand and quantify how inter-annual climate fluctuations affect net carbon exchange and the length of growing season over different vegetation types, land uses and climates. Eddy covariance (EC) technique is a widespread method that provide a direct measure of net carbon dioxide exchange across the biosphere-atmosphere interface by measuring the covariance between fluctuations in vertical wind velocity and CO2 mixing ratio. Two long-term monitoring sites have been equipped in the northwest Italian Alps (Aosta Valley) with the aim of quantify the annual carbon dioxide sequestration by grassland and forest ecosystems in relation to climate change. Grasslands and European larch forests (Larix decidua, Mill.) are the most representative vegetation types of this alpine region. The grassland site, located at an elevation of 2160 m asl, has been equipped in summer 2008 in an abandoned pasture with Nardus stricta as dominant species. European larch stand is located at 2050 m asl, at a distance of ~8 km from the grassland, and measurements has started in winter 2009. Both sites have been equipped with the same eddy flux system mounted at 2.5 m and 20 m above the ground in the grassland and in the larch forest, respectively. Both sites were equipped with a basic EC system: a3D sonic anemometer and an open-path infrared gas analyser (LI-7500, LICOR Inc.). Along EC the main meteorological variables are measured (e.g. air temperature, humidity, precipitation, photosynthetically active radiation, PAR, , soil water content, snow height etc..). In order to link annual sites productivity to the growing seasons length, phenological observations are

  8. PRACE - The European HPC Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelmeyer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The mission of PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe) is to enable high impact scientific discovery and engineering research and development across all disciplines to enhance European competitiveness for the benefit of society. PRACE seeks to realize this mission by offering world class computing and data management resources and services through a peer review process. This talk gives a general overview about PRACE and the PRACE research infrastructure (RI). PRACE is established as an international not-for-profit association and the PRACE RI is a pan-European supercomputing infrastructure which offers access to computing and data management resources at partner sites distributed throughout Europe. Besides a short summary about the organization, history, and activities of PRACE, it is explained how scientists and researchers from academia and industry from around the world can access PRACE systems and which education and training activities are offered by PRACE. The overview also contains a selection of PRACE contributions to societal challenges and ongoing activities. Examples of the latter are beside others petascaling, application benchmark suite, best practice guides for efficient use of key architectures, application enabling / scaling, new programming models, and industrial applications. The Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) is an international non-profit association with its seat in Brussels. The PRACE Research Infrastructure provides a persistent world-class high performance computing service for scientists and researchers from academia and industry in Europe. The computer systems and their operations accessible through PRACE are provided by 4 PRACE members (BSC representing Spain, CINECA representing Italy, GCS representing Germany and GENCI representing France). The Implementation Phase of PRACE receives funding from the EU's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreements RI-261557, RI-283493 and RI

  9. Universal Services in the European Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Johannes M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses universal service policies in the European Union. Topics include information access; the demise of the public service model; the effects of competition on universal service; financing; national implementation of member states; programs for schools and libraries; and pertinent Web sites on European universal service policy. (LRW)

  10. Mathematics Teaching in Four European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Paul; Sayers, Judy

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a comparative study, funded by the European Union, of the teaching of mathematics in five European countries, (Flanders, England, Finland, Hungary and Spain) to students in the upper primary (ages 10-12) and lower secondary (12-14) years. These ages were chosen as they represent a time when many students' experiences of…

  11. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  12. European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrio, David; Maio, Elisa; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a reservoir for Coxiella burnetii in the Iberian region. High individual and population seroprevalences observed in wild and farmed rabbits, evidence of systemic infections, and vaginal shedding support the reservoir role of the European rabbit for C. burnetii. PMID:25988670

  13. Report from the European Prison Education Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2008-01-01

    Since the last edition of the Journal, the European Prison Education Association (EPEA) has been officially elected a member of the European Association for the Education of Adults (EAEA) at EAEA's General Assembly held at the University of Latvia in Riga. The EAEA is the largest umbrella organization in Europe advocating lifelong learning. It is…

  14. Internationalisms--Identical Vocabularies in European Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Peter

    Linguistic history has described borrowing in the European languages as a process exclusive to one language at any given time. However, it is more likely that there is a core of common loan words, or internationalisms, in many European languages. These internationalisms have come from a variety of sources: the historic interrelatedness of…

  15. A European Vision for Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Sue; Tuckett, Alan; Boucher, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) is the UK national coordinator for the European Agenda for Adult Learning, with the challenge of creating a coherent message across the four countries to inform European cooperation on adult learning. To start the debate, the journal staff asked Sue Waddington, Alan Tuckett, and Fiona…

  16. Implications of 1992 for European Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Jurgen

    This paper analyzes the effect of the unified single market of 1992 on European telecommunications. The major policy aspects of the European Economic Commission's Green Paper on "The Development of the Common Market for Telecommunications Services and Equipment" are highlighted, and the effects of these policies in the equipment market…

  17. European and Intercultural Dimension in Greek Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damanakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Negotiations concerning Greece's accession into the European Union began as early as 1961, when a cooperation agreement was signed between Greece and the European Economic Community. These negotiations were concluded 20 years later, on 1 January 1981, when Greece became the tenth full member of the EU. The next major step in Greece's progress…

  18. Transnational Lives in European Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Transnational collaboration by educational researchers in Europe has grown fast since the mid-1990s and the means to support it have become more easily accessible. A study of the growth of the European Educational Research Association (EERA) since its foundation in the mid-1990s shows how transnational research in European education began, and how…

  19. The Future of Copyright Management: European Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battisti, Michele

    This paper presents European perspectives on the future of copyright management. The first section is an overview of intellectual property rights in Europe, including differences between copyright countries and "droit d'auteur" countries. The second section addresses European Community legal policy, including examples related to the…

  20. Towards European Citizenship through Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernndez, Scar

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study, the first part of a recently concluded project, is to describe and analyse the perceptions that European university students have of European citizenship and to offer some insight into the term. Before describing our findings, we offer a brief review of the concept of citizenship, attempting to define it in the European…

  1. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  2. The Words That Buoy the European Impulse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogenraad, Robert; Tousignant, Nathalie; Castano, Emanuele; Bestgen, Yves; Dumoulin, Michel

    With a view on analyzing the deeper trends in the European discourse that will shape the European Union's (EU's) future, a study examined 121 speeches made by EU political leaders over the period 1985-1997 and concorded and statisticized which words were used, how often, where, and when with the help of a computer-aided content analysis engine.…

  3. How Young Is Standard Average European?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haspelmath, Martin

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of Standard Average European, a European linguistic area, looks at 11 of its features (definite, indefinite articles, have-perfect, participial passive, antiaccusative prominence, nominative experiencers, dative external possessors, negation/negative pronouns, particle comparatives, A-and-B conjunction, relative clauses, verb fronting…

  4. Prospects for European labour demand.

    PubMed

    Lindley, R M

    1988-07-01

    The impact of economic and technological trends upon the level and structure of labor demand is examined, exploring the methods used to model the labor market and making special reference to demography and technology. Evidence on recent and prospective changes in labor demand is reviewed for France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. The models used to explore future employment scenarios usually fail to incorporate the linkages required to fully analyze the various demographic-economic interactions. Further, this is not generally viewed as a limitation, given the time frame of most employment projections and their preoccupation with changes in the structure of labor demand. Medium-term multisectoral models tend to pay more attention to both demographic and technical change, but the treatment of both aspects is limited. The projections provide a framework for considering how both socioeconomic behavior and policy might change to achieve different outcomes. The greater a model's behavioral content, as expressed in its relationships between different variables, the greater the insight obtainable from simulation exercises. The 1st half of the 1970s was characterized by a reduction in German employment, representing the severest of European reactions to the oil crisis. The 2nd half of the decade recorded rapid growth in Italy and the Netherlands. The 1980s started with marked declines in Germany and the UK. Overall, the net gains of the 1970s were lost in the recession following the 2nd oil crisis. In none of the 5 countries studied does any realistic prospect emerge of achieving full employment before 2000. The most optimistic outcome is that unemployment will decline only slowly, it at all. The growth of both new forms and areas of employment will not compensate sufficiently for the loss of jobs elsewhere and the growth of labor supply. The industrial sector will continue to experience change in favor of the service sector but at a slower rate than during

  5. Do online pharmacies fit European internal markets?

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Mia Maria; Rautava, Päivi Tuire; Forsström, Jari Johannes

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the suitability of online pharmacies into European internal market area. This required considering the models of present online pharmacies in respect to the existing legislation. Data on online pharmacy settings was collected by looking some online pharmacies, which were found by using Goggle search machine with term "online pharmacy" and by studying websites of some well-known online pharmacies. European legislation and policy were studied from European Union's official website. Online drug markets seem to be increasing in popularity for reasons related to their ready availability and cost benefits. Few online pharmacies are based in Europe, yet online markets are worldwide. Community legislation does not stipulate on the legality of online pharmacies on European internal markets. Instead Community legislation offers framework for electronic commerce that could also include online pharmacy practise. National legislation, however, may rule them out either directly or indirectly. Regardless of European internal markets online pharmacies' cross-border operations are particularly complicated. Preliminary ruling from the European Court of Justice concerning one European online pharmacy's cross-border practise is awaited 2003-2004 and will offer some aspects for future.

  6. Hermes - A manned European system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretenet, J.-C.

    Features of a European hypersonic winged reentry vehicle, Hermes, are presented, together with the technology requirements for its development and the missions it would serve. LEO is beginning to hold promise for the manufacture of materials in microgravity and/or vacuum conditions in orbiting facilities which need to be serviced. A manned, reusable, winged reentry vehicle would permit the delivery and return of payloads from space, recovery of the first stage of the Ariane V rocket for reuse, and return of the Hermes to a landing at the Kourou launch site. The avionics would be similar to those of modern aircraft, as would the landing system. In-orbit operational techniques would be needed, as would an internal environment similar to Spacelab, a rigid turnaround time, high utilization rate, and a 10 yr lifetime. The length of the Hermes is projected as 12.5 m, wingtip to wingtip breadth of 7.4 m, and a total mass of 11,400 kg for a heliosynchronous orbit mission, while 15,400 kg are available for a circular, 490 m/sec orbit.

  7. Infective endocarditis: the European viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tornos, Pilar; Gonzalez-Alujas, Teresa; Thuny, Frank; Habib, Gilbert

    2011-05-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult and complex disease. In recent years epidemiology and microbiology have changed. In developed countries IE is now affecting older patients and patients with no previously known valve disease. Prosthetic IE (prosthetic valve endocarditis [PVE]) and endocarditis in patients with pacemakers and other devices (cardiac device related infective endocarditis [CDRIE]) are becoming more frequent. The number of Staphylococcus aureus IE is increasing related to the number of endocarditis that occurs because of health care associated procedures, especially in diabetics or patients on chronic hemodialysis. The change in the underlying population and the increase in the number of cases caused by very virulent organism explain why the disease still carries a poor prognosis and a high mortality. The variety of clinical manifestations and complications, as well as the serious prognosis, makes it mandatory that IE patients need to be treated in experienced hospitals with a collaborative approach between different specialists, involving cardiologists, infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, surgeons, and frequently others, including neurologists and radiologists. Only an early diagnosis followed by risk stratification and a prompt institution of the correct antibiotic treatment as well as an appropriate and timed surgical indication may improve mortality figures. The recent European Guidelines try to provide clear and simple recommendations, obtained by expert consensus after thorough review of the available literature to all specialists involved in clinical decision-making of this difficult and changing disease.

  8. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  9. An overview on European SPS activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhartz, K. K.

    1980-01-01

    The organization of space and energy research in Europe is discussed. The European situation is highlighted with emphasis on the dependency of energy imports and on the energy requirements of Europe. The status of SPS research in the countries that form the European Space Agency was reviewed. It is concluded that in view of the unfavorable geographical and climatic situation of large parts of Europe, terrestrial solar energy conversion is unlikely to make a significant contribution to Europe's future energy supply. Thus, SPS development is of special interest to the European community.

  10. The oxygen isotope enrichment of leaf-exported assimilates – does it always reflect lamina leaf water enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Arthur; Brandes, Elke; Keitel, Claudia; Boda, Sonja; Kayler, Zachary E; Granier, André; Barbour, Margaret; Farquhar, Graham D; Treydte, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen stable isotope composition of plant organic matter (OM) (particularly of wood and cellulose in the tree ring archive) is valuable in studies of plant–climate interaction, but there is a lack of information on the transfer of the isotope signal from the leaf to heterotrophic tissues. We studied the oxygen isotopic composition and its enrichment above source water of leaf water over diel courses in five tree species covering a broad range of life forms. We tracked the transfer of the isotopic signal to leaf water-soluble OM and further to phloem-transported OM. Observed leaf water evaporative enrichment was consistent with values predicted from mechanistic models taking into account nonsteady-state conditions. While leaf water-soluble OM showed the expected 18O enrichment in all species, phloem sugars were less enriched than expected from leaf water enrichment in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), European larch (Larix decidua) and Alpine ash (Eucalyptus delegatensis). Oxygen atom exchange with nonenriched water during phloem loading and transport, as well as a significant contribution of assimilates from bark photosynthesis, can explain these phloem 18O enrichment patterns. Our results indicate species-specific uncoupling between the leaf water and the OM oxygen isotope signal, which is important for the interpretation of tree ring data. PMID:23763637

  11. Application of micro-PIXE, MRI and light microscopy for research in wood science and dendroecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merela, M.; Pelicon, P.; Vavpetič, P.; Regvar, M.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Serša, I.; Poličnik, H.; Pokorny, B.; Levanič, T.; Oven, P.

    2009-06-01

    Beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) branches were topped and after five months the wound response was analyzed by PIXE, 3D-MRI and light microscopy. From freshly cut and deeply frozen sample 30 μm thick longitudinal-radial tissue sections were prepared for anatomical investigations and micro-PIXE analysis. Light microscopy revealed the structural response to wounding, i.e. occurrence of the reaction zone between the exposed and dehydrated dead tissue and healthy sound wood. The reaction zone was characterized by tylosis in vessels and accumulation of colored deposits in parenchyma cells, fibres and vessels. 3D MRI of a parallel sample showed that the moisture content in the reaction zone was three times higher than in normal healthy wood. Micro-PIXE mapping at margins of compromised wood in beech revealed an increased concentration of potassium in the reaction zone. The increase in the calcium concentration was associated with the dehydrated tissue adjacent to reaction zones. In addition, micro-PIXE was used to determine the elemental distribution in annual tree rings. This may be relevant for retrospective assessment of environmental pollution in wood by measuring yearly increments as a biomonitoring tool. The analysis of European larch ( Larix decidua Mill.) wood revealed a high similarity between optical characteristics (i.e. late versus earlywood) and elemental (e.g. Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Zn) distribution.

  12. European small geostationary communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei, , Dr.; Ellmers, Frank; Winkler, Andreas; Schuff, Herbert; Sansegundo Chamarro, Manuel Julián

    2011-04-01

    Hispasat Advanced Generation 1 (HAG1) is the first satellite using the SGEO platform, which is under the development in the ESA Artes-11 program. Since the last presentation in the IAC 2007, a European industrial consortium led by OHB has completed the mission and spacecraft design. The platform Preliminary Design Review has been carried out in May 2008. The customer for the first mission is a commercial operator—Hispasat. The contract was signed in December 2008 and the satellite will be launched in 2012. To give confidence to the customer, SGEO platform will use up to date flight proven technologies. HAG1 carries 20/24 Ku-band and 3/5 Ka-band transponders to provide commercial services. Some innovative payload technologies will also be flown on board of HAG1 to gain in-orbit heritage. SGEO has also been selected as the baseline platform for the ESA Data Relay Satellite (EDRS). Phase-A study has just kicked off in January 2009. The targeted launch date is 2013. Heinrich Hertz will also use the SGEO platform. Heinrich Hertz is funded by the German Space Agency (DLR) and provides flight opportunities for technologies and components developed by the German Space Industry. With the HAG1 contract in hand, and EDRS and Heinrich Hertz in the line, OHB with its partners has the confidence that it will be able to speed up the product development of the SGEO platform for potential customers in the commercial market. This paper will first present the updated platform design and the status of the product development will be followed with the introduction of innovative payload technologies on board the first mission—HAG1 and ended with the mission concepts of EDRS and Heinrich Hertz missions.

  13. Heart Failure Epidemiology: European Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Guha, K; McDonagh, T

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure poses an increasing problem for global healthcare systems. The epidemiological data which has been accrued over the last thirty years has predominantly been accumulated from experience within North America and Europe. Initial large cohort, prospective longitudinal studies produced the first publications; however latterly the focus has shifted onto epidemiological data governing hospitalisation and mortality. The emphasis behind this shift has been the resource implications with regards to repetitive, costly and prolonged hospitalisation. The European experience in heart failure, though similar to North America has recently demonstrated differences in hospitalisation which may underlie the differences between healthcare system configuration. Heart failure however remains an increasing global problem and the endpoint of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Allied with the fact of increasingly elderly populations and prior data demonstrating a steep rise in prevalent cases within more elderly populations, it is likely that the increasing burden of disease will continue to pose challenges for modern healthcare. Despite the predicted increase in the number of patients affected by heart failure, over the last thirty years, a clear management algorithm has evolved for the use of pharmacotherapies (neuro-hormonal antagonists), device based therapies (Implantable Cardioverting Defibrillator (ICD) and Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy (CRT)) and mechanical therapies including left ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplantation. Though the management of such patients has been clearly delineated in national and international guidelines, the underuse of all available and appropriate therapies remains a significant problem. When comparing various epidemiological studies from different settings and timepoints, it should be remembered that rates of prevalence and incidence may vary depending upon the definition used, methods of accumulating information (with

  14. Review of European microgravity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamacher, Hans

    1994-01-01

    AA In a French/Russion cooperation, CNES developed a microgravity detection system for analyzing the Mir space station micro-g-environment for the first time. European efforts to characterize the microgravity (1/9) environment within a space laboratory began in the late seventies with the design of the First Spacelab Mission SL-1. Its Material Science Double Rack was the first payload element to carry its own tri-axial acceleration package. Even though incapable for any frequency analysis, the data provided a wealth of novel information for optimal experiment and hardware design and operations for missions to come. Theoretical investigations under ESA contract demonstrated the significance of the detailed knowledge of micro-g data for a thorough experiment analysis. They especially revealed the high sensitivity of numerous phenomena to low frequency acceleration. Accordingly, the payloads of the Spacelab missions D-1 and D-2 were furnished with state-of-the-art detection systems to ensure frequency analysis between 0.1 and 100 Hz. The Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA) of D-2 was a centralized system comprising fixed installed as well as mobile tri-axial packages showing real-time data processing and transmission to ground. ESA's free flyer EURECA carried a system for continuous measurement over the entire mission. All EURECA subsystems and experimental facilities had to meet tough requirements defining the upper acceleration limits. In a French/Russion cooperation, CNES developed a mi crogravity detection system for analyzing the Mir space station micro-g-environment for the first time. An approach to get access to low frequency acceleration between 0 and 0.02 Hz will be realized by QSAM (Quasi-steady Acceleration Measurement) on IML-2, complementary to the NASA system Spacelab Acceleration Measurement System SAMS. A second flight of QSAM is planned for the Russian free flyer FOTON.

  15. Developing indicators for European birds

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Richard D; van Strien, Arco; Vorisek, Petr; Gmelig Meyling, Adriaan W; Noble, David G; Foppen, Ruud P.B; Gibbons, David W

    2005-01-01

    The global pledge to deliver ‘a significant reduction in the current rate of biodiversity loss by 2010’ is echoed in a number of regional and national level targets. There is broad consensus, however, that in the absence of conservation action, biodiversity will continue to be lost at a rate unprecedented in the recent era. Remarkably, we lack a basic system to measure progress towards these targets and, in particular, we lack standard measures of biodiversity and procedures to construct and assess summary statistics. Here, we develop a simple classification of biodiversity indicators to assist their development and clarify purpose. We use European birds, as example taxa, to show how robust indicators can be constructed and how they can be interpreted. We have developed statistical methods to calculate supranational, multi-species indices using population data from national annual breeding bird surveys in Europe. Skilled volunteers using standardized field methods undertake data collection where methods and survey designs differ slightly across countries. Survey plots tend to be widely distributed at a national level, covering many bird species and habitats with reasonable representation. National species' indices are calculated using log-linear regression, which allows for plot turnover. Supranational species' indices are constructed by combining the national species' indices weighted by national population sizes of each species. Supranational, multi-species indicators are calculated by averaging the resulting indices. We show that common farmland birds in Europe have declined steeply over the last two decades, whereas woodland birds have not. Evidence elsewhere shows that the main driver of farmland bird declines is increased agricultural intensification. We argue that the farmland bird indicator is a useful surrogate for trends in other elements of biodiversity in this habitat. PMID:15814345

  16. Phootprint: A European Phobos Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, S.; Ratcliffe, A.; Buchwald, R.; Scheer, H.; Chapuy, M.; Garland, M.; Rebuffat, D.

    2014-06-01

    Phootprint is an ESA funded feasibility study for a European Phobos Sample Return Mission. A complete system design has been performed including ERC, Landing Leg, Sample Acquisition System and GNC Proximity Operations.

  17. European packaging laws: Can it happen here?

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, B.

    1996-06-01

    European packaging recycling and reduction efforts helped reshape recycling efforts and thinking. This article provides an update on what is happening with packaging recycling in Europe and how it affects the rest of the world, especially the US. World recycling markets were shaken by the enactment of the German Packaging Recycling ordinance of 1991. While the initial market shock waves may have subsided, the effects are still being felt. The ordinance has changed the way European countries think about packaging waste, and that way of thinking has spread, in various forms, around the world, affecting US manufacturers and causing US lawmakers to at least consider similar legislation here. The German Packaging Ordinance, its counterparts in other countries, and the European Union (EU) Directive have, themselves, been evolutionary as well as revolutionary--reacting and changing over the past five years. US reaction to the European laws has also evolved, moving from horror and annoyance to a reasoned analysis and evaluation.

  18. [European curriculum for further education in radiology].

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, B

    2014-11-01

    The European training curriculum for radiology of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) aims to harmonize training in radiology in Europe. Levels I and II constitute the centerpiece of the curriculum. The ESR recommends a 5-year training period in radiology with 3 years of level I and 2 years of level II training. The undergraduate (U) level curriculum is conceived as a basis for teaching radiology in medical schools and consists of a modality-oriented U1 level and an organ-based U2 level. Level III curricula provide contents for subspecialty and fellowship training after board certification in radiology. The curricular contents of all parts of the European Training Curriculum are divided into the sections knowledge, skills as well as competences and attitudes. The European training curriculum is meant to be a recommendation and a basis for the development of national curricula, but is not meant to replace existing national regulations.

  19. European Lung Foundation: from local to global

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Pippa; Williams, Sîan

    2016-01-01

    Key points Although there are many patient organisations in Europe, this is not the case in all countries across the globe. Access to care is one of the main global issues highlighted by the European Lung Foundation International Patient Advisory Committee. The European Respiratory Society/European Lung Foundation Healthy Lungs for Life campaign can be used locally or globally to raise awareness of the risk factors for lung disease. Implementation science is a method that can be used to assess the feasibility of using research findings in routine healthcare in clinical settings in different parts of the world. Educational aims To show how patient- and public-focussed initiatives and activities can be adapted and modified to be effective in local, national and international settings, and to provide specific examples of these from the European Lung Foundation. PMID:28210296

  20. Natural gas demand surges among European customers

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1993-12-27

    Europe's view of natural gas as a clean fuel is driving demand faster than European producers can supply the fuel. By 2010 European gas demand is expected to rise by 50%, so imports will need to rise in step. There are plenty of gas reserves within and in reach of the European market to meet increasing needs. But current low gas prices in Europe are a barrier to development of gas projects, which are large, long term investments. Meanwhile, the structure of Europe and its gas markets is changing. There is a trend to privatization and uncertainty over the future role of state gas monopolies. The paper discusses European production, natural gas as a primary energy source, gas sources, price requirements, megaprojects, the Middle East promise, new infrastructure, power generation, privatization, and third party access.

  1. European Cargo Ship Launches to Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle cargo craft (ATV-4) launched atop an Ariane 5 rocket from Kourou, French Guiana at 5:52 p.m. EDT on Wednesday to begin a 10-day t...

  2. European Science Notes. Volume 39, Number 10.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Behavioral Sciences -7The European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction . ............................ Richard E. Snow 451 The first and...Metallwerk Plansee--A Leader in Powder Metallurgy ............................. Kenneth D. Challenger 466 This is the first of two articles this month focusing...intended to be exhaustive; it is expected that the organization of The first and founding conference future EARLI conferences wiil work with of the European

  3. Demographics of the European apicultural industry.

    PubMed

    Chauzat, Marie-Pierre; Cauquil, Laura; Roy, Lise; Franco, Stéphanie; Hendrikx, Pascal; Ribière-Chabert, Magali

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, many European and North American countries have reported a high rate of disorders (mortality, dwindling and disappearance) affecting honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera). Although beekeeping has become an increasingly professional activity in recent years, the beekeeping industry remains poorly documented in Europe. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Honeybee Health sent a detailed questionnaire to each Member State, in addition to Kosovo and Norway, to determine the demographics and state of their beekeeping industries. Based on data supplied by the National Reference Laboratory for honeybee diseases in each European country, a European database was created to describe the beekeeping industry including the number and types of beekeepers, operation size, industry production, and health (notifiable diseases, mortalities). The total number of beekeepers in Europe was estimated at 620,000. European honey production was evaluated at around 220,000 tons in 2010. The price of honey varied from 1.5 to 40 €/kg depending on the country and on the distribution network. The estimated colony winter mortality varied from 7 to 28% depending on the country and the origin of the data (institutional survey or beekeeping associations). This survey documents the high heterogeneity of the apicultural industry within the European Union. The high proportion of non-professional beekeepers and the small mean number of colonies per beekeeper were the only common characteristics at European level. The tremendous variation in European apicultural industries has implication for any comprehensive epidemiological or economic analysis of the industry. This variability needs to be taken into account for such analysis as well as for future policy development. The industry would be served if beekeeping registration was uniformly implemented across member states. Better information on the package bee and queen production would help in understanding the ability of

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-31

    Fig. 1. Simplified mechanical system repre- physical Illness; at least some of the negative senting the human body standing on a effects observed are...meeting. D. x. Barr 161 The European Spaue Agency and the * 5gIEKP. Popoe Kepler Miesion,Among the poelbl new Btau" under onsideration by the European spac...defining equal fatigue- keep the effective vibration below the discom decreased proficiency boundaries. fort levels; this Is especially true if critical

  5. Demographics of the European Apicultural Industry

    PubMed Central

    Chauzat, Marie-Pierre; Cauquil, Laura; Roy, Lise; Franco, Stéphanie; Hendrikx, Pascal; Ribière-Chabert, Magali

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, many European and North American countries have reported a high rate of disorders (mortality, dwindling and disappearance) affecting honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera). Although beekeeping has become an increasingly professional activity in recent years, the beekeeping industry remains poorly documented in Europe. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Honeybee Health sent a detailed questionnaire to each Member State, in addition to Kosovo and Norway, to determine the demographics and state of their beekeeping industries. Based on data supplied by the National Reference Laboratory for honeybee diseases in each European country, a European database was created to describe the beekeeping industry including the number and types of beekeepers, operation size, industry production, and health (notifiable diseases, mortalities). The total number of beekeepers in Europe was estimated at 620 000. European honey production was evaluated at around 220 000 tons in 2010. The price of honey varied from 1.5 to 40 €/kg depending on the country and on the distribution network. The estimated colony winter mortality varied from 7 to 28% depending on the country and the origin of the data (institutional survey or beekeeping associations). This survey documents the high heterogeneity of the apicultural industry within the European Union. The high proportion of non-professional beekeepers and the small mean number of colonies per beekeeper were the only common characteristics at European level. The tremendous variation in European apicultural industries has implication for any comprehensive epidemiological or economic analysis of the industry. This variability needs to be taken into account for such analysis as well as for future policy development. The industry would be served if beekeeping registration was uniformly implemented across member states. Better information on the package bee and queen production would help in understanding the ability of

  6. Competition and liberalization in European gas markets: Towards a continental European model

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    Many of the long-awaited changes to the European gas market are now imminent. Institutional developments and market forces are combining to produce a transformation. This major study analyzes the developments in a wide range of European countries, including central and eastern Europe. In examining how different institutional traditions and political priorities will affect the gas market, Stern explores the potential for a distinct continental European model of competition and liberalization.

  7. European Vertical Reference System Influence in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celms, A.; Reķe, I.; Ratkevičs, A.

    2015-11-01

    Till 1 December, 2014, in Latvia the heights were determined in Baltic Normal Height System 1977. The national height system is determined by the Cabinet of Ministers and internal laws. Now for the change of the national height system to reconcile it with the European Vertical Reference System, amendments to the laws and regulations have been developed, but so far only the amendment to the Geospatial Information Law is in force, the amendment to the regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers is still not approved. This amendment declares the Latvia Height System based on the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia as the national height system. For height transformation, there is a transformation formula for each European country. After calculations it is seen that height difference between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and European Vertical Reference System depends on point location in the territory (coordinates). This unequal height difference between both height systems will cause unequal height values on border connection points between Baltic countries. The aim of the research is to evaluate the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia. To reach the aim the following tasks are set: 1) to evaluate the components of transformation formulas; 2) using the transformation formulas to calculate height differences between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the European Vertical Reference System realization EVRF2007 for the territory of Latvia and also between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the Latvia Normal Height System; 3) to get height differences in the European Vertical Reference System on the borderlines of Latvia - Estonia and Latvia - Lithuania.

  8. How Green Are European Curricula? A Comparative Analysis of Primary School Syllabi in Five European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanish, Anna; Rank, Astrid; Seeber, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted a cross-national curriculum analysis as part of a European Union Comenius project regarding the implementation of an online tool to foster environmental education (EE) in primary schools. The overall goal was to determine the extent and intensity that EE is embedded in the syllabi of five European countries. To this end, the…

  9. The European Round Table of Industrialists and the Restructuring of European Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    The restructuring of European higher education (EHE) since the 1980s is a widely studied subject. However, this paper argues that previous studies have paid insufficient attention to the role of transnational policy-making groups in this complex and multilevel process. This argument is supported by focusing on how the European Round Table of…

  10. Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the Creation of a European Education Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grek, Sotiria; Lawn, Martin; Ozga, Jenny; Segerholm, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on the first, completed phase of a research project on inspection as governing in three European inspection systems. The data presented here draw attention to the rather under-researched associational activities of European inspectorates and their developing practices of policy learning and exchange, and highlight their…

  11. ERASMUS: European Community Program for the Development of Student Mobility in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Education, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes the European Community's efforts to unify Europe and enhance competitiveness in world markets by improving use of available intellectual potential. Discusses ERASMUS, the European Community Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students. Explains the role of Inter-University Cooperation Programs (ICPs), a course credit transfer…

  12. The Emergent European Educational Policies under Scrutiny: The Bologna Process from a Central European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the Bologna Process and the European Research Area are viewed as the two sides of the same coin: that of the redefinition of the missions of the institution of the university. The Bologna Process is viewed as relatively closed to global developments: as largely inward-looking, focused on European regional problems (and European…

  13. Working towards a European Geological Data Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Krogt, Rob; Hughes, Richard; Pedersen, Mikael; Serrano, Jean-Jacques; Lee, Kathryn A.; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, François

    2013-04-01

    The increasing importance of geological information for policy, regulation and business needs at European and international level has been recognized by the European Parliament and the European Commission, who have called for the development of a common European geological knowledge base. The societal relevance of geoscience data/information is clear from many current issues such as shale gas exploration (including environmental impacts), the availability of critical mineral resources in a global economy, management and security with regard to geohazards (seismic, droughts, floods, ground stability), quality of (ground-)water and soil and societal responses to the impacts of climate change. The EGDI-Scope project responds to this, aiming to prepare an implementation plan for a pan-European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), under the umbrella of the FP7 e- Infrastructures program. It is envisaged that the EGDI will build on geological datasets and models currently held by the European Geological Surveys at national and regional levels, and will also provide a platform for datasets generated by the large number of relevant past, ongoing and future European projects which have geological components. With European policy makers and decision makers from (international) industry as the main target groups (followed by research communities and the general public) stakeholder involvement is imperative to the successful realization and continuity of the EGDI. With these ambitions in mind, the presentation will focus on the following issues, also based on the first results and experiences of the EGDI-Scope project that started mid-2012: • The organization of stakeholder input and commitment connected to relevant 'use cases' within different thematic domains; a number of stakeholder representatives is currently involved, but the project is open to more extensive participation; • A large number of European projects relevant for data delivery to EGDI has been reviewed

  14. European comparisons between mental health services.

    PubMed

    Wahlbeck, K

    2011-03-01

    When developing accessible, affordable and effective mental health systems, exchange of data between countries is an important moving force towards better mental health care. Unfortunately, health information systems in most countries are weak in the field of mental health, and comparability of data is low. Special international data collection exercises, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) Atlas Project and the WHO Baseline Project have provided valuable insights in the state of mental health systems in countries, but such single-standing data collections are not sustainable solutions. Improvements in routine data collection are urgently needed. The European Commission has initiated major improvements to ensure harmonized and comprehensive health data collection, by introducing the European Community Health Indicators set and the European Health Interview Survey. However, both of these initiatives lack strength in the field of mental health. The neglect of the need for relevant and valid comparable data on mental health systems is in conflict with the importance of mental health for European countries and the objectives of the 'Europe 2020' strategy. The need for valid and comparable mental health services data is today addressed only by single initiatives, such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development work to establish quality indicators for mental health care. Real leadership in developing harmonized mental health data across Europe is lacking. A European Mental Health Observatory is urgently needed to lead development and implementation of monitoring of mental health and mental health service provision in Europe.

  15. West European public and the Atlantic Alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Using original and previously published survey data, this study explores West European public attitudes about Atlantic cooperation in general and NATO in particular. Alternative viewpoints are categorized into a typology that is used to describe the conceptual nature of European beliefs and to measure the level of public support for the different viewpoints. Long-term trends in these attitudes and causal determinants are also examined. A distinguishing feature of this study is that it is truly comparative. The analysis relies on identical survey items administered in four European countries: Great Britain, France, West German, and Italy. The longitudinal data examined indicate that some fundamental changes have occurred in European security beliefs. Anti-Americanism has increased dramatically at the same time that attitudes toward the Soviet Union have become more favorable, and the fear of nuclear weapons and nuclear war has increased substantially. Explanations for these shifts in opinion are not found in sociological factors, such as changes in generational experiences, educational levels, or social classes; but instead, European attitudes appear to reflect broad changes in international politics, such as the Vietnam War, nuclear parity, and detente. Favorable opinion for NATO tends to be high, yet specific defense-related measures receive much less support.

  16. European veterinary education: a bridge to quality.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tito H

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an insight into the current state of, and future changes in, veterinary education within the European Community, as well as the role of the European Association of Establishments for Veterinary Education (EAEVE) in evaluating and raising standards of education and training. It also describes the role of EAEVE in developing strategies for changes in the future. Veterinary schools have traditionally aimed at producing the omnicompetent veterinarian at graduation. Many have questioned whether this is possible, and a recent European Commission (EC) funded market survey has confirmed that this is indeed an impossible task and has identified the requirements of society within the European Union (EU) for veterinary services in the future. There is however a need to change the current 1978 European Directive. The current mechanisms which have been used by EAEVE to evaluate over 100 veterinary schools in Europe and their relationship with other systems of appraisal are described. The future of veterinary education within the context of higher education in Europe as part of the Bologna process and in relation to standards of veterinary education worldwide are discussed. Whilst the merits of standardisation of educational quality so that there can be mutual recognition of qualifications are supported, the need to preserve the strengths associated with the diversity of approaches and teaching methods is strongly advocated.

  17. Baptism of Fire for the European Security and Defense Policy: Will the European Forces Successfully Implement the Dayton Accords?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    in 2005, some critics argue that, though the European Union (EU) has become an economic superpower, it is still a negligible player in the realm of...PAGES 121 14. SUBJECT TERMS European Union (EU), European Security and Defense Policy (ESDP), European Union Forces (EUFOR), Bosnia and...Balkans and showed a startling incapacity to deal with this crisis. Even in 2005, some critics argue that, though the European Union (EU) has become an

  18. European neolithization and ancient DNA: an assessment.

    PubMed

    Deguilloux, Marie-France; Leahy, Rachael; Pemonge, Marie-Hélène; Rottier, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Neolithic processes underlying the distribution of genetic diversity among European populations have been the subject of intense debate since the first genetic data became available. However, patterns observed in the current European gene pool are the outcome of Paleolithic and Neolithic processes, overlaid with four millennia of further developments. This observation encouraged paleogeneticists to contribute to the debate by directly comparing genetic variation from the ancient inhabitants of Europe to their contemporary counterparts. Pre-Neolithic and Neolithic paleogenetic data are becoming increasingly available for north and northwest European populations. Despite the numerous problems inherent in the paleogenetic approach, the accumulation of ancient DNA datasets offers new perspectives from which to interpret the interactions between hunter-gatherer and farming communities. In light of information emerging from diverse disciplines, including recent paleogenetic studies, the most plausible model explaining the movement of Neolithic pioneer groups in central Europe is that of leapfrog migration.

  19. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject.

  20. Educational Innovations in Finnish and European Contexts: An Analysis of the Aims and Outcomes of "The European Observatory" of the European Commission (1994-1998). Research Report 200.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Seppo; Tirri, Kirsi

    The purpose of this document is to analyze some of the major developments and research findings of the European Observatory of Innovations in Education and Training (1994-1998). The Observatory was a consortium of 13 member countries of the European Union serving as a European network of researchers and educators in the field of comparative…

  1. Awareness System Implemented in the European Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jańıček, František; Jedinák, Martin; Šulc, Igor

    2014-09-01

    Transmission system in Slovakia is part of a synchronously interconnected system of continental Europe. Besides indisputable technical and economical benefits of cooperation many hazardous factors exist of fault condition spreading with impact on our system. Even today a system break-up escalated into a vast blackout is a real danger. European transmission system operators continually work on preventive measures and develop systems with a goal to handle critical situations. The ambition of the European Awareness System is to signalize the rise of these situations and also assist with system restoration

  2. European scientific notes. Volume 34, Number 9

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, W.V.; Peters, D.J.

    1980-09-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by calling attention to current development and to institutions and individuals engaged in these scientific efforts. The articles are written primarily by members of the staff of ORNL and occasionally articles are prepared by, or in cooperation with, members of the scientific staffs of the United States Air Force's European Office of Aerospace Research and Development and the United States ARmy Research and Standardization Group. Articles are also contributed by visiting Stateside scientists.

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-30

    AD-A31 850 EUROPEAN SlN11I NOTE VOUM 37 NUMBRbU OFIC 1/ OF NAVAL RESEARCH LONDON (ENGLAND) D MOSHER ET AL. 30 JUN 83 ESN-37-6 UNLASSIFIED F/G 5/2 NIL... RESEARCH LONDON EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES ESN 37-6 30 JUNE 1983 V OF Distributed by the Office of Naval Research Branch Office. C This document is issued...PROJECT TASK US Office of Naval Research , Branch Office London Box 39 FPO NY 09510 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE 30 aune

  4. Serving European Science: The EIROforum Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C.

    2004-06-01

    OVER THE LAST FEW years, the idea of a “European Research Area” (ERA) has gained strong support among science policy makers and, increasingly, among scientists themselves. The goal of the ERA is to establish a single “market” for research on our continent, allowing for better co-ordination of research efforts, synergies between projects, the achievement of “critical mass” (both human and financial) and thus to strengthen the competitiveness of European research. These goals necessitate deep structural changes in the way science is organised, breaking up existing borderlines and barriers between national research systems in Europe.

  5. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  6. European Science Notes, volume 40, number 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, L. E.

    1986-02-01

    ESN is a monthly publication with brief articles on recent developments in European scientific research. Its partial contents are: Biotechnology Research at GBF, and at the Inst. of Technical Chemistry, Univ. of Hanover, West Germany; 7th European Immunology Congress; Biotechnia '85 - First International Congress for Biotechnology; Acoustic Cavitation Generated by Clinical Ultrasound; Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics; Geophysics Research in Israel; Fiber Composite Research at Paisley College of Technology, Scotland; A review of International Research on the Physical Metallurgy of Welding; Silicon Metallurgy at the Helsinki Technical Univ.; A Conference on Guided Optical Structures and Their Applications; Optoelectronics Research at Oxford Univ.; and Fractal Conferences in Europe.

  7. The molecular genetics of European ancestry.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, B

    1999-01-01

    In an earlier paper we proposed, on the basis of mitochondrial control region variation, that the bulk of modern European mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) diversity had its roots in the European Upper Palaeolithic. Refining the mtDNA phylogeny and enlarging the sample size both within Europe and the Middle East still support this interpretation and indicate three separate phases of colonization: (i) the Early Upper Palaeolithic about 50,000 BP; (ii) the Late Upper Palaeolithic 11,000-14,000 BP; and (iii) the Neolithic from 8500 BP. PMID:10091253

  8. [European Union fight against smoking related activitiy].

    PubMed

    Calvete Oliva, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This study is aimed at providing information concerning the provisions adopted by the European Union on both a compulsory and non-compulsory basis for its member States related in one way or another to the fight against smoking. To this end, a review is made of all of the provisions published in the Official Journal of the European Union as of the first published in 1986 up to March 2005, commenting upon the aspects of each provision having to do with the subject stated above.

  9. [Research with big data: the European perspective].

    PubMed

    Bender, Stefan; Elias, P

    2015-08-01

    The article examines the impact that legislative developments in the European Union have had, still have and are continuing to have on cross-border access to microdata for research purposes. Therefore, we describe two competing aims: the tension between the ambitions of the EU to create a European Research Area within which research communities gain access to and share data across national boundaries; and the desire within the EU to establish a harmonious legislative framework that provides protection from the misuse of personal information. We attempt to examine which new developments at the EU level will have an impact upon research plans and the challenges researchers face when analysing big data.

  10. European Extremely Large Telescope: progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2014-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope is a project of the European Southern Observatory to build and operate a 40-m class optical near-infrared telescope. The telescope design effort is largely concluded and construction contracts are being placed with industry and academic/research institutes for the various components. The siting of the telescope in Northern Chile close to the Paranal site allows for an integrated operation of the facility providing significant economies. The progress of the project in various areas is presented in this paper and references to other papers at this SPIE meeting are made.

  11. Missions and Challenges of the European Battlegroups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-22

    a variety of aircraft, including the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules and the Transall C- 160. The A400M range is 3300 Kilometer (1782 miles) and has a...20Declaration%20Text.html, (accessed 27 December 2008). 9 Gustav Lindstrom , Enter the EU Battlegroups, (Paris: Institute for Security Studies, Chaillot Paper no...Gustav Lindstrom , 9-15. 12 Ibid, 17. 13 Western European Union Council of Ministers, “Petersberg Declaration,” Bonn, 19 June 1992. 6, para 4. 14 European

  12. Status of German European exhaust emission legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Seiffert, U.

    1985-01-01

    Recent legislative initiatives in West Germany and other European countries are leading to more stringent automobile exhaust emission standards. A review of the emission inventory on a global and West German basis and other factors, such as acid rain and forest damage, indicate that the contribution of automobile exhaust to the emission problem may be less than the European public assumes. As an interim step while new standards are being considered, the West German government is promoting the purchase of low-pollution vehicles through a vehicle tax reduction program.

  13. European pharmacovigilance: increasingly outsourced to drug companies.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    New regulations reorganising pharmacovigilance at the European level were adopted in late 2010, then revised in 2012 in the wake of the Mediator (benfluorex) disaster. The European Commission's original proposals, released in 2008, would have represented a major step backwards in the protection afforded to European citizens, in particular by facilitating earlier marketing authorisations. Thanks to the mobilisation of civil society, the Members of the European Parliament have improved these proposals, supported by EU health ministers. The role of the new European Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has been strengthened. Patients in every Member State have the right to report adverse drug effects directly to health authorities. EU drug regulatory agencies are required to provide greater transparency, and public access to information about adverse effects has been improved. However, one major regression persists: the central role given to pharmaceutical companies in the collection and interpretation of reports of adverse drug effects, despite their conflicts of interest. Drug companies are asked to record the adverse effect reports of which they are aware in a vast European centralised database, Eudravigilance, without going through drug regulatory agencies. Pharmaceutical companies remain responsible for producing "a scientific evaluation of the risk-benefit balance" of their drug, as part of the periodic benefit-risk assessment reports they are required to submit to drug regulatory agencies. These reports are analysed for the entire EU by two Member States (one rapporteur and one co-rapporteur), so that harmonised decisions can be taken. But these decisions are based on data preanalysed by the drug companies. In addition, the independence of the European Medicines Agency is undermined by its financial reliance on the fees paid by pharmaceutical companies in exchange for these assessments. In 2012, following France's Mediator disaster, several modest

  14. Brazil to Join the European Southern Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The Federative Republic of Brazil has yesterday signed the formal accession agreement paving the way for it to become a Member State of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Following government ratification Brazil will become the fifteenth Member State and the first from outside Europe. On 29 December 2010, at a ceremony in Brasilia, the Brazilian Minister of Science and Technology, Sergio Machado Rezende and the ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw signed the formal accession agreement aiming to make Brazil a Member State of the European Southern Observatory. Brazil will become the fifteen Member State and the first from outside Europe. Since the agreement means accession to an international convention, the agreement must now be submitted to the Brazilian Parliament for ratification [1]. The signing of the agreement followed the unanimous approval by the ESO Council during an extraordinary meeting on 21 December 2010. "Joining ESO will give new impetus to the development of science, technology and innovation in Brazil as part of the considerable efforts our government is making to keep the country advancing in these strategic areas," says Rezende. The European Southern Observatory has a long history of successful involvement with South America, ever since Chile was selected as the best site for its observatories in 1963. Until now, however, no non-European country has joined ESO as a Member State. "The membership of Brazil will give the vibrant Brazilian astronomical community full access to the most productive observatory in the world and open up opportunities for Brazilian high-tech industry to contribute to the European Extremely Large Telescope project. It will also bring new resources and skills to the organisation at the right time for them to make a major contribution to this exciting project," adds ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) telescope design phase was recently completed and a major review was

  15. Willingness for Mobility amongst European Fishermen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita, Cristina; Dickey, Heather; Pierce, Graham J.; Mente, Elena; Theodossiou, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    The global trend of fisheries overexploitation and collapse has resulted in the need to reduce fishing effort, and providing alternative employment for fishermen is a frequently mentioned policy option in order to achieve this goal. Reducing fishing effort is central to the European Commission Common Fisheries Policy and over the years, the…

  16. Common Core History for Young Europeans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A required core contemporary history course is proposed for Europe's senior pupils, needed because of prospects for European integration. The course could be shaped by pairing three fundamental ideas with related conflicts: Reformation/30 Years War, Enlightenment/French Revolution and Napoleanic Wars, and Nationalism/World Wars I and II. (IAH)

  17. Indo-Europeans in the Near East.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Carleton T.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines factors to consider regarding movements of peoples and cultural change, including the thousands of years between the departure of Indo-Europeans from the Near East and their arrival in localities where we find them, and their movements in the second millenium. Available from: Anthropological Linguistics, Dr. Florence Voegelin, Dept. of…

  18. Overview on Biofuels from a European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Luigi; Gutierrez, Andrew Paul

    2009-01-01

    In light of the recently developed European Union (EU) Biofuels Strategy, the literature is reviewed to examine (a) the coherency of biofuel production with the EU nonindustrial vision of agriculture, and (b) given its insufficient land base, the implications of a proposed bioenergy pact to grow biofuel crops in the developing world to meet EU…

  19. European students explore possible mission to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    The Russian Yuri Gagarin was the first man in orbit, the American Neil Armstrong the first man on the Moon, on 21 July, 1969. Is there a chance that the first human being to set foot on Mars will be a European? Attendants at the 1999 Alpbach Summer School will be putting their minds to this challenging question. Seventy-four students from member states of the European Space Agency will be attending the Summer School from 3 to 12 August in the small mountain village of Alpbach in the Austrian Tyrol. They will be set the task of defining a future Mars Exploration Mission. 25 European experts will provide them with an overview of all aspects of the Red Planet. Basic questions such as the chemical and mineralogical composition of its surface, its geophysics and geochemistry or the search for life on Mars will be addressed. A review of past, present and future exploration of Mars will be presented. The annual Summer School is co-organised by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Transport, the European Space Agency and the Austrian Space Agency. ESA's Director of Science, Prof. Roger Bonnet, will open this year's at 9 a.m. on 3 August, in Alpbach Secondary School with a lecture on "Mars Exploration: For What Purpose? How?" Media representatives are most welcome.

  20. The European Young Chemist Award 2014.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, Bruno

    2014-12-08

    The future's bright! The European Young Chemist Award for 2014 was awarded at the 5th EuCheMS Chemistry Congress in Instanbul. Impressions and reflections from the Convener of the event, Professor Bruno Pignataro, are given in the Guest Editorial.

  1. Mobility Attitudes and Behaviours among Young Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Noeleen; Dickmann, Michael; Mills, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to explore the career attitudes, motivations and behaviours of young people in initial vocational education and training (IVET) in Europe. Design/methodology/approach: This exploratory web-based survey was conducted during the European year for mobility. Drawing on existing research on the motivators of international…

  2. Europe's Universities in the European Research Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Universities are placed strategically at the interplay of research and technological development, educational and regional development policies at both national and European level. Universities are also unique environments in which interdisciplinary skills are being developed to tackle the complex challenges facing human, social and economic…

  3. Is There a European Language History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus J.

    2010-01-01

    The thoughts on a language history within a European context sketched out here represent an attempt to extend the concepts of regional and particularly national language history by adding a third dimension: transnational language history in Europe. After a few general thoughts on the extended area of research, in which so-called external language…

  4. European registration: today, tomorrow, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Currie, W J

    1990-05-01

    Within the European Community (EC) countries the national pharmaceutical regulatory systems work with varying degrees of efficiency and scientific sophistication. At the Community level the objective of mutual recognition has failed to be realized. To achieve for one registration application within the EC, timely and simultaneous marketing approvals throughout the member states will require changes to the present regulatory procedures or the single market concept for pharmaceuticals will not be realized. To have the greatest chances for success we should move cautiously, identifying and correcting deficiencies in the present procedures, which are known from experience, rather than abandoning such hard won knowledge for a new system with all its attendant potential unknowns and uncertainty. The free movement of drugs within the Internal European market will be a reality. The question remaining is at what price will it be achieved? It is vital to the European economy and consumer, as well as to the innovative pharmaceutical industry, that Europe does not exchange its present competitive edge in the time to develop and register new drugs for a costly drug lag. The experiment must equally succeed as a torch showing the way forward not only for an enlarging European Community, but also to the ever increasing interest in global harmonization of drug regulation.

  5. Standardizing the European Education Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Countries in Europe, through the European Union, are creating, as part of the market and its governance, a new policy space in education. It is being formed through law, regulation, networking and harmonization. The development of standards across the different fields of policy, statistical calculation and commerce underpins and extends the…

  6. Satisfaction with Social Contacts of Older Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonsang, Eric; van Soest, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the determinants of an important component of well-being among individuals aged 50 years or older in eleven European countries: satisfaction with social contacts. We use data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe and anchoring vignettes to correct for potential differences in responses scales across…

  7. Dynamics of Volunteering in Older Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hank, Karsten; Erlinghagen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dynamics of volunteering in the population aged 50 years or older across 11 Continental European countries. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data from the first 2 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, we run multivariate regressions on a set of binary-dependent variables indicating…

  8. European Year of Lifelong Learning 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education, Training, and Youth.

    This publication provides glimpses of how different individuals and organizations have responded to the spirit of lifelong learning during the European Year. Each case study consists of the project's location, name, and objective and brief description. They include the following: Chapito Project, Lisbon, Portugal; Ligerius Project, a…

  9. European Braille Conference. Papers and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwegian Blind Organization, Oslo.

    Presented are seven papers given at a 1973 conference on European braille by the World Council for the Welfare of the Blind. Arne Husveg sees braille as a continuing indispensable aid and recommends legislation giving the blind the right to free instruction and materials. The use of special braille systems of mathematical, physical, and chemical…

  10. Special Education in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).

    The monograph contains a report on developments and trends in special education within the European community and a selection of the principal papers of a conference on special education in Europe. Chapter 1 contains results of a comparative study presented tabularly and narratively covering all handicaps in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, France,…

  11. European Community Education Cooperation: The First Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).

    Nearly one-third of the European Community population of 320 million is involved daily with some form of education. The Community Education Action Programme celebrated its tenth anniversary in February 1986. The initial thrust was to increase mutual understanding and promote closer relations between the different education systems of member…

  12. Regulatory pathways in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    In principle, there are three defined procedures to obtain approval for a medicinal product in the European Union. As discussed in this overview of the procedures, the decision on which regulatory pathway to use will depend on the nature of the active substance, the target indication(s), the history of product and/or the marketing strategy.

  13. European Quality--Adding to the Debate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birtwistle, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Two pilot programs designed to improve and maintain quality in European higher education are described and compared: an audit of universities' procedures for quality assurance; and an assessment of programs of study, including teaching and learning, student characteristics, staff, facilities, and quality management. Both include institutional…

  14. AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Walter, Nicolas; Westall, Frances; Grenfell, John Lee; Martin, William F; Gomez, Felipe; Leuko, Stefan; Lee, Natuschka; Onofri, Silvano; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Saladino, Raffaele; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Palomba, Ernesto; Harrison, Jesse; Rull, Fernando; Muller, Christian; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Brucato, John R; Rettberg, Petra; Capria, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

  15. Why We Need a European Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenhall, Mark

    2012-01-01

    All the countries of the United Kingdom have something to learn from nations facing comparable challenges elsewhere in Europe. Seeing these challenges through a European lens can help these countries understand them and their selves better. The author thinks they need to join in solidarity with adult educators across Europe and, indeed, further…

  16. Comparative "Glocal" Perspectives on European Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caena, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a PhD study, which offers comparative perspectives on teacher education in a period of reforms, inquiring into stakeholders' perceptions in English, French, Italian and Spanish contexts as case studies. The interaction of needs and constraints in European initial teacher education within higher education…

  17. The European Qualifications Framework: A Technical Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Stan

    2015-01-01

    The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) was introduced in 2008 as a "meta-framework" or common reference point for national qualifications frameworks in Europe, a function for which, with some caveats, it has been pragmatically successful. It has also been used with variable success to support the development or referencing of…

  18. Current European developments in solar paddle drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentall, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) is sponsoring the development of a number of critical spacecraft hardware items. The hardware under development includes two competing solar paddle drives which are being produced to similar specifications. Three mechanisms of each type are being produced and will undergo thermal vacuum testing. All mechanisms have lead lubricated bearings.

  19. Geographical assemblages of European raptors and owls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-López, Pascual; Benavent-Corai, José; García-Ripollés, Clara

    2008-09-01

    In this work we look for geographical structure patterns in European raptors (Order: Falconiformes) and owls (Order: Strigiformes). For this purpose we have conducted our research using freely available tools such as statistical software and databases. To perform the study, presence-absence data for the European raptors and owl species (Class Aves) were downloaded from the BirdLife International website. Using the freely available "pvclust" R-package, we applied similarity Jaccard index and cluster analysis in order to delineate biogeographical relationships for European countries. According to the cluster of similarity, we found that Europe is structured into two main geographical assemblages. The larger length branch separated two main groups: one containing Iceland, Greenland and the countries of central, northern and northwestern Europe, and the other group including the countries of eastern, southern and southwestern Europe. Both groups are divided into two main subgroups. According to our results, the European raptors and owls could be considered structured into four meta-communities well delimited by suture zones defined by Remington (1968) [Remington, C.L., 1968. Suture-zones of hybrid interaction between recently joined biotas. Evol. Biol. 2, 321-428]. Climatic oscillations during the Quaternary Ice Ages could explain at least in part the modern geographical distribution of the group.

  20. Professionalization in Universities and European Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivas, Amparo Jimenez; Hevia, David Menendez Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    The constant assessment of the quality of higher education within the framework of European convergence is a challenge for all those universities that wish their degrees and diplomas to reflect a unified Europe. As is the case in any assessment, change and review process, the quest to improve quality implies measuring achievement of the objectives…

  1. Pre-European Conditions of Micmac People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Shirley Ann

    1976-01-01

    The history and traditional ways of the Micmac Indians prior to the 17th century are discussed. During this era, the Micmac Indians had a sociopolitical system which provided political, social, economic, cultural and educational structures which surprised the early Europeans. (NQ)

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    London. ESN 38-7 (1984) NATO Establishes Special Program Panel on Sensory Systems for Robotic Control ............................ J.F. Blackburn 365...technical information about sensing technology- and machine intelligence in robots . S Parallel Processing at the University of Amsterdam ....... J.F...Rozzell 407 Robot Census: Too Many Manufacturers .................. Larry E. Shaffer 408 Stage Set for European Standards for Biomaterials ..... Thomas

  3. [The specialty of orthodontics in European perspective].

    PubMed

    van der Linden, F P; Schmiedel, W J; Bijlstra, R J

    2003-01-01

    After clarifying the role and significance of the European Federations of Orthodontic Specialists Associations (EFOSA), the results of a recent survey on the situation of the Speciality of Orthodontics in Europe are presented. Among the many items included are the recognition and availability of orthodontic specialists, their training, their working conditions, the height of the charged fees and the present insurance and refunding systems.

  4. European Science Notes. Volume 39, Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    asked and answered prior to starting the viduelle du Niveau de Developpement procedure. The procedure was then car- Operatoire et ses Implications ried...European * questions had been answered, countries, including three Eastern bloc The Flammer work suggests a new nations as well as North America and

  5. European Swimming Pool Designs Cross the Atlantic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaskulak, Neil

    1983-01-01

    Conventional swimming pools have been built with the needs of competitive swimmers in mind. Planners in several European countries have greatly increased swimming pool attendance by designing "leisure pools," based primarily on the needs and behavior of recreationists. Design of these pools and their equipment requirements are discussed.…

  6. Western European Art Foundations and Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lindsay M.; Clement, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    Western European art foundations create invaluable opportunities for research and exhibition by artists, curators, and scholars. These activities are often documented and disseminated via high-quality publications. This article highlights an important but under-recognized collecting resource for academic and museum libraries by profiling several…

  7. The European Perspective on Women's Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macha, Hildegard; Bauer, Quirin J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors show the perspective on women's leadership in Europe. The authors present the European data on the educational status of girls and women at schools and universities and in academic careers. Data from Germany is presented as an example to provide evidence of some details. First, the authors point out four contradictions…

  8. European Scientific Notes 36-1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-31

    prevention deals with measures ized because of an accident . His private taken by those with no diagnosis estab- physician addressed the assembly...could lead to test satellite (OTS) from CERN (Conseil commercial products. Wide area communi- European pour La Recherche Nucleaire , cations under

  9. The European Telecommunications Satellite Organization (Eutelsat)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Jean

    An overview is presented of Eutelsat, which was created in 1977 by 17 European telecommunications operators to provide mobile and fixed satellite communication services to the entire continent. The eight Eutelsat satellites now in orbit are utilized for telephony and business services, for direct-to-home broadcasting, for the distribution and exchange of radio and television programs, and for land mobile services.

  10. European Perspectives on Global Climate Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempton, Willett; Craig, Paul P.

    1993-01-01

    Explores why some European countries are much more eager than the United States to endorse international environmental treaties and the roles history, culture, economics, and geography play. Influential policymakers throughout Austria, Germany, Sweden, and the United Kingdom are interviewed. (12 references) (Author/MCO)

  11. European Training Thesaurus: A Multilingual Synopsis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Education and training issues are similar across Europe, but how can we ensure we mean the same things with the same terms? The new format of the European training thesaurus (ETT) is a multilingual synopsis. It is an online tool enabling those working in education, training and employment to have a common understanding of terms. It helps…

  12. European Academic Labor Markets in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselin, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Even if convergences are to be observed among the orientations adopted by higher education policies in European countries, they still are characterized by strong national features. One of the most striking national patterns of each system is its academic labor market, salaries, status, recruitment procedures, workloads, career patterns, promotion…

  13. European Society for Clinical Virology - winter meeting.

    PubMed

    Westh, Henrik

    2004-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical Virology annual winter meeting mainly appeals to clinical virologists interested in human disease. Basic and clinical data were presented, highlighting a number of interesting findings. This report briefly describes options in HIV antiviral treatment, and focuses on fusion inhibitors, a new anti-HIV class of drugs. Recent improvements in experimental DNA vaccines are also presented.

  14. AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Westall, Frances; Grenfell, John Lee; Martin, William F.; Gomez, Felipe; Leuko, Stefan; Lee, Natuschka; Onofri, Silvano; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Saladino, Raffaele; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Palomba, Ernesto; Harrison, Jesse; Rull, Fernando; Muller, Christian; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Brucato, John R.; Rettberg, Petra; Capria, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems• Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space• Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life• Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability• Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system. Key Words: Astrobiology roadmap—Europe—Origin and evolution of life—Habitability—Life detection—Life in extreme environments. Astrobiology 16, 201–243. PMID:27003862

  15. Promoting European Dimensions in Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John, Ed.

    This collection of 19 essays shares the lessons of a wealth of experience and challenges professionals to open up adult learning to a variety of international perspectives. The first essay, "Building a European Dimension: A Realistic Response to Globalization?" (John Field), is an introduction to the essays. The six essays in Section I,…

  16. The Information Economy--A European Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmot, R.

    From a European perspective, this paper focuses on a set of issues affecting the emerging information economy. Among the issues covered are: developing a means of measuring the value of information and knowledge; studying other institutions such as the United States Department of Defense and the United States venture capital industry which are…

  17. Quantifying the European Strategic Airlift Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    total E and H variants) Turkish Air Force C-130E flying over Hirfanli Dam Lake in November 2009. General Aircraft Data Wingspan...That Weight: Improving European Strategic Airlift Capabilities (Unpublished Doctoral degree in Public Policy Analysis) Pardee RAND Graduate School

  18. Post-modernity, Education and European Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulby, David; Jones, Crispin

    1996-01-01

    Describes the "Enlightenment program" (often equated with modernity) and postmodernist criticisms of Enlightenment thought. Discusses the notions of Europe and Europeans as reflecting social inclusion/exclusion as much as geography. Examines the relevance of postmodernist theories to school and university knowledge systems, highlighting…

  19. Maintenance of European nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.W.; Schoenecke, P.L.

    1987-05-01

    European practice and attitude toward maintenance have been reviewed and discussed face-to-face. Important but sometimes subtle differences with the US situation appear. Among the more obvious differences is the more cooperative relationship between the industry and the government.

  20. Poverty in Ireland in Comparative European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Christopher T.; Maitre, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we seek to put Irish poverty rates in a comparative European context. We do so in a context whereby the Irish economic boom and EU enlargement have led to increasing reservations being expressed regarding rates deriving from the EU "at risk of poverty" indicator. Our comparative analysis reports findings for both overall…

  1. European Education in a World Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jose Luis Garcia

    1992-01-01

    Discusses problems facing European education as the world continues to become more interconnected through politics, communication, and economics. Stresses the need to maintain national values without regressing to nationalism. Examines teacher training, history instruction, and television as areas where divisions can be lessened. Warns against…

  2. Inspection of Home Education in European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blok, Henk; Karsten, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    In many European countries and in North America, home education is a viable alternative for education at school. Parents who want to home school their child are legally allowed to do so, although some countries impose rather strict conditions. This article concentrates on the way authorities supervise or inspect the quality of home education. A…

  3. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luterbacher, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    The spatial context is critical when assessing present-day climate anomalies, attributing them to potential forcings and making statements regarding their frequency and severity in a long-term perspective. Recent international initiatives have expanded the number of high-quality proxy-records and developed new statistical reconstruction methods. These advances allow more rigorous regional past temperature reconstructions and, in turn, the possibility of evaluating climate models on policy-relevant, spatio-temporal scales. Here we provide a new proxy-based, annually-resolved, spatial reconstruction of the European summer (June-August) temperature fields back to 755 CE based on Bayesian hierarchical modelling (BHM), together with estimates of the European mean temperature variation since 138 BCE based on BHM and composite-plus-scaling (CPS). Our reconstructions compare well with independent instrumental and proxy-based temperature estimates, but suggest a larger amplitude in summer temperature variability than previously reported. Both CPS and BHM reconstructions indicate that the mean 20th century European summer temperature was not significantly different from some earlier centuries, including the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 10th centuries CE. The 1st century (in BHM also the 10th century) may even have been slightly warmer than the 20th century, but the difference is not statistically significant. Comparing each 50 yr period with the 1951-2000 period reveals a similar pattern. Recent summers, however, have been unusually warm in the context of the last two millennia and there are no 30-yr periods in either reconstruction that exceed the mean average European summer temperature of the last 3 decades (1986-2015 CE). A comparison with an ensemble of climate model simulations suggests that the reconstructed European summer temperature variability over the period 850-2000 CE reflects changes in both internal variability and external forcing on multi-decadal time-scales. For pan-European

  4. European Commission activities in eHealth.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Silas; Lymberis, Andreas; Whitehouse, Diane

    2004-12-01

    Health-care is an information-intensive and knowledge-demanding sector, which is why eHealth solutions are so important in this field. The European Commission (EC) has been initiating and funding research and development activities regarding Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for health, or "eHealth", since 1988. These programmes covered priority topics like electronic health-care records, regional and national health networks, telemedicine in homecare and care-at-the-point-of-need to support continuity of care concepts, systems to support people to stay healthy, and systems and tools to support health professionals to work more efficiently and safely on patients. During the 15-year span of the programmes, the European Union (EU) has contributed about 500 million Euro to approximately 400 R&D projects, support activities, best practice and studies covering technical, clinical, ethical, legal, organisational and market issues. eHealth has shown proven benefits in application fields like improved access to care, care at the point-of-need, citizen-centred care, improved quality and cost containment. Such applications were on show at the EU High Level eHealth Conferences in Brussels, Belgium, in 2003, and in Cork, Ireland, in 2004. eHealth is now on the governmental agenda of EU Member States to be implemented on a broader scale. In line with this development, the Commission has taken a number of policy initiatives. A European Union Action Plan for a European eHealth Area was published by the Commission in April 2004 and endorsed by the EU health ministers in June 2004. This means that, for the first time, Europe has a coherent agenda for the implementation of eHealth. This report will concentrate on eHealth activities initiated by the Information Society Directorate-General of the European Commission.

  5. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, E.; Adler, S.; Lipa, W.; Ungersböck, M.; Zach-Hermann, S.

    2010-09-01

    Europe is in the fortunate situation that it has a long tradition in phenological networking: the history of collecting phenological data and using them in climatology has its starting point in 1751 when Carl von Linné outlined in his work Philosophia Botanica methods for compiling annual plant calendars of leaf opening, flowering, fruiting and leaf fall together with climatological observations "so as to show how areas differ". Recently in most European countries, phenological observations have been carried out routinely for more than 50 years by different governmental and non governmental organisations and following different observation guidelines, the data stored at different places in different formats. This has been really hampering pan European studies as one has to address many network operators to get access to the data before one can start to bring them in a uniform style. From 2004 to 2009 the COST-action 725 established a European wide data set of phenological observations. But the deliverables of this COST action was not only the common phenological database and common observation guidelines - COST725 helped to trigger a revival of some old networks and to establish new ones as for instance in Sweden. At the end of 2009 the COST action the database comprised about 8 million data in total from 15 European countries plus the data from the International Phenological Gardens IPG. In January 2010 PEP725 began its work as follow up project with funding from EUMETNET the network of European meteorological services and of ZAMG the Austrian national meteorological service. PEP725 not only will take over the part of maintaining, updating the COST725 database, but also to bring in phenological data from the time before 1951, developing better quality checking procedures and ensuring an open access to the database. An attractive webpage will make phenology and climate impacts on vegetation more visible in the public enabling a monitoring of vegetation development.

  6. European Commission project: European Guideline for Target Group-Oriented Psychosocial Aftercare-Implementation.

    PubMed

    Vymetal, Stepan; Deistler, Albert; Bering, Robert; Schedlich, Claudia; Rooze, Magda; Orengo, Francisco; Zurek, Gisela; Krtickova, Michaela

    2011-06-01

    After disasters, the individual health and well-being of first responders and affected population are affected for years. Therefore, psychosocial help is needed. Although most victims recover on their own, a minority of survivors, members of rescue teams, or relatives develop long-term, disaster-related psychic disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This subgroup especially should receive timely and appropriate psychosocial help. Many European countries offer post-disaster psychosocial care from a variety of caregivers (i.e., professionals and volunteers, non-governmental organizations, church or commercial organizations). Therefore, European standards for providing post-disaster psychosocial support currently is required. This article describes the project European Guideline for Target Group-Oriented Psychosocial Aftercare-Implementation, supported by the European Commission.

  7. Fire, Fuel Composition and Resilience Threshold in Subalpine Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Blarquez, Olivier; Carcaillet, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background Forecasting the effects of global changes on high altitude ecosystems requires an understanding of the long-term relationships between biota and forcing factors to identify resilience thresholds. Fire is a crucial forcing factor: both fuel build-up from land-abandonment in European mountains, and more droughts linked to global warming are likely to increase fire risks. Methods To assess the vegetation response to fire on a millennium time-scale, we analyzed evidence of stand-to-local vegetation dynamics derived from sedimentary plant macroremains from two subalpine lakes. Paleobotanical reconstructions at high temporal resolution, together with a fire frequency reconstruction inferred from sedimentary charcoal, were analyzed by Superposed Epoch Analysis to model plant behavior before, during and after fire events. Principal Findings We show that fuel build-up from arolla pine (Pinus cembra) always precedes fires, which is immediately followed by a rapid increase of birch (Betula sp.), then by ericaceous species after 25–75 years, and by herbs after 50–100 years. European larch (Larix decidua), which is the natural co-dominant species of subalpine forests with Pinus cembra, is not sensitive to fire, while the abundance of Pinus cembra is altered within a 150-year period after fires. A long-term trend in vegetation dynamics is apparent, wherein species that abound later in succession are the functional drivers, loading the environment with fuel for fires. This system can only be functional if fires are mainly driven by external factors (e.g. climate), with the mean interval between fires being longer than the minimum time required to reach the late successional stage, here 150 years. Conclusion Current global warming conditions which increase drought occurrences, combined with the abandonment of land in European mountain areas, creates ideal ecological conditions for the ignition and the spread of fire. A fire return interval of less than 150 years

  8. Vocational Education and Training in Greece: The European Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paleocrassas, Stamatis

    1992-01-01

    Gives a brief review of Greece's current vocational education/training system, compares it to European models, describes the European Community process of harmonization of vocational qualifications, and discusses new legislation establishing a national vocational education/training system. (SK)

  9. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  10. European brown hare syndrome in free-ranging European brown and mountain hares from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Frölich, K; Haerer, G; Bacciarini, L; Janovsky, M; Rudolph, M; Giacometti, M

    2001-10-01

    From 1997 to 2000, complete necropsy and histopathologic investigations were performed on 157 free-ranging European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) found dead throughout Switzerland. Organ samples of all these individuals (157 livers and 107 spleens available) were tested for European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV)-antigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kit. Furthermore, 60 additional blood samples were tested for antibodies against EBHSV by ELISA. In addition, liver samples of 87 free-ranging mountain hares (Lepus timidus) hunted in 1996 were tested for EBHSV-antigen. In two European brown hares from southern Switzerland lesions suggestive of changes induced by EBHSV were present, and high titers of EBHSV-antigen were detected in both liver and spleen samples of these animals. Based on negative staining electron microscopy investigations of liver and spleen homogenates, we observed calicivirus in one antigen-positive hare. Low EBHSV-antigen titers were found in three additional European brown hares from central and western Switzerland, but EBHS-lesions were absent. Antibodies against EBHSV were not detected in any of the sera of European brown hares, and EBHSV-antigen was not found in the samples of mountain hares. This is the first report of EBHS in European brown hares from Switzerland.

  11. Sea & Space: a New European Educational Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    This spring, teachers across Europe will enjoy support for exciting, novel educational projects on astronomy, navigation and environmental observations. The largely web-based and highly interactive SEA & SPACE programme makes it possible for pupils to perform field experiments and astronomical observations and to obtain and process satellite images. A contest will take the best pupils for one week to Lisbon (Portugal), to Europe's space port in Kourou (French Guyana) where the European launcher lifts off or to ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Cerro Paranal Observatory in Chile, the largest optical telescope in the world. The SEA & SPACE project is a joint initiative of the European Space Agency (ESA) , the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It builds on these organisations' several years' successful participation in the European Week for Scientific and Technological Culture organised by the European Commission that they intend to continue in 1998. The 1998 World Exhibition EXPO98 in Lisbon will focus on the oceans. This is why the umbrella theme of SEA & SPACE is concerned with the many relations between the oceans and the space that surrounds us, from ancient times to present days. Under the new programme, teaching resources are offered for three major areas, Remote Sensing of Europe's Coastal Environment, Navigation and Oceans of Water. Remote Sensing of Europe's Coastal Environment : observations of the Earth from Space are made accessible to pupils who will appreciate their usefulness through interactive image processing and field observations; Navigation : the capabilities and functioning of different navigation techniques are explored through experiments using navigation by the stars, with GPS, and via satellite images/maps; Oceans of Water : What is the role of water in Nature? How can one detect water from satellites or with telescopes? How much water is there in rivers and floods, in an ocean

  12. A European Humus Forms Reference Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, A.; Englisch, M.; Ponge, J.-F.; Jabiol, B.; Sartori, G.; Gardi, C.

    2012-04-01

    From 2003 on, a panel of experts in humus and humus dynamics (Humus group) has been working about a standardisation and improvement of existing national humus classifications. Some important goals have been reached, in order to share data and experiences: a) definition of specific terms; b) description of 15 types of diagnostic horizons; c) of 10 basic humus forms references; d) subdivision of each main reference in 2-4 sub-unities; e) elaboration of a general European Humus Form Reference Base (http://hal-agroparistech.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/56/17/95/PDF/Humus_Forms_ERB_31_01_2011.pdf); f) publication of the scientific significance of this base of classification as an article [A European morpho-functional classification of humus forms. Geoderma, 164 (3-4), 138-145]. The classification will be updated every 2 years and presently the Humus group is assessing biological (general: soil, vegetation, biome; specific: fungi, bacteria, pedofauna), physical (air temperature, rainfall) and chemical (pH, mineral elements, organic matter, quality and quantity of humic components…) factors which characterize basic humus forms and their varieties. The content of the new version of the classification is planned to be more "practical", like an ecological manual which lists associated humus forms and environmental data in the aim to contribute to a more precise environmental diagnosis of every analysed terrestrial and semiterrestrial European ecosystem. The Humus group is also involved in an endeavour to include humus forms in the World Reference Base for Soils (WRB-FAO) according to nomenclatural principles erected for soil profiles. Thirty basic references have been defined, complemented by a set of qualifiers (prefixes and suffixes), allowing to classify European humus forms and probably a large majority of humus forms known worldwide. The principles of the classification, the diagnostic horizons and humus forms main references are presented at the General Assembly of

  13. The Quality of Textbooks: A Basis for European Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooghoff, Hans

    The enhancement of the European dimension in the national curriculum is a large scale educational innovation that affects many European countries. This report puts forward the proposition that broad scale educational innovation has more success if the aims and objectives find their way into textbooks. The reasons why a European dimension in…

  14. The European Qualification Framework: Skills, Competences or Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehaut, Philippe; Winch, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The European Qualification Framework (EQF) is intended to transform European national qualification frameworks (NQFs) by moulding them into a learning outcomes framework. Currently adopted as an enabling law by the European Union, the EQF has now operated for several years. In order to secure widespread adoption, however, it will be necessary for…

  15. Languages and Institutions in the European Union. Mercator Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcaraz, Manuel

    This paper situates languages in the framework of European construction, analyzing problems resulting from the definition of languages' official status in the European Union (EU) juridical system. It explains that the process of European construction is historically defined by means of two distinct features (it is an open process, and at the same…

  16. A European Perspective on the Promotion of Women's Career Aspirations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasonen, Lahja Johanna

    Although commitment to equal opportunities in employment has been a major component of European Community legislation and although increasing numbers of European women are entering professions, women throughout Europe still face many barriers to advancing in their professions. Since the early 1970s, European governments including Finland have…

  17. European Law: Ending Discrimination against Girls in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    1992-01-01

    Examines how the European Convention on Human Rights and its case law could combat sexist education and develop concepts of philosophical convictions, the European Community's duty, and children's rights. Considers feminist strategies for improving girls' education, English and European procedural laws, and difficulties of using English law. (RLC)

  18. A European Space for Education Looking for Its Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlstrom, Ninni

    2010-01-01

    The open method of coordination (OMC) within the Lisbon strategy is discussed in terms of a European Space for Education and "programme ontology". The focus is on indicators and the European dimension, and how they "work" in the forming of contents and identities in this European Space for Education. The OMC is analyzed in…

  19. The Organisation and Management of a European Educational Satellite System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, A. W.

    This paper looks at the possible roles that the European Economic Community (EEC), as a pan-European quasi-governmental institution, might play in the management and organization of a European educational satellite system. The argument is made that there is a need for the EEC Commission to play an ongoing, regulatory role in this area. An…

  20. Politics and Policies of Promoting Multilingualism in the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romaine, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the politics of policies promoting multilingualism in the European Union (EU), specifically in light of the recently released European Union Civil Society Platform on Multilingualism. As the most far-reaching and ambitious policy document issued by the European Commission, the Platform warrants close scrutiny at a significant…

  1. Expert Groups in the Building of European Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to building European public action, expertise is ubiquitous and polymorphic. This article intends to study the ways expertise is being used in the European Commission and the logics underlying its use. The massive use of expertise also has consequences for the practices and identities of actors with whom European institutions…

  2. A European Approach to Lifelong Learning: Goals and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thery, Michel; Roussel, Patrick; Zygmunt, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of company practices regarding continuing training of employees shows great diversity among the 15 European Union member states. In 11 countries, over 70 percent of companies are "training involved" (TICs). South European countries have a low percentage of TICs; the proportion of TICs in north European countries is over 80…

  3. Training Engineers of Joint Programs for the European Aerospace Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jurgen

    1985-01-01

    Examines topics and issues related to training engineers of joint programs for the European aerospace industry. Forms of cooperation, European educational systems, and skills needed to successfully work as an engineer in a joint program for the European aircraft industry are the major areas addressed. (JN)

  4. Putting Dreyfus into Action: The European Credit Transfer System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitsch, Jorg; Luomi-Messerer, Karin; Becker, Matthias; Spottl, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to look closely at the development of a European Credit Transfer System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET). The European Commission, together with the member States, are working on it and several pilot projects have been initiated within the Leonardo da Vinci Programme of the European Commission.…

  5. Project Report ECLIPSE: European Citizenship Learning Program for Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombardelli, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a European project, the Comenius ECLIPSE project (European Citizenship Learning in a Programme for Secondary Education) developed by six European partners coordinated by the University of Trento in the years 2011-2014. ECLIPSE (co-financed by the EACEA--Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency) aims at developing,…

  6. Possible Orientations of the European Dimension in Romanian Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enache, Roxana

    2011-01-01

    Curricular reform in any educational system should be to balance national, European or international elements and should integrate diversity. European education calls for a democratic citizenship education that includes a political, cultural, social and economic education--an overall European dimension, which implies an awareness of the drive and…

  7. Reconciling Energy Use with Environmental Protection in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelrod, Regina S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the energy and environmental policymaking strategies of the European Community to regulate the consumption of energy. Strategies include the stabilization of carbon dioxide emissions, the creation of the European Environmental Agency, the implementation of the European Energy Charter, the SAVE Program, and economic and fiscal instruments…

  8. Space weather: European Space Agency perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E. J.; Hilgers, A.

    Spacecraft and payloads have become steadily more sophisticated and therefore more susceptible to space weather effects. ESA has long been active in applying models and tools to the problems associated with such effects on its spacecraft. In parallel, ESA and European agencies have built a highly successful solar-terrestrial physics capability. ESA is now investigating the marriage of these technological and scientific capabilities to address perceived user needs for space weather products and services. Two major ESA-sponsored studies are laying the groundwork for a possible operational European space weather service. The wide-ranging activities of ESA in the Space Weather/Space Environment domain are summarized and recent important examples of space weather concerns given.

  9. [European Union funds and clinical toxicology].

    PubMed

    Wiszniewiecka, Monika; Cejrowski, Daniel; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Since 2014 we are heading the third programming period of help from European Union (EU). The new budget will run until 2020. From common resources of EU, 106 billion euro will reach Poland, of which about 82.3 billion to cohesion policy, levelling differences of regional development. Clinical toxicology centres will be able to apply for funding under the allocation for the health service. Polish health service very actively benefited from EU funds in previous programming periods, between 2004-2006, and 2007-2013. Thanks to grants from the EU, a large number of health centres were built or renovated. Unfortunately the needs of hospitals, which were underinvested for many years, exceeded available funds according to UE programmes. Except investment projects, also projects training of health professionals were executed. In the current programming period European Union will still support projects aimed at health service. Clinical toxicology centres should have a try of using this period to fulfil their plans.

  10. Are aliens threatening European aquatic coastal ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten; Olenin, Sergej; Thieltges, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Inshore waters of European coasts have accumulated a high share of non-indigenous species, where a changeable palaeoenvironment has caused low diversity in indigenous biota. Also strongly transformed modern coastal ecosystems seem to assimilate whatever species have been introduced and tolerate the physical regime. Adding non-native species does not have any directional predetermined effects on recipient coastal ecosystems. The status of being a non-native rather refers to a position in evolutionary history than qualify as an ecological category with distinct and consistent properties. Effects of invaders vary between habitats and with the phase of invasion and also with shifting ambient conditions. Although aliens accelerate change in European coastal biota, we found no evidence that they generally impair biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. More often, invaders expand ecosystem functioning by adding new ecological traits, intensifying existing ones and increasing functional redundancy.

  11. Generation of a Catalogue of European Windstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varino, Filipa; Baptiste Granier, Jean; Bordoy, Roger; Arbogast, Philippe; Joly, Bruno; Riviere, Gwendal; Fandeur, Marie-Laure; Bovy, Henry; Mitchell-Wallace, Kirsten; Souch, Claire

    2016-04-01

    The probability of multiple wind-storm events within a year is crucial to any (re)insurance company writing European wind business. Indeed, the volatility of losses is enhanced by the clustering of storms (cyclone families), as occurred in early 1990 (Daria, Vivian, Wiebke), December 1999 (Lothar, Martin) or December 2015 (Desmond, Eva, Frank), among others. In order to track winter extratropical cyclones, we use the maximum relative vorticity at 850 hPa of the new-released long-term ERA-20C reanalysis from the ECMWF since the beginning of the 20th Century until 2010. We develop an automatic procedure to define events. We then quantify the severity of each storm using loss and meteorological indices at country and Europe-wide level. Validation against market losses for the period 1970-2010 is undertaken before considering the severity and frequency of European windstorms for the 110 years period.

  12. A European approach to clinical investigator training

    PubMed Central

    Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Canivet, Cindy; Chan, Anthony; Clarke, Mary J.; Cornu, Catherine; Daemen, Esther; Demotes, Jacques; Nys, Katelijne De; Hirst, Barry; Hundt, Ferdinand; Kassai, Behrouz; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Kiessig, Lucy; Klech, Heinrich; Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre; Lafolie, Pierre; Lucht, Martin; Niese, Detlef; Pauli-Magnus, Christiane; Peters, Barbara; Schaltenbrand, Ralf; Stockis, Armel; Stykova, Martina; Verheus, Nicolette; Klingmann, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    A better education and training of clinical investigators and their teams is one of the factors that could foster the development of clinical research in Europe, a key objective of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI). PharmaTrain (an IMI programme on training in medicines development), and European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) have joined forces to address this issue. An advisory group composed of representatives of universities, pharmaceutical companies and other organisations met four times between June 2011 and July 2012. This resulted in a position paper proposing a strategy to improve and harmonize clinical investigator training in Europe, and including a detailed syllabus and list of learning outcomes. Major recommendations are the establishment of minimal and mutually recognized certification requirement for investigators throughout the EU and the creation of a European platform to provide a suitable course and examination infrastructure. PMID:24058345

  13. [Sexual risk factors among European young people].

    PubMed

    Calatrava, María; López-Del Burgo, Cristina; de Irala, Jokin

    2012-05-05

    The sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) in Europe are still rising. In order to prioritize STI prevention strategies in Europe, it is important to describe the prevalence of different sexual risk factors for STIs among European young people. We carried out a systematic review of published articles and studies performed by European institutions. A total of 21 articles and 10 studies were identified. The data shows an increase in early sexual initiation and the number of sexual partners. Young people who use condoms inconsistently ranged from 15 to 20%. The observed risk factors are: unawareness about other STIs different from HIV, being in favour of casual sex, wrongly believing that some measures are effective in avoiding HIV, not being aware of the risks from having multiple sexual partners and unawareness about the sexual transmission of HIV. The data suggests the need to improve the information addressed to youth.

  14. European standardization effort: interworking the goal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattheus, Rudy A.

    1993-09-01

    In the European Standardization Committee (CEN), the technical committee responsible for the standardization activities in Medical Informatics (CEN TC 251), has agreed upon the directions of the scopes to follow in this field. They are described in the Directory of the European Standardization Requirements for Healthcare Informatics and Programme for the Development of Standards adopted on 02-28-1991 by CEN/TC 251 and approved by CEN/BT. Top-down objectives describe the common framework and items like terminology, security, more bottom up oriented items describe fields like medical imaging and multi-media. The draft standard is described; the general framework model and object oriented model; the interworking aspects, the relation to ISO standards, and the DICOM proposal. This paper also focuses on all the boundaries in the standardization work, which are also influencing the standardization process.

  15. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH.

  16. Nuclear medicine technologist training in European countries.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-08-01

    This article overviews the training of nuclear medicine technologists in chosen European countries, the United States and Canada. There are basically two types of training: at medical schools following secondary school, without any university degree, usually on a 2- or 3-year basis, or else as a university course, leading to a BSc degree after 3 years, and in some countries to an MSc degree after an additional 2 years. In the United States both systems coexist, while in Europe the picture varies from country to country. The number of hours devoted to nuclear medicine also varies between curricula. Some efforts are being made to unify this system by transition to the university model of education in many European countries.

  17. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    PubMed

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST.

  18. Health care for undocumented migrants: European approaches.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bradford H; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2012-12-01

    European countries have smaller shares of undocumented migrants than does the United States, but these individuals have substantial needs for medical care and present difficult policy challenges even in countries with universal health insurance systems. Recent European studies show that policies in most countries provide for no more than emergency services for undocumented migrants. Smaller numbers of countries provide more services or allow undocumented migrants who meet certain requirements access to the same range of services as nationals. These experiences show it is possible to improve access to care for undoc­umented migrants. Strategies vary along three dimensions: (1) focusing on segments of the population, like children or pregnant women; (2) focusing on types of services, like preventive services or treatment of infectious diseases; or (3) using specific funding policies, like allowing undocumented migrants to purchase insurance.

  19. European user trial of paging by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fudge, R. E.; Fenton, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    British Telecom conceived the idea of adapting their existing paging service, together with the use of existing terrestrial pagers, to yield a one way data (i.e., paging) satellite service to mobiles. The user trial of paging by satellites was successful. It demonstrated that services could be provided over a wide geographical area to low priced terminals. Many lessons were learned in unexpected areas. These include the need for extensive liaison with all users involved, especially the drivers, to ensure they understood the potential benefits. There was a significant desire for a return acknowledgement channel or even a return data channel. Above all there is a need to ensure that the equipment can be taken across European borders and legitimately used in all European countries. The next step in a marketing assessment would be to consider the impact of two way data messaging such as INMARSAT-C.

  20. Opportunities to Learn about Europe at School. A Comparative Analysis among European Adolescents in 21 European Member States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaegen, Soetkin; Hooghe, Marc; Meeusen, Cecil

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the relationship between different learning methods and the formation of European identity among adolescents. The analysis is based on the European module of the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (2009), with 70,502 respondents in 21 European member states. The results show that offering…

  1. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    R.L. Carovillano 218 The Seventh European Regional Astronomy meeting dealt with almost every area of astronomy; coverage included solar ...in the 25- to found in areas as diverse as electro- 35-m range at the Comitato Nazionale optics and pharmacology. Energia Nucleare laboratory in...physics research has led to knowledge gained in one area (or param- many discoveries in the solar system and eter domain) to another area that lacks to

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-30

    primarily for the information of L ’ S. Government scientific personnel and contractors. It i-, not coli- c sidered part of the scientific literature...Stjbtiti.) S YEO EOT&PRO OEE EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES April_____________ S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(#) 9... PERFORMING ORGANI1ZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10, PROGRAM ELEMENT PROJECT, TASK( AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS US OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH BRANCH OFFICE

  3. European stem cell research in legal shackles.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Myrthe G; de Vries, Sybe A; Geijsen, Niels

    2013-12-11

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brüstle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent was challenged and put before the European Court of Justice, which ruled that inventions involving the prior destruction of human embryos cannot be patented. The legal maneuvering around this case demonstrates that the future of stem cell-based patents in Europe remains unsettled. Furthermore, owing to the European Court's broad definition of hESC as 'any cell that is capable of commencing development into a human being,' novel technologies that could eliminate the need for hESCs, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are at risk of being included under the same ruling. Advances in the in vitro development of germ cells from pluripotent stem cells may one day provide a direct developmental path from iPSC to oocyte and sperm, and, according to the European Court's reasoning, legally equate iPSCs with human embryos. In this review, we will briefly discuss the Brüstle v Greenpeace case and the implications of the European Court of Justice's ruling. We will identify potential risks for stem cell research and future therapeutics resulting from the broad legal definition of the human embryo. Finally, we will broach the current legal landscape, as this broad definition has also created great uncertainty about the status of human iPSCs.

  4. The cure of cancer: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Silvia; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Grande, Enrico; Santaquilani, Mariano; Simonetti, Arianna; Allemani, Claudia; Gatta, Gemma; Sant, Milena; Zigon, Giulia; Bray, Freddie; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska

    2009-04-01

    Cancer survival analyses based on cancer registry data do not provide direct information on the main aim of cancer treatment, the cure of the patient. In fact, classic survival indicators do not distinguish between patients who are cured, and patients who will die of their disease and in whom prolongation of survival is the main objective of treatment. In this study, we applied parametric cure models to the cancer incidence and follow-up data provided by 49 EUROCARE-4 (European Cancer Registry-based study, fourth edition) cancer registries, with the aims of providing additional insights into the survival of European cancer patients diagnosed from 1988 to 1999, and of investigating between-population differences. Between-country estimates the proportion of cured patients varied from about 4-13% for lung cancer, from 9% to 30% for stomach cancer, from 25% to 49% for colon and rectum cancer, and from 55% to 73% for breast cancer. For all cancers combined, estimates varied between 21% and 47% in men, and 38% and 59% in women and were influenced by the distribution of cases by cancer site. Countries with high proportions of cured and long fatal case survival times for all cancers combined were characterised by generally favourable case mix. For the European pool of cases both the proportion of cured and the survival time of fatal cases were associated with age, and increased from the early to the latest diagnosis period. The increases over time in the proportions of Europeans estimated cured of lung, stomach and colon and rectum cancers are noteworthy and suggest genuine progress in cancer control. The proportion of cured of all cancers combined is a useful general indicator of cancer control as it reflects progress in diagnosis and treatment, as well as success in the prevention of rapidly fatal cancers.

  5. The Economic Impact on Future European Security.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), Jacques Attali , is a former adviser to President Francois Mitterand. "Mr. Attali had never run a...Linkina NATO and the WEU, p. 10. 14. " Attali Unleashed," Wall Street Journal (New York), 17 April 1991, p. A14. 24 15. "France Threatens NATO Walkout...Jacques Attali to serve as president of the bank, but the designated American number two in command declined. Quickly, Mr. Attali appointed an

  6. International arrivals: widespread bioinvasions in European Seas

    PubMed Central

    Galil, B.S.; Marchini, A.; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A.; Minchin, D.; Narščius, A.; Ojaveer, H.; Olenin, S.

    2014-01-01

    The European Union lacks a comprehensive framework to address the threats posed by the introduction and spread of marine non-indigenous species (NIS). Current efforts are fragmented and suffer substantial gaps in coverage. In this paper we identify and discuss issues relating to the assessment of spatial and temporal patterns of introductions in European Seas (ES), based on a scientifically validated information system of aquatic non-indigenous and cryptogenic species, AquaNIS. While recognizing the limitations of the existing data, we extract information that can be used to assess the relative risk of introductions for different taxonomic groups, geographic regions and likely vectors. The dataset comprises 879 multicellular NIS. We applied a country-based approach to assess patterns of NIS richness in ES, and identify the principal introduction routes and vectors, the most widespread NIS and their spatial and temporal spread patterns. Between 1970 and 2013, the number of recorded NIS has grown by 86, 173 and 204% in the Baltic, Western European margin and the Mediterranean, respectively; 52 of the 879 NIS were recorded in 10 or more countries, and 25 NIS first recorded in European seas since 1990 have since been reported in five or more countries. Our results highlight the ever-rising role of shipping (commercial and recreational) as a vector for the widespread and recently spread NIS. The Suez Canal, a corridor unique to the Mediterranean, is responsible for the increased introduction of new thermophilic NIS into this warming sea. The 2020 goal of the EU Biodiversity Strategy concerning marine Invasive Alien Species may not be fully attainable. The setting of a new target date should be accompanied by scientifically robust, sensible and pragmatic plans to minimize introductions of marine NIS and to study those present. PMID:24899770

  7. European Community Projects on Surface Electromyography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    surface EMG and provided insight in muscular disorders in computer users. Neuromuscular assessment in the Elderly Worker (NEW, 2001-2004) will apply...sport and geriatric medicine. Keywords - electromyography, surface EMG, fine wire EMG, needle EMG, muscles, European Union I. INTRODUCTION...Pullman et al. [3] are “SEMG is considered unacceptable as a clinical t ool i n the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease at t his time.” a nd “SEMG

  8. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Elisabeth; Adler, Silke; Ungersböck, Markus; Zach-Hermann, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Europe is in the fortunate situation that it has a long tradition in phenological networking: the history of collecting phenological data and using them in climatology has its starting point in 1751 when Carl von Linné outlined in his work Philosophia Botanica methods for compiling annual plant calendars of leaf opening, flowering, fruiting and leaf fall together with climatological observations "so as to show how areas differ". The Societas Meteorologicae Palatinae at Mannheim well known for its first European wide meteorological network also established a phenological network which was active from 1781 to 1792. Recently in most European countries, phenological observations have been carried out routinely for more than 50 years by different governmental and non governmental organisations and following different observation guidelines, the data stored at different places in different formats. This has been really hampering pan European studies, as one has to address many National Observations Programs (NOP) to get access to the data before one can start to bring them in a uniform style. From 2004 to 2005 the COST-action 725 was running with the main objective to establish a European reference data set of phenological observations that can be used for climatological purposes, especially climate monitoring, and detection of changes. So far the common database/reference data set of COST725 comprises 7687248 data from 7285 observation sites in 15 countries and International Phenological Gardens (IPG) spanning the timeframe from 1951 to 2000. ZAMG is hosting the database. In January 2010 PEP725 has started and will take over not only the part of maintaining, updating the database, but also to bring in phenological data from the time before 1951, developing better quality checking procedures and ensuring an open access to the database. An attractive webpage will make phenology and climate impacts on vegetation more visible in the public enabling a monitoring of

  9. Comparison with European observations of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    A model for the inference of object size and speed from observations is used to discuss European observations of impact. It compares the observed and predicted breakup altitudes for the objects larger than one meter and observes useful correlations. Trends in magnitude correlate well with measured velocities, altitudes, and trajectories and inferred size and strength parameters, but each parameter is subject to dispute, which can only be addressed when the sensitivity of predictions to uncertainties in these parameters is assessed.

  10. Evolution of Trends in European Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    I. Mihalas, George

    2014-01-01

    This presentation attempts to analyze the trends in Medical Informatics along half a century, in the European socio-political and technological development context. Based on the major characteristics which seem dominant in some periods, a staging is proposed, with a description of each period – the context, major ideas, views and events. A summary of major features of each period is also added. This paper has an original presentation of the evolution of major trends in medical informatics. PMID:24648618

  11. New Testing Standard For European Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, P.

    2004-08-01

    Standardization is a key aspect of the production business committed to the optimization of the product development and cost. In the Space field, American industries and Government organizations have developed since several decades Space standards like the MIL series, deriving them from the aircraft and military fields, or the NASA standards. The same happened later in other countries like Russia, Japan and China. In the last years most of those standards were revised to cope with the emerging needs of the market. In Europe, the Space activities were generally managed by a set of ESA standards, the PSS, which covered some aspects of these activities and reflected the up-to-date approaches and common practices. But, in the last years an initiative was also promoted by ESA, National Agencies and Space Organizations, named ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardization), with the aim to develop a coherent, single set of user-friendly standards for use in all European space activities. European industries supported this initiative, including a deep involvement of Alenia Spazio and, sometime through a suitable revision of the old PSS documents, new standards were defined, as for the "Testing" (ECSS-E-10-03A, now published). The ECSS-E-10-03A provides standard environmental and performance test requirements for space products (systems and their constituents) which are generally applicable to all projects. Scope of this paper is to present the status of the worldwide initiatives in the testing standardization, the major contents of the European ECSS Testing standard and the possibilities for tailoring. Differences in requirement definition with other international testing standards and proposals for further ECSS optimization are presented on the basis of Alenia Spazio experience in supporting the above initiatives.

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-30

    probed, or as relativistic components may help resolve the remaining dis- of the nucleus ’ mcmentum distribution crepancies. For large momentum trans...RESOLUTION TST CHART OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH LONDON COLEYEL> EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES 0 ESN 34-4+ 30 April 1980 DTlC ELECTE Distributed by the Office...contractors. It is not con- sidered part of the scientific literature and should not be. cited : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED 80 6

  13. The Independent European Force: Costs of Independence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    cost method of obtaining the intelligence that a new military force might need. In particular, we have not considered all the nonsatellite ways of...system to eavesdrop on communications from geosynchrnus orbit, a system to detect ballistic missile launches, and a duplicate of the United States...for a short time. But if the contingpicy is extended and a lasting European presence is needed, support forces and resupply capabilities would have

  14. The Physical Tourist. A European Study Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd; Westfall, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    We organized and led a European study course for American undergraduate university students to explore the early history of relativity and quantum theory. We were inspired by The Physical Tourist articles published in this journal on Munich, Bern, Berlin, Copenhagen, and Göttingen. We describe this adventure both for others wishing to teach such a course and for anyone wishing to walk in the footsteps of the physicists who revolutionized physics in the early decades of the twentieth century.

  15. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, E.; Lipa, W.; Ungersböck, M.; Zach-Hermann, S.

    2012-04-01

    PEP725 is a 5 years project with the main object to promote and facilitate phenological research by delivering a pan European phenological database with an open, unrestricted data access for science, research and education. PEP725 is funded by EUMETNET (the network of European meteorological services), ZAMG and the Austrian ministry for science & research bm:w_f. So far 16 European national meteorological services and 7 partners from different nati-onal phenological network operators have joined PEP725. The data access is very easy via web-access from the homepage www.pep725.eu. Ha-ving accepted the PEP725 data policy and registry the data download can be done by different criteria as for instance the selection of a specific plant or all data from one country. At present more than 300 000 new records are available in the PEP725 data-base coming from 31 European countries and from 8150 stations. For some more sta-tions (154) META data (location and data holder) are provided. Links to the network operators and data owners are also on the webpage in case you have more sophisticated questions about the data. Another objective of PEP725 is to bring together network-operators and scientists by organizing workshops. In April 2012 the second of these workshops will take place on the premises of ZAMG. Invited speakers will give presentations spanning the whole study area of phenology starting from observations to modelling. Quality checking is also a big issue. At the moment we study the literature to find ap-propriate methods.

  16. The European Academy of Tumor Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    The European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI, official website: http://eati.landesbioscience.com/index.html) has been founded in 2011 with the idea of creating a novel organization that responds to the need of structuring the European research space in this expanding, clinically ever more important area of research. Rapidly, this initiative, which regroups (part of) the elite of tumor immunologists, has been joined by 110 scientists, who accepted to join EATI as founding members. Obviously, EATI will not enter in competition with existing prestigious organizations, be they supranational (such as the Cancer Research Institute, CRI; the European Society for Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, ESCII; and the Society for the Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC), or national [such as the Cancer Immunology Working Group, CIMM, of the American Association for Cancer Reserch; the (German) Association for Cancer Immunotherapy, CIMT; the (US) Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium, CIC; the (US) Cancer Vaccine Consortium, CVC; and the Italian Network for Cancer Biotherapy, NIBIT]. The choice of cooperation (rather than competition) with these organizations is clearly documented by the fact that many prominent members of CIMM, CIC, CIMT, CRI, CVC, ESCII, NIBIT and SITC are also EATI Academicians. PMID:22720233

  17. An overview of European space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    With the completion of the launch rocket series Ariane 1 to 4, Europe will have reached the same capacity to transport commercial payloads as the USA has with the Space Shuttle and the kick stages which are presently operative. The near term development of these capacities would require Europe to develop a larger launch rocket, Araine 5. Further motivations for this rocket are access to manned spaceflight, the development of an European space station, and the demand for shuttle technology. Shuttle technology is the subject of research being done in France on the winged re-entry vehicle Hermes. Operation of the European space station Columbus will require development of an interorbital transport system to facilitate traffic between the various segments of the space station. All European space transportation systems will have to match their quality to that of the other countries involve in space flight. All areas of development are marked not only by possible cooperation but also by increased competition because of increasing commercialization of space flight.

  18. The European experience with vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Abe; Leppäniemi, Ari K; Androulakis, George A; Archodovassilis, F; Bouillon, Bertil; Cavina, Enrico; Chaloner, Eddie; Chiarugi, Massimo; Davidovic, Lazar; Delgado-Millan, Miguel Angel; Goris, Jan; Gunnlaugsson, Gunnar H; Jover, Jose Maria; Konstandoulakis, Manoussos M; Kurtoglu, Mehmet; Lepäntalo, Mauri; Llort-Pont, Carme; Meneu-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Gonzales, Enrique; Navarro-Soto, Salvador; Panoussis, P; Ryan, James M; Salenius, Juha P; Seccia, Massimo; Takolander, Rabbe; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Torfason, Bjarni; Uranüs, Selman

    2002-02-01

    The rich and diverse heritage of the management of vascular injuries in the 45 independent European countries prevents the authors from revealing a uniform picture of the European experience, but some trends are clearly emerging. In countries with a low incidence of penetrating trauma and increasing use of interventional vascular procedures, the proportion of iatrogenic vascular trauma exceeds 40% of all vascular injuries, whereas on other parts of the continent, armed conflicts are still a major cause of vascular trauma. National vascular registries, mostly in the Scandinavian countries, produce useful, nationwide data about vascular trauma and its management but suffer still from inadequate data collection. Despite a relatively low incidence of vascular trauma in most European countries, the results are satisfactory, probably in most cases because of active and early management by surgeons on call, whether with vascular training or not, treating all kinds of vascular surgical emergencies. In some countries, attempts at developing a trauma and emergency surgical specialty, including expertise in the management of vascular injuries, are on their way.

  19. European plans for new clocks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leschiutta, Sigfrido M.; Tavella, Patrizia

    1995-01-01

    An outline of the future European space research program where precise clocks are necessary is presented, pointing out how space applications are posing impressive requirements as regards clock mass, power, ruggedness, long life, accuracy and, in some cases, spectral purity. The material presented was gathered in some laboratories; useful information was obtained from the Space Agencies of France (CNES), Germany (DARA) and Italy (ASI), but the bulk is coming from a recent exercise promoted inside ESA (the European Space Agency) and aimed to prefigure space research activities at the beginning of the next millennium. This exercise was called Horizon 2000 plus; the outcomings were summarized in two reports, presented by ESA in may 1994. Precise clocks and time measurements are needed not only for deep-space or out-ward space missions, but are essential tools also for Earth oriented activities. In this latter field, the European views and needs were discussed in October 1994, in a meeting organized by ESA and devoted to Earth Observation problems. By a scrutiny of these reports, an analysis was performed on the missions requiring a precise clock on board and the driving requirements were pointed out, leading to a survey of the necessary PTTI developments that, to some extent, are in the realm of possibility but that pose serious challenges. In this report the use of frequency standards in the satellite navigation systems is not considered.

  20. The SDI and European security interests

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines Europe's reactions to President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). On the one hand, the American proposals have inspired forceful European opposition of a kind potentially damaging to Alliance solidarity. On the other, paradoxically, the debate occurred in a period of rare Alliance harmony, when the deployment of cruise and Pershing II missiles was satisfactorily completed despite Soviet hostility. Yet the nature of the discussion and the compromises reached between Europe and the United States on the SDI have meant that a true strategic debate has not yet begun. Although the SDI is largely an American response to an American strategic problem, Europeans are intimately affected by many of its implications. The author argues that if the SDI program is not to cause great difficulties in the future a more sophisticated discussion of the purposes of strategic defense must now be undertaken. Contents. Introduction; defense in the nuclear age; defense or deterrence: The limits of western consensus; the Euro-American debate on the SDI; European concerns and American responses; and conclusion.

  1. Nano-education from a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malsch, I.

    2008-03-01

    At a global level, educating the nanotechnology workforce has been discussed since the beginning of the new millennium. Scientists, engineers and technicians should be trained in nanotechnology. Most educators prefer training students first in their own discipline at the Bachelor level (physics, chemistry, biology, etc) followed by specialisation in nanoscience and technology at the Master's level. Some favour a broad interdisciplinary basic training in different nanosciences followed by specialisation in a particular application area. What constitutes a good nanoscience curriculum is also being discussed, as well as the application of e-learning methodologies. The European Union is stimulating the development of nanoscience education in universities. The Erasmus Mundus programme is funding nanoscience and nanotechnology education programmes involving universities in several European countries. The policy debate in Europe is moving towards vocational training in nanotechnology for educating the technicians needed in industry and research. The EU vocational training institute CEDEFOP published a report in 2005 The EU funded European gateway to nanotechnology Nanoforum has stimulated the accessibility of nano-education throughout Europe with reports and online databases of education courses and materials. For university education, they list courses at the Bachelor, Master's, and PhD level as well as short courses. The EU funded EuroIndiaNet project also reviewed Nano-education courses at the Master's level, short courses, e-learning programmes, summerschools and vocational training courses. In this presentation, I review Nanoforum and other publications on nano-education in Europe and highlight current trends and gaps.

  2. Tuberculosis among migrant populations in the European Union and the European Economic Area

    PubMed Central

    Tillmann, Taavi; Sandgren, Andreas; Williams, Gemma; Rechel, Bernd; Ingleby, David; Noori, Teymur; Mladovsky, Philipa; McKee, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although tuberculosis (TB) incidence has been decreasing in the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) in the last decades, specific subgroups of the population, such as migrants, remain at high risk of TB. This study is based on the report ‘Key Infectious Diseases in Migrant Populations in the EU/EEA’ commissioned by The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Methods: We collected, critically appraised and summarized the available evidence on the TB burden in migrants in the EU/EEA. Data were collected through: (i) a comprehensive literature review; (ii) analysis of data from The European Surveillance System (TESSy) and (iii) evidence provided by TB experts during an infectious disease workshop in 2012. Results: In 2010, of the 73 996 TB cases notified in the EU/EEA, 25% were of foreign origin. The overall decrease of TB cases observed in recent years has not been reflected in migrant populations. Foreign-born people with TB exhibit different socioeconomic and clinical characteristics than native sufferers. Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to use multiple data sources, including the largest available European database on infectious disease notifications, to assess the burden and provide a comprehensive description and analysis of specific TB features in migrants in the EU/EEA. Strengthened information about health determinants and factors for migrants’ vulnerability is needed to plan, implement and evaluate targeted TB care and control interventions for migrants in the EU/EEA. PMID:25500265

  3. European brown hare syndrome virus in free-ranging European brown hares from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Kai; Kujawski, Olgierd E J Graf; Rudolph, Michael; Ronsholt, Leif; Speck, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    From 1998 to 2000, serum samples of 80 shot European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) from Argentina were examined for antibodies against European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV) and 80 spleen samples were tested for EBHSV-antigen by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nine hares were positive for EBHSV-antigen. Antibodies against EBHSV were detected in only one individual. Based on negative staining electron microscopy of spleen homogenates, we observed calicivirus in one of five EBHSV-antigen positive hares. However, EBHS has not been reported to cause abnormal mortality in these hares. This is the first report of antibodies to EBHSV, EBHSV-antigen, and electron microscopy findings in free-ranging European brown hares from South America.

  4. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients.

  5. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  6. A Grand Vision for European Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Today, and for the first time, astronomers share their global Science Vision for European Astronomy in the next two decades. This two-year long effort by the ASTRONET network of funding agencies, sponsored by the European Commission and coordinated by INSU-CNRS, underscores Europe's ascension to world leadership in astronomy and its will to maintain that position. It will be followed in just over a year by a prioritised roadmap for the observational facilities needed to implement the Vision. Implementation of these plans will ensure that Europe fully contributes to Mankind's ever deeper understanding of the wonders of our Universe. astronet logo "This is a great opportunity to help create a vibrant long-term future for astronomy and science" says Tim de Zeeuw (Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands) who led this community-wide effort. The ASTRONET Science Vision provides a comprehensive overview of the most important scientific questions that European astronomy should address in the next twenty years. The four key questions are the extremes of the Universe, from the nature of the dark matter and dark energy that comprise over 95% of the Universe to the physics of extreme objects such as black holes, neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts; the formation of galaxies from the first seeds to our Milky Way; the formation of stars and planets and the origin of life; and the crucial question of how do we (and our Solar System) fit in the global picture. These themes reach well beyond the realm of traditional astronomy into the frontiers of physics and biology. The Vision identifies the major new facilities that will be needed to achieve these goals, but also stresses the need for parallel developments in theory and numerical simulations, high-performance computing resources, efficient astronomical data archiving and the European Virtual Observatory, as well as in laboratory astrophysics. "This report is a key input for the even more challenging task of developing a prioritised

  7. European brown hare syndrome in wild European brown hares from Greece.

    PubMed

    Billinis, Charalambos; Psychas, Vassilios; Tontis, Dimitrios K; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Birtsas, Periklis K; Sofia, Marina; Likotrafitis, Fotios; Maslarinou, Olga M; Kanteres, Dimitrios

    2005-10-01

    From 1999 to mid-2003, 97 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) found dead throughout Greece were examined by necropsy, histopathology, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of European brown hare syndrome (EBHS) and EBHS virus (EBHSV), respectively. Hare losses were sporadic, starting in the cold season and lasting for many months (December to May). The most prominent gross lesions were observed in the liver and included swelling and discoloration; congestion and hemorrhages were present mainly in lungs and tracheal mucosa. Necropsy findings were suggestive of EBHS, which was confirmed by histopathology and RT-PCR. This study documents, for the first time, EBHS in Greece.

  8. Global integration of European tuna markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Toribio, Ramòn; Guillotreau, Patrice; Mongruel, Rémi

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the degree of integration between the world market and the major European marketplaces of frozen and canned tuna through both vertical and horizontal price relationships. Spatial linkages are investigated horizontally in order to estimate the connection between the European market and the world-wide market on the primary stage of the value chain. One of the key results is the high level of market integration at the ex-vessel stage, and the price leadership of yellowfin tuna over skipjack tuna. The same approach is applied at the ex-factory level. Basically, the European market for final goods appears to be segmented between the Northern countries consuming low-priced canned skipjack tuna imported from Asia (mainly Thailand) and the Southern countries (Italy, Spain) processing and importing yellowfin-based products sold at higher prices. France appears to be an intermediate market where both products are consumed. The former market is found to be well integrated to the world market and can be considered to be competitive, but there is a suspicion of market power being exercised on the latter. Price relationships are therefore tested vertically between the price of frozen tuna paid by the canneries and the price of canned fish in both Italy and France. The two species show an opposite pattern in prices transmission along the value chain: price changes along the chain are far better transmitted for the “global” skipjack tuna than for the more “European” yellowfin tuna. The results are discussed, along with their implications for the fishing industry.

  9. European Birth Cohorts for Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Maribel; Bergström, Anna; Carmichael, Amanda; Cordier, Sylvaine; Eggesbø, Merete; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria P.; Fernández, Mariana F.; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Gehring, Ulrike; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Hohmann, Cynthia; Karvonen, Anne M.; Keil, Thomas; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koppen, Gudrun; Krämer, Ursula; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Magnus, Per; Majewska, Renata; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Patelarou, Evridiki; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Pierik, Frank H.; Polanska, Kinga; Porta, Daniela; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Santos, Ana Cristina; Slama, Rémy; Sram, Radim J.; Thijs, Carel; Tischer, Christina; Toft, Gunnar; Trnovec, Tomáš; Vandentorren, Stephanie; Vrijkotte, Tanja G.M.; Wilhelm, Michael; Wright, John; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many pregnancy and birth cohort studies investigate the health effects of early-life environmental contaminant exposure. An overview of existing studies and their data is needed to improve collaboration, harmonization, and future project planning. Objectives: Our goal was to create a comprehensive overview of European birth cohorts with environmental exposure data. Methods: Birth cohort studies were included if they a) collected data on at least one environmental exposure, b) started enrollment during pregnancy or at birth, c) included at least one follow-up point after birth, d) included at least 200 mother–child pairs, and e) were based in a European country. A questionnaire collected information on basic protocol details and exposure and health outcome assessments, including specific contaminants, methods and samples, timing, and number of subjects. A full inventory can be searched on www.birthcohortsenrieco.net. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 37 cohort studies of > 350,000 mother–child pairs in 19 European countries. Only three cohorts did not participate. All cohorts collected biological specimens of children or parents. Many cohorts collected information on passive smoking (n = 36), maternal occupation (n = 33), outdoor air pollution (n = 27), and allergens/biological organisms (n = 27). Fewer cohorts (n = 12–19) collected information on water contamination, ionizing or nonionizing radiation exposures, noise, metals, persistent organic pollutants, or other pollutants. All cohorts have information on birth outcomes; nearly all on asthma, allergies, childhood growth and obesity; and 26 collected information on child neurodevelopment. Conclusion: Combining forces in this field will yield more efficient and conclusive studies and ultimately improve causal inference. This impressive resource of existing birth cohort data could form the basis for longer-term and worldwide coordination of research on environment and child health. PMID

  10. Affordability of medicines in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Zaprutko, Tomasz; Kopciuch, Dorota; Kus, Krzysztof; Merks, Piotr; Nowicka, Monika; Augustyniak, Izabela; Nowakowska, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Background Medications and their prices are key issues for healthcare. Although access to medicines at affordable prices had been specified as a key objective of the European Health Policy, it seems that these goals have not been achieved. Therefore, we attempted an evaluation of affordability of selected medicines at full prices. Methods The analysis concerned 2012 and was conducted between 2013 and 2015 in all the European Union (EU) countries divided into 3 groups depending on the date of their accession to the EU. Finally, we considered 9 originators used in the treatment of schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Information on drug prices were collected from pharmacies. Participation in the study was voluntary and anonymous in order to avoid accusations of advertising. To evaluate affordability, several factors were used (e.g. minimum earnings and Gini coefficient). Due to unavailability in some countries, the exact number of analyzed medicines varies. Results Drug prices vary significantly between EU Member States. Almost eleven fold difference was observed between Germany (EUR 1451.17) and Croatia (EUR 132.77) in relation to Interferone beta-1a 22 μg. Generally, prices were the highest in Germany. The cheapest drugs were found in various countries but never in the poorest ones like Bulgaria or Romania. Discrepancies in wages were observed too (the smallest minimum wage was EUR 138.00 in Bulgaria and the highest EUR 1801.00 in Luxembourg). Full price of olanzapine 5mg, however, was higher in Bulgaria (EUR 64.53) than, for instance, in Belgium (EUR 37.26). Conclusions Analyzed medications are still unaffordable for many citizens of the EU. Besides, access to medicines is also impaired e.g. due to parallel trade. Unaffordability of medications may lead to the patients’ non-compliance and therefore to increased direct and indirect costs of treatment. Common European solutions are needed to achieve a real affordability and accessibility of medications. PMID

  11. How fast do European conifers overgrow wounds inflicted by rockfall?

    PubMed

    Schneuwly-Bollschweiler, Michelle; Schneuwly, Dominique M

    2012-08-01

    The capacity of trees to recover from mechanical disturbance is of crucial importance for tree survival but has been primarily investigated in saplings using artificially induced wounds. In this study, mature Larix decidua Mill., Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Abies alba Mill. trees growing on alpine slopes that were wounded by naturally occurring rockfall were analyzed to determine their efficiency in overgrowing wounds. In total 43 L. decidua, P. abies and A. alba trees were sampled. First, 106 samples from 27 L. decidua and P. abies trees were analyzed to reconstruct yearly and overall overgrowth rates. Cross sections were taken at the maximum extension of the injury and overgrowth rates were determined on a yearly basis. Results clearly showed that L. decidua overgrew wounds more efficiently than P. abies with an average overgrowth rate of 19° and 11.8° per year, respectively. The higher on the stem the injury was located, the faster the wound was closed. Young and small trees overgrew wounds more efficiently than older or thicker trees. In contrast, no correlation was observed between injury size or increment before/after wounding and wound closure. Second, cross sections from 16 L. decidua, P. abies and A. alba (54 injuries) were used to assess closure rates at different heights around the injury. Overgrowth was generally smallest at the height of the maximum lateral extension of the injury and increased at the upper and lower end of the injury. The efficiency with which L. decidua closes wounds inflicted by rockfall makes this species highly adapted to sites with this type of mechanical disturbance.

  12. The dietary adaptations of European Miocene catarrhines.

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, P S; Kay, R F

    1995-01-01

    European Miocene "apes" have been known for nearly a century and a half but their phylogenetic significance is only now becoming apparent with the recent discovery of many relatively complete remains. Some appear to be close in time and morphology to the last common ancestor of modern great apes and humans. The current study is an attempt to reconstruct the diets of these fossils on the basis of quantitative data. Results suggest that these primates varied more greatly in their diets than modern apes, with adaptations ranging from hard-object feeding to soft-object frugivory to folivory. PMID:7777533

  13. Eurotra: A European perspective on MT

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, D.

    1986-07-01

    This paper describes the perspective on Machine Translation taken in the Eurotra project: an R and D project of the European Communities at a relatively early stage. It describes: i) the project's rather challenging aims; ii) the framework of design principles and linguistic and software methodology which are of particular importance given its size, scope, and organization; iii) the proposed representational theories and expressive (programming) languages with which actual instances of MT systems can be constructed. The final section sketches some recent proposals and directions for future research.

  14. Report on ''European Radio Interferometry School 2015''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, R.; Richards, A.

    2016-03-01

    The sixth European Interferometry School (ERIS2015) was held at ESO for the first time. As usual the school was aimed at graduate students and early-career postdocs, but this year the emphasis was on enhanced wide-bandwidth interferometers covering metre to submillimetre wavebands. More than 100 participants attended ERIS2015. The topics of the school are briefly described here. They covered a wide range, from an introduction to radio interferometric techniques through packages for data reduction and analysis to hands-on workshop sessions and proposal writing.

  15. European Science Notes. Volume 41, Number 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    have been amplified relatively recently, dren aged I to 15 years. Most individuals and evidence for one such family has al- are infected with HSV type 1 ...I-AtB2 686 EUROPEAN SCIENCE MOTES VOLUME 41 NUMBER ?U) OFFICE OF 1 / 1 EN4NVAL RESEARCH LONDON (ENGLAND) C J FOX JUL 87 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 5/2 U 11111 1 ...release and sale its distribution is unu~mited. 87 Z t 1 11111 V X UNCLASSIFIED . SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE , .J REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Is

  16. European opportunities for fuel cell commercialisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, C. E.; Steel, M. C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The European electricity market is changing. This paper will look at the background to power generation in Europe and highlight the recent factors which have entered the market to promote change. The 1990s seem to offer great possibilities for fuel cell commercialisation. Awareness of environmental problems has never been greater and there is growing belief that fuel cell technology can contribute to solving some of these problems. Issues which have caused the power industry in Europe to re-think its methods of generation include: concern over increasing carbon dioxide emissions and their contribution to the greenhouse effect; increasing SO x and NO x emissions and the damage cause by acid rain; the possibility of adverse effects on health caused by high voltage transmission lines; environmental restrictions to the expansion of hydroelectric schemes; public disenchantment with nuclear power following the Chernobyl accident; avoidance of dependence on imported oil following the Gulf crisis and a desire for fuel flexibility. All these factors are hastening the search for clean, efficient, modular power generators which can be easily sited close to the electricity consumer and operated using a variety of fuels. It is not only the power industry which is changing. A tightening of the legislation concerning emissions from cars is encouraging European auto companies to develop electric vehicles, some of which may be powered by fuel cells. Political changes, such as the opening up of Eastern Europe will also expand the market for low-emission, efficient power plants as attempts are made to develop and clean up that region. Many Europeans organisations are re-awakening their interest, or strengthening their activities, in the area of fuel cells because of the increasing opportunities offered by the European market. While some companies have chosen to buy, test and demonstrate Japanese or American fuel cell stacks with the aim of gaining operational experience and

  17. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  18. European Space Standards for Environments and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E. J.

    Under the auspices of the European Cooperation on Space Standards ECSS standards are being established to help engineers assess various environmental effects on space systems These include standards on the space environment itself on spacecraft-plasma interactions and on radiation effects calculation methods The standards indicate the most appropriate methods to evaluate the environments and the various effects that may be encountered including radiation damage and spacecraft charging The standards complement existing and planned ISO and ECSS standards including the ECSS standards relating to EEE components and electrical and mechanical systems development Relationships with testing and margin issues are discussed

  19. UK: impact of European human rights law.

    PubMed

    Brahams, D

    2000-10-21

    The UK's Human Rights Act 1998, which incorporates into that country's law the European Convention on Rights and Freedoms, came into full operation on Oct 2, 2000. The Act imposes duties on public authorities, who must now justify their position if that is in conflict with a Convention right. Four Articles in the Convention are potential flashpoints in respect of health cases, examples being patients' rights to receive expensive life-saving treatment and disciplinary procedures, including those of the General Medical Council and National Health Service trusts.

  20. Oestrid myiasis in European mouflon from Spain.

    PubMed

    Moreno, V; Pérez, J M; Moreno, P A; Granados, J E; Ruiz-Martinez, I; Soriguer, R C; de Simon, M A

    1999-01-01

    From February 1992 to March 1997, 245 European mouflon (Ovis orientalis musimon) from Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas Natural Park (southern Spain) were surveyed for oestrid larvae in order to estimate prevalence and mean intensity of parasitism by Oestrus ovis. Over 46 percent of the animals surveyed were infected, with a mean intensity of 9.6 larvae/host parasitized. No significant differences in prevalence rates between host sexes were observed, but older mouflons were infected with more larvae than younger ones.

  1. European Space Agency announces comet landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-09-01

    Scientists believe that comets hold clues to the solar system's origins, and soon they will be one step closer to unlocking these secrets. Last week, the European Space Agency announced that the spacecraft Rosetta will deploy its lander, Philae, to land on the "head" of the comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko at candidate site J. Project scientists have been racing to choose an ideal landing site since Rosetta arrived at the comet on 6 August. This event will mark the first landing mission on a comet.

  2. European X-ray observatory satellite (Exosat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Initially planned to be launched on the Ariane L6, the 510 kilogram European X-Ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) is to be placed into orbit from Space Launch Complex 2 West by NASA's Delta 3914 launch vehicle. Objectives of the mission are to study the precise position, structure, and temporal and spectral characteristics of known X-ray sources as well as search for new sources. The spacecraft is described as well as its payload, principal subsystems, and the stages of the Delta 3914. The flight sequence of events, land launch operations are discussed. The ESA management structure for EXOSAT, the NASA/industry team, and contractors are listed.

  3. A European Network for Earth System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcke, Sophie; Budich, Reinhard; Carter, Mick; Guilyardi, Eric; Foujols, Marie-Alice; Lautenschlager, Michael; Redler, René; Steenman-Clark, Lois; Wedi, Nils

    2007-03-01

    The increasing complexity of Earth system models and the computing facilities needed to run those models put a heavy technical burden on research teams active in climate modeling. To ease this burden, a European collaborative venture called PRISM was initiated in December 2001 to organize a network of experts in order to share the development, maintenance, and support of Earth system modeling software tools and community standards. PRISM was recently reorganized, and a new Web portal (http://prism.enes.org) was unveiled in July 2006.

  4. European Science Notes. Volume 39, number 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, L. E.

    1985-12-01

    Progress in European science and technology is reported. Topics discussed in this issue include: bioelectromagnetic featured at ONRL Minisymposium on the influence of electric and electromagnetic fields on organized biological structures; neurobiology research at the universities of Stockholm, Lund, and Goeteborg (Sweden); conference on parallel computing; General Electric Co. (UK) research at Hirst and Marconi; research centres--information technology, image processing and analysis, radars communications, and semiconductors; and fatigue research at the Univ. of Vienna on short crack (less than 0.5 mm).

  5. What can Europeans learn from Americans?

    PubMed Central

    Enthoven, Alain C.

    1989-01-01

    In a wide-ranging look at many aspects of health care financing and delivery, the concepts of glasnost and perestroika are used as a framework for presenting ideas from the American system that may have value for European health care planners. These include more uniform approaches to data collection and cost reporting, patient outcome studies, evaluation of service and access standards, publication of information, quality assurance review, decentralization and independent institutions, prepaid group practice, demonstrations and experiments, and managed competition. Suggestions are offered for making health care systems on both sides of the Atlantic more manageable, efficient, and responsive. PMID:10313435

  6. Photovoltaic pilot projects in the European community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.; Grassi, G.; Schnell, W.

    The paper presents proposals received for the construction of photovoltaic pilot plants as part of the Commission of the European Communities' second 4-year solar energy R and D program. The proposed plants range from 30 to 300 kWp and cover a variety of applications including rural electrification, water pumping, desalination, dairy farming, factories, hospitals, schools and vacation centers. Fifteen projects will be accepted with a total generating capacity of 1 MWp, with preference given to those projects involving the development of new techniques, components and systems.

  7. Satellite broadcasting - The European experience and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alan

    1991-11-01

    The use of satellites is considered as a means for developing a European transnational broadcasting system with attention given to the control of technology. A tension is described between maintaining technology as the property of one nation when the DBSs are developed for multinational program broadcasting. The simultaneous development of satellite systems is theorized to lead eventually to a single merged program for a particular nation, and the effect is considered of the regulation of cross-holding and cross-selling systems by investors.

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34. Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-31

    UNCLASSIFIED E SN-34-5 NL Ehhhhhhhhhommml Emomhhhmhhhhhhl OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH LONDON EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES ESN 34-5S 51 MAY 1980 Il *o Distributed by...Israeli Universities R.E. Machol 240 Operations Research in Italy- Part I R.E. Machol 245 IN E MThe Institute of Physics J.R. Neiahbours 250 Lasers...those of SRC’s Rutherford Laboratory The laboratory-environment studies at Chilton. Chilton is about 40. miles of nm-wave gaseous absorption have

  9. Towards a European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, is taking an important step towards the realisation of a new, giant telescope for Europe's astronomers, by creating the ESO Extremely Large Telescope Project Office. It will be headed by Jason Spyromilio, formerly La Silla Paranal Observatory Director. "We believe that the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is essential if we are to ensure the continued competitiveness of the astronomical community in ESO's member-states. This goal can be achieved in a timely manner through ESO and the community working closely together, and the establishment of the ELT project office is a significant step in this direction", says Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. "In its December 2004 Resolution, ESO's Council requested ESO to launch the construction of an ELT on a competitive timescale", says Jason Spyromilio. "The creation of the ELT Project Office is thus the logical step, following on the large amount of preparatory work on ELTs carried out in Europe, for instance in the framework of the OWL Conceptual Study [1], the EU co-funded ELT Design Study project [2] and more recently by the five ELT thematic working groups established by the Director General." The ESO ELT Project Office, which is part of the ESO Telescope Systems Division (TSD), will work closely together with experts, from both ESO and the European scientific community, represented in the ELT Science and Engineering Working Group and in a Standing Review Committee established by the ESO Council. "ESO aims to put the European Extremely Large Telescope on a 'fast-track', within a wide collaboration with its community and with the direct involvement of industry", says Roberto Gilmozzi, head of the ESO TSD and E-ELT Principal Investigator. A baseline design is to be presented to the ESO Council at the end of 2006. The plan is a telescope with a primary mirror between 30 and 60 metres in diameter and a financial envelope

  10. A European Navy: Can it Complete European Political and Economic Integration?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Nicole Gnesotto, Jolyon Howorth, Daniel Keohane , Stefano Silvestri, and Teija Tiilikainen, What do Europeans want from NATO?, in Report no. 8...co-operation (accessed May 23, 2012). Biscop, Sven, Nicole Gnesotto, Jolyon Howorth, Daniel Keohane , Stefano Silvestri, and Teija Tiilikainen. What

  11. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: The European Network Adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood that persists into adulthood in the majority of cases. The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe. Methods The European Network Adult ADHD, founded in 2003, aims to increase awareness of this disorder and improve knowledge and patient care for adults with ADHD across Europe. This Consensus Statement is one of the actions taken by the European Network Adult ADHD in order to support the clinician with research evidence and clinical experience from 18 European countries in which ADHD in adults is recognised and treated. Results Besides information on the genetics and neurobiology of ADHD, three major questions are addressed in this statement: (1) What is the clinical picture of ADHD in adults? (2) How can ADHD in adults be properly diagnosed? (3) How should ADHD in adults be effectively treated? Conclusions ADHD often presents as an impairing lifelong condition in adults, yet it is currently underdiagnosed and treated in many European countries, leading to ineffective treatment and higher costs of illness. Expertise in diagnostic assessment and treatment of ADHD in adults must increase in psychiatry. Instruments for screening and diagnosis of ADHD in adults are available and appropriate treatments exist, although more research is needed in this age group. PMID:20815868

  12. Integration through Europeanization: Ukraine’s Policy Towards the European Union

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    Legislation to that of the EU,”92 and “Ukraine’s Economy and EU Integration” by Igor Burakovsky, Andrii Goncharuk and Alan Mayhew.93 Laure Delcour’s article...and Alan Mayhew, “Ukraine’s Economy and EU Integration,” in ibid. 94Laure Delcour, “Does the European Neighbourhood Policy Make a Difference

  13. Patterns of contraceptive use in 5 European countries. European Study Group on Infertility and Subfecundity.

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, A; Talamanca, I F; Lauria, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The use of contraception in Denmark, Germany, Poland, Italy, and Spain is described. METHODS: Data were drawn from a population-based cross-sectional study, the European Study of Infertility and Subfecundity. Interviews were conducted with 6630 women aged 25 to 44 years. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of factors associated with contraceptive use. RESULTS: Residents of Northern European countries tended to use more effective methods of contraception than residents of Southern European countries. The use of contraception was generally more common among single women, the more highly educated, those with children, and those with a previous induced abortion. These characteristics were also the main determinants of the use of more effective methods. Periodic abstinence and withdrawal were more common among older women. CONCLUSIONS: The European countries are in different phases of contraceptive practice: in Northern and Western Europe, use of more modern methods has been stable over the past 10 years, whereas these methods are less common in Southern and Eastern Europe. The results suggest the need for information, education, and provision of contraceptive services in Eastern and Southern Europe. PMID:10983197

  14. Overview of European technology in computers, telecommunications, and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, J. F.

    1990-05-01

    The emergence of the personal computer, the growing use of distributed systems, and the increasing demand for supercomputers and mini-supercomputers are causing a profound impact on the European computer market. An equally profound development in telecommunications is the integration of voice, data, and images in the public network systems - the Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN). The programs being mounted in Europe to meet the challenges of these technologies are described. The Europe-wide trends and actions with respect to computers, telecommunications, and microelectronics are discussed, and the major European collaborative programs in these fields are described. Specific attention is given to the European Strategic Programme for Research and Development in Information (ESPRIT); Research in Advanced Communications for Europe (RACE); European Research Coordination Agency (Eureka) programs; Joint European Submicron Silicon Initiative (JESSI); and the recently combined programs Basic Research Industrial Technologies in Europe/European Research in Advanced Materials (BRITE/EURAM).

  15. Research on photonic components: the perspective of the European Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbe, Gustav

    2008-11-01

    The importance of photonic technologies for the European economy is recognized by the European Union and enjoys continued support. The mechanisms of the European Union to support research and development by introducing the "7th European Framework Program for Collaborative Research" are outlined. The topical content of the Framework Program is presented, as well as its implementation and in particular the support of photonic components related research and development. We will highlight the importance of the collaborative European effort and give examples of its impact. We will then provide an overview of the current topics supported by the European Commission. We will conclude by presenting the long term vision and giving indications on the likely research priorities for Photonic Components in the ICT Workprogram 2009-2010 of the 7th Framework Program (FP7).

  16. Pan-European catalogue of flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajka, Juraj; Mangini, Walter; Viglione, Alberto; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Ceola, Serena

    2016-04-01

    There have been numerous extreme flood events observed in Europe in the past years. One of the way to improve our understanding about causing flood generation mechanisms is to analyse spatial and temporal variability of a large number of flood events. The aim of this study is to present a pan-European catalogue of flood events developed within the SWITCH-ON EU Project. The flood events are identified from daily discharge observations at 1315 stations listed in Global Runoff Data Centre database. The average length of discharge time-series for selected stations is 54 years. For each event, basin boundary and additional hydrological and weather characteristics are extracted. Hydrological characteristics are extracted from the pan-European HYPE model simulations. Precipitation, together with the corresponding proportions of rainfall and snowfall, snowmelt, and evapotranspiration are computed as total amounts between the event start date and event peak date. Soil moisture, soil moisture deficit, and basin accumulated snow water equivalent are computed for the event start date. Weather characteristics are derived from the weather circulation pattern catalogue developed within COST 733 Project. The results are generated in an open data access and tools framework which allows reproduction and extension of results to other regions. More information about the analysis and project are available at: http://www.water-switch-on.eu/lab.html.

  17. Studying ignition schemes on European laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemot, S.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S. D.; Chanteloup, J. C.; Labaune, C.; Koenig, M.; Michel, D. T.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoigt, H. P.; Canaud, B.; Cherfils Clérouin, C.; Debras, G.; Depierreux, S.; Ebrardt, J.; Juraszek, D.; Lafitte, S.; Loiseau, P.; Miquel, J. L.; Philippe, F.; Rousseaux, C.; Blanchot, N.; Edwards, C. B.; Norreys, P.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Hallo, L.; Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Santos, J. J.; Schurtz, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Debayle, A.; Honrubia, J. J.; Temporal, M.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Badziak, J.; Klimo, O.

    2011-09-01

    Demonstrating ignition and net energy gain in the near future on MJ-class laser facilities will be a major step towards determining the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), in Europe as in the United States. The current status of the French Laser MégaJoule (LMJ) programme, from the laser facility construction to the indirectly driven central ignition target design, is presented, as well as validating experimental campaigns, conducted, as part of this programme, on various laser facilities. However, the viability of the IFE approach strongly depends on our ability to address the salient questions related to efficiency of the target design and laser driver performances. In the overall framework of the European HiPER project, two alternative schemes both relying on decoupling target compression and fuel heating—fast ignition (FI) and shock ignition (SI)—are currently considered. After a brief presentation of the HiPER project's objectives, FI and SI target designs are discussed. Theoretical analysis and 2D simulations will help to understand the unresolved key issues of the two schemes. Finally, the on-going European experimental effort to demonstrate their viability on currently operated laser facilities is described.

  18. European Measurement Comparisons of Environmental Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Waetjen, Uwe

    2008-08-14

    The scheme of European measurement comparisons to verify radioactivity monitoring in the European Union is briefly explained. After a review of comparisons conducted during the years 1990, the approach of IRMM organising these comparisons since 2003 is presented. IRMM is providing comparison samples with a reference value traceable to the SI units and which is fully documented to all participants and national authorities after completion of the comparison. The sample preparation and determination of traceable reference values at IRMM, the sample treatment and measurement in the participating laboratories, as well as the evaluation of comparison results are described in some detail using the example of an air filter comparison. The results of a comparison to determine metabolised {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in milk powder are presented as well. The necessary improvements in the estimation of measurement uncertainty by the participating laboratories are discussed. The performance of individual laboratories which have participated in at least four comparison exercises over the years is studied in terms of observable trends.

  19. Refugee blues: a UK and European perspective

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the numbers of refugees travelling to the European Union are set in a global context. It is argued that the increasing restrictions placed on asylum seekers from the 1980s onwards in the UK and the associated culture of deterrence and prohibition have had the perverse effect of supporting the economic market for people smuggling. It appears that these restrictions were initially designed to deter people, most of whom would have been granted humanitarian assistance had they managed to arrive in the UK, so as to prevent them from accessing the decision-making process on asylum. Policy changes concerning travel, benefits, and other pressures on asylum seekers are also considered in the context of deterrence. The problems facing asylum seekers do not end with their arrival in a safe country. The current methods of determining refugee status are alarmingly weak. Indeed there is evidence suggesting that those who are most traumatised before arrival face systematic disadvantage. The focus of this paper is on the United Kingdom but its conclusions apply to most Western European countries. The paper concludes with some tentative suggestions for change. PMID:26514159

  20. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  1. A future European launcher - Ariane 5/Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretenet, J. C.; Marx, P.

    1984-12-01

    The development of the Ariane launch vehicle was begun in Europe ten years ago to provide independence in terms of the commercial exploitation of telecommunications satellites. In connection with the spectacular development of the satellite market and, consequently, the launch services market, Ariane has now also a commercial objective, which is related to the penetration of the international launch services market. The current capacity of Ariane is adequate for short and medium-term European launch requirements. However, in the longer term, Ariane's capacity is insufficient and a new launcher is needed. It is attempted to evaluate future launching requirements for the 1995-2000 period, taking into account competing launch resources related to the U.S. Space Shuttle. The results of this evaluation lead to a discussion of the characteristics of the Ariane 5, which is to be the new launcher for the 1990s. Attention is given to improved geostationary orbit service, low orbit injection, and the Hermes European manned system.

  2. Influences Determining European Coal Seam Gas Deliverability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.

    2009-04-01

    Technically the coal basins of Europe have generated significant Gas In Place figures that has historically generated investor's interest in the development of this potential coal seam gas (CSG) resource. In the early 1980's, a wave of international, principally American, companies arrived, established themselves, drilled and then left with a poor record of success and disappointed investors. Recently a second wave of investment started after 2002, with the smaller companies leading the charge but have the lesson been learned from the past failures? To select a CSG investment project the common European approach has been to: 1. Find an old mining region; 2. Look to see if it had a coal mine methane gas problem; 3. Look for the non-mined coal seams; and 4. Peg the land. This method is perhaps the reason why the history of CSG exploration in Europe is such a disappointment as generally the coal mining regions of Europe do not have commercial CSG reservoir attributes. As a result, investors and governments have lost confidence that CSG will be a commercial success in Europe. New European specific principles for the determination of commercial CSG prospects have had to be delineated that allow for the selection of coal basins that have a strong technical case for deliverability. This will result in the return of investor confidence.

  3. Genetic structure of European sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Lawson Handley, L-J; Byrne, K; Santucci, F; Townsend, S; Taylor, M; Bruford, M W; Hewitt, G M

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale evaluations of genetic diversity in domestic livestock populations are necessary so that region-specific conservation measures can be implemented. We performed the first such survey in European sheep by analysing 820 individuals from 29 geographically and phenotypically diverse breeds and a closely related wild species at 23 microsatellite loci. In contrast to most other domestic species, we found evidence of widespread heterozygote deficit within breeds, even after removing loci with potentially high frequency of null alleles. This is most likely due to subdivision among flocks (Wahlund effect) and use of a small number of rams for breeding. Levels of heterozygosity were slightly higher in southern than in northern breeds, consistent with declining diversity with distance from the Near Eastern centre of domestication. Our results highlight the importance of isolation in terms of both geography and management in augmenting genetic differentiation through genetic drift, with isolated northern European breeds showing the greatest divergence and hence being obvious targets for conservation. Finally, using a Bayesian cluster analysis, we uncovered evidence of admixture between breeds, which has important implications for breed management.

  4. A European Roadmap for Thermophysical Properties Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filtz, J.-R.; Wu, J.; Stacey, C.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.; Hay, B.; Hameury, J.; Villamañan, M. A.; Thurzo-Andras, E.; Sarge, S.

    2015-03-01

    A roadmap for thermophysical properties metrology was developed in spring 2011 by the Thermophysical Properties Working Group in the EURAMET Technical Committee in charge of Thermometry, Humidity and Moisture, and Thermophysical Properties metrology. This roadmapping process is part of the EURAMET (European Association of National Metrology Institutes) activities aiming to increase impact from national investment in European metrology R&D. The roadmap shows a shared vision of how the development of thermophysical properties metrology should be oriented over the next 15 years to meet future social and economic needs. Since thermophysical properties metrology is a very broad and varied field, the authors have limited this roadmap to the following families of properties: thermal transport properties (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.), radiative properties (emissivity, absorbance, reflectance, and transmittance), caloric quantities (specific heat, enthalpy, etc.), thermodynamic properties (PVT and phase equilibria properties), and temperature-dependent quantities (thermal expansion, compressibility, etc.). This roadmap identifies the main societal and economical triggers that drive developments in thermophysical properties metrology. The key topics considered are energy, environment, advanced manufacturing and processing, public safety, security, and health. Key targets that require improved thermophysical properties measurements are identified in order to address these triggers. Ways are also proposed for defining the necessary skills and the main useful means to be implemented. These proposals will have to be revised as needs and technologies evolve in the future.

  5. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe.

  6. Determinants of urban sprawl in European cities

    PubMed Central

    Alvanides, Seraphim; Garrod, Guy

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence that helps to answer several key questions relating to the extent of urban sprawl in Europe. Building on the monocentric city model, this study uses existing data sources to derive a set of panel data for 282 European cities at three time points (1990, 2000 and 2006). Two indices of urban sprawl are calculated that, respectively, reflect changes in artificial area and the levels of urban fragmentation for each city. These are supplemented by a set of data on various economic and geographical variables that might explain the variation of the two indices. Using a Hausman-Taylor estimator and random regressors to control for the possible correlation between explanatory variables and unobservable city-level effects, we find that the fundamental conclusions of the standard monocentric model are valid in the European context for both indices. Although the variables generated by the monocentric model explain a large part of the variation of artificial area, their explanatory power for modelling the fragmentation index is relatively low. PMID:26321770

  7. Precipitation nowcasting and warning at European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenguer, Marc; Sempere-Torres, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The recent production of OPERA radar mosaics at European scale in real time has enabled the possibility of operational precipitation nowcasting based on the extrapolation of radar mosaics over the Continent at the resolution of radar mosaics (4 km and every 15 minutes). This study analyzes the performance of the nowcasting technique in the period June-October 2012. The results show: (1) the impact of some artifacts contaminating the radar precipitation maps, (2) a clear spatial variability of the nowcasting skill, and (3) the dependence of the nowcasting performance on the meteorological situation. Also, the ensemble nowcasting technique SBMcast (Berenguer et al. 2011) has been adapted to the use of OPERA mosaics. The performance of this probabilistic technique has been evaluated over a number of cases, also focusing on its ability to assess the uncertainty in the generated nowcasts. The final goal of this work, carried out within the framework of the Project on Prevention of the EC Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection "HAZARD Assessment based on rainfall European nowcasts"(HAREN), is using the generated nowcasts for issuing intense rainfall warnings when the observed and nowcasted values exceed the thresholds used throughout Europe. REFERENCES Berenguer, M., D. Sempere-Torres, and G. G. S. Pegram, 2011: SBMcast - An ensemble nowcasting technique to assess the uncertainty in rainfall forecasts by Lagrangian extrapolation. Journal of Hydrology, 404, 226-240.

  8. European Association of Echocardiography: Research Grant Programme.

    PubMed

    Gargani, Luna; Muraru, Denisa; Badano, Luigi P; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Sicari, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) offers a variety of grants/fellowships to help young professionals in the field of cardiological training or research activities throughout Europe. The number of grants has significantly increased in recent years with contributions from the Associations, Working Groups and Councils of the ESC. The European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is a registered branch of the ESC and actively takes part in this initiative. One of the aims of EAE is to promote excellence in research in cardiovascular ultrasound and other imaging modalities in Europe. Therefore, since 2008, the EAE offers a Research Grant Programme to help young doctors to obtain research experience in a high standard academic centre (or similar institution oriented to clinical or pre-clinical research) in an ESC member country other than their own. This programme can be considered as a valorization of the geographical mobility as well as cultural exchanges and professional practice in the field of cardiovascular imaging. The programme has been very successful so far, therefore in 2012 the EAE has increased its offer to two grants of 25,000 euros per annum each.

  9. Determinants of urban sprawl in European cities.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Walid; Alvanides, Seraphim; Garrod, Guy

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence that helps to answer several key questions relating to the extent of urban sprawl in Europe. Building on the monocentric city model, this study uses existing data sources to derive a set of panel data for 282 European cities at three time points (1990, 2000 and 2006). Two indices of urban sprawl are calculated that, respectively, reflect changes in artificial area and the levels of urban fragmentation for each city. These are supplemented by a set of data on various economic and geographical variables that might explain the variation of the two indices. Using a Hausman-Taylor estimator and random regressors to control for the possible correlation between explanatory variables and unobservable city-level effects, we find that the fundamental conclusions of the standard monocentric model are valid in the European context for both indices. Although the variables generated by the monocentric model explain a large part of the variation of artificial area, their explanatory power for modelling the fragmentation index is relatively low.

  10. Refugee blues: a UK and European perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the numbers of refugees travelling to the European Union are set in a global context. It is argued that the increasing restrictions placed on asylum seekers from the 1980s onwards in the UK and the associated culture of deterrence and prohibition have had the perverse effect of supporting the economic market for people smuggling. It appears that these restrictions were initially designed to deter people, most of whom would have been granted humanitarian assistance had they managed to arrive in the UK, so as to prevent them from accessing the decision-making process on asylum. Policy changes concerning travel, benefits, and other pressures on asylum seekers are also considered in the context of deterrence. The problems facing asylum seekers do not end with their arrival in a safe country. The current methods of determining refugee status are alarmingly weak. Indeed there is evidence suggesting that those who are most traumatised before arrival face systematic disadvantage. The focus of this paper is on the United Kingdom but its conclusions apply to most Western European countries. The paper concludes with some tentative suggestions for change.

  11. Cohort profile: the European Male Ageing Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, David M; Pye, Stephen R; Tajar, Abdelouahid; O'Neill, Terence W; Finn, Joseph D; Boonen, Steven; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E J; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C W

    2013-04-01

    The European Male Ageing Study (EMAS) was designed to examine the hypothesis that inter-individual and regional variability in symptomatic dysfunctions, alterations in body composition and health outcomes in ageing men can be explained by different rates of decline in anabolic hormones, the most important of which being testosterone. Between 2003 and 2005, 3369 community-dwelling men, aged between 40 and 79 years, were recruited from population-based registers in eight European centres to participate in the baseline survey, with follow-up investigations performed a median of 4.3 years later. Largely, identical questionnaire instruments and clinical investigations were used in both phases to capture contemporaneous data on general health (including cardiovascular diseases and chronic conditions), physical and cognitive functioning, mental health, sexual function, quality of life, bone health, chronic pain, disease biomarkers, hormones (sex hormones and metabolic hormones) and genetic polymorphisms. EMAS actively encourages new collaborations, data sharing for validation studies and participation in genetic study consortia. Potential collaborators should contact the principal investigator (F.C.W.W.) in the first instance.

  12. The Role of European Security Institutions in Future Crises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-05

    evolves into a true European Union though, the WEU wilt gradually replace NATO. CSCE wilt not only provide a platform for fundamental discussions on...around the EC with NATO providing the mili- tary component. As the EC evolves into a true European Union though, the WEU will gradually replace NATO...word .... ......... .. 82 The road to a European Union ... ......... 88 Strengths and weaknesses ..... ........... 91 Conclusion

  13. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database.

  14. The European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP)--a sentinel approach in the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA).

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Gianfranco; Cole, Michelle; Unemo, Magnus; Hoffmann, Steen; Ison, Catherine; van de Laar, Marita

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is monitored in the European Union/European Economic Area through the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP) coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Euro-GASP includes a sentinel surveillance programme which aims to detect in a timely manner changes in resistance patterns and inform treatment guidelines. The programme aims to test a representative number of isolates from each European Union/European Economic Area member state per year for a range of therapeutically relevant antimicrobials through a biannual hybrid centralised/decentralised system. Testing is supported by an External Quality Assurance programme and a laboratory training programme. Participation in the programme has increased to 21 countries in 2012. Euro-GASP has been able to detect the rapid spread of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cefixime across Europe in 2010 and 2011. Results from the programme have informed changes in European treatment guidelines for gonorrhoea and led to the development of the 'Response plan to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant gonorrhoea in Europe'. Future challenges for Euro-GASP include supporting countries to participate in Euro-GASP through decentralised testing, improving timeliness and epidemiological data quality, and increasing participation from Eastern Europe.

  15. The Integration Role of European Defense Procurement in Achieving a More Competitive and Stronger European Defense Equipment Market

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    DEFENSE PROCUREMENT IN ACHIEVING A MORE COMPETITIVE AND STRONGER EUROPEAN DEFENSE EQUIPMENT MARKET by Kiril O. Angelov June 2015 Thesis Advisor...COMPETITIVE AND STRONGER EUROPEAN DEFENSE EQUIPMENT MARKET 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Kiril O. Angelov 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...creation of a strong and competitive European defense equipment market out of the 28 fragmented markets of the EU member states remains an important

  16. Geostatistical enhancement of european hydrological predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio; Parajka, Juraj; Arheimer, Berit; Bagli, Stefano; Mazzoli, Paolo; Montanari, Alberto; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical Enhancement of European Hydrological Prediction (GEEHP) is a research experiment developed within the EU funded SWITCH-ON project, which proposes to conduct comparative experiments in a virtual laboratory in order to share water-related information and tackle changes in the hydrosphere for operational needs (http://www.water-switch-on.eu). The main objective of GEEHP deals with the prediction of streamflow indices and signatures in ungauged basins at different spatial scales. In particular, among several possible hydrological signatures we focus in our experiment on the prediction of flow-duration curves (FDCs) along the stream-network, which has attracted an increasing scientific attention in the last decades due to the large number of practical and technical applications of the curves (e.g. hydropower potential estimation, riverine habitat suitability and ecological assessments, etc.). We apply a geostatistical procedure based on Top-kriging, which has been recently shown to be particularly reliable and easy-to-use regionalization approach, employing two different type of streamflow data: pan-European E-HYPE simulations (http://hypeweb.smhi.se/europehype) and observed daily streamflow series collected in two pilot study regions, i.e. Tyrol (merging data from Austrian and Italian stream gauging networks) and Sweden. The merger of the two study regions results in a rather large area (~450000 km2) and might be considered as a proxy for a pan-European application of the approach. In a first phase, we implement a bidirectional validation, i.e. E-HYPE catchments are set as training sites to predict FDCs at the same sites where observed data are available, and vice-versa. Such a validation procedure reveals (1) the usability of the proposed approach for predicting the FDCs over the entire river network of interest using alternatively observed data and E-HYPE simulations and (2) the accuracy of E-HYPE-based predictions of FDCs in ungauged sites. In a

  17. The greenhouse gas balance of European grasslands.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinfeng; Ciais, Philippe; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Sultan, Benjamin; Soussana, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of European grasslands (EU-28 plus Norway and Switzerland), including CO2 , CH4 and N2 O, is estimated using the new process-based biogeochemical model ORCHIDEE-GM over the period 1961-2010. The model includes the following: (1) a mechanistic representation of the spatial distribution of management practice; (2) management intensity, going from intensively to extensively managed; (3) gridded simulation of the carbon balance at ecosystem and farm scale; and (4) gridded simulation of N2 O and CH4 emissions by fertilized grassland soils and livestock. The external drivers of the model are changing animal numbers, nitrogen fertilization and deposition, land-use change, and variable CO2 and climate. The carbon balance of European grassland (NBP) is estimated to be a net sink of 15 ± 7 g C m(-2 ) year(-1) during 1961-2010, equivalent to a 50-year continental cumulative soil carbon sequestration of 1.0 ± 0.4 Pg C. At the farm scale, which includes both ecosystem CO2 fluxes and CO2 emissions from the digestion of harvested forage, the net C balance is roughly halved, down to a small sink, or nearly neutral flux of 8 g C m(-2 ) year(-1) . Adding CH4 and N2 O emissions to net ecosystem exchange to define the ecosystem-scale GHG balance, we found that grasslands remain a net GHG sink of 19 ± 10 g C-CO2 equiv. m(-2 ) year(-1) , because the CO2 sink offsets N2 O and grazing animal CH4 emissions. However, when considering the farm scale, the GHG balance (NGB) becomes a net GHG source of -50 g C-CO2 equiv. m(-2 ) year(-1) . ORCHIDEE-GM simulated an increase in European grassland NBP during the last five decades. This enhanced NBP reflects the combination of a positive trend of net primary production due to CO2 , climate and nitrogen fertilization and the diminishing requirement for grass forage due to the Europe-wide reduction in livestock numbers.

  18. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases: Report of the European Union Parliament Symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2016-05-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS), and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized, on October 14, 2015, a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli, and with active participation of the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis, MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). The socioeconomic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic noncommunicable diseases in the EU; 30% of the total European population is suffering from allergies and asthma, and more than half are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine represents a novel approach, embracing four key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic, and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision-making process of therapeutic actions, and considering predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of precision medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the epidemic of allergies and chronic airways diseases. Participants underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient empowerment, and cost-effective treatment strategies.

  19. Developing a European Drought Observatory for Monitoring, Assessing and Forecasting Droughts across the European Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.; Barbosa, P.; Hofer, B.; Magni, D.; Jager, A. D.; Singleton, A.; Horion, S.; Sepulcre, G.; Micale, F.; Sokolova, E.; Calcagni, L.; Marioni, M.; Antofie, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Many European countries have repeatedly been affected by droughts, resulting in considerable ecological and economic damage. Climate change studies indicate a trend towards increasing climate variability most likely resulting in more frequent drought occurrences also in Europe. Against this background, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) is developing methods and tools for assessing, monitoring and forecasting droughts in Europe and develops a European Drought Observatory (EDO) to complement national activities with a European view. As droughts affect the entire water cycle continuous monitoring of a suite of indicators is required. Drought indicators at continental scale are supplemented by indicators at national, regional and local scales, providing more detailed information. At the core of the European Drought Observatory (EDO) are a portal and a map server presenting Europe-wide up-to-date drought-relevant information to the public and to decision makers in policy and water resources management. The final portal will include access to metadata catalogues, media reports, a map server and other related resources. The current version of EDO publishes continental information based on data processed and analysed at JRC as well as more detailed information at national and river basin scale processed by the local authorities. Available drought products include monthly updated Standardized Precipitation Indices (SPI), modelled soil moisture anomalies, remote sensing observations on the state of the vegetation cover (i.e. fAPAR and NDWI) and groundwater levels. A one-week soil moisture anomaly forecast complements the picture. Access to information at the national and river basin scale is established through interoperability arrangements with local authorities, making use of a special metadata catalogue and OWS standards (especially WMS and WCS). In addition, time series of drought indices can be retrieved for grid cells and administrative regions in

  20. 'European approach' to arc flash risk.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    DuPont claims that electrical arc, and the resulting "arc flash", are among the deadliest, least understood hazards of electricity", and can potentially occur in many industrial and other applications, including hospital plant rooms. Technical and engineering personnel from DuPont Engineering Technology, DuPont Personal Protection, and external independent experts, have thus collaborated to develop "a European approach to electrical arc risk assessment". The resulting free online resource, the DuPont Arc-Guide, sets out key steps to minimise serious arc flash incident risk, and details a range of optional, paid-for tailored risk assessment services, and an accompanying secure web portal, offering more in-depth guidance on this important, but apparently often overlooked, issue. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports.

  1. Northern European adolescent attitudes toward dating violence.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Erica; Holdsworth, Emma; Leen, Eline; Sorbring, Emma; Helsing, Bo; Jaans, Sebastian; Awouters, Valère

    2013-01-01

    A focus group methodology was used to examine attitudes toward dating violence among 86 adolescents (aged 12-17) from four northern European countries (England, Sweden, Germany, and Belgium). Four superordinate themes were identified from thematic analyses: gender identities, television as the educator, perceived acceptability of dating violence, and the decision to seek help/tell someone. Although violence in relationships was generally not condoned, when violence was used by females, was unintended (despite its consequences), or was in retaliation for infidelity, violence was perceived as acceptable. Adolescents indicated that their views were stereotypical and based solely on stereotypical television portrayals of violence in relationships. Stereotypical beliefs and portrayals generate barriers for victimized males to seek help because of fear of embarrassment.

  2. Medical imaging at risk from European directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The recent Forum article by Denis Le Bihan ("Threats to ultra-high-field MRI" August pp16-17) is a valuable addition to the ongoing debate about the impact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the European Commission's Physical Agents (EMF) directive. When this directive was introduced in 2004, exposure limits for static magnetic fields were excluded, because it was known that guidance published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1994 was being revised. It is likely that the new ICNIRP guidelines, to which Le Bihan refers, will now be incorporated into the directive. If so, this could indeed impact on ultra-highfield MRI, in which Europe has a worldleading position.

  3. Architectural Design for European SST System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzmann, Jens; Wagner, Axel; Blanchet, Guillaume; Assemat, Francois; Vial, Sophie; Dehecq, Bernard; Fernandez Sanchez, Jaime; Garcia Espinosa, Jose Ramon; Agueda Mate, Alberto; Bartsch, Guido; Schildknecht, Thomas; Lindman, Niklas; Fletcher, Emmet; Martin, Luis; Moulin, Serge

    2013-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a detailed design, evaluation and trade-off of a potential European Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) system architecture. The results have been produced in study phase 1 of the on-going "CO-II SSA Architectural Design" project performed by the Astrium consortium as part of ESA's Space Situational Awareness Programme and are the baseline for further detailing and consolidation in study phase 2. The sensor network is comprised of both ground- and space-based assets and aims at being fully compliant with the ESA SST System Requirements. The proposed ground sensors include a surveillance radar, an optical surveillance system and a tracking network (radar and optical). A space-based telescope system provides significant performance and robustness for the surveillance and tracking of beyond-LEO target objects.

  4. Human vaccine research in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Ole F; Lonnroth, Anna; Mulligan, Bernard

    2009-01-29

    The use of vaccines is saving millions of lives every year across the globe, but a number of important diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB and hepatitis C continue to frustrate attempts to produce effective vaccines against them. Confronting these challenges will require new approaches and increased research efforts by the scientific community. The Sixth Framework Programme (FP6; 2002-2006) of the European Commission (EC) has been an important catalyst in this direction by allocating a financial contribution of more than EUR 210 million to a wide variety of vaccine research activities, ranging from basic vaccinology, translational research to clinical application of vaccines. Taken together, around 581 research groups from 52 countries are participating in the vaccine activities of FP6. This impressive number signals a new spirit of collaborative research, which will facilitate the exploitation of the immense possibilities in modern vaccinology.

  5. European Security in an Evolving World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-18

    political efforts to assert additional influence over the UN and other Bretton Woods ’ era elements of the international political order, as well as...While global trends are driving many of the European trends, the                                                        61 “The  Bretton   Woods  system...name from the site of the  1944 conference that created the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank, the  Bretton   Woods   system was history’s

  6. Clinical evaluation of terconazole. European experience.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H A

    1989-08-01

    Terconazole is a new topical antifungal agent that differs structurally and functionally from the imidazoles. European clinical trials were conducted to determine (1) the lowest effective dose for a given treatment period, (2) which formulation should be tested further, and (3) how terconazole compares with other topical antifungal agents in terms of safety and efficacy. The results of dose-response studies demonstrated that 80- and 240-mg suppositories and 0.4% cream were the most effective formulations. Data from multicenter studies of pregnant and nonpregnant women in Belgium and Luxembourg indicate that the efficacy of terconazole cream is superior to that of miconazole nitrate cream and clotrimazole cream. Terconazole cream is also more effective than clotrimazole cream in terms of lower relapse rates.

  7. The European lead/acid battery industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudel, J. L.

    The European lead/acid battery industry is examined from a general perspective that covers wide economic, industrial and technical issues. It would appear that the upheavals witnessed in Eastern Europe two years ago together with the more recent political and monetary events throw two points into sharp relief: first, the merely relative value of general speeches, that are liable to sound technocratic and out of touch with the realities of the world; second, the need for an industrialist to be able to stand back and view things from a distance. Given this background, the review is divided into four parts, namely: (i) general remarks about Europe; (ii) the wider context of the lead/acid battery industry; (iii) changes in demand; (iv) structural changes in market supply. Finally, a number of observations are made about the key issues that will prove decisive for the future of battery manufacturers in Europe within the context of a rapidly changing environment.

  8. BLSS, a European approach to CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    Several studies have revealed the benefits of a biological life support system (BLSS) in space stations. Problem areas requiring experimental and analytical investigations necessary for the development of BLSS have been identified. The nature of these problems allows for the classification into near-term (prepilot) and long-term (pilot) studies, and into terrestrial and space research programmes. The knowledge of planned European and U.S. space experiments allows for a coordination with existing Spacelab and Shuttle programmes to avoid duplication of research efforts. The Japanese also plan biological experiments on Spacelab in 1988. Coordinating efforts should provide answers to certain BLSS relevant questions. Major areas which need immediate attention are: micorgravity effects; cosmic radiation effects; use of PAR-radiation and high energy particle radiation protection; and monitoring and control (including sensor technology).

  9. Temperature modulates testis steroidogenesis in European eel.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, David S; Morini, Marina; Tveiten, Helge; Vílchez, M Carmen; Gallego, Victor; Dirks, Ron P; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M; Pérez, Luz; Asturiano, Juan F

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluates the effects of temperature on hCG-induced spermatogenesis in European eel (Anguilla anguilla), subjected to three thermal regimes: T10: 10°C (first 4weeks), 15°C (next 3weeks) and 20°C (last 6weeks); T15: 15°C (first 4weeks) and 20°C (last 9weeks); and T20: constant 20°C for the duration of the experiment. At 10°C, maturation stopped in the A spermatogonial stage (SPG1), and no further maturation was observed until the temperature was ≥15°C. With the aim of explaining these results, the influence of temperature on steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroid synthesis was tested. The initial synthesis of androgens (T and 11-KT) increased at SPG1, and was not influenced by temperature. Likewise, the gene expression of the steroidogenic enzymes linked to androgen synthesis (aacyp11a1, aacyp17-I and aa11βHSD) also increased at SPG1. In contrast, no correlation was seen between the increase in E2 and the aacyp19a1 gene expression peak in the testes, with E2 increasing as a consequence of the seawater acclimation carried out before hormonal treatment, and peaking the aacyp19a1 gene expression at B spermatogonial stage (SPG2). Aacyp21 gene expression was also higher at SPG2, and this stage was only reached when the rearing temperature was ≥15°C. In conclusion, androgen synthesis is not dependent on temperature, but further maturation requires higher temperatures in order to induce a change in the steroidogenic pathway towards estrogen and progestin synthesis. This study demonstrates that temperature plays a crucial role in European eel maturation, even perhaps controlling gonad development during the reproductive migration.

  10. Laboratory medicine in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Wytze P; Zerah, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The profession of laboratory medicine differs between countries within the European Union (EU) in many respects. The objective of professional organizations of the promotion of mutual recognition of specialists within the EU is closely related to the free movement of people. This policy translates to equivalence of standards and harmonization of the training curriculum. The aim of the present study is the description of the organization and practice of laboratory medicine within the countries that constitute the EU. A questionnaire covering many aspects of the profession was sent to delegates of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and Union Européenne de Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) of the 28 EU countries. Results were sent to the delegates for confirmation. Many differences between countries were identified: predominantly medical or scientific professionals; a broad or limited professional field of interest; inclusion of patient treatment; formal or absent recognition; a regulated or absent formal training program; general or minor application of a quality system based on ISO Norms. The harmonization of the postgraduate training of both clinical chemists and of laboratory physicians has been a goal for many years. Differences in the organization of the laboratory professions still exist in the respective countries which all have a long historical development with their own rationality. It is an important challenge to harmonize our profession, and difficult choices will need to be made. Recent developments with respect to the directive on Recognition of Professional Qualifications call for new initiatives to harmonize laboratory medicine both across national borders, and across the borders of scientific and medical professions.

  11. European Cloth and “Tropical” Skin:

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    As Britain’s imperial and colonial ambitions intensified toward the end of the nineteenth century, the preservation of white European health in tropical climates became an increasingly important concern. Since at least the seventeenth century, the “tropics” had been seen as spaces holding vast potential wealth but also death and disease. To combat these deadly but desirable landscapes, the British built a considerable commodity culture around the preservation of white European health, and for many, tropical clothing was one of the most important and essential items in their “kits.” This article investigates the composition and use of such clothing in relation to British ideas of health and hygiene in tropical climates. First, it considers debates that ensued over the best material—wool, cotton, linen, silk, or a combination of these materials—and the role of “black” skin and local practice in the development of tropical clothing. Second, it demonstrates the importance of location in any discussion of tropical medicine and hygiene, and the tension and ambiguity that still surrounded British ideas of health and hygiene in the tropical colonies. Third, it argues that tropical clothing was important in the maintenance of climatic etiologies despite advances in parasitology and sanitary science. Finally, it considers the relationship of tropical clothing to the formation of a unique colonial identity. To British men and women embarking for any number of tropical destinations, proper clothing was not a banal and mundane component of their outfitting. For many, the clothing signified a departure from the safe and “civil” climes of Britain for adventure in the expanding tropical empire. PMID:19801795

  12. Is ICH exportable outside the European Union?

    PubMed

    Dent, N J

    2000-01-01

    This article sets out to explore whether or not the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Good Clinical Practices (GCP) Guidelines are exportable outside the European Union (EU). It is not a question of whether the Guidelines per se are exportable but rather can studies outside the EU be performed to the same, or a better standard? It is well known that the ICH Guidelines are accepted worldwide in the countries where International Clinical Trials are carried out. Likewise with the signatories to the Step 5 document being the major players--the USA, Japan, and Europe--the guidelines are already enshrined in national legislation. The author therefore sets out to address whether clinical trials can be conducted to the ICH GCP standard outside Western Europe. The facts and opinions presented here are based on a 16 centre (of which eight of the centres were required to be audited by the Sponsor) clinical study that was carried out in both the Czech Republic and Poland for nonseasonal rhinitis. The recruitment of patients was required to take place in a short period of time and had strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The overall concept of the study and the compliance with internationally accepted ICH GCPs was found to be of a very high standard. In addition, several other studies from totally different therapeutic areas, clearly show that the standard in non-EU countries is equally high and in most cases of a higher standard than is seen at the principal investigators sites within the EU. In what Western Europeans like to call "developing countries," an understanding of the international GCPs has already been grasped and extremely high quality clinical trials are being carried out. To demonstrate this, attention is drawn to a large head and neck cancer study that was part device and part pharmaceutical product and was conducted in conjunction with photodynamic therapy (PDT), carried out in several countries, but of note in India.

  13. Medieval European medicine and Asian spices.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jong Kuk

    2014-08-01

    This article aimed to explain the reasons why Asian spices including pepper, ginger, and cinnamon were considered as special and valuable drugs with curative powers in the Medieval Europe. Among these spices, pepper was most widely and frequently used as medicine according to medieval medical textbooks. We analyzed three main pharmacology books written during the Middle Ages. One of the main reasons that oriental spices were widely used as medicine was due to the particular medieval medical system fundamentally based on the humoral theory invented by Hippocrates and Galen. This theory was modified by Arab physicians and imported to Europe during the Middle Ages. According to this theory, health is determined by the balance of the following four humors which compose the human body: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm. Each humor has its own qualities such as cold, hot, wet, and dry. Humoral imbalance was one of the main causes of disease, so it was important to have humoral equilibrium. Asian spices with hot and dry qualities were used to balance the cold and wet European diet. The analysis of several major medical textbooks of the Middle Ages proves that most of the oriental spices with hot and dry qualities were employed to cure diverse diseases, particularly those caused by coldness and humidity. However, it should be noted that the oriental spices were considered to be much more valuable and effective as medicines than the local medicinal ingredients, which were not only easily procured but also were relatively cheap. Europeans mystified oriental spices, with the belief that they have marvelous and mysterious healing powers. Such mystification was related to the terrestrial Paradise. They believed that the oriental spices were grown in Paradise which was located in the Far East and were brought to the Earthly world along the four rivers flowing from the Paradise.

  14. European Conference on Atmospheric UV Radiation: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taalas, Petteri; Amanatidis, Georgios T.; Heikkilä, Anu

    2000-02-01

    Interest in atmospheric ultraviolet radiation (UV) research has increased considerably since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone "hole" and after indications of the existence of a similar kind of potential in northern high latitudes. UV measuring and research activities have grown accordingly, including development of new instruments, improvement in quality assurance/quality control methodologies, as well as development of models. Modeling methodologies have been applied for development of spaceborne techniques for estimating the global distribution of solar UV radiation. The European Conference on Atmospheric UV Radiation (ECUV), which was held on June 28 to July 2, 1998 in Helsinki, Finland, brought together 160 scientists from all parts of the world. The Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) ECUV special issue summarizes 32 papers presented at the conference. New UV trend analyses based on spectral and broadband measurements and modeled UV data for the most recent decades indicate increases of UV-B radiation in various parts of Europe. Additional observational and modeled information on the impact of cloudiness, total ozone, ozone profiles, aerosols, and albedo on ground level UV irradiance has been gathered. The regional UV albedo has been studied over snow-covered surfaces, vegetation, and sea areas by aircraft-based, ground-based, and modeled methods. Further instrument development, improved QA/QC practices, and the application of data correction methods have already taken place but are also clearly needed in the future. Different methods for estimating UV irradiance using spaceborne information have been developed. Additional efforts to improve our understanding of the impact of cloudiness, albedo, and aerosol on UV are expected to improve spaceborne UV retrievals in the future. In Europe the European Commission and national funding agencies have been supporting research projects aimed at understanding the UV climatology in Europe through UV instrument

  15. European Union energy policy integration: A case of European Commission policy entrepreneurship and increasing supranationalism

    PubMed Central

    Maltby, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on gas, this article explores the role of the European Commission in the process of European Union energy security policy development, and the extent to which the policy area is becoming increasingly supranational. Situating the article within the literature on agenda-setting and framing, it is argued that a policy window was opened as a result of: enlargement to include more energy import dependent states, a trend of increasing energy imports and prices, and gas supply disruptions. From the mid-2000s, the Commission contributed to a shift in political norms, successfully framing import dependency as a problem requiring an EU-level solution, based on the institution’s pre-existing preferences for a diversified energy supply and internal energy market. Whilst Member States retain significant sovereignty, the Commission has achieved since 2006 creeping competencies in the internal, and to a lesser extent external, dimensions of EU energy policy. PMID:24926115

  16. European Union energy policy integration: A case of European Commission policy entrepreneurship and increasing supranationalism.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Tomas

    2013-04-01

    Focusing on gas, this article explores the role of the European Commission in the process of European Union energy security policy development, and the extent to which the policy area is becoming increasingly supranational. Situating the article within the literature on agenda-setting and framing, it is argued that a policy window was opened as a result of: enlargement to include more energy import dependent states, a trend of increasing energy imports and prices, and gas supply disruptions. From the mid-2000s, the Commission contributed to a shift in political norms, successfully framing import dependency as a problem requiring an EU-level solution, based on the institution's pre-existing preferences for a diversified energy supply and internal energy market. Whilst Member States retain significant sovereignty, the Commission has achieved since 2006 creeping competencies in the internal, and to a lesser extent external, dimensions of EU energy policy.

  17. The East European Press and Three-Mile Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Owen V.

    This report of the investigation into East European newspaper treatment of the accident at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in the spring of 1979 focuses on the Czech and Slovak media, particularly on the Slovak Communist Party's daily newspaper, "Pravda." The response of the media of other East European countries to…

  18. Contemporary European Studies: A Model for Interdisciplinary Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannerbeck, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the University of South Carolina's (Columbia) Contemporary European Studies program, which drew on current course offerings and existing financial resources to provide study about post-French Revolution European languages, cultures, politics, history, geography, and economics. Options exist at many other institutions to create broadly…

  19. The Rise of the Information Society amongst European Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the information society discourse in the European Union in relation to the European Commission's eLearning programmes, based on selected academics' conceptualisation of the term. It reveals a mixed picture of the perceptions that academics have of the information society in their respective countries. The findings indicate…

  20. Challenges of Adolescent Psychology in the European Identity Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lannegrand-Willems, Lyda; Barbot, Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, the question of identity and youth civic engagement constitutes a challenge both for the European Union (EU) and for research on adolescent psychology. In this article, we discuss the European historical context and the current initiatives from the EU that aim to encourage civic engagement among young people. Then, we suggest some…