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Sample records for european peptide society

  1. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  2. European National Society Cardiovascular Journals

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, F.; Ambrosio, G.; Pinto, F.J.; van der Wall, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane˘k MD, Jørgen Videbæk MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations) PMID:18665206

  3. European Society for Clinical Virology - winter meeting.

    PubMed

    Westh, Henrik

    2004-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical Virology annual winter meeting mainly appeals to clinical virologists interested in human disease. Basic and clinical data were presented, highlighting a number of interesting findings. This report briefly describes options in HIV antiviral treatment, and focuses on fusion inhibitors, a new anti-HIV class of drugs. Recent improvements in experimental DNA vaccines are also presented.

  4. European Hernia Society classification of parastomal hernias.

    PubMed

    Śmietański, M; Szczepkowski, M; Alexandre, J A; Berger, D; Bury, K; Conze, J; Hansson, B; Janes, A; Miserez, M; Mandala, V; Montgomery, A; Morales Conde, S; Muysoms, F

    2014-02-01

    A classification of parastomal hernias (PH) is needed to compare different populations described in various trials and cohort studies, complete the previous inguinal and ventral hernia classifications of the European Hernia Society (EHS) and will be integrated into the EuraHS database (European Registry of Abdominal Wall Hernias). Several members of the EHS board and invited experts gathered for 2 days to discuss the development of an EHS classification of PH. The discussions were based on a literature review and critical appraisal of existing classifications. The classification proposal is based on the PH defect size (small is ≤5 cm) and the presence of a concomitant incisional hernia (cIH). Four types were defined: Type I, small PH without cIH; Type II, small PH with cIH; Type III, large PH without cIH; and Type IV, large PH with cIH. In addition, the classification grid includes details about whether the hernia recurs after a previous PH repair or whether it is a primary PH. Clinical validation is needed in the future to assess if the classification allows us to differentiate the treatment strategy and if the classification impacts outcome in these different subgroups. A classification of PH divided into subgroups according to size and cIH was formulated with the aim of improving the ability to compare different studies and their results.

  5. European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 highlights.

    PubMed

    Fox, Keith A A

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in 2013 met in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) as an innovative and interactive congress involving more than 30,000 participants. There were 10,490 abstract submissions and a total of 227 hotline, basic science hotline and trial update submissions. Participants were involved from more than 150 countries. To make the congress manageable for participants, related topics were grouped together in ‘villages’ and a smart electronic application allowed the participants to guide their way through the congress and choose the sessions of interest. The innovative new program was initiated by the ESC Congress Programme Committee and the Congress Chair (Keith AA Fox, Chair 2012–2014) has responsibility for the design and delivery of the scientific program. The spotlight of the congress was ‘the heart interacting with systemic organs’, chosen because of the importance of cardiovascular disease conditions crossing conventional boundaries. In all 572 abstracts, the work involved an interaction between the heart and another organ, such as the brain, lungs, kidney, vasculature or inflammation system. In addition, innovative new approaches linked basic science and clinical science and the new ‘hubs of the congress’ allowed excellent interaction and exchange of ideas.

  6. The Rise of the Information Society amongst European Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the information society discourse in the European Union in relation to the European Commission's eLearning programmes, based on selected academics' conceptualisation of the term. It reveals a mixed picture of the perceptions that academics have of the information society in their respective countries. The findings indicate…

  7. The Rise of the Information Society amongst European Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the information society discourse in the European Union in relation to the European Commission's eLearning programmes, based on selected academics' conceptualisation of the term. It reveals a mixed picture of the perceptions that academics have of the information society in their respective countries. The findings indicate…

  8. Organization of heart failure management in European Society of Cardiology member countries: survey of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology in collaboration with the Heart Failure National Societies/Working Groups.

    PubMed

    Seferovic, Petar M; Stoerk, Stefan; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mareev, Viacheslav; Kavoliuniene, Ausra; Ristic, Arsen D; Ponikowski, Piotr; McMurray, John; Maggioni, Aldo; Ruschitzka, Frank; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Coats, Andrew; Piepoli, Massimo; McDonagh, Theresa; Riley, Jillian; Hoes, Arno; Pieske, Burkert; Dobric, Milan; Papp, Zoltan; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Parissis, John; Ben Gal, Tuvia; Vinereanu, Dragos; Brito, Dulce; Altenberger, Johann; Gatzov, Plamen; Milinkovic, Ivan; Hradec, Jaromír; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Amir, Offer; Moura, Brenda; Lainscak, Mitja; Comin, Josep; Wikström, Gerhard; Anker, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this document was to obtain a real-life contemporary analysis of the demographics and heart failure (HF) statistics, as well as the organization and major activities of the Heart Failure National Societies (HFNS) in European Society of Cardiology (ESC) member countries. Data from 33 countries were collected from HFNS presidents/representatives during the first Heart Failure Association HFNS Summit (Belgrade, Serbia, 29 October 2011). Data on incidence and/or prevalence of HF were available for 22 countries, and the prevalence of HF ranged between 1% and 3%. In five European and one non-European ESC country, heart transplantation was reported as not available. Natriuretic peptides and echocardiography are routinely applied in the management of acute HF in the median of 80% and 90% of centres, respectively. Eastern European and Mediterranean countries have lower availability of natriuretic peptide testing for acute HF patients, compared with other European countries. Almost all countries have organizations dealing specifically with HF. HFNS societies for HF patients exist in only 12, while in 16 countries HF patient education programmes are active. Most HFNS reported that no national HF registry exists in their country. Fifteen HFNS produced national HF guidelines, while 19 have translated the ESC HF guidelines. Most HFNS (n = 23) participated in the organization of the European HF Awareness Day. This document demonstrated significant heterogeneity in the organization of HF management, and activities of the national HF working groups/associations. High availability of natriuretic peptide and echocardiographic measurements was revealed, with differences between developed countries and countries in transition.

  9. Colon capsule endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, C; Hassan, C; Galmiche, J P; Neuhaus, H; Dumonceau, J M; Adler, S; Epstein, O; Gay, G; Pennazio, M; Rex, D K; Benamouzig, R; de Franchis, R; Delvaux, M; Devière, J; Eliakim, R; Fraser, C; Hagenmuller, F; Herrerias, J M; Keuchel, M; Macrae, F; Munoz-Navas, M; Ponchon, T; Quintero, E; Riccioni, M E; Rondonotti, E; Marmo, R; Sung, J J; Tajiri, H; Toth, E; Triantafyllou, K; Van Gossum, A; Costamagna, G

    2012-05-01

    PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an innovative noninvasive, and painless ingestible capsule technique that allows exploration of the colon without the need for sedation and gas insufflation. Although it is already available in European and other countries, the clinical indications for CCE as well as the reporting and work-up of detected findings have not yet been standardized. The aim of this evidence-based and consensus-based guideline, commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to furnish healthcare providers with a comprehensive framework for potential implementation of this technique in a clinical setting.

  10. Task Force on Sudden Cardiac Death, European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Priori, S G; Aliot, E; Blømstrom-Lundqvist, C; Bossaert, L; Breithardt, G; Brugada, P; Camm, J A; Cappato, R; Cobbe, S M; Di, Mario C; Maron, B J; McKenna, W J; Pedersen, A K; Ravens, U; Schwartz, P J; Trusz-Gluza, M; Vardas, P; Wellens, H J J; Zipes, D P

    2002-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology has convened a Task Force on Sudden Cardiac Death in order to provide a comprehensive, educational document on this important topic. The main document has been published in the European Heart Journal in August 2001. The Task Force has now summarized the most important clinical issues on sudden cardiac death and provided tables with recommendations for risk stratification and for prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death. The present recommendations are specifically intended to encourage the development and revision of national guidelines on prevention of sudden cardiac death. The common challenge for cardiologists, physicians of other medical specialties and health professionals throughout Europe is to realize the potential for sudden cardiac death prevention and to contribute to public health efforts to reduce its burden.

  11. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement.

  12. Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Vilmann, Peter; Frost Clementsen, Paul; Colella, Sara; Siemsen, Mette; De Leyn, Paul; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Herth, Felix J; Larghi, Alberto; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Hassan, Cesare; Crombag, Laurence; Korevaar, Daniël A; Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-07-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in Endoscopy and the European Respiratory Journal.

  13. European society of contraception statement on contraception in obese women.

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Skouby, Sven; Serfaty, David; Lech, Medard; Bitzer, Johannes; Crosignani, Pier Giorgio; Cagnacci, Angelo; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-02-01

    The obesity 'epidemic' continues to increase, mostly but not only in developed countries. As overweight and obese women are at an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) at baseline and at a much higher risk during pregnancy, it is essential to help these women to plan pregnancies carefully and to use contraceptives with a positive ratio of benefits versus risks. The Expert Group on hormonal and molecular contraception of the European Society of Contraception convened to review the existing evidence and propose recommendations to the prescribers in line with most recent studies and with the Medical Eligibility Criteria of the World Health Organisation.

  14. 39th Annual European Brain and Behaviour Society Abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Treves, Edited by: Alessandro; Battaglini, P. Paolo; Chelazzi, Leonardo; Diamond, Mathew; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    The EUROPEAN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR SOCIETY has held its 39th Annual General Meeting in Trieste, in the campus next to the Miramare castle and its park, co-hosted by SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies, and ICTP, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Alessandro Treves (SISSA) was the head and inspiration of the Local Organizing committee, supported by P. Battaglini, L. Chelazzi, M. Diamond and G. Vallortigara. All approaches relating brain and behaviour were represented at the meeting, which aimed to further expand the wide spectrum of previous EBBS AGMs, and to bring together integrative, system, cognitive, computational neuroscientists. See also the societies home page: http://www.ebbs-science.org/.

  15. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from London 2015.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in London from 29 August to 2 September 2015. It is the leading conference in cardiology in the world, with presentations on the latest scientific discoveries, innovations, technology, education, and clinical practices. More than 32,000 delegates and 5,000 exhibitors from 140 countries participated, sharing a number of scientific presentations, including 28 clinical hot lines, 18 clinical trial updates, 20 registry studies, 12 basic and translational science hot line studies, and 4,533 abstract studies. Japan had the highest number of accepted abstracts at the Congress, indicating the great contribution of Japanese scientists and the Japanese Circulation Society.

  16. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  17. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Sean S.; Haas, W. Randall; Shennan, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems on the verge of major reorganization—regime shift—may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8–4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science. PMID:27573833

  18. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse.

    PubMed

    Downey, Sean S; Haas, W Randall; Shennan, Stephen J

    2016-08-30

    Ecosystems on the verge of major reorganization-regime shift-may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8-4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science.

  19. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  20. European Society for Swallowing Disorders - European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baijens, Laura Wj; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization's classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies.

  1. Dunlop receives European Geophysical Society's Néel Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    David J. Dunlop of the Physics Department and Erindale College at the University of Toronto has been awarded the 1999 Louis Néel Medal of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) for “authoritative contributions to rock magnetism, setting the standards for future decades.” The medal will be presented to Dunlop in April in a special ceremony at the Nederlands Congresbebouw in The Hague, The Netherlands, during the 24th General Assembly of the EGS.The Néel Medal is awarded by the Solid Earth Geophysics section of EGS in recognition of the scientific achievements of Louis Néel, who shared the 1970 Nobel Prize in Physics for his fundamental discoveries in magnetism.The medal is awarded “for outstanding achievements in the fertilization of the Earth Sciences by the transfer and application of fundamental theory and/or experimental techniques of solid state physics, defined in its broadest sense.”

  2. The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 2013 Europhysics conference on High Energy Physics is a biennial conference organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society since 1971. The conference in this series usually attracts 600-700 participants and is one of the worlds largest conferences in this field. The latest conferences in this series were held in Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisabon and Aachen. The conference has parallel, plenary and poster sessions as well as an industrial exhibition. The conference is jointly organised by the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University, Chalmers University of Technology, Lund University, Uppsala University, Nordita and the Oskar Klein Centre. Topics covered are: Standard Model and Beyond Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Neutrino Physics Flavour Physics CP Violation and Tests of Fundamental Symmetries QCD and Hadronic Physics Heavy Ions Astroparticle Physics High Energy Astrophysics Cosmology Non-perturbative Field Theory String Theory Detectors and Data Handling Accelerator R&D Future Facilities. Special ECFA session 20 July: Particle Physics after the European strategy update

  3. Sociality in Diverse Societies: A Regional Analysis Across European Countries.

    PubMed

    Koster, Ferry

    2013-04-01

    For a long time, researchers investigate the impact of diversity on society. To measure diversity, either archival data at the national level of census data at the neighborhood level, within a single country are used. Both approaches are limited. The first approach does not allow to investigate variation in diversity within countries and the second approach misses the possibility to investigate cross national differences. The present study aims at bringing these two approaches closer together by constructing diversity measures based on the European Social Survey (ESS). The ESS is collected every 2 years since 2002 and includes individual level data that allow replicating earlier measures of ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity for 30 European countries. Furthermore, since respondents are asked to indicate in what region they live, measured with the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics classification, it is possible to construct disaggregated measures. Comparing the new indicators with existing diversity scores leads to the following conclusions. First, the new and old measures are strongly correlated at the national level. Secondly, investigating the relationship between diversity and different kinds of sociality (interpersonal trust, institutional trust, and support for government redistribution) shows that regional diversity is more strongly related to them than diversity at the national level.

  4. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress report from Barcelona 2014.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in Barcelona from 30th August to 3rd September 2014. More than 30,300 attendees from around the world shared the latest original research, including 27 clinical Hot Line studies, 12 basic science Hot Lines, 15 clinical trial updates, 19 registry studies, and 4,597 abstracts. Many important issues were presented, including novel treatment strategies for heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, interventional treatment for structural heart disease, renal denervation, novel anticoagulant therapies, atrial fibrillation and so on. In addition, 5 new ESC clinical practice guidelines (ie, myocardial revascularization, non-cardiac surgery, acute pulmonary embolism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and aortic disease) were launched. It should be noted that Japan has recently been ranked in the top position in terms of the number of abstract submissions. Based on these activities, the ESC Congress has been recognized as the dominant scientific and educational forum for healthcare professionals in cardiology. We report the highlights and several key presentations of the ESC Congress 2014. The scientific activities and growing contributions of Japanese cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons enhance the favorable relationship between the ESC and the Japanese Circulation Society.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia W; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs, and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality health care contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by the full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. ERS and ATS have strong international commitments, and work with leaders from governments, academia, and organizations to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of health care systems and health equality. Both the ATS and ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organizations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members and other societies to

  6. An official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality healthcare contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by their full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. The ERS and the ATS have strong international commitments and work with leaders from governments, academia, and other organisational bodies to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of healthcare systems and health equality. Both the ATS and the ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organisations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members

  7. Lutetium-177 Labeled Peptides: The European Institute of Oncology Experience.

    PubMed

    Carollo, Angela; Papi, Stefano; Chinol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues has shown encouraging results in various somatostatin receptor positive tumors. Partial remission rates up to 30% have been documented as well as significant improvements in quality of life and survival. This treatment takes advantage of the high specific binding of the radiolabeled peptide to somatostatin receptors overexpressed by the tumors thus being more effective on the tumor cells with less systemic side-effects. The development of macrocyclic chelators conjugated to peptides made possible the stable binding with various radionuclides. In particular 177Lu features favourable physical characteristics with a half-life of 6.7 days, emission of β- with energy of 0.5 MeV for treatment and γ-emissions suitable for imaging. The present contribution describes the learning process achieved at the European Institute of Oncology (IEO) since the first application of 90Y labeled peptides to the therapy of neuroendocrine tumors back in 1997. Continuous improvements led to the preparation of a safe 177Lu labeled peptide for human use. Our learning curve began with the identification of the optimal characteristics of the isotope paying attention to its chemical purity and specific activity along with the optimization of the parameters involved in the radiolabeling procedure. Also the radiation protection issues have been improved along the years and recently more and more attention has been devoted to the pharmaceutical aspects involved in the preparation. The overall issue of the quality has now been completed by drafting an extensive documentation with the goal to deliver a safe and reliable product to our patients.

  8. European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Goeminne, Pieter C; McDonnell, Melissa J; Aliberti, Stefano; Marshall, Sara E; Loebinger, Michael R; Murris, Marlene; Cantón, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Dimakou, Katerina; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T; Haworth, Charles S; Vendrell, Montserrat; Ringshausen, Felix C; Subotic, Dragan; Wilson, Robert; Vilaró, Jordi; Stallberg, Bjorn; Welte, Tobias; Rohde, Gernot; Blasi, Francesco; Elborn, Stuart; Almagro, Marta; Timothy, Alan; Ruddy, Thomas; Tonia, Thomy; Rigau, David; Chalmers, James D

    2017-09-01

    Bronchiectasis in adults is a chronic disorder associated with poor quality of life and frequent exacerbations in many patients. There have been no previous international guidelines.The European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis describe the appropriate investigation and treatment strategies determined by a systematic review of the literature.A multidisciplinary group representing respiratory medicine, microbiology, physiotherapy, thoracic surgery, primary care, methodology and patients considered the most relevant clinical questions (for both clinicians and patients) related to management of bronchiectasis. Nine key clinical questions were generated and a systematic review was conducted to identify published systematic reviews, randomised clinical trials and observational studies that answered these questions. We used the GRADE approach to define the quality of the evidence and the level of recommendations. The resulting guideline addresses the investigation of underlying causes of bronchiectasis, treatment of exacerbations, pathogen eradication, long term antibiotic treatment, anti-inflammatories, mucoactive drugs, bronchodilators, surgical treatment and respiratory physiotherapy.These recommendations can be used to benchmark quality of care for people with bronchiectasis across Europe and to improve outcomes. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  9. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  10. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  11. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar A; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  12. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  13. Endoscopic submucosal dissection: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Ponchon, Thierry; Repici, Alessandro; Vieth, Michael; De Ceglie, Antonella; Amato, Arnaldo; Berr, Frieder; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bialek, Andrzej; Conio, Massimo; Haringsma, Jelle; Langner, Cord; Meisner, Søren; Messmann, Helmut; Morino, Mario; Neuhaus, Horst; Piessevaux, Hubert; Rugge, Massimo; Saunders, Brian P; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Seewald, Stefan; Kashin, Sergey; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Deprez, Pierre H

    2015-09-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system 1 2 was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. 1 ESGE recommends endoscopic en bloc resection for superficial esophageal squamous cell cancers (SCCs), excluding those with obvious submucosal involvement (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) may be considered in such lesions when they are smaller than 10 mm if en bloc resection can be assured. However, ESGE recommends endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as the first option, mainly to provide an en bloc resection with accurate pathology staging and to avoid missing important histological features (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 ESGE recommends endoscopic resection with a curative intent for visible lesions in Barrett's esophagus (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). ESD has not been shown to be superior to EMR for excision of mucosal cancer, and for that reason EMR should be preferred. ESD may be considered in selected cases, such as lesions larger than 15 mm, poorly lifting tumors, and lesions at risk for submucosal invasion (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends endoscopic resection for the treatment of gastric superficial neoplastic lesions that possess a very low risk of lymph node metastasis (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). EMR is an acceptable option for lesions smaller than 10 - 15 mm with a very low probability of advanced histology (Paris 0-IIa). However, ESGE recommends ESD as treatment of choice for most gastric superficial neoplastic lesions (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 4 ESGE states that the majority of colonic and rectal superficial lesions can be effectively removed in a curative way by standard polypectomy and

  14. Mineral Metabolism in European Children Living with a Renal Transplant: A European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association–European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonthuis, Marjolein; Busutti, Marco; Jager, Kitty J.; Baiko, Sergey; Bakkaloğlu, Sevcan; Battelino, Nina; Gaydarova, Maria; Gianoglio, Bruno; Parvex, Paloma; Gomes, Clara; Heaf, James G.; Podracka, Ludmila; Kuzmanovska, Dafina; Molchanova, Maria S.; Pankratenko, Tatiana E.; Papachristou, Fotios; Reusz, György; Sanahuja, Maria José; Shroff, Rukshana; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Schaefer, Franz; Verrina, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Data on mineral metabolism in pediatric renal transplant recipients largely arise from small single-center studies. In adult patients, abnormal mineral levels are related to a higher risk of graft failure. This study used data from the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association–European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry to study the prevalence and potential determinants of mineral abnormalities, as well as the predictive value of a disturbed mineral level on graft survival in a large cohort of European pediatric renal transplant recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 1237 children (0–17 years) from 10 European countries, who had serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone measurements from 2000 onward. Abnormalities of mineral metabolism were defined according to European guidelines on prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in children on chronic renal failure. Results Abnormal serum phosphorus levels were observed in 25% (14% hypophosphatemia and 11% hyperphosphatemia), altered serum calcium in 30% (19% hypocalcemia, 11% hypercalcemia), and hyperparathyroidism in 41% of the patients. A longer time since transplantation was associated with a lower risk of having mineral levels above target range. Serum phosphorus levels were inversely associated with eGFR, and levels above the recommended targets were associated with a higher risk of graft failure independently of eGFR. Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are common after pediatric renal transplantation in Europe and are associated with graft dysfunction. PMID:25710805

  15. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jonathan; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London.

  16. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L.; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London. PMID:28154820

  17. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition syllabus for subspecialty training: moving towards a European standard.

    PubMed

    D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Nicastro, Emanuele; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Mearin, Maria L; Tzivinikos, Christos; Vandenplas, Yvan; van Goudoever, Hans; Baumann, Ulrich; Troncone, Riccardo; Koletzko, Berthold

    2014-09-01

    The requirements for and conditions of subspecialty training in paediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition (PGHN) are rather variable across European countries. The European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) agreed on a training syllabus aimed to foster a harmonised European PGHN curriculum and to support national PGHN societies and governmental bodies to promote and establish high-quality training programmes and levels of certification in the field. The document provides PGHN training prerequisites and objectives and the basic knowledge elements to acquire the clinical, technical, and management skills needed. Guidelines and instruments for self-monitoring and appraisal are proposed, and a logbook is available online. These training standards are a first step towards a European certification and recognition as a specialist in PGHN.

  18. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    participants, and finally basic and astrophysical plasmas (BAP). New strategies are required to achieve a more balanced participation of these four areas of knowledge in future meetings, but the large number of participants and the overall high quality of the invited talks were particularly relevant this year. In the preparation of the Conference Programme we tried to present an updated view of plasma physics and to integrate suggestions coming from the scientific community, in particular through the use of the EPS PPD Open Forum. As mentioned, two evening sessions took place during the Conference. This year, the traditional evening on ITER was replaced by a session dedicated to inertial fusion, organized by D Batani, where the main installations and experiments on laser fusion around the world were presented and critically discussed. The other session, dedicated to plasma physics education, was organized by N Lopes-Cardoso, and discussed the specific educational issues of plasma physics and fusion, and presented the training programmes existing in Europe. As a concluding remark, we would like to thank our colleagues of the Programme Committee and, in particular, the coordinators of the subcommittees, Clarisse Bourdelle and Arthur Peters for MCF, Javier Honrubia for BPIF, Christoph Hollenstein for LTP, and Uli Stroth for BAP, for their generous help, suggestions and support. Due to the large number of participants, the smooth and efficient local organization, and the high overall quality of the plenary and invited presentations, the 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be considered an undeniable success. I hope you will find, in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, an interesting and useful account of this event. Outstanding scientists honoured at the 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics During the Conference the EPS Plasma Physics Division rewarded researchers who have achieved outstanding scientific or technological results

  19. Highlights from the Third European International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council Symposium 2014

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this meeting report, we give an overview of the talks, presentations and posters presented at the third European Symposium of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council. The event was organized as a satellite meeting of the 13th European Conference for Computational Biology (ECCB) and took place in Strasbourg, France on September 6th, 2014. PMID:25708611

  20. Highlights from the Third International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) European Student Council Symposium 2014.

    PubMed

    Francescatto, Margherita; Hermans, Susanne M A; Babaei, Sepideh; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Borrel, Alexandre; Meysman, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In this meeting report, we give an overview of the talks, presentations and posters presented at the third European Symposium of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council. The event was organized as a satellite meeting of the 13th European Conference for Computational Biology (ECCB) and took place in Strasbourg, France on September 6th, 2014.

  1. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society--first revision.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE and Cochrane Systematic Reviews published between August 2004 and July 2009 and prepared statements that were agreed to in an iterative fashion. The Task Force agreed on Good Practice Points to define clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for MMN, investigations to be considered, and principal recommendations for treatment.

  2. Developing an Inclusive System in a Rapidly Changing European Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drudy, Sheelagh; Kinsella, William

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses Ireland--one of Europe's most rapidly changing societies--as a case study and examines progress towards an inclusive education system. It explores policy and progress on developing an inclusive system under a number of key headings: social class, ethnicity, gender and disability. On the basis of analysis of official statistics and…

  3. Sociality in Diverse Societies: A Regional Analysis across European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, researchers investigate the impact of diversity on society. To measure diversity, either archival data at the national level of census data at the neighborhood level, within a single country are used. Both approaches are limited. The first approach does not allow to investigate variation in diversity within countries and the…

  4. Sociality in Diverse Societies: A Regional Analysis across European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, researchers investigate the impact of diversity on society. To measure diversity, either archival data at the national level of census data at the neighborhood level, within a single country are used. Both approaches are limited. The first approach does not allow to investigate variation in diversity within countries and the…

  5. [Science, society and shared expertise: a European issue?].

    PubMed

    Yves, Charpak

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the MML action plan has funded many projects designed to bring about a rapprochement between science (and scientists) and other civil society actors. The aim was to respond to social concerns about the various issues raised by science and to close the gap between scientific experts and society, especially during periods of crisis, when decisions that have a profound impact on society are taken on the basis of scientific findings. Other recent international organizations and initiatives have had similar objectives. At the same time, a wide range of sources of information and dissemination have emerged and developed in recent years, based on an extensive use of electronic tools and resources. While scientific information is becoming increasingly available, it has also paradoxically become increasingly subject to competition and criticism, and even 'manipulation'. A growing number of societal issues and challenges surrounding science have also emerged, and the capacity to share scientific expertise democratically and consensually has become an issue that transcends national boundaries.

  6. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Best Practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan R; Bell, Scott C; Bojcin, Snezana; Bryon, Mandy; Duff, Alistair; Flume, Patrick; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; Munck, Anne; Ratjen, Felix; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Southern, Kevin W; Taccetti, Giovanni; Ullrich, Gerald; Wolfe, Sue

    2014-05-01

    Specialised CF care has led to a dramatic improvement in survival in CF: in the last four decades, well above what was seen in the general population over the same period. With the implementation of newborn screening in many European countries, centres are increasingly caring for a cohort of patients who have minimal lung disease at diagnosis and therefore have the potential to enjoy an excellent quality of life and an even greater life expectancy than was seen previously. To allow high quality care to be delivered throughout Europe, a landmark document was published in 2005 that sets standards of care. Our current document builds on this work, setting standards for best practice in key aspects of CF care. The objective of our document is to give a broad overview of the standards expected for screening, diagnosis, pre-emptive treatment of lung disease, nutrition, complications, transplant/end of life care and psychological support. For comprehensive details of clinical care of CF, references to the most up to date European Consensus Statements, Guidelines or Position Papers are provided in Table 1. We hope that this best practice document will be useful to clinical teams both in countries where CF care is developing and those with established CF centres.

  7. Pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Guideline Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Andrea; Thomson, Mike; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Tavares, Marta; Tabbers, Merit M; Furlano, Raoul; Spaander, Manon; Hassan, Cesare; Tzvinikos, Christos; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Viala, Jérôme; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Benninga, Marc; Orel, Rok; Vandenplas, Yvan; Keil, Radan; Romano, Claudio; Brownstone, Eva; Hlava, Štěpán; Gerner, Patrick; Dolak, Werner; Landi, Rosario; Huber, Wolf Dietrich; Everett, Simon; Vecsei, Andreas; Aabakken, Lars; Amil-Dias, Jorge; Zambelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This Executive summary of the Guideline on pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) refers to infants, children, and adolescents aged 0 - 18 years. The areas covered include: indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; endoscopic management of corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been dealt with in other Guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this Guideline. Training and ongoing skill maintenance will be addressed in an imminent sister publication. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. European Cardiomyopathy Pilot Registry: EURObservational Research Programme of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Perry; Charron, Philippe; Blanes, Juan Ramon Gimeno; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tendera, Michal; Konté, Marème; Laroche, Cécile; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2016-01-07

    -up in close liaison with expert centres. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: Journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A Comprehensive Fracture Prevention Strategy in Older Adults: The European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) Statement.

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Masud, T; Dargent-Molina, P; Martin, F C; Rosendahl, E; van der Velde, N; Bousquet, J; Benetos, A; Cooper, C; Kanis, J A; Reginster, J Y; Rizzoli, R; Cortet, B; Barbagallo, M; Dreinhöfer, K E; Vellas, B; Maggi, S; Strandberg, T

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region (IAGG-ER), the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS), the International Osteoporosis Foundation - European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.

  10. A comprehensive fracture prevention strategy in older adults: the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) statement.

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Masud, T; Dargent-Molina, P; Martin, F C; Rosendahl, E; van der Velde, N; Bousquet, J; Benetos, A; Cooper, C; Kanis, J A; Reginster, J Y; Rizzoli, R; Cortet, B; Barbagallo, M; Dreinhöfer, K E; Vellas, B; Maggi, S; Strandberg, T

    2016-08-01

    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region, the European Union of Medical Specialists, and the International Osteoporosis Foundation-European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.

  11. Summary of basic science activities at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona 2014.

    PubMed

    Thum, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    With >35 000 participants, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress was one of the biggest ESC events ever and basic science activities were well implemented. I here summarize the basic science activities during the congress. This includes a section 'Basic science activities in a nutshell' summarizing the most important sessions as well as 'Emerging science activities in the ESC' section with special focus on novel research fields such as the characterization of long non-coding RNAs in cardiovascular research. © 2015 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Reconstructing the history of residence strategies in Indo-European-speaking societies: neo-, uxori-, and virilocality.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Laura

    2011-02-01

    Linguists and archaeologists have used reconstructions of early Indo-European residence strategies to constrain hypotheses about the homeland and trajectory of dispersal of Indo-European languages; however, these reconstructions are largely based on unsystematic and a historical use of the linguistic and ethnographic evidence, coupled with substantial bias in interpretation. Here I use cross-cultural data in a phylogenetic comparative framework to reconstruct the pattern of change in residence strategies in the history of societies speaking Indo-European languages. The analysis provides evidence in support of prevailing virilocality with alternative neolocality for Proto-Indo-European, and that this pattern may have extended back to Proto-Indo-Hittite. These findings bolster interpretations of the archaeological evidence that emphasize the "non-matricentric" structure of early Indo-European society; however, they also counter the notion that early Indo-European society was strongly "patricentric." I discuss implications of these findings in the context of the archaeological and genetic evidence on prehistoric social organization.

  13. The 22nd annual meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society (ETRS) in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society, Athens, Greece, October 4 to 5, 2012 informed about pathophysiological mechanisms in tissue repair and on the development of clinical treatments of chronic wounds, fibrosis, and cancer, considering recent advances in molecular biology and biotechnology. PMID:23374673

  14. Teachers' Professional Learning in a European Learning Society: The Case of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makopoulou, Kyriaki; Armour, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the contemporary "knowledge-driven" European society, the quality and relevance of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teachers and Physical Education teachers (PE-CPD) has come under scrutiny. National contexts within Europe vary considerably, however, so there is a need to gain analytical insights into PE-CPD…

  15. Involvement of the European Confederation of the Soil Science Societies in soil protection policy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    The European Confederation of the Soil Science Societies (ECSSS) was founded not only to organize the Eurosoil congress, but also to continuously support and promote the soil causes in the European area. A work is in progress to define the best way to achieve this goal, with integrating voices of the European structures and networks, and the national societies. One of the major objectives is to develop a modern approach of soil protection, including leading experimentations shared with all the members, and active lobbying. Such an approach requires the buildup of an efficient interface with policy makers, stake holders, engineering and science, which should be concretized in a new the dimension of the Eurosoil congress. This communication will sketch the on-going work, with reviewing the perspectives, conditions, strengths, questions and difficulties identified.

  16. A Brief History of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rickards, Hugh; Paschou, Peristera; Rizzo, Renata; Stern, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    The European Society for the Study of Tourette syndrome (ESSTS) was established in Denmark in 2000 by Mary Robertson and Anne Korsgaard. The aims of the organisation are to foster research activity and raise awareness of Tourette syndrome throughout Europe. The organisation went into abeyance in 2002 but was resurrected in 2007 in Bari, Italy. Since that time ESSTS has grown and prospered. We have established elected officers and a constitution. We have successfully applied for three large scale European research grants and have members throughout the European Union. We have held yearly meetings across Europe including two training schools and we have developed successful alliances with patient support groups. ESSTS has developed and published the first European guidelines on assessment, diagnosis and treatment of Tourette syndrome. PMID:23187138

  17. Pilot analysis of presentations at meetings of the American Contact Dermatitis Society and the European Society of Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel J; Miller, Lee; Neal, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The largest meetings on contact dermatitis are those of the American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) and the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD). To document the topics presented at these meetings and their presenters' countries of origin. Review of abstracts from the 2006 ESCD meeting and the 2005 and 2006 ACDS meetings. Twenty percent of ACDS presentations were on patch testing, versus 5% at the ESCD meeting (p < .001); 15% of ACDS presentations were on local reactions, versus 5% at the ESCD meeting (p < .01); 10% of ESCD presentations were on cosmetics/fragrance, versus 1% at the ACDS meetings (p = .014); and 31% of ESCD presentations were on metals and occupational topics, versus 18% at the ACDS meetings (p < .05). At the ACDS meetings, 55% of presenters were American, versus 2% at the ESCD meeting. Higher percentages of ESCD presenters were from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland (p < .001), the United Kingdom (p < .01), France and Belgium (p < .05), Italy (p < .05), and Scandinavia (p < .001). More papers from Canada (p < .001) and the rest of the world were presented at the ACDS meetings (p < .001). Significant differences exist between these meetings. There may be the potential for increased joint meetings of these societies.

  18. A profile of European intensive care unit physiotherapists. European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Norrenberg, M; Vincent, J L

    2000-07-01

    To determine the profile and role of the physiotherapist in European intensive care units (ICUs). Postal questionnaire. 460 ICUs in 17 western European countries. Heads of intensive care physiotherapy. One hundred and two completed questionnaires were analyzed, representing 22% of the questionnaires sent: 48% were from university hospitals, 45% of the hospitals had more than 700 beds, and 50% had more than 24 ICU beds. 38% of the hospitals had more than 30 physiotherapists working in the hospital, but 25% had no exclusive ICU physiotherapist. 34% had a physiotherapist available during the night, and 85% during the weekend. In almost 100% of ICUs the physiotherapist performed respiratory therapy, mobilization, and positioning. The physiotherapist played an active role in the adjustment of mechanical ventilation in 12% of the respondent's units, in weaning from mechanical ventilation in 22% of units, in extubation in 25%, and in the implementation of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in 46%. Among the physiotherapists, there were equivalent numbers of university and non-university graduates. Differences in the role of the physiotherapist were apparent between countries. For example, 80% of respondents from the United Kingdom stated that physiotherapists were available during the night, while in Germany and Sweden physiotherapists were available at night in none of the respondent's units. Even though the response rate was limited, variations in the role and profile of the ICU physiotherapist are apparent across Europe. The involvement of physiotherapists in more specialized techniques is also a function of the number of physiotherapists working exclusively in an ICU.

  19. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED).

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Areia, M; de Vries, A C; Marcos-Pinto, R; Monteiro-Soares, M; O'Connor, A; Pereira, C; Pimentel-Nunes, P; Correia, R; Ensari, A; Dumonceau, J M; Machado, J C; Macedo, G; Malfertheiner, P; Matysiak-Budnik, T; Megraud, F; Miki, K; O'Morain, C; Peek, R M; Ponchon, T; Ristimaki, A; Rembacken, B; Carneiro, F; Kuipers, E J

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods.

  20. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED).

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Areia, M; de Vries, A C; Marcos-Pinto, R; Monteiro-Soares, M; O'Connor, A; Pereira, C; Pimentel-Nunes, P; Correia, R; Ensari, A; Dumonceau, J M; Machado, J C; Macedo, G; Malfertheiner, P; Matysiak-Budnik, T; Megraud, F; Miki, K; O'Morain, C; Peek, R M; Ponchon, T; Ristimaki, A; Rembacken, B; Carneiro, F; Kuipers, E J

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the European Helicobacter Study Group, the European Society of Pathology, and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach. A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia and the need for adequate staging in the case of high-grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods.

  1. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED)

    PubMed Central

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M.; Areia, M.; de Vries, A. C.; Marcos-Pinto, R.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; O'Connor, A.; Pereira, C.; Pimentel-Nunes, P.; Correia, R.; Ensari, A.; Dumonceau, J. M.; Machado, J. C.; Macedo, G.; Malfertheiner, P.; Matysiak-Budnik, T.; Megraud, F.; Miki, K.; O'Morain, C.; Peek, R. M.; Ponchon, T.; Ristimaki, A.; Rembacken, B.; Carneiro, F.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods. PMID:22198778

  2. Reconstructing the history of marriage strategies in Indo-European-speaking societies: monogamy and polygyny.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Laura

    2011-02-01

    Explanations for the emergence of monogamous marriage have focused on the cross-cultural distribution of marriage strategies, thus failing to account for their history. In this paper I reconstruct the pattern of change in marriage strategies in the history of societies speaking Indo-European languages, using cross-cultural data in the systematic and explicitly historical framework afforded by the phylogenetic comparative approach. The analysis provides evidence in support of Proto-Indo-European monogamy, and that this pattern may have extended back to Proto-Indo-Hittite. These reconstructions push the origin of monogamous marriage into prehistory, well beyond the earliest instances documented in the historical record; this, in turn, challenges notions that the cross-cultural distribution of monogamous marriage reflects features of social organization typically associated with Eurasian societies, and with "societal complexity" and "modernization" more generally. I discuss implications of these findings in the context of the archaeological and genetic evidence on prehistoric social organization.

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Research questions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarized, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of COPD as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS Research Statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centered outcomes.

  4. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    PubMed

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Singh, Sally J; Garvey, Chris; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda; Rochester, Carolyn; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Man, William D-C; Pitta, Fabio; Sewell, Louise; Raskin, Jonathan; Bourbeau, Jean; Crouch, Rebecca; Franssen, Frits M E; Casaburi, Richard; Vercoulen, Jan H; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Gosselink, Rik; Clini, Enrico M; Effing, Tanja W; Maltais, François; van der Palen, Job; Troosters, Thierry; Janssen, Daisy J A; Collins, Eileen; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Brooks, Dina; Fahy, Bonnie F; Puhan, Milo A; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Garrod, Rachel; Schols, Annemie M W J; Carlin, Brian; Benzo, Roberto; Meek, Paula; Morgan, Mike; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry; Goldstein, Roger S; Dowson, Claire A; Brozek, Jan L; Donner, Claudio F; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our knowledge of its efficacy and scope. The purpose of this Statement is to update the 2006 document, including a new definition of pulmonary rehabilitation and highlighting key concepts and major advances in the field. A multidisciplinary committee of experts representing the ATS Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the ERS Scientific Group 01.02, "Rehabilitation and Chronic Care," determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant clinical and scientific expertise. The final content of this Statement was agreed on by all members. An updated definition of pulmonary rehabilitation is proposed. New data are presented on the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation, including its effectiveness in acutely ill individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and in individuals with other chronic respiratory diseases. The important role of pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic disease management is highlighted. In addition, the role of health behavior change in optimizing and maintaining benefits is discussed. The considerable growth in the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation since 2006 adds further support for its efficacy in a wide range of individuals with chronic respiratory disease.

  6. [The European network of transfusion medicine societies (EuroNet-TMS): The White Book 2005].

    PubMed

    Rouger, P

    2005-06-01

    Europe is building up. It develops in a quite complex environment, in which health care represents an important field of activities. As for blood transfusion, it plays a major role especially in the development of medical activities as well as for the patients treatments. Today, blood components are still of human origin and there are no substitutes for them. As a medical discipline, Blood Transfusion represents a broad field in medicine which requests the involvement of numerous actors. It is up to professional medical/scientific societies to promote the discipline. This is why it has been considered necessary and relevant to build up a federation of transfusion medicine societies throughout the European Union (EU) ; it is called EuroNet-TMS, the European Network of Transfusion Medicine Societies. This network groups more than 7500 professionals of involved in blood transfusion activities. It has six major objectives: 1) To find coherent responses to issues at stake in transfusion; 2) To promote medical and scientific developments of blood transfusion in Europe; 3) To ensure the highest and most up-to-date scientific level to meet safety and quality standards; 4) To offer similar services to all EU citizens in the field of blood transfusion; 5) To share knowledge and date within Europe; 6) To develop interfaces with decision-makers among the diverse European countries. The first step is the writing of the "White Book 2005" which reports the state of the art of blood transfusion in Europe; a prospective plan is proposed to be discussed.

  7. The European Society of Human Genetics: beginnings, early history and development over its first 25 years.

    PubMed

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-05-10

    The European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) was founded on 15 March 1967, after preliminary discussions at the International Human Genetics Congress in Chicago the previous year and in Copenhagen in early 1967. Its initial meeting was held on 18-19 November 1967, also in Copenhagen, and annual meetings have been held from that time until the present, apart from years in which the International Congress of Human Genetics was also being held. The character of the Society during its early years was strongly influenced by its founding and permanent Secretary, Jan Mohr, head of the Copenhagen Institute of Medical Genetics, whose records are archived in the Tage Kemp/Jan Mohr Archive, now part of the Danish National Archives. These records show Jan Mohr's determination to keep the activities of the Society limited to the holding of an annual meeting to enhance contacts between European human geneticists, and to resist expansion to other activities. Pressures for a wider role of ESHG became irresistible in the late 1980s and a revised constitution, adopted in 1991, reshaped the Society into a more conventional and less restrictive structure. This has allowed it to play a wider and increasingly influential role in the development of human and medical genetics across Europe, with its own Journal, a range of committees covering different aspects of the field and a series of valuable reports on specific important topics, to be described in a forthcoming article on the Society's more recent history.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 May 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.34.

  8. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Policy Statement: Enhancing Implementation, Use, and Delivery of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Puhan, Milo A; Spruit, Martijn A; Masefield, Sarah; Casaburi, Richard; Clini, Enrico M; Crouch, Rebecca; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Garvey, Chris; Goldstein, Roger S; Hill, Kylie; Morgan, Michael; Nici, Linda; Pitta, Fabio; Ries, Andrew L; Singh, Sally J; Troosters, Thierry; Wijkstra, Peter J; Yawn, Barbara P; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has demonstrated physiological, symptom-reducing, psychosocial, and health economic benefits for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, yet it is underutilized worldwide. Insufficient funding, resources, and reimbursement; lack of healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge; and additional patient-related barriers all contribute to the gap between the knowledge of the science and benefits of PR and the actual delivery of PR services to suitable patients. The objectives of this document are to enhance implementation, use, and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation to suitable individuals worldwide. Members of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Rehabilitation and Chronic Care Group established a Task Force and writing committee to develop a policy statement on PR. The document was modified based on feedback from expert peer reviewers. After cycles of review and revisions, the statement was reviewed and formally approved by the Board of Directors of the ATS and the Science Council and Executive Committee of the ERS. This document articulates policy recommendations for advancing healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge of PR, increasing patient access to PR, and ensuring quality of PR programs. It also recommends areas of future research to establish evidence to support the development of an updated funding and reimbursement policy regarding PR. The ATS and ERS commit to undertake actions that will improve access to and delivery of PR services for suitable patients. They call on their members and other health professional societies, payers, patients, and patient advocacy groups to join in this commitment.

  9. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, Cristiano; Stoker, Jaap; Alarcon, Onofre; Barbaro, Federico; Bellini, Davide; Bretthauer, Michael; De Haan, Margriet C; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Ferlitsch, Monika; Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Hellstrom, Mikael; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lefere, Philippe; Mang, Thomas; Neri, Emanuele; Petruzziello, Lucio; Plumb, Andrew; Regge, Daniele; Taylor, Stuart A; Hassan, Cesare; Laghi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR). It addresses the clinical indications for the use of computed tomographic colonography (CTC). A targeted literature search was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of CTC. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE/ESGAR recommend computed tomographic colonography (CTC) as the radiological examination of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend barium enema in this setting (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC, preferably the same or next day, if colonoscopy is incomplete. Delay of CTC should be considered following endoscopic resection. In the case of obstructing colorectal cancer, preoperative contrast-enhanced CTC may also allow location or staging of malignant lesions (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 When endoscopy is contraindicated or not possible, ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC as an acceptable and equally sensitive alternative for patients with symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 4 ESGE/ESGAR recommend referral for endoscopic polypectomy in patients with at least one polyp  ≥  6  mm in diameter detected at CTC. CTC surveillance may be clinically considered if patients do not undergo polypectomy (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 5 ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend CTC as a primary test for population screening or in individuals with a positive first-degree family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it may be proposed as a CRC screening test on an individual basis providing the screenee is adequately informed about test characteristics, benefits, and risks

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  11. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N A; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M W J; Spruit, Martijn A; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem. Strategies for early detection and specific treatments for

  12. Tele-monitoring of ventilator-dependent patients: a European Respiratory Society Statement.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Nicolino; Vitacca, Michele; Dreher, Michael; Isetta, Valentina; Montserrat, Josep M; Tonia, Thomy; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Winck, Joao Carlos; Burgos, Felip; Kampelmacher, Michael; Vagheggini, Guido

    2016-09-01

    The estimated prevalence of ventilator-dependent individuals in Europe is 6.6 per 100 000 people. The increasing number and costs of these complex patients make present health organisations largely insufficient to face their needs. As a consequence, their burden lays mostly over families. The need to reduce healthcare costs and to increase safety has prompted the development of tele-monitoring for home ventilatory assistance.A European Respiratory Society Task Force produced a literature research based statement on commonly accepted clinical criteria for indications, follow-up, equipment, facilities, legal and economic issues of tele-monitoring of these patients.Many remote health monitoring systems are available, ensuring safety, feasibility, effectiveness, sustainability and flexibility to face different patients' needs. The legal problems associated with tele-monitoring are still controversial. National and European Union (EU) governments should develop guidelines and ethical, legal, regulatory, technical, administrative standards for remote medicine. The economic advantages, if any, of this new approach must be compared to a "gold standard" of home care that is very variable among different European countries and within each European country.Much more research is needed before considering tele-monitoring a real improvement in the management of these patients.

  13. Performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy: a European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Michal F; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Bugajski, Marek; Bretthauer, Michael; Rees, Colin J; Dekker, Evelien; Hoff, Geir; Jover, Rodrigo; Suchanek, Stepan; Ferlitsch, Monika; Anderson, John; Roesch, Thomas; Hultcranz, Rolf; Racz, Istvan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Garborg, Kjetil; East, James E; Rupinski, Maciej; Seip, Birgitte; Bennett, Cathy; Senore, Carlo; Minozzi, Silvia; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Rutter, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and United European Gastroenterology present a short list of key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. We recommend that endoscopy services across Europe adopt the following seven key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy for measurement and evaluation in daily practice at a center and endoscopist level: 1 Rate of adequate bowel preparation (minimum standard 90 %); 2 Cecal intubation rate (minimum standard 90 %); 3 Adenoma detection rate (minimum standard 25 %); 4 Appropriate polypectomy technique (minimum standard 80 %); 5 Complication rate (minimum standard not set); 6 Patient experience (minimum standard not set); 7 Appropriate post-polypectomy surveillance recommendations (minimum standard not set). Other identified performance measures have been listed as less relevant based on an assessment of their importance, scientific acceptability, feasibility, usability, and comparison to competing measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy: a European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Bugajski, Marek; Bretthauer, Michael; Rees, Colin J; Dekker, Evelien; Hoff, Geir; Jover, Rodrigo; Suchanek, Stepan; Ferlitsch, Monika; Anderson, John; Roesch, Thomas; Hultcranz, Rolf; Racz, Istvan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Garborg, Kjetil; East, James E; Rupinski, Maciej; Seip, Birgitte; Bennett, Cathy; Senore, Carlo; Minozzi, Silvia; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Rutter, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and United European Gastroenterology present a short list of key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. We recommend that endoscopy services across Europe adopt the following seven key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy for measurement and evaluation in daily practice at a center and endoscopist level: 1 rate of adequate bowel preparation (minimum standard 90%); 2 cecal intubation rate (minimum standard 90%); 3 adenoma detection rate (minimum standard 25%); 4 appropriate polypectomy technique (minimum standard 80%); 5 complication rate (minimum standard not set); 6 patient experience (minimum standard not set); 7 appropriate post-polypectomy surveillance recommendations (minimum standard not set). Other identified performance measures have been listed as less relevant based on an assessment of their importance, scientific acceptability, feasibility, usability, and comparison to competing measures. PMID:28507745

  15. Privacy and anonymity in the information society - challenges for the European Union.

    PubMed

    Tsoukalas, Ioannis A; Siozos, Panagiotis D

    2011-03-01

    Electronic information is challenging traditional views on property and privacy. The explosion of digital data, driven by novel web applications, social networking, and mobile devices makes data security and the protection of privacy increasingly difficult. Furthermore, biometric data and radiofrequency identification applications enable correlations that are able to trace our cultural, behavioral, and emotional states. The concept of privacy in the digital realm is transformed and emerges as one of the biggest risks facing today's Information Society. In this context, the European Union (EU) policy-making procedures strive to adapt to the pace of technological advancement. The EU needs to improve the existing legal frameworks for privacy and data protection. It needs to work towards a "privacy by education" approach for the empowerment of "privacy-literate" European digital citizens.

  16. A report from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 (August 30-September 3 - Barcelona, Spain).

    PubMed

    Dulsat, C

    2014-09-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress is the largest cardiology conference in the world and this year ran in Barcelona from August 30 to September 3. During the meeting, more than 30,000 cardiologists from over 100 countries met to share their knowledge in all cardiovascular fields, from basic science to management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Apart from more than 4,500 interesting abstracts presented in posters and oral sessions, five new ESC Clinical Practice Guidelines were presented among the latest clinical trial results, updates and registries.

  17. ESSOP--25 years: personal reflections from one who started the European Society for Social Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Köhler, L

    2003-09-01

    ESSOP--the European Society for Social Paediatrics--was initiated in Lund, Sweden in 1977, and at the annual congress in Spetses, Greece, its 25th anniversary was celebrated. At the congress, Professor Lennart Köhler, who started the organization and for 10 years was its first Secretary General, presented his recollections from the life of ESSOP, its people, activities, strategies and ideologies, and the main lines of development over the years. This paper presents an edited version of his speech for the benefit of the readers of Child: Care, Health and Development.

  18. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-06-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  19. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee the credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  20. [Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-04-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  1. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-05-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. Conflict of interest disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for conflicts of interest disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical conflict of interest-related issues. New insights into current conflicts of interest policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  2. European Society of Endodontology position statement: the use of CBCT in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Roig, M; Shemesh, H; Lambrechts, P; Lemberg, K

    2014-06-01

    This Position Statement represents a consensus of an expert committee convened by the European Society of Endodontology (ESE) on the use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The statement is based on the current scientific evidence, and provides the clinician with evidence-based criteria on when to use CBCT in Endodontics. Given the dynamic and changing nature of research, development of new devices and clinical practice relating to CBCT, this Position Statement will be updated within 3 years, or before that time should new evidence become available.

  3. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, F; Timmis, A; Pinto, F J; Ambrosio, G; Ector, H; Kulakowski, P; Vardas, P

    2012-06-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  4. [Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos; Antoniades, Loizos; Ahmad, Mansoor; Apetrei, Eduard; Arai, Kaduo; Artigou, Jean Yves; Aschermann, Michael; Böhm, Michael; Bolognese, Leonardo; Bugiardini, Raffaele; Cohen, Ariel; Edes, Istvan; Elias, Joseph; Galeano, Javier; Guarda, Eduardo; Haouala, Habib; Heras, Magda; Höglund, Christer; Huber, Kurt; Hulin, Ivan; Ivanusa, Mario; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Kuo, Chi Tai; Lau, Chu-Pak; Lyusov, Victor A; Marinskis, Germanas; Márquez, Manlio F; Masic, Izet; Pinho-Moreira, Luis Felipe; Mrochek, Alexander; Oganov, Rafael G; Raev, Dimitar; Rogava, Mamanti; Rødevand, Olaf; Sansoy, Vedat; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Shumakov, Valentin A; Tajer, Carlos Daniel; van der Wall, Ernst E; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Videbæk, Jørgen; Lüscher, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. Conflict of interest disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for conflicts of interest disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical conflict of interest-related issues. New insights into current conflicts of interest policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardized questionnaire, are discussed.

  5. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-03-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COIs) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. Conflict of interest disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into the current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardized questionnaire, are discussed.

  6. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-04-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. Conflict of interest disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into the current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier España.

  7. Conflicts of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-06-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is neither systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This article provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardized questionnaire, are discussed.

  8. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  9. Conflict of interest policies and disclosure requirements among European Society of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Journals.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Timmis, Adam; Pinto, Fausto J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ector, Hugo; Kulakowski, Piotr; Vardas, Panos

    2012-04-01

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is used by biomedical journals to guarantee credibility and transparency of the scientific process. COI disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals. Recent joint editorial efforts paved the way towards the implementation of uniform vehicles for COI disclosure. This paper provides a comprehensive editorial perspective on classical COI-related issues. New insights into current COI policies and practices among European Society of Cardiology national cardiovascular journals, as derived from a cross-sectional survey using a standardised questionnaire, are discussed.

  10. Maintaining postreproductive health: A care pathway from the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS).

    PubMed

    Armeni, Eleni; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Mueck, Alfred; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Schouw, Yvonne T van der; Senturk, Levent M; Simoncini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C; Stute, Petra; Rees, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    This position statement from the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) provides a care pathway for the maintenance of women's health during and after the menopause. It is designed for use by all those involved in women's health. It covers assessment, screening for diseases in later life, treatment and follow-up. Strategies need to be optimised to maintain postreproductive health, in part because of increased longevity. They encompass optimising diet and lifestyle, menopausal hormone therapy and non-estrogen-based treatment options for climacteric symptoms and skeletal conservation, personalised to individual needs.

  11. [Principles of the management of adult inguinal hernia--recommendations by the European Hernia Society].

    PubMed

    Wéber, György

    2010-10-01

    The European Hernia Society (EHS) presented the EHS Guidelines for the Treatment of Inguinal Hernia in Adult Patients. The Guidelines contain recommendations for the management of inguinal hernia from diagnosis to aftercare. These have been developed by a Working Group consisting of expert surgeons with representatives of 14 member countries of the EHS. The Guidelines are evidence-based and, when necessary, a consensus of all members was reached. The Guidelines have been reviewed by a Steering Committee as well. Before finalisation, feedback from the relevant national hernia societies was obtained. The Guidelines can be used to adjust local protocols, training purposes as well as quality control. In order to keep them updated the next revision will be published in 2012. A short update of new high-level evidence will be provided by the Working Group during the EHS annual congress until the next revision.

  12. The Changing Place of the University and a Clash of Values: The Entrepreneurial University in the European Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinne, Risto; Koivula, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews literature on changing environment and culture of European universities. First it considers: the pressures of globalisation and knowledge society on universities, the implication of emerging European higher education area, the demands confronting universities, the permeation of the public sector by market ideology and the…

  13. The Changing Place of the University and a Clash of Values: The Entrepreneurial University in the European Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinne, Risto; Koivula, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews literature on changing environment and culture of European universities. First it considers: the pressures of globalisation and knowledge society on universities, the implication of emerging European higher education area, the demands confronting universities, the permeation of the public sector by market ideology and the…

  14. European National Society Cardiovascular Journals: Background, rationale and mission statement of the 'Editors' Club' (Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology).

    PubMed

    Alfonso, F; Ambrosio, G; Pinto, F J; van der Wall, E E

    2008-06-01

    Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane k MD, Jørgen Videbaek MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations).

  15. Management of stable angina: A commentary on the European Society of Cardiology guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Komajda, Michel; Mugelli, Alessandro; Lopez-Sendón, José; Tamargo, Juan; Camm, John

    2016-09-01

    In 2013 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) released new guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease. These guidelines update and replace the previous ESC guidelines on the management of stable angina pectoris, issued in 2006. There are several new aspects in the 2013 ESC guidelines compared with the 2006 version. This opinion paper provides an in-depth interpretation of the ESC guidelines with regard to these issues, to help physicians in making evidence-based therapeutic choices in their routine clinical practice. The first new element is the definition of stable coronary artery disease itself, which has now broadened from a 'simple' symptom, angina pectoris, to a more complex disease that can even be asymptomatic. In the first-line setting, the major changes in the new guidelines are the upgrading of calcium channel blockers, the distinction between dihydropyridines and non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, and the presence of important statements regarding the combination of calcium channel blockers with beta-blockers. In the second-line setting, the 2013 ESC guidelines recommend the addition of long-acting nitrates, ivabradine, nicorandil or ranolazine to first-line agents. Trimetazidine may also be considered. However, no clear distinction is made among different second-line drugs, despite different quality of evidence in favour of these agents. For example, the use of ranolazine is supported by strong and recent evidence, while data supporting the use of the traditional agents appear relatively scanty. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  16. Career opportunities and benefits for young oncologists in the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Gilberto; Lambertini, Matteo; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Amaral, Teresa; Argiles, Guillem; Banerjee, Susana; Cardone, Claudia; Corral, Jesus; De Mattos-Arruda, Letticia; Öztürk, Akif; Petrova, Mila; Poulsen, Laurids; Strijbos, Michiel; Tyulyandina, Alexandra; Vidra, Radu; Califano, Raffaele; de Azambuja, Evandro; Garrido Lopez, Pilar; Guarneri, Valentina; Reck, Martin; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Martinelli, Erika; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Stahel, Rolf; Voest, Emile; Arnold, Dirk; Cardoso, Fatima; Casali, Paolo; Cervantes, Andrés; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Eniu, Alexandru; Jassem, Jacek; Pentheroudakis, George; Peters, Solange; McGregor, Keith; Rauh, Stefan; Zielinski, Christoph C; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tabernero, Josep; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is one of the leading societies of oncology professionals in the world. Approximately 30% of the 13 000 ESMO members are below the age of 40 and thus meet the society's definition of young oncologists (YOs). ESMO has identified the training and development of YOs as a priority and has therefore established a comprehensive career development programme. This includes a leadership development programme to help identify and develop the future leaders in oncology. Well-trained and highly motivated future generations of multidisciplinary oncologists are essential to ensure the optimal evolution of the field of oncology with the ultimate goal of providing the best possible care to patients with cancer. ESMO's career development portfolio is managed and continuously optimised by several dedicated committees composed of ESMO officers and is directly supervised by the ESMO Executive Board and the ESMO President. It offers unique resources for YOs at all stages of training and includes a broad variety of fellowship opportunities, educational courses, scientific meetings, publications and resources. In this article, we provide an overview of the activities and career development opportunities provided by ESMO to the next generation of oncologists. PMID:28255451

  17. Career opportunities and benefits for young oncologists in the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gilberto; Lambertini, Matteo; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Amaral, Teresa; Argiles, Guillem; Banerjee, Susana; Cardone, Claudia; Corral, Jesus; De Mattos-Arruda, Letticia; Öztürk, Akif; Petrova, Mila; Poulsen, Laurids; Strijbos, Michiel; Tyulyandina, Alexandra; Vidra, Radu; Califano, Raffaele; de Azambuja, Evandro; Garrido Lopez, Pilar; Guarneri, Valentina; Reck, Martin; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Martinelli, Erika; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Stahel, Rolf; Voest, Emile; Arnold, Dirk; Cardoso, Fatima; Casali, Paolo; Cervantes, Andrés; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Eniu, Alexandru; Jassem, Jacek; Pentheroudakis, George; Peters, Solange; McGregor, Keith; Rauh, Stefan; Zielinski, Christoph C; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tabernero, Josep; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is one of the leading societies of oncology professionals in the world. Approximately 30% of the 13 000 ESMO members are below the age of 40 and thus meet the society's definition of young oncologists (YOs). ESMO has identified the training and development of YOs as a priority and has therefore established a comprehensive career development programme. This includes a leadership development programme to help identify and develop the future leaders in oncology. Well-trained and highly motivated future generations of multidisciplinary oncologists are essential to ensure the optimal evolution of the field of oncology with the ultimate goal of providing the best possible care to patients with cancer. ESMO's career development portfolio is managed and continuously optimised by several dedicated committees composed of ESMO officers and is directly supervised by the ESMO Executive Board and the ESMO President. It offers unique resources for YOs at all stages of training and includes a broad variety of fellowship opportunities, educational courses, scientific meetings, publications and resources. In this article, we provide an overview of the activities and career development opportunities provided by ESMO to the next generation of oncologists.

  18. Management and follow-up of gallbladder polyps : Joint guidelines between the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR), European Association for Endoscopic Surgery and other Interventional Techniques (EAES), International Society of Digestive Surgery - European Federation (EFISDS) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE).

    PubMed

    Wiles, Rebecca; Thoeni, Ruedi F; Barbu, Sorin Traian; Vashist, Yogesh K; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Dewhurst, Catherine; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Lahaye, Max; Soltes, Marek; Perinel, Julie; Roberts, Stuart Ashley

    2017-09-01

    The management of incidentally detected gallbladder polyps on radiological examinations is contentious. The incidental radiological finding of a gallbladder polyp can therefore be problematic for the radiologist and the clinician who referred the patient for the radiological examination. To address this a joint guideline was created by the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR), European Association for Endoscopic Surgery and other Interventional Techniques (EAES), International Society of Digestive Surgery - European Federation (EFISDS) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). A targeted literature search was performed and consensus guidelines were created using a series of Delphi questionnaires and a seven-point Likert scale. A total of three Delphi rounds were performed. Consensus regarding which patients should have cholecystectomy, which patients should have ultrasound follow-up and the nature and duration of that follow-up was established. The full recommendations as well as a summary algorithm are provided. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as guidance when a gallbladder polyp is encountered in clinical practice. • Management of gallbladder polyps is contentious • Cholecystectomy is recommended for gallbladder polyps >10 mm • Management of polyps <10 mm depends on patient and polyp characteristics • Further research is required to determine optimal management of gallbladder polyps.

  19. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology: a way forward with the European Board and the European Society of Anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Petrini, F; Solca, M; De Robertis, E; Peduto, V A; Pasetto, A; Conti, G; Antonelli, M; Pelosi, P

    2010-11-01

    Anesthesiology, which includes anaesthesia, perioperative care, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy, is acknowledged as the leading medical specialty in addressing issues of patient safety, but there is still a long way to go. Several factors pose hazards in Anesthesiology, like increasingly older and sicker patients, more complex surgical interventions, more pressure on throughput, as well as new drugs and devices. To better design educational and research strategies to improve patient safety, the European Board of Anesthesiology (EBA) and the European Society of Anesthesiology (ESA) have produced a blueprint for patient safety in Anesthesiology. This document, to be known as the Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology, was endorsed together with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists (WFSA), and the European Patients' Federation (EPF) at the Euroanaesthesia meeting in Helsinki in June 2010. It was signed by several Presidents of National Anesthesiology Societies as well as other stakeholders. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology represents a shared European view of what is necessary to improve patient safety, recommending practical steps that all anesthesiologists can include in their own clinical practice. The Italian Society of Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Reanimation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) is looking forward to continuing work on "patient safety" issues in Europe, and to cooperating with the ESA in the best interest of European patients.

  20. Cardiovascular diseases in women: a statement from the policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Fox, Kim M; Priori, Silvia G; Collins, Peter; Daly, Caroline; Graham, Ian; Jonsson, Benct; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Tendera, Michal

    2006-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality both in men and women. In Europe, about 55% of all females' deaths are caused by CVD, especially coronary heart disease and stroke. Unfortunately, however, the risk of heart disease in women is underestimated because of the perception that women are 'protected' against ischaemic heart disease. What is not fully understood is that women during the fertile age have a lower risk of cardiac events, but this protection fades after menopause thus leaving women with untreated risk factors vulnerable to develop myocardial infarction, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease in women may be different from those commonly observed in males and this factor may account for under-recognition of the disease. The European Society of Cardiology has recently initiated an extensive 'Women at heart' program to coordinate research and educational initiatives on CVD in women. A Policy Conference on CVD in Women was one of the first steps in the development of this program. The objective of the conference was to collect the opinion of experts in the field coming from the European Society of Cardiology member countries to: (1) summarize the state-of-the-art from an European perspective; (2) to identify the scientific gaps on CVD in women; and (3) to delineate the strategies for changing the misperception of CVD in women, improving risk stratification, diagnosis, and therapy from a gender perspective and increasing women representation in clinical trials. The Policy Conference has provided the opportunity to review and comment on the current status of knowledge on CVD in women and to prioritize the actions needed to advance this area of knowledge in cardiology. In the preparation of this document we intend to provide the medical community and the stakeholders of this field with an overview of the more critical aspects that have emerged during the discussion. We

  1. The contribution of the European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazzi, Carmelo; Fullen, Michael A.; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Theocharopoulos, Sid; Rickson, Jane; Kasparinskis, Raimonds; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Peres, Guenola; Sholten, Thomas; Kertész, Adam; Vasenev, Ivan; Dumitru, Mihail; Cornelis, Wim; Rubio, José L.

    2017-04-01

    Soil is an integral component of the global environmental system that supports the quality and diversity of terrestrial life on Earth. Therefore, it is vital to consider the processes and impacts of soil degradation on society, especially on the provision of environmental goods and services, including food security and climate change mitigation and adaptation. Scientific societies devoted to Soil Science play significant roles in promoting soil security by advancing scientific knowledge, education and environmental sustainability. The European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) was founded in Ghent (Belgium) on 4 November 1988 by a group of 23 researchers from several European countries. It is an interdisciplinary, non-political association with over 500 members in 56 countries. The ESSC produces and distributes a hardcopy Newsletter twice a year and maintains both a website and Facebook page: http://www.soilconservation.eu/ https://www.facebook.com/European-Society-for-Soil-Conservation-ESSC-100528363448094/ The ESSC aims to: • Support research on soil degradation, soil protection and soil and water conservation. • Provide a network for the exchange of knowledge about soil degradation processes and soil conservation research and practises. • Produce publications on major issues relating to soil degradation and soil and water conservation. • Advise regulators and policy-makers on soil issues, especially soil degradation, protection and conservation. The ESSC held its First International Congress in Silsoe (UK) in 1992. Further International Congresses were held in Munich (1996), Valencia (2000), Budapest (2004), Palermo (2007), Thessaloniki (2011) and Moscow (2015). The Eighth International Congress will be held in Lleida (Spain) in June 2017: http://www.consowalleida2017.com/ Interspersed between these international congresses, the ESSC organizes annual international conferences on specific topics. These include Imola, Italy (Biogeochemical Processes at

  2. European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for home blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parati, G; Stergiou, G S; Asmar, R; Bilo, G; de Leeuw, P; Imai, Y; Kario, K; Lurbe, E; Manolis, A; Mengden, T; O'Brien, E; Ohkubo, T; Padfield, P; Palatini, P; Pickering, T G; Redon, J; Revera, M; Ruilope, L M; Shennan, A; Staessen, J A; Tisler, A; Waeber, B; Zanchetti, A; Mancia, G

    2010-12-01

    Self-monitoring of blood pressure by patients at home (home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM)) is being increasingly used in many countries and is well accepted by hypertensive patients. Current hypertension guidelines have endorsed the use of HBPM in clinical practice as a useful adjunct to conventional office measurements. Recently, a detailed consensus document on HBPM was published by the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring. However, in daily practice, briefer documents summarizing the essential recommendations are needed. It is also accepted that the successful implementation of clinical guidelines in routine patient care is dependent on their acceptance by involvement of practising physicians. The present document, which provides concise and updated guidelines on the use of HBPM for practising physicians, was therefore prepared by including the comments and feedback of general practitioners.

  3. Interventional cardiology in Europe 1993. Working Group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Meyer, B J; Meier, B; Bonzel, T; Fabian, J; Heyndrickx, G; Morice, M C; Mühlberger, V; Piscione, F; Rothman, M; Wijns, W; van den Brand, M

    1996-09-01

    An annual survey on cardiac interventions in Europe is performed by the working group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology with the help of the national societies of cardiology. A questionnaire about cardiac interventions in 1993 was mailed to a representative of the national societies of 35 members of the European Society of Cardiology. The data collection of coronary interventions was delayed by slow backreporting and from 10 of the 35 national members data were missing or grossly incomplete. They were excluded from the analysis. A total of 756,822 coronary angiograms were reported resulting in an incidence of 1146 +/- 1024 per 10(6) inhabitants, ranging from 24 (Romania) to 3499 (Germany). This represents an increase of 12% compared to 1992. Germany (279,882 cases), France (157,237), the United Kingdom (77,000), Italy (44,934) and Spain (37,591) registered 79% of all the coronary angiograms performed. A total of 183,728 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty cases were reported in 1993, 24% more than in 1992. On average, they accounted for 18 +/- 7% (range 8 (Romania) to 35% (Sweden) of the coronary angiograms. Most of these percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (82%) were confined to a single vessel. In 13% only, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty took place immediately after the diagnostic study. Adjusted per capita. Germany ranks first with 873 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants, followed by France (737), Holland (725), Belgium (713), and Switzerland (665). The European mean of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants was 270 +/- 279, representing an increase of 14% compared with 1992. A major in-hospital complication was reported in 3.8% of the patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: 0.6% hospital deaths, 1.5% emergency coronary artery bypass grafting, and 1.7% myocardial infarctions. In 1993 stents were

  4. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations for malignant disease 1 ESGE recommends placement of partially or fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia over laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, and esophageal bypass (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 For patients with longer life expectancy, ESGE recommends brachytherapy as a valid alternative or in addition to stenting in esophageal cancer patients with malignant dysphagia. Brachytherapy may provide a survival advantage and possibly a better quality of life compared to SEMS placement alone. (Strong recommendation, high quality evidence.) 3 ESGE recommends esophageal SEMS placement as the preferred treatment for sealing malignant tracheoesophageal or bronchoesophageal fistula (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend the use of concurrent external radiotherapy and esophageal stent treatment. SEMS placement is also not recommended as a bridge to surgery or prior to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. It is associated with a high incidence of adverse events and alternative satisfactory options such as placement of a feeding tube are available. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) Main recommendations for benign disease 1 ESGE recommends against the use of self-expandable stents (SEMSs) as first-line therapy for the management of benign esophageal strictures because of the potential for adverse events, the availability of alternative therapies, and costs (strong

  5. Classification of parotidectomies: a proposal of the European Salivary Gland Society.

    PubMed

    Quer, M; Guntinas-Lichius, O; Marchal, F; Vander Poorten, V; Chevalier, D; León, X; Eisele, D; Dulguerov, P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive classification system for parotidectomy operations. Data sources include Medline publications, author's experience, and consensus round table at the Third European Salivary Gland Society (ESGS) Meeting. The Medline database was searched with the term "parotidectomy" and "definition". The various definitions of parotidectomy procedures and parotid gland subdivisions extracted. Previous classification systems re-examined and a new classification proposed by a consensus. The ESGS proposes to subdivide the parotid parenchyma in five levels: I (lateral superior), II (lateral inferior), III (deep inferior), IV (deep superior), V (accessory). A new classification is proposed where the type of resection is divided into formal parotidectomy with facial nerve dissection and extracapsular dissection. Parotidectomies are further classified according to the levels removed, as well as the extra-parotid structures ablated. A new classification of parotidectomy procedures is proposed.

  6. Full-text publication of abstracts presented at European Orthodontic Society congresses.

    PubMed

    Livas, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos; Ren, Yijin

    2014-10-01

    Empirical evidence has indicated that only a subsample of studies conducted reach full-text publication and this phenomenon has become known as publication bias. A form of publication bias is the selectively delayed full publication of conference abstracts. The objective of this article was to examine the publication status of oral abstracts and poster-presentation abstracts, included in the scientific program of the 82nd and 83rd European Orthodontic Society (EOS) congresses, held in 2006 and 2007, and to identify factors associated with full-length publication. A systematic search of PubMed and Google Scholar databases was performed in April 2013 using author names and keywords from the abstract title to locate abstract and full-article publications. Information regarding mode of presentation, type of affiliation, geographical origin, statistical results, and publication details were collected and analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Approximately 51 per cent of the EOS 2006 and 55 per cent of the EOS 2007 abstracts appeared in print more than 5 years post congress. A mean period of 1.32 years elapsed between conference and publication date. Mode of presentation (oral or poster), use of statistical analysis, and research subject area were significant predictors for publication success. Inherent discrepancies of abstract reporting, mainly related to presentation of preliminary results and incomplete description of methods, may be considered in analogous studies. On average 52.2 per cent of the abstracts presented at the two EOS conferences reached full publication. Abstracts presented orally, including statistical analysis, were more likely to get published. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures

    PubMed Central

    Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F.; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision. ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients. PMID:26966520

  8. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision.ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients.

  9. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition's Educational Offer and the Training Syllabus.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Marco; Finizio, Daniela; Veres, Gabor; Pop, Tudor Lucian; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Guarino, Alfredo

    2017-06-21

    The basic knowledge necessary for a European pediatric gastroenterologist/hepatologist/nutritionist (PGHN) is set-out in the Training Syllabus (TS) of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN).We retrospectively compared the topics covered in ESPGHAN's training events between 2013 and 2016 with the basic knowledge TS items.Thirty-six initiatives including e-learning were identified. Twelve (33%) courses focused on gastroenterology, 9 (25%) on hepatology, and 10 (28%) on nutrition. Five (14%) courses covered more than one field and were classified "General". The initiatives covered 12/57 (21%) TS items; 31/57 items (54%) were partially covered and 14/57 (25%) not covered. Five of 9 e-learning courses covered gastroenterology topics, whereas none covered hepatology topics.ESPGHAN's three-year educational offer partially met the training needs listed in the TS. A coordinated educational program covering all TS items would harmonize training within Europe and would provide trainees with a professional portfolio for employment purposes.

  10. Insect gonadotropic peptide hormones: some recent developments.

    PubMed

    Kuczer, Mariola; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Konopińska, Danuta

    2007-01-01

    Gonadotropic peptides are a new generation of peptide hormone regulators of insect reproduction. They have been isolated from ovaries, oviducts, or brains of insects. The subject of this paper is insect peptides that exert stimulatory or inhibitory effects on ovarian development and oocyte maturation. On the basis of the literature data and the results of our investigations, the structure and biological properties of different groups of peptides are presented. (c) 2006 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The annual meeting of the European Society for Vascular Surgery--the scientific contents over the years.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D

    2008-07-01

    to analyze the presentations given at the annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery: topic, geographical distribution, later publication. Three six-year periods from 1989 have been evaluated. case series dominates but randomized trials have increased somewhat. Papers on animal experiments and basic science have decreased. The most frequently reported diseases have been aortic aneurysm, carotid artery problems, lower extremity ischaemia and with an increasing number of papers on venous disease. Around two thirds of the presentations have been later published as full papers in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, but as many as one quarter has not been published. Geographical origin has varied over time with a decrease in the UK dominance. The presentations at the Annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery contribute substantially to the contents of the Society Journal but a large proportion of the presentations never appear in print. Northern Europe dominates when papers per population unit is counted.

  12. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress Report From Rome 2016.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroya; Otani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-10-25

    From August 27th to 31st, the 2016 Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC 2016) was held in Fiera di Roma, Italy. Despite the socially unstable situation, more than 32,000 attendees, including clinical physicians, basic researchers, medical students, and paramedical personnel, as well as 5,000 exhibitors from 106 countries gathered in this historical city to share the latest findings and to discuss the present issues in cardiovascular medicine. There were scientific sessions, including 28 Hot Lines, 26 clinical trial updates, 24 registry studies, and 5 clinical practice guideline sessions. Japan had 1,170 attendees, with 1,743 submitted and 670 accepted abstracts, including the NIPPON trial presented in the hotline session. From 2011 to 2016, Japan has been the first abstract submitter and has had the most abstracts accepted, which indicates the great contribution of Japanese cardiologists and the Japanese Circulation Society. This report briefly introduces the key presentations and highlights from the ESC 2016 Scientific Sessions. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2282-2286).

  13. Introduction to "Diversity of Child Health Care in Europe: A Study of the European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations".

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Jochen; Namazova-Baranova, Leyla; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The field of pediatrics in Europe is characterized by the diversities, variations, and heterogeneities of child health care services provided in 53 European countries with more than 200 million children below 18 years of age. Managing the health care of infants, children, and adolescents in Europe requires balancing clinical aims, research findings, and socioeconomic goals within a typical environment characterized by cultural and economic complexity and large disparity in availability, affordability, and accessibility of pediatric care. Since its foundation in 1976, the European Paediatric Association-Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations has worked to improve both medical care of all children and cooperation of their caretakers in Europe. Such a report has been conceived in the strong belief that broadening of the intellectual basis of the European Paediatric Association-Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations and creating a multidisciplinary society will be necessary to reduce fragmentation of pediatrics and tackle the legal, economic, and organizational challenges of child health care in Europe.

  14. Publication rate of abstracts presented at European Paediatric Orthopaedic Society Annual Meetings, 2006 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Konig, Marie-Theres; Schulte, Tobias L; Gosheger, Georg; Rödl, Robert; Schiedel, Frank M

    2014-09-01

    The quality of the abstracts presented at a conference reflects the scientific work and level of activity of the scientific association concerned. The aim of the present study was to determine the rate of publications of podium presentations and posters at the conferences of the European Paediatric Orthopaedic Society (EPOS) from 2006 to 2008 and to identify factors that favor publication in peer-reviewed journals. The results are compared with those of other international societies. All 646 abstracts (including podiums, posters, and e-posters) presented at the EPOS conferences were investigated using the PubMed database to identify any corresponding published articles in the journals listed in the database. A period of 5 years before and after the relevant conference was used for the PubMed search. Factors influencing publication and the quality of the study, such as the type of presentation and the level of evidence, were also investigated. A publication rate of 36.7% was observed, corresponding to 237 publications of 646 abstracts. The period to publication showed a mean of 13.88 ± 1.34 months. It was found that abstracts of podium presentations were published significantly more often than poster abstracts (P<0.001). Experimental studies, with a publication rate of 50.9%, showed better results than clinical studies (36.0%). Overall, the articles were published in 61 different journals, with the largest number (n=50) appearing in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. In addition, the present study shows that abstracts with a higher level of evidence were associated with a higher publication rate. At 36.7%, the rate of publication of EPOS abstracts is within the range reached by other specialist orthopaedics societies, such as the German Society of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery (36%) and the British Orthopaedic Association (36%). However, it is lower than the publication rate of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA), at 50%. The high

  15. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons general thoracic surgery databases: joint standardization of variable definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Felix G; Falcoz, Pierre E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Salati, Michele; Wright, Cameron D; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) general thoracic surgery databases collect thoracic surgical data from Europe and North America, respectively. Their objectives are similar: to measure processes and outcomes so as to improve the quality of thoracic surgical care. Future collaboration between the two databases and their integration could generate significant new knowledge. However, important discrepancies exist in terminology and definitions between the two databases. The objective of this collaboration between the ESTS and STS is to identify important differences between databases and harmonize terminology and definitions to facilitate future endeavors.

  16. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw; Bisschops, Raf; Saftoiu, Adrian; Dekker, Evelien; Gralnek, Ian; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Jover, Rodrigo; Meisner, Søren; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Valori, Roland; Hucl, Tomas; Le Moine, Olivier; Domagk, Dirk; Kaminski, Michal F; Bretthauer, Michael; Rutter, Matthew D; Aabakken, Lars; Ponchon, Thierry; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D

    2016-10-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the field of endoscopy and prioritizing those that are important enables researchers and funders to appropriately allocate resources. Methods: Over 2 years, the ESGE Research Committee gathered information on research priorities and refined them through a modified Delphi approach. Consultations were held with the ESGE Governing Board and Quality Improvement Committee to identify important unanswered questions. Research workshops were held at the 21st United European Gastroenterology Week. Research questions were refined by the ESGE Research Committee and Governing Board, compiled into an online survey, and distributed to all ESGE members, who were invited to rank each question by priority. Results: The final questionnaire yielded 291 responses from over 60 countries. The three countries with the highest response rates were Spain, Italy, and United Kingdom. Most responders were from teaching hospitals (62 %) and were specialist endoscopists (51 %). Responses were analyzed with weighted rankings, resulting in prioritization of 26 key unanswered questions. The top ranked generic questions were: 1) How do we define the correct surveillance interval following endoscopic diagnosis? 2) How do we correctly utilize advanced endoscopic imaging? 3) What are the best markers of endoscopy quality? Conclusion: Following this comprehensive process, the ESGE has identified and ranked the key unanswered questions within the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Researchers, funders, and journals should prioritize studies that seek to answer these important questions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent: a unique form of screening for airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William; Lange, Peter; Costabel, Ulrich; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Sybrecht, Gerhard W; Burghuber, Otto C; Stevenson, Robin; Tønnesen, Philip; Haeussinger, Karl; Hedlin, Gunilla; Bauer, Torsten T; Riedler, Josef; Nicod, Laurent; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Viegi, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    In order to raise public awareness of the importance of early detection of airway obstruction and to enable many people who had not been tested previously to have their lung function measured, the European Lung Foundation and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) organised a spirometry testing tent during the annual ERS Congresses in 2004-2009. Spirometry was performed during the ERS Congresses in volunteers; all participants answered a simple, brief questionnaire on their descriptive characteristics, smoking and asthma. Portable spirometers were freely provided by the manufacturer. Nurses and doctors from pulmonary departments of local hospitals/universities gave their service for free. Lower limit of normal (LLN) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for diagnosing and grading airway obstruction were used. Of 12,448 participants in six congress cities, 10,395 (83.5%) performed acceptable spirometry (mean age 51.0 ± 18.4 yrs; 25.5% smokers; 5.5% asthmatic). Airway obstruction was present in 12.4% of investigated subjects according to LLN criteria and 20.3% according to GOLD criteria. Through multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, smoking habits and asthma were significant risk factors for airway obstruction. Relative risk ratio and 95% confidence interval for LLN stage I, for example, was 2.9 (2.0-4.1) for the youngest age (≤ 19 yrs), 1.9 (1.2-3.0) for the oldest age (≥ 80 yrs), 2.4 (2.0-2.9) for current smokers and 2.8 (2.2-3.6) for reported asthma diagnosis. In addition to being a useful advocacy tool, the spirometry tent represents an unusual occasion for early detection of airway obstruction in large numbers of city residents with an important public health perspective.

  18. Patenting and licensing in genetic testing: recommendations of the European Society of Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Aymé, S; Matthijs, Gert; Soini, S

    2008-05-01

    Patents for inventions can be beneficial for society, if they drive innovation and promote progress. In most areas, the patenting system works satisfactorily. However, it must be recognized that in some instances it can also be problematic; this is the case in the field of genetics, and particularly in the area of genetic testing. As patents should serve their original purpose (promoting innovation through a fair reward system for the inventors), the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) suggests ways to improve the mechanisms that already form part of the patents system as a whole. In brief, the ESHG recommends limiting the breadth of the claims in genetic patents and, more practically, to reduce the number of patents by limiting the patentable subject matter, thereby improving the quality of the patents that will eventually be granted. There is also a suggestion to redefine the concept of utility in patent law, by taking account of downstream clinical experience. The ESHG sees no harm in the patenting of novel technical tools for genetic testing (eg PCR or chip technologies), as they can promote investment and still allow for invention around them. Many disputes between supporters of the patenting system and the public revolve around ethical issues. The European Patent Office should consider the benefit of having an ethics committee to consider issues of major interest, such as patents applied to genes. The problem of licensing should also be addressed. Practically, this means supporting the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, which prescribe that licences should be non-exclusive and easily obtainable, both in practical and in financial terms. To promote this, the practical exploration of alternative models for licensing, like patent pools and clearinghouses, is a prerequisite. To better track developments in this field, the establishment of a voluntary reporting system, whereby geneticists could report on any issues related to

  19. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  20. European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Consensus Guidelines on Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Juliane; Olivieri, Antonella; Donaldson, Malcolm; Torresani, Toni; Krude, Heiko; van Vliet, Guy; Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Evidence: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify key articles relating to the screening, diagnosis, and management of CH. The evidence-based guidelines were developed with the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, describing both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. In the absence of sufficient evidence, conclusions were based on expert opinion. Consensus Process: Thirty-two participants drawn from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and five other major scientific societies in the field of pediatric endocrinology were allocated to working groups with assigned topics and specific questions. Each group searched the literature, evaluated the evidence, and developed a draft document. These papers were debated and finalized by each group before presentation to the full assembly for further discussion and agreement. Recommendations: The recommendations include: worldwide neonatal screening, approaches to assess the cause (including genotyping) and the severity of the disorder, the immediate initiation of appropriate L-T4 supplementation and frequent monitoring to ensure dose adjustments to keep thyroid hormone levels in the target ranges, a trial of treatment in patients suspected of transient CH, regular assessments of developmental and neurosensory functions, consulting health professionals as appropriate, and education about CH. The harmonization of diagnosis, management, and routine health surveillance would not only optimize patient outcomes, but should also facilitate epidemiological studies of the disorder. Individuals with CH require monitoring throughout their lives, particularly during early childhood and pregnancy. PMID:24446653

  1. The "Renaissance of the University" in the European Knowledge Society: An Exploration of Principled and Governmental Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    A "renaissance of the university" in the European knowledge society is regarded today as a necessity. However, there is an ongoing debate about what that renaissance should look like. The aim of this article is to take a closer look at these debates, and in particular, the disputes related to the public role of the (future) university in…

  2. Adherence to European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery recommendations among Italian cataract surgeons: a survey.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Andrea; Pertile, Grazia; Marchini, Giorgio; Scarpa, Giuseppe; Ceruti, Piero; Prigione, Guido; Romano, Mario R; Bert, Fabrizio; Gili, Renata; Panico, Claudio; Siliquini, Roberta; Engelbert, Michael

    2016-08-04

    To survey the surgical routines with regards to prophylactic strategies in a sample of Italian hospitals and compare these with European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ESCRS) guidelines. Six private and 18 public hospitals were included in this clinical-based retrospective study. The overall volume of cataract operations in the 24 centers in 2013 was 43,553. Main outcome measure was incidence of endophthalmitis per 1,000. An incidence of less than 0.13% was considered acceptable. Our study provides the first Italian data on the use of intracameral antibiotics in cataract surgery as recommended by the ESCRS. Thirteen centers (54%) used intracameral cefuroxime at the end of surgery. Of the 13 centers that used cefuroxime, 8 (62%) had an incidence of endophthalmitis less than 0.13%. Of the 7 (29%) centers that did not use intracameral cefuroxime, all had an endophthalmitis rate of greater than 0.13%. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Among the 4 centers not included, 2 used vancomycin in the infusion bottle, 1 a fluoroquinolone, and the last a combination of antibiotics. The majority of surgeons (71%) used preoperative antibiotic eyedrops, but this measure was not shown to be significantly protective. Slightly more than half of the centers surveyed in this study adhered to the recommendations of the ESCRS and routinely employed prophylactic intracameral cefuroxime. An incidence of endophthalmitis greater than 0.13% was encountered significantly more frequently among centers that did not employ intracameral cefuroxime.

  3. European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Stergiou, George; O'Brien, Eoin; Asmar, Roland; Beilin, Lawrence; Bilo, Grzegorz; Clement, Denis; de la Sierra, Alejandro; de Leeuw, Peter; Dolan, Eamon; Fagard, Robert; Graves, John; Head, Geoffrey A; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Lurbe, Empar; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mengden, Thomas; Myers, Martin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M; Shennan, Andrew; Staessen, Jan A; vanMontfrans, Gert; Verdecchia, Paolo; Waeber, Bernard; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-07-01

    Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published a comprehensive position paper dealing with all aspects of the technique, based on the available scientific evidence for ABPM. The present work represents an updated schematic summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, and is aimed at providing recommendations for proper use of this technique in a clinical setting by both specialists and practicing physicians. The present article details the requirements and the methodological issues to be addressed for using ABPM in clinical practice, The clinical indications for ABPM suggested by the available studies, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension, are outlined in detail, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is discussed. The role of ABPM in pharmacological, epidemiological, and clinical research is also briefly mentioned. Finally, the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the situation of different countries with regard to the reimbursement and the availability of ABPM in primary care practices, hospital clinics, and pharmacies.

  4. Live endoscopy events (LEEs): European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Position Statement - Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hassan, Cesare; Meining, Alexander; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is dedicated to improving the quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy through educational activities such as live endoscopy events (LEEs). The primary utility of LEEs is the educational value for the audience, and patients should not expect additional benefit from being treated during a LEE compared to a routine setting. Although there is no evidence that LEEs entail additional risks for patients, neither can possible unknown risks be excluded as the evidence available is limited. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to assure patient safety. Patients must be adequately informed that the standard of care will be assured and that their identity will not be revealed. ESGE recommends that an endoscopist not belonging to the hosting unit is named as patient advocate. Clinical indications for the LEE procedures and the educational outputs must be clear and agreed between host and demonstrator teams. ESGE will ensure that in all ESGE-organized LEEs the indications, procedural descriptions, and adverse events will be registered, and that organizers requesting ESGE endorsement can demonstrate such a registry.

  5. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  6. Classification of parotidectomy: a proposed modification to the European Salivary Gland Society classification system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Keat; Shetty, Subhaschandra

    2017-08-01

    Parotidectomy remains the mainstay of treatment for both benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland. There exists a wide range of possible surgical options in parotidectomy in terms of extent of parotid tissue removed. There is increasing need for uniformity of terminology resulting from growing interest in modifications of the conventional parotidectomy. It is, therefore, of paramount importance for a standardized classification system in describing extent of parotidectomy. Recently, the European Salivary Gland Society (ESGS) proposed a novel classification system for parotidectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate this system. A classification system proposed by the ESGS was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability. Modifications mainly focused on subdividing Levels I and II into IA, IB, IIA, and IIB. From June 2006 to June 2016, 126 patients underwent 130 parotidectomies at our hospital. The classification system was tested in that cohort of patient. While the ESGS classification system is comprehensive, it does not cover all possibilities. The addition of Sublevels IA, IB, IIA, and IIB may help to address some of the clinical situations seen and is clinically relevant. We aim to test the modified classification system for partial parotidectomy to address some of the challenges mentioned.

  7. European Respiratory Society guidelines for the diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jane S; Barbato, Angelo; Collins, Samuel A; Goutaki, Myrofora; Behan, Laura; Caudri, Daan; Dell, Sharon; Eber, Ernst; Escudier, Estelle; Hirst, Robert A; Hogg, Claire; Jorissen, Mark; Latzin, Philipp; Legendre, Marie; Leigh, Margaret W; Midulla, Fabio; Nielsen, Kim G; Omran, Heymut; Papon, Jean-Francois; Pohunek, Petr; Redfern, Beatrice; Rigau, David; Rindlisbacher, Bernhard; Santamaria, Francesca; Shoemark, Amelia; Snijders, Deborah; Tonia, Thomy; Titieni, Andrea; Walker, Woolf T; Werner, Claudius; Bush, Andrew; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia is often confirmed with standard, albeit complex and expensive, tests. In many cases, however, the diagnosis remains difficult despite the array of sophisticated diagnostic tests. There is no "gold standard" reference test. Hence, a Task Force supported by the European Respiratory Society has developed this guideline to provide evidence-based recommendations on diagnostic testing, especially in light of new developments in such tests, and the need for robust diagnoses of patients who might enter randomised controlled trials of treatments. The guideline is based on pre-defined questions relevant for clinical care, a systematic review of the literature, and assessment of the evidence using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. It focuses on clinical presentation, nasal nitric oxide, analysis of ciliary beat frequency and pattern by high-speed video-microscopy analysis, transmission electron microscopy, genotyping and immunofluorescence. It then used a modified Delphi survey to develop an algorithm for the use of diagnostic tests to definitively confirm and exclude the diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia; and to provide advice when the diagnosis was not conclusive. Finally, this guideline proposes a set of quality criteria for future research on the validity of diagnostic methods for primary ciliary dyskinesia. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  8. Nutritional assessment and therapy in COPD: a European Respiratory Society statement.

    PubMed

    Schols, Annemie M; Ferreira, Ivone M; Franssen, Frits M; Gosker, Harry R; Janssens, Wim; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Pison, Christophe; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Slinde, Frode; Steiner, Michael C; Tkacova, Ruzena; Singh, Sally J

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition and metabolism have been the topic of extensive scientific research in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but clinical awareness of the impact dietary habits, nutritional status and nutritional interventions may have on COPD incidence, progression and outcome is limited. A multidisciplinary Task Force was created by the European Respiratory Society to deliver a summary of the evidence and description of current practice in nutritional assessment and therapy in COPD, and to provide directions for future research. Task Force members conducted focused reviews of the literature on relevant topics, advised by a methodologist. It is well established that nutritional status, and in particular abnormal body composition, is an important independent determinant of COPD outcome. The Task Force identified different metabolic phenotypes of COPD as a basis for nutritional risk profile assessment that is useful in clinical trial design and patient counselling. Nutritional intervention is probably effective in undernourished patients and probably most when combined with an exercise programme. Providing evidence of cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention is required to support reimbursement and thus increase access to nutritional intervention. Overall, the evidence indicates that a well-balanced diet is beneficial to all COPD patients, not only for its potential pulmonary benefits, but also for its proven benefits in metabolic and cardiovascular risk. ©ERS 2014.

  9. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host-pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress.

  10. The new European Society of Cardiology guidelines on myocardial revascularisation: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Sjoerd T; Gaspersz, Marcia; Deckers, Jaap W

    2012-01-01

    The latest European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on myocardial revascularisation are reviewed. The nearly 300 recommendations make it difficult to apply them in their totality. The authors would propose 20-30 recommendations per guideline based on sound clinical evidence. Also, the scope of the current guidelines is very wide as it includes topics already incorporated in other guidelines, such as strategies for pre-intervention diagnosis and imaging as well as on secondary prevention. Some recommendations in the new guidelines are sensible and will not be disputed. In particular, the encouragement of a balanced multidisciplinary decision process (the 'heart team') is welcome. Although coronary revascularisation in unstable high risk patients is well accepted, this is less the case for the low risk patient with chest pain. This issue is controversial and a balanced discussion of the pros and cons of percutaneous coronary intervention is missing. Despite convincing evidence indicating lack of benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion, this procedure is not discouraged. Lastly, most committee members were interventional cardiologists or cardiac surgeons. Guideline committees should be representative of the whole group of professionals as the interpretation of the evidence by specialists may be biased. There may be a role for procedure oriented guidelines but, in that case, the items at issue should remain confined to matters directly related to technical aspects of the procedure.

  11. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Quality Management in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta; Corey, Mary; Dembski, Birgit; Goss, Christopher H; Pressler, Tanja; Rault, Gilles; Viviani, Laura; Elborn, J Stuart; Castellani, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful treatments and patient outcomes to be recognized and improvement programmes to be implemented in specialist CF centres. Over the past decades, the greater volumes of data becoming available through Centre databases and patient registries led to the possibility of making comparisons between different therapies, approaches to care and indeed data recording. The quality of care for individuals with CF has become a focus at several levels: patient, centre, regional, national and international. This paper reviews the quality management and improvement issues at each of these levels with particular reference to indicators of health, the role of CF Centres, regional networks, national health policy, and international data registration and comparisons. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  12. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H.; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host–pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress. PMID:27730203

  13. Statistics on the use of cardiac electronic devices and electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology countries: 2014 report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Merino, Jose Luis; Levya, Francisco; Hindriks, Gerhardt; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There has been large variations in the use of invasive electrophysiological therapies in the member countries of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy trends in the ESC countries over the last five years. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on CIED and catheter ablation therapy since 2008. Last year 49 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. This analysis is based on the current and previous editions of the EHRA White Book. Data on procedure rates together with information on economic aspects, local reimbursement systems and training activities are presented for each ESC country and the five geographical ESC regions. In 2013, the electrophysiological procedure rates per million population were highest in Western Europe followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The CIED implantation and catheter ablation rate was lowest in the Eastern European and in the non-European ESC countries, respectively. However, in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product procedure rates exceeded those of some wealthier Western countries, suggesting that economic resources are not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies. These statistics indicate that despite significant improvements, there still is considerable heterogeneity in the availability of arrhythmia therapies across the ESC area. Hopefully, these data will help identify areas for improvement and guide future activities in cardiac arrhythmia management. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. PREFACE: 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Klein, R.; Schwoerer, M.

    1993-01-01

    The 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in conjunction with the Frühjahrstagung des Arbeitskreises Festkörperphysik der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft from March 29 till April 2, 1993, in Regensburg. The programme comprised 3,134 contributions : 8 Plenary Talks, 171 Invited Talks, 1,480 Contributed Talks, 1,441 Poster Presentations, 1 Public Evening Talk and 33 Exhibitors Reports. The abstracts have been published as Europhysics Conference Abstracts, Volume 17A/Verhandlungen der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft 5/1993. The table (see PDF file) shows the distribution of the Plenary and Invited Speakers as well as of the participants according to countries within and outside of Europe. The conference was the largest meeting of physicists held in Germany to date. It was a manifestation of the enormous scientific activity in both basic and applied research in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics in Europe. Most of the research work, which was presented at the conference, was done by young physicists. They represent a large human capital in Europe. Most of the senior physicists and many of our young colleagues maintain scientific cooperations, and also personal friendships, which are and which have been almost independent of national barriers over the past three decades. The latter is to a large extent due to the European Physical Society which always cultivated these contacts, especially between the eastern and western parts of Europe. We would like to express our sincere thanks to the members of the Programme Committee. By their intensive work, which was free from national interests, a scientific programme was prepared, which covered the entire field of Condensed Matter Physics. About 70% of the Plenary and Invited Speakers came from 20 different foreign countries and about 30% from Germany. The meeting therefore has been a truly European Conference. For the young physicists, the number of

  15. Multimodality imaging in Europe: a survey by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR).

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, Alberto; Breatnach, Eamann

    2010-01-01

    Multimodality imaging represents an area of rapid growth with important professional implication for both nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists throughout Europe. As a preliminary step for future action aimed at improving the quality and accessibility of PET/SPECT/CT multimodality imaging practice in Europe, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) performed a survey among the individual membership of both societies to obtain information on the status of multimodality imaging in their facilities and their future visions on training for combined modalities. A questionnaire was forwarded to all individual members of the EANM and ESR. The main subject matter of the questionnaire related to: (1) study performance,current procedures, current equipment including its supervisory personnel at respondents' individual facilities and (2)vision of future practice, performance and the potential for combined interdisciplinary viewing and training for future professionals. The reporting and the billing procedures of multimodality imaging studies are very heterogeneous in European countries. The majority of the members of both societies believe that the proportion of PET/CT conducted as a full diagnostic CT with contrast enhancement will increase over time. As expected, (18)F-FDG is the most commonly used PET tracer for clinical applications. The large majority of respondents were in favour of an interdisciplinary training programme being developed on a European level together by the EANM and the ESR and the respective sections of the European Union of Medical Specialists. The results of this survey show that there is wide heterogeneity in the current practice of multimodality imaging in Europe. This situation may limit the full potential and integration of multimodality imaging within the clinical arena. There is a strong desire within both specialties for the development of interdisciplinary training to address some

  16. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  17. Refractory septic shock in children: a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition.

    PubMed

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and neonatal intensive care (ESPNIC) experts' definition of paediatric RSS. We conducted a two-round Delphi study followed by an observational multicentre retrospective study. One hundred and fourteen paediatric intensivists answered a clinical case-based, two-round Delphi survey, identifying clinical items consistent with RSS. Multivariate analysis of these items in a development single-centre cohort (70 patients, 30 % mortality) facilitated development of RSS definitions based on either a bedside or computed severity score. Both scores were subsequently tested in a validation cohort (six centres, 424 patients, 11.6 % mortality). From the Delphi process, the draft definition included evidence of myocardial dysfunction and high blood lactate levels despite high vasopressor treatment. When assessed in the development population, each item was independently associated with the need for extracorporeal life support (ECLS) or death. Resultant bedside and computed septic shock scores had high discriminative power against the need for ECLS or death, with areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.920 (95 % CI 0.89-0.94), and 0.956 (95 % CI 0.93-0.97), respectively. RSS defined by a bedside score equal to or higher than 2 and a computed score equal to or higher than 3.5 was associated with a significant increase in mortality. This ESPNIC definition of RSS accurately identifies children with the most severe form of septic shock.

  18. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  19. European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology Quality Indicators for Advanced Ovarian Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, François; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Cristiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; du Bois, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The surgical management of advanced ovarian cancer involves complex surgery. Implementation of a quality management program has a major impact on survival. The goal of this work was to develop a list of quality indicators (QIs) for advanced ovarian cancer surgery that can be used to audit and improve the clinical practice. This task has been carried out under the auspices of the European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology (ESGO). Quality indicators were based on scientific evidence and/or expert consensus. A 4-step evaluation process included a systematic literature search for the identification of potential QIs and the documentation of scientific evidence, physical meetings of an ad hoc multidisciplinarity International Development Group, an internal validation of the targets and scoring system, and an external review process involving physicians and patients. Ten structural, process, or outcome indicators were selected. Quality indicators 1 to 3 are related to achievement of complete cytoreduction, caseload in the center, training, and experience of the surgeon. Quality indicators 4 to 6 are related to the overall management, including active participation to clinical research, decision-making process within a structured multidisciplinary team, and preoperative workup. Quality indicator 7 addresses the high value of adequate perioperative management. Quality indicators 8 to 10 highlight the need of recording pertinent information relevant to improvement of quality. An ESGO-approved template for the operative report has been designed. Quality indicators were described using a structured format specifying what the indicator is measuring, measurability specifications, and targets. Each QI was associated with a score, and an assessment form was built. The ESGO quality criteria can be used for self-assessment, for institutional or governmental quality assurance programs, and for the certification of centers. Quality indicators and corresponding targets give

  20. Management of severe perioperative bleeding: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre; Santullano, Cesar Aldecoa Alvarez; De Robertis, Edoardo; Filipescu, Daniela C; Fries, Dietmar; Görlinger, Klaus; Haas, Thorsten; Imberger, Georgina; Jacob, Matthias; Lancé, Marcus; Llau, Juan; Mallett, Sue; Meier, Jens; Rahe-Meyer, Niels; Samama, Charles Marc; Smith, Andrew; Solomon, Cristina; Van der Linden, Philippe; Wikkelsø, Anne Juul; Wouters, Patrick; Wyffels, Piet

    2013-06-01

    The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia and stabilisation of the macro- and microcirculations in order to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Third, targeted procoagulant interventions to reduce the amount of bleeding, morbidity, mortality and costs. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists throughout Europe to integrate this knowledge into daily patient care wherever possible. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of scientific subcommittees and individual expert members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched without language restrictions from the year 2000 until 2012. These searches produced 20 664 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. At the suggestion of the ESA Guideline Committee, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was initially used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. During the process of guideline development, the official position of the ESA changed to favour the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This report includes general recommendations as well as specific recommendations in various fields of surgical interventions. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for four weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members. Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and

  1. Extraskeletal osteosarcoma: A European Musculoskeletal Oncology Society study on 266 patients.

    PubMed

    Longhi, A; Bielack, S S; Grimer, R; Whelan, J; Windhager, R; Leithner, A; Gronchi, A; Biau, D; Jutte, P; Krieg, A H; Klenke, F M; Grignani, G; Donati, D M; Capanna, R; Casanova, J; Gerrand, C; Bisogno, G; Hecker-Nolting, S; De Lisa, M; D'Ambrosio, L; Willegger, M; Scoccianti, G; Ferrari, S

    2017-03-01

    Prognosis of extraskeletal osteosarcoma (ESOS) is reported to be poorer than that of skeletal osteosarcoma. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to evaluate factors influencing ESOS prognosis. Members of the European Musculoskeletal Oncology Society (EMSOS) submitted institutional data on patients with ESOS. Data from 274 patients treated from 1981 to 2014 were collected from 16 EMSOS centres; 266 patients were eligible. Fifty (18.7%) had metastases at diagnosis. Of 216 patients with localised disease, 211 (98%) underwent surgery (R0 = 70.6%, R1 = 27%). Five-year overall survival (OS) for all 266 patients was 47% (95% CI 40-54%). Five-year OS for metastatic patients was 27% (95% CI 13-41%). In the analysis restricted to the 211 localised patients who achieved complete remission after surgery 5-year OS was 51.4% (95% CI 44-59%) and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 43% (95% CI 35-51%). One hundred twenty-one patients (57.3%) received adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 80 patients (37.9%) received radiotherapy. A favourable trend was seen for osteosarcoma-type chemotherapy versus soft tissue sarcoma-type (doxorubicin ± ifosfamide) regimens. For the 211 patients in complete remission after surgery, patient age, tumour size, margins and chemotherapy were positive prognostic factors for DFS and OS by univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, patient age (≤40 years versus >40 years) (P = 0.05), tumour size (P = 0.0001) and receipt of chemotherapy (P = 0.006) were statistically significant prognostic factors for survival. Patient age and tumour size are factors influencing ESOS prognosis. Higher survival was observed in patients who received perioperative chemotherapy with a trend in favour of multiagent osteosarcoma-type regimen which included doxorubicin, ifosfamide and cisplatin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc; Meisner, Søren; Repici, Alessandro; Saunders, Brian P; Vezakis, Antonios; Gonzalez, Jean Michel; Turino, Stine Ydegaard; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Fockens, Paul; Hassan, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that each center implements a written policy regarding the management of iatrogenic perforation, including the definition of procedures that carry a high risk of this complication. This policy should be shared with the radiologists and surgeons at each center. 2 In the case of an endoscopically identified perforation, ESGE recommends that the endoscopist reports: its size and location with a picture; endoscopic treatment that might have been possible; whether carbon dioxide or air was used for insufflation; and the standard report information. 3 ESGE recommends that symptoms or signs suggestive of iatrogenic perforation after an endoscopic procedure should be carefully evaluated and documented, possibly with a computed tomography (CT) scan, in order to prevent any diagnostic delay. 4 ESGE recommends that endoscopic closure should be considered depending on the type of perforation, its size, and the endoscopist expertise available at the center. A switch to carbon dioxide insufflation, the diversion of luminal content, and decompression of tension pneumoperitoneum or tension pneumothorax should also be done. 5 After closure of an iatrogenic perforation using an endoscopic method, ESGE recommends that further management should be based on the estimated success of the endoscopic closure and on the general clinical condition of the patient. In the case of no or failed endoscopic closure of the iatrogenic perforation, and in patients whose clinical condition is deteriorating, hospitalization and surgical consultation are recommended.

  3. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines for the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Husby, S; Koletzko, S; Korponay-Szabó, I R; Mearin, M L; Phillips, A; Shamir, R; Troncone, R; Giersiepen, K; Branski, D; Catassi, C; Lelgeman, M; Mäki, M; Ribes-Koninckx, C; Ventura, A; Zimmer, K P

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease (CD) from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) were published in 1990. Since then, the autoantigen in CD, tissue transglutaminase, has been identified; the perception of CD has changed from that of a rather uncommon enteropathy to a common multiorgan disease strongly dependent on the haplotypes human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8; and CD-specific antibody tests have improved. A panel of 17 experts defined CD and developed new diagnostic criteria based on the Delphi process. Two groups of patients were defined with different diagnostic approaches to diagnose CD: children with symptoms suggestive of CD (group 1) and asymptomatic children at increased risk for CD (group 2). The 2004 National Institutes of Health/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality report and a systematic literature search on antibody tests for CD in paediatric patients covering the years 2004 to 2009 was the basis for the evidence-based recommendations on CD-specific antibody testing. In group 1, the diagnosis of CD is based on symptoms, positive serology, and histology that is consistent with CD. If immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase type 2 antibody titers are high (>10 times the upper limit of normal), then the option is to diagnose CD without duodenal biopsies by applying a strict protocol with further laboratory tests. In group 2, the diagnosis of CD is based on positive serology and histology. HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 testing is valuable because CD is unlikely if both haplotypes are negative. The aim of the new guidelines was to achieve a high diagnostic accuracy and to reduce the burden for patients and their families. The performance of these guidelines in clinical practice should be evaluated prospectively.

  4. Advanced endoscopic imaging: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technology Review.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Vleugels, Jasper L; Roelandt, Philip; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Dekker, Evelien; Hassan, Cesare; Horgan, Gareth; Kiesslich, Ralf; Longcroft-Wheaton, Gaius; Wilson, Ana; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Background and aim: This technical review is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the utilization of advanced endoscopic imaging in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Methods: This technical review is based on a systematic literature search to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of advanced endoscopic imaging throughout the GI tract. Technologies considered include narrowed-spectrum endoscopy (narrow band imaging [NBI]; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement [FICE]; i-Scan digital contrast [I-SCAN]), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendation and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations:1. We suggest advanced endoscopic imaging technologies improve mucosal visualization and enhance fine structural and microvascular detail. Expert endoscopic diagnosis may be improved by advanced imaging, but as yet in community-based practice no technology has been shown consistently to be diagnostically superior to current practice with high definition white light. (Low quality evidence.) 2. We recommend the use of validated classification systems to support the use of optical diagnosis with advanced endoscopic imaging in the upper and lower GI tracts (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3. We suggest that training improves performance in the use of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and that it is a prerequisite for use in clinical practice. A learning curve exists and training alone does not guarantee sustained high performances in clinical practice. (Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.) Conclusion: Advanced endoscopic imaging can improve mucosal visualization and endoscopic diagnosis; however it requires training and the use of validated classification systems.

  5. Professional burnout in European young oncologists: results of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Young Oncologists Committee Burnout Survey.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Califano, R; Corral, J; de Azambuja, E; De Mattos-Arruda, L; Guarneri, V; Hutka, M; Jordan, K; Martinelli, E; Mountzios, G; Ozturk, M A; Petrova, M; Postel-Vinay, S; Preusser, M; Qvortrup, C; Volkov, M N M; Tabernero, J; Olmos, D; Strijbos, M H

    2017-07-01

    Burnout in health care professionals could have serious negative consequences on quality of patient care, professional satisfaction and personal life. Our aim was to investigate the burnout prevalence, work and lifestyle factors potentially affecting burnout amongst European oncologists ≤40 (YOs). A survey was conducted using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and additional questions exploring work/lifestyle factors. Statistical analyses were carried out to identify factors associated with burnout. Total of 737 surveys (all ages) were collected from 41 European countries. Countries were divided into six regions. Results from 595 (81%) YOs were included (81% medical oncologists; 52% trainees, 62% women). Seventy-one percent of YOs showed evidence of burnout (burnout subdomains: depersonalization 50%; emotional exhaustion 45; low accomplishment 35%). Twenty-two percent requested support for burnout during training and 74% reported no hospital access to support services. Burnout rates were significantly different across Europe (P < 0.0001). Burnout was highest in central European (84%) and lowest in Northern Europe (52%). Depersonalization scores were higher in men compared with women (60% versus 45% P = 0.0001) and low accomplishment was highest in the 26-30 age group (P < 0.01). In multivariable linear regression analyses, European region, work/life balance, access to support services, living alone and inadequate vacation time remained independent burnout factors (P < 0.05). This is the largest burnout survey in European Young Oncologists. Burnout is common amongst YOs and rates vary across Europe. Achieving a good work/life balance, access to support services and adequate vacation time may reduce burnout levels. Raising awareness, support and interventional research are needed.

  6. Differential gene expression profiles according to the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society histopathological classification in lung adenocarcinoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Molina-Romero, Camilo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Ortega-Gómez, Alette; Alanis-Funes, Gerardo J; Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Mercado, Gabriela E; Cardona, Andrés F; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Arrieta, Oscar

    2017-08-01

    The current lung cancer classification from the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society has considerably changed the pathologic diagnosis of lung invasive adenocarcinoma, identifying disease subtypes with substantial implications for medical practice, such as clinical, radiological, molecular, and prognostic differences. We analyzed the differences in the genetic expression of adenocarcinoma subtypes according to the new classification. Microarray gene expression analysis was performed on a cohort of 29 adenocarcinoma patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of Mexico from 2008 to 2011. All patients had an available biopsy sample and were classified into 4 different subtypes of adenocarcinoma (2015 World Health Organization classification). Lepidic-predominant adenocarcinoma was the only pattern that exhibited a marked gene expression difference compared with other predominant histologic patterns, revealing genes with significant expression (P < .01). Moreover, we identified 13 genes with specific differential expression in the lepidic-predominant adenocarcinoma that could be used as a gene signature. The lepidic-predominant histologic pattern has a differential gene expression profile compared with all predominant histologic patterns. Additionally, we identified a gene expression signature of 13 genes that have a unique behavior in the lepidic histologic pattern; these 13 genes are candidates for follow-up studies for their potential use as biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Results from this study highlight the importance of the new Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification and exemplify the potential clinical implications of correlating histopathology with exclusive molecular beacons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: The Role of the Pulmonologist in the Diagnosis and Management of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S.; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. Purpose: This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. Methods: A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Results: Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Conclusions: Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care. PMID:23947517

  8. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: the role of the pulmonologist in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-15

    Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care.

  9. Report of a European Society of Cardiology-European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions task force on the evaluation of coronary stents in Europe: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Robert A; Serruys, Patrick W; Baumbach, Andreas; Escaned, Javier; Fajadet, Jean; James, Stefan; Joner, Michael; Oktay, Semih; Jüni, Peter; Kastrati, Adnan; Sianos, George; Stefanini, Giulio G; Wijns, William; Windecker, Stephan

    2015-10-07

    The evaluation for European Union market approval of coronary stents falls under the Medical Device Directive that was adopted in 1993. Specific requirements for the assessment of coronary stents are laid out in supplementary advisory documents. In response to a call by the European Commission to make recommendations for a revision of the advisory document on the evaluation of coronary stents (Appendix 1 of MEDDEV 2.7.1), the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) established a Task Force to develop an expert advisory report. As basis for its report, the ESC-EAPCI Task Force reviewed existing processes, established a comprehensive list of all coronary drug-eluting stents that have received a CE mark to date, and undertook a systematic review of the literature of all published randomized clinical trials evaluating clinical and angiographic outcomes of coronary artery stents between 2002 and 2013. Based on these data, the TF provided recommendations to inform a new regulatory process for coronary stents. The main recommendations of the task force include implementation of a standardized non-clinical assessment of stents and a novel clinical evaluation pathway for market approval. The two-stage clinical evaluation plan includes recommendation for an initial pre-market trial with objective performance criteria (OPC) benchmarking using invasive imaging follow-up leading to conditional CE-mark approval and a subsequent mandatory, large-scale randomized trial with clinical endpoint evaluation leading to unconditional CE-mark. The data analysis from the systematic review of the Task Force may provide a basis for determination of OPC for use in future studies. This paper represents an executive summary of the Task Force's report. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  11. Omron HEM-711 DLX home Blood pressure monitor passes the European Society of Hypertension International Validation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Grim, Clarence E; Grim, Carlene M

    2008-08-01

    The Omron HEM-711 DLX home Blood pressure monitor was tested using the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol in 33 patients. The average error was 0.9+/-5.2 (SD) (range: -12 to 10 mmHg)/-0.8+/-5.6 (-19 to 8). It can be recommended for use by patients. With all automatic devices it is, however, important to validate its accuracy in each individual patient who uses it.

  12. Endoscopic management of Barrett's esophagus: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Weusten, Bas; Bisschops, Raf; Coron, Emanuel; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Esteban, José-Miguel; Hassan, Cesare; Pech, Oliver; Repici, Alessandro; Bergman, Jacques; di Pietro, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    Current practices for the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE) vary across Europe, as several national European guidelines exist. This Position Statement from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is an attempt to homogenize recommendations and, hence, patient management according to the best scientific evidence and other considerations (e.g. health policy). A Working Group developed consensus statements, using the existing national guidelines as a starting point and considering new evidence in the literature. The Position Statement wishes to contribute to a more cost-effective approach to the care of patients with BE by reducing the number of surveillance endoscopies for patients with a low risk of malignant progression and centralizing care in expert centers for those with high progression rates.Main statements MS1 The diagnosis of BE is made if the distal esophagus is lined with columnar epithelium with a minimum length of 1 cm (tongues or circular) containing specialized intestinal metaplasia at histopathological examination. MS2 The ESGE recommends varying surveillance intervals for different BE lengths. For patients with an irregular Z-line/columnar-lined esophagus of < 1 cm, no routine biopsies or endoscopic surveillance is advised. For BE ≥ 1 cm and < 3 cm, BE surveillance should be repeated every 5 years. For BE ≥ 3 cm and < 10 cm, the interval for endoscopic surveillance should be 3 years. Patients with BE with a maximum extent ≥ 10 cm should be referred to a BE expert center for surveillance endoscopies. Patients with limited life expectancy and advanced age should be discharged from endoscopic surveillance. MS3 The diagnosis of any degree of dysplasia (including "indefinite for dysplasia") in BE requires confirmation by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. MS4 Patients with visible lesions in BE diagnosed as dysplasia or early cancer should be referred to a BE expert center. All visible

  13. LPXRFa peptide system in the European sea bass: A molecular and immunohistochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; Gómez, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia; Mañanos, Evaristo; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide that suppresses reproduction in birds and mammals by inhibiting GnRH and gonadotropin secretion. GnIH orthologs with a C-terminal LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) motif have been identified in teleost fish. Although recent work also suggests its role in fish reproduction, studies are scarce and controversial, and have mainly focused on cyprinids. In this work we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding an LPXRFa precursor in the European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. In contrast to other teleosts, the sea bass LPXRFa precursor contains only two putative RFamide peptides, termed sbLPXRFa1 and sbLPXRFa2. sblpxrfa transcripts were expressed predominantly in the olfactory bulbs/telencephalon, diencephalon, midbrain tegmentum, retina, and gonads. We also developed a specific antiserum against sbLPXRFa2, which revealed sbLPXRFa-immunoreactive (ir) perikarya in the olfactory bulbs-terminal nerve, ventral telencephalon, caudal preoptic area, dorsal mesencephalic tegmentum, and rostral rhombencephalon. These sbLPXRFa-ir cells profusely innervated the preoptic area, hypothalamus, optic tectum, semicircular torus, and caudal midbrain tegmentum, but conspicuous projections also reached the olfactory bulbs, ventral/dorsal telencephalon, habenula, ventral thalamus, pretectum, rostral midbrain tegmentum, posterior tuberculum, reticular formation, and viscerosensory lobe. The retina, pineal, vascular sac, and pituitary were also targets of sbLPXRFa-ir cells. In the pituitary, this innervation was observed close to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) cells. Tract-tracing retrograde labeling suggests that telencephalic and preoptic sbLPXRFa cells might represent the source of pituitary innervation. The immunohistochemical distribution of sbLPXRFa cells and fibers suggest that LPXRFa peptides might be involved in some functions as well as reproduction, such as feeding, growth, and behavior.

  14. How will 2014 European Society of Cardiology Congress influence our daily practice?

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, M Birhan

    2014-12-01

    European Cardiology Congress which was held in Barcelona in this year; was a meeting with striking results of the presented scientific studies. Herein, a brief overview of congress highlights is presented.

  15. Designer nanomaterials using chiral self-assembling peptide systems and their emerging benefit for society.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongli; Zhang, Shuguang

    2012-07-07

    Chirality is absolutely central in chemistry and biology. The recent findings of chiral self-assembling peptides' remarkable chemical complementarity and structural compatibility make it one of the most inspired designer materials and structures in nanobiotechnology. The emerging field of designer chemistry and biology further explores biological and medical applications of these simple D,L- amino acids through producing marvellous nanostructures under physiological conditions. These self-assembled structures include well-ordered nanofibers, nanotubes and nanovesicles. These structures have been used for 3-dimensional tissue cultures of primary cells and stem cells, sustained release of small molecules, growth factors and monoclonal antibodies, accelerated wound-healing in reparative and regenerative medicine as well as tissue engineering. Recent advances in molecular designs have also led to the development of 3D fine-tuned bioactive tissue culture scaffolds. They are also used to stabilize membrane proteins including difficult G-protein coupled receptors for designing nanobiodevices. One of the self-assembling peptides has been used in human clinical trials for accelerated wound-healings. It is our hope that these peptide materials will open doors for more and diverse clinical uses. The field of chiral self-assembling peptide nanobiotechnology is growing in a number of directions that has led to many surprises in areas of novel materials, synthetic biology, clinical medicine and beyond.

  16. FESCC survey on accreditation and post-graduate training in clinical chemistry in European countries. Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossier, M; Blaton, V; Franzini, C; Queralto, J M; Palicka, V

    2000-04-01

    Promotion of the professional growth and development of specialists in the field of clinical chemistry in European countries, and harmonisation of quality assessment and accreditation procedures are listed among the main goals and activities of Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry (FESCC), according to its 1999-2000 strategic plan. The European countries that are members of the European Union are in the process of establishing the "European Register for Clinical Chemists", based on minimum standards of education, training and experience as defined by the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemists (EC4). Many other European countries would like to adapt their system of professional education to this model. Data on post-graduate training in EC4 FESCC members have already been gathered in 1998. However, at the present time, there is no detailed knowledge of pre- and post-graduate professional education of specialists in clinical chemistry in the non-EC4 European countries. FESCC launched a survey in July 1998 in order to gather this information with the hope to start a database about existing systems. All FESCC members received the same questionnaire on accreditation (seven questions) and non-EC4 FESCC members received an additional questionnaire with 11 questions related to post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. The response rate of the 35 FESCC member countries was 93% from the 15 EC4 members (14 responses/15 countries) and 80% from the 20-non-EC4 (16 responses/20 countries). The heterogeneity of the data on post-graduate training in clinical chemistry indicates that a great effort will be needed before harmonisation is reached. These results, however, will provide an interesting basis for further discussion and promotion of post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. The data provided on accreditation show that the total number of accredited laboratories was relatively low in EC4 countries and even lower in non-EC4 members

  17. Moving towards a Learning Society. A CRE-ERT Forum Report on European Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochinaux, Philippe; de Woot, Philippe

    Society is undergoing profound transformations: movement toward a knowledge society, globalization, new patterns of work, unemployment and social exclusion, aging of the population, immigration, transformation of the family, a multimedia revolution, and consumerism. These changes are necessitating better, more balanced education and lifelong…

  18. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  19. Performance of the UA-787 oscillometric blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension protocol.

    PubMed

    Longo, Daniele; Toffanin, Gianluca; Garbelotto, Raffaella; Zaetta, Vania; Businaro, Lucio; Palatini, Paolo

    2003-04-01

    To determine the accuracy of the UA-787 oscillometric blood pressure monitor developed by the A&D Company. Evaluation of the UA-787 was performed using the new protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The performance of the monitor was assessed in relation to the subjects' gender, age, skinfold thickness, arm circumference, body mass index and elasticity index of large (C1) and small (C2) arteries. The UA-787 monitor was assessed according to European Society of Hypertension requirements, which are based on four zones of accuracy differing from the mercury standard by 5, 10, 15 mmHg, or more. In all subjects (n=33), indices of large-artery elasticity (C1) and small-artery elasticity (C2) were measured with the HDI/Pulsewave CR-2000 Research Cardiovascular Profiling System. The UA-787 passed all three phases of the protocol for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The mean blood pressure difference between device and the observers was 1.0+/-5.3 mmHg for systolic pressure, and 0.7+/-5.3 mmHg for diastolic pressure. In univariate analysis, the discrepancy between device and the observers was related to forearm circumference (P=0.02) for systolic pressure. For diastolic blood pressure, a significant relationship was found only for heart rate (P<0.01). However, in a multivariable regression analysis no clinical variable was an independent predictor of device-observer discrepancy. In particular, the performance of the UA-787 appeared to be uniform across the whole range of C1 and C2. These data show that the A&D UA-787 device satisfies the new recommended European Society of Hypertension accuracy levels for both systolic and diastolic pressure. Its performance is uniform across sub-groups of subjects with different clinical characteristics.

  20. Diagnostic terminology for reporting thyroid fine needle aspiration cytology: European Federation of Cytology Societies thyroid working party symposium, Lisbon 2009.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, G; Cochand-Priollet, B; de Agustin, P P; Bourgain, C; Chandra, A; Daneshbod, Y; Deery, A; Duskova, J; Ersoz, C; Fadda, G; Fassina, A; Firat, P; Jimenez-Ayala, B; Karakitsos, P; Koperek, O; Matesa, N; Poller, D; Thienpont, L; Ryska, A; Schenck, U; Sauer, T; Schmitt, F; Tani, E; Toivonen, T; Tötsch, M; Troncone, G; Vass, L; Vielh, P

    2010-04-01

    A European Federation of Cytology Societies (EFCS) working party of 28 members from 14 European countries met at the European Congress of Cytology in Lisbon in September 2009, with two observers from the USA, to discuss the need for standardising thyroid FNA nomenclature in the light of the National Institute of Cancer (NCI) recommendations resulting from the State of the Science conference in Bethesda in 2007. The data were obtained through two questionnaires sent by email and a transcript of the live discussion at the congress, which is presented in full. The surveys and discussion showed that there were currently no national terminologies for reporting thyroid FNA in the different European countries except in Italy and the UK. Personal, 'local', surgical pathology and descriptive terminologies were in use. All but one of the working party members agreed that thyroid FNA reporting should be standardised. Whilst almost a third would adopt the NCI Bethesda terminology, which offers the advantages of a 'risk of cancer' correlation and is linked to clinical recommendations, more than half favoured a translation of local terminology as the first step towards a unified nomenclature, as has been done recently in the UK. There was some disagreement about the use of: a) the six-tiered as opposed to four or five-tiered systems, b) the use of an indeterminate category and c) the 'follicular neoplasm' category, which was felt by some participants not to be different from the 'suspicious of malignancy' category. The conclusions will be passed to the different national societies of cytology for discussion, who will be asked to map their local terminologies to the Bethesda classification, observe its acceptance by clinicians and audit its correlation with outcome.

  1. Migration Related Socio-Cultural Changes and e-Learning in a European Globalising Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leman, Johan; Trappers, Ann; Brandon, Emily; Ruppol, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    OECD figures (1998-2002) reveal a sharply increasing flow of foreign workers into European countries. Ethnic diversification has become a generalized matter of fact. At the same time, rapidly developing technology and "intellectual globalization" processes--the world wide web--have also become a reality. This complex cluster of changes…

  2. European Dimension on Education and Training for an Aging Society. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joanna

    1990-01-01

    A European conference sponsored by the Association for Educational Gerontology examined such issues as the right of older persons to education and training, the value of training older workers, motivations for educating older people (empowerment versus personal fulfillment), and the objectives and merit of preretirement education. (SK)

  3. Migration Related Socio-Cultural Changes and e-Learning in a European Globalising Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leman, Johan; Trappers, Ann; Brandon, Emily; Ruppol, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    OECD figures (1998-2002) reveal a sharply increasing flow of foreign workers into European countries. Ethnic diversification has become a generalized matter of fact. At the same time, rapidly developing technology and "intellectual globalization" processes--the world wide web--have also become a reality. This complex cluster of changes…

  4. Reconstructing the history of marriage and residence strategies in Indo-European-speaking societies.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Laura

    2011-02-01

    This file provides additional information on the data and methods used in Fortunato (2011a, b), and discussion of the results of the fossilization of nodes Proto-Indo-Hittite (PIH) and Proto-Indo-European (PIE) for marriage and residence strategies.

  5. Design and Implementation Aspects of the Geological Data Infrastructure for European Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Krogt, Rob; Pedersen, Mikael; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, François; Serrrano, Jean-Jacques; Grellet, Sylvain; Lee, Kathryn; Harrison, Matthew; Demicheli, Luca; Delfini, Claudia; Hugelier, Sara; van Daalen, Tirza

    2014-05-01

    Digital geological data play a vital role in responding to the key social and economic challenges facing the European and global communities in the 21st century. These challenges include sustainable supply of energy, water and mineral resources, mitigating the impacts of natural hazards, and responding to climate change by exploiting renewable energy sources and capturing and storing greenhouse gases. As a response to these challenges the European geological surveys have enhanced their collaboration to prepare the implementation of a European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), in order to provide easily accessible, interoperable and harmonized geological information on a European and international level. The high-level objective is to create a proper information base that supports the provision of geological services for European and international organisations, international industry and any other stakeholder working at cross-border or international level. It is additionally expected that the easy access to geological data at European level will enhance the development of new applications. The datasets to be served by the EGDI will primarily originate from the National Geological Survey Organisations (NGSO's) in Europe and the infrastructure will build further on the results of past, present and future European research projects and international programs in which these surveys are involved, for example the OneGeology-Europe project that serves regularly updated geological maps at 1:1M scale for the European area via a web portal. To prepare the implementation of the EGDI the NGSO's collaborate under the framework of the EU-FP7 EGDI-Scope study. This paper will present the main results and conclusions of this program, covering the following main issues that are taken into account to achieve the objectives of the EGDI: Stakeholder involvement: The study has exchanged with representative stakeholders from organisations and institutions to cover perspectives from

  6. Federation of the European Pharmacological Societies-fourth annual meeting. Part II. 14-17 July 2004, Porto. Portugal.

    PubMed

    Urch, Catherine

    2004-09-01

    The aims of this Federation of European Pharmacological Societies (EPHAR) meetings are to broaden the understanding of fundamental pharmacology. Rather than present clinically relevant novel therapeutics, most symposia and posters presented data exploring the role of receptors, transmitters and potential agents within a basic science framework. The opening plenary session was given by Sir James Black, and the main meeting revolved around parallel symposia and poster sessions. Most presenters gave a broad overview of the current understanding, with less emphasis on individual compounds, while others developed a theme exploring specific agonists/antagonists and experimental models.

  7. Veterinary pathology trends in the light of The European Society of Veterinary Pathology Congresses in 1997-2009.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Józef; Gesek, Michał; Babińska, Izabella; Szweda, Magdalena; Sobczak-Filipiak, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the main trends in the activity of veterinary pathologists in the context of their oral presentations, short speeches and posters during annual congresses of the European Society of Veterinary Pathology (ESVP) in the years 1997-2009. During the thirteen analyzed congresses, 2668 presentations were prepared, including 72 plenary lectures, 946 short oral presentations and 1489 posters. Based on the analysis, organ pathology (779 presentations) was the most popular branch of pathology. Infectious and parasitic diseases (714 presentations) and oncology (563) were also quite popular. This paper analyzes also the role of congresses of the Society in disseminating knowledge on veterinary pathology and training pathologists in Europe as well as the trends in their scientific activity.

  8. Review of the therapeutic management of Parkinson's disease. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Movement Disorder Society-European Section. Part I: early (uncomplicated) Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Horstink, M; Tolosa, E; Bonuccelli, U; Deuschl, G; Friedman, A; Kanovsky, P; Larsen, J P; Lees, A; Oertel, W; Poewe, W; Rascol, O; Sampaio, C

    2006-11-01

    The aim of the study was to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of early (uncomplicated) Parkinson's disease (PD), based on a review of the literature. Uncomplicated PD refers to patients suffering from the classical motor syndrome of PD only, without treatment-induced motor complications and without neuropsychiatric or autonomic problems. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) database literature searches were conducted. National guidelines were requested from all European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) societies. Non-European guidelines were searched for using MEDLINE. Part I of the guidelines deals with prevention of disease progression, symptomatic treatment of motor features (parkinsonism), and prevention of motor and neuropsychiatric complications of therapy. For each topic, a list of therapeutic interventions is provided, including classification of evidence. Following this, recommendations for management are given, alongside ratings of efficacy. Classifications of evidence and ratings of efficacy are made according to EFNS guidance. In cases where there is insufficient scientific evidence, a consensus statement (good practice point) is made.

  9. Adult Education and the Labour Market. European Society for Research on the Education of Adults Seminar Proceedings (Ljubljana, Slovenia, October 10-12, 1993). First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenovsek, Tanja Vilic, Ed.; Olesen, Henning Salling, Ed.

    This book contains papers, reports, and welcoming speeches from a seminar for European adult education researchers. The following are included: "Background and Thematic Outline for the ESREA (European Society for Research on the Education of Adults) Seminar on Research into Adult Education and the Labor Market" (Olesen); "Welcoming…

  10. Validation of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine guidelines/recommendations in white European men presenting for couple's infertility.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Capogrosso, Paolo; Boeri, Luca; Ippolito, Silvia; Scano, Roberta; Moschini, Marco; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Papaleo, Enrico; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    To retrospectively validate the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines/recommendations concerning endocrine evaluation in a cohort of white European men presenting for couple's infertility. Retrospective study. Academic reproductive medicine outpatient clinic. Cohort of 1,056 consecutive infertile men (noninterracial infertile couples). Testicular volume was assessed with a Prader orchidometer. Serum hormones were measured (8-10 a.m.) in all cases. Hypogonadism was defined as total T < 3 ng/mL, according to the Endocrine Society definition. Semen analysis values were assessed based on the 2010 World Health Organisation reference criteria. ASRM indications for endocrine assessment in infertile men (sperm concentration <10 million/mL, impaired sexual function, and other clinical findings suggesting a specific endocrinopathy) were used to predict hypogonadism in our cohort. Moreover, a clinically user-friendly three-item nomogram was developed to predict hypogonadism and was compared to the ASRM guidelines assessment. Biochemical hypogonadism was diagnosed in 156 (14.8%) men. Overall, 669 (63.4%) patients would have necessitated total T assessment according to the ASRM criteria; of these, only 119 (17.8%) were actually hypogonadal according to the Endocrine Society classification criteria. Conversely, 37 (23.7%) out of 156 patients with biochemical hypogonadism would have been overlooked. The overall predictive accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the ASRM guidelines was 58%, 76%, and 39%, respectively. Our nomogram was not reliable enough to predict hypogonadism, despite demonstrating a significantly higher predictive accuracy (68%) than the ASRM guidelines. The current findings show that the ASRM guidelines/recommendations for male infertility workup may not be suitable for application in white European infertile men. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Three case reports].

    PubMed

    Silber, Sigmund; Richartz, Barbara M; Brilmayer, Matthias

    2006-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) for the first time issued guidelines for percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in spring 2005. The strengths of recommendations stated in the ESC guidelines (as in those of the AHA/ACC [American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology]) are traditionally a combination of recommendation classes (I, IIa, and IIb) and a level of evidence (A, B, or C). This paper explains and discusses selected focal points of the ESC PCI guidelines based on three representative cases from daily practice. 1. Stable coronary artery disease (CAD): PCI in a 53-year-old patient without angina pectoris and proof of myocardial ischemia. With a clear indication of ischemia in the anterior myocardial wall, the ESC PCI guidelines indicated coronary angiography with possible PCI, even without angina pectoris symptoms. Cardiac catheterization showed a 99% proximal LAD stenosis, which was immediately dilated and stented based on the indicated ischemia. According to the ESC PCI guidelines, an intervention is indicated for CAD when a larger ischemic area is clearly evident even in the absence of typical angina (recommendation class I A). 2. ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI): PCI even after successful thrombolysis. A 70-year-old patient experienced acute substernal pain and immediately went to his nearby hospital. The ECG clearly showed anterior myocardial wall STEMI, which in this hospital without a cardiac cath lab indicated thrombolysis, since it could be initiated within 3 h after the onset of chest pain. Pain relief was evident soon after thrombolysis, combined with a resolution of the ST segment elevations. As suggested by the ESC PCI guidelines, a transfer to a cardiac cath lab took place the next day, where the 50% residual stenosis of the LAD was stented. The ESC PCI guidelines suggest coronary angiography with possible PCI within 1-2 days following successful thrombolysis (recommendation class I A). Thus, even

  12. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). Main Recommendations MR1. ESGE recommends immediate assessment of hemodynamic status in patients who present with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH), with prompt intravascular volume replacement initially using crystalloid fluids if hemodynamic instability exists (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR2. ESGE recommends a restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy that aims for a target hemoglobin between 7 g/dL and 9 g/dL. A higher target hemoglobin should be considered in patients with significant co-morbidity (e. g., ischemic cardiovascular disease) (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR3. ESGE recommends the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS) for pre-endoscopy risk stratification. Outpatients determined to be at very low risk, based upon a GBS score of 0 - 1, do not require early endoscopy nor hospital admission. Discharged patients should be informed of the risk of recurrent bleeding and be advised to maintain contact with the discharging hospital (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR4. ESGE recommends initiating high dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPI), intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour), in patients presenting with acute UGIH awaiting upper endoscopy. However, PPI infusion should not delay the performance of early endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR5. ESGE does not recommend the routine use of nasogastric or orogastric aspiration/lavage in patients presenting with acute UGIH (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR6. ESGE recommends intravenous erythromycin (single dose, 250 mg given 30 - 120 minutes prior to upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) in patients with clinically severe

  13. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times. Conference Proceedings of the Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 4-7, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Käpplinger, Bernd, Ed.; Lichte, Nina, Ed.; Haberzeth, Erik, Ed.; Kulmus, Claudia, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles over 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was "Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional…

  14. The Financing of Adult Learning in Civil Society: A European Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Paul; Bochynek, Bettina

    The financing of adult learning in civil society in Europe was examined in an exploratory study that focused on the relationship between nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the status of financing in the general field of adult learning. Adult education experts from the following countries were subcontracted to develop "country…

  15. The European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists recommendations for the management of young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Fatima; Loibl, Sibylle; Pagani, Olivia; Graziottin, Alessandra; Panizza, Pietro; Martincich, Laura; Gentilini, Oreste; Peccatori, Fedro; Fourquet, Alain; Delaloge, Suzette; Marotti, Lorenza; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Kotti-Kitromilidou, Anna Maria; Rodger, Alan; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    EUSOMA (The European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists) is committed to writing recommendations on different topics of breast cancer care which can be easily adopted and used by health professionals dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer in their daily practice. In 2011, EUSOMA identified the management of young women with breast cancer as one of the hot topics for which a consensus among European experts was needed. Therefore, the society recently organised a workshop to define such recommendations. Thirteen experts from the different disciplines met for two days to discuss the topic. This international and multidisciplinary panel thoroughly reviewed the literature in order to prepare evidence-based recommendations. During the meeting, two working groups were set up to discuss in detail diagnosis and loco-regional and systemic treatments, including both group aspects of psychology and sexuality. The conclusions reached by the working groups were then discussed in a plenary session to reach panel consensus. Whenever possible, a measure of the level of evidence (LoE) from 1 (the highest) to 4 (the lowest) degree, based on the methodology proposed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), was assigned to each recommendation. The present manuscript presents the recommendations of this consensus group for the management of young women with breast cancer in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Constructing thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via on-resin intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingchuan; Zhang, Qingzhou; Li, Zigang

    2016-08-01

    Thiol-ene reactions have been used in a variety of applications that mostly involve an inter-molecular pathway. Herein, we report a facile method to construct thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via an intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction. This reaction is efficient, selective, and has good residue compatibility. Short peptides with thioether tethers were constructed and were used to construct longer cyclic peptides. This synthetic method may be useful for constructing bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ancion, A; D'Orio, V; Lancellotti, P

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem in industrialized countries. Its prognosis remains poor. The new European recommendations for heart failure management allow validation of the latest advances in the field. This article focuses on the definition, classification and treatment of chronic heart failure. Indeed, there are new aspects to consider such as, a new classification, a new therapeutic class and new remote monitoring solutions. On the contrary, there is no change in initial drug therapy, integration of the patient in a multidisciplinary program and the importance of treatment of comorbidities.

  18. Scouting for Drivers of the European Knowledge Society: The Role of Social Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidoni, Daniele; Mascherini, Massimiliano; Manca, Anna Rita

    Knowledge is a relational good. The flow of interactions among the individuals of a group provide the necessary opportunities to share the existing knowledge and use it to further accumulate the (human) capital, which is the main productive input for the development of any knowledge economy. In this sense, the opportunities of social interaction are per se a resource and a dimension of knowledge. The analysis of individual civil participation in different kinds of civil formal organizations across Europe further confirms the existence of different European social models and hints to a possible positive parallelism between the effectiveness of economic policies and social policies aimed at fostering social participation.

  19. Validation of the Pangao PG-800B11 blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension and the British Hypertension Society protocols.

    PubMed

    Bing, Sen; Zhang, Cunhai; Wang, Liping; Li, Linyi; Wan, Yi

    2014-12-01

    The study aimed to determine the accuracy of the fully automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure (BP) monitor Pangao PG-800B11 according to the European Society of Hypertension-International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010 and the British Hypertension Society (BHS) protocol 1993. Data from 33 participants were initially examined according to the ESH-IP revision 2010. Furthermore, 52 participants were then enrolled to fulfill the BHS protocol requirements. In all participants, sequential left arm measurements were performed by two trained observers using a mercury sphygmomanometer and one supervisor using the device. The protocols' requirements were followed precisely. The device passed all parts of the ESH protocol for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and was graded A according to the criteria of the BHS protocol for both SBP and DBP. The A/A grade was achieved in low (<130/80 mmHg), medium (130-160/80-100 mmHg), and high (>160/100 mmHg) BP categories. The mean BP difference between PG-800B11 and observers in the 85 participants was -0.6±5.0 mmHg for SBP and -0.6±4.5 mmHg for DBP; thus, the device also fulfilled the requirements of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). The Pangao PG-800B11 passed all requirements of the ESH-IP revision 2010 and achieved A/A grade of the BHS protocol across a wide range of BPs.

  20. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: Update of the international multidisciplinary classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Costabel, Ulrich; Hansell, David M; King, Talmadge E; Lynch, David A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Ryerson, Christopher J; Ryu, Jay H; Selman, Moisés; Wells, Athol U; Behr, Jurgen; Bouros, Demosthenes; Brown, Kevin K; Colby, Thomas V; Collard, Harold R; Cordeiro, Carlos Robalo; Cottin, Vincent; Crestani, Bruno; Drent, Marjolein; Dudden, Rosalind F; Egan, Jim; Flaherty, Kevin; Hogaboam, Cory; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kim, Dong Soon; Kitaichi, Masanori; Loyd, James; Martinez, Fernando J; Myers, Jeffrey; Protzko, Shandra; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Sverzellati, Nicola; Swigris, Jeffrey; Valeyre, Dominique

    2013-09-15

    In 2002 the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defined seven specific entities, and provided standardized terminology and diagnostic criteria. In addition, the historical "gold standard" of histologic diagnosis was replaced by a multidisciplinary approach. Since 2002 many publications have provided new information about IIPs. The objective of this statement is to update the 2002 ATS/ERS classification of IIPs. An international multidisciplinary panel was formed and developed key questions that were addressed through a review of the literature published between 2000 and 2011. Substantial progress has been made in IIPs since the previous classification. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is now better defined. Respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease is now commonly diagnosed without surgical biopsy. The clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is recognized to be heterogeneous. Acute exacerbation of IIPs is now well defined. A substantial percentage of patients with IIP are difficult to classify, often due to mixed patterns of lung injury. A classification based on observed disease behavior is proposed for patients who are difficult to classify or for entities with heterogeneity in clinical course. A group of rare entities, including pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and rare histologic patterns, is introduced. The rapidly evolving field of molecular markers is reviewed with the intent of promoting additional investigations that may help in determining diagnosis, and potentially prognosis and treatment. This update is a supplement to the previous 2002 IIP classification document. It outlines advances in the past decade and potential areas for future investigation.

  1. Prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification in stage IB lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, C-h; Wang, W; Wei, Y; Hu, H-d; Zou, J; Yan, J; Yu, L-k; Yang, R-s; Wang, Y

    2015-10-01

    Patients with pathological stage IB lung adenocarcinoma have a variable prognosis, even if received the same treatment. This study investigated the prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) lung adenocarcinoma classification in resected stage IB lung adenocarcinoma. We identified 276 patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma who had undergone surgical resection at the Nanjing Chest Hospital between 2005 and 2010. The histological subtypes of all patients were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS international multidisciplinary lung adenocarcinoma classification. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification and patients' prognosis. Two hundred and seventy-six patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma had an 86.2% 5-year overall survival (OS) and 80.4% 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). Patients with micropapillary and solid predominant tumors had a significantly worse OS and DFS as compared to those with other subtypes predominant tumors (p = 0.003 and 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the new classification was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and DFS of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma (p = 0.009 and 0.003). Our study revealed that the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was an independent prognostic factor of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma. This new classification is valuable of screening out high risk patients to receive postoperative adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Enteral nutrient supply for preterm infants: commentary from the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Committee on Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, C; Buonocore, G; Carnielli, V P; De Curtis, M; Darmaun, D; Decsi, T; Domellöf, M; Embleton, N D; Fusch, C; Genzel-Boroviczeny, O; Goulet, O; Kalhan, S C; Kolacek, S; Koletzko, B; Lapillonne, A; Mihatsch, W; Moreno, L; Neu, J; Poindexter, B; Puntis, J; Putet, G; Rigo, J; Riskin, A; Salle, B; Sauer, P; Shamir, R; Szajewska, H; Thureen, P; Turck, D; van Goudoever, J B; Ziegler, E E

    2010-01-01

    The number of surviving children born prematurely has increased substantially during the last 2 decades. The major goal of enteral nutrient supply to these infants is to achieve growth similar to foetal growth coupled with satisfactory functional development. The accumulation of knowledge since the previous guideline on nutrition of preterm infants from the Committee on Nutrition of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition in 1987 has made a new guideline necessary. Thus, an ad hoc expert panel was convened by the Committee on Nutrition of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition in 2007 to make appropriate recommendations. The present guideline, of which the major recommendations are summarised here (for the full report, see http://links.lww.com/A1480), is consistent with, but not identical to, recent guidelines from the Life Sciences Research Office of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences published in 2002 and recommendations from the handbook Nutrition of the Preterm Infant. Scientific Basis and Practical Guidelines, 2nd ed, edited by Tsang et al, and published in 2005. The preferred food for premature infants is fortified human milk from the infant's own mother, or, alternatively, formula designed for premature infants. This guideline aims to provide proposed advisable ranges for nutrient intakes for stable-growing preterm infants up to a weight of approximately 1800 g, because most data are available for these infants. These recommendations are based on a considered review of available scientific reports on the subject, and on expert consensus for which the available scientific data are considered inadequate.

  3. INTRODUCTION: Trends in Physics EPS-7: Proceedings of the Seventh General Conference of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, T.; Stenholm, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Seventh General Conference of the European Physical Society "Trends in Physics" was held in Finland, August 10-14, 1987. The conference sites were the Finlandia Hall in Helsinki and the Helsinki University of Technology in Espoo. Seventy-five plenary and invited talks were presented together with about hundred and forty posters. In this special issue we have been able to include the majority of the plenary and invited talks. They cover a large area of contemporary physics from cosmology to biophysics. In addition a section has been devoted to the role of physics in our human society. In our compilation of the papers we have not attempted to follow the organisation of the conference, but the contributions are arranged so that the readers can find their way through the material in as easy a way as we have been able to achieve. We are very grateful to the authors for their contributions to these Proceedings, which in many ways reflect the exciting progress physics has made during recent years. It is, of course, impossible to cover all aspects of the development of physics in a five days conference. Nevertheless after having had access to all the manuscripts we feel that the international programme committee did an excellent job. This successful result was achieved largely through the efforts of the Program Committee Chairman, Professor Klaus Dransfeld. We think that it is a remarkable achievement of the European Physical Society to run these general physics conferences, where physicists representing widely diverse fields can meet and discover that they still share a common language.

  4. Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Søren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ≥ III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).

  5. Advocating vaccination of adults aged 60 years and older in Western Europe: statement by the Joint Vaccine Working Group of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society and the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-European Region.

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Johnson, Robert W; Lambert, Paul Henri; Maggi, Stefania; Moulias, Robert; Nicholson, Karl; Werner, Hans

    2009-04-01

    Vaccines are an underused public health strategy for healthy aging. Considering the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the current low vaccine coverage rates in older European citizens, the two European geriatric and gerontological societies (European Union Geriatric Medicine Society [EUGMS] and International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-European Region [IAGG-ER]) convened a Joint Vaccine Working Group to develop a consensus document advocating routine vaccination of aging populations. The mandate of this Working Group was to improve the uptake of routine vaccinations in adults aged 60 years and over. The consensus statement underlines the need to establish, strengthen, and harmonize European policies that continue routine vaccinations to adulthood and that will include older populations. Improved vaccination rates will promote healthy aging by reducing the burden of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in older populations, a population that is rapidly increasing in Europe.

  6. Executive Summary: European Heart Rhythm Association Consensus Document on the Management of Supraventricular Arrhythmias: Endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE).

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Josephson, Mark E; Keegan, Roberto; Knight, Bradley P; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Yh; Malmborg, Helena; Oral, Hakan; Pappone, Carlo; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Wood, Kathryn A; Young-Hoon, Kim; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace. It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasis on new advances since the previous European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The EHRA consensus document is available to read in full at http://europace.oxfordjournals.org.

  7. [Breast cancer care quality analysis of the National Institute of Oncology in Hungary according to the requirements of European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists (EUSOMA)].

    PubMed

    Újhelyi, Mihály; Pukancsik, Dávid; Kelemen, Péter; Sávolt, Ákos; Gődény, Mária; Kovács, Eszter; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Bak, Mihály; Polgár, Csaba; Rubovszky, Gábor; Kásler, Miklós; Mátrai, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    The European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists has created quality indicators for breast units to establish minimum standards and to ensure specialist multimodality care with the conscious aim of improving outcomes and decreasing breast cancer mortality. The aim of this study was to analyse the breast cancer care in the National Institute of Oncology according to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists requirements and in a large number of cases in order to present representative clinico-pathological data on the incidence of breast cancer in Hungary. According to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists uniformed criteria clinico-pathological data of multimodality treated breast cancer cases were retrospectively analysed between June 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. During the period of interest 906 patients underwent breast surgery for malignant or benign lesions. According to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists quality indicators the breast cancer care of the National Institute of Oncology is eligible. The diagnostic modalities and multimodality care of breast cancer of the National Institute of Oncology breast unit meets the critical mass and minimum standards of the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists criteria. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(42), 1674-1682.

  8. Classification of the cardiomyopathies: a position statement from the European Society Of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Perry; Andersson, Bert; Arbustini, Eloisa; Bilinska, Zofia; Cecchi, Franco; Charron, Philippe; Dubourg, Olivier; Kühl, Uwe; Maisch, Bernhard; McKenna, William J; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Pankuweit, Sabine; Rapezzi, Claudio; Seferovic, Petar; Tavazzi, Luigi; Keren, Andre

    2008-01-01

    In biology, classification systems are used to promote understanding and systematic discussion through the use of logical groups and hierarchies. In clinical medicine, similar principles are used to standardise the nomenclature of disease. For more than three decades, heart muscle diseases have been classified into primary or idiopathic myocardial diseases (cardiomyopathies) and secondary disorders that have similar morphological appearances, but which are caused by an identifiable pathology such as coronary artery disease or myocardial infiltration (specific heart muscle diseases). In this document, The European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases presents an update of the existing classification scheme. The aim is to help clinicians look beyond generic diagnostic labels in order to reach more specific diagnoses.

  9. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G.; Powell, Charles A.; Riely, Gregory J.; Van Schil, Paul E.; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H. M.; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M.; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Methods An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection

  10. International association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society international multidisciplinary classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim R; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G; Powell, Charles A; Riely, Gregory J; Van Schil, Paul E; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H M; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W; Hirsch, Fred R; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2011-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤ 5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection, will have 100% or near 100

  11. Validation of the Oregon scientific BPW810 blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension Protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hui, Wang; Jin Lan, Wu

    2006-12-01

    To determine the accuracy of the BPW810 blood pressure monitor developed by IDT Technology Limited, according to the international protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The international protocol is divided into two phases: the first phase is performed on 15 selected participants and, if the device passes this phase, 18 more participants are included making a total of 33 participants on whom the final validation is performed. According to the European Society of Hypertension requirements, for each of the 33 participants, four blood pressure measurements were taken simultaneously by two trained observers, using mercury sphygmomanometers alternately with three measurements by the test device. The difference between the blood pressure value given by the device and mean of the two observers' readings was calculated for each measurement. The 99 differences were classified into zones (< or =5, < or =10, and < or =15 mmHg). The number of differences in each zone was compared with the number required by the international protocol. Furthermore, an individual analysis was then done to determine for each participant the number of comparisons < or =5 mmHg, which requires that at least 22 of the 33 participants should have two of three comparisons < or =5 mmHg. The BPW810 passed the first phase of the validation process for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. For the second phase, the difference between the device and mean of two observers was -2.2+/-4.8 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -0.5+/-3.7 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. In the last phase, 26 participants fell in the zone of two of the three comparisons lying within 5 mmHg and none of the participants fell in the zone of all three of the comparisons over 5 mmHg apart. The BPW810 passed all the phases of the international protocol for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

  12. Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the perioperative period may constitute an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, aside from the risks associated with the underlying disease. Second, this should help us to design perioperative strategies that aim to reduce additional perioperative risks. Very few well performed randomised studies on the topic are available and many recommendations rely heavily on expert opinion and are adapted specifically to the healthcare systems in individual countries. This report aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of subcommittees of scientific subcommittees and individual members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched from the year 2000 until July 2010 without language restrictions. These searches produced 15 425 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines.

  13. Improving clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases: a position paper from the Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neville; Atar, Dan; Borentain, Maria; Breithardt, Günter; van Eickels, Martin; Endres, Matthias; Fraass, Uwe; Friede, Tim; Hannachi, Hakima; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Landray, Martin; Lautsch, Dominik; Le Floch, Chantal; Mol, Peter; Naci, Huseyin; Samani, Nilesh J; Svensson, Anders; Thorstensen, Cathrine; Tijssen, Jan; Vandzhura, Victoria; Zalewski, Andrew; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in the world, but the pharmaceutical industry's willingness to invest in this field has declined because of the many challenges involved with bringing new cardiovascular drugs to market, including late-stage failures, escalating regulatory requirements, bureaucracy of the clinical trial business enterprise, and limited patient access after approval. This contrasts with the remaining burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe and in the world. Thus, clinical cardiovascular research needs to adapt to address the impact of these challenges in order to ensure development of new cardiovascular medicines. The present paper is the outcome of a two-day workshop held by the Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology. We propose strategies to improve development of effective new cardiovascular therapies. These can include (i) the use of biomarkers to describe patients who will benefit from new therapies more precisely, achieving better human target validation; (ii) targeted, mechanism-based approaches to drug development for defined populations; (iii) the use of information technology to simplify data collection and follow-up in clinical trials; (iv) streamlining adverse event collection and reducing monitoring; (v) extended patent protection or limited rapid approval of new agents to motivate investment in early phase development; and (vi) collecting data needed for health technology assessment continuously throughout the drug development process (before and after approval) to minimize delays in patient access. Collaboration across industry, academia, regulators, and payers will be necessary to enact change and to unlock the existing potential for cardiovascular clinical drug development. A coordinated effort involving academia, regulators, industry, and payors will help to foster better and more effective conduct of clinical cardiovascular trials, supporting earlier

  14. International ERS/ESICM/ESCMID/ALAT guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia: Guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)/ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and Asociación Latinoamericana del Tórax (ALAT).

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael S; Chastre, Jean; Ewig, Santiago; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Hanberger, Hakan; Kollef, Marin; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luna, Carlos M; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Paiva, J Artur; Read, Robert C; Rigau, David; Timsit, Jean François; Welte, Tobias; Wunderink, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The most recent European guidelines and task force reports on hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were published almost 10 years ago. Since then, further randomised clinical trials of HAP and VAP have been conducted and new information has become available. Studies of epidemiology, diagnosis, empiric treatment, response to treatment, new antibiotics or new forms of antibiotic administration and disease prevention have changed old paradigms. In addition, important differences between approaches in Europe and the USA have become apparent.The European Respiratory Society launched a project to develop new international guidelines for HAP and VAP. Other European societies, including the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, were invited to participate and appointed their representatives. The Latin American Thoracic Association was also invited.A total of 15 experts and two methodologists made up the panel. Three experts from the USA were also invited (Michael S. Niederman, Marin Kollef and Richard Wunderink).Applying the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology, the panel selected seven PICO (population-intervention-comparison-outcome) questions that generated a series of recommendations for HAP/VAP diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  15. European Laryngological Society: ELS recommendations for the follow-up of patients treated for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Simo, Ricard; Bradley, Patrick; Chevalier, Dominique; Dikkers, Frederik; Eckel, Hans; Matar, Nayla; Peretti, Giorgio; Piazza, Cesare; Remacle, Mark; Quer, Miquel

    2014-09-01

    It is accepted that the follow-up of patients who had treatment for laryngeal cancer is a fundamental part of their care. The reasons of post-treatment follow-up include evaluation of treatment response, early identification of recurrence, early detection of new primary tumours, monitoring and management of complications, optimisation of rehabilitation, promotion smoking and excessive alcohol cessation, provision of support to patients and their families, patient counselling and education. Controversies exist in how these aims are achieved. Increasing efforts are being made to rationalise the structure and timing of head and neck cancer follow-up clinics. The aim of this document is to analyse the current evidence for the need to follow up patients who have been treated for LC and provide an up to date, evidence-based statement which is meaningful and applicable to all European Health Care Systems. A working group of the Head and Neck Cancer Committee of the ELS was constituted in 2009. A review of the current published literature on the management and follow-up of laryngeal cancer was undertaken and statements are made based on critical appraisal of the literature and best current evidence. Category recommendations were based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Statements include: length, frequency, setting, type of health professional, clinical assessment, screening investigations, patient's education, second primary tumours, and mode of treatment considerations including radiotherapy, chemo-radiation therapy, transoral surgery and open surgery. It also addresses specific recommendations regarding patients with persistent pain, new imaging techniques, tumour markers and narrow band imaging.

  16. The polycystic ovary syndrome: a position statement from the European Society of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Conway, Gerard; Dewailly, Didier; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Franks, Stephen; Gambineri, Alessandra; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Macut, Djuro; Micic, Dragan; Pasquali, Renato; Pfeifer, Marija; Pignatelli, Duarte; Pugeat, Michel; Yildiz, Bulent O

    2014-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common ovarian disorder associated with androgen excess in women, which justifies the growing interest of endocrinologists. Great efforts have been made in the last 2 decades to define the syndrome. The presence of three different definitions for the diagnosis of PCOS reflects the phenotypic heterogeneity of the syndrome. Major criteria are required for the diagnosis, which in turn identifies different phenotypes according to the combination of different criteria. In addition, the relevant impact of metabolic issues, specifically insulin resistance and obesity, on the pathogenesis of PCOS, and the susceptibility to develop earlier than expected glucose intolerance states, including type 2 diabetes, has supported the notion that these aspects should be considered when defining the PCOS phenotype and planning potential therapeutic strategies in an affected subject. This paper offers a critical endocrine and European perspective on the debate on the definition of PCOS and summarises all major aspects related to aetiological factors, including early life events, potentially involved in the development of the disorder. Diagnostic tools of PCOS are also discussed, with emphasis on the laboratory evaluation of androgens and other potential biomarkers of ovarian and metabolic dysfunctions. We have also paid specific attention to the role of obesity, sleep disorders and neuropsychological aspects of PCOS and on the relevant pathogenetic aspects of cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, we have discussed how to target treatment choices based according to the phenotype and individual patient's needs. Finally, we have suggested potential areas of translational and clinical research for the future with specific emphasis on hormonal and metabolic aspects of PCOS.

  17. [Diagnostics and therapy of chronic stable coronary artery disease : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology].

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, A; Sechtem, U

    2014-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease published in 2013 give practical recommendations for diagnostics and therapy. The approach depends on the clinical picture and symptoms of the patient, the severity and extent of ischemia, the degree and location of coronary stenoses, additional cardiac findings and finally on non-cardiac comorbidities. The selection of suitable diagnostic tools is based on the tabulated pretest probability for the presence of coronary artery disease which plays an important and central role in the diagnostic algorithm. An invasive approach is recommended only in patients with severe angina, i.e. a Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina grading scale of ≥ CCS3 or in patients who are at high risk for death or myocardial infarction based on the results of the test used for detection of ischemia. Detailed therapeutic recommendations are given for medicinal and interventional or surgical therapy. Medicinal therapy includes drugs both for relief of symptoms and prevention of cardiovascular events. Recommendations are also given for the use of new antianginal drugs. A PCI is only indicated in vessels causing ischemia which can be verified by using fractional flow reserve measurements. The indications for PCI now also include patients with a low SYNTAX score and multivessel disease or left main stenosis; however, the optimal strategy should be individually determined in heart team discussions.

  18. Protocol update and preliminary results of EACVI/HFA Cardiac Oncology Toxicity (COT) Registry of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Galderisi, Maurizio; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Popescu, Bogdan A; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Habib, Gilbert; Lestuzzi, Chiara; Santoro, Ciro; Moonen, Marie; Jerusalem, Guy; Andarala, Maryna; Anker, Stefan D

    2017-08-01

    European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Heart Failure Association Cardiac Oncology Toxicity Registry was launched in October 2014 as a European Society of Cardiology multicentre registry of breast cancer patients referred to imaging laboratories for routine surveillance, suspected, or confirmed anticancer drug-related cardiotoxicity (ADRC). After a pilot phase (1 year recruitment and 1 year follow-up), some changes have been made to the protocol (version 1.0) and electronic case report form. Main changes of the version 2.0 concerned exclusion criteria, registry duration, and clarification of the population characteristics. Breast cancer radiotherapy has been removed as an exclusion criterion, which involves now only history of a pre-chemotherapy left ventricular dysfunction. The period for long-term registry recruitment has been reduced (December 2017), but the target study population was extended to 3000 patients. The characteristics of the population are now better defined: patients seen in an imaging lab, which will include patients undergoing chemotherapy with associated targeted therapy or no targeted therapy, at increased risk of ADRC. In total, 1294 breast cancer patients have been enrolled, and 783 case report forms locked from October 2014 to November 2016. Of these, 481 (61.4%) were seen at first evaluation and 302 (38.6%) while on oncologic treatment with anticancer drugs. Fifty-two patients (17.2%) were not in targeted therapies, 191 (63.3%) were ongoing targeted therapy, and 59 (19.5%) had completed it. Twenty-three (2.9%) patients had a suspected diagnosis and 35 (4.5%) a confirmed diagnosis of ADRC. Arterial hypertension was the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factor (29.2%) followed by diabetes (6.1%). Previous history of heart failure accounted for 0.5%, whereas previous cardiac disease was identified in 6.3% of population. The changes of the original protocol of the COT Registry and first update allow a first glance to the panorama of

  19. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    OMS'07 was the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society (EOS) on Optical Microsystems (OMS). It was organized by the EOS in the frame of its international topical meeting activity, and after the success of the inaugural meeting was once again held in Italy, 30 September to 3 October 2007, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. The local organizing committee was composed of researchers from `La Sapienza' University in Rome and the National Council of Research (CNR) in Naples, Italy. A selected group of leading scientists in the field formed the international scientific committee. The conference was fully dedicated to the most recent advancements carried out in the field of optical microsystems. More then 150 scientists coming from five continents attended the conference and more than 100 papers were presented, organized into the following sessions: Photonic cystals and metamaterials Optofluidic microsystems and devices Optical microsystems and devices New characterization methods for materials and devices Application of optical systems Optical sources and photodetectors Optical resonators Nonlinear optic devices Micro-optical devices. Four keynote lecturers were invited for the Plenary sessions: Federico Capasso, Harvard University, USA; Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut, USA (Distinguished Lecturer, Emeritus of LEOS--IEEE Society); Demetri Psaltis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ammon Yariv, California Institute of Technology, USA. Furthermore, 21 invited speakers opened each session of the conference with their talks. In addition a special session was organized to celebrate eighty years of the Isituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (INOA) of CNR. The special invited speaker for this session was Professor Theodor W Hänsch (Nobel Prize in Physics, 2005), who gave a lecture entitled `What can we do with optical frequency combs?' In this special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics, a selection of the most interesting

  20. The Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guideline on endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: commentary from a European Perspective.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antonio J; Rubio, Miguel A

    2011-08-01

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery is experiencing a noteworthy increase worldwide in recent years, but protocols and consensus published in the past decade have not yet established clear evidence-based clinical recommendations. The Endocrine Society, with the participation of the European Society of Endocrinology, has promoted the creation of an expert panel to propose a clinical practice guideline for postoperative management of patients, candidates to bariatric surgery, that places a particular emphasis on evidence-based medical aspects. The main arguments reflected in those recommendations are set out in this article and are subject to analysis and discussion from the specific viewpoint of the current European experience.

  1. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC).

    PubMed

    Flotats, Albert; Knuuti, Juhani; Gutberlet, Matthias; Marcassa, Claudio; Bengel, Frank M; Kaufmann, Philippe A; Rees, Michael R; Hesse, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in software and hardware have enabled the integration of dual imaging modalities into hybrid systems, which allow combined acquisition of the different data sets. Integration of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) scanners into PET/CT systems has shown improvement in the management of patients with cancer over stand-alone acquired CT and PET images. Hybrid cardiac imaging either with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or PET combined with CT depicts cardiac and vascular anatomical abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting and appears to offer superior information compared with either stand-alone or side-by-side interpretation of the data sets in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Hybrid systems are also advantageous for the patient because of the single short dual data acquisition. However, hybrid cardiac imaging has also generated controversy with regard to which patients should undergo such integrated examination for clinical effectiveness and minimization of costs and radiation dose, and if software-based fusion of images obtained separately would be a useful alternative. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients with known or suspected CAD.

  3. Pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Dependence: The 2015 Recommendations of the French Alcohol Society, Issued in Partnership with the European Federation of Addiction Societies.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Benjamin; Paille, François; Gillet, Claudine; Rigaud, Alain; Moirand, Romain; Dano, Corine; Dematteis, Maurice; Mann, Karl; Aubin, Henri-Jean

    2016-01-01

    The latest French good practice recommendations (GPRs) for the screening, prevention, and treatment of alcohol misuse were recently published in partnership with the European Federation of Addiction Societies (EUFAS). This article aims to synthesize the GPRs focused on the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence. A four-member European steering committee defined the questions that were addressed to an 18-member multiprofessional working group (WG). The WG developed the GPRs based on a systematic, hierarchical, and structured literature search and submitted the document to two review processes involving 37 French members from multiple disciplines and 5 non-French EUFAS members. The final GPRs were graded A, B, or C, or expert consensus (EC) using a reference recommendation grading system. The treatment of alcohol dependence consists of either alcohol detoxification or abstinence maintenance programs or drinking reduction programs. The therapeutic objective is the result of a decision made jointly by the physician and the patient. For alcohol detoxification, benzodiazepines (BZDs) are recommended in first-line (grade A). BZD dosing should be guided by regular clinical monitoring (grade B). Residential detoxification is more appropriate for patients with a history of seizures, delirium tremens, unstable psychiatric comorbidity, or another associated substance use disorder (grade B). BZDs are only justified beyond a 1-week period in the case of persistent withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal events or associated BZD dependence (grade B). BZDs should not be continued for more than 4 weeks (grade C). The dosing and duration of thiamine (vitamin B1) during detoxification should be adapted to nutritional status (EC). For relapse prevention, acamprosate and naltrexone are recommended as first-line medications (grade A). Disulfiram can be proposed as second-line option in patients with sufficient information and supervision (EC). For reducing alcohol consumption, nalmefene is

  4. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Debast, S B; Bauer, M P; Kuijper, E J

    2014-03-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness of the currently available treatment modalities of CDI is given, thereby providing evidence-based recommendations on this issue. A computerized literature search was carried out to investigate randomized and non-randomized trials investigating the effect of an intervention on the clinical outcome of CDI. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to grade the strength of our recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The ESCMID and an international team of experts from 11 European countries supported the process. To improve clinical guidance in the treatment of CDI, recommendations are specified for various patient groups, e.g. initial non-severe disease, severe CDI, first recurrence or risk for recurrent disease, multiple recurrences and treatment of CDI when oral administration is not possible. Treatment options that are reviewed include: antibiotics, toxin-binding resins and polymers, immunotherapy, probiotics, and faecal or bacterial intestinal transplantation. Except for very mild CDI that is clearly induced by antibiotic usage antibiotic treatment is advised. The main antibiotics that are recommended are metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Faecal transplantation is strongly recommended for multiple recurrent CDI. In case of perforation of the colon and/or systemic inflammation and deteriorating clinical condition despite antibiotic therapy, total abdominal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy combined with colonic lavage is recommended.

  5. Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Adamič, M; Pavlović, M D; Troilius Rubin, A; Palmetun-Ekbäck, M; Boixeda, P

    2015-09-01

    Lasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. These guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. Lasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Clinical evaluation of quality of life: a survey among members of European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Pompili, Cecila; Novoa, Nuria; Balduyck, Bram

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life (QoL) has been recognized as an important postoperative outcome. Despite the growing interest in this topic, there is almost no information about the daily use of QoL questionnaires within European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS). The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey launched to know the current practice of collecting and using QoL data within the Society. The survey was designed by the members of the QoL and Patient Safety ESTS committee and included 13 questions about different aspects of QoL assessment: time points of data collection, type and method of administration of questionnaires, dropouts, surgical-related symptoms and definition of the target population. An electronic link was sent to invite 1250 ESTS members to complete the survey by e-mail. One hundred and fifty surgeons worldwide completed the survey. Of the total, 54.4% of the surgeons indicated that they never collect QoL data in their daily practice. Both SF-36 and EORTC C30 were the most commonly used questionnaires. They are considered as the most appropriate for thoracic surgery patients. Only 20% of the surgeons used the LC-13 module in addition. Most of the time (45.5%), questionnaires are completed through a face-to-face interview led by a physician. Only 21.2% of the responders collected data prior to surgery; 39.3% of the responders collect QoL data only from lung cancer patients and 16% add patients with oesophageal diseases. Postoperative complications, comorbidities, surgical and oncological baseline data and wound pain, healing disorders, arm mobility, oxygen dependency, return to work and postoperative medication were important items that responders suggested to include in future questionnaires. The obtained data showed a broad area for improvement in QoL. The ESTS has to lead this effort collaborating to standardize the research in this field, endorsing specific questionnaires, incorporating patient-reported outcomes more and more into

  7. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat; Larsen, Michael; Souied, Eric; Schlingemann, Reinier; Eldem, Bora; Monés, Jordi; Richard, Gisbert; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has led to an overwhelming improvement in the prognosis of patients affected by neovascular AMD, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of patients. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by significant economic investments, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations in diagnostic technologies, such as optical coherence tomography, allows unprecedented high-resolution visualisation of disease morphology and provides a promising horizon for early disease detection and efficient therapeutic follow-up. However, definite conclusions from morphologic parameters are still lacking, and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state-of-the-art care to their patients. Trial registration number NCT01318941. PMID:25136079

  8. PREFACE: European Microbeam Analysis Society's 14th European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis (EMAS 2015), Portorož, Slovenia, 3-7 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Xavier; Matthews, Michael B.; Čeh, Miran; Langer, Enrico; Žagar, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 14th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from the 3rd to the 7th of May 2015 in the Grand Hotel Bernardin, Portorož, Slovenia. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on a career in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a unique format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field.This workshop was organized in collaboration with the Jožef Stefan Institute and SDM - Slovene Society for Microscopy. The technical programme included the following topics: electron probe microanalysis, STEM and EELS, materials applications, cathodoluminescence and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and their applications. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. The best presentation by a young scientist was awarded with an invitation to attend the 2016 Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting at Columbus, Ohio. The prize went to Shirin Kaboli, of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering of McGill University (Montréal, Canada), for her talk entitled "Electron channelling contrast reconstruction with electron backscattered diffraction". The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 71 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan, Canada, USA, and Australia. A selection of participants with posters was invited

  9. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  10. European Society of Cardiology Guideline-Adherent Antithrombotic Treatment and Risk of Mortality in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chou, Annie Y.; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Su-Jung; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the risk of mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated adherent to the 2012 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for stroke prevention and those who were not treated according to guideline recommendations. This study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1996 to 2011, 354,649 newly diagnosed AF patients were identified as the study population. Among the study cohort, 45,595 and 309,054 patients were defined as Guideline-Adherent and Non-Adherent groups, respectively. During the follow up of 1,480,280 person-years, 133,552 (37.7%) patients experienced mortality. The risk of mortality was lower among AF patients whose treatment was adherent to the guideline recommendation for stroke prevention than those whose treatment was not (annual risk of mortality = 4.3% versus 10.0%) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval = 0.61–0.64, p value < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, CHA2DS2-VASc score and antiplatelet therapy. The findings were consistently observed after propensity matching analysis. In conclusion, the risk of mortality was lower for AF patients who were treated according to the antithrombotic recommendations of the 2012 ESC guidelines, guided by the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Better efforts to implement guidelines would lead to improved outcomes for patients with AF. PMID:27498702

  11. Laryngeal framework surgery: a proposal for classification and nomenclature by the Phonosurgery Committee of the European Laryngological Society.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, G; de Jong, F I; Mahieu, H F; Benninger, M S; Isshiki, N

    2001-10-01

    Laryngeal framework surgery, developed by Isshiki in the 1970s, is one of the most dynamic areas of phonosurgery and these procedures have served to considerably widen our spectrum and options for surgical improvement and/or changing of voice. As these techniques became more accepted and became common throughout the world, several new surgical modifications and different terms have been introduced. These new developments have lead to a confusion regarding terminology and types which make it difficult to communicate between and to compare the results of different authors. In an effort to create a more precise and descriptive list of definitions and terms, the Phonosurgery Committee of the European Laryngological Society has developed a new terminology for laryngeal framework surgery. In accordance with the concept of Isshiki, four types can be separated according to the intended purpose of the surgery: -Approximation laryngoplasty: medialization thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction. -Expansion laryngoplasty: lateralization thyroplasty, vocal fold abduction. -Relaxation laryngoplasty: shortening thyroplasty -Tensioning laryngoplasty: cricothyroid approximation, elongation thyroplasty. The proposed terms are functionally oriented and related closely to the intended purpose of the procedure or related to the underlying pathogenesis of the dysphonia. This new classification should provide a general framework suited not only to classify the current techniques but also to easily apply and adapt to include new procedures and future developments as necessary.

  12. Reliability and reproducibility of the German version of the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons reading charts.

    PubMed

    Hirnschall, Nino; Dexl, Alois; Zandanell, Stephan; Motaabbed, Jasmin Katrin; Grabner, Guenther; Findl, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    To create a validated, standardized, logarithmic European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ESCRS) reading chart in German and to use this reading chart as a template for comparable reading charts in other languages. Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, and Department of Ophthalmology, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria. Prospective multicenter validation study. Thirty-nine short standardized German sentences were developed and tested on healthy volunteers and pseudophakic patients. On the first visit, corrected distance visual acuity was assessed in each eye using autorefraction (KR8000) and subjective refraction using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study charts at 4 m. Reading speed, when reading the new ESCRS reading charts, was tested under photopic conditions (85 to 100 candelas/m(2)) and high contrast (≥95% Michelson contrast). The study assessed 120 subjects. Sixty subjects were young healthy volunteers and 60 were pseudophakic patients. Reliability of the sentences was tested using Cronbach's α and was found to be high (α = 0.994). Furthermore, reproducibility was high in most cases and the absolute mean difference between the first measurement and second measurement for all sentences was 0.56 seconds ± 0.07 (SD) (range 0.43 to 0.72 seconds). The German version of the ESCRS reading charts, a standardized logarithmic and validated reading test, was reliable in healthy volunteers as well as in pseudophakic patients. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of the Grandway MD2301 digital automatic blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan; Zeng, Zhao-Lin; Bing, Sen; Li, Lin-Yi; Wang, Rui; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the Grandway MD2301 digital automatic blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. The ESH-IP revision 2010 for the validation of blood pressure-measuring devices in adults was followed precisely. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) were measured sequentially in 33 adult patients and compared with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers). A total of 99 comparison pairs were obtained. The device produced 78, 95 and 99 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for SBP and 83, 96, and 99 for DBP, respectively. The average device-observer difference was -1.81±4.22 mmHg for SBP and -0.15±3.93 mmHg for DBP. All of the data were within the standards requirements to pass the testing. The Grandway MD2301 digital automatic blood pressure monitor meets the standards of the ESH-IP revision 2010 and can be recommended for self/home measurement in the general population.

  14. Treatment of high blood pressure in elderly and octogenarians: European Society of Hypertension statement on blood pressure targets.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Stenehjem, Aud; Os, Ingrid; Van de Borne, Philippe; Burnier, Michel; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Redon, Josep; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The European Society of Hypertension recommend the following main rules for treatment of hypertension in elderly and octogenarians: 1) In elderly hypertensives with SBP ≥ 160 mmHg there is solid evidence to recommend reducing SBP to between 140 mmHg and 150 mmHg. 2) In fit elderly patients less than 80 years old treatment may be considered at SBP ≥ 140 mmHg with a target SBP < 140 mmHg if treatment is well tolerated. 3) In fit individuals older than 80 years with an initial SBP ≥ 160 mmHg it is recommended to reduce SBP to between 150 mmHg and 140 mmHg. 4) In frail elderly patients, it is recommended to base treatment decisions on comorbidity and carefully monitor the effects of treatment. 5) Continuation of well-tolerated antihypertensive treatment should be considered when a treated individual becomes octogenarian. 6) All hypertensive agents are recommended and can be used in the elderly, although diuretics and calcium antagonists may be preferred in isolated systolic hypertension.

  15. Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement for reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    To develop standards for high quality in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all GI endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on the requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems in GI endoscopy. Recommendations 1 Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic. 2 Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospitals' patient record systems. 3 Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources. 4 Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free-text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry. 5 Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated. 6 Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically. 7 Endoscopy reporting systems shall facilitate the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions, patient satisfaction, adverse events, and surveillance recommendations. 8 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format. 9 Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees. 10 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations.

  16. A report from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 (August 31-September 4, 2013 - Amsterdam, the Netherlands).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2013-09-01

    Many are the diseases that can affect the heart and the vessels, most of which were discussed during the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 in Amsterdam. With an attendance of almost 30,000 delegates buzzing the halls of the RAI convention center, Amsterdam was the capital of cardiologic science this summer, and a big challenge for any attendee trying to get the most out of all the oral and poster sessions missing the minimum of new science being presented. Thomson Reuters Cortellis™ supplements the information for any scientist who missed an important session, with a particular focus on new investigational drugs, many of them still in preclinical research, which will certainly impact how cardiovascular disorders are treated in a foreseeable future. Clinical and preclinical research advance to bring novel therapeutic targets, new drugs and new insight into patient characteristics requiring particular treatment approaches. This report is a sample of the new science discussed during the 5 days of meetings. Copyright 2013 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  17. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient's satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations.

  18. Evolving interpretation of the athlete's electrocardiogram: from European Society of Cardiology and Stanford criteria, to Seattle criteria and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; ElMaghawry, Mohamed; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) pre-participation screening can prevent sudden cardiac death in the athletes by early diagnosis and disqualification of affected individuals. Interpretation of the athlete's ECG should be based on specific criteria, because ECG changes that would be considered abnormal in the untrained population may develop in trained athletes as a physiologic and benign consequence of the heart's adaptation to exercise. In 2010, a stem document from the Section of Sports Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) proposed to classify the athlete's ECG changes according to the prevalence, relation to exercise training, association with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and need for further investigations into two groups: "common and training-related" (Group 1) and "uncommon and training-unrelated" (Group 2). Over the last years, several efforts have been made to refine the ESC criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG in order to improve specificity maintaining good sensitivity, especially among elite and Afro-Caribbean athletes, which show the highest rate of false positives Group 2 ECG abnormalities. However, the balance between improvement in specificity and loss of sensitivity should be evaluated keeping in mind that the primary aim of the screening program is to save the athlete's lives rather than money.

  19. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the diagnostic guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Crobach, M J T; Planche, T; Eckert, C; Barbut, F; Terveer, E M; Dekkers, O M; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2016-08-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) guideline for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was launched. Since then newer tests for diagnosing CDI have become available, especially nucleic acid amplification tests. The main objectives of this update of the guidance document are to summarize the currently available evidence concerning laboratory diagnosis of CDI and to formulate and revise recommendations to optimize CDI testing. This update is essential to improve the diagnosis of CDI and to improve uniformity in CDI diagnosis for surveillance purposes among Europe. An electronic search for literature concerning the laboratory diagnosis of CDI was performed. Studies evaluating a commercial laboratory test compared to a reference test were also included in a meta-analysis. The commercial tests that were evaluated included enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) detecting glutamate dehydrogenase, EIAs detecting toxins A and B and nucleic acid amplification tests. Recommendations were formulated by an executive committee, and the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence were graded using the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. No single commercial test can be used as a stand-alone test for diagnosing CDI as a result of inadequate positive predictive values at low CDI prevalence. Therefore, the use of a two-step algorithm is recommended. Samples without free toxin detected by toxins A and B EIA but with positive glutamate dehydrogenase EIA, nucleic acid amplification test or toxigenic culture results need clinical evaluation to discern CDI from asymptomatic carriage.

  20. Management of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis: 2015 Survey of Members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carande, Elliott J.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1995, the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID) carried out a survey of its members to assess the variation in management of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis. The aim of the current study was to carry out a similar survey 20 years later to assess how the management had changed. An electronic, structured, English language survey, based on the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) bronchiolitis draft guideline, was sent to ESPID members in March 2015. Questions asked included information on treatment practices of infants with bronchiolitis and doctor demographics. We received responses from 135 doctors (14% of the ESPID members) who worked in 115 hospitals. 56% of the doctors used a written guideline to manage bronchiolitic infants. All doctors stated that they isolated individually or in cohorts all hospitalised bronchiolitis infants. The level of oxygen saturation suggested as an indication to administer supplemental oxygen varied between <89% and <95%. We found significant reductions in the use of ribavirin, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids from 1995 to 2015 (ribavirin 57% to 13%, P < 0.0001; bronchodilators 95% to 82%, P = 0.0024; corticosteroids 81% to 45%, P < 0.0001). Although variability in management remains high, encouragingly significantly fewer doctors are prescribing ribavirin, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids compared to 20 years ago. PMID:27840650

  1. Validation of the custo screen pediatric blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Beime, Beate; Deutsch, Cornelia; Krüger, Ralf; Wolf, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Hammel, Gertrud; Bramlage, Peter

    2017-02-24

    The purpose of the study was to validate the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) device custo screen pediatric in children aged 3 to 12 years according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP revision 2010). Thirty-three children were included and systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements were performed according to the ESH-IP. The protocol was modified for children considering data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KIGGS). The custo screen pediatric met all the requirements of the ESH-IP. The mean difference between the test device and the reference was -1.4 ± 3.0 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and -0.7 ± 3.2 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure (DBP). For SBP and DBP, all 99 measurements were within the absolute difference of 10 mmHg between the test device and the reference. As to part 2 of the protocol, for DBP in all subjects, two out of three measurements were within 5 mmHg between the device and the standard, whereas for SBP in 32 of 33 subjects, two out of three measurements were within this range.

  2. Peptide hormones and lipopeptides: from self-assembly to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, J A; Burholt, S; Hamley, I W

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the properties and activities of lipopeptides and peptide hormones and how the lipidation of peptide hormones could potentially produce therapeutic agents combating some of the most prevalent diseases and conditions. The self-assembly of these types of molecules is outlined, and how this can impact on bioactivity. Peptide hormones specific to the uptake of food and produced in the gastrointestinal tract are discussed in detail. The advantages of lipidated peptide hormones over natural peptide hormones are summarised, in terms of stability and renal clearance, with potential application as therapeutic agents. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Measurements of Neuronal Soma Size and Estimated Peptide Concentrations in Addition to Cell Abundance Offer a Higher Resolution of Seasonal and Reproductive Influences of GnRH-I and GnIH in European Starlings.

    PubMed

    Amorin, Nelson; Calisi, Rebecca M

    2015-08-01

    abundance of cells. We also report that GnRH-I- and GnIH-ir soma size and our proxy for peptide concentration positively co-varied with each other and, in males, were positively correlated with testosterone. In summary, we offer a higher resolution of understanding of the function of GnRH-I and GnIH during the breeding period of European starlings. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Protocol update and preliminary results of EACVI/HFA Cardiac Oncology Toxicity (COT) Registry of the European Society of Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Galderisi, Maurizio; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Popescu, Bogdan A.; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Habib, Gilbert; Lestuzzi, Chiara; Santoro, Ciro; Moonen, Marie; Jerusalem, Guy; Andarala, Maryna; Anker, Stefan D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Heart Failure Association Cardiac Oncology Toxicity Registry was launched in October 2014 as a European Society of Cardiology multicentre registry of breast cancer patients referred to imaging laboratories for routine surveillance, suspected, or confirmed anticancer drug‐related cardiotoxicity (ADRC). After a pilot phase (1 year recruitment and 1 year follow‐up), some changes have been made to the protocol (version 1.0) and electronic case report form. Methods and results Main changes of the version 2.0 concerned exclusion criteria, registry duration, and clarification of the population characteristics. Breast cancer radiotherapy has been removed as an exclusion criterion, which involves now only history of a pre‐chemotherapy left ventricular dysfunction. The period for long‐term registry recruitment has been reduced (December 2017), but the target study population was extended to 3000 patients. The characteristics of the population are now better defined: patients seen in an imaging lab, which will include patients undergoing chemotherapy with associated targeted therapy or no targeted therapy, at increased risk of ADRC. In total, 1294 breast cancer patients have been enrolled, and 783 case report forms locked from October 2014 to November 2016. Of these, 481 (61.4%) were seen at first evaluation and 302 (38.6%) while on oncologic treatment with anticancer drugs. Fifty‐two patients (17.2%) were not in targeted therapies, 191 (63.3%) were ongoing targeted therapy, and 59 (19.5%) had completed it. Twenty‐three (2.9%) patients had a suspected diagnosis and 35 (4.5%) a confirmed diagnosis of ADRC. Arterial hypertension was the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factor (29.2%) followed by diabetes (6.1%). Previous history of heart failure accounted for 0.5%, whereas previous cardiac disease was identified in 6.3% of population. Conclusion The changes of the original protocol of the COT Registry

  5. Consensus document on the radial approach in percutaneous cardiovascular interventions: position paper by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions and Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care** and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Martial; Pristipino, Christian; Di Mario, Carlo; Nolan, James; Ludwig, Josef; Tubaro, Marco; Sabate, Manel; Mauri-Ferré, Josepa; Huber, Kurt; Niemelä, Kari; Haude, Michael; Wijns, William; Dudek, Dariusz; Fajadet, Jean; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2013-03-01

    Radial access use has been growing steadily but, despite encouraging results, still varies greatly among operators, hospitals, countries and continents. Twenty years from its introduction, it was felt that the time had come to develop a common evidence-based view on the technical, clinical and organisational implications of using the radial approach for coronary angiography and interventions. The European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) has, therefore, appointed a core group of European and non-European experts, including pioneers of radial angioplasty and operators with different practices in vascular access supported by experts nominated by the Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Their goal was to define the role of the radial approach in modern interventional practice and give advice on technique, training needs, and optimal clinical indications.

  6. Current trends in the use of cardiac implantable electronic devices and interventional electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology member countries: 2015 report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Merino, Jose Luis; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Hindricks, Gerhardt

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to provide comprehensive information on the use of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on use of invasive arrhythmia managements since 2008. Fifty-one of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book 2015. This analysis is based on the current and previous editions of the EHRA White Book. Up-to-date information on procedure rates for the last 5 years together with information on economic resources, reimbursement systems, and training requirements are presented for each country and the five geographical ESC regions. In 2014, the CIED implantation rates per million population were highest in the Western followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The catheter ablation activity was largest in the Western followed by the Northern and Southern areas. Altogether the procedure rates were lowest in the Eastern European and in the non-European ESC countries. In the European ESC countries, the procedure rates were 3-10 times higher than in the non-European ESC countries. However, in some countries with a relatively low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values indicating that utilization of arrhythmia therapies was not driven merely by the economic factors. This analysis indicates that considerable heterogeneity in the availability and utilization of arrhythmia therapies still exist across the ESC area. The data will hopefully aid in directing future activities and promote harmonization of cardiac arrhythmia care in the ESC countries. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Arlt, Wiebke; Bancos, Irina; Dralle, Henning; Newell-Price, John; Sahdev, Anju; Tabarin, Antoine; Terzolo, Massimo; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-08-01

    'autonomous cortisol secretion' who also have comorbidities that are potentially related to cortisol excess. (vi) In principle, the appropriateness of surgical intervention should be guided by the likelihood of malignancy, the presence and degree of hormone excess, age, general health and patient preference. (vii) Surgery is not usually indicated in patients with an asymptomatic, nonfunctioning unilateral adrenal mass and obvious benign features on imaging studies. We provide guidance on which surgical approach should be considered for adrenal masses with radiological findings suspicious of malignancy. Furthermore, we offer recommendations for the follow-up of patients with adrenal incidentaloma who do not undergo adrenal surgery, for those with bilateral incidentalomas, for patients with extra-adrenal malignancy and adrenal masses and for young and elderly patients with adrenal incidentalomas. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. A Decade of Information on the Use of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and Interventional Electrophysiological Procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries: 2017 Report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Merkely, Bela; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Hindricks, Gerhard; Heidbuchel, Hein; Camm, John

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on invasive cardiac arrhythmia therapies in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area over the past 10 years. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on invasive arrhythmia therapies since 2008. This year 53 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. Here we present updated data on procedure rates together with information on demographics, economy, vital statistics, local healthcare systems and training activities. Considerable heterogeneity in the access to invasive arrhythmia therapies still exists across the five geographical ESC regions. In 2016, the device implantation rates per million population were 3-6 times higher in the Western region than in the non-European and Eastern ESC member countries. Catheter ablation activity was highest in the Western countries followed by the Northern and Southern areas. In the non-European countries, atrial fibrillation ablation rate was more than tenfold lower than in the European countries. On the other hand, the growth rate over the past ten years was highest in the non-European and Eastern countries. In some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values. It was encouraging to note that during the past decade the growth in invasive arrhythmia therapies was greatest in the areas historically with relatively low activity. Nevertheless, there is substantial disparity and continued efforts are needed to improve harmonization of cardiac arrhythmia therapies in the ESC area.

  9. Cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapies: a position statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Eschenhagen, Thomas; Force, Thomas; Ewer, Michael S; de Keulenaer, Gilles W; Suter, Thomas M; Anker, Stefan D; Avkiran, Metin; de Azambuja, Evandro; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Brutsaert, Dirk L; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Hansen, Arne; Heymans, Stephane; Hill, Joseph A; Hirsch, Emilio; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Janssens, Stefan; de Jong, Steven; Neubauer, Gitte; Pieske, Burkert; Ponikowski, Piotr; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Sawyer, Douglas; Sugden, Peter H; Wojta, Johann; Zannad, Faiez; Shah, Ajay M

    2011-01-01

    The reductions in mortality and morbidity being achieved among cancer patients with current therapies represent a major achievement. However, given their mechanisms of action, many anti-cancer agents may have significant potential for cardiovascular side effects, including the induction of heart failure. The magnitude of this problem remains unclear and is not readily apparent from current clinical trials of emerging targeted agents, which generally under-represent older patients and those with significant co-morbidities. The risk of adverse events may also increase when novel agents, which frequently modulate survival pathways, are used in combination with each other or with other conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. The extent to which survival and growth pathways in the tumour cell (which we seek to inhibit) coincide with those in cardiovascular cells (which we seek to preserve) is an open question but one that will become ever more important with the development of new cancer therapies that target intracellular signalling pathways. It remains unclear whether potential cardiovascular problems can be predicted from analyses of such basic signalling mechanisms and what pre-clinical evaluation should be undertaken. The screening of patients, optimization of therapeutic schemes, monitoring of cardiovascular function during treatment, and the management of cardiovascular side effects are likely to become increasingly important in cancer patients. This paper summarizes the deliberations of a cross-disciplinary workshop organized by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology (held in Brussels in May 2009), which brought together clinicians working in cardiology and oncology and those involved in basic, translational, and pharmaceutical science.

  10. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement

    PubMed Central

    Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE’s viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient’s satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations. PMID:27087943

  11. Essentials from the 2015 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons.

    PubMed

    Ryom, L; Boesecke, C; Gisler, V; Manzardo, C; Rockstroh, J K; Puoti, M; Furrer, H; Miro, J M; Gatell, J M; Pozniak, A; Behrens, G; Battegay, M; Lundgren, J D

    2016-02-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines are intended for all clinicians involved in the care of HIV-positive persons, and are available in print, online, and as a free App for download for iPhone and Android. The 2015 version of the EACS guidelines contains major revisions in all sections; antiretroviral treatment (ART), comorbidities, coinfections and opportunistic diseases. Among the key revisions is the recommendation of ART for all HIV-positive persons, irrespectively of CD4 count, based on the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study results. The recommendations for the preferred and the alternative ART options have also been revised, and a new section on the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been added. A number of new antiretroviral drugs/drug combinations have been added to the updated tables on drug-drug interactions, adverse drug effects, dose adjustment for renal/liver insufficiency and for ART administration in persons with swallowing difficulties. The revisions of the coinfection section reflect the major advances in anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment with direct-acting antivirals with earlier start of treatment in individuals at increased risk of liver disease progression, and a phasing out of interferon-containing treatment regimens. The section on opportunistic diseases has been restructured according to individual pathogens/diseases and a new overview table has been added on CD4 count thresholds for different primary prophylaxes. The diagnosis and management of HIV infection and related coinfections, opportunistic diseases and comorbidities continue to require a multidisciplinary effort for which the 2015 version of the EACS guidelines provides an easily accessable and updated overview. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  12. Sporadic multiple parathyroid gland disease--a consensus report of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons (ESES).

    PubMed

    Barczyński, Marcin; Bränström, Robert; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Mihai, Radu

    2015-12-01

    Sporadic multiglandular disease (MGD) has been reported in literature in 8-33 % of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). This paper aimed to review controversies in the pathogenesis and management of sporadic MGD. A literature search and review was made to evaluate the level of evidence concerning diagnosis and management of sporadic MGD according to criteria proposed by Sackett, with recommendation grading by Heinrich et al. and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Results were discussed at the 6th Workshop of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons entitled 'Hyperparathyroidism due to multiple gland disease: An evidence-based perspective'. Literature reports no prospective randomised studies; thus, a relatively low level of evidence was achieved. Appropriate surgical therapy of sporadic MGD should consist of a bilateral approach in most patients. Unilateral neck exploration guided by preoperative imaging should be reserved for selected patients, performed by an experienced endocrine surgeon and monitored by intraoperative parathormone assay (levels of evidence III-V, grade C recommendation). There is conflicting or equally weighted levels IV-V evidence supporting that cure rates can be similar or worse for sporadic MGD than for single adenomas (no recommendation). Best outcomes can be expected if surgery is performed by an experienced parathyroid surgeon working in a high-volume centre (grade C recommendation). Levels IV-V evidence supports that recurrent/persistence pHPT occurs more frequently in patients with double adenomas hence in situations where a double adenoma has been identified, the surgeon should have a high index of suspicion during surgery and postoperatively for the possibility of a four-gland disease (grade C recommendation). Identifying preoperatively patients at risk for MGD remains challenging, intraoperative decisions are important for achieving acceptable cure rates and long

  13. [Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia: Spanish adaptation of the position paper from the Consensus Panel on Familial Hypercholesterolaemia of the European Atherosclerosis Society. Consensus document of the Spanish Society of Arteriosclerosis (SEA) and Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Foundation (FHF)].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F; Mata, Pedro; Arbona, Cristina; Civeira, Fernando; Valdivielso, Pedro; Masana, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) is a rare life-threatening disease characterized by markedly elevated circulating levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated, premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). The Consensus Panel on Familial Hypercholesterolaemia of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has recently published a clinical guide to diagnose and manage HoFH (Eur Heart J. 2014;35:2146-57). Both the Spanish Society of Atherosclerosis (SEA) and Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Foundation (FHF) consider this European Consensus document of great value and utility. However, there are particularities in our country which advise to have a Spanish adaptation of the European HoFH document in order to approximate this clinical guide to our environment. In Spain, chronic treatment with statins, ezetimibe and resins (colesevelam) has a reduced contribution in the National Health System (NHS) and is one of the few European countries where LDL apheresis is included in the Basic Service Portfolio coverage. This Spanish document also includes clinical experience in the management of these patients in our country. The Drafting Committee emphasizes the need for early identification of HoFH patients, prompt referral to specialized units, and an early and appropriate treatment. These recommendations will provide a guidance for HoFH patient management in Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. A joint procedural position statement on imaging in cardiac sarcoidosis: from the Cardiovascular and Inflammation & Infection Committees of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2017-10-01

    This joint position paper illustrates the role and the correct use of echocardiography, radionuclide imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. This position paper will aid in standardizing imaging for cardiac sarcoidosis and may facilitate clinical trials and pooling of multi-centre data on cardiac sarcoidosis. Proposed flow charts for the work up and management of cardiac sarcoidosis are included. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Nuclear Medicine, the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology.

  15. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a list of recommendations and additional conclusions: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Careful patient monitoring using a variety of techniques including clinical and laboratory evaluation, bedside physiological monitoring with continuous or non-continuous techniques and imaging is fundamental to the care of patients who require neurocritical care. How best to perform and use bedside monitoring is still being elucidated. To create a basic platform for care and a foundation for further research the Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to develop recommendations about physiologic bedside monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews as a background to the recommendations. In this article, we highlight the recommendations and provide additional conclusions as an aid to the reader and to facilitate bedside care.

  16. Access to and clinical use of cardiac implantable electronic devices and interventional electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries: 2016 Report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Merkely, Bela; Camm, A John; Hindricks, Gerhardt

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on the access to and use of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has been collecting descriptive and quantitative data on invasive arrhythmia therapies since 2008. This year 50 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. Up-to-date information on procedure rates for the last 5 years together with information on demographics, economy, vital statistics, local healthcare systems, and training activities is presented for each country and the 5 geographical ESC regions. Our analysis indicated that considerable heterogeneity in the access to arrhythmia therapies still exists across the ESC area. In 2015, the CIED implantation rates per million population were highest in the Western followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The catheter ablation activity was largest in the Western followed by the Northern and Southern areas. Overall, the procedure rates were 3-10 times higher in the European than in the non-European ESC countries. Economic resources were not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies as in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values. These data will help the healthcare professionals and stakeholders to identify and to understand in more depth the trends, disparities, and gaps in cardiac arrhythmia care and thereby promote harmonization of cardiac arrhythmias therapies in the ESC area. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Patient-centred care of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and risk of sudden cardiac death: What do the 2015 European Society of Cardiology guidelines add?

    PubMed

    Norekvål, Tone M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Nurses and allied professionals are at the forefront of care delivery in patients with arrythmogenic risk and have a responsibility to deliver care that is focused on their individual needs. The 2015 European Society of Cardiology guideline on prevention of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death heralds a step-change in patient and family focus and interdisciplinary involvement. This development reflects a recognition within the European Society of Cardiology that chronic care of patients with cardiovascular conditions can be improved by involving all stakeholders, making use of multidisciplinary interventions, and placing the patient at the centre of the care process. In this article, taskforce contributors discuss the latest evidence and highlight some of the most pertinent issues for nurses involved in patient-centred care of patients and families with ventricular arrhythmias and/or risk of sudden death.

  18. Recommendations for cardiac chamber quantification by echocardiography in adults: an update from the American Society of Echocardiography and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roberto M; Badano, Luigi P; Mor-Avi, Victor; Afilalo, Jonathan; Armstrong, Anderson; Ernande, Laura; Flachskampf, Frank A; Foster, Elyse; Goldstein, Steven A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Muraru, Denisa; Picard, Michael H; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Rudski, Lawrence; Spencer, Kirk T; Tsang, Wendy; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2015-03-01

    The rapid technological developments of the past decade and the changes in echocardiographic practice brought about by these developments have resulted in the need for updated recommendations to the previously published guidelines for cardiac chamber quantification, which was the goal of the joint writing group assembled by the American Society of Echocardiography and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. This document provides updated normal values for all four cardiac chambers, including three-dimensional echocardiography and myocardial deformation, when possible, on the basis of considerably larger numbers of normal subjects, compiled from multiple databases. In addition, this document attempts to eliminate several minor discrepancies that existed between previously published guidelines. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Celebrating 40 years of progress in bone marrow transplantation: a report from the 40th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Lyon, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation was established in 1974 to enable scientists and physicians involved in clinical bone marrow transplantation to share their experience and develop cooperative studies. The organization celebrated its 40th anniversary with a meeting that considered hematopoietic stem cell transplantation not as a standalone procedure, but as part of a complex therapeutic program managed by a multidisciplinary professional team. The role of antifungal prophylaxis, emerging resistance in Aspergillus, the management of mucormycosis and new guidelines on antifungal therapy were among the topics discussed by the physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and scientists attending the 40th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  20. What news in the 2010 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of grown-up congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    The new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) for the management of grown-up congenital heart disease were published in August 2010 and follow the first guidelines on this subject published by the society in 2003. This article discusses the rational for publishing this document and the difficulties of generating guidelines for this special field in cardiology. The concept of the new document is outlined and differences when compared with the previous version are summarized. In addition, the European guideline document is compared with the current guidelines of the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. Compared to previous documents the new guidelines provide more comprehensive information with more precise recommendations and update the knowledge in this field. They should help to improve the quality of care of grown-up congenital heart disease patients.

  1. [Scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence].

    PubMed

    Brodel, E G; Ionescu, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This article details the scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence. The intensity of the scientific contacts of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy arise from detailed analysis of the correspondence that outlasts time in the state archive of Jassy. 75% of this correspondence was written in German, and most of it was sent from the German Confederate or the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. This influence and contribution of German science in Moldavian natural science development, was undoubtedly in the first half of the 19th century. This can be attributed to dr. Iacob Cihac, one of the founders of the Society, who was born in Aschaffenburg (Germany) and studied medicine in Heidelberg (Germany), before he moved to Moldavia. Based on the initiative of drs. Cihac and Zotta, and not least the financial support of a part of the Moldavian high class and the Moldavian government, the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy was founded in 1833. This became the first scientific society in the territory of modern Romania. Since the inception of the Moldavian Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy, it has pushed the boundaries of a simple scientific society. This society provides an encyclopedic framework of most of the scientific subjects of the 19th century (medicine, pharmacy, natural science, agronomy, paleontology and geology). It played a major role during the democratization of the Moldavian education system, for example by founding a medical school teaching in the Romanian language in Jassy. The society survived and continued to maintain scientific activities during all the political changes in Moldavia during the 19th century, particularly the revolution of 1848 and the unification process of Romania. The influence and activity of the society in Jassy has continued to make a significant contribution to science and education

  2. Publication Rate of Abstracts Presented at the Annual Congress of the European Society for Surgical Research during 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Meral, Ulvi Mehmet; Alakus, Umit; Urkan, Murat; Ureyen, Orhan; Oren, Nisa Cem; Ozturk Meral, Aylin; Çağıltay, Eylem; Can, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of scientific studies at major meetings serves to rapidly share study results with the scientific community. On the other hand, full-text publication of abstracts in peer-reviewed journals ensures the dissemination of science. This study examines the publication rate (PR) of meeting abstracts presented at the European Society for Surgical Research (ESSR) congresses and determines/compares the factors affecting the PRs. All presentations at the ESSR congresses held during 2008-2011 were retrospectively assessed. Manuscripts indexed in PubMed were included. The meeting year, journal impact factor (IF) in the publication year, study type, presentation type, time to publication and geographic origin of studies were assessed. Among a total of 1,368 oral and poster abstracts, 48.7% (n = 391) of the oral presentations (OPs) and 29.7% (n = 168) of the poster presentations (PPs) were published in medical journals indexed in PubMed. The mean IF of the journals was 2.696 (0.17-14.95). The journals that published OPs had a higher IF than the journals in which PPs were published (2.944 vs. 2.118; p < 0.001). The PR was also higher in the OP group than in the PP group of journals (p < 0.001). The time to publication was 17.5 months (-166 to 82) and was shorter for PPs than for OPs (14.02 vs. 19.09 months; p = 0.01). According to the study type, experimental studies had a significantly higher PR (53.7%; p < 0.001); however, there was no significant difference in PR in terms of the prospective or retrospective nature of clinical studies. The clinical studies were also compared according to the IF values of the journals in terms of the prospective or retrospective nature of the study, and no significant difference was found (p = 0.62). The ESSR congress is an efficient meeting for researchers from varied surgical disciplines and has a PR equivalent to that of similar scientific meetings. The congress has achieved a PR of 40.9% over 4 years with an average IF of 2

  3. Introduction of subspecialty examinations by the European Board of Ophthalmology (EBO) in close collaboration with European Subspecialty Ophthalmological Societies: FEBO-SA.

    PubMed

    Aclimandos, Wagih; Mathysen, Danny G P; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sunaric-Mégevand, Gordana

    2015-12-01

    The European Board of Ophthalmology (EBO) aims to establish common European standards in ophthalmology. The comprehensive EBO Diploma (EBOD) examination has been officially used since 1995 by an increasing number of European countries to assess the level of education in ophthalmology of their residents at the end of their training. The current comprehensive EBOD examination ensures a minimum standard of knowledge. We present an update on the EBO plans to establish a subspecialty advanced EBOD (AdEBOD) examination in order to award ophthalmologists who complete subspecialty training with formal recognition of their expertise. The purpose, structure and process of the AdEBOD examination are presented. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The need for interaction between assisted reproduction technology and genetics: recommendations of the European Societies of Human Genetics and Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    Infertility and reproductive genetic risk are both increasing in our societies because of lifestyle changes and possibly environmental factors. Owing to the magnitude of the problem, they have implications not only at the individual and family levels but also at the community level. This leads to an increasing demand for access to assisted reproduction technology (ART) and genetic services, especially when the cause of infertility may be genetic in origin. The increasing application of genetics in reproductive medicine and vice versa requires closer collaboration between the two disciplines. ART and genetics are rapidly evolving fields where new technologies are currently introduced without sufficient knowledge of their potential long-term effects. As for any medical procedures, there are possible unexpected effects which need to be envisaged to make sure that the balance between benefits and risks is clearly on the benefit side. The development of ART and genetics as scientific activities is creating an opportunity to understand the early stages of human development, which is leading to new and challenging findings/knowledge. However, there are opinions against investigating the early stages of development in humans who deserve respect and attention. For all these reasons, these two societies, European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), have joined efforts to explore the issues at stake and to set up recommendations to maximize the benefit for the couples in need and for the community.

  5. Report of the European Society of Cardiology Cardiovascular Round Table regulatory workshop update of the evaluation of new agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Héctor; de Graeff, Pieter; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Emmerich, Joseph; Fox, Keith Aa; Friedman, Carola P; Gaudin, Christophe; El-Gazayerly, Amany; Goldman, Samantha; Hemmrich, Melanie; Henderson, Robert A; Himmelmann, Anders; Irs, Alar; Jackson, Neville; James, Stefan K; Katus, Hugo A; Laslop, Andrea; Laws, Ian; Mehran, Roxana; Ong, Seleen; Prasad, Krishna; Roffi, Marco; Rosano, Giuseppe Mc; Rose, Martin; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thygesen, Kristian; Van de Werf, Frans; Varin, Claire; Verheugt, Freek Wa; de Los Angeles Alonso García, Maria

    2016-06-29

    Regulatory authorities interpret the results of randomized controlled trials according to published principles. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is planning a revision of the 2000 and 2003 guidance documents on clinical investigation of new medicinal products for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to achieve consistency with current knowledge in the field. This manuscript summarizes the key output from a collaborative workshop, organized by the Cardiovascular Round Table and the European Affairs Committee of the European Society of Cardiology, involving clinicians, academic researchers, trialists, European and US regulators, and pharmaceutical industry researchers. Specific questions in four key areas were selected as priorities for changes in regulatory guidance: patient selection, endpoints, methodologic issues and issues related to the research for novel agents. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI) should be studied separately for therapies aimed at the specific pathophysiology of either condition, particularly for treatment of the acute phase, but can be studied together for other treatments, especially long-term therapy. Unstable angina patients should be excluded from acute phase ACS trials. In general, cardiovascular death and reinfarction are recommended for primary efficacy endpoints; other endpoints may be considered if specifically relevant for the therapy under study. New agents or interventions should be tested against a background of evidence-based therapy with expanded follow-up for safety assessment. In conclusion, new guidance documents for randomized controlled trials in ACS should consider changes regarding patient and endpoint selection and definitions, and trial designs. Specific requirements for the evaluation of novel pharmacological therapies need further clarification. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  6. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  7. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. How does single party dominance influence civil society organisations’ engagement strategies? Exploratory analysis of participative mainstreaming in a ‘regional’ European polity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A raft of United Nations Treaties, European Union Directives and domestic laws oblige governments in 180 + countries to apply the Participative Democratic Model of mainstreaming equalities to public administration by involving those targeted by equality initiatives at all stages in their design and delivery. Notwithstanding Participative Democratic Model’s deeply political nature, extant work has overlooked how governing party turnover influences civil society organisations’ (CSOs) strategies. Here, this lacuna is addressed using a negative ‘extreme case study’ research design involving qualitative accounts from civil society organisations in Wales, a ‘regional’ European polity characterised by one-party dominance. The findings reveal how the absence of turnover distorts the Participative Democratic Model in relation to diverse factors including: strategic bridging, extraparliamentary politics, cognitive locks and party institutionalisation. Inter alia, the wider contribution of this analysis lies in showing the importance of turnover to effective engagement, the ‘pathologies’ associated with one-party dominance and the need for adaptive civil society strategies tailored to prevailing electoral politics and governing party turnover in liberal democracies. PMID:28596639

  9. How does single party dominance influence civil society organisations' engagement strategies? Exploratory analysis of participative mainstreaming in a 'regional' European polity.

    PubMed

    Chaney, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A raft of United Nations Treaties, European Union Directives and domestic laws oblige governments in 180 + countries to apply the Participative Democratic Model of mainstreaming equalities to public administration by involving those targeted by equality initiatives at all stages in their design and delivery. Notwithstanding Participative Democratic Model's deeply political nature, extant work has overlooked how governing party turnover influences civil society organisations' (CSOs) strategies. Here, this lacuna is addressed using a negative 'extreme case study' research design involving qualitative accounts from civil society organisations in Wales, a 'regional' European polity characterised by one-party dominance. The findings reveal how the absence of turnover distorts the Participative Democratic Model in relation to diverse factors including: strategic bridging, extraparliamentary politics, cognitive locks and party institutionalisation. Inter alia, the wider contribution of this analysis lies in showing the importance of turnover to effective engagement, the 'pathologies' associated with one-party dominance and the need for adaptive civil society strategies tailored to prevailing electoral politics and governing party turnover in liberal democracies.

  10. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  11. Highlights from the 36th European Society of Surgical Oncology Congress (ESSO 36), 14–16 September 2016, Kracow, Poland: optimising European cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lichosik, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    The ESSO Congress is the event for all surgeons with an interest in surgical oncology. The congress is a gathering for the surgical oncology community from all around the world to meet and gain an insight into state-of-the-art technology, latest healthcare services, and solutions within their field. The ESSO 36 congress gathered over 750 participants from 58 countries. With over 100 speakers, the scientific programme featured 18 scientific symposia including a joint symposium with the American Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), 6 multidisciplinary sessions including joint sessions with CIRSE (Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe) and JCOG (Japanese Clinical Oncology Group), 8 meet-the-expert sessions, 5 debates, 13 proffered paper sessions, and 2 video sessions. PMID:28386298

  12. Validation of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines risk prediction model for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, Pieter A; Schinkel, Arend F L; Liebregts, Max; Theuns, Dominic A M J; van Cleemput, Johan; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Willems, Rik; Michels, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The recently released 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) use a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death (SCD), based on the HCM Risk-SCD study. Our study is the first external and independent validation of this new risk prediction model. The study population consisted of a consecutive cohort of 706 patients with HCM without prior SCD event, from 2 tertiary referral centers. The primary end point was a composite of SCD and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, identical to the HCM Risk-SCD end point. The 5-year SCD risk was calculated using the HCM Risk-SCD formula. Receiver operating characteristic curves and C-statistics were calculated for the 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines, and risk stratification methods of the 2003 American College of Cardiology/European Society of Cardiology guidelines and 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines. During follow-up of 7.7±5.3 years, SCD occurred in 42 (5.9%) of 706 patients (ages 49±16 years; 34% women). The C-statistic of the new model was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.57-0.82; P=0.008), which performed significantly better than the conventional risk factor models based on the 2003 guidelines (C-statistic of 0.55: 95% CI, 0.47-0.63; P=0.3), and 2011 guidelines (C-statistic of 0.60: 95% CI, 0.50-0.70; P=0.07). The HCM Risk-SCD model improves the risk stratification of patients with HCM for primary prevention of SCD, and calculating an individual risk estimate contributes to the clinical decision-making process. Improved risk stratification is important for the decision making before implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for the primary prevention of SCD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Managing Multilingualism in a European Nation-State: Challenges for Sweden. Current Issues in Language and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Sally, Ed.; Huss, Leena, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents a range of views about the three-layered language situation in Sweden, a situation not unlike that in many other countries worldwide. The papers include the following: "Introduction" (Sally Boyd and Leena Huss); "Swedish, English, and the European Union" (Bjorn Melander), which summarizes…

  14. Managing Multilingualism in a European Nation-State: Challenges for Sweden. Current Issues in Language and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Sally, Ed.; Huss, Leena, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents a range of views about the three-layered language situation in Sweden, a situation not unlike that in many other countries worldwide. The papers include the following: "Introduction" (Sally Boyd and Leena Huss); "Swedish, English, and the European Union" (Bjorn Melander), which summarizes…

  15. Conference report on the 28th annual meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society, 29 April-1 May 2015, Athens.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Andreas; Andreou, Dimosthenis; Grimer, Robert; Ferrari, Stefano; Gosheger, Georg; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Bielack, Stefan S

    2015-01-01

    The 28th Annual Meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society was organised in Athens by the local host Professor Papagelopoulos and his team. The main objective of the meeting was to focus on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. The interdisciplinary nature of the meeting was of great value-surgeons, oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and basic researchers discussed new strategies in the war on sarcoma. This report will highlight the major findings of this successful meeting.

  16. Conference report on the 28th annual meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society, 29 April–1 May 2015, Athens

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Andreas; Andreou, Dimosthenis; Grimer, Robert; Ferrari, Stefano; Gosheger, Georg; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Bielack, Stefan S

    2015-01-01

    The 28th Annual Meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society was organised in Athens by the local host Professor Papagelopoulos and his team. The main objective of the meeting was to focus on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. The interdisciplinary nature of the meeting was of great value—surgeons, oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and basic researchers discussed new strategies in the war on sarcoma. This report will highlight the major findings of this successful meeting. PMID:26284114

  17. Three-dimensional Echocardiography in Congenital Heart Disease: An Expert Consensus Document from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the American Society of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John; Lopez, Leo; Acar, Philippe; Friedberg, Mark K; Khoo, Nee S; Ko, H Helen; Marek, Jan; Marx, Gerald; McGhie, Jackie S; Meijboom, Folkert; Roberson, David; Van den Bosch, Annemien; Miller, Owen; Shirali, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has become important in the management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), particularly with pre-surgical planning, guidance of catheter intervention, and functional assessment of the heart. 3DE is increasingly used in children because of good acoustic windows and the non-invasive nature of the technique. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the optimal application of 3DE in CHD including technical considerations, image orientation, application to different lesions, procedural guidance, and functional assessment. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease: current situation and perspectives—a position statement from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT)

    PubMed Central

    Mohty, M; Malard, F; Abecassis, M; Aerts, E; Alaskar, A S; Aljurf, M; Arat, M; Bader, P; Baron, F; Bazarbachi, A; Blaise, D; Ciceri, F; Corbacioglu, S; Dalle, J-H; Duarte, R F; Fukuda, T; Huynh, A; Masszi, T; Michallet, M; Nagler, A; NiChonghaile, M; Pagluica, T; Peters, C; Petersen, F B; Richardson, P G; Ruutu, T; Savani, B N; Wallhult, E; Yakoub-Agha, I; Carreras, E

    2015-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome or veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD) is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). This review aims to highlight, on behalf of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the current knowledge on SOS/VOD pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis and treatments. Our perspectives on SOS/VOD are (i) to accurately identify its risk factors; (ii) to define new criteria for its diagnosis; (iii) to search for SOS/VOD biomarkers and (iv) to propose prospective studies evaluating SOS/VOD prevention and treatment in adults and children. PMID:25798682

  19. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease: current situation and perspectives-a position statement from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    PubMed

    Mohty, M; Malard, F; Abecassis, M; Aerts, E; Alaskar, A S; Aljurf, M; Arat, M; Bader, P; Baron, F; Bazarbachi, A; Blaise, D; Ciceri, F; Corbacioglu, S; Dalle, J-H; Duarte, R F; Fukuda, T; Huynh, A; Masszi, T; Michallet, M; Nagler, A; NiChonghaile, M; Pagluica, T; Peters, C; Petersen, F B; Richardson, P G; Ruutu, T; Savani, B N; Wallhult, E; Yakoub-Agha, I; Carreras, E

    2015-06-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome or veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD) is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). This review aims to highlight, on behalf of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the current knowledge on SOS/VOD pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis and treatments. Our perspectives on SOS/VOD are (i) to accurately identify its risk factors; (ii) to define new criteria for its diagnosis; (iii) to search for SOS/VOD biomarkers and (iv) to propose prospective studies evaluating SOS/VOD prevention and treatment in adults and children.

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L.; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H.; McEvoy, Cindy T.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice. PMID:26848609

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C; Cheifetz, Ira M; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H; McEvoy, Cindy T; Newth, Christopher J L; Pillow, J Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-02-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice.

  2. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  3. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011.

  4. [The common position of the Czech professional associations on the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine regarding investigation on blood lipids and interpretation of their levels].

    PubMed

    Soška, Vladimír; Franeková, Janka; Friedecký, Bedřich; Jabor, Antonín; Kraml, Pavel; Rosolová, Hana; Vrablík, Michal

    The aim of this opinion is to summarize and to comment the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, which covers two main areas: 1) whether it is necessary / required to be fasting or non-fasting before blood sampling for lipids measurement, and what are the changes in the concentration of blood lipids during the day; 2) What decision limits (cut off value) of lipids and lipoproteins should be reported from laboratories and what is the recommended procedure for people with extreme / critical blood lipid values. Following parameters are discused: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein(a). This opinion should be the object of interest both for professionals in clinical laboratories and for physicians in hospitals and out-patients departments.Key words: apolipoproteins - blood collection - cholesterol - laboratory testing - lipoprotein(a) - cut off limits - triglycerides.

  5. Synthesis of N,N-dimethylaminopyrene-modified short peptides for chemical photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Sergej; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2017-07-01

    The synthesis of peptide-based photocatalysts that use 1-N,N-dimethylaminopyrene as chromophore and their application in photocatalysis is reported. The copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition was applied as key step to prepare the peptide-pyrene conjugates in quantitative yields for different short peptide sequences. The photocatalysts were evaluated for the nucleophilic addition of methanol to 1,1-diphenylethylenes to products with Markovnikov-type orientation The short peptides contain arginine as substrate binding site during photocatalysis, and thus, the reaction was performed without the additive triethylamine that was previously applied as electron shuttle. Full conversion of the substrate and good yields for the addition product were achieved. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Population Aging in the European Information Societies: Towards a Comprehensive Research Agenda in eHealth Innovations for Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Vancea, Mihaela; Solé-Casals, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Population ageing is one of the major social and economic challenges of our contemporary societies. With the advent of the information society, new research and technological developments have been promoted in the field of assistive technologies and information and communication technologies of benefit to elderly people. This article examines the potentialities of new informatics developments in generating solutions to better address elderly people’s daily-life, especially those with chronic illness and/or low autonomy. The authours attempt to propose a research agenda, by exposing various strengts and weaknesses of eHealth innovations for elderly, mainly grounded in secondary sources analysis. PMID:27493837

  7. Population Aging in the European Information Societies: Towards a Comprehensive Research Agenda in eHealth Innovations for Elderly.

    PubMed

    Vancea, Mihaela; Solé-Casals, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    Population ageing is one of the major social and economic challenges of our contemporary societies. With the advent of the information society, new research and technological developments have been promoted in the field of assistive technologies and information and communication technologies of benefit to elderly people. This article examines the potentialities of new informatics developments in generating solutions to better address elderly people's daily-life, especially those with chronic illness and/or low autonomy. The authours attempt to propose a research agenda, by exposing various strengts and weaknesses of eHealth innovations for elderly, mainly grounded in secondary sources analysis.

  8. The relationship between European paediatricians and commerce: ethical principles in paediatrics working group recommendations. Confederation of European Societies of Paediatrics (CESP).

    PubMed

    Chambers, T L

    2000-01-01

    It is important that doctors have an ethically proper relationship with commercial interests. The relationship between paediatricians, paediatric societies and industry is probably healthy. To further the interests of patients it is important that it remains so. This mentionship would be undermined if: there was a perceived conflict of interests between paediatricians, their patients and industry; paediatricians were seen to endorse companies whose marketing and other practices were unethical. It will be enhanced if: paediatricians did not receive individual gain from industry; industrial support for educational and research activities, whether to individuals or institutions, is open, proportionate and accountable.

  9. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: evidentiary tables: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    A variety of technologies have been developed to assist decision-making during the management of patients with acute brain injury who require intensive care. A large body of research has been generated describing these various technologies. The Neurocritical Care Society (NCS) in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium (LABIC) organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to perform a systematic review of the published literature to help develop evidence-based practice recommendations on bedside physiologic monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews on physiologic processes important in the care of acute brain injury. In this article we provide the evidentiary tables for select topics including systemic hemodynamics, intracranial pressure, brain and systemic oxygenation, EEG, brain metabolism, biomarkers, processes of care and monitoring in emerging economies to provide the clinician ready access to evidence that supports recommendations about neuromonitoring.

  10. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux clinical practice guidelines: joint recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN).

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Rudolph, Colin D; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Hassall, Eric; Liptak, Gregory; Mazur, Lynnette; Sondheimer, Judith; Staiano, Annamaria; Thomson, Michael; Veereman-Wauters, Gigi; Wenzl, Tobias G; North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition; European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition

    2009-10-01

    To develop a North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) international consensus on the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the pediatric population. An international panel of 9 pediatric gastroenterologists and 2 epidemiologists were selected by both societies, which developed these guidelines based on the Delphi principle. Statements were based on systematic literature searches using the best-available evidence from PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and bibliographies. The committee convened in face-to-face meetings 3 times. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations through nominal group technique, a structured, quantitative method. Articles were evaluated using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Using the Oxford Grades of Recommendation, the quality of evidence of each of the recommendations made by the committee was determined and is summarized in appendices. More than 600 articles were reviewed for this work. The document provides evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the pediatric population. This document is intended to be used in daily practice for the development of future clinical practice guidelines and as a basis for clinical trials.

  11. ENVRI Cluster - a community-driven platform of European environmental research infrastructures for providing common solution for science and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorvari, Sanna; Kutsch, Werner; Laj, Paolo; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    European long-term environmental research infrastructures (often referred as ESFRI RIs) are the core facilities for providing services for scientists in their quest for understanding and predicting the complex Earth system and its functioning that requires long-term efforts to identify environmental changes (trends, thresholds and resilience, interactions and feedbacks). Many of the research infrastructures originally have been developed to respond to the needs of their specific research communities, however, it is clear that strong collaboration among research infrastructures is needed to serve the trans-boundary research requires exploring scientific questions at the intersection of different scientific fields, conducting joint research projects and developing concepts, devices, and methods that can be used to integrate knowledge. European Environmental research infrastructures have already been successfully worked together for many years and have established a cluster - ENVRI cluster - for their collaborative work. ENVRI cluster act as a collaborative platform where the RIs can jointly agree on the common solutions for their operations, draft strategies and policies and share best practices and knowledge. Supporting project for the ENVRI cluster, ENVRIplus project, brings together 21 European research infrastructures and infrastructure networks to work on joint technical solutions, data interoperability, access management, training, strategies and dissemination efforts. ENVRI cluster act as one stop shop for multidisciplinary RI users, other collaborative initiatives, projects and programmes and coordinates and implement jointly agreed RI strategies.

  12. Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence in Indo-European and Austronesian societies

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Laura; Jordan, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of prehistoric social organization is important if we are to put together satisfactory multidisciplinary scenarios about, for example, the dispersal of human groups. Such considerations apply in the case of Indo-European and Austronesian, two large-scale language families that are thought to represent Neolithic expansions. Ancestral kinship patterns have mostly been inferred through reconstruction of kin terminologies in ancestral proto-languages using the linguistic comparative method, and through geographical or distributional arguments based on the comparative patterns of kin terms and ethnographic kinship ‘facts’. While these approaches are detailed and valuable, the processes through which conclusions have been drawn from the data fail to provide explicit criteria for systematic testing of alternative hypotheses. Here, we use language trees derived using phylogenetic tree-building techniques on Indo-European and Austronesian vocabulary data. With these trees, ethnographic data and Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods, we statistically reconstruct past marital residence and infer rates of cultural change between different residence forms, showing Proto-Indo-European to be virilocal and Proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocal. The instability of uxorilocality and the rare loss of virilocality once gained emerge as common features of both families. PMID:21041215

  13. Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence in Indo-European and Austronesian societies.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Laura; Jordan, Fiona

    2010-12-12

    Accurate reconstruction of prehistoric social organization is important if we are to put together satisfactory multidisciplinary scenarios about, for example, the dispersal of human groups. Such considerations apply in the case of Indo-European and Austronesian, two large-scale language families that are thought to represent Neolithic expansions. Ancestral kinship patterns have mostly been inferred through reconstruction of kin terminologies in ancestral proto-languages using the linguistic comparative method, and through geographical or distributional arguments based on the comparative patterns of kin terms and ethnographic kinship 'facts'. While these approaches are detailed and valuable, the processes through which conclusions have been drawn from the data fail to provide explicit criteria for systematic testing of alternative hypotheses. Here, we use language trees derived using phylogenetic tree-building techniques on Indo-European and Austronesian vocabulary data. With these trees, ethnographic data and Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods, we statistically reconstruct past marital residence and infer rates of cultural change between different residence forms, showing Proto-Indo-European to be virilocal and Proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocal. The instability of uxorilocality and the rare loss of virilocality once gained emerge as common features of both families.

  14. Arginine selective reagents for ligation to peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Darren A; Ng, Raymond; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-05-01

    A new class of arginine-specific bioconjugation reagents for protein labeling has been developed. This method utilizes a triazolyl-phenylglyoxal group on the probe molecule that reacts selectively with the guandinyl group of Arg residues in a protein or peptide. The reaction proceeds in neutral to basic bicarbonate buffers and is selective for arginine residues in peptides and folded proteins. Importantly, the triazolyl-phenylglyoxal group can be introduced into complex molecules containing alkyne groups using CuAAC chemistry, providing a robust approach for the generation of phenylglyoxal reactive groups into molecules to be covalently attached onto the surface of proteins. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Validation of Omron RS8, RS6, and RS3 home blood pressure monitoring devices, in accordance with the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hakuo; Yoshika, Masamichi; Yokoi, Toyohiko

    2013-01-01

    Allowing patients to measure their blood pressure at home is recognized as being of clinical value. However, it is not known how often these measurements are taken correctly. Blood pressure monitors for home use fall into two types based on the position of the cuff, ie, at the upper arm or the wrist. The latter is particularly convenient, as measurements can be taken fully clothed. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the wrist-type blood pressure monitors Omron RS8 (HEM-6310F-E), Omron RS6 (HEM-6221-E), and Omron RS3 (HEM-6130-E). A team of three trained doctors validated the performance of these devices by comparing the measurements obtained from these devices with those taken using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. All the devices met the validation requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. The difference in blood pressure readings between the tested device and the standard mercury sphygmomanometer was within 3 mmHg, which is acceptable according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. All the home devices tested were found to be suitable for measuring blood pressure at home because their performance fulfilled the requirement of the guidelines.

  16. Validation of Transtek blood pressure monitor TMB-1491 for self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huiyong; Zeng, Sijian; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Gong, Wei; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-10-01

    Transtek blood pressure monitor TMB-1491 is an automatic upper arm device designed for self/home measurement in adult populations. This study aimed to evaluate its accuracy according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. The protocol requirements were followed precisely with the recruitment of 33 adult individuals on whom same-left-arm sequential systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. According to the validation protocol, 99 pairs of test device and reference blood pressure measurements were obtained in this study (three pairs for each of the 33 participants). The device produced 74, 95 and 99 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for SBP and 85, 97, and 99 for DBP, respectively. The mean±SD device-observer difference was -0.6±4.4 mmHg for SBP and -0.6±3.4 mmHg for DBP. The number of participants with two or three device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was 24 for SBP and 29 for DBP. In addition, none of the participants had a device-observer difference within 5 mmHg for SBP, and three of the participants had the same for DBP. Transtek TMB-1491 has passed all phases of European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010 and can be recommended for self/home measurement in adult populations.

  17. Balancing health care needs in a changing context: nursing highlights from the 2016 European Oncology Nursing Society Congress (EONS10), 17-18 October 2016, Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lichosik, Danuta; Caruso, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    European cancer nurses have to face many challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economic and political context in which balancing health care needs has become strategic for healthcare delivery. Currently, cancer nurses must overcome many obstacles arising from clinical, organisational, and educational issues. Within this scenario, the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) shaped its tenth congress programme to boost discussion and reflections, to share experiences and research, and to see how cancer nurses try to anticipate and embrace changes. The aim of this was to promote innovative solutions and to address the many issues involved with cancer care. EONS10 was held on 17-18 October in Dublin, Ireland. The congress was attended by more than 500 delegates. The programme covered the following themes: caring for families and carers, inequalities and access to cancer care, caring for patients with haematological cancers, palliative care, communication and information exchange, community cancer care (i.e. parallel sessions), roles and responsibility for advanced nursing practice, International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)-Academy workshops (i.e. workshops), cancer survivorship, clinical leadership and new roles, oncology nursing research, symptom experiences and management, palliative care (i.e. proffered papers), poster presentations, and satellite symposia. The aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss the contents of the EONS10 congress.

  18. Balancing health care needs in a changing context: nursing highlights from the 2016 European Oncology Nursing Society Congress (EONS10), 17–18 October 2016, Dublin, Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Lichosik, Danuta; Caruso, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    European cancer nurses have to face many challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economic and political context in which balancing health care needs has become strategic for healthcare delivery. Currently, cancer nurses must overcome many obstacles arising from clinical, organisational, and educational issues. Within this scenario, the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) shaped its tenth congress programme to boost discussion and reflections, to share experiences and research, and to see how cancer nurses try to anticipate and embrace changes. The aim of this was to promote innovative solutions and to address the many issues involved with cancer care. EONS10 was held on 17–18 October in Dublin, Ireland. The congress was attended by more than 500 delegates. The programme covered the following themes: caring for families and carers, inequalities and access to cancer care, caring for patients with haematological cancers, palliative care, communication and information exchange, community cancer care (i.e. parallel sessions), roles and responsibility for advanced nursing practice, International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)-Academy workshops (i.e. workshops), cancer survivorship, clinical leadership and new roles, oncology nursing research, symptom experiences and management, palliative care (i.e. proffered papers), poster presentations, and satellite symposia. The aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss the contents of the EONS10 congress. PMID:28144284

  19. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management. Differences Between the European and American Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline for long-term follow-up of patients operated on for a phaeochromocytoma or a paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Plouin, P F; Amar, L; Dekkers, O M; Fassnacht, M; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A P; Lenders, J W M; Lussey-Lepoutre, C; Steichen, O

    2016-05-01

    Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumours. Standard treatment is surgical resection. Following complete resection of the primary tumour, patients with PPGL are at risk of developing new tumoural events. The present guideline aims to propose standardised clinical care of long-term follow-up in patients operated on for a PPGL. The guideline has been developed by The European Society of Endocrinology and based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) principles. We performed a systematic review of the literature and analysed the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumours (ENS@T) database. The risk of new events persisted in the long term and was higher for patients with genetic or syndromic diseases. Follow-up in the published cohorts and in the ENS@T database was neither standardised nor exhaustive, resulting in a risk of follow-up bias and in low statistical power beyond 10 years after complete surgery. To inform patients and care providers in this context of low-quality evidence, the Guideline Working Group therefore prepared recommendations on the basis of expert consensus. Key recommendations are the following: we recommend that all patients with PPGL be considered for genetic testing; we recommend assaying plasma or urinary metanephrines every year to screen for local or metastatic recurrences or new tumours; and we suggest follow-up for at least 10 years in all patients operated on for a PPGL. High-risk patients (young patients and those with a genetic disease, a large tumour and/or a paraganglioma) should be offered lifelong annual follow-up. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Advances in Fmoc solid‐phase peptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Raymond; White, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Today, Fmoc SPPS is the method of choice for peptide synthesis. Very‐high‐quality Fmoc building blocks are available at low cost because of the economies of scale arising from current multiton production of therapeutic peptides by Fmoc SPPS. Many modified derivatives are commercially available as Fmoc building blocks, making synthetic access to a broad range of peptide derivatives straightforward. The number of synthetic peptides entering clinical trials has grown continuously over the last decade, and recent advances in the Fmoc SPPS technology are a response to the growing demand from medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. Improvements are being continually reported for peptide quality, synthesis time and novel synthetic targets. Topical peptide research has contributed to a continuous improvement and expansion of Fmoc SPPS applications. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26785684

  2. Determinants of geographic variations in implantation of cardiac defibrillators in the European Society of Cardiology member countries--data from the European Heart Rhythm Association White Book.

    PubMed

    Lubinski, Andrzej; Bissinger, Andrzej; Boersma, Lucas; Leenhardt, Antoine; Merkely, Bela; Oto, Ali; Proclemer, Alessandro; Brugada, Josep; Vardas, Panos E; Wolpert, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major health concern in developed countries. Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in the prevention of SCD and total mortality reduction. However, the high individual costs and the reimbursement policy may limit widespread ICD utilization. This study analyzed the temporal and the geographical trends of the ICD implantation rate. Data were gathered from two editions of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) White Books published in 2008 and 2009. The analysis revealed significant differences in the rates of ICD implantation per million capita between the countries, but the median implantations was constantly increasing. The number of ICD implantations correlated with gross domestic product (GDP), GDP per capita, expenditure on health, life expectancy, and the number of implanting centres. There are great number of differences in the ICD-implanting rates between EHRA member countries, consequent to the increase in the number of ICD implantations. The ICD implantation rates are related to national economic status and healthcare expenses.

  3. Recommendations for the imaging assessment of prosthetic heart valves: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging endorsed by the Chinese Society of Echocardiography, the Inter-American Society of Echocardiography, and the Brazilian Department of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pibarot, Philippe; Chambers, John; Edvardsen, Thor; Delgado, Victoria; Dulgheru, Raluca; Pepi, Mauro; Cosyns, Bernard; Dweck, Mark R; Garbi, Madalina; Magne, Julien; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Bernard, Anne; Lowenstein, Jorge; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Vyhmeister, Rodrigo Hernández; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is rare but potentially life-threatening. Although often challenging, establishing the exact cause of PHV dysfunction is essential to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. In clinical practice, a comprehensive approach that integrates several parameters of valve morphology and function assessed with 2D/3D transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography is a key to appropriately detect and quantitate PHV dysfunction. Cinefluoroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and to a lesser extent, nuclear imaging are complementary tools for the diagnosis and management of PHV complications. The present document provides recommendations for the use of multimodality imaging in the assessment of PHVs. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Determination of glyoxylyl-peptide concentration using oxime chemistry and RP-HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jean-Michel; Far, Samia; Diesis, Eric; Melnyk, Oleg

    2006-11-01

    Glyoxylyl-peptides are useful peptide derivatives in the context of hydrazone, oxime or thiazolidine ligations. We describe a method for the determination of glyoxylyl-peptide concentration based on the reaction of the alpha-oxo aldehyde group with an excess of O-benzylhydroxylamine. The amount of O-benzylhydroxylamine necessary to convert the alpha-oxo aldehyde group into the corresponding O-benzyloxime was determined by RP-HPLC analysis and corresponded to the quantity of glyoxylyl-peptide used in the experiment. The method is rapid, sensitive, accurate and allows the automated analysis of several samples. Copyright 2006 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Critical Illness-Related Corticosteroid Insufficiency (CIRCI): A Narrative Review from a Multispecialty Task Force of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM).

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Olsen, Keith M; Rochwerg, Bram; Rodgers, Sophia C; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-09-21

    To provide a narrative review of the latest concepts and understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). A multi-specialty task force of international experts in critical care medicine and endocrinology and members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Medline, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Three major pathophysiologic events were considered to constitute CIRCI: dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, altered cortisol metabolism, and tissue resistance to glucocorticoids. The dysregulation of the HPA axis is complex, involving multidirectional crosstalk between the CRH/ACTH pathways, autonomic nervous system, vasopressinergic system, and immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated that plasma clearance of cortisol is markedly reduced during critical illness, explained by suppressed expression and activity of the primary cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and kidney. Despite the elevated cortisol levels during critical illness, tissue resistance to glucocorticoids is believed to occur due to insufficient glucocorticoid alpha-mediated anti-inflammatory activity. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of CIRCI add to the limitations of the current diagnostic tools to identify at-risk patients and may also impact how corticosteroids are used in patients with CIRCI.

  6. Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI): a narrative review from a Multispecialty Task Force of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM).

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Olsen, Keith M; Rochwerg, Bram; Rodgers, Sophia C; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-09-21

    To provide a narrative review of the latest concepts and understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). A multispecialty task force of international experts in critical care medicine and endocrinology and members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM). Medline, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Three major pathophysiologic events were considered to constitute CIRCI: dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, altered cortisol metabolism, and tissue resistance to glucocorticoids. The dysregulation of the HPA axis is complex, involving multidirectional crosstalk between the CRH/ACTH pathways, autonomic nervous system, vasopressinergic system, and immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated that plasma clearance of cortisol is markedly reduced during critical illness, explained by suppressed expression and activity of the primary cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and kidney. Despite the elevated cortisol levels during critical illness, tissue resistance to glucocorticoids is believed to occur due to insufficient glucocorticoid alpha-mediated anti-inflammatory activity. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of CIRCI add to the limitations of the current diagnostic tools to identify at-risk patients and may also impact how corticosteroids are used in patients with CIRCI.

  7. Validation of the G.LAB MD2200 wrist blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension, the British Hypertension Society, and the International Organization for Standardization Protocols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Han; Ye, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Da-Peng; Cheng, Kang; Zhang, Chun-Hai; Wan, Yi

    2017-04-01

    To validate the G.LAB MD2200 automated wrist blood pressure (BP) monitors according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010, the British Hypertension Society (BHS), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 81060-2:2013 protocols. The device was assessed on 33 participants according to the ESH requirements and was then tested on 85 participants according to the BHS and ISO 81060-2:2013 criteria. The validation procedures and data analysis followed the protocols precisely. The G.LAB MD2200 devices passed all parts of ESH-IP revision 2010 for both systolic and diastolic BP, with a device-observer difference of 2.15±5.51 and 1.51±5.16 mmHg, respectively. The device achieved A/A grading for the BHS protocol and it also fulfilled the criteria of ISO 81060-2:2013, with mean differences of systolic and diastolic BP between the device and the observer of 2.19±5.21 and 2.11±4.70 mmHg, respectively. The G.LAB MD2200 automated wrist BP monitor passed the ESH-IP revision 2010 and the ISO 81060-2:2013 protocol, and achieved the A/A grade of the BHS protocol, which can be recommended for self-measurement in the general population.

  8. Consensus summary statement of the International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen M; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Böesel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Robertson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care depends, in part, on careful patient monitoring but as yet there are little data on what processes are the most important to monitor, how these should be monitored, and whether monitoring these processes is cost-effective and impacts outcome. At the same time, bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field in critical care but as yet there is little agreement or standardization on what information is important and how it should be displayed and analyzed. The Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to begin to address these needs. International experts from neurosurgery, neurocritical care, neurology, critical care, neuroanesthesiology, nursing, pharmacy, and informatics were recruited on the basis of their research, publication record, and expertise. They undertook a systematic literature review to develop recommendations about specific topics on physiologic processes important to the care of patients with disorders that require neurocritical care. This review does not make recommendations about treatment, imaging, and intraoperative monitoring. A multidisciplinary jury, selected for their expertise in clinical investigation and development of practice guidelines, guided this process. The GRADE system was used to develop recommendations based on literature review, discussion, integrating the literature with the participants' collective experience, and critical review by an impartial jury. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based on both data quality and on trade-offs and translation into clinical practice. Strong consideration was given to providing pragmatic guidance and recommendations for bedside neuromonitoring, even in the absence of high quality data.

  9. Three-dimensional echocardiography in congenital heart disease: an expert consensus document from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the American Society of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John; Lopez, Leo; Acar, Philippe; Friedberg, Mark; Khoo, Nee; Ko, Helen; Marek, Jan; Marx, Gerald; McGhie, Jackie; Meijboom, Folkert; Roberson, David; Van den Bosch, Annemien; Miller, Owen; Shirali, Girish

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has become important in the management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), particularly with pre-surgical planning, guidance of catheter intervention, and functional assessment of the heart. 3DE is increasingly used in children because of good acoustic windows and the non-invasive nature of the technique. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the optimal application of 3DE in CHD including technical considerations, image orientation, application to different lesions, procedural guidance, and functional assessment. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ultrasound-guided central vascular interventions, comments on the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology guidelines on interventional ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Rudolf; Morf, Susanne; Chiorean, Liliana; Dong, Yi; Cui, Xin-Wu; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Jenssen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access has traditionally been performed on the basis of designated anatomical landmarks. However, due to patients’ individual anatomy and vessel pathology and depending on individual operators’ skill, this landmark approach is associated with a significant failure rate and complication risk. There is substantial evidence demonstrating significant improvement in effectiveness and safety of vascular access by realtime ultrasound (US)-guidance, as compared to the anatomical landmark-guided approach. This review comments on the evidence-based recommendations on US-guided vascular access which have been published recently within the framework of Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (InVUS) of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) from a clinical practice point of view. PMID:27747022

  11. Self-Inflicted Lesions in Dermatology: A Management and TherapeuticApproach - A Position Paper From the European Society for Derma-tology and Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Tomas-Aragones, Lucía; Consoli, Silla M; Consoli, Sylvie G; Poot, Francoise; Taube, Klaus-Michael; Linder, M Dennis; Jemec, Gregor B E; Szepietowski, Jacek C; de Korte, John; Lvov, Andrey N; Gieler, Uwe

    2017-02-08

    The classification of self-inflicted skin lesions proposed by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry (ESDaP) group generated questions with regard to specific treatments that could be recommended for such cases. The therapeutic guidelines in the current paper integrate new psychotherapies and psychotropic drugs without forgetting the most important relational characteristics required for dealing with people with these disorders. The management of self-inflicted skin lesions necessitates empathy and a doctor-patient relationship based on trust and confidence. Cognitive behavioural therapy and/or psychodynamic and psychoanalytic psychotherapy (alone, or combined with the careful use of psychotropic drugs) seem to achieve the best results in the most difficult cases. Relatively new therapeutic techniques, such as habit reversal and mentalization-based psychotherapy, may be beneficial in the treatment of skin picking syndromes.

  12. Current state of knowledge on Takotsubo syndrome: a Position Statement from the Taskforce on Takotsubo Syndrome of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Alexander R; Bossone, Eduardo; Schneider, Birke; Sechtem, Udo; Citro, Rodolfo; Underwood, S Richard; Sheppard, Mary N; Figtree, Gemma A; Parodi, Guido; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ruschitzka, Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Omerovic, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is an acute reversible heart failure syndrome that is increasingly recognized in modern cardiology practice. This Position Statement from the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association provides a comprehensive review of the various clinical and pathophysiological facets of Takotsubo syndrome, including nomenclature, definition, and diagnosis, primary and secondary clinical subtypes, anatomical variants, triggers, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, complications, prognosis, clinical investigations, and treatment approaches. Novel structured approaches to diagnosis, risk stratification, and management are presented, with new algorithms to aid decision-making by practising clinicians. These also cover more complex areas (e.g. uncertain diagnosis and delayed presentation) and the management of complex cases with ongoing symptoms after recovery, recurrent episodes, or spontaneous presentation. The unmet needs and future directions for research in this syndrome are also discussed.

  13. Revised diagnosis and severity criteria for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease in adult patients: a new classification from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mohty, M; Malard, F; Abecassis, M; Aerts, E; Alaskar, A S; Aljurf, M; Arat, M; Bader, P; Baron, F; Bazarbachi, A; Blaise, D; Ciceri, F; Corbacioglu, S; Dalle, J-H; Dignan, F; Fukuda, T; Huynh, A; Masszi, T; Michallet, M; Nagler, A; NiChonghaile, M; Okamoto, S; Pagliuca, A; Peters, C; Petersen, F B; Richardson, P G; Ruutu, T; Savani, B N; Wallhult, E; Yakoub-Agha, I; Duarte, R F; Carreras, E

    2016-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, also known as veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD), is a potentially life threatening complication that can develop after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Although SOS/VOD progressively resolves within a few weeks in most patients, the most severe forms result in multi-organ dysfunction and are associated with a high mortality rate (>80%). Therefore, careful attention must be paid to allow an early detection of SOS/VOD, particularly as drugs have now proven to be effective and licensed for its treatment. Unfortunately, current criteria lack sensitivity and specificity, making early identification and severity assessment of SOS/VOD difficult. The aim of this work is to propose a new definition for diagnosis, and a severity-grading system for SOS/VOD in adult patients, on behalf of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. PMID:27183098

  14. Revised diagnosis and severity criteria for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease in adult patients: a new classification from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohty, M; Malard, F; Abecassis, M; Aerts, E; Alaskar, A S; Aljurf, M; Arat, M; Bader, P; Baron, F; Bazarbachi, A; Blaise, D; Ciceri, F; Corbacioglu, S; Dalle, J-H; Dignan, F; Fukuda, T; Huynh, A; Masszi, T; Michallet, M; Nagler, A; NiChonghaile, M; Okamoto, S; Pagliuca, A; Peters, C; Petersen, F B; Richardson, P G; Ruutu, T; Savani, B N; Wallhult, E; Yakoub-Agha, I; Duarte, R F; Carreras, E

    2016-07-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, also known as veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD), is a potentially life threatening complication that can develop after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Although SOS/VOD progressively resolves within a few weeks in most patients, the most severe forms result in multi-organ dysfunction and are associated with a high mortality rate (>80%). Therefore, careful attention must be paid to allow an early detection of SOS/VOD, particularly as drugs have now proven to be effective and licensed for its treatment. Unfortunately, current criteria lack sensitivity and specificity, making early identification and severity assessment of SOS/VOD difficult. The aim of this work is to propose a new definition for diagnosis, and a severity-grading system for SOS/VOD in adult patients, on behalf of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  15. Antibiotic therapy in the critically ill - expert opinion of the Intensive Care Medicine Scientific Subcommittee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  16. Controlling acute pain to improve the quality of postoperative pain management: an update from the European Society of Regional Anesthesia meeting held in Maastricht (September 2016).

    PubMed

    Andrés, Jose De; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Huygen, Frank; Neugebauer, Edmund; Fawcett, William

    2017-08-10

    Improvement in postoperative pain management remains a global concern with a significant unmet need for patients. This was the focus of a 'Change Pain' session at the 35th European Society of Regional Anesthesia meeting (Maastricht, September 2016). Awareness of the size and nature of the problem is important to improve postoperative pain management strategies. Optimal treatment of acute pain should aim to avoid long-term sequelae such as the development of chronic pain disorders (e.g., phantom limb pain). Cases highlighting unsuccessful and successful strategies to manage individuals undergoing surgery were presented. The benefits of personalized care, encouraging patients to be more involved in decisions regarding their treatment and their preferred clinical outcomes were discussed and considered to be a step forward in acute pain management.

  17. Antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients: expert opinion of the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-01-30

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  18. Clinical trials update from the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting: PEP-CHF, ACCLAIM and the HHH study.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-10-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting held in Barcelona in September 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The PEP-CHF study suggests that perindopril improves symptoms and functional capacity and may reduce heart failure hospitalisations in patients with diastolic heart failure. Although immune modulation therapy failed to reduce the incidence of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations in the ACCLAIM study, the observed differences in outcome in some heart failure patients warrants further investigation. The HHH study failed to show a beneficial effect of telemonitoring over usual care in patients with heart failure but potentially important country interactions were observed.

  19. The Research Biobank of the Year Competition of the European, Middle Eastern and African Society for Biopreservation and Biobanking (ESBB): aims and achievements.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christina; Corfield, Julie; di Donato, Jeanne-Hélène; Meir, Karen; Parodi, Barbara; Schmitz, Arndt A; Tiran, Andreas; Tybring, Gunnel; Hewitt, Robert E

    2014-04-01

    With the increasing number of research biobanks and the importance of their role in supporting medical and biological research, the development and sharing of biobanking best practices and benchmarking standards has become paramount. To promote outstanding biobank services for research, the Research Biobank of the Year Competition (RBYC) has been inaugurated by the European, Middle-Eastern, and African Society for Biopreservation and Biobanking (ESBB) in October 2013. The procedures for the call and evaluation procedure, including the newly developed scoring system, are presented here. The statistics and evaluation results of the first year's applications, as well as the experiences of the jury are reported here, and improvements for the RBYC in subsequent years are proposed. Beyond offering a unique benchmarking opportunity for biobanks, the RBYC is discussed as a novel tool to enhance biobank quality, transparency, usage, connectivity, innovation, and sustainability.

  20. A benchmarking project on the quality of previous guidelines about the management of malignant pleural effusion from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Pleural Diseases Working Group.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Marinova, Katerina; Raveglia, Federico; Rocco, Gaetano; Shargall, Yaron; Solli, Piergiorgio; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Martinez-Barenys, Carlos; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan F; Toker, Alper; Scarci, Marco

    2017-08-01

    In the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) survey about management of malignant pleural effusions (MPE), 56% of respondents are not informed of any relevant clinical guidelines and 52%, who are aware of the existence of guidelines, declared that they are in need of updating or revision. The ESTS Pleural Diseases Working Group developed a benchmarking project on quality of previous guidelines on the management of MPE. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument was used to assess each guideline. Each item was scored on a 7-point scale. Scores for each domain were calculated. Economic data for the nations which have issued the guidelines were collected from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development health statistics database. Six guidelines fitted the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Five out of 6 guidelines were produced by a multinational collaboration. Observers would recommend only 2 guidelines with minimal modification. Two areas that received the best score were clarity of presentation and scope and purpose (objectives and health questions target population). The applicability of guideline domain had the lowest score. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that clarity of presentation, international guidelines and publication through medical journal were related to improved scores. A strong correlation was observed between the measures of economic status. The quality of guidelines assessed by the AGREE II criteria was found to be extremely variable. Guidelines achieving higher AGREE II scores were more likely to come from the European Union with the direct involvement of scientific societies in their development. It was also recognized that some fundamental unanswered questions remain about the management of MPE.

  1. Validation of the A&D UM-211 device for office blood pressure measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Fania, Claudio; Albertini, Federica; Palatini, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define the accuracy of UM-211, an automated oscillometric device for office use coupled to several cuffs for different arm sizes, according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The validation was performed in 33 individuals. Their mean age was 59.6±12.9 years, systolic blood pressure (BP) was 144.3±21.5 mmHg (range: 96-184 mmHg), diastolic BP was 86.8±18.5 mmHg (range: 48-124 mmHg), and arm circumference was 30.2±4.3 cm (range: 23-39 cm). Four sequential readings were taken by observers 1 and 2 using a double-headed stethoscope and a mercury sphygmomanometer, whereas three BP readings were taken by the supervisor using the test instrument. The differences between the readings provided by the device and the mean observer measurements were calculated. Therefore, each device measurement was compared with the previous and the next mean observer measurement. The validation results fulfilled all the 2010 European Society of Hypertension revision Protocol criteria for the general population and passed all validation grades. On average, the device overestimated systolic BP by 1.7±2.4 mmHg and diastolic BP by 1.7±2.5 mmHg. These data show that the UM-211 device coupled to several cuffs for different ranges of arm circumference met the requirements for validation according to the International Protocol and can be recommended for clinical use in the adult population. However, these results mainly apply to the use of the 22-32 and the 31-45 cm cuffs.

  2. Validation of the Andon KD-5965 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhua; Li, Zhijie; Li, Guimei; Liu, Zhaoying

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the Andon KD-5965 upper-arm blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adults, with 20 women using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the Andon KD-5965 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 70/99, 91/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 81/99, 99/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-five and 29 participants, for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24). Two and one participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had all three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. According to the validation results, with better performance for diastolic blood pressure than that for systolic blood pressure, the Andon automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor KD-5965 fulfilled the requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement in adults.

  3. [Criticism of the gonioscopic classifications of the glaucoma: with particular reference to the classification issued by the European Glaucoma Society in 2008].

    PubMed

    Bordeianu, Constantin Dan

    2014-01-01

    To critically analyze the gonioscopic classifications of glaucoma, especially of the classification issued by the European Glaucoma Society in 2008, in order to reveal its advantages and shortcomings. The paper tries to determine the extent to which this classification is clear (being based on a coherent and consistently followed set of criteria), is comprehensive (framing all forms of glaucoma), helps to understand the sickness (using a logical framing system), and facilitates therapeutic decision making (offering direct therapeutic suggestions). The paper shows that, compared with all the previous classifications, the 2008 European Glaucoma Society classification is one step ahead (in the way of classifying the group of secondary angle-closure glaucomas), two steps behind (in rejecting two useful categories of congenital glaucoma), and similar in several respects: that it is based on criticizable fundamental and secondary criteria that cannot cover all forms of sickness gathered at a particular crossing; that it uses several equally weighted criteria for one single crossing (division); that it frames one clinical entity in several clinical categories; that it does not reflect reality in some aspects; and that it does not offer direct therapeutic suggestions: after framing a case in a scheme built on the basis of gonioscopic observation, it requires a second stage of pathogenic analysis, so that the ophthalmologist is able to decide the correct treatment only in the third stage. This tortuous thinking pathway, with successive stages - that are not followed by all doctors, explains many of the erroneous therapeutic decisions. All these considerations justify the efforts to find a new classification, able to correct the abovementioned shortcomings.

  4. Stem cell transplantation in severe congenital neutropenia: an analysis from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fioredda, Francesca; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Gaspar, Bobby; Ancliff, Phil; Donadieu, Jean; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Peters, Christina; Calvillo, Michaela; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Morreale, Giuseppe; van 't Veer-Tazelaar, Nelleke; de Wreede, Liesbeth; Al Seraihy, Amal; Yesilipek, Akif; Fischer, Alain; Bierings, Marc; Ozturk, Gulyuz; Smith, Owen; Veys, Paul; Ljungman, Per; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Sánchez de Toledo Codina, José; Or, Reuven; Ganser, Arnold; Afanasyev, Boris; Wynn, Robert; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Marsh, Judith; Dufour, Carlo

    2015-10-15

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), but data on outcome are scarce. We report on the outcome of 136 SCN patients who underwent HSCT between 1990 and 2012 in European and Middle East centers. The 3-year overall survival (OS) was 82%, and transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 17%. In multivariate analysis, transplants performed under the age of 10 years, in recent years, and from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors were associated with a significantly better OS. Frequency of graft failure was 10%. Cumulative incidence (day +90) of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grade 2-4 was 21%. In multivariate analysis, HLA-matched related donor and prophylaxis with cyclosporine A and methotrexate were associated with lower occurrence of acute GVHD. Cumulative incidence (1 year) of chronic GVHD was 20%. No secondary malignancies occurred after a median follow-up of 4.6 years. These data show that the outcome of HSCT for SCN from HLA-matched donors, performed in recent years, in patients younger than 10 years is acceptable. Nevertheless, given the TRM, a careful selection of HSCT candidates should be undertaken.

  5. Extending trust to immigrants: Generalized trust, cross-group friendship and anti-immigrant sentiments in 21 European societies.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Meta; Hooghe, Marc; de Vroome, Thomas; Van Laar, Colette

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is twofold. First, we expand on the literature by testing whether generalized trust is negatively related to anti-immigrant sentiments in Europe. Second, we examine to what extent the relation between generalized trust and anti-immigrant sentiments is dependent upon cross-group friendships. We apply multilevel linear regression modeling to representative survey data enriched with levels of ethnic diversity covering 21 European countries. Results show that both generalized trust and cross-group friendship are negatively related to anti-immigrant sentiments. However, there is a negligible positive relation between generalized trust and cross-group friendship (r = .10), and we can clearly observe that they operate independently from one another. Hence, trusting actors are not more likely to form more cross-group friendships, and cross-group friendship do not lead to the development of more generalized trust. Instead, the findings show that generalized trust leads immigrants too to be included in the radius of trusted others and, as a consequence, the benign effects of generalized trust apply to them as well. We conclude that the strength of generalized trust is a form of generalization, beyond the confines of individual variations in intergroup experiences.

  6. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Veterinary pathology in Europe in the light of the congresses of the European Society of Veterinary Pathology in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Gesek, M; Szarek, J; Babińska, I; Wojtacka, J; Sobczak-Filipiak, M; Felsmann, M Z

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the main trends in the activity of European veterinary pathologists in the context of their oral presentations (plenary lectures and short presentations) and posters provided during annual meetings of the European Society of Veterinary Pathology (ESVP), in the decade 1997-2006. It was found that the issue that was most often brought up in the meetings was organ pathology (566 presentations). Infectious and parasitical diseases were only slightly less frequent (548 presentations). Oncology was another common issue (404 presentations). During this decade, 52 plenary lectures were presented, 765 oral presentations and 1 072 posters. Altogether, 1 889 presentations were made, which is between 127 and 238 per year. Research by Polish scientists accounted for 3.16% of all presentations. Additionally, the subject matter discussed at the annual meetings is analysed, and the trends in the development of veterinary diagnostic pathology and broad pathology education are indicated. It is shown that veterinary pathology enhances knowledge in the field of veterinary medicine by fulfilling a cognitive and diagnostic role.

  8. Guidelines on the safety of light-based home-use hair removal devices from the European Society for Laser Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Town, G; Ash, C; Dierickx, C; Fritz, K; Bjerring, P; Haedersdal, M

    2012-07-01

    In the past 5 years since their US introduction, there has been a rapid proliferation of light-based hair removal devices intended for home-use. In the last 2 years in Europe, sales already run into many tens of thousands of units with well-known multi-national companies entering the market. These guidelines provide a definition of light-based home-use technology, to inform healthcare professionals about home-use light-based technology and encourage manufacturers wishing to sell in Europe to adopt 'best practice'. The review presents the current status on standards and regulation issues and considers home-use safety issues, encompassing human, device and electrical safety, given risks to the eyes and skin from optical radiation both to the consumer and persons in the vicinity. Proposed technical measurement methodology is considered with focus on recognized critical parameters for the safe use of light-based hair removal technology including recording the technical performance and safety claims of a range of home-use hair removal devices. The literature review emphasizes potential adverse incidents and safety aspects of treating cosmetic conditions, such as unwanted hair growth. Although some regulations exist, they differ from region to region and there is a specific need for international common principles and guidelines relating to the manufacture, marketing and use of intense pulsed light and laser devices, including manufacturing standards for home-use products intended, amongst others, for cosmetic hair removal and photo-rejuvenation procedures. In these guidelines, the European Society for Laser Dermatology (ESLD) provides a professional view of what 'best practice' may imply for manufacturers and consumers alike. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. [Spanish interdisciplinary committee for cardiovascular disease prevention and the spanish society of cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and american guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-04-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier España.

  12. Factors impeding the implementation of cardiovascular prevention guidelines: findings from a survey conducted by the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian M; Stewart, Murray; Hertog, Michaël G L

    2006-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease mortality remains high in Europe and many patients have elevated risk factors, despite evidence-based targets and treatment guidelines. This survey examined barriers to implementing cardiovascular risk reduction guidelines. We conducted a semi-structured market research survey of physicians. The survey was conducted in six European countries among cardiologists and primary care physicians. In total, 67 questions were used: 35 had multiple choice answers (prompted) and 32 allowed any answer (unprompted). Respondents were working full-time in patient care (>or=3 years experience) and were in a position to initiate cardiovascular drug treatment. Of the 220 respondents (155 primary care physicians, 65 cardiologists), most (85%) based assessment of cardiovascular risk on all risk factors, reflecting a global approach to risk, rather than considering risk factors individually. A majority (62%) used subjective assessments for establishing global risk rather than guidelines or risk calculators. The most common unprompted barrier to guideline implementation was patient compliance (36%) and a lack of time (23%), and when prompted, the most important was government health policy (40%). The most common unprompted suggestion for improving implementation were financial opportunities (24%) and clear and easy to use guidelines (23%), while when prompted the most important change required was the development of simpler guidelines (46%). Although a majority of physicians are aware of the need to look at a combination of cardiovascular disease risk factors, less than half use guidelines or risk calculators to determine total risk. It is recommended that guidelines need to be simpler and easier to use and supplemented with (patient friendly) risk calculators.

  13. Research and the promotion of child health: a position paper of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Kolacek, Sanja; Phillips, Alan; Troncone, Riccardo; Vandenplas, Yvan; Thapar, Nikhil; Baumann, Ulrich; van Goudoever, Johannes; Mihatsch, Walter; de Swarte, Casper; Benninga, Marc; Mearin, Luisa

    2014-08-01

    Children comprise one-fifth of Europe's population. Promoting child health and development is of key importance for society and its future. This position paper highlights opportunities of investing in gastrointestinal, liver, and nutritional research to promote child health and delineates priorities for research. Investing in child health plays a key role in the promotion of population health, well-being, and disease prevention lifelong, with large health economic benefits. Major opportunities for improving knowledge and translational application arise from recent scientific and technological developments, for example, the long-term impact of early environmental cues interacting with genes. Personalised approaches to therapy and prevention should be enhanced. Deciphering the microbiome and its effects on functions can help in promoting long-term health. Epigenetic research can help to understand how early environmental factors influence later gastrointestinal and hepatic health and disease. A linked nutrition and physical activity strategy can promote health and prevent nutritional deficiencies, inactivity, and chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as diabetes, to ensure optimal health and cognition. Special attention should be devoted to populations with low socioeconomic status, migrant background, and ethnic minorities, and to critical life periods, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, and childhood. Improved understanding of optimal nutrition and on maintaining gut and liver homeostasis throughout childhood will help prevent chronic diseases in later life.

  14. A tool for reliable self-home blood pressure monitoring designed according to the European Society of Hypertension recommendations: the Microlife WatchBP Home monitor.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Jaenecke, Bernd; Giovas, Periklis P; Chang, Arron; Chung-Yueh, Yen; Tan, Ty-Minh

    2007-04-01

    Self-blood pressure monitoring by patients at home (HBPM) is being increasingly used in clinical practice and has been endorsed by hypertension societies as an important adjunct to the conventional office blood pressure measurements. Several problems, however, exist regarding the application of HBPM in practice, such as device inaccuracy, observer bias and misreporting, variable monitoring schedule and variable method for summarizing measurements. The European Society of Hypertension Working Group (ESH-WG) on Blood Pressure Monitoring has published detailed recommendations on how to apply HBPM in clinical practice. The Microlife WatchBP Home monitor is designed to provide reliable and unbiased self-blood pressure monitoring by patients at home, strictly according to the ESH-WG recommendations. Dual-function automated oscillometric monitor for HBPM in the arm, with memory, PC link capacity and embedded monitoring schedule. The device has a Usual mode for casual HBPM and a Diag (diagnostic) mode for HBPM strictly according to the ESH-WG proposed schedule (duplicate morning and evening measurements for 7 days). Readings are averaged by the device after exclusion of the initial day according to ESH-WG recommendations and can be transferred to PC for storing or printing. A pilot study in hypertensive patients with previous experience in HBPM suggested that the device is user-friendly and well accepted. The Microlife WatchBP Home monitor is a novel device that provides a reliable and unbiased assessment of home blood pressure strictly according to the ESH recommendations.

  15. Enforcement of presumed-consent policy and willingness to donate organs as identified in the European Union Survey: the role of legislation in reinforcing ideology in pluralistic societies.

    PubMed

    Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; McGregor, Joan L; Friederich-Murray, Catherine

    2009-04-01

    To increase the supply of transplantable organs, some European Union (EU) countries have begun implementing and enforcing presumed consent policies for organ donation. Mossialos and colleagues performed an analysis of samples of citizens in 15 EU countries and found that legislation, enforcement, and awareness of presumed consent policies for organ donation increase people's willingness to donate their own organs and those of a deceased relative. The authors concluded that, in countries with enforced presumed consent, citizens are willing to donate because they accept organ donation as an ideology. This ideology originates in the thinking that organ donation is an implicit communal contract i.e., a mechanism by which individuals pay back society for the inclusion and social support that they have already experienced and hope to experience in the future. Acceptance of this ideology enhances people's willingness to donate organs and the efficiency in pursuing this collective action, thus, paving the way toward increased paternalism in society. We highlight some potential biases that may have been incorporated in the survey design and in Mossialos et al.'s conclusions, including (1) how the survey questions were constructed, (2) whether sufficient information was communicated about organ procurement practices in heart-beating and non-heart-beating donation before participants responded to the survey, and (3) whether respondents' knowledge about donation legislation can be equated with understanding of processes involved in organ donation. We address the consequences of using legislative authority to enforce the ideology of organ donation, thereby superseding the varying moral values, beliefs, and attitudes about human life and culture that are inherent in multicultural societies.

  16. Validation of the Tensoval Duo Control II blood pressure monitor for clinic use and self-measurement according to the British Hypertension Society protocol and the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol Revision 2010.

    PubMed

    de Greeff, Annemarie; Shennan, Andrew H

    2013-06-01

    The Tensoval Duo Control II is an automated upper arm device that uses a combination of oscillometric and auscultatory technology to determine blood pressure noninvasively. The accuracy of this device was assessed according to the British Hypertension Society (BHS) protocol and the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010 (ESH-IP2) in an adult population. Ethical approval was obtained. Eighty-five and 33 adult individuals, respectively, were recruited to fulfil the requirements of each protocol. Trained observers took nine sequential same-arm measurements alternating between a mercury sphygmomanometer and the device. The device had to achieve at least a B grade for both systolic and diastolic pressures to pass the BHS protocol and had to fulfil the criteria of all three phases of the ESH-IP2 protocol to receive recommendation. The device achieved an A/A grading for the BHS protocol and passed all three phases of the ESH-IP2 protocol. The mean difference±SD for the BHS/ESH protocols, respectively, was -1.8±6.5/-0.7±5.7 mmHg for systolic pressure and 1.9±5.1/2.4±4.5 mmHg for diastolic pressure. The device maintained its A/A grading throughout the low-pressure, medium-pressure and high-pressure ranges. The Tensoval Duo Control II device is recommended for clinical and home use according to both the BHS and the ESH-IP2 standard.

  17. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification predicts occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Chen; Kadota, Kyuichi; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Sima, Camelia S.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Jones, David R.; Travis, William D.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the role of the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification in predicting occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma. METHODS We reviewed lung adenocarcinoma patients who had clinically N2-negative status, were evaluated by preoperative positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and had undergone lobectomy or pneumonectomy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (n = 297). Tumours were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. The associations between occult lymph node metastasis and clinicopathological variables were analysed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Thirty-two (11%) cN0-1 patients had occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis (pN2) whereas 25% of cN1 patients had pN2 disease. Increased micropapillary pattern was associated with increased risk of pN2 disease (P = 0.001). On univariate analysis, high maximum standard uptake value of the primary tumour on PET/CT (P = 0.019) and the presence of micropapillary (P = 0.014) and solid pattern (P = 0.014) were associated with occult pN2 disease. On multivariable analysis, micropapillary pattern was positively associated with risk of pN2 disease (odds ratio = 3.41; 95% confidence intervals = 1.42–8.19; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS The presence of micropapillary pattern is an independent predictor of occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Our observations have potential therapeutic implications for management of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26377636

  18. Validation of the SAA-102 home blood pressure monitor according to the protocols of the European Society of Hypertension, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and the British Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zaetta, Vania; Daniele, Longo; Perkovic, Davor; Pratticò, Francesco; Barisa, Marlena; Perfetti, Paola; Gabrieli, Alberto; Buonocore, Francesco; Winnicki, Mikolaj

    2007-12-01

    To determine the accuracy of a new oscillometric home blood pressure (BP) monitor for arm BP measurement, the SAA-102, developed by the Sensacare Company. Evaluation of the SAA-102 was performed using validation protocols of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH), the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), and the British Hypertension Society (BHS). The SAA-102 monitor was assessed on 33 participants according to ESH requirements, which are based on four zones of accuracy differing from the mercury standard by 5, 10, 15 mmHg or more. Then the oscillometric monitor was tested on 85 participants according to AAMI criteria which require a mean device-observers discrepancy within 5+/-8 mmHg. Finally, the electronic device was evaluated on 93 participants according to BHS requirements, which are based on five phases: before-use calibration, in-use assessment, after-use calibration, static device validation and report of the results. The SAA-102 passed all phases of the ESH international protocol for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP). The SAA-102 passed also AAMI criteria for SBP and DBP. The mean discrepancy between the SAA-102 and observers was 0.1+/-4.6 and -2.7+/-5.2 mmHg, for SBP and DBP, respectively. According to BHS protocol, the oscillometric monitor achieved final grading of A/A for SBP and DBP, respectively. These data show that the SAA-102 device satisfies ESH, AAMI, and BHS protocols for both SBP and DBP and may be recommended for everyday use for BP monitoring at home and in clinical practice.

  19. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ivani, Giorgio; Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; Krane, Elliot; Veyckemans, Francis; Polaner, David M; Van de Velde, Marc; Neal, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Some topics in the clinical management of regional anesthesia in children remain controversial. To evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a joint committee practice advisory on pediatric regional anesthesia (PRA). Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA comprised the joint committee practice advisory on PRA. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Experts selected controversial topics in PRA. The performance of PRA under general anesthesia or deep sedation is associated with acceptable safety and should be viewed as the standard of care (Evidence B2 and Evidence B3). Because of the difficulty interpreting a negative test dose, the use of test dosing should remain discretionary (Evidence B4). The use of either air-loss of resistance or saline-loss of resistance techniques is supported by expert opinion, but the literature supporting one technique over the other is sparse and controversial; when used appropriately, each technique may be safely used in children. There are no current evidence-based data that the use of RA increases the risk for acute compartment syndrome or delays its diagnosis in children. High-level evidence is not yet available for the topics evaluated, and most recommendations are based on Evidence B studies. The ESRA/ASRA recommendations intend to provide guidance for the safe practice of regional anesthesia in children.

  20. Correlation of EGFR mutation status with predominant histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new lung adenocarcinoma classification of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Villa, Celina; Cagle, Philip T; Johnson, Melissa; Patel, Jyoti D; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Raj, Rishi; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Raparia, Kirtee

    2014-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer. To investigate the relationship of EGFR mutation status to the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We screened EGFR mutation in 200 consecutive lung adenocarcinoma resection specimens diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Among 200 lung adenocarcinomas, EGFR mutations were identified in 41 tumors (20.5%). The mean age in the EGFR-mutant group was 64.8 years and this group consisted of 78% females and 22% males. Most patients with EGFR-positive lung cancers were never-smokers (51%) as compared to 8% with EGFR-negative cancers (P < .001). The most common mutations identified in our population were deletions in exon 19 (22 patients) and L858R in exon 21 (12 patients). Five patients had double mutations. The predominant pattern of adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers as compared to 69% with acinar pattern in EGFR wild-type lung cancers (P < .001). Of 22 minimally invasive adenocarcinomas, 8 (36%) had EGFR mutations, accounting for 20% of adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations (P < .05). Based on the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification, the predominant subtype of adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers (P < .001). However, histologic subtype should not be used to exclude patients from tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, since EGFR mutations are found in lung adenocarcinomas of other subtypes.

  1. [Catalogue of learning goals for pregraduate education in geriatric medicine. A recommendation of the German Geriatric Society (DGG), the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (ÖGGG) and the Swiss Society of Geriatric Medicine (SFGG) on the basis of recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) 2013].

    PubMed

    Singler, K; Stuck, A E; Masud, T; Goeldlin, A; Roller, R E

    2014-11-01

    Sound knowledge in the care and management of geriatric patients is essential for doctors in almost all medical subspecialties. Therefore, it is important that pregraduate medical education adequately covers the field of geriatric medicine. However, in most medical faculties in Europe today, learning objectives in geriatric medicine are often substandard or not even explicitly addressed. As a first step to encourage undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine, the European Union of Medical Specialists -Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) recently developed a catalogue of learning goals using a modified Delphi technique in order to encourage education in this field. This catalogue of learning objectives for geriatric medicine focuses on the minimum requirements with specific learning goals in knowledge, skills and attitudes that medical students should have acquired by the end of their studies.In order to ease the implementation of this new, competence-based curriculum among the medical faculties in universities teaching in the German language, the authors translated the published English language curriculum into German and adapted it according to medical language and terms used at German-speaking medical faculties and universities of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. This article contains the final German translation of the curriculum. The Geriatric Medicine Societies of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland formally endorse the present curriculum and recommend that medical faculties adapt their curricula for undergraduate teaching based on this catalogue.

  2. Facile synthesis of peptide nucleic acids and peptide nucleic acid-peptide conjugates on an automated peptide synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra; Jha, Deepti; Su, Wu; Engelmann, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are DNA mimics with a neutral peptide backbone instead of the negatively charged sugar phosphates. PNAs exhibit several attractive features such as high chemical and thermal stability, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and stable binding to their RNA or DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, they are widely used in molecular diagnosis of antisense-targeted therapeutic drugs or probes and in pharmaceutical applications. However, the main hindrance to the effective use of PNAs is their poor uptake by cells as well as the difficult and laborious chemical synthesis. In order to achieve an efficient delivery of PNAs into cells, there are already many published reports of peptides being used for transport across the cell membrane. In this protocol, we describe the automated as well as cost-effective semi-automated synthesis of PNAs and PNA-peptide constructs on an automated peptide synthesizer. The facile synthesis of PNAs will be helpful in generating PNA libraries usable, e.g. for high-throughput screening in biomolecular studies. Efficient synthetic schemes, the automated procedure, the reduced consumption of costly reagents, and the high purity of the products are attractive features of the reported procedure. Copyright © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The European society of regional anesthesia and pain therapy and the American society of regional anesthesia and pain medicine joint committee practice advisory on controversial topics in pediatric regional anesthesia I and II: what do they tell us?

    PubMed

    Lönnqvist, Per-Arne; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Suresh, Santhanam; Ivani, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    To summarize the two recent sets of European and American Societies of Regional Anesthesia (ESRA-ASRA) Practice Advisory Guidelines for the performance of pediatric regional anesthesia (PRA). Owing to the still ongoing debate regarding crucial issues concerning the effective and safe conduct of PRA and because of the lack of any generally accepted guidelines regarding PRA the (ESRA-ASRA) have addressed these in two topical publications. Following an extensive literature search and an evidence-based approach the ESRA-ASRA task force have now provided a practice advisory on the following hot topics in PRA: the safety and appropriateness of placing block during general anesthesia or deep sedation, the use of test dosing, whether to use air or saline when performing loss-of-resistance, the risk of masking an acute compartment syndrome by use of PRA, dosing of local anesthetics for neuroaxial nerve blocks as well as peripheral nerve blocks, and finally the use of various drugs as adjuncts to local anesthetics.

  4. Heterochiral Jun and Fos bZIP peptides form a coiled-coil heterodimer that is competent for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Rui; Nakagawa, Natsumi; Oyama, Taiji; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Coiled coils, consisting of at least two α-helices, have important roles in the regulation of transcription, cell differentiation, and cell growth. Peptides composed of d-amino acids (d-peptides) have received great attention for their potential in biomedical applications, because they give large diversity for the design of peptidyl drug and are more resistant to proteolytic digestion than l-peptides. However, the interactions between l-peptides/l-protein and d-peptides in the formation of complex are poorly understood. In this study, stereoisomer-specific peptides were constructed corresponding to regions of the basic-leucine-zipper domains of Jun and Fos proteins. basic-leucine-zipper domains consist of an N-terminal basic domain, which is responsible for DNA binding, and a C-terminal domain that enables homodimerization or heterodimerization via formation of a coiled-coil. By combining peptides with different stereochemistries, the d-l heterochiral Jun-Fos heterodimer formation induced DNA binding by the basic domains of Jun-Fos. Our study provides new insight into the interaction between l-peptide and d-peptide enantiomers for developing d-peptide materials and drugs. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Current perceptions of the term Clinical Pharmacy and its relationship to Pharmaceutical Care: a survey of members of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Background The definitions that are being used for the terms 'clinical pharmacy' and 'pharmaceutical care' seem to have a certain overlap. Responsibility for therapy outcomes seems to be especially linked to the latter term. Both terms need clarification before a proper definition of clinical pharmacy can be drafted. Objective To identify current disagreements regarding the term 'Clinical Pharmacy' and its relationship to 'Pharmaceutical Care' and to assess to which extent pharmacists with an interest in Clinical Pharmacy are willing to accept responsibility for drug therapy outcomes. Setting The membership of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy. Methods A total of 1,285 individuals affiliated with the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy were invited by email to participate in an online survey asking participants to state whether certain professional activities, providers, settings, aims and general descriptors constituted (a) 'Clinical Pharmacy only', (b) 'Pharmaceutical Care only', (c) 'both' or (d) 'neither'. Further questions examined pharmacists' willingness to accept ethical or legal responsibility for drug therapy outcomes, under current and ideal working conditions. Main outcome measures Level of agreement with a number of statements. Results There was disagreement (<80% agreement among all participants) regarding 'Clinical Pharmacy' activities, whether non-pharmacists could provide 'Clinical Pharmacy' services, and whether such services could be provided in non-hospital settings. There was disagreement (<80% agreement among those linking items to Clinical Pharmacy) as to whether Pharmaceutical care also encompassed certain professional activities, constituted a scientific discipline and targeted cost effectiveness. The proportions of participants willing to accept legal responsibility under current/ideal working conditions were: safety (32.7%/64.3%), effectiveness (17.9%/49.2%), patient-centeredness (17.1%/46.2%), cost-effectiveness (20

  6. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis: an electronic guideline implementability appraisal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are intended to improve healthcare. However, even if guidelines are excellent, their implementation is not assured. In subfertility care, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guidelines have been inventoried, and their methodological quality has been assessed. To improve the impact of the ESHRE guidelines and to improve European subfertility care, it is important to optimise the implementability of guidelines. We therefore investigated the implementation barriers of the ESHRE guideline with the best methodological quality and evaluated the used instrument for usability and feasibility. Methods We reviewed the ESHRE guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis to assess its implementability. We used an electronic version of the guideline implementability appraisal (eGLIA) instrument. This eGLIA tool consists of 31 questions grouped into 10 dimensions. Seven items address the guideline as a whole, and 24 items assess the individual recommendations in the guideline. The eGLIA instrument identifies factors that influence the implementability of the guideline recommendations. These factors can be divided into facilitators that promote implementation and barriers that oppose implementation. A panel of 10 experts from three European countries appraised all 36 recommendations of the guideline. They discussed discrepancies in a teleconference and completed a questionnaire to evaluate the ease of use and overall utility of the eGLIA instrument. Results Two of the 36 guideline recommendations were straightforward to implement. Five recommendations were considered simply statements because they contained no actions. The remaining 29 recommendations were implementable with some adjustments. We found facilitators of the guideline implementability in the quality of decidability, presentation and formatting, apparent validity, and novelty or innovation of the recommendations. Vaguely defined actions, lack of

  7. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union. Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. Methods/design This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35°C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010. Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. Discussion The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It

  8. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35 °C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial).

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J D; Sinclair, Helen Louise; Battison, Claire G; Polderman, Kees H; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mascia, Luciana; Harris, Bridget A; Murray, Gordon D; Stocchetti, Nino; Menon, David K; Shakur, Haleema; De Backer, Daniel

    2011-01-12

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union.Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1 °C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35 °C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010.Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It represents a new and fundamental step for

  9. Simple method to assess stability of immobilized peptide ligands against proteases.

    PubMed

    Giudicessi, Silvana L; Salum, María L; Saavedra, Soledad L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Camperi, Silvia A

    2017-09-01

    Although peptides are used as affinity chromatography ligands, they could be digested by proteases. Usually, peptide stability is evaluated in solution, which differs from the resin-bounded peptide behavior. Furthermore, the study of the degradation products requires purification steps before analysis. Here, we describe an easy method to assess immobilized peptide stability. Sample peptides were synthesized on hydroxymethylbenzamide-ChemMatrix resin. Peptidyl-resin beads were then incubated with solutions containing proteases. Peptides were detached from the solid support with ammonia vapor and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, allowing the detection of the whole peptides as well as their C-terminal degradation products. The method allowed a fast evaluation of peptide ligand stability in solid phase towards proteases that may be present in the crude sample before their use as ligands in affinity chromatography. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Suppressing the epimerization of endothioamide peptides during Fmoc/t-Bu-based solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Chatterjee, Jayanta

    2016-11-01

    Despite a number of intriguing utilities associated with thioamide-containing peptides and proteins in the context of biophysics, pharmacology and chemical biology, it has hitherto remained as one of the underexplored territories of peptidomimetics. The synthesis of long mono to multiply substituted endothioamide peptides is invariably accompanied with severe epimerization, oxoamide formation and various other undesired side reactions, resulting in messy product profiles. This has completely restrained their use as novel chemical tools for biological studies. During the chain elongation of an N-terminally located thioamide peptide using the Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry, it becomes vulnerable to the repetitive basic treatments as required for such chemistry. The incompatibility of thioamide moiety with bases as well as strong coupling reagents leads to epimerization as well as other side reactions due to its nucleophilicity, resulting in the loss of the stereochemical identity of the thioamidated amino acid residue. An easy-to-implement and efficient protocol to synthesize long (>10-mer) endothioamide peptides, significantly suppressing epimerization and other side reactions using 10% piperidine/dimethylformamide for 1 min, is reported herein. The novelty of the protocol is shown through the efficient synthesis of a number of 10-12-mer mono to multiply thioamide-substituted peptides with broad substrate scopes. The utility of the protocol in the context of protein engineering and chemical protein synthesis is also shown through the synthesis of a thioamide version of the 16-mer peptide from the B1 domain of protein G. Such a protocol to synthesize long endothioamide peptides would open up avenues toward engineering and accessing novel thiopeptide and thioprotein-based chemical tools, the synthesis of which had been a serious hurdle thus far. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley

  11. Validation of the Microlife BP A200 Comfort and W2 Slim automated blood pressure monitors in a general adult population according to the European Society of Hypertension and the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2: 2013 protocols.

    PubMed

    Bing, Sen; Chen, Kang; Hou, Hong; Zhang, Weijuan; Li, Linyi; Wei, Jiao; Shu, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of the Microlife BP A200 Comfort and W2 Slim automated blood pressure monitors according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010 and the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 protocols. The devices were assessed on 33 participants according to the European Society of Hypertension requirements and were then tested on 85 participants according to the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 criteria. Procedures and data analysis were carried out following protocol guidelines precisely. The Microlife BP A200 Comfort and W2 Slim devices passed the criteria of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010 for both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. The devices also fulfilled the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 criteria, with mean differences of SBP and DPB between the devices and observers of 0.38±5.12 and 0.28±4.29 mmHg for the BP A200 Comfort and 1.01±6.80 and 0.34±5.62 mmHg for the W2 Slim, respectively. The Microlife BP A200 Comfort and W2 Slim automated blood pressure monitors fulfilled the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010 and the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 protocols, and can be recommended for self-measurement in the general population.

  12. Impact of European Society of Cardiology and European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery Guidelines on Myocardial Revascularization on the activity of percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass graft surgery for stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Yates, Martin T; Soppa, Gopal K R; Valencia, Oswaldo; Jones, Sion; Firoozi, Sami; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2014-02-01

    Joint guidelines on myocardial revascularization were published by the European Society of Cardiology and European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery: Patients with left main stem, proximal left anterior descending, or 3-vessel disease should be discussed with a surgeon before revascularization, and ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention has no elective indication in these categories. We assess the impact of the guidelines on referral patterns to a cardiac surgery service at a large-volume cardiac center in the United Kingdom. Joint guidelines were published in August 2010. All patients with severe disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at one institution were identified 6 months before (January to June 2010) and 6 months after (January to June 2011) their introduction. Decision-making and surgical referral were determined from minutes of multidisciplinary meeting. A total of 197 patients underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention pre-guidelines, of whom 62 had severe disease. Only 6 patients (9%) were discussed at a multidisciplinary meeting before intervention. After introduction of the guidelines, elective percutaneous coronary interventions were performed in 164 patients, of whom 42 had surgical disease. Only 8 patients (17%) were discussed at a multidisciplinary meeting before intervention (P = not significant). Follow-up was a median of 480 (380-514) days for the pre-guideline group and 104 (31-183) days for the post-guideline group. Ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention in surgical disease occurred in 8 patients (14%) pre-guidelines and was unchanged for 9 patients (26%) post-guidelines (P = not significant). Despite recommendation by both cardiology and cardiac surgical bodies and widespread publicity, a significant number of patients in this single-center study are not receiving optimal treatment recommended by these guidelines. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc

  13. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in critically ill patients (Part I): Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) 2017.

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Rochwerg, Bram; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Umberto Meduri, Gianfranco; Olsen, Keith M; Rodgers, Sophia; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-09-21

    To update the 2008 consensus statements for the diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in adult and pediatric patients. A multispecialty task force of 16 international experts in Critical Care Medicine, endocrinology, and guideline methods, all of them members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and/or the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. The recommendations were based on the summarized evidence from the 2008 document in addition to more recent findings from an updated systematic review of relevant studies from 2008 to 2017 and were formulated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The strength of each recommendation was classified as strong or conditional, and the quality of evidence was rated from high to very low based on factors including the individual study design, the risk of bias, the consistency of the results, and the directness and precision of the evidence. Recommendation approval required the agreement of at least 80% of the task force members. The task force was unable to reach agreement on a single test that can reliably diagnose CIRCI, although delta cortisol (change in baseline cortisol at 60 min of <9 µg/dl) after cosyntropin (250 µg) administration and a random plasma cortisol of <10 µg/dl may be used by clinicians. We suggest against using plasma free cortisol or salivary cortisol level over plasma total cortisol (conditional, very low quality of evidence). For treatment of specific conditions, we suggest using intravenous (IV) hydrocortisone <400 mg/day for ≥3 days at full dose in patients with septic shock that is not responsive to fluid and moderate- to high-dose vasopressor therapy (conditional, low quality of evidence). We suggest not using corticosteroids in adult patients with sepsis without shock (conditional recommendation, moderate quality of evidence). We suggest the use of IV methylprednisolone 1

  14. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Critical Illness-Related Corticosteroid Insufficiency (CIRCI) in Critically Ill Patients (Part I): Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) 2017.

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Rochwerg, Bram; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Umberto Meduri, Gianfranco; Olsen, Keith M; Rodgers, Sophia C; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-09-21

    To update the 2008 consensus statements for the diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in adult and pediatric patients. A multispecialty task force of 16 international experts in critical care medicine, endocrinology, and guideline methods, all of them members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and/or the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. The recommendations were based on the summarized evidence from the 2008 document in addition to more recent findings from an updated systematic review of relevant studies from 2008 to 2017 and were formulated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The strength of each recommendation was classified as strong or conditional, and the quality of evidence was rated from high to very low based on factors including the individual study design, the risk of bias, the consistency of the results, and the directness and precision of the evidence. Recommendation approval required the agreement of at least 80% of the task force members. The task force was unable to reach agreement on a single test that can reliably diagnose CIRCI, although delta cortisol (change in baseline cortisol at 60 min of < 9 μg/dL) after cosyntropin (250 μg) administration and a random plasma cortisol of < 10 μg/dL may be used by clinicians. We suggest against using plasma-free cortisol or salivary cortisol level over plasma total cortisol (conditional, very low quality of evidence). For treatment of specific conditions, we suggest using IV hydrocortisone < 400 mg/day for ≥ 3 days at full dose in patients with septic shock that is not responsive to fluid and moderate- to high-dose vasopressor therapy (conditional, low quality of evidence). We suggest not using corticosteroids in adult patients with sepsis without shock (conditional recommendation, moderate quality of evidence). We suggest the use of IV methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg/day in

  15. Relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutations with histologic subtyping according to International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society 2011 adenocarcinoma classification and their impact on overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Singh, Navneet; Bal, Amanjit; Gupta, Nalini; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited Indian data on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene activating mutations (AMs) prevalence and their clinicopathologic associations. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between EGFR AM and histologic subtypes and their impact on overall survival (OS) in a North Indian cohort. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing (n = 186) over 3 years period (2012–2014). EGFR mutations were tested using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Patients were classified as EGFR AM, EGFR wild type (WT) or EGFR unknown (UKN). Histologically adenocarcinomas (ADC) were further categorized as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-2011 classification. Results: Overall EGFR AM prevalence was 16.6%. The ratio of exon 19 deletions to exon 21 L858R mutations was 3.17:1. Female sex (P = 0.002), never smoking status (P = 0.002), metastatic disease (P = 0.032), and nonsolid subtype of ADC (P = 0.001) were associated with EGFR AM on univariate logistic regression analysis (LRA). On multivariate LRA, solid ADC was negatively associated with EGFR AM. Median OS was higher in patients with EGFR AM (750 days) as compared to EGFR-WT (459 days) or EGFR-UKN (291 days) for the overall population and in patients with Stage IV disease (750 days vs. 278 days for EGFR-WT, P = 0.024). On univariate Cox proportional hazard (CPH) analysis, smoking, poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≥ 2), EGFR-UKN status, and solid ADC were associated with worse OS while female sex and lepidic ADC had better OS. On multivariate CPH analysis, lepidic ADC (hazard ratio [HR] =0.12) and EGFR-WT/EGFR-UKN (HR = 2.39 and HR = 3.30 respectively) were independently associated with OS in separate analyses. Conclusions: Histologic subtyping of ADC performed on small biopsies is

  16. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting: TNT subgroup analysis, darbepoetin alfa, FERRIC-HF and KW-3902.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Alison P; Tin, Lwin; Loh, P Huan; Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2006-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting held in June 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. In a sub-group analysis of the TNT study, intensive treatment with high-dose atorvastatin significantly reduced hospitalisations for heart failure in patients with stable coronary heart disease, compared with low-dose atorvastatin; this benefit was most evident in patients with a history of heart failure at baseline. In a combined analysis of two studies of darbepoetin alfa, which included 475 patients, treatment increased and maintained haemoglobin levels and produced non-significant improvements in symptoms and morbidity in anaemic heart failure patients compared to placebo. In the FERRIC-HF study (n=35), intravenous iron sucrose therapy improved exercise capacity and symptom status in iron-deficient heart failure patients. In a combined analysis of two studies (n=186), the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist KW-3902 showed diuretic properties and appeared to enhance response to loop diuretics in heart failure patients hospitalised with fluid overload.

  17. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS)

    PubMed Central

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1). PMID:27966427

  18. Cardiovascular risk assessment in low-resource settings: a consensus document of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk in Low Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Modesti, Pietro A.; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Agyemang, Charles; Basu, Sanjay; Benetos, Athanase; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Ceriello, Antonio; Del Prato, Stefano; Kalyesubula, Robert; O’Brien, Eoin; Kilama, Michael O.; Perlini, Stefano; Picano, Eugenio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Stuckler, David; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Van Bortel, Luc M.; Watfa, Ghassan; Zhao, Dong; Parati, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 confirms ischemic heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death and that hypertension is the main associated risk factor worldwide. How best to respond to the rising prevalence of hypertension in resource-deprived settings is a topic of ongoing public-health debate and discussion. In low-income and middle-income countries, socioeconomic inequality and cultural factors play a role both in the development of risk factors and in the access to care. In Europe, cultural barriers and poor communication between health systems and migrants may limit migrants from receiving appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To use more efficiently resources available and to make treatment cost-effective at the patient level, cardiovascular risk approach is now recommended. In 2011, The European Society of Hypertension established a Working Group on ‘Hypertension and Cardiovascular risk in low resource settings’, which brought together cardiologists, diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical trialists, epidemiologists, economists, and other stakeholders to review current strategies for cardiovascular risk assessment in population studies in low-income and middle-income countries, their limitations, possible improvements, and future interests in screening programs. This report summarizes current evidence and presents highlights of unmet needs. PMID:24577410

  19. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  20. Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection: Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Garcia-Dorado, David; Erik Bøtker, Hans; Davidson, Sean M; Downey, James; Engel, Felix B; Jennings, Robert; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Perrino, Cinzia; Prunier, Fabrice; Schulz, Rainer; Sluijter, Joost P G; Van Laake, Linda W; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; Yellon, Derek M; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Heusch, Gerd; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-17

    Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, novel therapies are required to protect the heart against the detrimental effects of acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. During the last three decades, a wide variety of ischaemic conditioning strategies and pharmacological treatments have been tested in the clinic - however, their translation from experimental to clinical studies for improving patient outcomes has been both challenging and disappointing. Therefore, in this Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart, we critically analyse the current state of ischaemic conditioning in both the experimental and clinical settings, provide recommendations for improving its translation into the clinical setting, and highlight novel therapeutic targets and new treatment strategies for reducing acute myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

  1. Validation of the blood pressure measurement device Erkameter 125 PRO according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Beime, Beate; Deutsch, Cornelia; Krüger, Ralf; Zimmermann, Erik; Bramlage, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the blood pressure (BP) measurement device Erkameter 125 PRO according to the International Protocol revision 2010 of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP2). In 33 patients aged 32-79 years, BP measurements were performed alternately using the Erkameter 125 PRO and the reference mercury sphygmomanometer according to ESH-IP revision 2010. For the analysis, a total of 99 comparisons were included. All absolute differences between the test device and the reference were within 10 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP), and all except one for diastolic blood pressure (DBP). A total of 93 out of 99 comparisons for SBP showed an absolute difference within 5 mmHg and 92 out of 99 for DBP. The mean±SD difference between the Erkameter 125 PRO and the standard reference was -0.5±3.5 mmHg for SBP and 0.5±3.5 mmHg for DBP. As to part 2 of ESH-IP 2010, all patients had a minimum of two out of three measurements within 5 mmHg difference for SBP and 31 out of 33 patients for DBP. The Erkameter 125 PRO fulfilled the requirements of parts 1 and 2 of the ESH-IP revision 2010 and can be recommended for office BP measurements in adults.

  2. Validation of the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring device according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Bramlage, Peter; Deutsch, Cornelia; Krüger, Ralf; Wolf, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Zwingers, Thomas; Beime, Beate; Mengden, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring (ABPM) device according to the 2010 International Protocol revision of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP). The device can be used for ABPM for up to 72 hours. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) were sequentially measured in 33 adult subjects (13 males and 20 females) and compared with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers). A total of 99 comparison pairs were obtained. The custo screen 400 met the requirements of parts 1 and 2 of the ESH-IP revision 2010. The mean difference between the device and reference sphygmomanometer readings was -0.5±4.5 mmHg for SBP and -0.1±3.3 mmHg for DBP. All but one measurement were within the absolute difference of 10 mmHg between the device and the observers for SBP and DBP. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5 mmHg was 84 of 99 readings for SBP, and 93 of 99 readings for DBP. The custo screen 400 ABPM device met the requirements of the 2010 ESH-IP revision, and hence can be recommended for ABPM in adults. To our knowledge, the custo screen 400 is the first device to pass the revised ESH-IP 2010.

  3. Validation of the Andon KD-5851 upper arm blood pressure monitor, for self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Jiao, Yinghui; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Lei; Di, Dalin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to validate the Andon KD-5851 upper arm blood pressure (BP) monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. A total of 33 eligible participants were included in the study. Sequential measurements of BPs were performed using a mercury sphygmomanometer and the device, and the data analysis was carried out following precisely the ESH-IP revision 2010. The device had 82, 98, and 99 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 85, 95, and 99 measurements for diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The average device-observer difference was -0.53±4.00 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -1.15±4.06 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The device passed all the criteria according to the ESH-IP revision 2010. According to the validation results on the basis of the ESH-IP revision 2010, the Andon KD-5851 upper arm BP monitor can be recommended for self/home measurement in adults. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of the Pangao PG-800B5 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan; Zeng, Zhaolin; Li, Lizhi; Wan, Xiaofen; Wan, Yi

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to validate the Pangao PG-800B5 upper arm blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. A total of 33 participants, 16 men and 17 women, were included in the device evaluation. The protocol requirements were followed precisely. The mean age of the participants was 56.4±21.0 years (range 22-84 years). The mean systolic blood pressure was 143.6±25.5 mmHg (range 98-188 mmHg), the mean diastolic blood pressure was 85.7±17.2 mmHg (range 49-125 mmHg), and the mean arm circumference was 26.1±2.2 cm (range 23-32 cm). On average, the device overestimated the systolic blood pressure by 0.9±4.2 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure by 0.7±4.5 mmHg. The device passed all requirements, fulfilling the standards of the protocol. Therefore, the Pangao PG-800B5 upper arm blood pressure monitor can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in an adult population.

  5. Validation of the AVITA BPM15S wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Zhang, Lu; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor AVITA BPM15S for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol revision 2010 of the European Society of Hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 Chinese adults (15 women, mean age 51 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM15S device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The AVITA BPM15S device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg were 85/99, 94/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 82/99, 96/99, and 98/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Thirty-two and 28 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥ 24). No participant had all of the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic or diastolic blood pressure. The AVITA wrist blood pressure monitor BPM15S fulfilled the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010 and hence can be recommended for home use in an adult population.

  6. Validation of the Beurer BM 44 upper arm blood pressure monitor for home measurement, according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol 2002.

    PubMed

    Lüders, Stephan; Krüger, Ralf; Zemmrich, Claudia; Forstner, Klaus; Sturm, Claus-Dieter; Bramlage, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The present study aimed to validate the automated upper arm blood pressure (BP) measuring device BM 44 for home BP monitoring according to the 2002 Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The most important new feature of the new device was an integrated 'WHO indicator', which categorizes the patient's individual result within the WHO recommendations for target BP by a coloured scale. Systolic and diastolic BPs were measured sequentially in 35 adult participants (16 men, 19 women) using a standard mercury y-tubed reference sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the BM 44 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 15 participants in phase 1 and a further 18 participants in phase 2 of the validation study. The BM 44 device passed phase 1 of the validation study successfully with a number of absolute differences between device and observers of 5, 10 and 15 mmHg for at least 28 out of 25, 35 out of 35 and 40 out of 40 measurements, respectively. The device also achieved the targets for phases 2.1 and 2.2, with 23 and 26 participants having had at least two of three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively. The Beurer BM 44 upper arm BP monitor has passed the International Protocol requirements, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  7. Validation of the iHealth BP7 wrist blood pressure monitor, for self-measurement, according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Huadong; Chen, Wan; Li, Ni; Wan, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the iHealth BP7 wireless wrist blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. A total of 99 pairs of test device and reference blood pressure measurements (three pairs for each of the 33 participants) were obtained for validation. The ESH-IP revision 2010 for the validation of blood pressure measuring devices in adults was followed precisely. The device produced 66, 87, and 97 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 72, 93, and 99 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respectively. The mean±SD device-observer difference was -0.7±6.9 mmHg for SBP and -1.0±5.1 mmHg for DBP. The number of participants with two or three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg was 25 for SBP and 26 for DBP; furthermore, there were three participants for SBP and one participant for DBP, with none of the device-observer differences within 5 mmHg. On the basis of the validation results, the iHealth BP7 wireless wrist blood pressure monitor can be recommended for self-measurement in an adult population.

  8. Validation of the AVITA BPM17 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Qi; Liu, Chang-Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor AVITA BPM17 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (19 men, 45.7 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM17 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The AVITA BPM17 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 94/99, 98/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 92/99, 99/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Overall, 32 participants for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observerss differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). None had all the three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The AVITA wrist blood pressure monitor BPM17 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  9. Validation of the A&D BP UA-651 device for home blood pressure measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Elisabetta; Fania, Claudio; Palatini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of the A&D BP UA-651 device for home blood pressure (BP) measurement according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. Device evaluation was carried out in 33 patients. The mean age of the patients was 48.3±15.5 years, the mean systolic BP was 138.3±24.9 mmHg (range 90-180), the mean diastolic BP was 88.3±13.8 mmHg (range 60-108), and the mean arm circumference was 28.6±3.4 cm (range 23-36). The protocol requirements were followed precisely. The device passed all requirements, fulfilling the standards of the protocol. On average, the device underestimated the systolic BP by 0.4±4.4 mmHg and diastolic BP by 1.3±3.5 mmHg. The device-observer discrepancies were unrelated to patients' clinical characteristics. These data show that the A&D BP UA-651 device fulfilled the requirements for validation by the International Protocol and can be recommended for clinical use in the adult population.

  10. Validation of the A&D BP UB-542 wrist device for home blood pressure measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Saladini, Francesca; Benetti, Elisabetta; Fania, Claudio; Palatini, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of the A&D BP UB-542 wrist device for home blood pressure (BP) measurement according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH). Device evaluation was carried out in 33 patients. The mean age was 50.9±10.1 years, the mean systolic BP was 141.6±22.8 mmHg (range 92 : 189), the mean diastolic BP was 89.2±11.4 mmHg (range 62 : 120), the mean arm circumference was 28.8±3.2 cm (range 23-35), and the mean wrist circumference was 17.1±1.4 cm (range 14-19.5). The protocol requirements were followed precisely. The device passed all requirements, fulfilling the standards of the protocol. On average, the device overestimated the systolic BP by 1.8±7.2 mmHg and diastolic BP by 1.6±5.7 mmHg. These data show that the A&D BP UB-542 wrist device met the requirements for validation by the International Protocol and can be recommended for clinical use in the adult population.

  11. Validation of the SCIAN LD-735 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Qi; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor SCIAN LD-735 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured sequentially in 33 adult Chinese participants (10 women, mean age 44.8 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the SCIAN LD-735 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The SCIAN LD-735 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 86/99, 97/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 85/99, 98/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. In total, 30 and 33 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). No participant had all of the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic or diastolic blood pressure. The SCIAN wrist blood pressure monitor LD-735 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  12. Validation of the BPUMP BF1112 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure (BP) monitor BPUMP BF1112 for home BP monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010 (ESH-IP2010). Systolic and diastolic BPs were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (13 women, mean age 46.7 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the BF1112 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The BPUMP BF1112 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 85/99, 96/99, and 97/99, respectively, for systolic BP, and 83/99, 97/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic BP. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. A total of 31 and 30 participants for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24mmHg). No participant for systolic or diastolic BP had all the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. The BPUMP BP monitor BF1112 has passed the requirements of the ESH-IP2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  13. Validation of the SEJOY BP-1307 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Chen, Yi; Chen, Qi; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-08-03

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor SEJOY BP-1307 (also called JOYTECH DBP-1307) for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese individuals (13 women, 45.1 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the SEJOY BP-1307 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The average±SD of the device-observer differences was 0.2±4.1 and -1.7±4.7 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The SEJOY BP-1307 device achieved the criteria in both part 1 and part 2 of the validation study. The SEJOY upper-arm blood pressure monitor BP-1307 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  14. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS).

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1).
.

  15. Cardiovascular risk assessment in low-resource settings: a consensus document of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk in Low Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Modesti, Pietro A; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Agyemang, Charles; Basu, Sanjay; Benetos, Athanase; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Ceriello, Antonio; Del Prato, Stefano; Kalyesubula, Robert; O'Brien, Eoin; Kilama, Michael O; Perlini, Stefano; Picano, Eugenio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Stuckler, David; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Van Bortel, Luc M; Watfa, Ghassan; Zhao, Dong; Parati, Gianfranco

    2014-05-01

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 confirms ischemic heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death and that hypertension is the main associated risk factor worldwide. How best to respond to the rising prevalence of hypertension in resource-deprived settings is a topic of ongoing public-health debate and discussion. In low-income and middle-income countries, socioeconomic inequality and cultural factors play a role both in the development of risk factors and in the access to care. In Europe, cultural barriers and poor communication between health systems and migrants may limit migrants from receiving appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To use more efficiently resources available and to make treatment cost-effective at the patient level, cardiovascular risk approach is now recommended. In 2011, The European Society of Hypertension established a Working Group on 'Hypertension and Cardiovascular risk in low resource settings', which brought together cardiologists, diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical trialists, epidemiologists, economists, and other stakeholders to review current strategies for cardiovascular risk assessment in population studies in low-income and middle-income countries, their limitations, possible improvements, and future interests in screening programs. This report summarizes current evidence and presents highlights of unmet needs.

  16. SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune ‘resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for ‘good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies. PMID:25387090

  17. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  18. European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Program for the integration of oncology and Palliative Care: a 5-year review of the Designated Centers' incentive program.

    PubMed

    Cherny, N; Catane, R; Schrijvers, D; Kloke, M; Strasser, F

    2010-02-01

    In 1999, the National Representatives of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) created a Palliative Care Working Group to improve the delivery of supportive and palliative care (S + PC) by oncologists, oncology departments and cancer centers. They have addressed this task through initiatives in policy, education, research and incentives. As an incentive program for oncology departments and centers, ESMO developed a program of Designated Centers (DCs) for programs meeting predetermined targets of service development and delivery of a high level of S + PC. The history, accreditation criteria and implementation of the DC incentive program is described. Since 2004, 75 centers have applied for designation and 48 have been accredited including 34 comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) in general hospitals and seven freestanding CCCs. Perceived benefits accrued from the accreditation included the following: improved status and role identification of the center, positive impact on daily work, positive impact on business activity and positive impact on funding for projects. The accreditation of DCs has been a central to the ESMO initiative to improve the palliative care provided by oncologists and oncology centers. It is likely that many other oncology departments and cancer centers already meet the criteria and ESMO strongly encourages them to apply for accreditation.

  19. Use of Nebulized Antimicrobials for the Treatment of Respiratory Infections in Invasively Mechanically Ventilated Adults: A Position Paper from the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rello, Jordi; Solé-Lleonart, Candela; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Chastre, Jean; Blot, Stijn; Poulakou, Garyfallia; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Riera, Jordi; Palmer, Lucy B; Pereira, Jose M; Felton, Tim; Dhanani, Jayesh; Bassetti, Matteo; Welte, Tobias; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-13

    With an established role in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis, nebulized antibiotics are increasingly being used to treat respiratory infections in critically ill invasively mechanically ventilated adult patients. Although there is limited evidence describing their efficacy and safety, in an era of need for new strategies to enhance antibiotic effectiveness because of a shortage of new agents and increases in antibiotic resistance, the potential of nebulization of antibiotics to optimize therapy is considered of high interest, particularly in patients infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. This Position Paper of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases provides recommendations based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology regarding the use of nebulized antibiotics in invasively mechanically ventilated adults, based on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing literature (last search July 2016). Overall, the panel recommends to avoid use of nebulized antibiotics in clinical practice, due to a weak level of evidence of their efficacy and the high potential for underestimated risks of adverse events (particularly, respiratory complications). Higher quality evidence is urgently needed to inform clinical practice. Priorities of future research are detailed in the second part of the Position Paper as a guidance for researchers in this field. In particular, the panel identified an urgent need for randomized clinical trials of nebulized antibiotic therapy as part of a substitution approach to treatment of pneumonia due to MDR pathogens.

  20. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  1. Validation of the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring device according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, Peter; Deutsch, Cornelia; Krüger, Ralf; Wolf, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Zwingers, Thomas; Beime, Beate; Mengden, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to validate the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring (ABPM) device according to the 2010 International Protocol revision of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP). The device can be used for ABPM for up to 72 hours. Materials and methods Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) were sequentially measured in 33 adult subjects (13 males and 20 females) and compared with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers). A total of 99 comparison pairs were obtained. Results The custo screen 400 met the requirements of parts 1 and 2 of the ESH-IP revision 2010. The mean difference between the device and reference sphygmomanometer readings was −0.5±4.5 mmHg for SBP and −0.1±3.3 mmHg for DBP. All but one measurement were within the absolute difference of 10 mmHg between the device and the observers for SBP and DBP. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5 mmHg was 84 of 99 readings for SBP, and 93 of 99 readings for DBP. Conclusion The custo screen 400 ABPM device met the requirements of the 2010 ESH-IP revision, and hence can be recommended for ABPM in adults. To our knowledge, the custo screen 400 is the first device to pass the revised ESH-IP 2010. PMID:24868162

  2. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and International Society for Cutaneous Lymphoma consensus recommendations for the management of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Senff, Nancy J; Noordijk, Evert M; Kim, Youn H; Bagot, Martine; Berti, Emilio; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Dummer, Reinhard; Duvic, Madeleine; Hoppe, Richard T; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Rosen, Steven T; Vermeer, Maarten H; Whittaker, Sean; Willemze, Rein

    2008-09-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCL) represent approximately 20% to 25% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. With the advent of the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Consensus Classification for Cutaneous Lymphomas in 2005, uniform terminology and classification for this rare group of neoplasms were introduced. However, staging procedures and treatment strategies still vary between different cutaneous lymphoma centers, which may be because consensus recommendations for the management of CBCL have never been published. Based on an extensive literature search and discussions within the EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Group and the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the present report aims to provide uniform recommendations for the management of the 3 main groups of CBCL. Because no systematic reviews or (randomized) controlled trials were available, these recommendations are mainly based on retrospective studies and small cohort studies. Despite these limitations, there was consensus among the members of the multidisciplinary expert panel that these recommendations reflect the state-of-the-art management as currently practiced in major cutaneous lymphoma centers. They may therefore contribute to uniform staging and treatment and form the basis for future clinical trials in patients with a CBCL.

  3. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  4. Second allogeneic stem cell transplant for aplastic anaemia: a retrospective study by the Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Tridello, Gloria; Pillon, Marta; Carlson, Kristina; Fagioli, Franca; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Koh, Mickey B C; Panizzolo, Irene Sara; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Maertens, Johan; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Strahm, Brigitte; Blaise, Didier; Maschan, Alexei; Marsh, Judith; Dufour, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We analysed the outcome of a second allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in 162 patients reported to the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation between 1998 and 2009. Donor origin was a sibling in 110 and an unrelated donor in 52 transplants, respectively. The stem cell source was bone marrow in 31% and peripheral blood in 69% of transplants. The same donor as for the first alloHSCT was used in 81% of transplants whereas a change in the choice of stem cell source was reported in 56% of patients, mainly from bone marrow to peripheral blood. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred in 85% and 72% of patients, after a median time of 15 and 17 days, respectively. Grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD occurred in 21% and 37% of patients, respectively. Graft failure (GF) occurred in 42 patients (26%). After a median follow-up of 3·5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 60·7%. In multivariate analysis, the only factor significantly associated with a better outcome was a Karnofsky/Lansky score ≥80 (higher OS). We conclude that a second alloHSCT is feasible rescue option for GF in SAA, with a successful outcome in 60% of cases.

  5. Learning, techniques, and complications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Polkowski, M; Larghi, A; Weynand, B; Boustière, C; Giovannini, M; Pujol, B; Dumonceau, J-M

    2012-02-01

    This article is the second of a two-part publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) about endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling, including EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and EUS-guided Trucut biopsy. The first part (the Clinical Guideline) focused on the results obtained with EUS-guided sampling, and the role of this technique in patient management, and made recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use. The current Technical Guideline discusses issues related to learning, techniques, and complications of EUS-guided sampling, and to processing of specimens. Technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., rapid on-site cytopathological evaluation, needle diameter, microcore isolation for histopathological examination, and adequate number of needle passes) are discussed and recommendations are made for various settings, including solid and cystic pancreatic lesions, submucosal tumors, and lymph nodes. The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes gastroenterologists, oncologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technical Guideline should be most useful to endoscopists who perform EUS-guided sampling. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. News Letter: European Geophysical Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Rachel Bridgman Booth #04 AGICO, Inc. Tgcnä 29s. 621 00 Brno Tel: +420-5-7264-323 Czech Republic Fax: +420-5-7264-328 Atta. Libro Vejmelek and Jiri...OKUBO, P. Use of earthquakes and deformations as remote strcss-mctcrs 09:15 BARBERI, G.; COCINA , O.; NERI, G.; PRIVITERA, E...116 COCINA , O. 92 CODINA.R. 95 CODRESCU, M. 218 COE, H. 195-197 COE, J.A. 279 COELHO, D. 112 COEUR, C. 229 COGNARD-PLANCQ, A.L. 154 COHARD.J

  7. Kidney Versus Combined Kidney and Liver Transplantation in Young People With Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Data From the European Society for Pediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant (ESPN/ERA-EDTA) Registry.

    PubMed

    Mekahli, Djalila; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Jager, Kitty J; Balat, Ayşe; Benetti, Elisa; Godefroid, Nathalie; Edvardsson, Vidar O; Heaf, James G; Jankauskiene, Augustina; Kerecuk, Larissa; Marinova, Svetlana; Puteo, Flora; Seeman, Tomas; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Pirenne, Jacques; Schaefer, Franz; Groothoff, Jaap W

    2016-11-01

    The choice for either kidney or combined liver-kidney transplantation in young people with kidney failure and liver fibrosis due to autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) can be challenging. We aimed to analyze the characteristics and outcomes of transplantation type in these children, adolescents, and young adults. Cohort study. We derived data for children, adolescents, and young adults with ARPKD with either kidney or combined liver-kidney transplants for 1995 to 2012 from the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry, a European pediatric renal registry collecting data from 36 European countries. Liver transplantation. Transplantation and patient survival. 202 patients with ARPKD aged 19 years or younger underwent transplantation after a median of 0.4 (IQR, 0.0-1.4) years on dialysis therapy at a median age of 9.0 (IQR, 4.1-13.7) years. 32 (15.8%) underwent combined liver-kidney transplantation, 163 (80.7%) underwent kidney transplantation, and 7 (3.5%) were excluded because transplantation type was unknown. Age- and sex-adjusted 5-year patient survival posttransplantation was 95.5% (95% CI, 92.4%-98.8%) overall: 97.4% (95% CI, 94.9%-100.0%) for patients with kidney transplantation in contrast to 87.0% (95% CI, 75.8%-99.8%) with combined liver-kidney transplantation. The age- and sex-adjusted risk for death after combined liver-kidney transplantation was 6.7-fold (95% CI, 1.8- to 25.4-fold) greater than after kidney transplantation (P=0.005). Five-year death-censored kidney transplant survival following combined liver-kidney and kidney transplantation was similar (92.1% vs 85.9%; P=0.4). No data for liver disease of kidney therapy recipients. Combined liver-kidney transplantation in ARPKD is associated with increased mortality compared to kidney transplantation in our large observational study and was not associated with improved 5-year kidney transplant survival. Long-term follow-up of both kidney and liver involvement are needed to better delineate the optimal

  8. Peptide hormones and lipopeptides: from self‐assembly to therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, J. A.; Burholt, S.

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the properties and activities of lipopeptides and peptide hormones and how the lipidation of peptide hormones could potentially produce therapeutic agents combating some of the most prevalent diseases and conditions. The self‐assembly of these types of molecules is outlined, and how this can impact on bioactivity. Peptide hormones specific to the uptake of food and produced in the gastrointestinal tract are discussed in detail. The advantages of lipidated peptide hormones over natural peptide hormones are summarised, in terms of stability and renal clearance, with potential application as therapeutic agents. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28127868

  9. [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. Consensus document of the Bárány Society, the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society].

    PubMed

    Lopez-Escamez, José A; Carey, John; Chung, Won-Ho; Goebel, Joel A; Magnusson, Måns; Mandalà, Marco; Newman-Toker, David E; Strupp, Michael; Suzuki, Mamoru; Trabalzini, Franco; Bisdorff, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes 2 categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low-to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24h.

  10. Publication rate of abstracts presented at the emergency medicine congresses held by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EUSEM) in 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Asim; Kose, Ozkan; Bilir, Ozlem; Ersunan, Gokhan; Ozel, Deniz; Guler, Ferhat

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the publication rate of the abstracts presented at the 6th Mediterranean Emergency Medicine Congress, 2011 and the 7th European Congress on Emergency Medicine, 2012. All abstracts, both posters and oral presentations, from the international emergency medicine congresses held by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EUSEM) in 2011 and 2012 were identified. To establish whether these abstracts were subsequently published in peer-reviewed medical journals, the names of all the authors and the title of the abstracts were searched for in the databases of Clinical Key/Elsevier, EBSCO Discovery Service, MD Consult, Science Direct, Scopus, EMBASE, Medscape, Google Scholar and local ULAKBIM. The year of publication, consistency of author names and titles, the type of study, the journals in which papers were published and countries from which reports were submitted were all recorded. A total of 1721 abstracts were examined; 626 from 2011 (307 oral presentations and 319 posters) and 1095 from 2012 (154 oral presentations and 941 posters). Of all abstracts in 2011, 172 (27.5%) and of all abstracts in 2012, 265 (24.2%) were subsequently published as full-text reports in peer-reviewed journals. Of the 172 papers published in 2011, 152 (88.4%) were accepted by Science Citation Index (SCI) and/or SCI Expanded (SCI-E) journals and 155 (58.5%) of 265 papers were accepted by SCI and/or SCI-E journals in 2012 (p=0.0001). The publication rate of abstracts submitted to international emergency medicine congresses held by EUSEM over those 2 years was low compared with that of abstracts presented in other emergency medicine congresses. Presenters should be encouraged to send their studies to peer-reviewed journals. During the selection process by the scientific panel, constructive critics should be notified to the presenters instead of simply accepting or rejecting the studies that submitted to the congress, which may increase the

  11. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  12. Level of evidence of free papers presented at the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy congress from 2008 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Kay, Jeffrey; Memon, Muzammil; Rogozinsky, Joelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Seil, Romain; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi Rolland

    2017-02-01

    The European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy (ESSKA) congress is an important venue, and the research presented can be a critical source of information used to impact clinical decisions and health policies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of evidence of clinical free papers presented at the ESSKA congress from 2008 to 2016. Moreover, this study evaluated whether there were any changes in the distribution of level of evidence over time. Two reviewers screened the free papers presented at the ESSKA biannual congresses 2008-2016 for clinical evidence. Clinical papers included observational studies and trials involving direct interaction between an investigator and human subjects. Biomechanical studies, technique demonstrations, cadaveric studies, and panel discussions were excluded. The reviewers independently graded their level of evidence from level I (e.g. high-quality randomized trials) to level IV (e.g. case series and reports) using the classification system published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Of 1036 free papers that were identified, 729 met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 18% of studies were level I, 24% level II, 25% level III, and 33% level IV evidence. There was a significant improvement in level of evidence over time (p < 0.0001), with the proportion of level I studies increasing most dramatically (9% in 2008, 20% in 2012, 24% in 2016). Free papers studying the knee had higher levels of evidence than those evaluating other joints (p = 0.002). The level of evidence of clinical free papers presented at the ESSKA congress between 2008 and 2016 is high relative to other orthopaedic meetings. Moreover, there has been a significant improvement in the level of evidence over time. Systematic review, Level IV.

  13. Evidence- and consensus-based (S3) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis - International League of Dermatological Societies in cooperation with the European Dermatology Forum - Short version.

    PubMed

    Werner, R N; Stockfleth, E; Connolly, S M; Correia, O; Erdmann, R; Foley, P; Gupta, A K; Jacobs, A; Kerl, H; Lim, H W; Martin, G; Paquet, M; Pariser, D M; Rosumeck, S; Röwert-Huber, H-J; Sahota, A; Sangueza, O P; Shumack, S; Sporbeck, B; Swanson, N A; Torezan, L; Nast, A

    2015-11-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a frequent health condition attributable to chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Several treatment options are available and evidence based guidelines are missing. The goal of these evidence- and consensus-based guidelines was the development of treatment recommendations appropriate for different subgroups of patients presenting with AK. A secondary aim of these guidelines was the implementation of knowledge relating to the clinical background of AK, including consensus-based recommendations for the histopathological definition, diagnosis and the assessment of patients. The guidelines development followed a pre-defined and structured process. For the underlying systematic literature review of interventions for AK, the methodology suggested by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was adapted. All recommendations were consented during a consensus conference using a formal consensus methodology. Strength of recommendations was expressed based on the GRADE approach. If expert opinion without external evidence was incorporated into the reasoning for making a certain recommendation, the rationale was provided. The Guidelines underwent open public review and approval by the commissioning societies. Various interventions for the treatment of AK have been assessed for their efficacy. The consenting procedure led to a treatment algorithm as shown in the guidelines document. Based on expert consensus, the present guidelines present recommendations on the classification of patients, diagnosis and histopathological definition of AK. Details on the methods and results of the systematic literature review and guideline development process have been published separately. International guidelines are intended to be adapted to national or regional

  14. Validation of the A&D BP UB-543 wrist device for home blood pressure measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Fania, Claudio; Benetti, Elisabetta; Palatini, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the A&D BP UB-543 wrist device for home blood pressure (BP) measurement according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The A&D BP UB-543 monitor is provided with a correct position guidance (CPG) indicator that ensures the correct placement of the wrist at the heart level. Device evaluation was carried out in 33 patients with the CPG indicator on. The mean age of the patients was 53.1±16.4 years, the mean systolic BP was 141.8±25.1 mmHg (range 84 : 196), the mean diastolic BP was 88.2±14.5 mmHg (range 34 : 132), the mean arm circumference was 29.0±3.6 cm (range 21 : 38), and the mean wrist circumference was 17.5±1.4 cm (range 15 : 20). The protocol requirements were followed precisely. The device passed all requirements, fulfilling the standards of the protocol. On average, the device overestimated the systolic BP by 1.1±2.9 mmHg and underestimated diastolic BP by 0.1±3.0 mmHg. These data show that the A&D BP UB-543 wrist device used correctly with the CPG indicator on met the requirements for validation by the International Protocol and can be recommended for clinical use in the adult population. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the AVITA BPM63S upper arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Liu, Ming; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the AVITA BPM63S upper arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (14 women, mean age of 47 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM63S device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the blood pressure requirements were fulfilled. The AVITA BPM63S device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 68/99, 89/99, and 96/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 75/99, 95/99, and 97/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-four and 25 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). One and two participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had all three device-observers differences greater than 5 mmHg. The AVITA BPM63S automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement at home in adults.

  16. Validation of the Rossmax CF175 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the Rossmax CF175 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (17 women, mean age 46 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the Rossmax CF175 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the blood pressure requirements were fulfilled. The Rossmax CF175 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 78/99, 94/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 81/99, 96/99, and 97/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-nine participants, for both of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). Only one participant for diastolic blood pressure had all three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. The Rossmax automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor CF175 fulfilled the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement in adults.

  17. Validation of the Somnotouch-NIBP noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Grzegorz; Zorzi, Cristina; Ochoa Munera, Juan E; Torlasco, Camilla; Giuli, Valentina; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the Somnotouch-NIBP noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adults (11 women, mean age 63.5±11.9 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the Somnotouch-NIBP device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the validation requirements were fulfilled. The Somnotouch-NIBP device fulfilled the requirements of the part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 75/99, 90/99, and 96/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 90/99, 99/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-seven and 31 participants had at least two of the three device-observers differences less than or equal to 5 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. All three device-observer differences were greater than 5 mmHg in two participants for systolic and in one participant for diastolic blood pressure. The Somnotouch-NIBP noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitor has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure monitoring in adults, at least under conditions corresponding to those investigated in our study.

  18. Validation of the Kingyield BP210 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension-International Protocol.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Fang; Huang, Qi-Fang; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor BP210 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese participants (21 women, 51 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the BP210 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 15 participants in phase 1 and a further 18 participants in phase 2 of the validation study. Data analysis was conducted using the ESHIP analyzer. The BP210 device successfully passed phase 1 of the validation study with a number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for at least 33/45, 44/45, and 44/45 measurements, respectively. The device also achieved the targets for phase 2.1, with 77/99, 95/99, and 97/99 differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively for systolic blood pressure, and with 78/99, 97/99, and 99/99 within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively for diastolic blood pressure. In phase 2.2, 29 and 25 participants had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required≥22) for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The Kingyield wrist blood pressure monitor BP210 has passed the International Protocol requirements, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  19. Validation of the HEM-780REL with easy wrap cuff for self-measurement of blood pressure according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    PubMed

    Viera, Anthony J; Hinderliter, Alan L

    2007-10-01

    We tested the accuracy of the HEM-780REL automatic blood pressure monitor with Easy Wrap Cuff. We used the International Protocol for validation of blood pressure measuring devices developed by the Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring of the European Society of Hypertension. Thirty-three adults over the age of 30 years participated to have 11 total participants in each of the three required blood pressure ranges for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Sequential blood pressure readings were taken independently by trained observers using a mercury standard with appropriate size cuff. A third observer performed measurements with the test device. Analyses were performed according to International Protocol specifications for the 99 pairs of measurements. The device was given a pass/fail recommendation based on bands of accuracy compared with the mercury standard (within 5, 10, or 15 mmHg), as well as number of readings per participant within 5 mmHg. The mean blood pressure difference was 0.52+/-7.7 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 0.39+/-4.7 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. Twenty-four out of 33 participants had two out of three readings within 5 mmHg of the mercury standard for systolic blood pressure. Twenty-seven out of 33 participants had two out of three readings within 5 mmHg of the mercury standard for diastolic blood pressure. The device received a passing grade both for accuracy of individual measurements and for accuracy for individuals. The HEM-780REL with Easy Wrap Cuff performs accurately according to the standards of the International Protocol.

  20. The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale in daily practice: a single institution, real-life experience at the Medical University of Vienna

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Barbara; Raderer, Markus; Steger, Günther G; Bartsch, Rupert; Pirker, Robert; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Prager, Gerald; Krainer, Michael; Preusser, Matthias; Schmidinger, Manuela; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2016-01-01

    Background The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (MCBS) has been designed to stratify the therapeutic benefit of a certain drug registered for the treatment of cancer. However, though internally validated, this tool has not yet been evaluated for its feasibility in the daily practice of a major center of medical oncology. Methods The practicability of the MCBS for advanced oncological diseases at the Clinical Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, which constitutes one of the largest oncological centres in Europe, was analysed in a three-step approach. First, retrospectively collected data were analysed to gain an overview of treatments in regular use. Second, data were scored by using the MCBS. Third, the ensuing results were evaluated within corresponding programme directorships to assess feasibility in a real-life clinical context. Results In the majority of tumour entities, the MCBS results reported earlier are consistent with daily clinical practice. Thus, in metastatic breast cancer or advanced lung cancer, there was a high level of clinical benefit for first-line treatment standards, and these results reflected well real-life experience. However, analyses based on the first version of the MCBS are limited if it comes to salvage treatment in tumour entities in which optimal sequencing of potential treatment options is of major importance, as in metastatic colorectal or renal cell cancer. In contrast to this, it is remarkable that certain novel therapies such as nivolumab assessed for heavily pretreated advanced renal cancer reached the highest level of clinical benefit due to prolongation in survival and a favourable toxicity profile. The MCBS clearly underlines the potential benefit of these compounds. Conclusions The MCBS is an excellent tool for daily clinical practice of a tertiary referral centre. It supports treatment decisions based on the clinical benefit to be expected from a novel approach

  1. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential.

  2. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy—European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Stroes, Erik S.; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A.; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Stroes, Erik; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; de Backer, Guy; Catapano, Alberico L.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Jacobson, Terry A.; Leiter, Lawrence; Mach, Francois; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7–29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential. PMID:25694464

  3. Gluten Introduction and the Risk of Coeliac Disease: A Position Paper by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, Hania; Shamir, Raanan; Mearin, Luisa; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Catassi, Carlo; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary S; Husby, Steffen; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Vandenplas, Yvan; Castillejo, Gemma; Kolacek, Sanja; Koletzko, Sibylle; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Lionetti, Elena; Polanco, Isabel; Troncone, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommended in 2008, based on observational data, to avoid both early (<4 months) and late (≥7 months) introduction of gluten and to introduce gluten while the infant is still being breast-fed. New evidence prompted ESPGHAN to revise these recommendations. To provide updated recommendations regarding gluten introduction in infants and the risk of developing coeliac disease (CD) during childhood. The risk of inducing CD through a gluten-containing diet exclusively applies to persons carrying at least one of the CD risk alleles. Because genetic risk alleles are generally not known in an infant at the time of solid food introduction, the following recommendations apply to all infants, although they are derived from studying families with first-degree relatives with CD. Although breast-feeding should be promoted for its other well-established health benefits, neither any breast-feeding nor breast-feeding during gluten introduction has been shown to reduce the risk of CD. Gluten may be introduced into the infant's diet anytime between 4 and 12 completed months of age. In children at high risk for CD, earlier introduction of gluten (4 vs 6 months or 6 vs 12 months) is associated with earlier development of CD autoimmunity (defined as positive serology) and CD, but the cumulative incidence of each in later childhood is similar. Based on observational data pointing to the association between the amount of gluten intake and risk of CD, consumption of large quantities of gluten should be avoided during the first weeks after gluten introduction and during infancy. The optimal amounts of gluten to be introduced at weaning, however, have not been established.

  4. European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Complications in Children With Neurological Impairment.

    PubMed

    Romano, Claudio; van Wynckel, Myriam; Hulst, Jessie; Broekaert, Ilse; Bronsky, Jiri; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Mis, Nataša F; Hojsak, Iva; Orel, Rok; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Schaeppi, Michela; Thapar, Nikhil; Wilschanski, Michael; Sullivan, Peter; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    Feeding difficulties are frequent in children with neurological impairments and can be associated with undernutrition, growth failure, micronutrients deficiencies, osteopenia, and nutritional comorbidities. Gastrointestinal problems including gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, and dysphagia are also frequent in this population and affect quality of life and nutritional status. There is currently a lack of a systematic approach to the care of these patients. With this report, European Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition aims to develop uniform guidelines for the management of the gastroenterological and nutritional problems in children with neurological impairment. Thirty-one clinical questions addressing the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of common gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in neurological impaired children were formulated. Questions aimed to assess the nutritional management including nutritional status, identifying undernutrition, monitoring nutritional status, and defining nutritional requirements; to classify gastrointestinal issues including oropharyngeal dysfunctions, motor and sensory function, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and constipation; to evaluate the indications for nutritional rehabilitation including enteral feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy/jejunostomy; to define indications for surgical interventions (eg, Nissen Fundoplication, esophagogastric disconnection); and finally to consider ethical issues related to digestive and nutritional problems in the severely neurologically impaired children. A systematic literature search was performed from 1980 to October 2015 using MEDLINE. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation was applied to evaluate the outcomes. During 2 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was applied to

  5. Pulmonary embolism risk stratification by European Society of Cardiology is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism: Findings from a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Zhai, Zhenguo; Yang, Yuanhua; Zhu, Jianguo; Kuang, Tuguang; Xie, Wanmu; Yang, Suqiao; Liu, Fangfang; Gong, Juanni; Shen, Ying H; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence carries significant mortality and morbidity. Accurate risk assessment and effective treatment for patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is important for VTE recurrence prevention. We examined the association of VTE recurrence with risk stratification and PE treatment. We enrolled 627 patients with a first episode of confirmed PE. Baseline clinical information was collected. PE severity was assessed by the European Society of Cardiology's (ESC) risk stratification, the simplified PE Severity Index (sPESI) and the Qanadli score of clot burden. Patients were followed for 1-5 years. The cumulative recurrent VTE and all-cause death were documented. The association between recurrent VTE and risk factors was analyzed. The cumulative incidences of recurrent VTE were 4.5%, 7.3%, and 13.9% at 1, 2, and 5 years of follow-up, respectively. The VTE recurrence was associated with higher (high- and intermediate-) risk stratification predicted by ESC model (HR 1.838, 95% CI 1.318-2.571, P<0.001), as well as with unprovoked PE (HR 2.809, 95% CI 1.650-4.781, P b 0.001) and varicose veins (HR 4.747, 95% CI 2.634-8.557, P<0.001). The recurrence was negatively associated with longer (≥6 months) anticoagulation (HR 0.473, 95% CI 0.285-0.787, P=0.004), especially in patients with higher risk (HR 0.394, 95% CI 0.211-0.736, P=0.003) and unprovoked PE (HR 0.248, 95% CI 0.122-0.504, P<0.001). ESC high-risk and intermediate-risk PE, unprovoked PE and varicose veins increase recurrence risk. Longer anticoagulation treatment reduces recurrence, especially in higher risk and unprovoked PE patients.

  6. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for chronic heart failure - A national survey of the cardiologists in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the awareness of and attitudes towards the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for Heart Failure (HF) of the cardiologists in Pakistan and assess barriers to adherence to guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in person from March to July 2009 to all cardiologists practicing in 4 major cities in Pakistan (Karachi, Lahore, Quetta and Peshawar). A validated, semi-structured questionnaire assessing ESC 2005 Guidelines for HF was used to obtain information from cardiologists. It included questions about awareness and relevance of HF guidelines (See Additional File 1). Respondents' management choices were compared with those of an expert panel based on the guidelines for three fictitious patient cases. Cardiologists were also asked about major barriers to adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 372 cardiologists were approached; 305 consented to participate (overall response rate, 82.0%). The survey showed a very high awareness of CHF guidelines; 97.4% aware of any guideline. About 13.8% considered ESC guidelines as relevant or very relevant for guiding treatment decisions while 92.8% chose AHA guidelines in relevance. 87.2% of respondents perceived that they adhered to the HF guidelines. For the patient cases, the proportions of respondents who made recommendations that completely matched those of the guidelines were 7% (Scenario 1), 0% (Scenario 2) and 20% (Scenario 3). Respondents considered patient compliance (59%) and cost/health economics (50%) as major barriers to guideline implementation. Conclusion We found important self reported departures from recommended HF management guidelines among cardiologists of Pakistan. PMID:22093082

  7. Subtrochanteric fractures after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates: a European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, and International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, K.; Bouxsein, M.; Kanis, J. A.; Napoli, N.; Papapoulos, S.; Reginster, J.-Y.; Cooper, C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case–control studies report this association, but retrospective phase III trial analyses show no increased risk. Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is yet unproven. Introduction A Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the International Osteoporosis Foundation has reviewed the evidence for a causal association between subtrochanteric fractures and long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, with the aim of identifying areas for further research and providing recommendations for physicians. Methods A PubMed search of literature from 1994 to May 2010 was performed using key search terms, and articles pertinent to subtrochanteric fractures following bisphosphonate use were analysed. Results Several clinical case reports and case reviews report a possible association between atypical fractures at the subtrochanteric region of the femur in bisphosphonate-treated patients. Common features of these ‘atypical’ fractures include prodromal pain, occurrence with minimal/no trauma, a thickened diaphyseal cortex and transverse fracture pattern. Some small case–control studies report the same association, but a large register-based study and retrospective analyses of phase III trials of bisphosphonates do not show an increased risk of subtrochanteric fractures with bisphosphonate use. The number of atypical subtrochanteric fractures in association with bisphosphonates is an estimated one per 1,000 per year. It is recommended that physicians remain vigilant in assessing their patients treated with bisphosphonates for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis and advise patients of the potential risks. Conclusions Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric

  8. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE): recommendations (2009) on clinical use of video capsule endoscopy to investigate small-bowel, esophageal and colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ladas, S D; Triantafyllou, K; Spada, C; Riccioni, M E; Rey, J-F; Niv, Y; Delvaux, M; de Franchis, R; Costamagna, G

    2010-03-01

    These recommendations on video capsule endoscopy, an emerging technology with an impact on the practice of endoscopy, were developed by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guidelines Committee. The first draft of each section was prepared by one or two members of the writing team, who were selected as experts on the content of that section on the basis of their published work. They used evidence-based methodology, performing MEDLINE and PubMed literature searches to identify relevant clinical studies. Abstracts from scientific meetings were included only if there was no published full paper on a particular topic. If there was disagreement, the first author of the Guideline made the final decision. Recommendations were graded according to the strength of the supporting evidence. The draft guideline was critically reviewed by all authors and submitted to the ESGE councillors for their critical review before approval of the final document. The ESGE Guidelines Committee acknowledges that this document is based on a critical review of the data available at the time of preparation and that further studies may be needed to clarify some aspects. Moreover, this Guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. This document should be regarded as supplying recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. It is not a set of rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care, or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. These recommendations must be interpreted according to the clinician's knowledge, expertise, and clinical judgment in the management of individual patients and, if necessary, a course of action that varies from recommendations must be undertaken.

  9. Effect of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis on FEV1 in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis: a European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaditis, Athanasios G; Miligkos, Michael; Bossi, Anna; Colombo, Carla; Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; de Monestrol, Isabelle; Thomas, Muriel; Mei-Zahav, Meir; Chrousos, George; Zolin, Anna

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) on FEV1 percent predicted in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. Longitudinal data analysis (2008-2010). Patients participating in the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry. 3350 patients aged 6-17 years. FEV1 percent predicted was the main outcome measure (one measurement per year per child). To describe the effect of ABPA (main explanatory variable) on FEV1 while controlling for other prognostic factors, a linear mixed effects regression model was applied. In 2008, the mean (±SD) FEV1 percent predicted was 78.6 (±20.6) in patients with ABPA (n=346) and 88 (±19.8) in those without ABPA (n=2806). After considering other variables, FEV1 in subjects with ABPA on entry to the study was 1.47 percentage points lower than FEV1 in patients of similar age without ABPA (p=0.003). There was no FEV1 decline associated with ABPA over the subsequent study years as the interaction of ABPA with age was not significant (p>0.05). For patients aged 11.82 years (population mean age), poor body mass index had the greatest impact on FEV1 in 2008, followed by high-risk genotype (two severe mutations), female gender, diabetes mellitus, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and ABPA in descending order of effect size. In contrast to the common clinical belief of ABPA having a serious impact on lung function, the difference in FEV1 between young patients with and without the complication was found to be modest when the effect of other prognostic factors was considered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Variations in compliance to quality indicators by age for 41,871 breast cancer patients across Europe: a European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists database analysis.

    PubMed

    Kiderlen, Mandy; Ponti, Antonio; Tomatis, Mariano; Boelens, Petra G; Bastiaannet, Esther; Wilson, Robin; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess age-specific compliance to quality indicators (QIs) regarding the treatment of breast cancer as defined by European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists (EUSOMA) for patients across Europe. All patients entered into this study were affected by in situ or invasive breast cancer, diagnosed and treated between 2003 and 2012 at 27 Breast Units across Europe, who were entered into the EUSOMA database. Patients were categorised according to age; compliance to thirteen QIs was assessed for each age group and per time period (2003-2007 and 2008-2012). Compliance to QIs was tested by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for breast unit, incidence year and tumour characteristics. Overall, 41,871 patients with a mean age of 59.6years were available for analysis. The highest compliance was reached for patients aged 55-64years and in the time period 2008-2012, whilst the lowest compliance was observed for women aged over 74 or under 40years and in the earlier time period. In multivariable logistic regression models, a significant difference between age categories was shown for 12 out of 13 QIs (P<0.001). Compliance to the QIs for patients aged ⩾75years was significantly lower when compared to patients aged 55-64years for ten QIs, whilst for patients in the youngest age group this was true for seven QIs. In conclusion, we found that among the 27 included breast units across Europe, compliance to QIs for breast cancer treatment is often lower in the youngest and oldest breast cancer patients, with a tendency to overtreatment in the youngest patients, and to under-treatment in the elderly. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Relations between professional medical associations and healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  12. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  13. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a Policy Statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  14. A prospective survey in European Society of Cardiology member countries of atrial fibrillation management: baseline results of EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot General Registry.

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Laroche, Cécile; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Santini, Massimo; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Oliveira, Mário Martins; Mairesse, Georges; Crijns, Harry J G M; Simantirakis, Emmanouil; Atar, Dan; Kirchhof, Paulus; Vardas, Panos; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2014-03-01

    Given the advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) management and the availability of new European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines, there is a need for the systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF in ESC member countries. We conducted a registry of consecutive in- and outpatients with AF presenting to cardiologists in nine participating ESC countries. All patients with an ECG-documented diagnosis of AF confirmed in the year prior to enrolment were eligible. We enroled a total of 3119 patients from February 2012 to March 2013, with full data on clinical subtype available for 3049 patients (40.4% female; mean age 68.8 years). Common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary disease, and heart failure. Lone AF was present in only 3.9% (122 patients). Asymptomatic AF was common, particularly among those with permanent AF. Amiodarone was the most common antiarrhythmic agent used (∼20%), while beta-blockers and digoxin were the most used rate control drugs. Oral anticoagulants (OACs) were used in 80% overall, most often vitamin K antagonists (71.6%), with novel OACs being used in 8.4%. Other antithrombotics (mostly antiplatelet therapy, especially aspirin) were still used in one-third of the patients, and no antithrombotic treatment in only 4.8%. Oral anticoagulants were used in 56.4% of CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, with 26.3% having no antithrombotic therapy. A high HAS-BLED score was not used to exclude OAC use, but there was a trend towards more aspirin use in the presence of a high HAS-BLED score. The EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot Registry has provided systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF by cardiologists in ESC member countries. Oral anticoagulant use has increased, but novel OAC use was still low. Compliance with the treatment guidelines for patients with the lowest and higher stroke risk scores remains suboptimal.

  15. Applicability of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines on management of acute coronary syndromes to people with haemophilia - an assessment by the ADVANCE Working Group.

    PubMed

    Staritz, P; de Moerloose, P; Schutgens, R; Dolan, G

    2013-11-01

    There are no evidence-based guidelines for antithrombotic management in people with haemophilia (PWH) presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to review the current European Society of Cardiology guidelines, and to consider how best they should be adapted for PWH. Structured communication techniques based on a Delphi-like methodology were used to achieve expert consensus on key aspects of clinical management. The main final statements are as follows: (i) ACS and myocardial revascularization should be managed promptly by a multidisciplinary team that includes a haemophilia expert, (ii) each comprehensive care centre for adult PWH should have a formal clinical referral pathway with a cardiology centre with an emergency unit and 24 h availability of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), (iii) PCI should be performed as soon as possible under adequate clotting factor protection, (iv) bare metal stents are preferred to drug-eluting stents, (v) anticoagulants should only be used in PWH after replacement therapy, (vi) minimum trough levels should not fall below 5-15% in PWH on dual antiplatelet therapy, (vii) the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS and PCI should be limited to a minimum, (viii) the use of GPIIb-IIIa inhibitors is not recommended in PWH other than in exceptional circumstances, (ix) the use of fibrinolysis may be justified in PWH when primary PCI (within 90 min) is not available ideally under adequate clotting factor management. It is hoped that the results of this initiative will help to guide optimal management of ACS in PWH.

  16. The use of HeartQoL in patients with coronary heart disease: Association with risk factors and European reference values. The EUROASPIRE IV study of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Delphine; Clays, Els; Höfer, Stefan; Oldridge, Neil; Kotseva, Kornelia; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Pogosova, Nana; Dolzhenko, Maryna; De Bacquer, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    HeartQoL is a recently developed core health-related quality of life instrument for patients with coronary heart disease. The current study aims to investigate its association with patients' coronary risk profile and to provide reference values for patients with coronary heart disease across Europe. Analyses are based on the EUROASPIRE IV (EUROpean Action on Secondary and Primary prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events) cross-sectional survey. Patients with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease were examined and interviewed six months to three years after their coronary event. The HeartQoL questionnaire was completed by 7261 coronary heart disease patients. Reference values were calculated and the association with the coronary risk profile was assessed. Significantly worse outcomes were observed in higher-risk patient groups. Both metabolic and behavioural risk factors were associated with worse HeartQoL outcomes. Further, the HeartQoL scores decreased as the number of risk factors increased. The mean global reference values in males were 2.27 ± 0.65 (<60 years), 2.30 ± 0.61 (between 60 and 69 years) and 2.19 ± 0.64 (≥70 years). Likewise, in females, the respective global HeartQoL reference values were 2.02 ± 0.67, 2.01 ± 0.66 and 1.83 ± 0.70. The ceiling effect in males was 11.4%, 10.4% and 7.4% for the three age classes respectively, whereas in females the ceiling effect was 5.2%, 3.5% and 1.9%, respectively. HeartQoL scores were associated with patients' coronary risk profile. The reference values may help other researchers to interpret HeartQoL scores. Further research should focus on the minimal important difference needed to evaluate the effect of therapies and lifestyle changes. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  17. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; Miguel, Jesus San; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  18. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) <60% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend treatment with inhaled bronchodilators (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 4: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians prescribe monotherapy using either long-acting inhaled

  19. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Outcome of operation in patients with adrenocortical cancer invading the inferior vena cava--a European Society of Endocrine Surgeons (ESES) survey.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu; Iacobone, Maurizio; Makay, Ozer; Moreno, Pablo; Frilling, Andrea; Kraimps, Jean-Louis; Soriano, Arturo; Villar del Moral, Jesús; Barczynski, Marcin; Durán, Manuel C; Sadler, Gregory P; Niederle, Bruno; Dralle, Henning; Harrison, Barney; Carnaille, Bruno

    2012-02-01

    Most patients with adrenocortical cancer (ACC) continue to present with advanced disease. Invasion into the inferior vena cava (IVC) defines stage III disease and the management of such patients raises additional difficulties. A multicentre survey was organized by emailing a standardized proforma to members of the European Society of Endocrine Surgery (ESES). Anonymised retrospective clinical data were collected. Replies were received from 18 centres in nine countries. ACC with IVC invasion was encountered in 38 patients (18F:20M, age 15-84 years, median 54 years). There were 16 nonfunctioning tumours and 22 functioning tumours predominantly right-sided (26R:12L) and measuring 18-255 mm (median 115 mm). Fourteen patients had metastatic disease at presentation. Tumour thrombus extended in the prehepatic IVC (n = 21), subdiaphragmatic IVC (n = 6) or into the SVC/right atrium (n = 3). Open adrenalectomy was associated with resection of surrounding viscera in 24 patients (nephrectomy n = 16, liver resection n = 14, splenectomy n = 3, Whipple procedure n = 2). IVC was controlled locally (n = 27), at suprahepatic levels (n = 6) or necessitated cardiac bypass (n = 5). Complete resection (R0, n = 20) was achieved in the majority of patients, with a minority having microscopic persistent disease (R1, n = 7) or macroscopic residual disease (R2, n = 4). Perioperative 30-day mortality was 13% (n = 5). Postoperative Mitotane was used in 23 patients and chemotherapy in eight patients. Twenty-five patients died 2-61 months after their operation (median 5 months). Currently, 13 patients are alive at 2-58 months (median 16 months) with known metastatic disease (n = 7) or with no signs of distant disease (n = 6). This dataset is limited by the lack of a denominator as it remains unknown how many other patients with ACC presenting with IVC invasion did not undergo surgery. The relatively low perioperative

  1. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  2. Comparative studies of adhesion peptides based on l- or d-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Sergey; Palmer, Daniel; Meldal, Morten; Diness, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies comparing solid-supported l- or d-amino acid adhesion peptides based on the sequence KLHRIRA were performed. Stability towards proteases and levels of cellular adhesion to the otherwise inert surface of PEGA resin were compared by using fluorescently labelled peptides. A clear difference in the peptide stability towards cleavage by subtilisin, trypsin, or papain was observed. However, all of the on-bead peptides provided an optimal surface for cell adhesion and proliferation. In long-term experiments, these properties were still found to be similar on the resins modified either with l- or with d-amino acids and unaffected by the nature of their fluorescence labelling at either terminus. These results support that the more accessible l-amino acids can be utilized for cell adhesion experiments and confirm the nonspecific interaction mechanism of cell binding to these peptides on the bead surface. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Three novel antimicrobial peptides from the skin of the Indian bronzed frog Hylarana temporalis (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Reshmy, V; Preeji, V; Parvin, A; Santhoshkumar, K; George, S

    2011-05-01

    Amphibian skin secretion is considered as a rich source of bioactive peptides. The present work describes the successful identification of three novel peptides named brevinin-1TEa, brevinin-2TEa and brevinin-2TEb present in the skin secretion of Indian bronzed frog Hylarana temporalis. The deduced open reading frame encoding the biosynthetic precursor of brevinin-1TEa consisted of 70 amino acid residues and brevinin-2TEa and brevinin-2TEb consisted of 71 and 72 amino acids, respectively. All the three peptides showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative than against Gram-positive bacteria. On the basis of the antibacterial and haemolytic activity, brevinin-2TEb is the most potent peptide reported in the present study. Further research on these peptides may provide potential clue towards newer drug development to combat various microbial diseases. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A novel glucagon-like peptide 1 peptide identified from Ophisaurus harti.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Huang, Xian; Gao, Hong; Bao, Qiuying; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Jin-Feng; Xia, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because of the short half-life of endogenous GLP1 peptide, other GLP1R agonists are considered to be appealing therapeutic candidates. A high-throughput assay has been established to screen for GLP1R agonists in a 60 000-well natural product compound library fractionated from 670 different herbs/materials widely used in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). The screening is based on primary screen of GLP1R⁺ reporter gene assay with the counter screen in GLP1R⁻ cell line. An active fraction, A089-147, was identified from the screening. Fraction A089-147 was isolated from dried Ophisaurus harti, and the fact that its GLP1R agonist activity was sensitive to trypsin treatment indicates its peptidic nature. The active ingredient of A089-147 was later identified as O. harti GLP1 through transcriptome analysis. Chemically synthesized O. harti GLP1 showed GLP1R agonist activity and sensitivity to dipeptidase IV digestion. This study illustrated a comprehensive screening strategy to identify novel GLP1R agonists from TCMs libraries and at the same time underlined the difficulty of identifying a non-peptidic GLP1R agonist. The novel O. harti GLP1 peptide yielded from this study confirmed broader application of TCMs libraries in active peptide identification. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adrenomedullin - new perspectives of a potent peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a 52-amino acid multifunctional peptide, which belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily of vasoactive peptide hormones. ADM exhibits a significant vasodilatory potential and plays a key role in various regulatory mechanisms, predominantly in the cardiovascular and lymphatic system. It exerts its effects by activation of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor associated with one of the receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 or 3. ADM was first isolated from human phaeochromocytoma in 1993. Numerous studies revealed a widespread distribution in various tissues and organs, which is reflected by its multiple physiological roles in health and disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and proliferative properties, ADM exhibits potent protective functions under diverse pathological conditions, but it is also critically involved in tumor progression. ADM has therefore raised great interest in therapeutic applications and several clinical trials already revealed promising results. However, because the receptor activation mode has not yet been fully elucidated, a rational design of potent and selective ligands is still challenging. Detailed information on the binding mode of ADM from a recently reported crystal structure as well as efforts to improve its plasma stability and bioavailability may help to overcome these limitations in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. INTRODUCTION: Award of the 2004 Hannes Alfvén Prize of the European Physical Society to J W Connor, R J Hastie and J B Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Jo, Dr

    2004-12-01

    Jack Connor, Jim Hastie and Bryan Taylor The Hannes Alfvén Prize of the European Physical Society for Outstanding Contributions to Plasma Physics (2004) has been awarded to Jack Connor, Jim Hastie and Bryan Taylor `for their seminal contributions to a wide range of issues of fundamental importance to the success of magnetic confinement fusion, including: the development of gyro-kinetic theory; the prediction of the bootstrap current; dimensionless scaling laws; pressure-limiting instabilities, and micro-stability and transport theory'. Jack Connor, Jim Hastie and Bryan Taylor form one of the most successful teams of theoretical physicists in the history of magnetic confinement fusion. They have made important contributions individually, but their greatest discoveries have mostly been accomplished jointly, either in pairs or as a team involving all three. Their early work, in the 1960s, included the development of the gyro-kinetic theory for fine-scale plasma instabilities, which today forms the basis of the most advanced turbulence simulation codes in tokamak and stellarator research. The theoretical prediction of the bootstrap current, made in 1970-71 was not confirmed experimentally for over a decade but is now regarded as crucial to the success of the tokamak as a steady-state fusion power source. Their work on collisional transport also included the prediction of impurity ion accumulation, which is observed in internal transport barriers and is a key concern for long-pulse tokamak operation. The relativistic threshold for runaway electrons, identified in 1975, forms the basis of the most recent tokamak disruption mitigation schemes. In the late 1970s, the team developed the theory for ballooning instabilities, which provided an important ingredient in the `Troyon-Sykes' β-limit—an expression that is still used as a guide to the performance of tokamaks and in the design of ITER. Ballooning mode theory has also contributed to the understanding of

  9. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; En Chiang, Chern; Williams, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Host defense peptide-derived privileged scaffolds for anti-infective drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2017-04-01

    'Privileged scaffolds' are molecular frameworks which have been successfully exploited for small molecule drug discovery. Peptide privileged scaffolds, featuring a strictly conserved multiple-disulfide framework and high variability in the rest of the sequence, display a broad range of biological effects, including antimicrobial and antiviral activity. Unlike small molecules, however, the cost of manufacturing these peptides is high, and their synthesis challenging. We previously described a simplified privileged scaffold corresponding to the γ-core of human β-defensin-3 (HBD3). The γ-core is a common structural signature found in virtually all host defense peptides (HDPs) stabilized by multiple disulfides, and we showed that for HBD3, it represents the evolutionary starting point of the full-length molecule and, thus, is itself a primordial HDP. Accordingly, we showed that the peptide folded rapidly and was stable in human serum, and displayed many of the biological activities of HBD3. We report here that in addition to the previously reported antibacterial activity on planktonic bacteria, the γ-core peptide is active against biofilm formation and maturation. We also show that it is readily cell penetrant, like HBD3, although with a different mechanism, which is independent from CD98. Overall, the potency of the single-disulfide, 23-amino acid γ-core is comparable with the full-length peptide across the whole spectrum of examined properties, and the peptide is not toxic to human cells. The HBD3 γ-core peptide may therefore represent the first example of an economically viable lead peptide derived from a HDP privileged scaffold. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Biomarkers come of age: PD1 in the frontline and cell cycle therapy swells the ranks of personalised therapy in the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) congress, Copenhagen, 7–10 October 2016

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Will

    2016-01-01

    After years of trials, Programmed Death Ligand and Receptor targeting finally debuts as a firstline therapy in combination and as a single agent regimen at the 2016 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress. The meeting brought together 20,522 attendees, from over 120 countries, to share updates and novel technologies from a wide swathe of oncology research. This year’s theme, From Disease Treatment to Patient Care, was matched by abstract presentations starting from inception of care regimens to new standards of care in high-risk patient subgroups, to wellbeing of care providers, and finally the funding obstacles at each continental level. PMID:28105074

  12. Trophoblastic disease review for diagnosis and management: a joint report from the International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Lorusso, Domenica; Brown, Jubilee; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Massuger, Leon; Vaughan, Michelle; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Golfier, Francois; Sekharan, Paradan K; Charry, Rafael Cortés; Poveda, Andres; Kim, Jae-Weon; Xiang, Yang; Berkowtiz, Ross; Seckl, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a consensus review on gestational trophoblastic disease diagnosis and management from the combined International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup. A joint committee representing various groups reviewed the literature obtained from PubMed searches. Guidelines were constructed on the basis of literature review. After initial diagnosis in local centers, centralization of pathology review and ongoing care is recommended to achieve the best outcomes.

  13. Biomarkers come of age: PD1 in the frontline and cell cycle therapy swells the ranks of personalised therapy in the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) congress, Copenhagen, 7-10 October 2016.

    PubMed

    Davies, Will

    2016-01-01

    After years of trials, Programmed Death Ligand and Receptor targeting finally debuts as a firstline therapy in combination and as a single agent regimen at the 2016 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress. The meeting brought together 20,522 attendees, from over 120 countries, to share updates and novel technologies from a wide swathe of oncology research. This year's theme, From Disease Treatment to Patient Care, was matched by abstract presentations starting from inception of care regimens to new standards of care in high-risk patient subgroups, to wellbeing of care providers, and finally the funding obstacles at each continental level.

  14. Multimodality Imaging in Restrictive Cardiomyopathies: An EACVI expert consensus document In collaboration with the "Working Group on myocardial and pericardial diseases" of the European Society of Cardiology Endorsed by The Indian Academy of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Habib, Gilbert; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Caforio, Alida L P; Cardim, Nuno; Charron, Philippe; Cosyns, Bernard; Dehaene, Aurélie; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Donal, Erwan; Dweck, Marc R; Edvardsen, Thor; Erba, Paola Anna; Ernande, Laura; Gaemperli, Oliver; Galderisi, Maurizio; Grapsa, Julia; Jacquier, Alexis; Klingel, Karin; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Neglia, Danilo; Pepe, Alessia; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Petersen, Steffen E; Plein, Sven; Popescu, Bogdan A; Reant, Patricia; Sade, L Elif; Salaun, Erwan; Slart, Riemer H J A; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Zamorano, Jose

    2017-10-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies (RCMs) are a diverse group of myocardial diseases with a wide range of aetiologies, including familial, genetic and acquired diseases and ranging from very rare to relatively frequent cardiac disorders. In all these diseases, imaging techniques play a central role. Advanced imaging techniques provide important novel data on the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of RCMs. This EACVI consensus document provides comprehensive information for the appropriateness of all non-invasive imaging techniques for the diagnosis, prognostic evaluation, and management of patients with RCM. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Creative Drama and Agricultural Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the interaction of culture and creative drama. Examines agricultural societies under three conditions: historically, from neolithic times; contemporary American Southwest Indian and Polynesian; and modern farming subcultures of European industrial societies. Asks how far agricultural life influences creative drama in agrarian societies.…

  16. En route towards the peptide γ-helix: X-ray diffraction analyses and conformational energy calculations of Adm-rich short peptides.

    PubMed

    Mazzier, Daniela; Grassi, Luigi; Moretto, Alessandro; Alemán, Carlos; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; Crisma, Marco

    2017-04-01

    We performed the solution-phase synthesis of a set of model peptides, including homo-oligomers, based on the 2-aminoadamantane-2-carboxylic acid (Adm) residue, an extremely bulky, highly lipophilic, tricyclic, achiral, C(α) -tetrasubstituted α-amino acid. In particular, for the difficult peptide coupling reaction between two Adm residues, we took advantage of the Meldal's α-azidoacyl chloride approach. Most of the synthesized Adm peptides were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The results indicate a significant propensity for the Adm residue to adopt γ-turn and γ-turn-like conformations. Interestingly, we found that a -CO-(Adm)2 -NH- sequence is folded in the crystal state into a regular, incipient γ-helix, at variance with the behavior of all of the homo-dipeptides from C(α) -tetrasubstituted α-amino acids already investigated, which tend to adopt either the β-turn or the fully extended conformation. Our density functional theory conformational energy calculations on the terminally blocked homo-peptides (n = 2-8) fully confirmed the crystal-state data, strongly supporting the view that this rigid C(α) -tetrasubstituted α-amino acid residue is largely the most effective building block for γ-helix induction, although to a limited length (anti-cooperative effect). Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Pediatric cyanide poisoning by fire smoke inhalation: a European expert consensus. Toxicology Surveillance System of the Intoxications Working Group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Mintegi, Santiago; Clerigue, Nuria; Tipo, Vincenzo; Ponticiello, Eduardo; Lonati, Davide; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; Delvau, Nicolas; Anseeuw, Kurt

    2013-11-01

    Most fire-related deaths are attributable to smoke inhalation rather than burns. The inhalation of fire smoke, which contains not only carbon monoxide but also a complex mixture of gases, seems to be the major cause of morbidity and mortality in fire victims, mainly in enclosed spaces. Cyanide gas exposure is quite common during smoke inhalation, and cyanide is present in the blood of fire victims in most cases and may play an important role in death by smoke inhalation. Cyanide poisoning may, however, be difficult to diagnose and treat. In these children, hydrogen cyanide seems to be a major source of concern, and the rapid administration of the antidote, hydroxocobalamin, may be critical for these children.European experts recently met to formulate an algorithm for prehospital and hospital management of adult patients with acute cyanide poisoning. Subsequently, a group of European pediatric experts met to evaluate and adopt that algorithm for use in the pediatric population.

  18. Preliminary study on expression of antimicrobial peptides in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) following in vivo infection with Vibrio anguillarum. A time course experiment.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Mauro; Candusso, Sabrina; Galeotti, Marco; Volpatti, Donatella

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial polypeptides (AMPPs) are humoral components of the vertebrates and invertebrates innate immune system. Their potent broad spectrum antimicrobial activities have drawn the attention of the scientific community to their potential use not only as an alternative to antibiotics but also as functional targets for immunostimulants in order to enhance the host immunity. Fish synthesize a great number of these peptides but in European sea bass, an important fish species in the Mediterranean aquaculture, only a few AMPPs have been studied and these surveys have highlighted their functional role as predictive markers of stressful conditions. Many aspects concerning AMPP mode of action in the host during bacterial infections are still unknown. In this work a 72 h time course experiment, performed on juvenile sea bass intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with a sub-lethal dose of Vibrio anguillarum, was aimed to investigate the mRNA expression of four specific AMPP genes and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in skin, gills, spleen, and head kidney. AMPP genes were: dicentracin (DIC), histone-like protein 1 (HLP-1), histone-like protein 2 (HLP-2) and hemoglobin-like protein (Hb-LP). The delta-delta C(T) method in real-time RT-PCR allowed to gain more knowledge about temporal dynamics, preferential sites of expression as well as immunological and physiological role of these molecular markers. DIC was significantly up-regulated mainly in head kidney at 1.5-3 h post-infection (p.i.). HLP-1 showed an extended-time overexpression in gills and a significant up-regulation in spleen. HLP-2 was interestingly overexpressed in gills at 24 h p.i., while Hb-LP showed a significant up-regulation in skin for all the 72 h trial as well as lower but always significant values either in gills or in spleen. Different was the response of IL-1β that showed a dramatic up-regulation in spleen and head kidney at 8 h p.i. whilst in gills it displayed a severe inhibition. During this survey the i

  19. European Approaches To Widening Participation in Higher Education: A Commentary in Light of the Role of the Society for Research into Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggins, Heather

    1999-01-01

    Case studies of Estonia, Bulgaria, and the United Kingdom illustrate how the access and equity agenda in each country reflect national social concerns and priorities and how individual institutions reinterpret national agendas in light of institutional missions and objectives. Sees a role for the Society for Research into Higher Education in…

  20. European Approaches To Widening Participation in Higher Education: A Commentary in Light of the Role of the Society for Research into Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggins, Heather

    1999-01-01

    Case studies of Estonia, Bulgaria, and the United Kingdom illustrate how the access and equity agenda in each country reflect national social concerns and priorities and how individual institutions reinterpret national agendas in light of institutional missions and objectives. Sees a role for the Society for Research into Higher Education in…

  1. Peptides as asymmetric catalysts and templates for the controlled formation of Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wennemers, Helma

    2012-07-01

    The question whether peptides can fulfill functions for which nature utilizes large macromolecules is an overarching theme of the research in the Wennemers laboratory. The Zervas Award Lecture summarized our research on the development of peptides as asymmetric catalysts and templates for the controlled formation of silver nanoparticles. Tripeptides of the general type Pro-Pro-Xaa (Xaa = acidic amino acid) were presented that effectively catalyze aldol and conjugate addition reactions. These peptides are not only highly active, robust, and stereoselective catalysts but have also remarkable chemoselectivities. In the second part, short peptides that allow for the generation of silver nanoparticles in distinctly different sizes were presented. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Validation of the Andon KD-5917 automatic upper arm blood pressure monitor, for clinic use and self-measurement, according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wan-Gang; Li, Bing-Ling; He, Yong; Xue, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zheng, Qiang-Sun; Xiang, Ding-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    To validate the Andon KD-5917 automatic upper arm blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Sequential same-left-arm measurements of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained in 33 participants using the mercury sphygmomanometer and the test device. According to the validation protocol, 99 pairs of test device and reference blood pressure measurements (three pairs for each of the 33 participants) were obtained in the study. The device produced 73, 98, and 99 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for SBP and 86, 98, and 99 for DBP, respectively. The mean ± SD device-observer difference was 3.07 ± 3.68 mmHg for SBP and -0.89 ± 3.72 mmHg for DBP. The number of patients with two or three of the device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was 26 for SBP and 29 for DBP, and no patient had a device-observer difference within 5 mmHg. The Andon KD-5917 automatic upper arm blood pressure monitor can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in an adult population on the basis of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

  3. Evaluation of the SCHILLER BR-102 plus noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitor according to the International Protocol introduced by the Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring of the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Denchev, Stefan V; Simova, Iana I; Matveev, Mikhail G

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the SCHILLER BR-102 plus (Schiller AG, Baar, Switzerland) noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure recorder according to the International Protocol for validation of blood pressure measuring devices in adults introduced by the Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring of the European Society of Hypertension. One SCHILLER BR-102 plus blood pressure recorder was tested by a validation team, consisting of three persons: two observers (nurses) and a doctor, acting as supervisor and 'expert'. The European Society of Hypertension International Protocol comprises two phases. Fifteen participants were recruited for the first phase and, following a successful test, a further 18 persons (giving a total of 33) were recruited additionally. For phase 1, five of the 15 participants had systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in each of the ranges: low, medium and high. For phase 2, 11 of the 33 participants (including the first 15 participants) had systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in each of the ranges. The mercury standard for validation was preferred over the optional Sphygmocorder. Because the SCHILLER BR-102 plus has the oscillometric method as backup to the basic auscultatory measurement, both systems of measurement were subjected to individual validations. Results obtained show that the SCHILLER BR-102 plus noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure recorder meets all the requirements specified in the International Protocol for both oscillometric and auscultatory methods. On the basis of these results, the SCHILLER BR-102 plus can be recommended for ambulatory blood pressure measurement in clinical practice using both auscultatory and oscillometric modes.

  4. Invention of stimulus-responsive peptide-bond-cleaving residue (Spr) and its application to chemical biology tools.

    PubMed

    Shigenaga, Akira; Yamamoto, Jun; Kohiki, Taiki; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Otaka, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Elucidation of biological functions of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding peptide/protein-related biological events and developing drugs. Caged peptides and proteins that release a parent active peptide/protein by photo-irradiation have successfully been employed to elucidate the functions. Whereas the usual caged peptide/protein enables conversion of an inactive form to an active form (OFF-to-ON conversion) by photo-induced deprotection, photo-triggered main chain cleavage is reported to be applicable to ON-to-OFF conversion. These peptides and proteins are photo-responsive; however, if peptides and proteins could respond to other stimuli such as disease-related environment or enzymes, their range of application should be widened. To convert the photo-responsive peptide/protein into other stimulus-responsive peptide/protein, quite laborious de novo design and synthesis of the stimulus-responsive unit are required. In this context, we designed a stimulus-responsive peptide-bond-cleaving residue (Spr) in which the stimuli available for the main chain cleavage vary according to the choice of protecting groups on the residue. In this review, design and synthesis of Spr are introduced, and challenges to apply Spr to other fields to enable, for example, functional control, localization control, delivery of cargos, labeling of a protein of interest in living cells, and identification of target proteins of bioactive ligands are discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Biological characterization of novel nitroimidazole-peptide conjugates in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Ralf; Splith, Katrin; Pietzsch, Jens; Bachmann, Michael; Neundorf, Ines

    2017-07-01

    Recently, we reported on the design of a multimodal peptide conjugate useful as delivery platform for targeting hypoxic cells. A nitroimidazole (2-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)acetic acid, NIA) moiety, which is selectively entrapped in hypoxic cells, was coupled to a cell-penetrating peptide serving as the transporter. Furthermore, attachment of a bifunctional linker allowed the introduction of a diagnostic or therapeutic radiometal. However, although selective tumor accumulation could be detected in vivo, a fast renal clearance of the compound was observed. The present study aims to improve the system by using the more proteolytically stable all-d version of the peptide carrier (DsC18), by attaching two NIA moieties instead of one (DsC18(NIA)2 ) to enhance the tumor uptake, and by incorporating the bifunctional chelator NODAGA instead of DOTA (NODAGA-DsC18(NIA)2 ) to optimize labeling chemistry. First, we characterized in vitro the novel all-d peptide compared with its parent l-version. Then, in order to investigate and compare the pharmacological profiles of the peptides, these were radiolabeled with (64) Cu(II) and (68) Ga(III) , and the biodistribution and kinetics were evaluated in vivo. Our results show the versatility of the d-peptide as cell-penetrating peptide and transporter. However, attaching two NIA groups modified the system in such a way that no selective tumor uptake could be observed compared with the peptide without NIA moieties. Still, this work highlights new pharmacokinetic data on the biodistribution of such compounds in vivo. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of lipophilic analogs of the cationic antimicrobial active peptide anoplin.

    PubMed

    Chionis, Kostas; Krikorian, Dimitrios; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria; Panou-Pomonis, Eugenia

    2016-11-01

    Anoplin is a short natural cationic antimicrobial peptide which is derived from the venom sac of the solitary wasp, Anoplius samariensis. Due to its short sequence G(1) LLKR(5) IKT(8) LL-NH2 , it is ideal for research tests. In this study, novel analogs of anoplin were prepared and examined for their antimicrobial, hemolytic activity, and proteolytic stability. Specific substitutions were introduced in amino acids Gly(1) , Arg(5) , and Thr(8) and lipophilic groups with different lengths in the N-terminus in order to investigate how these modifications affect their antimicrobial activity. These cationic analogs exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the native peptide; they are also nontoxic at their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and resistant to enzymatic degradation. The substituted peptide GLLKF(5) IKK(8) LL-NH2 exhibited high activity against Gram-negative bacterium Zymomonas mobilis (MIC = 7 µg/ml), and the insertion of octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid residues in its N-terminus increased the antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (MIC = 5 µg/ml). The conformational characteristics of the peptide analogs were studied by circular dichroism. Structure activity studies revealed that the substitution of specific amino acids and the incorporation of lipophilic groups enhanced the amphipathic α-helical conformation inducing better antimicrobial effects. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Centipede venom peptide SsmTX-I with two intramolecular disulfide bonds shows analgesic activities in animal models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaojie; Yang, Meifeng; Wu, Chunyun; Zou, Zhirong; Tang, Jing; Yang, Xinwang

    2017-05-01

    Pain is a major symptom of many diseases and results in enormous pressures on human body or society. Currently, clinically used analgesic drugs, including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have adverse reactions, and thus, the development of new types of analgesic drug candidates is urgently needed. Animal venom peptides have proven to have potential as new types of analgesic medicine. In this research, we describe the isolation and characterization of an analgesic peptide from the crude venom of centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. The amino acid sequence of this peptide was identical with SsmTX-I that was previously reported as a specific Kv2.1 ion channel blocker. Our results revealed that SsmTX-I was produced by posttranslational processing of a 73-residue prepropeptide. The intramolecular disulfide bridge motifs of SsmTX-I was Cys1-Cys3 and Cys2-Cys4. Functional assay revealed that SsmTX-I showed potential analgesic activities in formalin-induced paw licking, thermal pain, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing mice models. Our research provides the first report of cDNA sequences, disulfide motif, successful synthesis, and analgesic potential of SsmTX-I for the development of pain-killing drugs. It indicates that centipede peptide toxins could be a treasure trove for the search of novel analgesic drug candidates. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Interventional spine and pain procedures in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications: guidelines from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the International Neuromodulation Society, the North American Neuromodulation Society, and the World Institute of Pain.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer; Benzon, Honorio T; Provenzano, David A; Buvanendran, Asokumar; De Andres, José; Deer, Timothy R; Rauck, Richard; Huntoon, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Interventional spine and pain procedures cover a far broader spectrum than those for regional anesthesia, reflecting diverse targets and goals. When surveyed, interventional pain and spine physicians attending the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 11th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting exhorted that existing ASRA guidelines for regional anesthesia in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed that procedure-specific and patient-specific factors necessitated separate guidelines for pain and spine procedures. In response, ASRA formed a guidelines committee. After preliminary review of published complication reports and studies, committee members stratified interventional spine and pain procedures according to potential bleeding risk as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk procedures. The ASRA guidelines were deemed largely appropriate for the low- and intermediate-risk categories, but it was agreed that the high-risk targets required an intensive look at issues specific to patient safety and optimal outcomes in pain medicine. The latest evidence was sought through extensive database search strategies and the recommendations were evidence-based when available and pharmacology-driven otherwise. We could not provide strength and grading of these recommendations as there are not enough well-designed large studies concerning interventional pain procedures to support such grading. Although the guidelines could not always be based on randomized studies or on large numbers of patients from pooled databases, it is hoped that they will provide sound recommendations and the evidentiary basis for such recommendations.

  9. Are hospitalized or ambulatory patients with heart failure treated in accordance with European Society of Cardiology guidelines? Evidence from 12,440 patients of the ESC Heart Failure Long-Term Registry.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Anker, Stefan D; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ponikowski, Piotr; Zannad, Faiez; Amir, Offer; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Leiro, Marisa Crespo; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Erglis, Andrejs; Fazlibegovic, Emir; Fonseca, Candida; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gatzov, Plamen; Goncalvesova, Eva; Hassanein, Mahmoud; Hradec, Jaromir; Kavoliuniene, Ausra; Lainscak, Mitja; Logeart, Damien; Merkely, Bela; Metra, Marco; Persson, Hans; Seferovic, Petar; Temizhan, Ahmet; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate how recommendations of European guidelines regarding pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for heart failure (HF) are adopted in clinical practice. The ESC-HF Long-Term Registry is a prospective, observational study conducted in 211 Cardiology Centres of 21 European and Mediterranean countries, members of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). From May 2011 to April 2013, a total of 12,440 patients were enrolled, 40.5% with acute HF and 59.5% with chronic HF. Intravenous treatments for acute HF were heterogeneously administered, irrespective of guideline recommendations. In chronic HF, with reduced EF, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid antagonists (MRAs) were used in 92.2, 92.7, and 67.0% of patients, respectively. When reasons for non-adherence were considered, the real rate of undertreatment accounted for 3.2, 2.3, and 5.4% of the cases, respectively. About 30% of patients received the target dosage of these drugs, but a documented reason for not achieving the target dosage was reported in almost two-thirds of them. The more relevant reasons for non-implantation of a device, when clinically indicated, were related to doctor uncertainties on the indication, patient refusal, or logistical/cost issues. This pan-European registry shows that, while in patients with acute HF, a large heterogeneity of treatments exists, drug treatment of chronic HF can be considered largely adherent to recommendations of current guidelines, when the reasons for non-adherence are taken into account. Observations regarding the real possibility to adhere fully to current guidelines in daily clinical practice should be seriously considered when clinical practice guidelines have to be written.

  10. An unexpected cell-penetrating peptide from Bothrops jararaca venom identified through a novel size exclusion chromatography screening.

    PubMed

    Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Vigerelli, Hugo; Costa, André Santos; Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Junior, Paulo Luiz-de-Sá; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Efficient drug delivery systems are currently one of the greatest challenges in pharmacokinetics, and the transposition of the gap between in vitro candidate molecule and in vivo test drug is, sometimes, poles apart. In this sense, the cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) may be the bridge uniting these worlds. Here, we describe a technique to rapidly identify unlabeled CPPs after incubation with liposomes, based on commercial desalting (size exclusion) columns and liquid chromatography-MS/MS, for peptide de novo sequencing. Using this approach, we found it possible to identify one new CPP - interestingly, a classical bradykinin-potentiating peptide - in the peptide-rich low molecular mass fraction of the Bothrops jararaca venom, which was also able to penetrate live cell membranes, as confirmed by classical approaches employing fluorescence-labeled analogues of this CPP. Moreover, both the labeled and unlabeled CPPs caused no metabolic, cell-cycle or morphologic alterations, proving to be unmistakably cargo deliverers and not drugs themselves. In sum, we have developed and validated a method for screening label-free peptides for CPP activity, regardless of their biological origin, which could lead to the identification of new and more efficient drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [EUROASPIRE-IV: European Society of Cardiology study of lifestyle, risk factors, and treatment approaches in patients with coronary artery disease: Data from Turkey].

    PubMed

    Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Altay, Servet; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Barçın, Cem; Bostan, Cem; Çakmak, Hüseyin Altuğ; Çatakoğlu, Alp Burak; Emet, Samim; Ergene, Oktay; Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Kaya, Barış; Tulunay Kaya, Cansın; Kaymaz, Cihangir; Koylan, Nevrez; Kültürsay, Hakan; Oğuz, Aytekin; Özpelit, Ebru; Ünlü, Serkan

    2017-03-01

    Data from EUROASPIRE-IV Turkey report investigating risk factors and adherence to guidelines in patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease are presented and results are compared with those of EUROASPIRE-III Turkey and EUROASPIRE-IV Europe. Study was performed in 24 European countries, including Turkey (17 centers). Patients (18-80 years old) hospitalized for coronary (index) event during preceding 3 years were identified from hospital records and interviewed ≥6 months later. Patient information regarding index event was acquired from hospital records. Anamnesis was obtained during the interview, and physical examination and laboratory analyses were performed. Median age at the index coronary event was 58.8 years, and it was significantly decreased compared with last EUROASPIRE-III study (60.5 years), which was conducted at the same centers 6 years earlier (p=0.017). Of all patients, 19.3% were under 50 years of age and mean age was lower than that of EUROASPIRE-IV Europe (62.5 years). Comparing EUROASPIRE-IV Turkey with EUROASPIRE-III Turkey, rate of smokers increased to 25.5% from 23.1% (p=0.499), obesity increased to 40.7% from 35.5% (p=0.211), total cholesterol level increased to 49.6% from 48.3% (p=0.767), and diabetes rate increased to 39.7% from 33.6% (p=0.139), however none of the differences reached a level of statistical significance. Only 11.7% of the smokers quit after coronary event. Rates for these factors were lower in EUROASPIRE-IV Europe (16% for smoking, 37.6% for obesity, and 26.8% for diabetes). EUROASPIRE-IV Turkey data revealed that secondary prevention was unsatisfactory and had progressed unfavorably compared with last EUROASPIRE study, some risk factors were more uncontrolled than overall European average, and coronary artery events at young age remain an important problem.

  12. Homology, similarity, and identity in peptide epitope immunodefinition.

    PubMed

    Kanduc, Darja

    2012-08-01

    The tendency to use the terms homology, similarity, and identity interchangeably persists in comparative biology. When translated to immunology, overlapping the concepts of homology, similarity, and identity complicates the exact definition of the self-nonself dichotomy and, in particular, affects immunopeptidomics, an emerging field aimed at cataloging and distinguishing immunoreactive peptide epitopes from silent nonreactive amino acid sequences. The definition of similar/dissimilar peptides in immunology is discussed with special attention to the analysis of immunological (dis)similarity between two or more protein sequences that equates to measuring sequence similarity with the use of a proper measurement unit such as a length determinant. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Validation of the OMRON M7 (HEM-780-E) blood pressure measuring device in a population requiring large cuff use according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    El Feghali, Ramzi N; Topouchian, Jirar A; Pannier, Bruno M; El Assaad, Hiba A; Asmar, Roland G

    2007-06-01

    A high percentage of hypertensive patients present an arm circumference of over 32 cm; the use of a large cuff is therefore recommended. Validation studies are usually performed in the general population using a standard-size cuff. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the Omron M7 device in a population with an arm circumference ranging from 32 to 42 cm. A validation study was performed according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. This protocol is divided into two phases: the first phase is performed on 15 selected participants (45 pairs of blood-pressure measurements); if the device passes this phase, 18 supplementary participants are included (54 pairs of blood-pressure measurements), making a total number of 33 participants (99 pairs of blood-pressure measurements), on whom the analysis is performed. For each participant, four blood-pressure measurements were performed simultaneously by two trained observers, using mercury sphygmomanometers fitted with a Y tube; the measurements alternated with three by the test device. The difference between the blood-pressure value given by the device and that obtained by the two observers (mean of the two observations) was calculated for each measure. The 99 pairs of blood-pressure differences were classified into three categories (European Society of Hypertension protocol. The Omron M7 device passed the first and the second phases of the validation process. The average differences between the two observers were 1.5+/-3.2 and -0.5+/-2.2 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, and those between the device and the mercury sphygmomanometer were -1.6+/-6.7 for systolic blood pressure and -0.12+/-4.0 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure Readings that differ by less than 5, 10 and 15 mmHg for systolic blood-pressure and diastolic blood

  14. Anti-biofilm and sporicidal activity of peptides based on wheat puroindoline and barley hordoindoline proteins.

    PubMed

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Alfred, Rebecca L; Clayton, Andrew H A; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-07-01

    The broad-spectrum activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and low probability of development of host resistance make them excellent candidates as novel bio-control agents. A number of AMPs are found to be cationic, and a small proportion of these are tryptophan-rich. The puroindolines (PIN) are small, basic proteins found in wheat grains with proposed roles in biotic defence of seeds and seedlings. Synthetic peptides based on their unique tryptophan-rich domain (TRD) display antimicrobial properties. Bacterial endospores and biofilms are highly resistant cells, with significant implications in both medical and food industries. In this study, the cationic PIN TRD-based peptides PuroA (FPVTWRWWKWWKG-NH2 ) and Pina-M (FSVTWRWWKWWKG-NH2 ) and the related barley hordoindoline (HIN) based Hina (FPVTWRWWTWWKG-NH2 ) were tested for effects on planktonic cells and biofilms of the common human pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes and the non-pathogenic Listeria innocua. All peptides showed significant bactericidal activity. Further, PuroA and Pina-M at 2 × MIC prevented initial biomass attachment by 85-90% and inhibited >90% of 6-h preformed biofilms of all three organisms. However Hina, with a substitution of Lys-9 with uncharged Thr, particularly inhibited Listeria biofilms. The PIN based peptides were also tested against vegetative cells and endospores of Bacillus subtilis. The results provided evidence that these tryptophan-rich peptides could kill B. subtilis even in sporulated state, reducing the number of viable spores by 4 log units. The treated spores appeared withered under scanning electron microscopy. The results establish the potential of these tryptophan-rich peptides in controlling persistent pathogens of relevance to food industries and human health. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology-Heart Failure meeting 2015: AUGMENT-HF, TITRATION, STOP-HF, HARMONIZE, LION HEART, MOOD-HF, and renin-angiotensin inhibitors in patients with heart and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Clark, Andrew L

    2015-09-01

    This article provides an overview on the key trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure (HF) presented at the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) annual meeting held in Seville, Spain in May 2015. Trials reported include AUGMENT-AF (myocardial injections of calcium-alginate hydrogel), a propensity score-matched study of renin-angiotensin system antagonists in patients with HF and severe renal dysfunction, HARMONIZE (sodium zirconium cyclosilicate used to bind potassium), TITRATION, comparing two regimes for introducing LCZ696, STOP-HF, a trial of intramyocardial stromal cell-derived factor-1, MOOD-HF (escitalopram for patients with heart failure and depression), and LION HEART, a trial of intermittent levosimendan therapy. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication.

  16. World Health Organization 2006 child growth standards and 2007 growth reference charts: A discussion paper by the committee on Nutrition of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Turck, Dominique; Michaelsen, Kim F; Shamir, Raanan; Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie; Decsi, Tamás; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Kolacek, Sanja; Mihatsch, Walter; Moreno, Luis A; van Goudoever, Johannes