Science.gov

Sample records for european scientific user

  1. Scientific customer needs - NASA user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Some requirements for scientific users of the Space Station are considered. The use of testbeds to evaluate design concepts for information systems, and for interfacing between designers and builders of systems is examined. The need for an information system that provides an effective interaction between ground-based users and their space-based equipment is discussed.

  2. Scientific customer needs - NASA user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Some requirements for scientific users of the Space Station are considered. The use of testbeds to evaluate design concepts for information systems, and for interfacing between designers and builders of systems is examined. The need for an information system that provides an effective interaction between ground-based users and their space-based equipment is discussed.

  3. Scientific dishonesty: European reflections

    PubMed Central

    Riis, P

    2001-01-01

    Scientific dishonesty has attracted increased attention around the world during the past three to four decades. Europe became aware of the problem later than the USA, but has within the past 10 years created national control systems for all biomedical projects, not only those supported by public money. The prevalence of the problem can only be calculated indirectly by referring to population figures as denominators. Measured this way, figures from Denmark as a whole show: 1–2 cases referred/million inhabitants/year, 1 case treated/million inhabitants/year, 1 case of scientific dishonesty/million inhabitants/5 years. For Finland, 1–2 cases were referred/million inhabitants/1–2 years; for Norway, similar figures of 1/4 million inhabitants/year were calculated. Figures from the Danish national independent control body 1993–7 show the distribution of the types of cases that were charged, with numbers of confirmed cases in parentheses: fabrication, 2 (1); plagiarism, 3 (0); theft, 2 (0); ghost authorship, 2 (1); false methodological description, 3 (1); twisted statistics, 2 (0); suppression of existing data, 4 (0); unwarranted use of data, 4 (0); and authorship problems, 8 (1). This survey emphasises the need for national guidelines, an independent national control body, and initiatives for strong preventive actions. Key Words: scientific dishonesty • fraud • authorship PMID:11271787

  4. Scientific dishonestry: European reflections.

    PubMed

    Riis, P

    2001-01-01

    Scientific dishonesty has attracted increased attention around the world during the past three to four decades. Europe became aware of the problem later than the USA, but has within the past 10 years created national control systems for all biomedical projects, not only those supported by public money. The prevalence of the problem can only be calculated indirectly by referring to population figures as denominators. Measured this way, figures from Denmark as a whole show: 1-2 cases referred/million inhabitants/year, 1 case treated/million inhabitants/year, 1 case of scientific dishonesty/million inhabitants/5 years. For Finland, 1-2 cases were referred/million inhabitants/1-2 years; for Norway, similar figures of 1/4 million inhabitants/year were calculated. Figures from the Danish national independent control body 1993-7 show the distribution of the types of cases that were charged, with numbers of confirmed cases in parentheses: fabrication, 2 (1); plagiarism, 3 (0); theft, 2 (0); ghost authorship, 2 (1); false methodological description, 3 (1); twisted statistics, 2 (0); suppression of existing data, 4 (0); unwarranted use of data, 4 (0); and authorship problems, 8 (1). This survey emphasises the need for national guidelines, an independent national control body, and initiatives for strong preventive actions.

  5. European Scientific Notes, Volume 24, Number 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to both American and European scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  6. EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES NO. 22-4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to both American and European scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  7. European Scientific Notes, Volume 23, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to both American and European scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-30

    part of the scientific literature and should not be cited C as such. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED 83 06 07 064 UNCLASSIFIED...SECURITY CLASS. (of Slha rPo*H) UNCLASSIFIED Sa. OECL ASSI FICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16. DISTR SUTION STATEMENT (of thie Report) APPROVED FOR PUBLIC ...34European Scientific Notes (ESN) is a monthly publication with brief articles on recent developments in European Scientific research. The

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 25, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  10. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  11. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents articles about recent developments in European scientific research. Although this information is not a contribution to the scientific literature, it is intended to aid American scientists by reporting events and results well in advance of most of the scientific publications and the trade journals.

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 31, Number 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-31

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  13. European Scientific Notes. Volume 31, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advanced of the usual scientific publications .

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 29, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  15. European Scientific Notes, Volume 25, Number 12

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 25, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  17. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  18. European Scientific Notes, Volume 24 No. 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 31, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  20. European Scientific Notes. Volume 23, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  1. European Scientific Notes. Volume 24, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The document is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. The articles do not constitute part of the scientific literature but may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 29, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent development in European Scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 29, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 26, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-31

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  6. European Scientific Notes. Volume 26, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 26, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 25, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not consititute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  9. European Scientific. Volume 31, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-31

    This a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  10. European Scientific Notes. Volume 25, Number 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. These articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  11. European Scientific Notes Number 32-2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-28

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-31

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  13. European Scientific Notes. Volume 29, Number 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles which do not constitute part of the scientific literature may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 11,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  15. European Scientific Notes, Volume 28, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 29, Number 11,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  17. European Scientific Notes. Volume 31, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-31

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  18. European Scientific Notes. Volume 24, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 27, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  20. European Scientific Notes. Volume 31, Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  1. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-31

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 25, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  6. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 26, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The monthly publication presents brief articles concerning recent developments in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information in advance of the usual scientific publications .

  8. 2006 XSD Scientific Software User Survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Jemian, P. R.

    2007-01-22

    In preparation for the 2006 XSD Scientific Software workshop, our committee sent a survey on June 16 to 100 users in the APS user community. This report contains the survey and the responses we received. The responses are presented in the order received.

  9. NASA Scientific and Technical Program - User survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Shockley, Cynthia W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an intensive user requirements survey conducted by NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program with the goal of improving the foundation for the user outreach program. The survey was carried out by interviewing 550 NASA scientists, engineers, and contractors and by analyzing 650 individual responses to a mailed out questionnaire. To analyze the user demographic data, a data base was built and used, and will be applied to ongoing analysis by the NASA STI Program.

  10. NASA scientific and technical program: User survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Shockley, Cynthia W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an intensive user requirements survey conducted by NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program with the goal of improving the foundation for the user outreach program. The survey was carried out by interviewing 550 NASA scientists, engineers, and contractors and by analyzing 650 individual responses to a mailed out questionnaire. To analyze the user demographic data, a data base was built and used, and will be applied to ongoing analysis by the NASA STI Program.

  11. European scientific notes. Volume 34, Number 9

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, W.V.; Peters, D.J.

    1980-09-30

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent developments in European Scientific Research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by calling attention to current development and to institutions and individuals engaged in these scientific efforts. The articles are written primarily by members of the staff of ORNL and occasionally articles are prepared by, or in cooperation with, members of the scientific staffs of the United States Air Force's European Office of Aerospace Research and Development and the United States ARmy Research and Standardization Group. Articles are also contributed by visiting Stateside scientists.

  12. European user trial of paging by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fudge, R. E.; Fenton, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    British Telecom conceived the idea of adapting their existing paging service, together with the use of existing terrestrial pagers, to yield a one way data (i.e., paging) satellite service to mobiles. The user trial of paging by satellites was successful. It demonstrated that services could be provided over a wide geographical area to low priced terminals. Many lessons were learned in unexpected areas. These include the need for extensive liaison with all users involved, especially the drivers, to ensure they understood the potential benefits. There was a significant desire for a return acknowledgement channel or even a return data channel. Above all there is a need to ensure that the equipment can be taken across European borders and legitimately used in all European countries. The next step in a marketing assessment would be to consider the impact of two way data messaging such as INMARSAT-C.

  13. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-31

    Data Entered) 12/ REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE I. REPORT NUMBER 55Y-35-8 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC...completed a tour of duty in Northern Ireland. Before being assigned to a 4 -month hitch of such "combat" duty, all the men completed some personality...ferred by the bomb-disposal operators. When these soldiers return to England after a 4 -month tour, there is a strong tendency toward change in

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  16. [Medical scientific Romania in the European context].

    PubMed

    Rădut, D S; Alvarez-Dardet, C; Ruiz, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    A national and international publications bibliometric analysis was assessed to evaluate the scientific research situation about Romania and the relation with the European Parliament Health objectives for 2003-2008. A bibliographical search in MEDLINE between 1999 and 2003 was performed. An annual review was done and the articles were classified on seven activity branches. The clinical medicine articles were classified by using medical specialties. The 2003-2008 Health European report was classified on fourteen objectives and related to the Romanian scientific production. 2068 articles were found, distributed 271 in 1999, 373 in 2000, 434 in 2001, 492 in 2002, and 498 in 2003. 1335 are clinical medicine, 485 basic sciences, 126 Public Health, 40 pollution and environmental, 36 mental health and 25 nursing articles. 21 were not classified. The highest article's number belongs to the clinical medicine field and the highest research interest was found in Ophthalmology medical specialty. An increasing scientific research evolution was found but a focussed research tendency was observed around some of the European Union Parliament's objectives.

  17. National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

  18. EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC NOTES NO. ESN-22-6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This is a monthly publication presenting brief articles concerning recent development in European scientific research. It is hoped that these articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to both American and European scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  19. The European ALMA Regional Centre: a model of user support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Stoehr, F.; Zwaan, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Biggs, A.; Diaz-Trigo, M.; Humphreys, E.; Petry, D.; Randall, S.; Stanke, T.; van Kampen, E.; Bárta, M.; Brand, J.; Gueth, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Muxlow, T.; Richards, A.; Vlemmings, W.

    2014-08-01

    The ALMA Regional Centres (ARCs) form the interface between the ALMA observatory and the user community from the proposal preparation stage to the delivery of data and their subsequent analysis. The ARCs provide critical services to both the ALMA operations in Chile and to the user community. These services were split by the ALMA project into core and additional services. The core services are financed by the ALMA operations budget and are critical to the successful operation of ALMA. They are contractual obligations and must be delivered to the ALMA project. The additional services are not funded by the ALMA project and are not contractual obligations, but are critical to achieve ALMA full scientific potential. A distributed network of ARC nodes (with ESO being the central ARC) has been set up throughout Europe at the following seven locations: Bologna, Bonn-Cologne, Grenoble, Leiden, Manchester, Ondrejov, Onsala. These ARC nodes are working together with the central node at ESO and provide both core and additional services to the ALMA user community. This paper presents the European ARC, and how it operates in Europe to support the ALMA community. This model, although complex in nature, is turning into a very successful one, providing a service to the scientific community that has been so far highly appreciated. The ARC could become a reference support model in an age where very large collaborations are required to build large facilities, and support is needed for geographically and culturally diverse communities.

  20. The European ALMA Regional Centre Network: A Geographically Distributed User Support Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatziminaoglou, E.; Zwaan, M.; Andreani, P.; Barta, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Brand, J.; Gueth, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Maercker, M.; Massardi, M.; Muehle, S.; Muxlow, Th.; Richards, A.; Schilke, P.; Tilanus, R.; Vlemmings, W.; Afonso, J.; Messias, H.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years there has been a paradigm shift from centralised to geographically distributed resources. Individual entities are no longer able to host or afford the necessary expertise in-house, and, as a consequence, society increasingly relies on widespread collaborations. Although such collaborations are now the norm for scientific projects, more technical structures providing support to a distributed scientific community without direct financial or other material benefits are scarce. The network of European ALMA Regional Centre (ARC) nodes is an example of such an internationally distributed user support network. It is an organised effort to provide the European ALMA user community with uniform expert support to enable optimal usage and scientific output of the ALMA facility. The network model for the European ARC nodes is described in terms of its organisation, communication strategies and user support.

  1. 12th European VLBI Network Symposium and Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Andrea; Giroletti, Marcello; Feretti, Luigina

    The Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA) di Bologna and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari (OAC), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 12th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and Users Meeting. The Conference was held from 7th to 10th of October at the Hotel Regina Margherita, in the center of Cagliari. The latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, and, in particular, e-VLBI and space-VLBI (RadioAstron) outcomes were reported. The timing of this meeting coincided with the first successful observational tests of the Sardinia Radio Telescopes within the EVN, and with a number of results from new and upgraded radio facilities around the globe, such as e-MERLIN, ALMA, and the SKA pathfinders. The symposium was attended by 133 participants from all over the world, with the Asian community represented by more than 20 colleagues. The program of the meeting consisted of 70 oral contributions (including 8 invited speakers) and 50 poster that covered a very wide range of VLBI topics both in galactic and extragalactic astrophysics (e.g., AGN, stellar evolution from birth to death, astrometry, and planetary science) as well as technological developments and future international collaborations. The scientific program also included a visit to the 64-m Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) and the EVN Users Meeting, where astronomers have provided useful feedback on various matters regarding EVN operations. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013) under grant agreement No 283393 (RadioNet3). EDITORIAL BOARD: Andrea Tarchi, Marcello Giroletti, Luigina Feretti

  2. The USER: Utilizing Scientific Environments for Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lakeisha

    A lot of hard work goes into submitting a proposal for access to equipment in our nation's top science research facilities. It seems the biggest focus for a facility USER should be on the acceptance of the proposal, however, the job of a facility USER actually begins after the acceptance letter arrives. In order to make the most of the Awarded experiment time and cultivate collaborations for the future, facility USERs need to look beyond the proposal. From experiment scheduling to arrival to data analysis the entire USER experience is valuable and worth doing well. This presentation will discuss best practices for facility USERs and highlight successful USER collaborations at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for US DOE.

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 27, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  6. European Scientific Notes. Volume 28, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 27, Number 11,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  8. European Scientific Notes, Volume 28, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Modified author abstract)

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 23, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    articles (which do not constitute part of the scientific literature) may prove of value to American scientists by disclosing interesting information well in advance of the usual scientific publications . (Author)

  10. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Julie A.; Robertson, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    This is the 2013 Annual Report for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

  11. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-31

    Fig. 1. Simplified mechanical system repre- physical Illness; at least some of the negative senting the human body standing on a effects observed are...meeting. D. x. Barr 161 The European Spaue Agency and the * 5gIEKP. Popoe Kepler Miesion,Among the poelbl new Btau" under onsideration by the European spac...defining equal fatigue- keep the effective vibration below the discom decreased proficiency boundaries. fort levels; this Is especially true if critical

  12. Developing Concept-Based User Interfaces for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Stephan, Eric G.; Gracio, Deborah K.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2006-09-01

    From our interactions with researchers from different scientific fields and disciplines, we have observed that scientists often describe and convey concepts, theories, processes, and results using basic graphs and diagrams. Semantic graphs such as these provide a universal language that all scientists may apply to document their scientific knowledge and to communicate this knowledge to others. Furthermore, studies have shown that the cognitive processing of complex subject matter is improved when the structure of ideas and concepts are made explicit [39] and that semantic graphs may serve as effective “scaffolds” for cognitive processing [29]. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are deploying semantic graphs within scientific computing systems as central user representations of scientific knowledge. These systems provide concept-based user interfaces that allow scientists to visually define and capture conceptual models of their scientific problems, hypotheses, theories, and processes. Once defined, the visual models then become interaction framework for accessing and applying scientific and computational resources and capabilities. In this paper, through the examination of three visual research systems, we illustrate different ways concept-based user interfaces and semantic graph knowledge representations may make scientific knowledge concrete, usable, shareable, and computable in scientific computing systems.

  13. A training program for scientific supercomputing users

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

    1988-01-01

    There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    R.L. Carovillano 218 The Seventh European Regional Astronomy meeting dealt with almost every area of astronomy; coverage included solar ...in the 25- to found in areas as diverse as electro- 35-m range at the Comitato Nazionale optics and pharmacology. Energia Nucleare laboratory in...physics research has led to knowledge gained in one area (or param- many discoveries in the solar system and eter domain) to another area that lacks to

  15. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 8.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-31

    ible but is believed to be capable of and opportunity for management experi- long-term profitability, then the firm ences also may be essential ...analyze the gramar where their surfaces are exposed to the of user input which is "human* in the reactant gases flowing between the two sense that it may...supporting Green, A.K., D.P. Bushford, and W.H. a hip socket joint. Considerable rest Bowyer, Composites (October 1982). at essentially negligible loading

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-30

    data may prove session. to be far less manageable to users than they Regarding the command language, Niever- are to system experts. gelt believes that...configuration. Arditty com- continuing support. COMPEDA believes that mented that the system is of interest because it effective project management is a...sponsored research organizations. GAELIC provides necessary aids to solve the The organizations include the Science and design and management problems in

  17. Three-dimensional user interfaces for scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDam, Andries (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this grant was to experiment with novel user interfaces for scientific visualization applications using both desktop and virtual reality (VR) systems, and thus to advance the state of the art of user interface technology for this domain. This technology has been transferred to NASA via periodic status reports and papers relating to this grant that have been published in conference proceedings. This final report summarizes the research completed over the past three years, and subsumes all prior reports.

  18. European Scientific Notes, Volume 36, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    considerations in mind. These include manage- In the Baltic, flounders have been shown ment problems and the effect of the gear on to have relatively high ...Synchrotron Radiation Source, is the world’s first high -energy electron accel- erator dedicated to radiation production for scientific experi- ments. Its...microdosimetry to physi- cal, chemical, and biological sys- tems. This fusion of disciplines improved understanding of ion- izing radiation effects

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    seems that the latter * submitted to Biomateriale . can now be ruled out. It has generally been accepted that the best explanation for frequency...the Norwegian Council for ject involved H. HerO and R. Jirgensen Industrial and Scientific Research. (Scandinavian Institute of Dental Hater- With V.L...diameter Some chapter titles are: "Uniformly indicated to be PdCu in a dental Moving Dislocations, Surface Waves’ Ag -Pd-Cu-Au alloy. "Dislocations

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  1. A User-Driven Annotation Framework for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qinglan

    2013-01-01

    Annotations play an increasingly crucial role in scientific exploration and discovery, as the amount of data and the level of collaboration among scientists increases. There are many systems today focusing on annotation management, querying, and propagation. Although all such systems are implemented to take user input (i.e., the annotations…

  2. [G. Baglivi and scientific European community between rationalism and enlightenment].

    PubMed

    Toscano, A

    2000-01-01

    The Baglivi Correspondence, kept in the Waller Collection at the University Library of Uppsala, has been published in Italy for the first time in 1999. This Correspondence kept in Sweden provides new information about the scientific Italian culture between the second half of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the eighteenth. Moreover, it provides important knowledge on the diffusion the Baglivi's work in the scientific European context at that time.

  3. ATR NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC USER FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION ENHANCEMENT EFFORTS

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-04-01

    A key component of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) effort is to enhance instrumentation techniques available to users conducting irradiation tests in this unique facility. In particular, development of sensors capable of providing ‘real-time’ measurements of key irradiation parameters is emphasized because of their potential to offer increased fidelity data and reduced post-test examination costs. This paper describes the strategy for identifying new instrumentation needed for ATR irradiations and the program underway to develop and evaluate new sensors to address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing several new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users improved in-pile instrumentation.

  4. Present activies and opinions of scientific and technical information users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Ryo; Marumo, Kazuaki

    Present activities and opinions of database users at private enterprises, national institutes or universities are surveyed by a questionnaire and interviews. The investigation includes the following items : 1. Establishment of the inhouse database, 2. Complaints against the existing services of scientific and technical information, 3. Expense for collecting information, 4. Comparison of the database services between public and private, and Japanese and foreign, 5. Requirements to the organization for information service, and government. As the result, they knew that users expect much on the online service and especially wish providers to lower the price and make a single command which enables searchers to make easy access to the various databases.

  5. Scientific preparations for lunar exploration with the European Lunar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. D.; Fisackerly, R.; De Rosa, D.; Houdou, B.

    2012-12-01

    Recent Lunar missions and new scientific results in multiple disciplines have shown that working and operating in the complex lunar environment and exploiting the Moon as a platform for scientific research and further exploration poses major challenges. Underlying these challenges are fundamental scientific unknowns regarding the Moon's surface, its environment, the effects of this environment and the availability of potential resources. The European Lunar Lander is a mission proposed by the European Space Agency to prepare for future exploration. The mission provides an opportunity to address some of these key unknowns and provide information of importance for future exploration activities. Areas of particular interest for investigation on the Lunar Lander include the integrated plasma, dust, charge and radiation environment and its effects, the properties of lunar dust and its physical effects on systems and physiological effects on humans, the availability, distribution and potential application of in situ resources for future exploration. A model payload has then been derived, taking these objectives to account and considering potential payloads proposed through a request for information, and the mission's boundary conditions. While exploration preparation has driven the definition there is a significant synergy with investigations associated with fundamental scientific questions. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for the ESA Lunar Lander Mission, which emphasise human exploration preparatory science and introduces the model scientific payload considered as part of the on-going mission studies, in advance of a formal instrument selection.

  6. European lead standardisation—its relevance to users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillerie, J. L.

    The European lead industry, including users and producers, has agreed to prepare unique standards for lead products and analytical control methods. A technical committee (TC) was created in 1993 within the Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN) under the identification code CEN-TC 306. In 1998, 10 standards were prepared and two standards are available. To illustrate the work done by the experts, the lead 99.97 definition is presented in detail. Harmonisation has its limits. A unique standard for general applications, common to several countries, cannot cover all the numerous specific demands from users but has to reflect progress in refining and testing, and changes in demand. Recently, product standardisation covers the terminology of used products.

  7. Scientific Ocean Drilling to Assess Submarine Geohazards along European Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ask, M. V.; Camerlenghi, A.; Kopf, A.; Morgan, J. K.; Ocean DrillingSeismic Hazard, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine geohazards are some of the most devastating natural events in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Earthquakes pose a big threat to society and infrastructure, but the understanding of their episodic generation is incomplete. Tsunamis are known for their potential of striking coastlines world-wide. Other geohazards originating below the sea surface are equally dangerous for undersea structures and the coastal population: submarine landslides and volcanic islands collapse with little warning and devastating consequences. The European scientific community has a strong focus on geohazards along European and nearby continental margins, especially given their high population densities, and long historic and prehistoric record of hazardous events. For example, the Mediterranean is surrounded by very densely-populated coastline and is the World's leading holiday destination, receiving up 30% of global tourism. In addition, its seafloor is criss-crossed by hydrocarbon pipelines and telecommunication cables. However, the governing processes and recurrence intervals of geohazards are still poorly understood. Examples include, but are not limited to, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions along the active tectonic margins of the Mediterranean and Sea of Marmara, landslides on both active and passive margins, and tsunamites and seismites in the sedimentary record that suggest a long history of similar events. The development of geophysical networks, drilling, sampling and long-term monitoring are crucial to the understanding of earthquake, landslide, and tsunami processes, and to mitigate the associated risks in densely populated and industrialized regions such as Europe. Scientific drilling, particularly in the submarine setting, offers a unique tool to obtain drill core samples, borehole measurements and long-term observations. Hence, it is a critical technology to investigate past, present, and possible future influences of hazardous processes in this area. The

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  9. The Scientific Uplink and User Support System for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichsen, I.; Chavez, J.; Hartley, B.; Mei, Y.; Potts, S.; Roby, T.; Turek, G.; Valjavec, E.; Wu, X.

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is one of NASA's Great Observatory missions, scheduled for launch in 2001. As such its ground segment design is driven by the requirement to provide strong support for the entire astronomical community starting with the call for Legacy Proposals in early 2000. In this contribution, we present the astronomical user interface and the design of the server software that comprises the Scientific Uplink System for SIRTF. The software architecture is split into three major parts: A front-end Java application deployed to the astronomical community providing the capabilities to visualize and edit proposals and the associated lists of observations. This observer toolkit provides templates to define all parameters necessary to carry out the required observations. A specialized version of this software, based on the same overall architecture, is used internal to the SIRTF Science Center to prepare calibration and engineering observations. A Weblogic (TM) based middleware component brokers the transactions with the servers, astronomical image and catalog sources as well as the SIRTF operational databases. Several server systems perform the necessary computations, to obtain resource estimates, target visibilities and to access the instrument models for signal to noise calculations. The same server software is used internally at a later stage to derive the detailed command sequences needed by the SIRTF instruments and spacecraft to execute a given observation.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  11. European Society of Clinical Pharmacy (ESCP) glossary of scientific terms: a tool for standardizing scientific jargon.

    PubMed

    Carollo, Anna; Rieutord, André; Launay-Vacher, Vincent

    2012-04-01

    This glossary is a tool for clinicians who have to confront topics in which medical, scientific and technical jargon is closely linked. It provides definitions for the key concepts and terms of pharmaceutical care, clinical pharmacy, and research in the health care system in clinical settings. It includes items that are not particularly technical, but that should be part of the know-how of staff working in medical and scientific fields. In fact, the glossary can also help clinical technicians who want to understand the precise definition of scientific terms, which often do not coincide with the ones used in the practice setting. PRINCIPAL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this glossary is to aid in the development of more standardized and established terminology for clinical pharmacy, facilitate communication among different stakeholders and, ultimately, contribute to a higher-quality health care system. The glossary contains 165 definitions of concepts and principles in clinical pharmacy, and terms widely used in this field. The criteria for the inclusion of terms were specific applications in health promotion, or terms used in other fields that have a specific meaning or application when used in reference to clinical activity. The glossary arose from the need to standardize terminology in the scientific field. It was not intended as a comprehensive listing that would include all medical terms, but as a useful tool for clinical pharmacists working in this area, and for users who occasionally encounter unusual, often hard to understand, terminology.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor - A National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford J. Stanley

    2008-05-01

    The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected nuclear research reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The unique serpentine configuration of the fuel elements creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) and nine flux traps. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 additional irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. There are also 34 low-flux irradiation positions in the irradiation tanks outside the core reflector tank. The ATR is designed to provide a test environment for the evaluation of the effects of intense radiation (neutron and gamma). Due to the unique serpentine core design each of the five lobes can be operated at different powers and controlled independently. Options exist for the individual test trains and assemblies to be either cooled by the ATR coolant (i.e., exposed to ATR coolant flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and neutron flux) or to be installed in their own independent test loops where such parameters as temperature, pressure, flow rate, neutron flux, and energy can be controlled per experimenter specifications. The full-power maximum thermal neutron flux is ~1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec with a maximum fast flux of ~5.0 x1014 n/cm2-sec. The Advanced Test Reactor, now a National Scientific User Facility, is a versatile tool in which a variety of nuclear reactor, nuclear physics, reactor fuel, and structural material irradiation experiments can be conducted. The cumulative effects of years of irradiation in a normal power reactor can be duplicated in a few weeks or months in the ATR due to its unique design, power density, and operating flexibility.

  13. Deploying user-developed scientific analyses on federated data archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, V.; Ansari, S.; Radhakrishnan, A.

    2011-12-01

    V. Balaji (balaji@princeton.edu: corresponding author) Sameer Ansari, Georgia Institute of Technology Aparna Radhakrishnan, High Performance Technologies, Inc. The scale of the climate modeling enterprise has grown to the point where computing, storage, and analytic resources are all globally distributed. The CMIP5 project is an example of such a global undertaking. This scientific project was designed by a team spanning 20 or more modeling centers across the planet: many of the largest supercomputers in the world were given over for many months to the running of the experiments; the data is now stored in a distributed archive of nodes governed by the Earth System Grid Federation, with a core measuring more than 1 PB, and the total of about 20 PB. There is an explosion of interest in climate analytics since the archives were made available. Scientists who could not dream of building or running these models can now analyze them. New ways of diagnosing and analyzing the results of Earth System models emerge continually from an increasingly diverse set of sources, and there is often immediate interest from other researchers in replicating the analysis using other datasets or experiments. We address here one of the key questions regarding the future of such analytics on federated archives. Here is an innovative analysis script developed by a user, who has developed it using local analysis resources and some small subset of data downloaded from the CMIP5 federated archive. Her analysis is widely cited, and there is interest worldwide in replicating her study on other datasets from the archive. How is this to be achieved? We demonstrate here a mechanism for deploying such user-developed analysis on the ESGF federated archive. There are several elements in this solution: - a common layer for locating resources across the federation: in the case of ESGF this is based on underlying technologies (THREDDS, OPeNDAP) providing URL mechanisms for addressing datasets; - shared

  14. Third European Influenza Summit: organized by the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI).

    PubMed

    McElhaney, Janet; Osterhaus, Ab

    2013-12-16

    On 2 May 2013, the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI) held its third influenza summit at the Institute of European Studies at the Free University of Brussels. ESWI brought together more than 90 representatives of organizations of healthcare providers, senior citizens, at-risk patients and public health authorities for a day of tailored lectures, Q&A sessions and networking. Since recent studies, surveys and reviews have shed new light on some of the most intriguing influenza issues, the Summit faculty translated the newest scientific data into practice. The first part of the Summit programme focused on the current flu status in Europe, paying special attention to the protection of pregnant women and the elderly as well as to the issues of vaccine safety and effectiveness. The programme continued to highlight future challenges and evolutions like novel antiviral drugs against influenza, improved flu vaccines and the prospect of a universal flu vaccine. The annual ESWI flu summits are the pinnacles of ESWI's efforts to bridge the gap between science and society. ESWI's members are convinced that the fight against influenza can only be won when all parties are well informed and ready to work together.

  15. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

    2010-11-01

    This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

  16. User Facilities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences: A National Resource for Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well beyond the scope of any non-government institution and open up otherwise inaccessible facets of Nature to scientific inquiry. For approved, peer-reviewed projects, instrument time is available without charge to researchers who intend to publish their results in the open literature. These large-scale user facilities have made significant contributions to various scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, geology, materials science, environmental science, biology, and biomedical science. Over 16,000 scientists and engineers.pdf file (27KB) conduct experiments at BES user facilities annually. Thousands of other researchers collaborate with these users and analyze the data measured at the facilities to publish new scientific findings in peer-reviewed journals.

  17. Three-dimensional user interfaces for scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Andries

    1995-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to develop novel and productive user interface techniques for creating and managing visualizations of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) datasets. We have implemented an application framework in which we can visualize computational fluid dynamics user interfaces. This UI technology allows users to interactively place visualization probes in a dataset and modify some of their parameters. We have also implemented a time-critical scheduling system which strives to maintain a constant frame-rate regardless of the number of visualization techniques. In the past year, we have published parts of this research at two conferences, the research annotation system at Visualization 1994, and the 3D user interface at UIST 1994. The real-time scheduling system has been submitted to SIGGRAPH 1995 conference. Copies of these documents are included with this report.

  18. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Robertson; James Lane; Doug Copsey

    2015-09-01

    This is the 2015 Annual Report for the Nuclear Science User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

  19. Scientific user requirements for a herbarium data portal

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Jorick; den Bosch, Frederik Van; Bogaerts, Ann; Cocquyt, Christine; Degreef, Jérôme; Diagre, Denis; de Haan, Myriam; Smedt, Sofie De; Henry Engledow; Ertz, Damien; Fabri, Régine; Godefroid, Sandrine; Nicole Hanquart; Mergen, Patricia; Ronse, Anne; Sosef, Marc; Stévart, Tariq; Stoffelen, Piet; Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Groom, Quentin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The digitization of herbaria and their online access will greatly facilitate access to plant collections around the world. This will improve the efficiency of taxonomy and help reduce inequalities between scientists. The Botanic Garden Meise, Belgium, is currently digitizing 1.2 million specimens including label data. In this paper we describe the user requirements analysis conducted for a new herbarium web portal. The aim was to identify the required functionality, but also to assist in the prioritization of software development and data acquisition. The Garden conducted the analysis in cooperation with Clockwork, the digital engagement agency of Ordina. Using a series of interactive interviews, potential users were consulted from universities, research institutions, science-policy initiatives and the Botanic Garden Meise. Although digital herbarium data have many potential stakeholders, we focused on the needs of taxonomists, ecologists and historians, who are currently the primary users of the Meise herbarium data portal. The three categories of user have similar needs, all wanted as much specimen data as possible, and for those data, to be interlinked with other digital resources within and outside the Garden. Many users wanted an interactive system that they could comment on, or correct online, particularly if such corrections and annotations could be used to rank the reliability of data. Many requirements depend on the quality of the digitized data associated with each specimen. The essential data fields are the taxonomic name; geographic location; country; collection date; collector name and collection number. Also all researchers valued linkage between biodiversity literature and specimens. Nevertheless, to verify digitized data the researchers still want access to high quality images, even if fully transcribed label information is provided. The only major point of disagreement is the level of access users should have and what they should be

  20. Scientific Method and the Regulation of Health and Nutritional Claims by the European Food Safety Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoad, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The protection of European consumers from the false or misleading scientific and nutritional claims of food manufacturers took a step forward with the recent opinions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). As a risk assessment agency, the EFSA recently assessed and rejected a vast number of food claim forcing the withdrawal of many claims…

  1. Scientific Method and the Regulation of Health and Nutritional Claims by the European Food Safety Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoad, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The protection of European consumers from the false or misleading scientific and nutritional claims of food manufacturers took a step forward with the recent opinions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). As a risk assessment agency, the EFSA recently assessed and rejected a vast number of food claim forcing the withdrawal of many claims…

  2. Remote access and operation of telescopes by the scientific users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Amy, S.; Brodrick, D.; Carretti, E.; Hoyle, S.; Indermuehle, B.; McConnell, D.; Mader, S.; Mirtschin, P.; Preisig, B.; Smith, M.; Stevens, J.; Wark, R.; Wieringa, M.; Wu, X.

    2014-08-01

    The Australia Telescope National Facility operates three radio telescopes: the Parkes 64m Telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Mopra 22m Telescope. Scientific operation of all these is conducted by members of the investigating teams rather than by professional operators. All three can now be accessed and controlled from any location served by the internet, the telescopes themselves being unattended for part or all of the time. Here we describe the rationale, advantages, and means of implementing this operational model.

  3. NASA Scientific Data Purchase Project: From Collection to User

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lamar; Policelli, Fritz; Fletcher, Rose

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) project is currently a $70 million operation managed by the Earth Science Applications Directorate at Stennis Space Center. The SDP project was developed in 1997 to purchase scientific data from commercial sources for distribution to NASA Earth science researchers. Our current data holdings include 8TB of remote sensing imagery consisting of 18 products from 4 companies. Our anticipated data volume is 60 TB by 2004, and we will be receiving new data products from several additional companies. Our current system capacity is 24 TB, expandable to 89 TB. Operations include tasking of new data collections, archive ordering, shipment verification, data validation, distribution, metrics, finances, customer feedback, and technical support. The program has been included in the Stennis Space Center Commercial Remote Sensing ISO 9001 registration since its inception. Our operational system includes automatic quality control checks on data received (with MatLab analysis); internally developed, custom Web-based interfaces that tie into commercial-off-the-shelf software; and an integrated relational database that links and tracks all data through operations. We've distributed nearly 1500 datasets, and almost 18,000 data files have been downloaded from our public web site; on a 10-point scale, our customer satisfaction index is 8.32 at a 23% response level. More information about the SDP is available on our Web site.

  4. NASA Scientific Data Purchase Project: From Collection to User

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lamar; Policelli, Fritz; Fletcher, Rose

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) project is currently a $70 million operation managed by the Earth Science Applications Directorate at Stennis Space Center. The SDP project was developed in 1997 to purchase scientific data from commercial sources for distribution to NASA Earth science researchers. Our current data holdings include 8TB of remote sensing imagery consisting of 18 products from 4 companies. Our anticipated data volume is 60 TB by 2004, and we will be receiving new data products from several additional companies. Our current system capacity is 24 TB, expandable to 89 TB. Operations include tasking of new data collections, archive ordering, shipment verification, data validation, distribution, metrics, finances, customer feedback, and technical support. The program has been included in the Stennis Space Center Commercial Remote Sensing ISO 9001 registration since its inception. Our operational system includes automatic quality control checks on data received (with MatLab analysis); internally developed, custom Web-based interfaces that tie into commercial-off-the-shelf software; and an integrated relational database that links and tracks all data through operations. We've distributed nearly 1500 datasets, and almost 18,000 data files have been downloaded from our public web site; on a 10-point scale, our customer satisfaction index is 8.32 at a 23% response level. More information about the SDP is available on our Web site.

  5. Lessons from Introducing New Scientific Disciplines Into European Space Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.

    Physics experiments in space will permit us to investigate natural phenomena that cannot be observed on the ground, such as low-frequency gravitational waves, and to reach uncharted realms of accuracy — accessible only through experiments carried out in space — where current foundations of physics can be further tested and potentially falsified. Such projects require technologies that have not been in hand for a long time but are available now. To avoid conflict of interest, the merit of space projects in physics, from the proposal stage through development, ought to be judged by experts in physics, rather than by space scientists from other fields. It is time now to set aside some funding to let missions in fundamental physics compete fairly with the established space sciences, thereby enriching and deepening the space enterprise — and broadening its advocacy base. We look, in the context of the European space scene, at the measures and events that resurrected the initially suppressed planetary sciences and brought solar physics to blooming after a long drought; and derive ideas on how to increase the number of flight opportunities for fundamental physics in space.

  6. The transnational circulation of scientific ideas: importing behavioralism in European political science (1950-1970).

    PubMed

    Boncourt, Thibaud

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to deepen our understanding of the transatlantic circulation of scientific ideas during the Cold War by looking at the importation of behavioralism in European political science. It analyses the social, institutional, and intellectual dynamics that led to the creation, in 1970, of a transnational organization that aimed to promote behavioralism in Europe: the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR). Using qualitative material drawn from archives and interviews, the study shows that the creation of the ECPR was the joint product of academic, scientific, and political rivalries. It argues that the founding of the organization served a purpose for several agents (chiefly, academic entrepreneurs and philanthropic foundations) who pursued different strategies in different social fields in the context of the Cold War. More broadly, it suggests that the postwar development of the social sciences and the circulation of scientific ideas are best accounted for by mapping sociological interactions between scientific fields and neighboring social spheres.

  7. Education and Training of Users of Scientific and Technical Information: UNISIST Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, A. J.; And Others

    This guide is addressed to teachers who develop information retrieval skills in users of scientific and technical information--undergraduate and graduate students, scientists, and technologists. It is intended to have particular application in developing countries. The teacher is likely to need expertise in library and information science,…

  8. Education and Training of Users of Scientific and Technical Information: UNISIST Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, A. J.; And Others

    This guide is addressed to teachers who develop information retrieval skills in users of scientific and technical information--undergraduate and graduate students, scientists, and technologists. It is intended to have particular application in developing countries. The teacher is likely to need expertise in library and information science,…

  9. Spud and FLML: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Maddison, J. R.; Gorman, G. J.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. We present a model-independent system, Spud[1], which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automatically generated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module which minimises the development cost of adding model options. We further present FLML, the Fluidity Markup Language. FLML applies Spud to the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM) resulting in a graphically driven system which radically improves the usability of ICOM. As well as a step forward for ICOM, FLML illustrates how the Spud system can be applied to an existing complex ocean model highlighting the potential of Spud as a user interface for other codes in the ocean modelling community. [1] Ham, D. A. et.al, Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 1, 125-146, 2008.

  10. Implementing the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive: Scientific challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Alice; Borja, Angel; Solidoro, Cosimo; Grégoire, Marilaure

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD; EC, 2008) is an ambitious European policy instrument that aims to achieve Good Environmental Status (GES) in the 5,720,000 km2 of European seas by 2020, using an Ecosystem Approach. GES is to be assessed using 11 descriptors and up to 56 indicators (European Commission, 2010), and the goal is for clean, healthy and productive seas that are the basis for marine-based development, known as Blue-Growth. The MSFD is one of many policy instruments, such as the Water Framework Directive, the Common Fisheries Policy and the Habitats Directive that, together, should result in "Healthy Oceans and Productive Ecosystems - HOPE". Researchers working together with stakeholders such as the Member States environmental agencies, the European Environmental Agency, and the Regional Sea Conventions, are to provide the scientific knowledge basis for the implementation of the MSFD. This represents both a fascinating challenge and a stimulating opportunity.

  11. Current Efforts in European Projects to Facilitate the Sharing of Scientific Observation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredel, Henning; Rieke, Matthes; Maso, Joan; Jirka, Simon; Stasch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is intended to provide an overview of currently ongoing efforts in European projects to facilitate and promote the interoperable sharing of scientific observation data. This will be illustrated through two examples: a prototypical portal developed in the ConnectinGEO project for matching available (in-situ) data sources to the needs of users and a joint activity of several research projects to harmonise the usage of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement standards for providing access to marine observation data. ENEON is an activity initiated by the European ConnectinGEO project to coordinate in-situ Earth observation networks with the aim to harmonise the access to observations, improve discoverability, and identify/close gaps in European earth observation data resources. In this context, ENEON commons has been developed as a supporting Web portal for facilitating discovery, access, re-use and creation of knowledge about observations, networks, and related activities (e.g. projects). The portal is based on developments resulting from the European WaterInnEU project and has been extended to cover the requirements for handling knowledge about in-situ earth observation networks. A first prototype of the portal was completed in January 2017 which offers functionality for interactive discussion, information exchange and querying information about data delivered by different observation networks. Within this presentation, we will introduce the presented prototype and initiate a discussion about potential future work directions. The second example concerns the harmonisation of data exchange in the marine domain. There are many organisation who operate ocean observatories or data archives. In recent years, the application of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) technology has become more and more popular to increase the interoperability between marine observation networks. However, as the SWE standards were intentionally designed in a domain independent manner

  12. [Scientific advice by the national and European approval authorities concerning advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Jost, Nils; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Ziegele, Bettina; Reinhardt, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The aim of scientific advice is to support pharmaceutical developers in regulatory and scientific questions, thus facilitating the development of safe and efficacious new medicinal products. Recent years have shown that the development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in particular needs a high degree of regulatory support. On one hand, this is related to the complexity and heterogeneity of this group of medicinal products and on the other hand due to the fact that mainly academic research institutions and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are developing ATMPs. These often have limited regulatory experience and resources. In 2009 the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) initiated the Innovation Office as a contact point for applicants developing ATMPs. The mandate of the Innovation Office is to provide support on regulatory questions and to coordinate national scientific advice meetings concerning ATMPs for every phase in drug development and especially with view to the preparation of clinical trial applications. On the European level, the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) offers scientific advice. This article describes the concepts of national and EMA scientific advice concerning ATMPs and summarizes the experience of the last six years.

  13. The development of a prototype intelligent user interface subsystem for NASA's scientific database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry H.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has initiated an Intelligent Data Management (IDM) research effort which has as one of its components the development of an Intelligent User Interface (IUI).The intent of the latter is to develop a friendly and intelligent user interface service that is based on expert systems and natural language processing technologies. The purpose is to support the large number of potential scientific and engineering users presently having need of space and land related research and technical data but who have little or no experience in query languages or understanding of the information content or architecture of the databases involved. This technical memorandum presents prototype Intelligent User Interface Subsystem (IUIS) using the Crustal Dynamics Project Database as a test bed for the implementation of the CRUDDES (Crustal Dynamics Expert System). The knowledge base has more than 200 rules and represents a single application view and the architectural view. Operational performance using CRUDDES has allowed nondatabase users to obtain useful information from the database previously accessible only to an expert database user or the database designer.

  14. [Scientific Research Policy for Health in Portugal: I - European and National Environment].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Cátia Sá; Hartz, Zulmira; Sambo, Luís; Conceição, Cláudia; Dussault, Gilles; Russo, Giuliano; Viveiros, Miguel; Silveira, Henrique; Pita Barros, Pedro; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2017-02-27

    The global debate on scientific research policy for human health has been led by World Health Organisation with important contributions from other stakeholders such as Council on Health Research for Development, the World Bank and the Global Forum for Health Research. Recently it has been dominated by the thematic agendas of major global financiers. There is a growing interest worldwide in making better use of the evidence resulting from scientific research in health, in the decision-making process regarding health policies, which is fraught with difficulties, as it is the case in Europe. After more than 40 years of democracy and 30 years of European integration, Portugal has bridged the research gap it had previously. However, when compared to global and European research policies, Portugal still has a long way to go regarding investment in research and development.

  15. Medical informatics across Europe: analysis of medical informatics scientific output in 33 European countries.

    PubMed

    Polašek, Ozren; Kern, Josipa

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the medical informatics scientific output in 33 European countries. Medical Subject Heading term "medical informatics" was used to identify all relevant articles published in 1998-2007 and indexed in the Medline database. The number of articles was adjusted to the population size of each included country in order to obtain the rates per million inhabitants. A total of 28,604 articles were identified. The highest number per million inhabitants was found for Switzerland and the lowest for Albania. Overall, European Union member states had higher output than non-member states, gross domestic product was strongly associated with the scientific output in the field of medical informatics (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). While most countries had significant increase in the scientific output during the observed period, an adjustment to the European average output trend suggested that Lithuania, Portugal, Serbia and Spain had a greater increase than the rest of Europe. The results suggest large disparities across Europe. Further development of medical informatics as a profession and a clear recognition of the discipline are needed to reduce these disparities and propel further increase in research productivity.

  16. [Internationalism and science. Social and scientific bases of the European information science movement].

    PubMed

    Olague de Ros, G; Menendez Navarro, A; Medina Domenech, R M; Astrain Gallart, M

    1997-01-01

    As part of a continuing line of research on scientific documentation we propose in this article a novel approach to the study of the European information science movement at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. We suggest that this movement took place within the context of increasing internationalism of scientific endeavours, a process which was paralleled by the standardization of units, weight and measures for the different sciences. We investigate problems arising from scientific communication in connection with other aspects apparently unrelated to Information Science. Specifically, we refer to conflicts between nationalism and colonialism; concordance and discord between science policy and the corporate interests of nonscientific associations; higher educational policy; the professionalization of sciences; and the economic interests at stake as a consequence of the use of different information models.

  17. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  18. Patient representatives' contributions to the benefit-risk assessment tasks of the European Medicines Agency scientific committees.

    PubMed

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D L C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; van Delden, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    In the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the involvement of patients has been increasingly recognized as valuable and necessary. Specifically in scientific committees, patients through patient representatives are actively involved in deliberations and decision making processes. These scientific committees are meant to ensure that licensed medicines have a positive benefit-risk ratio in favour of the patients and users. To investigate what the contributions are of patient representatives in benefit-risk assessment, we interviewed 15 scientific committee members, 10 of whom are/were EU-state regulatory representatives and five are/were patient representatives. We asked the participants questions related to the benefit-risk assessment tasks of their committees, the connection between patient representatives and the patient perspective, and the contribution of patient representatives in the various benefit-risk assessments tasks. We found that the contribution of patient representatives benefit-risk assessment may be a variable of the benefits and the risks involved in the drug such that the necessity of their contribution is strongly felt when both benefits and risks are high, when benefits are almost equal or are equal to risks and when both benefits and risks are low. In terms of the various benefit-risk tasks, patient representatives contribute to benefit-risk analysis by providing criteria that help define the benefit-risk picture. In benefit-risk evaluation, patient representatives aid in providing a specific basis for the values and weights given to specific benefits and risks and in decision making, they provide what may be a crucial patient perspective in terms of the acceptability of risks. Hence, patient representatives provide a specific expertise in these scientific committees. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Interfacing Microcomputers: A Brief Guide for the Scientific User of S-100, TRS-80, PET, and Apple Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razlaff, Kanneth L.

    1981-01-01

    Presents information on interfacing microcomputers for scientific users of S-100, TRS-80, PET, and Apple microcomputers, including device-select pulses, programing considerations, data input, data output, and power supplies. (JN)

  20. User input and program assessment - An evaluation of the NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cross, E. M.; Hinnebusch, P. A.; Glassman, M.

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the scientific and technical information (STI) program of the Langley Research Center has been conducted, including surveys of both internal and external patrons. Questions included the perceived prestige of the Center's publications, the adequacy of Langley technical reports, and the use of selected NASA STI products and services. The internal and external profiles proved to be very similar, and the results indicated that the Langley STI program is meeting the information needs of both populations. A number of areas for increasing user satisfaction were identified.

  1. User input and program assessment - An evaluation of the NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cross, E. M.; Hinnebusch, P. A.; Glassman, M.

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the scientific and technical information (STI) program of the Langley Research Center has been conducted, including surveys of both internal and external patrons. Questions included the perceived prestige of the Center's publications, the adequacy of Langley technical reports, and the use of selected NASA STI products and services. The internal and external profiles proved to be very similar, and the results indicated that the Langley STI program is meeting the information needs of both populations. A number of areas for increasing user satisfaction were identified.

  2. European Bioanalysis Forum recommendation: scientific validation of quantification by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Higton, David; Young, Graeme; Timmerman, Philip; Abbott, Richard; Knutsson, Magnus; Svensson, Leif D

    2012-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is being used more widely to provide PK data for early decision making or to generate absolute bioavailability data in later phases of development. Presently, there is no clear consensus on the level of the scientific validation required for these assays. The European Bioanalysis Forum (EBF) has conducted two surveys with its members and presented the results at its 4th Open Symposium. With AMS being used for discrete scientific assessment, method establishment of AMS assays should focus on science rather than trying to fit the assay parameters into validation criteria used for Regulated Bioanalysis guidance, and an amount of freedom of execution and interpretation is needed. Hence, the EBF focuses their recommendation on introducing terminology around scientific qualification or validation to be used in relation to AMS. Guidance is given on which parameters should be investigated when a qualified method is required. The recommendations of the EBF for scientific validation are described herein. The scientific validation of AMS assays will be different to that applied for LC-MS/MS assays, and an example is that accuracy and precision limits, as used for ligand-binding assays, would be more appropriate.

  3. European Union research in support of environment and health: Building scientific evidence base for policy.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Hoeveler, Arnd; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2017-06-01

    Opinion polls show that the European Union citizens are increasingly concerned about the impact of environmental factors on their health. In order to respond and provide solid scientific evidence for the numerous policies related to the protection of human health and the environment managed at the Union level, the European Union made a substantial investment in research and innovation in the past two decades through its Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development, including the current programme, Horizon 2020, which started in 2014. This policy review paper analysed the portfolio of forty collaborative projects relevant to environment and health, which received a total amount of around 228 million euros from the EU. It gives details on their contents and general scientific trends observed, the profiles of the participating countries and institutions, and the potential policy implications of the results obtained. The increasing knowledge base is needed to make informed policy decisions in Europe and beyond, and should be useful to many stakeholders including the scientific community and regulatory authorities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A decade of spore-forming bacterial infections among European injecting drug users: pronounced regional variation.

    PubMed

    Hope, Vivian D; Palmateer, Norah; Wiessing, Lucas; Marongiu, Andrea; White, Joanne; Ncube, Fortune; Goldberg, David

    2012-01-01

    The recent anthrax outbreak among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Europe has highlighted an ongoing problem with severe illness resulting from spore-forming bacteria in IDUs. We collated the numbers of cases of 4 bacterial illnesses (botulism, tetanus, Clostridium novyi, and anthrax) in European IDUs for 2000 to 2009 and calculated population rates. Six countries reported 367 cases; rates varied from 0.03 to 7.54 per million people. Most cases (92%) were reported from 3 neighboring countries: Ireland, Norway, and the United Kingdom. This geographic variation needs investigation.

  5. User choice in European health systems: towards a systematic framework for analysis.

    PubMed

    Kreisz, Florian P; Gericke, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a systematic framework for analysis of the increasingly popular concept of user choice in European health systems. The development of such a framework is exemplified using one category of potential choice: the choice of health service provider. In the first part, the paper summarises the conceptual background of the user choice debate. Subsequently, the paper theoretically analyses the concept of user choice alongside a stringent set of standard dimensions embracing technical, administrative and allocative efficiency, as well as equity in access and finance. Reference to available evidence is made where applicable. The employed dimensions are critically discussed and finally mapped against the identified determinants within a systematic matrix framework for analysis. Furthermore, the paper underlines that user choice is by no means a panacea but rather a highly complex and ambiguous political strategy. Extended choice in some sectors and levels of health systems may lead to inefficiencies and may therefore lead to loss of benefits, including choice, for individuals and society.

  6. Scientific user facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: New research capabilities and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberto, James

    2011-10-01

    Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has transformed its research infrastructure, particularly in the areas of neutron scattering, nanoscale science and technology, and high-performance computing. New facilities, including the Spallation Neutron Source, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, and Leadership Computing Facility, have been constructed that provide world-leading capabilities in neutron science, condensed matter and materials physics, and computational physics. In addition, many existing physics-related facilities have been upgraded with new capabilities, including new instruments and a high- intensity cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor. These facilities are operated for the scientific community and are available to qualified users based on competitive peer-reviewed proposals. User facilities at ORNL currently welcome more than 2,500 researchers each year, mostly from universities. These facilities, many of which are unique in the world, will be reviewed including current and planned research capabilities, availability and operational performance, access procedures, and recent research results. Particular attention will be given to new neutron scattering capabilities, nanoscale science, and petascale simulation and modeling. In addition, user facilities provide a portal into ORNL that can enhance the development of research collaborations. The spectrum of partnership opportunities with ORNL will be described including collaborations, joint faculty, and graduate research and education.

  7. Adaptive clinical trial designs for European marketing authorization: a survey of scientific advice letters from the European Medicines Agency.

    PubMed

    Elsäßer, Amelie; Regnstrom, Jan; Vetter, Thorsten; Koenig, Franz; Hemmings, Robert James; Greco, Martina; Papaluca-Amati, Marisa; Posch, Martin

    2014-10-02

    Since the first methodological publications on adaptive study design approaches in the 1990s, the application of these approaches in drug development has raised increasing interest among academia, industry and regulators. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) as well as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have published guidance documents addressing the potentials and limitations of adaptive designs in the regulatory context. Since there is limited experience in the implementation and interpretation of adaptive clinical trials, early interaction with regulators is recommended. The EMA offers such interactions through scientific advice and protocol assistance procedures. We performed a text search of scientific advice letters issued between 1 January 2007 and 8 May 2012 that contained relevant key terms. Letters containing questions related to adaptive clinical trials in phases II or III were selected for further analysis. From the selected letters, important characteristics of the proposed design and its context in the drug development program, as well as the responses of the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP)/Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP), were extracted and categorized. For 41 more recent procedures (1 January 2009 to 8 May 2012), additional details of the trial design and the CHMP/SAWP responses were assessed. In addition, case studies are presented as examples. Over a range of 5½ years, 59 scientific advices were identified that address adaptive study designs in phase II and phase III clinical trials. Almost all were proposed as confirmatory phase III or phase II/III studies. The most frequently proposed adaptation was sample size reassessment, followed by dropping of treatment arms and population enrichment. While 12 (20%) of the 59 proposals for an adaptive clinical trial were not accepted, the great majority of proposals were accepted (15, 25%) or conditionally accepted (32, 54%). In the more recent 41 procedures, the most frequent

  8. European Extremely Large Telescope: some history, and the scientific community's preferences for wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    Extremely expensive new telescopes involve a compromise between the extreme ambitions of the scientific community, whose support justifies the financial costs, and the need to have a telescope design which can actually be built today at appropriate cost. In this article I provide a brief history of the process which built community support in Europe for what has become the European Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT). I then review remaining tensions between the community science case and day-one technical performance. While the range of very strong scientific cases which support the E-ELT project will largely be delivered, and lead to a quite outstanding scientific return, there are - as always! - demands for even more impressive performance. In addition to what the E-ELT will deliver, much of the community wants high spatial resolution at wavelengths shorter than one micron. Affordable adaptive optics systems will work best, initially at somewhat longer wavelengths. Planned performance enhancement during its operational life is very desirable in the E-ELT.

  9. Staff regard towards working with substance users: a European multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Gail; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Slezakova, Silvia; Okruhlica, Lubomir; Torrens, Marta; Vajd, Rajko; Baldacchino, Alex

    2011-06-01

    To compare regard for working with different patient groups (including substance users) among different professional groups in different health-care settings in eight European countries. A multi-centre, cross-sectional comparative study. Primary care, general psychiatry and specialist addiction services in Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Poland, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. A multi-disciplinary convenience sample of 866 professionals (physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses and social workers) from 253 services. The Medical Condition Regard Scale measured regard for working with different patient groups. Multi-factor between-subjects analysis of variance determined the factors associated with regard for each condition by country and all countries. Regard for working with alcohol (mean score alcohol: 45.35, 95% CI 44.76, 45.95) and drug users (mean score drugs: 43.67, 95% CI 42.98, 44.36) was consistently lower than for other patient groups (mean score diabetes: 50.19, 95% CI 49.71, 50.66; mean score depression: 51.34, 95% CI 50.89, 51.79) across all countries participating in the study, particularly among staff from primary care compared to general psychiatry or specialist addiction services (P<0.001). After controlling for sex of staff, profession and duration of time working in profession, treatment entry point and country remained the only statistically significant variables associated with regard for working with alcohol and drug users. Health professionals appear to ascribe lower status to working with substance users than helping other patient groups, particularly in primary care; the effect is larger in some countries than others. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. The French initiative for scientific cores virtual curating : a user-oriented integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignol, Cécile; Godinho, Elodie; Galabertier, Bruno; Caillo, Arnaud; Bernardet, Karim; Augustin, Laurent; Crouzet, Christian; Billy, Isabelle; Teste, Gregory; Moreno, Eva; Tosello, Vanessa; Crosta, Xavier; Chappellaz, Jérome; Calzas, Michel; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Arnaud, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Managing scientific data is probably one the most challenging issue in modern science. The question is made even more sensitive with the need of preserving and managing high value fragile geological sam-ples: cores. Large international scientific programs, such as IODP or ICDP are leading an intense effort to solve this problem and propose detailed high standard work- and dataflows thorough core handling and curating. However most results derived from rather small-scale research programs in which data and sample management is generally managed only locally - when it is … The national excellence equipment program (Equipex) CLIMCOR aims at developing French facilities for coring and drilling investigations. It concerns indiscriminately ice, marine and continental samples. As part of this initiative, we initiated a reflexion about core curating and associated coring-data management. The aim of the project is to conserve all metadata from fieldwork in an integrated cyber-environment which will evolve toward laboratory-acquired data storage in a near future. In that aim, our demarche was conducted through an close relationship with field operators as well laboratory core curators in order to propose user-oriented solutions. The national core curating initiative currently proposes a single web portal in which all scientifics teams can store their field data. For legacy samples, this will requires the establishment of a dedicated core lists with associated metadata. For forthcoming samples, we propose a mobile application, under Android environment to capture technical and scientific metadata on the field. This application is linked with a unique coring tools library and is adapted to most coring devices (gravity, drilling, percussion, etc...) including multiple sections and holes coring operations. Those field data can be uploaded automatically to the national portal, but also referenced through international standards or persistent identifiers (IGSN, ORCID and INSPIRE

  11. The contribution of the European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazzi, Carmelo; Fullen, Michael A.; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Theocharopoulos, Sid; Rickson, Jane; Kasparinskis, Raimonds; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Peres, Guenola; Sholten, Thomas; Kertész, Adam; Vasenev, Ivan; Dumitru, Mihail; Cornelis, Wim; Rubio, José L.

    2017-04-01

    Soil is an integral component of the global environmental system that supports the quality and diversity of terrestrial life on Earth. Therefore, it is vital to consider the processes and impacts of soil degradation on society, especially on the provision of environmental goods and services, including food security and climate change mitigation and adaptation. Scientific societies devoted to Soil Science play significant roles in promoting soil security by advancing scientific knowledge, education and environmental sustainability. The European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) was founded in Ghent (Belgium) on 4 November 1988 by a group of 23 researchers from several European countries. It is an interdisciplinary, non-political association with over 500 members in 56 countries. The ESSC produces and distributes a hardcopy Newsletter twice a year and maintains both a website and Facebook page: http://www.soilconservation.eu/ https://www.facebook.com/European-Society-for-Soil-Conservation-ESSC-100528363448094/ The ESSC aims to: • Support research on soil degradation, soil protection and soil and water conservation. • Provide a network for the exchange of knowledge about soil degradation processes and soil conservation research and practises. • Produce publications on major issues relating to soil degradation and soil and water conservation. • Advise regulators and policy-makers on soil issues, especially soil degradation, protection and conservation. The ESSC held its First International Congress in Silsoe (UK) in 1992. Further International Congresses were held in Munich (1996), Valencia (2000), Budapest (2004), Palermo (2007), Thessaloniki (2011) and Moscow (2015). The Eighth International Congress will be held in Lleida (Spain) in June 2017: http://www.consowalleida2017.com/ Interspersed between these international congresses, the ESSC organizes annual international conferences on specific topics. These include Imola, Italy (Biogeochemical Processes at

  12. United European Gastroenterology Week scientific abstracts and their progression to full publication.

    PubMed

    Raju, Suneil A; Sanders, David S; Akram, Rahim; Glover, Rebecca; Al-Rifaie, Ammar; Peever, Elise; Purves, Josh; Scanu, Emily; Kurien, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    Abstracts presentations at scientific meetings enable rapid dissemination of novel research. The percentage of abstracts that proceed to full publication from differing medical specialties is highly variable. This study aims to evaluate the outcomes of abstracts presented at the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). All abstracts presented at UEGW between 2009 and 2011 were assessed. Cross-referencing of the first author, senior author and at least one keyword of the abstract was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases. Abstracts and possible resultant full publications were then examined in tandem to ensure that they represented the same study. Data were also collected on lag time to publication, journal impact factors, country of the author and factors influencing subsequent publication. A total of 6785 abstracts (1438 oral and 5347 poster presentations) were presented during the period assessed. Of these, 2099 (30.9%) proceeded to full publication in indexed journals. Oral abstract presentations were most likely to proceed to full publication compared with poster presentations (odds ratio: 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-1.56) and were more likely to achieve publication in higher impact journals (median impact factor 4.78 vs. 2.89, P<0.0005). The median lag time to full publication was 15 (IQR: 7-15) months. The Netherlands had the highest United European Gastroenterology abstract conversion rate to full publication (46.8%). This is the first study to assess the publication rates of UEGW. Findings are favourable with similar studies from other societies.

  13. Scientific collaboration between 'old' and 'new' member states: Did joining the European Union make a difference?

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Teemu; Mitze, Timo

    This paper provides new insights on the effects of the enlargement of the European Union (EU) and European integration by investigating the issue of scientific collaboration within the new EU member states vis-à-vis the old EU member states. The question addressed is whether the EU membership following the two enlargement waves 2004 and 2007 has significantly increased the co-publication intensity of the new member states with other member countries. The empirical results based on data collected from the Web of Science database and Difference-in-Difference estimations point towards a conclusion that joining the EU indeed has had an additional positive impact on the co-publication intensity between the new and old member states and, in particular, within the new member states themselves. These results give tentative support for the successfulness of the EU's science policies in achieving a common 'internal market' in research. We also find evidence for early anticipation effects of the consecutive EU accession.

  14. Future European health care: cost containment, health care reform and scientific progress in drug research.

    PubMed

    Emilien, G

    1997-01-01

    The cost of the development of a new pharmaceutical product from its conception and synthesis through to the regulatory approval process has more than quadrupled in the last 20 years. Both clinical and total development times have increased substantially. To amortize the costs incurred, the pharmaceutical industry has taken an international dimension. The incentives for pharmaceutical firms to discover and develop new drugs depend on the length of the development and regulatory review process plus the potential market size. Recent regulatory, economic and political changes may have significant implications for the future of new drug developments in Europe. The European Union industrial policy felt that there is a need for convergence in the area of pricing. It is recommended that the policy should aim to contain growth in pharmaceutical expenses by means specific to reimbursement rather than direct price controls. By encouraging doctors to prescribe and customers to use generics, competition is enhanced to bring down drug prices. More emphasis is being laid by government in educating customers to cost-awareness and cost-benefit ratios with regard to pharmaceuticals. Concerning clinical trials, European harmonization has been achieved by significant developments: the rights and integrity of the trial subjects are protected; the credibility of the data is established; and the ethical, scientific and technical quality of the trials has improved. Future European health care forecasts a whole change in the pharmaceutical business. Important issues in cost and outcome measurement should be carefully planned and considered in drug development. Due to important mergers and acquisitions, the pharmaceutical sector will consist mainly of important multinational corporations. In this way, valuable new products may be brought to the market.

  15. Effects of the upper atmosphere on terrestrial and space communications: the new cost 271 action of the European scientific community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolesi, B.; Cander, Lj. R.

    During the last decade important results have been obtained by the two COST Actions (Co-operation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research) promoted by the European Union: the PRIME (Prediction and Retrospective Ionospheric Modelling over Europe) and the IITS (Improved Quality of Service in Ionospheric Telecommunication Systems Planning and Operation). The European scientific community involved in the ionospheric physics, radio propagation and space science has then proposed a new 4 years Action on the effects of the upper atmosphere on terrestrial and Earth space communications. The objectives and the most important directions of this recently accepted COST271 project are here shortly outlined.

  16. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Process of reviewing the scientific evidence and revising the recommendations.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Silvia; Armaroli, Paola; Espina, Carolina; Villain, Patricia; Wiseman, Martin; Schüz, Joachim; Segnan, Nereo

    2015-12-01

    The European Code Against Cancer is a set of recommendations to give advice on cancer prevention. Its 4th edition is an update of the 3rd edition, from 2003. Working Groups of independent experts from different fields of cancer prevention were appointed to review the recommendations, supported by a Literature Group to provide scientific and technical support in the assessment of the scientific evidence, through systematic reviews of the literature. Common procedures were developed to guide the experts in identifying, retrieving, assessing, interpreting and summarizing the scientific evidence in order to revise the recommendations. The Code strictly followed the concept of providing advice to European Union citizens based on the current best available science. The advice, if followed, would be expected to reduce cancer risk, referring both to avoiding or reducing exposure to carcinogenic agents or changing behaviour related to cancer risk and to participating in medical interventions able to avert specific cancers or their consequences. The information sources and procedures for the review of the scientific evidence are described here in detail. The 12 recommendations of the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer were ultimately approved by a Scientific Committee of leading European cancer and public health experts. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Renae

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  18. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

    2009-05-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  19. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  1. What Affects Reintegration of Female Drug Users after Prison Release? Results of a European Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurhold, Heike; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Sanclemente, Cristina; Schmied, Gabriele; Shewan, David; Verthein, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this follow-up study is to explore factors influencing the success or failure of women in reintegrating after their release from prison. Female drug users in five European cities were tracked after being released from prison. Out of 234 female prisoners contacted in prisons, 59 were included in the follow-up study. Structured…

  2. What Affects Reintegration of Female Drug Users after Prison Release? Results of a European Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurhold, Heike; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Sanclemente, Cristina; Schmied, Gabriele; Shewan, David; Verthein, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this follow-up study is to explore factors influencing the success or failure of women in reintegrating after their release from prison. Female drug users in five European cities were tracked after being released from prison. Out of 234 female prisoners contacted in prisons, 59 were included in the follow-up study. Structured…

  3. Bibliometric indicators: a snapshot of the scientific productivity of leading European PRM researchers.

    PubMed

    Franchignoni, F; Muñoz Lasa, S; Ozçakar, L; Ottonello, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the validity and practical usefulness of a set of bibliometric indicators with a focus on the scientific production of influential European researchers in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM). We randomly selected 24 European PRM specialists from the list of invited lecturers or chairpersons at the 17th ESPRM Congress in 2010. Using the time window 1996-2010, we recorded the number of papers published, total number of citations, and h-index from Web of Science (WoS) and Publish or Perish (PoP) databases. We also noted the journals in which the papers were published. Ranking the 24 authors into two groups according to higher vs. lower research productivity, we compared the frequency of Editorial Board membership of at least one of the 5 most influential journals in PRM. Median values (WoS, PoP) for papers, citations, and h-index were respectively: (31, 46); (171, 317); and (6.5, 8.5). High correlations were found among different indicators, and also between the same indicators calculated in the two different databases. However, the Bland-Altman plot indicated that the two databases could not be considered interchangeable. Twelve PRM specialists were Editorial Board members: 11 of them were in the first 10 ranking positions for at least one of the 6 indicators analysed. There is need to better understand the characteristics of bibliometric indicators and we retain that the information they provide is insufficiently valid to justify their use as the sole objective criterion for career assessment.

  4. [Scientific role of German ophthalmology in the European telecommunication project OPHTEL].

    PubMed

    Mertz, M; Mann, G; Zahlmann, G; Obermaier, M

    1997-07-01

    In Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain and Italy, the OPHTEL project combines clinical centers of ophthalmology and internal medicine, an institute for medical informatics and health services research, a publishing company and different industrial partners in the EDP market. With the aid of visual telecommunication and rapid data transfer, methods and conditions will be developed and proved so that any physician can very easily obtain sufficient information for treating his patient. Thus, the regional differences in the quality of structured health service (e.g., urban/ rural) will be overcome throughout Europe. SCIENTIFIC TASKS: A multilingual diagnostic and therapeutic thesaurus has to be worked out in order to create standards for communication and quality control. Based on literature, images and image analysis in a knowledge-based data bank, a monitoring system (containing watch-dog functions) and the basic aspects of an ophthalmological patient/disease register will be investigated. (In parallel, a technical development of synchronous and asynchronous telecommunication between eye physicians is taking place in close cooperation with the regional Bavarian project Teleopathalmology in Bavaria on-line). State of the art 6 months after starting the project:the knowledge-based image data bank has been founded and also an ophthalmological 8 language thesaurus and definition standard. All data transfer lines are installed. The project is taking place amid diverging sections of medicine: ophthalmology and internal medicine, health politics and data protection, individual treatment and common interest (health care), product management and office organization. Thus, the scientific quality of the transferred ophthalmological content must undergo sophisticated controls. FUTURE STEPS: Intense cooperation with the big German associations for ophthalmology (DOG, BVA) and the European ophthalmological societies concerning EDP, classification and quality control.

  5. European Union scientific production on alcohol and drug misuse (1976-2000).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carbonell, Xavier; Guardiola, Elena; Bellés, Ana; Beranuy, Marta

    2005-08-01

    Alcohol and drug misuse is a social and health phenomenon of great relevance in the European Union (EU). One indicator of scientific production in a given area is the analysis of publications included in bibliographic databases. Scientific production on alcohol and drug misuse was analysed in EU member countries, and comparisons were made between countries. Analysis of articles on alcohol and drug misuse published during the period 1976-2000 by institutions based in a country of the EU, indexed by PsycINFO. A total of 4825 citations was retrieved. Great Britain published 38.6%, while Sweden, Germany and Spain accounted for a further 30%. The articles dealt with drug and alcohol usage (12.8%), substance abuse (53.5%) and drug and alcohol rehabilitation (34.5%). The articles were published in 13 different languages, more than three-quarters being in English. Spanish was the second language, and was followed by French, German, Dutch and Italian. The articles were published in 521 different journals, and 62 of these published more than 10 articles. The journals publishing most were Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism and Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Sixty-eight per cent of the articles were signed by more than one author, and the index of collaboration, between 1996 and 2000, was 3.24. PsycINFO is useful for making comparisons between countries, because it includes the name and country of the institution. The number of publications in the EU on alcohol and drug misuse increased over the quarter-century analysed. The most used language was English, as it also is for PsycINFO as a whole, and a tendency towards its increased use was observed. Classification of the articles by subject by the Classification Code is too general, and makes it difficult to distinguish between the areas it proposes. Production tends to be concentrated in journals dealing specifically with drug dependence and psychiatry. The index of collaboration is similar to that found in other scientific areas.

  6. Evidence based policy making in the European Union: the role of the scientific community.

    PubMed

    Majcen, Špela

    2017-03-01

    In the times when the acquis of the European Union (EU) has developed so far as to reach a high level of technical complexity, in particular in certain policy fields such as environmental legislation, it is important to look at what kind of information and data policy decisions are based on. This position paper looks at the extent to which evidence-based decision-making process is being considered in the EU institutions when it comes to adopting legislation in the field of environment at the EU level. The paper calls for closer collaboration between scientists and decision-makers in view of ensuring that correct data is understood and taken into consideration when drafting, amending, negotiating and adopting new legal texts at all levels of the EU decision-making process. It concludes that better awareness of the need for such collaboration among the decision-makers as well as the scientific community would benefit the process and quality of the final outcomes (legislation).

  7. The VERCE Science Gateway: enabling user friendly seismic waves simulations across European HPC infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Krause, Amy; Ramos Garcia, Clàudia; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Klampanos, Iraklis A.; Frobert, Laurent; Krischer, Lion; Trani, Luca; David, Mario; Leong, Siew Hoon; Muraleedharan, Visakh

    2014-05-01

    The EU-funded project VERCE (Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community in Europe) aims to deploy technologies which satisfy the HPC and data-intensive requirements of modern seismology. As a result of VERCE's official collaboration with the EU project SCI-BUS, access to computational resources, like local clusters and international infrastructures (EGI and PRACE), is made homogeneous and integrated within a dedicated science gateway based on the gUSE framework. In this presentation we give a detailed overview on the progress achieved with the developments of the VERCE Science Gateway, according to a use-case driven implementation strategy. More specifically, we show how the computational technologies and data services have been integrated within a tool for Seismic Forward Modelling, whose objective is to offer the possibility to perform simulations of seismic waves as a service to the seismological community. We will introduce the interactive components of the OGC map based web interface and how it supports the user with setting up the simulation. We will go through the selection of input data, which are either fetched from federated seismological web services, adopting community standards, or provided by the users themselves by accessing their own document data store. The HPC scientific codes can be selected from a number of waveform simulators, currently available to the seismological community as batch tools or with limited configuration capabilities in their interactive online versions. The results will be staged out from the HPC via a secure GridFTP transfer to a VERCE data layer managed by iRODS. The provenance information of the simulation will be automatically cataloged by the data layer via NoSQL techonologies. We will try to demonstrate how data access, validation and visualisation can be supported by a general purpose provenance framework which, besides common provenance concepts imported from the OPM and the W3C-PROV initiatives, also offers

  8. The development of an intelligent user interface for NASA's scientific databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry H.

    1986-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has initiated an Intelligent Data Management (IDM) research effort which has as one of its components, the development of an Intelligent User Interface (IUI). The intent of the IUI effort is to develop a friendly and intelligent user interface service that is based on expert systems and natural language processing technologies. This paper presents the design concepts, development approach and evaluation of performance of a prototype Intelligent User Interface Subsystem (IUIS) supporting an operational database.

  9. COST action 724: scientific, technical and forecast aspects of the European space weather service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, F.; Lilensten, J.

    COST action 724 coordinates European research for modelling and prediction of space weather It started two years ago and is now fully operational More than 28 European countries and institutions are involved in this space weather action This talk will describe the objectives aims and status of this European space weather action

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  11. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  12. Understanding the translation of scientific knowledge about arsenic risk exposure among private well water users in Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Chappells, Heather; Campbell, Norma; Drage, John; Fernandez, Conrad V; Parker, Louise; Dummer, Trevor J B

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic is a class I human carcinogen that has been identified as the second most important global health concern in groundwater supplies after contamination by pathogenic organisms. Hydrogeological assessments have shown naturally occurring arsenic to be widespread in groundwater across the northeastern United States and eastern Canada. Knowledge of arsenic risk exposure among private well users in these arsenic endemic areas has not yet been fully explored but research on water quality perceptions indicates a consistent misalignment between public and scientific assessments of environmental risk. This paper evaluates knowledge of arsenic risk exposure among a demographic cross-section of well users residing in 5 areas of Nova Scotia assessed to be at variable risk (high-low) of arsenic occurrence in groundwater based on water sample analysis. An integrated knowledge-to-action (KTA) methodological approach is utilized to comprehensively assess the personal, social and local factors shaping perception of well water contaminant risks and the translation of knowledge into routine water testing behaviors. Analysis of well user survey data (n=420) reveals a high level of confidence in well water quality that is unrelated to the relative risk of arsenic exposure or homeowner adherence to government testing recommendations. Further analysis from the survey and in-depth well user interviews (n=32) finds that well users' assessments of risk are influenced by personal experience, local knowledge, social networks and convenience of infrastructure rather than by formal information channels, which are largely failing to reach their target audiences. Insights from interviews with stakeholders representing government health and environment agencies (n=15) are used to reflect on the institutional barriers that mediate the translation of scientific knowledge into public awareness and stewardship behaviors. The utilization of local knowledge brokers, community-based networks and

  13. Involving Users in Social Science Research--A New European Paradigm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickham, James; Collins, Grainne

    2006-01-01

    Recent EU social science research programmes have stressed the importance of the "user". Using a study of EU funded social science projects, the article develops a typology of the different forms of user involvement. A case study of a "cluster" of research projects shows that user involvement within projects has significant…

  14. Scientific Issues Relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine-Disrupting Substances in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Rémy; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Demeneix, Barbara; Ivell, Richard; Panzica, Giancarlo; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as exogenous compounds or mixtures that alter function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently cause adverse effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations. European regulations on pesticides, biocides, cosmetics, and industrial chemicals require the European Commission to establish scientific criteria to define EDs. Objectives: We address the scientific relevance of four options for the identification of EDs proposed by the European Commission. Discussion: Option 1, which does not define EDs and leads to using interim criteria unrelated to the WHO definition of EDs, is not relevant. Options 2 and 3 rely on the WHO definition of EDs, which is widely accepted by the scientific community, with option 3 introducing additional categories based on the strength of evidence (suspected EDs and endocrine-active substances). Option 4 adds potency to the WHO definition, as a decision criterion. We argue that potency is dependent on the adverse effect considered and is scientifically ambiguous, and note that potency is not used as a criterion to define other particularly hazardous substances such as carcinogens and reproductive toxicants. The use of potency requires a context that goes beyond hazard identification and corresponds to risk characterization, in which potency (or, more relevantly, the dose–response function) is combined with exposure levels. Conclusions: There is scientific agreement regarding the adequacy of the WHO definition of EDs. The potency concept is not relevant to the identification of particularly serious hazards such as EDs. As is common practice for carcinogens, mutagens, and reproductive toxicants, a multi-level classification of ED based on the WHO definition, and not considering potency, would be relevant (corresponding to option 3 proposed by the European Commission). Citation: Slama R, Bourguignon JP, Demeneix B, Ivell R, Panzica G

  15. Scientific Issues Relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine-Disrupting Substances in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Slama, Rémy; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Demeneix, Barbara; Ivell, Richard; Panzica, Giancarlo; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Zoeller, R Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as exogenous compounds or mixtures that alter function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently cause adverse effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations. European regulations on pesticides, biocides, cosmetics, and industrial chemicals require the European Commission to establish scientific criteria to define EDs. We address the scientific relevance of four options for the identification of EDs proposed by the European Commission. Option 1, which does not define EDs and leads to using interim criteria unrelated to the WHO definition of EDs, is not relevant. Options 2 and 3 rely on the WHO definition of EDs, which is widely accepted by the scientific community, with option 3 introducing additional categories based on the strength of evidence (suspected EDs and endocrine-active substances). Option 4 adds potency to the WHO definition, as a decision criterion. We argue that potency is dependent on the adverse effect considered and is scientifically ambiguous, and note that potency is not used as a criterion to define other particularly hazardous substances such as carcinogens and reproductive toxicants. The use of potency requires a context that goes beyond hazard identification and corresponds to risk characterization, in which potency (or, more relevantly, the dose-response function) is combined with exposure levels. There is scientific agreement regarding the adequacy of the WHO definition of EDs. The potency concept is not relevant to the identification of particularly serious hazards such as EDs. As is common practice for carcinogens, mutagens, and reproductive toxicants, a multi-level classification of ED based on the WHO definition, and not considering potency, would be relevant (corresponding to option 3 proposed by the European Commission). Slama R, Bourguignon JP, Demeneix B, Ivell R, Panzica G, Kortenkamp A, Zoeller RT. 2016. Scientific issues relevant

  16. Establishing a research agenda for scientific and technical information (STI) - Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  17. Establishing a research agenda for scientific and technical information (STI) - Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  18. Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  19. Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  20. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  2. Cross-national user priorities for housing provision and accessibility--findings from the European innovAge Project.

    PubMed

    Haak, Maria; Slaug, Björn; Oswald, Frank; Schmidt, Steven M; Rimland, Joseph M; Tomsone, Signe; Ladö, Thomas; Svensson, Torbjörn; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-03-02

    To develop an innovative information and communication technology (ICT) tool intended to help older people in their search for optimal housing solutions, a first step in the development process is to gain knowledge from the intended users. Thus the aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about needs and expectations about housing options as expressed and prioritized by older people, people ageing with disabilities and professionals. A participatory design focus was adopted; 26 people with a range of functional limitations representing the user perspective and 15 professionals with a variety of backgrounds, participated in research circles that were conducted in four European countries. An additional 20 experts were invited as guests to the different research circle meetings. Three themes illustrating cross-national user priorities for housing provision and accessibility were identified: "Information barrier: accessible housing", "Information barrier: housing adaptation benefits", and "Cost barrier: housing adaptations". In conclusion, early user involvement and identification of cross-national differences in priorities and housing options will strengthen the development of a user-friendly ICT tool that can empower older people and people with disabilities to be more active consumers regarding housing provision.

  3. Cross-National User Priorities for Housing Provision and Accessibility — Findings from the European innovAge Project

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Maria; Slaug, Björn; Oswald, Frank; Schmidt, Steven M.; Rimland, Joseph M.; Tomsone, Signe; Ladö, Thomas; Svensson, Torbjörn; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    To develop an innovative information and communication technology (ICT) tool intended to help older people in their search for optimal housing solutions, a first step in the development process is to gain knowledge from the intended users. Thus the aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about needs and expectations about housing options as expressed and prioritized by older people, people ageing with disabilities and professionals. A participatory design focus was adopted; 26 people with a range of functional limitations representing the user perspective and 15 professionals with a variety of backgrounds, participated in research circles that were conducted in four European countries. An additional 20 experts were invited as guests to the different research circle meetings. Three themes illustrating cross-national user priorities for housing provision and accessibility were identified: “Information barrier: accessible housing”, “Information barrier: housing adaptation benefits”, and “Cost barrier: housing adaptations”. In conclusion, early user involvement and identification of cross-national differences in priorities and housing options will strengthen the development of a user-friendly ICT tool that can empower older people and people with disabilities to be more active consumers regarding housing provision. PMID:25739003

  4. The Users and Uses of Scientific and Technical Information: Critical Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, James E.; Rubenstein, Albert H.

    At a 1973 workshop held in Denver, Colorado, 21 participants familiar with the uses of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) services gathered to identify the system's major research needs. Initially, 50 research projects were suggested in the areas of design, management, operations, marketing, and global considerations. Using a priority…

  5. Editorial: a scientifically rigorous and user-friendly Rangeland Ecology & Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rangeland Ecology and Management (REM) is the premier journal for communication of science-based knowledge and for fostering both innovation and rigor in our stewardship of the world’s rangelands. REM is critical to the mission of the Society for Range Management and has had increasing scientific im...

  6. Communication Strategies in the Writing of Scientific Research Articles by Non-native Users of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sionis, Claude

    1995-01-01

    This article compares the communication strategies used by representatives of two generations of French scientists (pre- and postcommunicative language teaching) in the writing of research articles in English-language scientific journals. It focuses on the relationships between general argumentative language and hard-core mathematical language in…

  7. European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) summaries for the public: are they fit for purpose? A user-testing study.

    PubMed

    Raynor, David K; Bryant, David

    2013-09-18

    Apply 'user testing' methodology to test the readability of a European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) summary-which describes how the decision was made by the European Medicines Agency to approve a medicine. User testing uses mixed methods (questionnaire and semistructured interview), applied iteratively, to assess document performance-can people find and understand key points of information. Testing was undertaken with 40 members of the public in four consecutive rounds of 10. Inclusion criteria, matched across rounds, included range of ages and educational attainment. In round 1 we tested 19 key points of information in a printed version of the EPAR summary for Bondronat (a cancer medicine). This was then revised to address the findings, and tested in round 2. In round 3 we tested the summary on-screen, and in round 4, tested a revised on-screen version, after addressing findings from both rounds 1 and 3. The target followed European guidance for medicine leaflets: for each point of information 90% of participants should be able to find, and of those, 90% able to show understanding of the point. For the original EPAR summary, 6 of the 19 points of information reached the target (both paper-based and on-screen). After revisions to format and content, using good practice in information writing and design, 14 and 16 points, respectively, met the target. The problems related to both finding (dependent on layout, headings and design) and understanding (words and sentences used, as well as design). We devised a new heading structure, increased use of bullet points, replaced difficult and technical words and divided long sentences. People had difficulty finding and understanding key messages in the summary, but user testing identified the problems, and application of good practice resulted in a revised format which performed well.

  8. Hybrid 2-D and 3-D Immersive and Interactive User Interface for Scientific Data Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    the zSpace semi-immersive virtual reality display system using ray tracing for rendering at an interactive rate. The zSpace display system supports...head-tracked stereoscopic display, and stylus-based 3-D interaction. Further, the zSpace virtual reality system requires very little calibration or...visualization, 3-D interactive visualization, scientific visualization, virtual reality, real-time ray tracing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  9. Collaborative Scientific Research in a European Context: A University of Liverpool Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weightman, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A collaborative research program in auger spectroscopy at the University of Liverpool (England) involved scientists from 12 universities and research groups in 5 European countries and financed with international funds is described. The experience of the collaborators suggests how similar projects might be initiated and managed. (Author/MSE)

  10. The Mystery of the European Smile: A Comparison Based on Individual Photographs Provided by Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cross-cultural differences in preference for smiling among the users of one of the most popular instant messaging sites called Windows Live Messenger in terms of facial expression (smiling vs. non-smiling) on the photographs accompanying their profiles. 2,000 photos from 10 countries were rated by two independent judges. Despite the fact that 20 years have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Internet users from a former Soviet bloc appear to smile less often than those from Western Europe. Also, replicating past research, women irrespective of their nationality smiled more than men. PMID:21057574

  11. Open exchange of scientific knowledge and European copyright: The case of biodiversity information.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Willi; Patterson, David J; Agosti, Donat; Hagedorn, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Background. The 7(th) Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development is helping the European Union to prepare for an integrative system for intelligent management of biodiversity knowledge. The infrastructure that is envisaged and that will be further developed within the Programme "Horizon 2020" aims to provide open and free access to taxonomic information to anyone with a requirement for biodiversity data, without the need for individual consent of other persons or institutions. Open and free access to information will foster the re-use and improve the quality of data, will accelerate research, and will promote new types of research. Progress towards the goal of free and open access to content is hampered by numerous technical, economic, sociological, legal, and other factors. The present article addresses barriers to the open exchange of biodiversity knowledge that arise from European laws, in particular European legislation on copyright and database protection rights. We present a legal point of view as to what will be needed to bring distributed information together and facilitate its re-use by data mining, integration into semantic knowledge systems, and similar techniques. We address exceptions and limitations of copyright or database protection within Europe, and we point to the importance of data use agreements. We illustrate how exceptions and limitations have been transformed into national legislations within some European states to create inconsistencies that impede access to biodiversity information. Conclusions. The legal situation within the EU is unsatisfactory because there are inconsistencies among states that hamper the deployment of an open biodiversity knowledge management system. Scientists within the EU who work with copyright protected works or with protected databases have to be aware of regulations that vary from country to country. This is a major stumbling block to international collaboration and is an impediment to the

  12. Open exchange of scientific knowledge and European copyright: The case of biodiversity information

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Willi; Patterson, David J.; Agosti, Donat; Hagedorn, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background. The 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development is helping the European Union to prepare for an integrative system for intelligent management of biodiversity knowledge. The infrastructure that is envisaged and that will be further developed within the Programme “Horizon 2020” aims to provide open and free access to taxonomic information to anyone with a requirement for biodiversity data, without the need for individual consent of other persons or institutions. Open and free access to information will foster the re-use and improve the quality of data, will accelerate research, and will promote new types of research. Progress towards the goal of free and open access to content is hampered by numerous technical, economic, sociological, legal, and other factors. The present article addresses barriers to the open exchange of biodiversity knowledge that arise from European laws, in particular European legislation on copyright and database protection rights. We present a legal point of view as to what will be needed to bring distributed information together and facilitate its re-use by data mining, integration into semantic knowledge systems, and similar techniques. We address exceptions and limitations of copyright or database protection within Europe, and we point to the importance of data use agreements. We illustrate how exceptions and limitations have been transformed into national legislations within some European states to create inconsistencies that impede access to biodiversity information. Conclusions. The legal situation within the EU is unsatisfactory because there are inconsistencies among states that hamper the deployment of an open biodiversity knowledge management system. Scientists within the EU who work with copyright protected works or with protected databases have to be aware of regulations that vary from country to country. This is a major stumbling block to international collaboration and is an

  13. Resistances to Scientific Knowledge Production of Comparative Measurements of Dropout and Completion in European Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlhed, Carina

    2017-01-01

    The article is a critical sociological analysis of current transnational practices on creating comparable measurements of dropout and completion in higher education and the consequences for the conditions of scientific knowledge production on the topic. The analysis revolves around questions of epistemological, methodological and symbolic types…

  14. Characteristics and analysis of scientific articles submitted to the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases.

    PubMed

    Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P; Denoyelle, F; Garrel, R; Jankowski, R; Karkas, A; Makeieff, M; Righini, C; Vincent, C; Martin, C

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate characteristics, suggested modifications and reasons for rejection in scientific articles submitted for publication in the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases. A prospective study analyzed the flaws noted by reviewers in 52 scientific articles submitted to the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases between August 31, 2014 and February 28, 2015. Fifteen flaws concerning content and 7 concerning form were identified. In more than 25% of submissions, major flaws were noted: purely descriptive paper; lack of contribution to existing state of knowledge; failure to define a clear study objective and/or analyze the impact of major variables; poorly structured Materials and methods section, lacking description of study population, objective and/or variables; lack of or inappropriate statistical analysis; Introduction verbose and/or misrepresenting the literature; excessively heterogeneous and/or poorly described study population; imprecise discussion, straying from the point, overstating the significance of results and/or introducing new results not mentioned in the Results section; description of the study population placed in the Results section instead of under Materials and methods; serious mistakes of syntax, spelling and/or tense; and failure to follow the Instructions to Authors. After review, 21.1% of articles were published, 65.3% rejected and 13.4% non-resubmitted within 3 months of review. On univariate analysis, the only variable increasing the percentage of articles accepted was the topic not being devoted to head and neck surgery (P=0.03). These results document the excessive flaw rate still to be found in manuscripts and demonstrate the continuing need for authors to master and implement the rules of scientific medical writing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced Test Reactor -- Testing Capabilities and Plans AND Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility -- Partnerships and Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2008-07-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plans for the NSUF.

  16. Barriers to implementing throughcare for problematic drug users in European prisons.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Morag; Williams, James; Kane, David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent of throughcare provision for prisoners with problematic drug use. Effective throughcare services have been recognised as important because they help to ensure that any progress in treatment made in prison is continued on release. Previous research demonstrates that examples of good practice in throughcare provision for prisoners with problematic drug use exist in many parts of the world. However, evidence from recent work carried out in Europe indicates that the implementation of throughcare services for this group of prisoners is limited and ineffective in some EU member states. This paper aims to explore the reasons for such failure and to identify the barriers to implementing effective throughcare for this particular group of prisoners. This paper is drawn from research carried out as part of a European project funded by the Directorate General Justice of the European Commission. The project involved six partners from a range of different member states. The research involved a literature review, followed by in-depth interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders. Each partner carried out the qualitative research within their own country, in order to enable the team to capture local nuances. The findings indicate that key barriers to implementation of effective throughcare are resources which impacts on the availability of support services, attitudes and training of staff and ultimately the continuity of care. This paper adds to the body of knowledge regarding the provision of effective throughcare to those with problematic drug use.

  17. Ethics issues in scientific data and service provision: evidence and challenges for the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Freda, Carmela; Haslinger, Florian; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    Addressing Ethics issues is nowadays a relevant challenge for any initiative, program or project dealing with scientific data and products provision, access to services for scientific purposes and communication with different stakeholders, including society. This is corroborated by the evidence that Ethics has very high priority in EU funded research. Indeed, all the activities carried out under Horizon 2020 must comply with ethical principles and national, Union and international legislation. This implies that "For all activities funded by the European Union, Ethics is an integral part of research from beginning to end, and ethical compliance is seen as pivotal to achieve real research excellence." Here, we present the experience of EPOS, a public pan-European research infrastructure. EPOS aims at integrating data, data products, services and software (DDSS) for solid Earth science generated and provided by monitoring networks, observing systems and facilities belonging to European countries. EPOS fosters the integrated use of multidisciplinary solid Earth data to improve the understanding of physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and surface dynamics. The EPOS integration plan will make significant contributions to understanding and mitigating geo-hazards, yielding data for hazard assessment, data products for engaging different stakeholders, and services for training, education and communication to society. Numerous national research infrastructures engaged in EPOS are deployed for the monitoring of areas prone to geo-hazards and for the surveillance of the national territory including areas used for exploiting geo-resources. The EPOS community is therefore already trained to provide services to public (civil defence agencies, local and national authorities) and private (petroleum industry, mining industry, geothermal companies, aviation security) stakeholders. Our ability to

  18. Is dental amalgam safe for humans? The opinion of the scientific committee of the European Commission

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It was claimed by the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR)) in a report to the EU-Commission that "....no risks of adverse systemic effects exist and the current use of dental amalgam does not pose a risk of systemic disease..." [1, available from: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_scenihr/docs/scenihr_o_016.pdf]. SCENIHR disregarded the toxicology of mercury and did not include most important scientific studies in their review. But the real scientific data show that: (a) Dental amalgam is by far the main source of human total mercury body burden. This is proven by autopsy studies which found 2-12 times more mercury in body tissues of individuals with dental amalgam. Autopsy studies are the most valuable and most important studies for examining the amalgam-caused mercury body burden. (b) These autopsy studies have shown consistently that many individuals with amalgam have toxic levels of mercury in their brains or kidneys. (c) There is no correlation between mercury levels in blood or urine, and the levels in body tissues or the severity of clinical symptoms. SCENIHR only relied on levels in urine or blood. (d) The half-life of mercury in the brain can last from several years to decades, thus mercury accumulates over time of amalgam exposure in body tissues to toxic levels. However, SCENIHR state that the half-life of mercury in the body is only "20-90 days". (e) Mercury vapor is about ten times more toxic than lead on human neurons and with synergistic toxicity to other metals. (f) Most studies cited by SCENIHR which conclude that amalgam fillings are safe have severe methodical flaws. PMID:21232090

  19. Teaching nanoscience across scientific and geographical borders A European Master programme in nanoscience and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, A.; Groeseneken, G.; Heremans, P.; Rep, D.; Rudquist, P.; Schwille, P.; Sluijter, B.; Wendin, G.

    2008-03-01

    Within the Erasmus Mundus Master (EMM) Programme, five European Universities (KU Leuven, Belgium, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Delft University of Technology and Leiden University, the Netherlands, and the University of Dresden, Germany) have joined forces to offer a unique master programme in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 'EMM-nano', at the cutting edge of state-of-the-art research. The students design and build their individual area of specialisation within nanophysics, nanotechnology, biophysics, biotechnology through their choice of trajectory between the partners. We discuss some of the challenges related to the crossdisciplinary nature of the field, educational activities in cleanrooms, and issues related to the integration of teaching programmes across the borders within Europe.

  20. Vaccinations in migrants and refugees: a challenge for European health systems. A systematic review of current scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Mipatrini, Daniele; Stefanelli, Paola; Severoni, Santino; Rezza, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The decline of immunization rates in countries of origin of migrants and refugees, along with risky conditions during the journey to Europe, may threaten migrants' health. We performed a systematic review of the scientific literature in order to assess the frequency of vaccine preventable diseases, and vaccination coverage among migrants and refugees in Europe. To this end, Medline and Cochrane databases were considered. After the screening and the selection process, 58 papers were included in the review. We focused on the following vaccine-preventable diseases: hepatitis B, measles, rubella, mumps, tetanus, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, meningitis, and varicella. The results were presented as a qualitative synthesis. In summary, several studies highlighted that migrants and refugees have lower immunization rates compared to European-born individuals. Firstly, this is due to low vaccination coverage in the country of origin. Then, several problems may limit migrants' access to vaccination in Europe: (i) migrants are used to move around the continent, and many vaccines require multiple doses at regular times; (ii) information on the immunization status of migrants is often lacking; (iii) hosting countries face severe economic crises; (iv) migrants often refuse registration with medical authorities for fear of legal consequences and (v) the lack of coordination among public health authorities of neighboring countries may determine either duplications or lack of vaccine administration. Possible strategies to overcome these problems include tailoring immunization services on the specific needs of the target population, developing strong communication campaigns, developing vaccination registers, and promoting collaboration among public health authorities of European Countries.

  1. Injuries among powered two-wheeler users in eight European countries: a descriptive analysis of hospital discharge data.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason L; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Pollack, Keshia; Heredero-Ordoyo, Rafael; Molinero, Aquilino; Mansilla, Alberto; Fildes, Brian; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    2012-11-01

    Powered two-wheelers (PTWs--mopeds, motorcycles, and scooters) remain the most dangerous form of travel on today's roads. This study used hospital discharge data from eight European countries to examine the frequencies and patterns of injury among PTW users (age≥14 years), the predicted incidence of the loss of functional ability, and the mechanisms of the head injuries observed (all in light of increased helmet use). Of 977,557 injured patients discharged in 2004, 12,994 were identified as having been injured in PTW collisions. Lower extremity injuries accounted for 26% (25.6-26.7, 95% C.I.) of the total injuries, followed by upper extremity injuries (20.7%: 20.3-21.2), traumatic brain injuries (TBI) (18.5%: 18-19), and thoracic injuries (8.2%: 7.8-8.5). Approximately 80% of the lower extremity injury cases were expected to exhibit some functional disability one year following discharge (predicted Functional Capacity Index, pFCI-AIS98<100), compared to 47% of the upper extremity injury cases and 24% of the TBI cases. Although it occurred less frequently, patients that were expected to experience some functional limitation from TBI were predicted to fair worse on average (lose more functional ability) than patients expected to have functional limitations from extremity injuries. Cerebral concussion was the most common head injury observed (occurring in 56% of head injury cases), with most concussion cases (78%) exhibiting no other head injury. Among the AIS3+ head injuries that could be mapped to an injury mechanism, 48% of these were associated with a translational-impact mechanism, and 37% were associated with a rotational mechanism. The observation of high rates of expected long-term disability suggests that future efforts aim to mitigate lower and upper extremity injuries among PTW users. Likewise, the high rates of concussion and head injuries associated with a rotational mechanism provide goals for the next phase of PTW user head protection.

  2. A network approach for the scientific collaboration in the European Framework Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, A.; Argyrakis, P.

    2008-12-01

    We construct the networks of collaboration between partners for projects carried out with the support of European Commission Framework Programs FP5 and FP6. We analyze in detail these networks, not only in terms of total number of projects, but also for the different tools employed, the different geographical partitions, and the different thematic areas. For all cases we find a scale-free behavior, as expected for such social networks, and also reported in the literature. In comparing FP5 to FP6, we show that, despite a decrease in the number of signed contracts, and the total number of unique partners, there is an increase in the average number of collaborative partners per institution. Furthermore, we establish a measure for the central role (hub) for each country, by using the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST), which we construct in detail for each thematic area (e.g. Informatics, Nanoscience, Life Sciences, etc.). The importance of these network hubs is highlighted, as this information can be used by policy planners in designing future research plans regarding the distribution of available funds.

  3. From field to database : a user-oriented approche to promote cyber-curating of scientific drilling cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignol, C.; Arnaud, F.; Godinho, E.; Galabertier, B.; Caillo, A.; Billy, I.; Augustin, L.; Calzas, M.; Rousseau, D. D.; Crosta, X.

    2016-12-01

    Managing scientific data is probably one the most challenging issues in modern science. In plaeosciences the question is made even more sensitive with the need of preserving and managing high value fragile geological samples: cores. Large international scientific programs, such as IODP or ICDP led intense effort to solve this problem and proposed detailed high standard work- and dataflows thorough core handling and curating. However many paleoscience results derived from small-scale research programs in which data and sample management is too often managed only locally - when it is… In this paper we present a national effort leads in France to develop an integrated system to curate ice and sediment cores. Under the umbrella of the national excellence equipment program CLIMCOR, we launched a reflexion about core curating and the management of associated fieldwork data. Our aim was then to conserve all data from fieldwork in an integrated cyber-environment which will evolve toward laboratory-acquired data storage in a near future. To do so, our demarche was conducted through an intimate relationship with field operators as well laboratory core curators in order to propose user-oriented solutions. The national core curating initiative proposes a single web portal in which all teams can store their fieldwork data. This portal is used as a national hub to attribute IGSNs. For legacy samples, this requires the establishment of a dedicated core list with associated metadata. However, for forthcoming core data, we developed a mobile application to capture technical and scientific data directly on the field. This application is linked with a unique coring-tools library and is adapted to most coring devices (gravity, drilling, percussion etc.) including multiple sections and holes coring operations. Those field data can be uploaded automatically to the national portal, but also referenced through international standards (IGSN and INSPIRE) and displayed in international

  4. Development status of the X-ray beam diagnostics devices for the commissioning and user operation of the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünert, Jan; Buck, Jens; Freund, Wolfgang; Ozkan, Cigdem; Molodtsov, Serguei

    2013-03-01

    X-ray Free-Electron-Lasers (XFEL) as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in the USA, SACLA in Japan, and the European XFEL under construction in Germany are 4th generation light sources which allow research of at the same time extremely small structures (Ångström resolution) and extremely fast phenomena (femtosecond resolution). Unlike the pulses from a conventional optical laser, the radiation in these sources is created by the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) process when electron bunches pass through very long segmented undulators. The shot noise at the origin of this process leads to significant pulse-to-pulse variations of pulse intensity, spectrum, wavefront, temporal properties etc. so that for user experiments an online monitoring of these properties is mandatory. Also, the adjustment of the long segmented undulators requires dedicated diagnostics such as an undulator commissioning spectrometer and spontaneous radiation analysis. The extremely high brilliance and resulting single-shot damage issue are difficult to handle for any XFEL diagnostics. Apart from the large energy range of operation of the facility from 280 eV to 25 keV in FEL fundamental, the particular challenge for the European XFEL diagnostics is the high intra bunch train photon pulse repetition rate of 4.5 MHz, potentially causing additional damage by high heat loads and making shot-to-shot diagnostics very demanding. This contribution reports on the facility concepts, recent progress in instrumentation development, and the optimization of diagnostics performance with respect to resolution/accuracy, shot-to-shot capabilities and energy range.

  5. European Training and Research in Peritoneal Dialysis--A Network to Deliver Scientific Peritoneal Dialysis Training to a New Generation of Researchers.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; van Wier, Tanja; Aufricht, Christoph; Beelen, Rob; Rutherford, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) utilization varies across countries, and of the factors that explain the variation, the scientific and clinical knowledge of health care professionals is potentially important. In this paper, we describe a European collaboration--between 8 academic PD research programs, a small-to-medium-sized enterprise, and a large PD product manufacturer--that received significant research funding from the EU commission to establish a training network. European Training and Research in Peritoneal Dialysis (EuTRiPD) is providing training to 12 PhD students who have moved within the European Union and are completing research training. The underlying structure and processes within EuTRiPD (http://www.eutripd. eu) are described, and the benefits of the collaborative approach are discussed. This model could be useful to other research groups and will assist in maintaining and growing scientific expertise in PD research.

  6. Managing scientific, technical and regulatory innovation in regulated bioanalysis: a discussion paper from the European Bioanalysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Philip; Henderson, Neil; Smeraglia, John; Mulder, Hans; Ingelse, Benno; Brudny-Kloeppel, Margarete; Companjen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    On 12-13 June 2012, the European Bioanalysis Forum hosted its third Focus Meeting in Brussels (Belgium). At the meeting, a panel discussion was held on the hurdles that the bioanalytical community encounters when adopting new technologies or managing regulated bioanalysis expectations around emerging technologies. Over the last few years, the industry has seen many new technologies maturing. As they became available, the bioanalytical scientist has observed that implementing these technologies in the regulated environment has become increasingly challenging. For one, scientific developments and regulatory expectations may not go hand in hand. At the same time, the pharmaceutical industry has become increasingly risk averse in their response to these real or perceived higher expectations in regulated bioanalysis. As a downstream consequence, the potential result of overinterpretation of guidance or occasional widespread and premature implementation of responses to health authority inspections, industry may be contributing significantly to raising the bar on some processes related to day-to-day practices in the bioanalytical laboratory. Last but not least, with the community being satisfied with the performance of the current tools, potential complacency can be observed in the regulated bioanalytical community because existing technologies, such as LC-MS/MS and ligand-binding assays, have served and still are serving them extremely well. Hence, the question 'what's next after LC-MS/MS or ELISA?' is not resonating with many scientists as pertinently compared with 'What's next after RIA, GC or LC-UV?', which was the key question in the 1990s, certainly in the context of an increasing effort needed to validate these new tools. With this article, the European Bioanalysis Forum aims to stimulate an open dialogue between all stakeholders in regulated bioanalysis to positively influence how we balance science, process and regulations in day-to-day work. This discussion

  7. A social way to experience a scientific event: Twitter use at the 7th European Public Health Conference.

    PubMed

    Bert, Fabrizio; Zeegers Paget, Dineke; Scaioli, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have analysed Twitter's use by attendees of scientific meetings and the characteristics of conference-related messages and most active attendees. Despite these previous reports, to date no studies have described the use of Twitter during Public Health conferences. For this reason, we decided to perform an analysis of Twitter's use during the 7th European Public Health (EPH) Conference (Glasgow, November 2014). All the tweets published from 21 July to 2 December 2014 and including the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved and much information (author, date, retweets, favourites, mentions, presence of pictures and/or external links, content type and topics) was analysed. A total of 1066 tweets with the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved; 86.3% of these were tweeted during the conference. A total of 209 single accounts tweeted, pictures were present in 29.7% tweets while external links were published in 13.8%. Conference speakers were mentioned in around 30% of tweets. Almost 60% of the tweets had a session-related content. Considering only the session-related tweets, one-third had as the main topic 'Health inequalities and migrant and ethnic minority health', while 20% were 'Health policy and health economics' oriented. The results of this study have demonstrated a massive use of Twitter by conference attendees during the 7th EPH conference, and that conference attendees are willing to share quotes and impressions particularly about conference-related topics. It is mandatory for conference organisers to promote online discussion and knowledge dissemination during conferences, especially in the public health field. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  8. Tiered approach into practice: scientific validation for chromatography-based assays in early development - a recommendation from the European Bioanalysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Philip; White, Stephen; Dougall, Stuart Mc; Kall, Morten A; Smeraglia, John; Fjording, Marianne Scheel; Knutsson, Magnus

    2015-09-10

    The principles of tiered approach have been part of the bioanalytical toolbox for some years. Nevertheless, an in spite of many valuable discussions in industry, they remain difficult to apply in a harmonized way for a broad array of studies in early drug development where these alternative approaches to regulated validation would make sense. The European Bioanalysis Forum has identified the need to proposes some practical workflows for five categories of studies for chromatography based assays where scientific validation will allow additional freedom while safeguarding scientific rigor and robust documentation: quantification of metabolites in plasma in relation to ICH M3(R2), urine analysis, tissue homogenate analysis, and preclinical and clinical studies in early stages of drug development. The recommendation would introduce a common language and harmonized best practice for these study categories and can help to refocus towards optimized scientific and resource investments for bioanalysis in early drug development.

  9. Food and feed chemical contaminants in the European Union: Regulatory, scientific, and technical issues concerning chemical contaminants occurrence, risk assessment, and risk management in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Silano, Marco; Silano, Vittorio

    2017-07-03

    A priority of the European Union is the control of risks possibly associated with chemical contaminants in food and undesirable substances in feed. Following an initial chapter describing the main contaminants detected in food and undesirable substances in feed in the EU, their main sources and the factors which affect their occurrence, the present review focuses on the "continous call for data" procedure that is a very effective system in place at EFSA to make possible the exposure assessment of specific contaminants and undesirable substances. Risk assessment of contaminants in food atances in feed is carried currently in the European Union by the CONTAM Panel of EFSA according to well defined methodologies and in collaboration with competent international organizations and with Member States.

  10. Do students with higher self-efficacy exhibit greater and more diverse scientific inquiry skills: An exploratory investigation in "River City", a multi-user virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass

    In this thesis, I conduct an exploratory study to investigate the relationship between students' self-efficacy on entry into authentic scientific activity and the scientific inquiry behaviors they employ while engaged in that process, over time. Scientific inquiry has been a major standard in most science education policy doctrines for the past two decades and is exemplified by activities such as making observations, formulating hypotheses, gathering and analyzing data, and forming conclusions from that data. The self-efficacy literature, however, indicates that self-efficacy levels affect perseverance and engagement. This study investigated the relationship between these two constructs. The study is conducted in a novel setting, using an innovative science curriculum delivered through an interactive computer technology that recorded each student's conversations, movements, and activities while behaving as a practicing scientist in a "virtual world" called River City. River City is a Multi-User Virtual Environment designed to engage students in a collaborative scientific inquiry-based learning experience. As a result, I was able to follow students' moment-by-moment choices of behavior while they were behaving as scientists. I collected data on students' total scientific inquiry behaviors over three visits to River City, as well as the number of sources from which they gathered their scientific data. I analyzed my longitudinal data on the 96 seventh-graders using individual growth modeling. I found that self-efficacy played a role in the number of data-gathering behaviors students engaged in initially, with high self-efficacy students engaging in more data gathering than students with low self-efficacy. However, the impact of student self-efficacy on rate of change in data gathering behavior differed by gender; by the end of the study, student self-efficacy did not impact data gathering. In addition, students' level of self-efficacy did not affect how many different

  11. Development of an open source package for the processing of sun-sky photometric data in the European Skyrad Users network (ESR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelles, V.; Smyth, T.; Campanelli, M.; Utrillas, M. P.

    2009-04-01

    The European SkyRad users network (ESR) is a joint initiative from the Institute of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ISAC) at the National Research Council (CNR) in Italy, the Group of Solar Radiation (GRSV) at the University of Valencia (UV) in Spain, and the Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) in the United Kingdom. It was started as a Protocol of Agreement between the three institutions, in 2003. The main objective was to collaborate on the improvement of some technical aspects of the Skyrad.pack algorithm. Currently the network is addressed at European research groups that are users of sun - sky photometers and mainly focus their research on the study of atmospheric aerosols and their application to remote sensing or climatological studies. There exist well known international networks such as AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) or SKYNET (SKYrad NETwork, in Asia) but they have some characteristics that actually prevent many European research groups to get involved with them. These limitations mean that a number of European groups are working independently, with no coordination. The resultant databases are not made public or the employed methodology is not homogeneous. In turn, it means that a great amount of data is being lost for critical regional studies in Europe. One of these limitations is related to the supported instrumentation. International networks usually adopt a given model of sun photometer as a standard. The ESR is a multi instrumental network using both Prede POM and Cimel CE318 sun - sky photometers. Another limitation is related to the calibration. In the case of AERONET, a centralized and stringent calibration protocol is adopted. This protocol is designed in order to offer a well tracked and quality assured calibration and data elaboration; it is in fact the key stone for the homogeneity of the network results. But centralization raises other problems. The instruments must be periodically sent every 6 - 12 months to United States or France

  12. Some ethical aspects of xenotransplantation in light of the proposed European directive on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes.

    PubMed

    Jorqui-Azofra, M; Romeo-Casabona, C M

    2010-01-01

    Unlike what has happened in other times, society in general and especially the scientific community has become aware that animals share our sensitivity to pain and the capacity to suffer. In this regard, it is generally accepted that animals must be protected from all types of abuse. In fact, it is unavoidable today that animals used in scientific experiments enjoy the maximum degree of protection and well-being. This view is based on an ecocentric notion of living matter as opposed to the traditional anthropocentric approach because it has become evident that ethics should not be limited to those belonging to the same species. Likewise, there is a broad consensus-with the exception of members of certain animal protection groups-regarding the need to experiment with animals, when no alternative methods (AM) are available, given that the current state of scientific knowledge still does not allow for this type of experimentation to be entirely abolished. Nevertheless, we must keep in mind that not every scientific procedure in which animals are used is legitimate. On one side of the scale that symbolizes the legislation in this field, we find the weight of science and safety, and on the other side, the weight of ethics. In this article we have reviewed some of the main ethical criteria that serve as a basis to balance the scale, in other words, to guide and legalize animal experimentation in the field of xenotransplantation (XT). To that end, we take into account the current revisions made to the European Directive regarding the welfare of animals used in scientific procedures (86/609/EEC), in order to reflect, in turn, on the following issue: where is European institutional ethics headed on this issue? Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. User's Guide to OASIS, Oceanic and Atmospheric Scientific Information System. Key to Oceanic and Atmospheric Information Sources No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Washington, DC. Environmental Data Service.

    OASIS (Oceanic and Atmospheric Scientific Information System) is an information retrieval service that furnishes ready reference to the technical literature and research efforts concerning the environmental sciences and marine and coastal resources. It provides computerized searches of both NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)…

  14. The annual meeting of the European Society for Vascular Surgery--the scientific contents over the years.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D

    2008-07-01

    to analyze the presentations given at the annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery: topic, geographical distribution, later publication. Three six-year periods from 1989 have been evaluated. case series dominates but randomized trials have increased somewhat. Papers on animal experiments and basic science have decreased. The most frequently reported diseases have been aortic aneurysm, carotid artery problems, lower extremity ischaemia and with an increasing number of papers on venous disease. Around two thirds of the presentations have been later published as full papers in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, but as many as one quarter has not been published. Geographical origin has varied over time with a decrease in the UK dominance. The presentations at the Annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery contribute substantially to the contents of the Society Journal but a large proportion of the presentations never appear in print. Northern Europe dominates when papers per population unit is counted.

  15. Case histories in scientific and pseudo-scientific mass-media communication in energy/heat production from underground (geogas storage, geothermics, hydrocarbons), in the frame of Nimby Sindrome enhancement in Europe: the proposal of a new European Direct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, Fedora; Boschi, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of energy/heat production from underground, the paper considers some European case histories and the needs of a complex and motley stakeholders community, made by scientific-industry-institutions, involved in the difficult task to study and accept (or refuse) projects strongly impacting the lived territory & underground, in densely populate countries, as Italy, in terms of appropriate public communication and sound deontological behaviour. Successively, the paper recalls years of "scientific" communication within the mass-media, highlighting the positive and negative messages, in comparison to the true and objective experimental data gathered by the real scientific work, as perceived by citizens of medium scholastic culture, which not delve the geologic disciplines, but receive simply the journalistic front-end, very often as sensationalist scoop. The authors retrace case histories of heuristic-participatory communication with the citizenship about the scientific results on challenges raised by certain technologies. The objective and rational communication is often impeded by local interests and by local journalism, which prefers to create sensationalist news more than scientific truths. This path progressively tangles as a consequence of the complex and with conflicting use of underground to produce energy (heat as gas storage, geothermical, unconventional gas exploitation, mining, etc…). Even the chain of renewables meets by now serious issues, exacerbated also by the need to start mining and drilling for the smart grids materials too (metals, rare Earths, etc..). A new text for a smart and innovative European Directivity is discussed, starting from the Italian regulatory issue. The review efforts for a "paper" on both a newspaper or a blog could be more difficult than the review a scientific paper, as a consequence of the peculiar situations behind the scenes and the conflicts of interests staying in the nest in a newspaper article or in a blog

  16. Determinants of Information Behaviour and Information Literacy Related to Healthy Eating among Internet Users in Five European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedzwiedzka, Barbara; Mazzocchi, Mario; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Gennaro, Laura; Verbeke, Wim; Traill, W. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigates how Europeans seek information related to healthy eating, what determines their information seeking and whether any problems are encountered in doing so. Method: A survey was administered through computer-assisted on-line web-interviewing. Respondents were grouped by age and sex (n = 3003, age +16) in Belgium,…

  17. [Scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence].

    PubMed

    Brodel, E G; Ionescu, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This article details the scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence. The intensity of the scientific contacts of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy arise from detailed analysis of the correspondence that outlasts time in the state archive of Jassy. 75% of this correspondence was written in German, and most of it was sent from the German Confederate or the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. This influence and contribution of German science in Moldavian natural science development, was undoubtedly in the first half of the 19th century. This can be attributed to dr. Iacob Cihac, one of the founders of the Society, who was born in Aschaffenburg (Germany) and studied medicine in Heidelberg (Germany), before he moved to Moldavia. Based on the initiative of drs. Cihac and Zotta, and not least the financial support of a part of the Moldavian high class and the Moldavian government, the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy was founded in 1833. This became the first scientific society in the territory of modern Romania. Since the inception of the Moldavian Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy, it has pushed the boundaries of a simple scientific society. This society provides an encyclopedic framework of most of the scientific subjects of the 19th century (medicine, pharmacy, natural science, agronomy, paleontology and geology). It played a major role during the democratization of the Moldavian education system, for example by founding a medical school teaching in the Romanian language in Jassy. The society survived and continued to maintain scientific activities during all the political changes in Moldavia during the 19th century, particularly the revolution of 1848 and the unification process of Romania. The influence and activity of the society in Jassy has continued to make a significant contribution to science and education

  18. Adaptation of the European Commission-recommended user testing method to patient medication information leaflets in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Michiko; Doi, Hirohisa; Yamamoto, Ken; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sato, Tsugumichi; Suka, Machi; Nakayama, Takeo; Sugimori, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    The safe use of drugs relies on providing accurate drug information to patients. In Japan, patient leaflets called Drug Guide for Patients are officially available; however, their utility has never been verified. This is the first attempt to improve Drug Guide for Patients via user testing in Japan. To test and improve communication of drug information to minimize risk for patients via user testing of the current and revised versions of Drug Guide for Patients, and to demonstrate that this method is effective for improving Drug Guide for Patients in Japan. We prepared current and revised versions of the Drug Guide for Patients and performed user testing via semi-structured interviews with consumers to compare these versions for two guides for Mercazole and Strattera. We evenly divided 54 participants into two groups with similar distributions of sex, age, and literacy level to test the differing versions of the Mercazole guide. Another group of 30 participants were divided evenly to test the versions of the Strattera guide. After completing user testing, the participants evaluated both guides in terms of amount of information, readability, usefulness of information, and layout and appearance. Participants were also asked for their opinions on the leaflets. Response rates were 100% for both Mercazole and Strattera. The revised versions of both Guides were superior or equal to the current versions in terms of accessibility and understandability. The revised version of the Mercazole guide showed better ratings for readability, usefulness of information, and layout (p<0.01) than did the current version, while that for Strattera showed superior readability and layout (p<0.01). User testing was effective for evaluating the utility of Drug Guide for Patients. Additionally, the revised version had superior accessibility and understandability.

  19. Three-dimensional dynamics of scientific balloon systems in response to sudden gust loadings. [including a computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, D. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed of the three-dimensional dynamics of a high-altitude scientific research balloon system perturbed from its equilibrium configuration by an arbitrary gust loading. The platform is modelled as a system of four coupled pendula, and the equations of motion were developed in the Lagrangian formalism assuming a small-angle approximation. Three-dimensional pendulation, torsion, and precessional motion due to Coriolis forces are considered. Aerodynamic and viscous damping effects on the pendulatory and torsional motions are included. A general model of the gust field incident upon the balloon system was developed. The digital computer simulation program is described, and a guide to its use is given.

  20. Zero tolerances in food and animal feed -- are there any scientific alternatives? A European point of view on an international controversy.

    PubMed

    Heberer, Thomas; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Abraham, Klaus; Pzyrembel, Hildegard; Henning, Klaus Juergen; Schauzu, Marianna; Braeunig, Juliane; Goetz, Mario; Niemann, Lars; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Luch, Andreas; Appel, Bernd; Banasiak, Ursula; Böl, Gaby Fleur; Lampen, Alfonso; Wittkowski, Reiner; Hensel, Andreas

    2007-12-10

    A number of zero tolerance provisions are contained in both food and animal feed law, e.g. for chemical substances whose occurrence is not permitted or is directly prohibited in food or animal feed. In the European Union, bans of this kind were introduced to give consumers and animals the greatest possible protection from substances with a possible hazard potential within the intendment of the hazard prevention principles and current precautionary measures. This also applies to substances for which an acceptable daily intake cannot be derived and a maximum residue limit cannot, therefore, be established, e.g. due to missing or inadequate toxicological data. Zero tolerances are also under discussion as trade barriers because their use has triggered numerous legal disputes. This paper draws together the results of an evaluation of alternative risk assessment methods to be used for the risk assessment of substances to which currently only zero tolerances apply. It will demonstrate that, depending on the available toxicological data, a scientifically sound risk assessment may still be possible. In this context, the two concepts - margin of exposure and threshold of toxicological concern - are very promising approaches. Until the scientific and sociopolitical discussions have been completed, it is essential that the principle of zero tolerances be upheld, especially for those substances which may be genotoxic carcinogens. In microbiology, there is no legal room for manoeuvre with regard to food safety criteria established for reasons of consumer health protection on the basis of scientific assessments.

  1. Great Lakes Integrated Sciences + Assessments: Connecting Users and Generators of Scientific Information to Inform Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baule, W. J.; Briley, L.; Brown, D.; Gibbons, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Lakes Integrated Sciences + Assessments (GLISA) is one of eleven NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISAs) and is a co-hosted by the University of Michigan and Michigan State University. The Great Lakes region falls between areas that are typically defined as the Midwest and Northeast in the United States and also includes portions of Ontario in Canada. This unique and complex region holds approximately 21% of global surface fresh water and is home to 23 million people on the United States side of the basin alone. GLISA functions as a bridge between climate science researchers and boundary organizations in the Great Lakes region, with the goals of contributing to the long-term sustainability of the region in face of a changing climate and to facilitate smart decision-making backed by sound scientific knowledge. Faculty and staff associated with GLISA implement physical and social science practices in daily operations, which includes but is not limited to: activating the boundary chain model to facilitate the transfer of knowledge through the community, integrating local and historical climate data into decision-making processes, addressing uncertainty and the downscaling of climate information, and implementing network analyses to find key access points to information networks across the Great Lakes region. GLISA also provides funding for projects related to climate and climate change adaptation in the Great Lakes region, as well as expertise to partner organizations through collaborations. Information from boundary organizations, stakeholders, and collaborators also flows back to GLISA to aid in the determination of the physical and social science needs of the region. Recent findings point to GLISA playing a crucial role in the scaling information across scales of government and ensuring that federal agencies and local stakeholders are able to learn from one another and share experiences and knowledge to continue building climate ready

  2. The Impact of Student Self-efficacy on Scientific Inquiry Skills: An Exploratory Investigation in River City, a Multi-user Virtual Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass

    2007-02-01

    This exploratory study investigated data-gathering behaviors exhibited by 100 seventh-grade students as they participated in a scientific inquiry-based curriculum project delivered by a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE). This research examined the relationship between students' self-efficacy on entry into the authentic scientific activity and the longitudinal data-gathering behaviors they employed while engaged in that process. Three waves of student behavior data were gathered from a server-side database that recorded all student activity in the MUVE; these data were analyzed using individual growth modeling. The study found that self-efficacy correlated with the number of data-gathering behaviors in which students initially engaged, with high self-efficacy students engaging in more data gathering than students with low self-efficacy. Also, the impact of student self-efficacy on rate of change in data gathering behavior differed by gender. However, by the end of their time in the MUVE, initial student self-efficacy no longer correlated with data gathering behaviors. In addition, students' level of self-efficacy did not affect how many different sources from which they chose to gather data. These results suggest that embedding science inquiry curricula in novel platforms like a MUVE might act as a catalyst for change in students' self-efficacy and learning processes.

  3. Full publication of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 European Association of Plastic Surgeons annual scientific meetings: a systemic bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Lydia P E; Hage, J Joris; Loonen, Martijn P J; Kon, Moshe

    2004-07-01

    From the multitude of oral presentations at major medical meetings, the most informative and highest-quality studies make it to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. The rate of publication may be regarded as an indicator of the scientific level of the meeting. Study of the publication rates of consecutive annual meetings allows for the evaluation of the consistency of the scientific level of these meetings and for comparison with publication rates of other meetings in the same field of interest. To grade how useful any publication is to other authors, one can furthermore measure how frequently they cite it in their own publications. Finally, the time lag between oral presentation and full publication is of importance to both its authors and the audience at the meeting. The main objectives of this study were to determine the publication rate of papers of various fields of interest as presented at five consecutive annual meetings of the European Association of Plastic Surgeons (EURAPS) and the time lag between these presentations and their publication. The authors compared their overall findings to those reported for other surgical specialties. Moreover, they identified and classified the journals in which the full publications appeared as an indicator of the scientific value of the meeting. They conclude that a greater than average number of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 annual EURAPS meetings went on to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. Among these journals, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was the best source for information presented at the meetings. Although approximately 90 percent of the publications appeared before 3 years had passed after a meeting, additional publications may be expected to appear even more than 6 years after the meeting. Given the high publication rate and the high average normalized impact factor of the journals in which the presentations appeared, the five studied EURAPS meetings overall had high scientific

  4. The European reference condition concept: A scientific and technical approach to identify minimally-impacted river ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Isabel; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Wasson, Jean-Gabriel; Owen, Roger; van de Bund, Wouter; Kelly, Martyn; Bennett, Cathy; Birk, Sebastian; Buffagni, Andrea; Erba, Stefania; Mengin, Nicolas; Murray-Bligh, John; Ofenböeck, Gisela

    2012-03-15

    One objective of the European Union (EU)'s Water Framework Directive (WFD: Directive 2000/60/EC) is for all European surface waters to achieve 'good status' by 2015. In support of this objective, the EU has facilitated an intercalibration exercise to ensure harmonized definitions of the status of water bodies, reflecting the deviation of their properties (mainly biotic assemblages) from a minimally disturbed state, termed the "reference condition". One of the major challenges of the WFD has been to find common approaches for defining reference conditions and to define the level of anthropogenic intervention allowed in reference sites. In this paper we describe how river reference sites were selected in the Central-Baltic region of Europe. A list of pressure criteria was provided and 14 Member States (MSs) categorized each criterion according to the method (i.e. measured, field inspection, etc.) used for reference site screening. Additionally, reference land-use and water-chemistry thresholds were agreed among countries in order to base reference site selection on objective criteria. For land-use criteria, a reference threshold and a rejection threshold were established. Sites with all criteria below the reference threshold were considered to be reference sites; sites having most criteria below the reference threshold and only some parameters between the reference and rejection threshold were "possible reference sites". These sites were retained only after carefully checking the cumulative effects of the pressures using local expertise, and a posteriori water-chemistry evaluation was necessary. In general, the most widespread method for defining a reference site was the measurement of pressures, followed by field inspections and expert judgment. However, some major pressures (e.g. hydromorphological alteration) were evaluated in a number of different ways (e.g. measured, field inspection, expert judgment). Our meta-analyses reveal a need to reinforce standardization

  5. Validation of the Oregon scientific BPW810 blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension Protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hui, Wang; Jin Lan, Wu

    2006-12-01

    To determine the accuracy of the BPW810 blood pressure monitor developed by IDT Technology Limited, according to the international protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The international protocol is divided into two phases: the first phase is performed on 15 selected participants and, if the device passes this phase, 18 more participants are included making a total of 33 participants on whom the final validation is performed. According to the European Society of Hypertension requirements, for each of the 33 participants, four blood pressure measurements were taken simultaneously by two trained observers, using mercury sphygmomanometers alternately with three measurements by the test device. The difference between the blood pressure value given by the device and mean of the two observers' readings was calculated for each measurement. The 99 differences were classified into zones (< or =5, < or =10, and < or =15 mmHg). The number of differences in each zone was compared with the number required by the international protocol. Furthermore, an individual analysis was then done to determine for each participant the number of comparisons < or =5 mmHg, which requires that at least 22 of the 33 participants should have two of three comparisons < or =5 mmHg. The BPW810 passed the first phase of the validation process for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. For the second phase, the difference between the device and mean of two observers was -2.2+/-4.8 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -0.5+/-3.7 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. In the last phase, 26 participants fell in the zone of two of the three comparisons lying within 5 mmHg and none of the participants fell in the zone of all three of the comparisons over 5 mmHg apart. The BPW810 passed all the phases of the international protocol for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

  6. Antibiotic therapy in the critically ill - expert opinion of the Intensive Care Medicine Scientific Subcommittee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  7. Antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients: expert opinion of the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-01-30

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  8. Home care robot for socially supporting the elderly: focus group studies in three European countries to screen user attitudes and requirements.

    PubMed

    Zsiga, Katalin; Edelmayer, Georg; Rumeau, Pierre; Péter, Orsolya; Tóth, András; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-12-01

    The growing number of elderly individuals presents new challenges for society. Many elderly individuals have physical or cognitive impairments and require support from caregivers. An attempt to overcome the limitations caused by the lack of human caregivers is the inclusion of assistive technology such as socially active robots. The Domeo-project of the Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme of the European Union aims to develop a new companion robotic system that would allow assistance to the elderly. The requirements and attitude of the potential users and caregivers have been assessed in Austria, France and Hungary. The robot functions were demonstrated to the participants. Three focus groups were formed: potential end users, older caregivers and younger caregivers. The discussions were recorded and processed according to six aspects: (i) acceptability and privacy, (ii) pertinence of services, (iii) possible obstacles, (iv) motivation level to use the proposed services, (v) organizational issues and (vi) recommendations. Minor differences were observed between the countries, but there were considerable differences regarding the age of the participants. The younger caregivers want to be assured of the safety of their client and to receive immediate notification in case of an emergency. As for the elderly, the most important aspect is to gain a companion and a physical helper. Many of the recommendations can be taken into consideration during robot development, but some of them are not realistic at present.

  9. Modelling and Predicting eHealth Usage in Europe: A Multidimensional Approach From an Online Survey of 13,000 European Union Internet Users.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sellens, Joan; Díaz-Chao, Ángel; Soler-Ramos, Ivan; Saigí-Rubió, Francesc

    2016-07-22

    More advanced methods and models are needed to evaluate the participation of patients and citizens in the shared health care model that eHealth proposes. The goal of our study was to design and evaluate a predictive multidimensional model of eHealth usage. We used 2011 survey data from a sample of 13,000 European citizens aged 16-74 years who had used the Internet in the previous 3 months. We proposed and tested an eHealth usage composite indicator through 2-stage structural equation modelling with latent variables and measurement errors. Logistic regression (odds ratios, ORs) to model the predictors of eHealth usage was calculated using health status and sociodemographic independent variables. The dimensions with more explanatory power of eHealth usage were health Internet attitudes, information health Internet usage, empowerment of health Internet users, and the usefulness of health Internet usage. Some 52.39% (6811/13,000) of European Internet users' eHealth usage was more intensive (greater than the mean). Users with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12-1.29) or receiving long-term treatment (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20), having family members with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.34-1.55), or undertaking care activities for other people (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.40-1.77) had a high propensity toward intensive eHealth usage. Sociodemographic predictors showed that Internet users who were female (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.14-1.31), aged 25-54 years (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.21), living in larger households (3 members: OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.15-1.36; 5 members: OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.97-1.28; ≥6 members: OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.57), had more children <16 years of age (1 child: OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.18-1.14; 2 children: OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17; 4 children: OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.88-2.08), and had more family members >65 years of age (1 member: OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18-1.50; ≥4 members: OR 1.82, 95% CI 0.54-6.03) had a greater propensity toward

  10. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun; Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  11. Using a multi-user virtual simulation to promote science content: Mastery, scientific reasoning, and academic self-efficacy in fifth grade science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronelus, Wednaud J.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of using a role-playing game versus a more traditional text-based instructional method on a cohort of general education fifth grade students' science content mastery, scientific reasoning abilities, and academic self-efficacy. This is an action research study that employs an embedded mixed methods design model, involving both quantitative and qualitative data. The study is guided by the critical design ethnography theoretical lens: an ethnographic process involving participatory design work aimed at transforming a local context while producing an instructional design that can be used in multiple contexts. The impact of an immersive 3D multi-user web-based educational simulation game on a cohort of fifth-grade students was examined on multiple levels of assessments--immediate, close, proximal and distal. A survey instrument was used to assess students' self-efficacy in technology and scientific inquiry. Science content mastery was assessed at the immediate (participation in game play), close (engagement in-game reports) and proximal (understanding of targeted concepts) levels; scientific reasoning was assessed at the distal (domain general critical thinking test) level. This quasi-experimental study used a convenient sampling method. Seven regular fifth-grade classes participated in this study. Three of the classes were the control group and the other four were the intervention group. A cohort of 165 students participated in this study. The treatment group contained 38 boys and 52 girls, and the control group contained 36 boys and 39 girls. Two-tailed t-test, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), and Pearson Correlation were used to analyze data. The data supported the rejection of the null hypothesis for the three research questions. The correlational analyses showed strong relationship among three of the four variables. There were no correlations between gender and the three dependent variables. The findings of this

  12. Modelling and Predicting eHealth Usage in Europe: A Multidimensional Approach From an Online Survey of 13,000 European Union Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Ramos, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background More advanced methods and models are needed to evaluate the participation of patients and citizens in the shared health care model that eHealth proposes. Objective The goal of our study was to design and evaluate a predictive multidimensional model of eHealth usage. Methods We used 2011 survey data from a sample of 13,000 European citizens aged 16–74 years who had used the Internet in the previous 3 months. We proposed and tested an eHealth usage composite indicator through 2-stage structural equation modelling with latent variables and measurement errors. Logistic regression (odds ratios, ORs) to model the predictors of eHealth usage was calculated using health status and sociodemographic independent variables. Results The dimensions with more explanatory power of eHealth usage were health Internet attitudes, information health Internet usage, empowerment of health Internet users, and the usefulness of health Internet usage. Some 52.39% (6811/13,000) of European Internet users’ eHealth usage was more intensive (greater than the mean). Users with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.29) or receiving long-term treatment (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03–1.20), having family members with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.34–1.55), or undertaking care activities for other people (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.40–1.77) had a high propensity toward intensive eHealth usage. Sociodemographic predictors showed that Internet users who were female (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.14–1.31), aged 25–54 years (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05–1.21), living in larger households (3 members: OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.15–1.36; 5 members: OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.97–1.28; ≥6 members: OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10–1.57), had more children <16 years of age (1 child: OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.18–1.14; 2 children: OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94–1.17; 4 children: OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.88–2.08), and had more family members >65 years of age (1 member: OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18–1.50; ≥4 members

  13. Relations between professional medical associations and healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  14. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  15. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a Policy Statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  16. Tracking and responding to a changing Arctic sea-ice cover: How ice users can help the scientific community design better observing systems (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, Hajo

    2010-05-01

    The Arctic sea-ice cover is undergoing a major transformation, with substantial reductions in summer ice extent reflecting changes in ice thickness, age, and circulation. These changes are impacting Arctic ecosystems and a range of human activities. Anticipating and responding to such impacts, exacerbated by increasing economic activity in parts of the Arctic, requires a foundation of environmental observations and model predictions. Recent increases in industrial activities such as shipping and resource development in parts of the Arctic have further highlighted the need for an integrated observing system. In the case of a changing sea-ice cover, how would one best design and optimize such a system? One of the challenges is to meet the information needs of the scientific community in furthering fundamental understanding of the Arctic system, as well as those of key stakeholders and society, helping them to prepare for and respond to Arctic change. This presentation focuses on how the concept of sea-ice system services, i.e., the uses and benefits (or harm) derived from sea ice, may help guide the implementation of an effective observing system. Principal service categories are (1) sea ice as climate regulator, marine hazard, and coastal buffer; (2) transportation and use of ice as a platform; (3) cultural services obtained from the "icescape"; and (4) support of food webs and biological diversity by sea ice. An analysis of the different ice services provided to different user groups can help prioritize different types of observations and determine optimal measurement strategies. Moreover, the focus on different uses of the ice cover may also help synthesize fundamental and applied research to help Arctic communities adapt in a changing environment. Alaska has experienced some of the most substantial changes in sea-ice conditions throughout the Arctic over the past three decades and is used to illustrate the concepts discussed above. Specifically, we have examined

  17. European meteorological data: contribution to research, development, and policy support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biavetti, Irene; Karetsos, Sotiris; Ceglar, Andrej; Toreti, Andrea; Panagos, Panos

    2014-08-01

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has developed Interpolated Meteorological Datasets available on a regular 25x25km grid both to the scientific community and the general public. Among others, the Interpolated Meteorological Datasets include daily maximum/minimum temperature, cumulated daily precipitation, evapotranspiration and wind speed. These datasets can be accessed through a web interface after a simple registration procedure. The Interpolated Meteorological Datasets also serve the Crop Growth Monitoring System (CGMS) at European level. The temporal coverage of the datasets is more than 30 years and the spatial coverage includes EU Member States, neighboring European countries, and the Mediterranean countries. The meteorological data are highly relevant for the development, implementation and assessment of a number of European Union (EU) policy areas: agriculture, soil protection, environment, agriculture, food security, energy, climate change. An online user survey has been carried out in order to assess the impact of the Interpolated Meteorological Datasets on research developments. More than 70% of the users have used the meteorological datasets for research purposes and more than 50% of the users have used those sources as main input for their models. The usefulness of the data scored more than 70% and it is interesting to note that around 25% of the users have published their scientific outputs based on the Interpolated Meteorological Datasets. Finally, the user feedback focuses mostly on improving the data distribution process as well as the visibility of the web platform.

  18. The European Medicines Agency review of eltrombopag (Revolade) for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Maria; Calvo, Gonzalo; Hudson, Ian; Feldschreiber, Peter; Brown, David; Lee, Ching Cheng; Lay, Geoffrey; Valeri, Anna; Abadie, Eric; Thomas, Angela; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    On 11th March 2010, the European Commission issued a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for Revolade for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura. Revolade is an orphan medicinal product indicated for splenectomized patients with immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura who are refractory to other treatments (e.g. corticosteroids, immunoglobulins) and as second-line treatment for non-splenectomized patients where surgery is contraindicated. The active substance of Revolade is eltrombopag (ATC code B02BX05). Eltrombopag increases platelet production through activation of the thrombopoietin receptor. The recommended oral dose is 50 mg once daily to achieve and maintain a platelet count of the 50×109/L or more necessary to reduce or prevent the risk of bleeding. The benefit of Revolade is a durable response in maintaining platelet levels. The most common side effects include headache, nausea, hepatobiliary toxicity, diarrhea, fatigue, paresthesia, constipation, rash, pruritus, cataract, arthralgia and myalgia. The decision to grant the marketing authorization was based on the favorable recommendation of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency. The objective of this paper is to describe the data submitted to the European Medicines Agency and to summarize the scientific review of the application. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21712542

  19. The European Medicines Agency review of pixantrone for the treatment of adult patients with multiply relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Péan, Elias; Flores, Beatriz; Hudson, Ian; Sjöberg, Jan; Dunder, Kristina; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    On May 10, 2012, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for pixantrone for the treatment of adult patients with multiply relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma (NHL). Pixantrone is a cytotoxic aza-anthracenedione that directly alkylates DNA-forming stable DNA adducts and cross-strand breaks. The recommended dose of pixantrone is 50 mg/m(2) administered on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle for up to 6 cycles. In the main study submitted for this application, a significant difference in response rate (proportion of complete responses and unconfirmed complete responses) was observed in favor of pixantrone (20.0% vs. 5.7% for pixantrone and physician's best choice, respectively), supported by the results of secondary endpoints of median progression-free and overall survival times (increase of 2.7 and 2.6 months, respectively). The most common side effects with pixantrone were bone marrow suppression (particularly of the neutrophil lineage) nausea, vomiting, and asthenia. This article summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the European Union. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu).

  20. Electromagnetic fields: activities in the European Commission with a focus on research projects and the Scientific Committee of Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR).

    PubMed

    Meroni, Donata; Schreck, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The article summarizes the main activities of the European Commission concerning electromagnetic fields. It explains also the regulatory context, with a special focus on past and current research projects funded by the European Union and the role of the SCENIHR in assessing risks related to EMF. Main conclusions of the SCENIHR opinion adopted in 2015 on EMF are reported.

  1. The European perspective for LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangler, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    LSST is a next generation telescope that will produce an unprecedented data flow. The project goal is to deliver data products such as images and catalogs thus enabling scientific analysis for a wide community of users. As a large scale survey, LSST data will be complementary with other facilities in a wide range of scientific domains, including data from ESA or ESO. European countries have invested in LSST since 2007, in the construction of the camera as well as in the computing effort. This latter will be instrumental in designing the next step: how to distribute LSST data to Europe. Astroinformatics challenges for LSST indeed includes not only the analysis of LSST big data, but also the practical efficiency of the data access.

  2. Metadata Management on the SCEC PetaSHA Project: Helping Users Describe, Discover, Understand, and Use Simulation Data in a Large-Scale Scientific Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D.; Deelman, E.; Maechling, P.; Wong-Barnum, M.; Jordan, T. H.; Meyers, D.

    2007-12-01

    Large scientific collaborations, such as the SCEC Petascale Cyberfacility for Physics-based Seismic Hazard Analysis (PetaSHA) Project, involve interactions between many scientists who exchange ideas and research results. These groups must organize, manage, and make accessible their community materials of observational data, derivative (research) results, computational products, and community software. The integration of scientific workflows as a paradigm to solve complex computations provides advantages of efficiency, reliability, repeatability, choices, and ease of use. The underlying resource needed for a scientific workflow to function and create discoverable and exchangeable products is the construction, tracking, and preservation of metadata. In the scientific workflow environment there is a two-tier structure of metadata. Workflow-level metadata and provenance describe operational steps, identity of resources, execution status, and product locations and names. Domain-level metadata essentially define the scientific meaning of data, codes and products. To a large degree the metadata at these two levels are separate. However, between these two levels is a subset of metadata produced at one level but is needed by the other. This crossover metadata suggests that some commonality in metadata handling is needed. SCEC researchers are collaborating with computer scientists at SDSC, the USC Information Sciences Institute, and Carnegie Mellon Univ. in order to perform earthquake science using high-performance computational resources. A primary objective of the "PetaSHA" collaboration is to perform physics-based estimations of strong ground motion associated with real and hypothetical earthquakes located within Southern California. Construction of 3D earth models, earthquake representations, and numerical simulation of seismic waves are key components of these estimations. Scientific workflows are used to orchestrate the sequences of scientific tasks and to access

  3. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME II, A. TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION, B. TECHNICAL APPENDICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    IN PHASE II OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) SURVEY TO FIND OUT HOW SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES ACQUIRE INFORMATION, SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL IN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY WERE INTERVIEWED TO DETERMINE THEIR INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF INFORMATION INHERENT IN SATISFYING THESE…

  4. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME II, A. TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION, B. TECHNICAL APPENDICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    IN PHASE II OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) SURVEY TO FIND OUT HOW SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES ACQUIRE INFORMATION, SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL IN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY WERE INTERVIEWED TO DETERMINE THEIR INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF INFORMATION INHERENT IN SATISFYING THESE…

  5. Paediatric cardiology in Europe--medical/scientific statement of the Association of European Paediatric Cardiologists. Definition of profession and training requirements.

    PubMed

    Daniëls, O; Choussat, A

    1994-02-01

    The treatment of growing and developing individuals with heart and circulation diseases demands expertise and organization. Due to the unification of Europe, international exchange of doctors can take place. The Association of European Paediatric Cardiologists had laid down professional and training requirements to harmonize the field of patient care, training and training institutes all over Europe.

  6. Space station user's handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A user's handbook for the modular space station concept is presented. The document is designed to acquaint science personnel with the overall modular space station program, the general nature and capabilities of the station itself, some of the scientific opportunities presented by the station, the general policy governing its operation, and the relationship between the program and participants from the scientific community.

  7. PREFACE: SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor: Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordely, Valentin; Kuklin, Alexander; Balasoiu, Maria

    2012-03-01

    The Second International Workshop 'SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor', devoted to the 75th anniversary of the birth of Professor Yu M Ostanevich (1936-1992), an outstanding neutron physicist and the founder of small-angle neutron scattering (field, group, and instrument) at JINR FLNPh, was held on 27-30 May at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. The first Workshop was held in October 2006. Research groups from different neutron centers, universities and research institutes across Europe presented more than 35 oral and poster presentations describing scientific and methodological results. Most of them were obtained with the help of the YuMO instrument before the IBR-2 shutdown in 2006. For the last four years the IBR-2 reactor has been shut down for refurbishment. At the end of 2010 the physical launch of the IBR-2M reactor was finally realized. Nowadays the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique is applied to a wide range of scientific problems in condensed matter, soft condensed matter, biology and nanotechnology, and despite the fact that there are currently over 30 SANS instruments in operation worldwide at both reactor and spallation sources, the demand for beam-time is considerably higher than the time available. It must be remembered, however, that as the first SANS machine on a steady-state reactor was constructed at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, the first SANS instrument on a 'white' neutron pulsed beam was accomplished at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at the IBR-30 reactor, beamline N5. During the meeting Yu M Ostanevich's determinative and crucial contribution to the construction of spectrometers at the IBR-2 high-pulsed reactor was presented, as well as his contribution to the development of the time-of-flight (TOF) small-angle scattering technique, and a selection of other scientific areas. His leadership and outstanding scientific achievements in applications of the

  8. The European medicines agency review of eribulin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Pean, Elias; Klaar, Sigrid; Berglund, Eva Gil; Salmonson, Tomas; Borregaard, Jeanett; Hofland, Kenneth F; Ersbøll, Jens; Abadie, Eric; Giuliani, Rosa; Pignatti, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    The European Commission issued on March 17, 2011, a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) for eribulin (Halaven; Eisai Limited). The decision was based on the favorable opinion of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use recommending a marketing authorization for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have progressed after at least 2 chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced disease. Eribulin mesylate is a structurally simplified synthetic analogue of halichondrin B, which is a natural product isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai (ATC code L01XX41). Eribulin is a nontaxane, microtubule dynamics inhibitor belonging to the halichondrin class of antineoplastic agents. Eribulin inhibits the growth phase of microtubules without affecting the shortening phase and sequesters tubulin into nonproductive aggregates leading to G(2)-M cell-cycle block, disruption of mitotic spindles, and, ultimately, apoptotic cell death after prolonged mitotic blockage. The recommended dose of eribulin is 1.23 mg/m(2) (equivalent to 1.4 mg/m(2) eribulin mesylate) to be administered intravenously over 2 to 5 min on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle. In the pivotal trial, eribulin was associated with increased overall survival in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who received at least 2 prior chemotherapy lines for advanced disease (median overall survival was 13.2 months in the eribulin arm vs. 10.6 months in the control arm; HR = 0.805; 95% confidence interval, 0.677-0.958; P = 0.014). The most common side effects are asthenia or fatigue and neutropenia. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary report and product information, including product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website.

  9. The new European Hubble archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Arevalo, Maria; Merin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The European Hubble Archive (hereafter eHST), hosted at ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre, has been released for public use in October 2015. The eHST is now fully integrated with the other ESA science archives to ensure long-term preservation of the Hubble data, consisting of more than 1 million observations from 10 different scientific instruments. The public HST data, the Hubble Legacy Archive, and the high-level science data products are now all available to scientists through a single, carefully designed and user friendly web interface. In this talk, I will show how the the eHST can help boost archival research, including how to search on sources in the field of view thanks to precise footprints projected onto the sky, how to obtain enhanced previews of imaging data and interactive spectral plots, and how to directly link observations with already published papers. To maximise the scientific exploitation of Hubble's data, the eHST offers connectivity to virtual observatory tools, easily integrates with the recently released Hubble Source Catalog, and is fully accessible through ESA's archives multi-mission interface.

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 22: Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is the creation of a generally accepted, systematically developed and implemented, but user focused, research agenda for the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) and the Technical Information Panel (TIP) member countries. Information use seldom exists as an isolated incident. Information use usually takes place within organizational and interpersonal contexts. Therefore, it should not be studied in isolation, but rather in an holistic environment. Once implemented, this research agenda could be completed within 3 to 5 years. The results would be generalizable to AGARD member nations, would form the basis for the development of theory based practice, and would form a significant body of knowledge that can be used by AGARD information professionals for policy, practice, product, and systems development.

  11. Students' Knowledge of Nuclear Science and Its Connection with Civic Scientific Literacy in Two European Contexts: The Case of Newspaper Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Hartzavalos, Sotiris; Nakiboglu, Canan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science has uses and applications that are relevant and crucial for world peace and sustainable development, so knowledge of its basic concepts and topics should constitute an integral part of civic scientific literacy. We have used two newspaper articles that deal with uses of nuclear science that are directly relevant to life, society,…

  12. Students' Knowledge of Nuclear Science and Its Connection with Civic Scientific Literacy in Two European Contexts: The Case of Newspaper Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Hartzavalos, Sotiris; Nakiboglu, Canan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science has uses and applications that are relevant and crucial for world peace and sustainable development, so knowledge of its basic concepts and topics should constitute an integral part of civic scientific literacy. We have used two newspaper articles that deal with uses of nuclear science that are directly relevant to life, society,…

  13. Maternal obesity in Europe: where do we stand and how to move forward?: A scientific paper commissioned by the European Board and College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG).

    PubMed

    Devlieger, Roland; Benhalima, Katrien; Damm, Peter; Van Assche, André; Mathieu, Chantal; Mahmood, Tahir; Dunne, Fidelma; Bogaerts, Annick

    2016-06-01

    Paralleling the global epidemic of obesity figures in the general population, the incidence of maternal obesity (BMI>30kg/m(2) at the start of pregnancy) has been rising over the last world. While most European countries do not systematically report obesity figures in their pregnant population, the prevalence of maternal obesity varies from 7 to 25% and seems strongly related to social and educational inequalities. Obesity during pregnancy represents an important preventable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes and is associated with negative long-term health outcomes for both mothers and offspring. These effects are often aggravated by the high incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance and excessive gestational weight gain found in this group. The main controversies around the management of the obese pregnant women are related to (1) the value of repeated weighing during pregnancy, (2) the optimal gestational weight gain to advise and the lifestyle messages to deliver in order to achieve this, (3) the optimal strategy and timing of screening for gestational diabetes (GDM) and (4) the optimal timing and mode of delivery. These controversies are reviewed in this review, with the exception of screening for gestational diabetes that is discussed extensively elsewhere in this issue (Benhalima et al.). An agenda for research is proposed with the hope that it will catch the attention of policy-makers and funders and ultimately lead to the development of European-wide evidence-based guidelines for clinicians.

  14. Space weather: European Space Agency perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E. J.; Hilgers, A.

    Spacecraft and payloads have become steadily more sophisticated and therefore more susceptible to space weather effects. ESA has long been active in applying models and tools to the problems associated with such effects on its spacecraft. In parallel, ESA and European agencies have built a highly successful solar-terrestrial physics capability. ESA is now investigating the marriage of these technological and scientific capabilities to address perceived user needs for space weather products and services. Two major ESA-sponsored studies are laying the groundwork for a possible operational European space weather service. The wide-ranging activities of ESA in the Space Weather/Space Environment domain are summarized and recent important examples of space weather concerns given.

  15. Patient Use of Email for Health Care Communication Purposes Across 14 European Countries: An Analysis of Users According to Demographic and Health-Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Codagnone, Cristiano; Atherton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of the Internet for health purposes is growing steadily, yet the use of asynchronous communication tools for health care purposes remains undeveloped. The introduction of email as a method of communication in health care has the potential to impact on both patients and health care professionals. Objective This study aims to describe the characteristics of people who have sent or received an email to or from their doctor, nurse, or health care organization, by country and in relation to demographics, health care resource use, and health status factors. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data (N=14,000) collected from the online Citizens and Information Communication Technology for Health survey, a project undertaken in 2011 by the Institute for Prospective Technology Studies of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. The survey was developed to understand and characterize European citizens’ use of information communication technologies for health. Descriptive and statistical analyses of association were used to interpret the data. Results Denmark reported the highest level of emails sent/received (507/1000, 50.70%). The lowest level reported was by participants in France (187/1000, 18.70%). Men used email communication for health care more than women, as did respondents in the 16-24 age group and those educated to tertiary level or still within the education system. As self-reported health state worsens, the proportion of people reporting having sent or received an email within the context of health care increases. Email use, poor health, multimorbidity, and number of visits to a physician are positively correlated. Conclusions The use of email communication within the context of European health care is extremely varied. The relationship between high email use, poor health, doctor visits, and multimorbidity is especially pertinent: provision of asynchronous communication for such groups is favored by policymakers. Low

  16. Patient use of email for health care communication purposes across 14 European countries: an analysis of users according to demographic and health-related factors.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Nikki; Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Codagnone, Cristiano; Atherton, Helen

    2015-03-06

    The use of the Internet for health purposes is growing steadily, yet the use of asynchronous communication tools for health care purposes remains undeveloped. The introduction of email as a method of communication in health care has the potential to impact on both patients and health care professionals. This study aims to describe the characteristics of people who have sent or received an email to or from their doctor, nurse, or health care organization, by country and in relation to demographics, health care resource use, and health status factors. We conducted a secondary analysis of data (N=14,000) collected from the online Citizens and Information Communication Technology for Health survey, a project undertaken in 2011 by the Institute for Prospective Technology Studies of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre. The survey was developed to understand and characterize European citizens' use of information communication technologies for health. Descriptive and statistical analyses of association were used to interpret the data. Denmark reported the highest level of emails sent/received (507/1000, 50.70%). The lowest level reported was by participants in France (187/1000, 18.70%). Men used email communication for health care more than women, as did respondents in the 16-24 age group and those educated to tertiary level or still within the education system. As self-reported health state worsens, the proportion of people reporting having sent or received an email within the context of health care increases. Email use, poor health, multimorbidity, and number of visits to a physician are positively correlated. The use of email communication within the context of European health care is extremely varied. The relationship between high email use, poor health, doctor visits, and multimorbidity is especially pertinent: provision of asynchronous communication for such groups is favored by policymakers. Low reported email use by country may not necessarily reflect

  17. The European Medicines Agency Review of Tegafur/Gimeracil/Oteracil (Teysuno™) for the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer When Given in Combination with Cisplatin: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP)

    PubMed Central

    van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo Rojas, Gonzalo; ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The product Teysuno™ (S-1) contains tegafur, a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and two modulators of 5-FU metabolism, gimeracil and oteracil. The main clinical study in this application was a randomized controlled study comparing S-1 plus cisplatin with 5-FU plus cisplatin. In this study, median overall survival times of 8.6 months and 7.9 months for S-1 plus cisplatin and 5-FU plus cisplatin, respectively, were observed (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–1.05). The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency concluded that S-1 in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2) was noninferior to 5-FU plus cisplatin (100 mg/m2) in patients with advanced gastric cancer and adopted a positive opinion recommending the marketing authorization for this product for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin. The recommended dose of S-1 is 25 mg/m2 (expressed as tegafur content) twice a day, for 21 consecutive days followed by 7 days rest (one treatment cycle), in combination with 75 mg/m2 cisplatin i.v. administered on day 1. This treatment cycle is repeated every 4 weeks. The most common side effects reported in the pivotal study were anemia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight decrease, anorexia, and fatigue. The objective of this paper is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The full scientific assessment report and the summary of product characteristics are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21963999

  18. Astrium spaceplane for scientific missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavagnac, Christophe; Gai, Frédéric; Gharib, Thierry; Mora, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Since years Novespace and Astrium are discussing mutual interest in cooperating together when considering Novespace well established capabilities and the ongoing development of the Astrium Spaceplane and its unique features. Indeed both companies are proposing service for non-public missions which require microgravity environment especially. It relies on assets of both parties: Novespace in operating 0-G aircraft platforms for the sake of the European scientific community for decades; Astrium and its Spaceplane currently in pre-development phase. Novespace and its Airbus A300 Zero-G exhibit a unique know-how in Europe for operating scientific payload on aeronautic platform(s). Moreover Astrium is preparing the development of a safe and passenger friendly Spaceplane, taking off and landing from a standard airport runway powered by turbofans and using a rocket engine of proven design to reach 100 km altitude. The paper details the joint service offered and the added value of the partnership of Novespace and Astrium for various end-users. In addition longer duration of on-board microgravity periods and ultra high altitude features of the Astrium Spaceplane mission expand the scope of possible non-public applications which includes e.g.: Earth system science and probing of uncharted layers of Earth atmosphere on a regular basis and in various locations worldwide; Spaceflight crew training.

  19. Easily cracked: scientific instruments in states of disrepair.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Simon

    2011-12-01

    There has been much scholarly attention to definitions of the term "scientific instrument." Rather more mundane work by makers, curators, and users is devoted to instruments' maintenance and repair. A familiar argument holds that when a tool breaks, its character and recalcitrance become evident. Much can be gained from historical study of instruments' breakages, defects, and recuperation. Maintenance and repair technologies have been a vital aspect of relations between makers and other users. Their history illuminates systems of instruction, support, and abuse. These systems were, for example, evident in the development of astronomical instruments around 1800 within and beyond the European sphere. Episodes from that milieu are used to explore how instrument users sought autonomy, how instruments' mutable character was defined, and how judgments of instruments' failure or success were ever secured.

  20. Joint Efforts Towards European HF Radar Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, A.; Mader, J.; Griffa, A.; Mantovani, C.; Corgnati, L.; Novellino, A.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Quentin, C.; Wyatt, L.; Ruiz, M. I.; Lorente, P.; Hartnett, M.; Gorringe, P.

    2016-12-01

    During the past two years, significant steps have been made in Europe for achieving the needed accessibility to High Frequency Radar (HFR) data for a pan-European use. Since 2015, EuroGOOS Ocean Observing Task Teams (TT), such as HFR TT, are operational networks of observing platforms. The main goal is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of HFR data access and tools. Particular attention is being paid by HFR TT to converge from different projects and programs toward those common objectives. First, JERICO-NEXT (Joint European Research Infrastructure network for Coastal Observatory - Novel European eXpertise for coastal observaTories, H2020 2015 Programme) will contribute on describing the status of the European network, on seeking harmonization through exchange of best practices and standardization, on developing and giving access to quality control procedures and new products, and finally on demonstrating the use of such technology in the general scientific strategy focused by the Coastal Observatory. Then, EMODnet (European Marine Observation and Data Network) Physics started to assemble HF radar metadata and data products within Europe in a uniform way. This long term program is providing a combined array of services and functionalities to users for obtaining free of charge data, meta-data and data products on the physical conditions of European sea basins and oceans. Additionally, the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) delivers from 2015 a core information service to any user related to 4 areas of benefits: Maritime Safety, Coastal and Marine Environment, Marine Resources, and Weather, Seasonal Forecasting and Climate activities. INCREASE (Innovation and Networking for the integration of Coastal Radars into EuropeAn marine SErvices - CMEMS Service Evolution 2016) will set the necessary developments towards the integration of existing European

  1. An European pupil project linked to the scientific aims of the experiment AQUARIUS-XENOPUS on the taxi Soyuz flight Andromede to ISS.

    PubMed

    Dournon, Christian; Membre, Herve; Brohm, Pierre-Eric; Coince, Aurore; Cornu, Nathalie; Dreyer, Laura; Florentin, Jonathan; Jeanneau, Lydie; Henniquin, Camille; Houbre, Marie; Guerard, Marine; Lecomte, Nathalie; Maxant, Lorie; Schluraff, Marion; Venandet, Anne-Sophie; Jusyte, Aiste; Simmet, Dana; Bocking, Dominique; Flaig, Dorothee; Santak, Leo; Bolek, Steffen; Goppel, Verena; Rossignon, Jean-Paul; Trossat, Marie-Alice; Raux, Martine; Forster, Susanne; Staudenmaier, Gerd; Boser, Sybille; Horn, Eberhard

    2002-07-01

    The German-French biological experiment AQUARIUS-XENOPUS which flew on the Soyuz flight Andromede to the International Space Station ISS (launched October 21, 2001 in Baikonour/Kazakhstan) was extended by an outreach project. Pupils of class 10 to 12 from Ulm/D and Nancy-Tomblaine/F studied swimming behavior of Xenopus tadpoles on ground. They were instructed to perform all experimental steps following the protocol of similar video recordings on ISS. After the flight, they evaluated the kinetics of swimming of both ground controls and space animals. The pupil project included theoretical components to introduce them to the field of gravitational biology. One feature of the project was the exchange of ideas between pupils by meetings which took place in Ulm (June 2001), Nancy (February 2002) and Paris (May 2002). We consider our approach as a successful way to include young people in space experiments on a cheap cost level and to bring ideas of gravitational biology into the curricula of European schools.

  2. GLAST User Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, David L.; Science Support Center, GLAST

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission will provide the user community with many scientific opportunities. The mission's interface with the user community is the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC). Yearly guest investigator (GI) cycles will support research related to GLAST. After the first year GIs may propose pointed observations; however, as a consequence of the large field-of-view of GLAST's instruments, pointed observations will rarely have an advantage over the default survey mode. Data, analysis software and documentation will be provided through the GSSC website (http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/); the website also includes a library of scientific results, and a helpdesk.

  3. Level 4 Global and European Chl-a Daily Analyses for End Users and Data Assimilation in the Frame of the Copernicus-Marine Environment Monitoring Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulquin, Bertrand; Gohin, Francis; Garnesson, Philippe; Demaria, Julien; Mangin, Antoine; Fanton d'Andon, Odile

    2016-08-01

    The level-4 daily chl-a products are a combination of a water typed merge of chl-a estimates and an optimal interpolation based on the kriging method with regional anisotropic models [1, 2]. The Level 4 products basically pro- vide a global continuous (cloud free) estimation of the surface chl-a concentration at 4 km resolution over the world and 1 km resolution over the Europe. The level-4 products gather MODIS, MERIS, SeaWiFS, VIIRS and OLCI daily observations from 1998 to now.The Level 4 product avoids end users to consider typical lack of data as observed during cloudy conditions and the historical multiplicity of available algorithms such as involved by case 1 (oligotrophic) and case 2 (turbid) water issues in ocean colour. [3, 4].A total product uncertainty, i.e. a combination of the interpolation and the estimation error, is provided for each daily product. The L4 products are freely distributed in the frame of the Copernicus - Marine environment monitoring service.

  4. Risk assessment of ochratoxin: current views of the European Scientific Committee on Food, the JECFA and the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ron

    2002-01-01

    The chlorinated isocoumarin compound, ochratoxin A (OTA), together with some related derivatives (ochratoxins B, C, alpha, beta) are produced by Penicillium verrucosum and by several spp. of Aspergillus, most notably A. ochraceus. P. verrucosum is the principal source of OTA contamination of stored foods in temperate climates while Aspergillus spp. predominate in warmer countries. The major dietary sources of OTA are cereals but significant levels of contamination may be found in grape juice and red wine, coffee, cocoa, nuts, spices and dried fruits. Because of the chemical stability of OTA and long half-life in mammalian tissues, contamination may also carry over into pork and pig blood products and into beer. OTA is potently nephrotoxic and carcinogenic, the potency varying markedly between species and sexes; it is also teratogenic and immunotoxic. There have been different approaches to the risk assessment of OTA in different jurisdictions, largely arising from whether or not the carcinogenicity of OTA is considered to arise through a thresholded or non-thresholded mechanism. Consequently the tolerable intakes have variously been estimated at 100 ng/kg bw/week (JECFA), 1.5 to 5.7 ng/kg bw/day (Canada) and not more than 5 ng/kg bw/day (European Commission). These differences are also reflected in risk management measures that have been implemented or proposed with different maximum contamination levels being applied to different commodities and to the same commodity in different countries. Prevention of contamination at source is considered to be the most effective public health measure. There is also a need to harmonise the risk assessment and management processes to a greater extent than currently exist if barriers to trade are to be avoided.

  5. Students' Knowledge of Nuclear Science and Its Connection with Civic Scientific Literacy in Two European Contexts: The Case of Newspaper Articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Hartzavalos, Sotiris; Nakiboğlu, Canan

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear science has uses and applications that are relevant and crucial for world peace and sustainable development, so knowledge of its basic concepts and topics should constitute an integral part of civic scientific literacy. We have used two newspaper articles that deal with uses of nuclear science that are directly relevant to life, society, economy, and international politics. One article discusses a new thermonuclear reactor, and the second one is about depleted uranium and its danger for health. 189 first-year undergraduate physics and primary education Greek students were given one of the two articles each, and asked to answer a number of accompanying questions dealing with knowledge that is part of the Greek high school curriculum. The study was repeated with 272 first-year undergraduate physics, physics education, science education, and primary education Turkish students. Acceptable or partially acceptable answers were provided on average by around 20 % of Greek and 11 % of Turkish students, while a large proportion (on the average, around 50 % of Greek and 27 % of Turkish students) abstained from answering the questions. These findings are disappointing, but should be seen in the light of the limited or no coverage of the relevant learning material in the Greek and the Turkish high-school programs. Student conceptual difficulties, misconceptions and implications for research and high school curricula are discussed.

  6. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Benveniste, Jerome; Delwart, Steven; Engdahl, Marcus; Regner, Peter; Zehner, Claus; Mathieu, Pierre Philippe; Arino, Olivier; Bojkov, Bojan; Ferran, Gaston; Donlon, Craig; Kern, Michael; Scipal, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    The prime objective of the ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) programme element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have built up over the last 20 years. It aims to further strengthen the international leadership of European Earth Observation research community by enabling them to extensively exploit observations from future European operational EO missions. SEOM will enable the science community to address many new avenues of scientific research that will be opened by free and open access to data from operational EO missions. As a preparation for the SEOM element a series of international science users consultation has been organized by ESA in 2012 covering Sentinel 1 (FRINGE /SEASAR ), Sentinel 2 ( S2 symposium), Sentinel 3 (COAST-ALT workshop , 20 Years Progress in Radar Altimetry, Sentinel 3 OLCI/SLSTR 2012 workshop) and Sentinel 4-5 (Atmospheric Science Confrence). The science users recommendations have been gathered and form the basis for the work plan 2013 for the SEOM element. The SEOM element is organized along the following action lines: 1. Developing, validating and maintaining open-source, multi-mission, scientific software toolboxes capable to handle the Sentinels data products 2. Stimulating the development and validation of advanced EO methods and observation strategies in particular the new TOpS mode on Sentinel 1, the new band settings on Sentinel 2, the new geometry/bands of Sentinel 3 OLCI ,SLSTR intruments and the advanced delay-doppler (SAR) altimeter exploitation. 3. Continuing to federate, support and expand the multi-disciplinary expert EO research communities by organizing thematic workshops and ensuring high-quality scientific publications linked to these research domains. Promoting widespread scientific use of data. 4. Training the next generation of European EO scientists on the scientific exploitation of Sentinel s data

  7. European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter (EuCPAD), a novel dosimetry system utilizing operational and scientific synergies for the benefit of humans in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straube, Ulrich; Berger, Thomas

    A significant expansion of Human presence in space can be recognized over the last decade. Not only the frequency of human space mission did rise, but also time in space, mission duration with extended flights lasting half a year or more are becoming "standard". Despite the challenges to human health and well-being are still significant, or may even increase with mission length and work density. Also radiation exposure in space remains one of the inevitable and dominating factors relevant to crew- health, -safety and therefore mission success. The radiation environment that the space crews are exposed to differs significantly as compared to earth. Exposure in flight exceed doses that are usually received by terrestrial radiation workers on ground. Expanding "medical" demands are not a solely characteristics of current and current and upcoming mission scenarios. Likewise the margins for what is understood as "efficient utilization" for the fully operational science platform ISS, are immense. Understanding, accepting and approaching these challenges ESA-HSO did choose a particular pass of implementation for one of their current developments. Exploiting synergies of research, science and medical operational aspects, the "European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter for Astronauts (EuCPAD)" development exactly addresses these circumstances. It becomes novel part of ESA Radiation Protection Initiative for astronauts. The EuCPAD project aims at the development and manufacturing of an active (powered) dosimeter system to measure astronaut's exposures, support risk assessment dose management by providing a differentiated data set. Final goal is the verification of the system capabilities for medical monitoring at highest standards. The EuCPAD consists of several small portable Personal Active Dosimeters (MU = Mobile Unitas) and a rack mounted docking station “Personal Storage Device (PSD)” for MU storage, data read out and telemetry. The PSD furthermore contains a Tissue

  8. Science in bullet points: How to compile scientific results to underpin guidelines for CO2 storage for the German transposition of the European CCS Directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streibel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    In 2012 the German Parliament passed the transposition of the EC Directive 2009/31/EC the "Carbon Dioxide Storage Law" (KSpG). The law focuses on the demonstration of the CO2 storage technology and mainly regulates the storage part of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) chain. As the law has a conceptual character, appendix 1 provides a description of criteria for the characterisation and assessment of a potential CO2 storage site starting with field data ending with requirements for dynamic modelling of the storage complex. Appendix 2 describes the expected monitoring system during all relevant phases of a life cycle of a CO2 storage site. The criteria given in the appendices are of general nature, which reflects on one hand that the CO2 storage technology is still being developed and on the other hand that site specific aspects needs to be considered. In 2004 the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany launched the programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN with one key aspect being the development of technologies for a sustainable storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations. Within this research field more than 30 projects in three phases have been funded until the end of 2014. In order to benefit from the gathered knowledge and use the experiences for the policy/law making process the umbrella project AUGE has been launched in October 2012 with a life time of three years. The aim of the project is to review and compile all results of projects funded during the three phases to underpin the appendices of the KSpG. In the first part of the paper the most important findings of the project with regard to the overall risk of a geological CO2 storage and the procedure of compiling the guidance document will be discussed. Milestones of this project were • the compilation of the results of national, European and international projects; • interviews with stakeholders; • a workshops to define state of the art for certain involved technologies and existing gaps

  9. Grand European and Asian-Pacific multi-model seasonal forecasts: maximization of skill and of potential economical value to end-users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandri, Andrea; De Felice, Matteo; Catalano, Franco; Lee, June-Yi; Wang, Bin; Lee, Doo Young; Yoo, Jin-Ho

    2017-04-01

    Multi-Model Ensembles (MMEs) are powerful tools in dynamical climate prediction as they account for the overconfidence and the uncertainties related to single-model errors. Previous works suggested that the potential benefit that can be expected by using a MME amplify with the increase of the independence of the contributing Seasonal Prediction Systems. In this work we combine the two Multi Model Ensemble (MME) Seasonal Prediction Systems (SPSs) independently developed by the European (ENSEMBLES) and by the Asian-Pacific (APCC/CliPAS) communities. To this aim, all the possible multi-model combinations obtained by putting together the 5 models from ENSEMBLES and the 11 models from APCC/CliPAS have been evaluated. The grand ENSEMBLES-APCC/CliPAS multi-model enhances significantly the skill in predicting 2m temperature and precipitation compared to previous estimates from the contributing MMEs. It is shown that the marginal performance contribution tends to be higher when adding one model from ENSEMBLES to APCC/CliPAS MMEs and vice versa, confirming that the benefit of using MMEs amplify with the increase of the independence the contributing models. Indeed, our results show that, in general, the better combinations of SPSs are obtained by mixing ENSEMBLES and APCC/CliPAS models and that only a limited number of SPSs is required to obtain the maximum performance. The number and selection of models that perform better is usually different depending on the region/phenomenon under consideration so that all models are useful in some cases. To verify the above results for a real world application, the Grand ENSEMBLES-APCC/CliPAS MME is used to predict retrospective energy demand over Italy as provided by TERNA (Italian Transmission System Operator) for the period 1990-2007. The results demonstrate the useful application of MME seasonal predictions for energy demand forecasting over Italy. It is shown a significant enhancement of the potential economic value of forecasting

  10. Grand European and Asian-Pacific multi-model seasonal forecasts: maximization of skill and of potential economical value to end-users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandri, Andrea; Felice, Matteo De; Catalano, Franco; Lee, June-Yi; Wang, Bin; Lee, Doo Young; Yoo, Jin-Ho; Weisheimer, Antije

    2017-06-01

    Multi-model ensembles (MMEs) are powerful tools in dynamical climate prediction as they account for the overconfidence and the uncertainties related to single-model ensembles. Previous works suggested that the potential benefit that can be expected by using a MME amplifies with the increase of the independence of the contributing Seasonal Prediction Systems. In this work we combine the two MME Seasonal Prediction Systems (SPSs) independently developed by the European (ENSEMBLES) and by the Asian-Pacific (APCC/CliPAS) communities. To this aim, all the possible multi-model combinations obtained by putting together the 5 models from ENSEMBLES and the 11 models from APCC/CliPAS have been evaluated. The grand ENSEMBLES-APCC/CliPAS MME enhances significantly the skill in predicting 2m temperature and precipitation compared to previous estimates from the contributing MMEs. Our results show that, in general, the better combinations of SPSs are obtained by mixing ENSEMBLES and APCC/CliPAS models and that only a limited number of SPSs is required to obtain the maximum performance. The number and selection of models that perform better is usually different depending on the region/phenomenon under consideration so that all models are useful in some cases. It is shown that the incremental performance contribution tends to be higher when adding one model from ENSEMBLES to APCC/CliPAS MMEs and vice versa, confirming that the benefit of using MMEs amplifies with the increase of the independence the contributing models. To verify the above results for a real world application, the Grand ENSEMBLES-APCC/CliPAS MME is used to predict retrospective energy demand over Italy as provided by TERNA (Italian Transmission System Operator) for the period 1990-2007. The results demonstrate the useful application of MME seasonal predictions for energy demand forecasting over Italy. It is shown a significant enhancement of the potential economic value of forecasting energy demand when using the

  11. User Modeling in Adaptive Hypermedia Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Antonio Constantino; Faria, Luiz; Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Carrapatoso, Eurico

    2008-01-01

    This document is a survey in the research area of User Modeling (UM) for the specific field of Adaptive Learning. The aims of this document are: To define what it is a User Model; To present existing and well known User Models; To analyze the existent standards related with UM; To compare existing systems. In the scientific area of User Modeling…

  12. Toxic element mobility assessment and modeling for regional geo-scientific survey to support Risk Assessment in a European Union context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdaal, Ahmed; Jordan, Gyozo; Bartha, Andras; Fugedi, Ubul

    2013-04-01

    The Mine Waste Directive 2006/21/EC requires the risk-based inventory of all mine waste sites in Europe. The geochemical documentation concerning inert classification and ranking of the mine wastes requires detailed field study and laboratory testing and analyses of waste material to assess the Acid Mine Drainage potential and toxic element mobility. The procedure applied in this study used a multi-level decision support scheme including: 1) expert judgment, 2) data review, 3) representative field sampling and laboratory analysis of formations listed in the Inert Mining Waste List, and 4) requesting available laboratory analysis data from selected operating mines. Based on expert judgment, the listed formations were classified into three categories. A: inert B: probably inert, but has to be checked, C: probably not inert, has to be examined. This paper discusses the heavy metal contamination risk assessment (RA) in leached quarry-mine waste sites in Hungary. In total 34 mine waste sites (including tailing lagoons and heaps of both abandoned mines and active quarries) have been selected for scientific testing using the EU Pre-selection Protocol. Over 93 field samples have been collected from the mine sites including Ore (Andesite and Ryolite), Coal (Lignite, black and brown coals), Peat, Alginite, Bauxite, Clay and Limestone. Laboratory analyses of the total toxic element content (aqua regia extraction), the mobile toxic element content (deionized water leaching) and the analysis of different forms of sulfur (sulfuric acid potential) ) on the base of Hungarian GKM Decree No. 14/2008. (IV. 3) concerning mining waste management. A detailed geochemical study together with spatial analysis and GIS has been performed to derive a geochemically sound contamination RA of the mine waste sites. Key parameters such as heavy metal and sulphur content, in addition to the distance to the nearest surface and ground water bodies, or to sensitive receptors such as settlements and

  13. Program Supports Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    Primary purpose of General Visualization System (GVS) computer program is to support scientific visualization of data generated by panel-method computer program PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on Silicon Graphics Iris workstation. Enables user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. GVS is written in C language.

  14. Program Supports Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    Primary purpose of General Visualization System (GVS) computer program is to support scientific visualization of data generated by panel-method computer program PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on Silicon Graphics Iris workstation. Enables user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. GVS is written in C language.

  15. EREP users handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Revised Skylab spacecraft, experiments, and mission planning information is presented for the Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) users. The major hardware elements and the medical, scientific, engineering, technology and earth resources experiments are described. Ground truth measurements and EREP data handling procedures are discussed. The mission profile, flight planning, crew activities, and aircraft support are also outlined.

  16. User Scientific Data Systems: Experience Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobinson, Elain R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an abbreviated history of NASA science data management system development over the past ten years by selecting two case studies, each representative of a distinct era of science data management systems.

  17. European journals on microbiology.

    PubMed

    Ronda, C; Vázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    A survey on the scientific journals dealing with microbiology published in Europe has been carried out. Eighteen European countries publish microbiological journals with the United Kingdom. Netherlands and Germany leading in number of journals on this specialty. Most of the European journals on microbiology are published bimonthly (27%), and English is the most common language used (54%). Most of these journals (86%) are included in some database, but only 36 (25%) are indexed in the six databases studied. Out of the 146 journals registered, 71 (49%), published in 11 European countries, are included in the 1995 Journal Citation Reports (ISI, Philadelphia).

  18. The European Medicines Agency approval of axitinib (Inlyta) for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma after failure of prior treatment with sunitinib or a cytokine: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Tzogani, Kyriaki; Skibeli, Venke; Westgaard, Ingunn; Dalhus, Marianne; Thoresen, Hege; Slot, Karsten Bruins; Damkier, Per; Hofland, Kenneth; Borregaard, Jeanett; Ersbøll, Jens; Salmonson, Tomas; Pieters, Ronny; Sylvester, Richard; Mickisch, Gerald; Bergh, Jonas; Pignatti, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Axitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1), VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3. Based on the positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) was issued for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after failure of prior treatment with sunitinib or a cytokine. The demonstration of clinical benefit for axitinib was based on a phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter study of axitinib compared with sorafenib in patients with advanced RCC after failure of a prior systemic first-line regimen containing one or more of the following agents: sunitinib, bevacizumab plus interferon-α, temsirolimus, or cytokines. In the primary analysis, a 2-month increase in median progression-free survival (PFS) was observed for axitinib compared with sorafenib (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.665; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.544-0.812; p < .0001). In the subgroup of patients with a prior cytokine-containing regimen, the increase in median PFS associated with axitinib was 5.4 months (updated analysis, HR: 0.519; 95% CI: 0.375-0.720; p < .0001). In the subgroup of patients with prior sunitinib treatment, the increase in median PFS was 1.4 months (updated analysis, HR: 0.736; 95% CI: 0.578-0.937; p = .0063). The analysis of overall survival showed no statistically significant survival benefit of axitinib over sorafenib in patients previously treated with cytokine-containing regimens (HR: 0.813; 95% CI: 0.556-1.191) or sunitinib (HR: 0.997; 95% CI: 0.782-1.270). The most common treatment-related adverse events associated with axitinib included diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, nausea, decreased appetite, dysphonia, and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. Most of these events were mild or moderate in severity. This paper summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information

  19. The European Medicines Agency review of ofatumumab (Arzerra®) for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab: summary of the scientific assessment of the European medicines agency committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Gravanis, Iordanis; Ersbøll, Jens; Skovlund, Eva; Abadie, Eric; Marty, Michel; Pignatti, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    On April 19, 2010, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) for ofatumumab (Arzerra®; Glaxo Group Ltd, Greenford, Middlesex, U.K.). The decision was based on the favorable opinion of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use recommending a conditional marketing authorization for ofatumumab for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in patients refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab. A conditional marketing authorization means that additional data to confirm the benefit-risk balance of ofatumumab are awaited. The active substance of Arzerra® is ofatumumab, a monoclonal antibody medicinal product (ATC code L01XC10). The recommended dose is 300 mg of atumumab for the first infusion and 2,000 mg of atumumab for all subsequent infusions. The infusion schedule is eight consecutive weekly infusions, followed 4-5 weeks later by four consecutive monthly (i.e., every 4 weeks) infusions. Ofatumumab targets CD20, a cell surface marker of B lymphocytes, which is followed by cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The benefit of ofatumumab is the control of CLL in patients who are refractory to both fludarabine and alemtuzumab, which was indicated by a high response rate. The most common side effects are infections and infusion reactions. The objective of this paper is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the EMA website (http://www.ema.europa.eu).

  20. What Audience for European Television?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendelbo, Harald Arni

    This discussion of the audience for European television argues that satellite television has taken an upside-down approach, i.e., it has begun by focusing on the hardware, and then the software, before checking to see if there would be a user at the end of the line willing to pay for the whole operation. "European television" is then…

  1. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Regner, Peter; Delwart, Steven; Benveniste, Jerome; Engdahl, Marcus; Zehner, Claus; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Bojkov, Bojan; Gascon, Ferran; Donlon, Craig; Davidson, Malcolm; Goryl, Philippe; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    SEOM is a program element within the fourth period (2013-2017) of ESA's Earth Observation Envelope Programme (http://seom.esa.int/). The prime objective is to federate, support and expand the international research community that the ERS,ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have built up over the last 25 years. It aims to further strengthen the leadership of the European Earth Observation research community by enabling them to extensively exploit future European operational EO missions. SEOM will enable the science community to address new scientific research that are opened by free and open access to data from operational EO missions. Based on community-wide recommendations for actions on key research issues, gathered through a series of international thematic workshops and scientific user consultation meetings, a work plan has been established and is approved every year by ESA Members States. The 2015 SEOM work plan is covering the organisation of three Science users consultation workshops for Sentinel1/3/5P , the launch of new R&D studies for scientific exploitation of the Sentinels, the development of open-source multi-mission scientific toolboxes, the organisation of advanced international training courses, summer schools and educational materials, as well as activities for promoting the scientific use of EO data. The first SEOM projects have been tendered since 2013 including the development of Sentinel toolboxes, advanced INSAR algorithms for Sentinel-1 TOPS data exploitation, Improved Atmospheric Spectroscopic data-base (IAS), as well as grouped studies for Sentinel-1, -2, and -3 land and ocean applications and studies for exploiting the synergy between the Sentinels. The status and first results from these SEOM projects will be presented and an outlook for upcoming SEOM studies will be given.

  2. Adding value to figures: a web-based European public health information system.

    PubMed

    van der Wilk, Eveline A; Verschuuren, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 a prototype, web-based system was launched which provided information for different user groups interested in European public health topics. The EUPHIX system contained scientifically sound data, with presentations as well as textual information. The information was structured according to the European Community Health Indicators (ECHI) shortlist. The information included different types of data presentations (tables, interactive graphs and maps), explanatory texts and overviews of the data sources and the literature used. The content was produced by a network of European experts according to a structured, peer-reviewed editorial process. Thus EUPHIX provided an easily accessible, comprehensive, state-of-the-art information source. To ensure that it will continue, financial support will be needed. Co-ownership by the European Commission and the Member States seems an appropriate solution.

  3. SOAP-based services provided by the European Bioinformatics Institute

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, S.; Silventoinen, V.; Kallio, K.; Senger, M.; Sobhany, S.; Tate, J.; Velankar, S.; Golovin, A.; Henrick, K.; Rice, P.; Stoehr, P.; Lopez, R.

    2005-01-01

    SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) () based Web Services technology () has gained much attention as an open standard enabling interoperability among applications across heterogeneous architectures and different networks. The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) is using this technology to provide robust data retrieval and data analysis mechanisms to the scientific community and to enhance utilization of the biological resources it already provides [N. Harte, V. Silventoinen, E. Quevillon, S. Robinson, K. Kallio, X. Fustero, P. Patel, P. Jokinen and R. Lopez (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 3–9]. These services are available free to all users from . PMID:15980463

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-31

    a data structure 101 ESN 36-5 (1982) (e.g., the Centre Electronique Horloger [CEHj and security industries. Industrial support has and the Laboratoire...measurement that has been IMT under FSRM sponsorship, in cooperation achieved corresponds to a minimum displacement with Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH...irradiating the of Industry, Commerce , and Tourism. About 5% films to produce an amorphous structure, and of its operational expenses are met by the

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-30

    the Zeiss manage- managing such a program is a full time ment did not want it and it was turned job. Paetzold has a research group over to the...Propaga- the intensity and time delay of the tion." This article is a sampling of echoes. papers presented at this meeting. As it turns out, the electron...osmosis"), such as water heaters, are turned on Israel is now operating a reverse- only during the slack periods. Arad osmosis plant in the-south at a

  6. Selections from European Scientific Notes 1946 - 1976.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    certain Saltwater lines throughout the special facilities exclusively available aquarium are plastic. Sea water in- to the Institute. It is expected...completed through the heavy-duty of a large specimen, gear root, etc. crocodile clip on the gear (anode). The replica method is particularly The water...sipunculid, four struction of the Suez Canal (completed copepods, two amphipods, one cumacean, in 1809), hotever, was a saltwater pas- 33 decapods, one

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-30

    Anthony Harriman are directed towards the Subsequent reaction of the oxidized form development of methods for solar energy of the sensitizer with water...RI) The RI developed into a place at which is under the overall direction of Porter not only was research conducted, but and Phillips. While the...ticles and forces, genetic engineering, in synthetic polymers and biopolymers, modern methods of crime detection, earth- (2) studies of oxidation using

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-28

    with agina pectoris due to effort and psychologic adaptation. J.P.M. Diederiks (The found that diltiazem increased exercise capacity Netherlands...plotted, and followed for 24 work load before the onset of angina than did months. With an excess of psychologic and patients on beta-adrenergic

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    a general class of two- require at least one point of nor- dimensional electron gas devices are malization. The Sheffield group has dimin eletr intees...and vis- and water. The dried, filtered mass is cosity of short fibers contained in a then pressed into small briquettes, suspension flowing through a...mechanical Britain remains a particular stronghold and systemic, respectively. Deci- of personal construct theory. The basic sion-making bodies were classified

  10. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-31

    baking tin .908 .419 .517 .419 .380 ballpoint pen .215 .149 .170 .149 032 bathtub .552 .804 .674 .552 .444 bookcover .023 .454 .007 .023 .010 automobile...the fleet, the potential for the disposal of nuclear wastes the 254-ft Discovery, is primarily used by on the bottom of the deep ocean. The Marine...source or the input into the second excimer amplifier. The group will then have at its disposal simultaneously an intense single- EXCIMER LASER

  11. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-31

    by time-consuming calorimetric multimode to single mode splitter- means. couplers. The photonics group is also working on solar cells using the... models in which "quick games" supplement higher resolution games at all levels of the hierarchy. * Thames Barrier Becomes Operational...qualitatively different from the older "playback" or walkthrough of the events analog models , in which a physical model preceding a famous ship

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 11.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    based on increase the rate of healing. Several acrylic- acid derivatives (Crazy Glue is approaches have been taken to this prob- a good example of this...also be Notable among these inhibitors are apro- used for burns and for other types of tinin and tranexamic acid . The inhibi- wounds, such as massive...cial and subglacial morphology, the . ces. The following are examples of drift tracks of icebergs , and dis- programs: tributions of Antarctic pack ice

  13. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-30

    nonintuitive command prac- and his recent "trail" of activities during a tices for transferring or storing data may prove session. to be far less...through the nonprofit He is now making a similar study of ’nodular Industrial association Fabrimetal (Fdlration des cast iron. entreprises de I’industrie

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    la Psychologie Genetique ing) . Pour Analyser le Fonctionnement % Chatillon, J.-F., "Etude des Aspects Coqnifit des Adults? Theorie Opera- Cognitifs...ef-ts f machin,, f!it a : - (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 4-6 ture types that ar" rI.- 7, 17.d November 1981). manipulated Lv t he m I, hin, T! 1 1...architecture. Data-structure architect oures are computer systems that manipulate at the hardware level arbitrarily complx data- structure objects as entities

  15. European Scientific Notes, Volume 37, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-31

    Institute of Physics.) Hirsch will deliver the paper "Effect of Doping on Mechanical Properties, Recrystallization and Diffusion in Semiconductors ...Conference on Higher Performance Electronic Devices M.N. Yoder The 16th Biennial Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors reported findings pertinent to...MATERIAL SCIENCES Metallurgy and Materials at Oxford R.W. Armstrong Metal deformation properties, electron microscopy and semiconductor

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-31

    will likely provide information the WHO Diarrheal Diseases Control Pro- leading to effective vaccines and a signifi- gram. Merson stressed the...and better Falkow (Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA). drugs for treatment and new or improved The techniques are applicable to the vaccines against the...effective vaccine or prophylaxis Dr. J.C. Coolbaugh (Naval Medical Research for cholera has been a goal of many in- Institute, Bethesda, MD) presented his

  17. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-31

    Spectroscopy in Solids, A Discussion Meeting of the Royal Society A.N. Garroway 496 Some Solid State Physics in Birmingham J.R. Neighbours ’ ~ INEWS AND NOTES... Garroway (NRL, Washington, about June 1981 in the Proceedings of DC) suggested that presently achieved the Royal Society (London). This written...solid- tnributions of isotropic chemical shifts state NMR. (A.N. Garroway , Chemistry within the specimen, and no improvement Division, Naval Research

  18. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    photovoltaics , applications to device action. M. Razeghi and M. Poisson of processing, and the newest area, photo- - f Thompson have teamed with a...countries: Algeria , Canada, German Democratic 1. 3’’..- -i,, /6:. U Republic, USSP, South Africa, the US, t . X x xx -I and Vietnam. The colloct,: includ,.d

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35. Number 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-31

    cation- tion mass spectrometry (FDMS). FDMS was ized, or deprotonated molecular -like ions, the first technique to revolutionize similarities of which...Gonadal Irradiation PHYSICS from X-ray Examination in Great Britain M.A. Greenfield 21 Genetically Significant Dose from Diagnostic Radiology in Great...solids. These techniques . Supplementary talks covering methods include field desorption (FD), certain aspects of each method followed Californium-2S2

  20. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 8.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    429 Professor J.M. Imbrie, speaking at a meeting of the British Geologi - cal Society, presented a framework for investigations of Pleistocene climates... Mesozoic climates to mathematical model- finite-elements techniques. This mesh ing. I was able to attend four of the . can be improved by adding new...for Geology and the internal processes which control the Oceanography in Europe and the Middle response to this forcing (and which also East for the

  1. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    Dr. H. Baur (BASP Aktiengesell- independent of the path by which that schaft, Ludwigshafen/Rhein, FRG) dis- state is reached, one can calculate cussed...introduced in the 9,10-positions. flow techniques. Dr. Rasmussen is The reaction of the same radical involved in theoretical calculations anion with propylene...courses, furcations , the water separates out and there are elective courses in aerody- corrosion problems result at such points namics, boundary

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    with a trans- energy due to the variation of velocity mitter on one side and a receiver on of propagation with depth. Caustics the other. Rather than...lack of knowledge of the velocity of Mathematical Science. I had heard of propagation . Raz pointed out that of his work from Dr. Thomas apRhys at...scattering occurred, due to inhomoge- NRI.. Blank also comes from the [IS, neities in the velocity of propagation where he obtained both an MIAE and an and

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-30

    of vaccine for the prevention the London team, using its contacts with of tick -borne encephalitis . While few the UK’s Ministry of Defence and British...ld6cnmrmunications, sion electron microscopy. D. Schmitt- Grenoble ) have developed a procedure for Landsiedel and colleagues (Siemrens AG, fabricating

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 33, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-31

    of storage tests as well reserve batteries such as Pb/PbO 2 with as fundamental studies of passivation fluoboric acid electrolyte, lithium , phenomena...the lithium anode has lance, or are simply being stored until prompted RARDE to carry out comparative the opportune time for examination, abuse...ing in accordance with a UK Standard. AgCl 3-V batteries. The simple conclu- Various lithium cells have been studied, sion after painstaking

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 11,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    papers and 23 poster sessions. The origin, such as tobacco, potato chips, former were divided into 9 invited pa- or sugar beet pulp. With the organic...of osmoregulation in marine organisms, tion de Geodynamics Sous Marine (Marine (6) The cytology of microtubes, micro- Geophysics Station) at

  6. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-31

    St. Mark’s Annaba, in eastern Algeria , helping to Square during the morning and late after- develop greater automation and better con- noon. It...15. systematics and morphology of fresh-watei With reference to Table 2 Great Bri- copepods (small crustaceans that are tain has the smallest

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 11.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    language, and linguistics with a Matignon. M. Jean -Jacques Servan-Schrieber pilot project in Marseilles, France. Third, was appointed chief executive...at forefront of the tiscipline at the Univ. of MIT under the direction of Professor Seymour Geneva, where Piaget did his fundamental Papert. The

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 39, Number 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    at millimeter-wave frequencies states--X, Y, and Z. These substates between 40 and 100 GHz (Webb, 1969; differ in energy, if the molecular sym...aerodynam- ONR, London, report R-11-84 ics, meteorology, and molecular science, examines developments in the program -0 Preliminary results, as reported by...per la Corrosione Marina dei results have been obtained with an epoxy Metalli Reparto di Biologia Marina, Con- base paint containing 30 percent ZnO

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    parti- often experience in Italy. So, quite tions each scan line within the overall unlike master’s degree engineering grad- picture into its variable ...students. This university state variable filters with unrestricted used to be entirely in the city of Dublin, sampling rate. This appears to offer...area of electrical filters Other research projects in the de- and system. His earlier work dealt with partment include variable -speed drive microwave

  10. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-30

    Greenfield Radiological Science & Medical Physics CDR J.A. Holt Undersea Systems Dr. R.S. Hughes Laser Physics Dr. I. Kaufman Electronic Engineering Dr. R.E...CHENUSTRY However, considering the sensitivity of neodymium YAG lasers to dust and lint AWRE--AN EXCITING VISIT particles, one can understand the care...that must be undertaken befeve entering A 30-minute train ride from cen- the area. The laser facilities are tral London, followed by a 30-minute

  11. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    analyzing relatively fast informa- C. Brand in Edinburgh. In brief, their tion processing in relatively simple argument is that Galton was right--or...simple sensory-motor ceasing provide the medium for theory in tasks. The modern work of Brand on this work. Some investigators search "inspection" ’time...special-purpose perceptual machines Hendrikson, and Brand work are available because no general set of independent in Eysenck (1982) and ESN 35-8:31

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-30

    solid propellants and\\ explosives held in Karlsruhe, Germany. Among topics discussed were plastic bonded explosives, low -vulnerability ammunition, and...ignition behavior of solid propellants when subjected to low . flux levels and subatmospheric environments. BEHAVIORAL \\9 A Decision Aid For Classifying...3) nitrodiene polymers, (4) nitro materials for low weapon vulnerability. The and diazide oxetanes, and (5) glycidylazide subject embraces technical

  13. European Scientific Notes Number 8-3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1954-02-01

    ncc c :f~~~~~~a~~~’,a na~~~:a i ra c a c . v t y a c c a ~~~a ~.;:t:-. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ - ~ x ~~ ~ year~ an~~~ t.~~ a:. aa ~ ~~~~a i n c ’ v...tao ~~ça~ a:~ . ~~ c ;:- c~~a. ~ inco •:~~~~ - -.~~~, aa ~ t~.ay nc;: inc : o cv ia~ nca ~c; ~‘a~~~~act vY~y • -~a~-~~ r~~~~ .a... ~~~~ conc~~~ca...tr i 1:he~ :- ’h ;:i:;oic c:~ tars , i 1~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ t ; e ~L i aa : i:e~l ; sys tcii~ / —— n j aica al.. ~-:nc~w~i

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-31

    pairing. fis so th teo u Energy-band calculations by Matthias and Discussions with the Julich group aboutEnegyban l their data and reasons for...impressive, priate learning materials available to schools at especially when one considers that the writing a low cost. But changes in the boards will...two projects elsewhere. The type of collaboration small teams writing self-instructional materials, that might be possible, if funding were avail

  15. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    laureate Irofe - sor Abdus Salam , the director of the Last month, university- lecturers center, the new laboratory will c in the UK launched a vigorous...fight over tenure, be unique. Accordinc to Salam , "Ixperi.- the AUT has already set up a j10ln,o00 mental scientists in the Third World ($200,000...death are common. student/teacher ratio, and a reduction According to Salam , the aim of this in the number of courses offered, research would he to

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 7,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-31

    the computer terminal and interacting In long-haul traffic the plane, a 747 on-line with a computer simulation or comparable aircraft, may go to Aus...implement the computerized system simply typei in "internal German flights before agreement has been reached on equal 0 for 1982-1985" or whatever. the...has saved millions of pounds a head and not in the computer . year, and therefore has more than paid The real test of such systems is, the cost of the

  17. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-30

    Pearson texts are applied in a program designed to detect diversion of sensitive material in a nuclear plant. D.R. Barr 131 A.4 ESN 36-6 (1982...processing of divers who differed in experi- To start a data -taking session, ECG elec- ence. The major hypothesis was that more trodes (left-right chest...target counter). had frogman training). The test site was at an Analysis of heart-rate data emphasized the ocean training center with a flat sandy

  18. European Scientific Notes. Volume 7, Number 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-01-15

    slightly contaminated with boric acid . Simi lar results were also obtaine d wi th a sample of copper which had been ciectro lyti— cally pol ished in the...trials in the treatme nt of patients wi th chronic myelogenous leukemia. The drug ~s moreselective than nitrogen mustard or the folic acid antagonist s...presence of phosphoric acid . However , a third sample of copper which was apparently unc ontaminated showed zero order kinetics. At present Dr. ~-iart

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-29

    rocky Smith (Plessey Co., Ltd) started the shores, soft shores, air pollution proceedings for this well-attended ( lichens are used as indicators of SO...This new method allows the pathologist enced by 1) blood flow, 2) the state to measure the DNA content of cell of osteogenesis, 3) the surface area...smears taken from the tumor. The DNA 4) capillary permeability, and 5) extra- content increases considerably from cellular fluid (ecf) concentration

  20. European Scientific Notes. Volume 39, Number 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    currently considering application of a lands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Japan, rudder-roll stabilization autopilot to a and Spain. Sixty unclassified...an adaptive autopilot . These parame- ger is the Liaison Scientist for Materi- ters are equally important for assessing als Science in Europe and the...Middle the performance of an autopilot with East for the Office of Naval Research’s respect to fuel economy, because the London Branch Office. He is on

  1. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-28

    SystemsDr. R.E. Machol Operations Research and Systems Analysis Dr. J.R. Neighbours Physics Dr. A.P. Schaap Organic Chemistry CDR C.H. Spikes...precise force and moment measurements parts: the decision tree, which is pro- for several configurations in a wind tun- vided by logical analysis ; the...general, this type of the value of people. Certainly a of analysis is relevant to most of the forerunner of modern cost/benefit analysist decisions which a

  2. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 8,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-31

    fessors. Prof. Dr. N. Klein of the the final academic year. Technion, Haifa, Israel, was with IfH Approximately 15% of the EE grad- in this capacity at...appointed to a newly daunting. established chair of manufacturing Professor Naomi McIntosh, the project system research at that University. director

  3. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    included £1.5 million (S3.S million) it seems lithium / thionyl chloride and lithium /sul- likely that more studies, especially fur dioxide batteries, sea... lithium thionyl chloride systems, the cell conductivity. The cell perform- was still the major concern. ance remains essentially unchanged, Lithium ...button-type batteries the chemistry and products produced during annually for use in calculators, etc., the discharge of lithium - thionyl chloride and

  4. European Scientific Notes, Volume 38, Number 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    France dealt with fractals--geometric structures which possess no characteristic size, but instead have features on many scales . Recent research...disclosure, and a number widespread among soldiers in the heat of of other factors. State-rating scales battle, and it can be made worse by poor...administered during time of danger or communications and loneliness ; after the its anticipation may be responded to Battle of Gettysburg, and in many later

  5. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    an electron beam lithography system phosphide (InP) substrates. The pro- to define transducer arrays of 0.4- to cedure will eliminate the tedious and...nucleated on .. electron x-ray auger Fourier spectros- the surface will predominate, and the copy (SEXAFS) technique; an x-ray beam deposition rate is the...10 W of light in a number projection screen in a manner similar to of green and blue lines at the rated the electron beam sweep in a CRT. 14-kW

  6. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-31

    are being exposed in San Jose (California), Saudi Arabia, and Durham, ___ and surface changes are being monitored ELECTRONICS using XPS. He hopes to...cells are indistinct. Dr. Luis -M. on the microstructure of foamed Cruz-Orive, from Weibel’s group, spoke rubber. Changes in the structure of on the...34 one thousand. I spoke with the Direc- At first I looked blank, but then tor, Julio Ferry Borges , the Chief of realized he meant "pipes." (Wayne V

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Number 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-31

    200 m, Research with animals, supplemented decompression sickness and bends become with limited human data, allows one to probable and serious. In fact...everything works and a shows Wilson’s curve of pre-exposure man lives through the trauma of the pressure and escape depth. If the curve escape pressure profile...Dependent on complex mix of human and material factors outside DISSUB cootrol. Autonom Under direct control / Outside control of of senior survivor DICF P

  8. European Scientific Notes. Volume 30, Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Laser Development at SERL; The Rosenhain Centenary Conference on Physical Metallurgy. Surface Layer Analysis by Means of Ion Beams; Atmospheric Sounding the French Way; Meteorology in France; Ocean Engineering -- Dutch Plumbing in the North Sea; Acoustics Research in Germany; and Electron Spectroscopy of Solid

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 7, Number 6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-03-15

    b — l o — s 3 T1~~~ :cI i i tics f cr Research In Nu; leer Phva :cs aol Co5mic .t..ys ~~ .. A.’_ ...:.:..s...-~ by ~~~~~~~ aria t~~ r , bI~tge: C. 1

  10. European Scientific Notes 36-1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-31

    Meteorology Studies in Italy and France R.L. Pfeffer 11 MATERIAL Conference on Electrochemical SCIENCES Methods in Corrosion Testing and Research P.A...Booker Environmental Systems and Military Oceanography DR. P.A. Clarkin Material Sciences Dr. R.L. Derr Liaison Technologist LCDR M.D. Schroeder...insecti- and comfortable. The problem may sound cides, and new medical and logistic tech- simple and manageable, but it took the niques. From recent

  11. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 10,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-31

    It also contains recommendations about future areas of research. C-11-81 Ninth International Conference on Sarcoidosis , by John C. Rose In this report...on the most recent international conference on sarcoidosis , the author discusses the current status of sarcoidosis research and the latest

  12. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34. Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-31

    equipment for the past mendous advantage over visual and in- five years. frared optical reproductions because From a commercial standpoint, it operates...time tests, those sleep quality (good versus poor sleep) given placebos perform better than and performance. The "fault" is motI- those given hypnotics ...after-effects other troughs in physiological states. of the hypnotic . In fact, there was As Bryce Hartman (USAP School of Aero- a tendency to report

  13. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    cal intermediate (or a category of birad - in this new fluorescence is not known, ical intermediates) in di--methane but the nucleophilic addition of...Italian Telecommu- Two Application Systems nications for testing. (1) SART There are other application systems Sistema Automatico di Riconoscimento in

  14. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    membranes and encapsulate 2/23/84 substances such as drugs within the cytoplasm and have the cells reseal themselves with no apparent detrimental...motion of a rigid robotic manipulatorC.J. Page (Coventry Polytechnic) dis- moving a hig d c be pu athecussed an intensity-sensing capability moving at high...a of a manipulator is largely dependent on rigid , inpenetrable surface. The the arrangement of links and joint axes. simulator is an interactive

  15. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Numbers 12.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    from models have been used, particularly the mppsana Univeriy, an2 were fromalkne ad h poysioxne. ssn- Uppsala University, and 24 were from alkanes and...34thermal polymer melts in a transient relaxation blob" model ; they fitted the mode only investigated by elastic neutron scatter- at very high molecular...using nuclear sity) described a model for the overlap spin relaxation data from NMR measure- concentration for the transition from ments. The motions

  16. European Scientific Notes. Volume 33, Number 9,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    C t .i ( l rr are- C’! Io "!,,.t ’i bolL h.as t een done using I on- ter r ra Ii i?% j. tflt I5s te v I ellt anal moldi ng eqli I ment modi fIed in...avni td I te food i s h ighl,% subs idi:ed. c rs Iat ( ins r vs ea rc:h i n 6"ree v v, or -I t toi tv i hant 𔃺! v’ of theit en! rants gr aduate. hI

  17. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38, Number 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    of research the system to perform the following in expert systems and related topics. tasks: Research interests include: expert systems , rule- based ...than a philoi.,)vhical viewpoint. The Enhancing Expert Systems Using Fuzzy researchers at Queen Mary College are Reasoning complementing their...several years Mamdani and his ledge in imprecise terms not acceptable group have been investigating the to existing expert systems . Fuzzy logic properties

  18. European Scientific Notes. Volume 36, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-31

    COMPUTER at the UK Science and Engineering SCIENCES Research Council: -) A common hardware and software base approach has been taken to improve ...summation suggests that protracted or unreli miniaturi~ed airborne computers ; so, it a new able performance will occur, the system de- radar is...he overall performance figures from the past may outcome probabilities from his computerized t.;., largely be due to non- system factors such as

  19. European Scientific Notes. Volume 38. Number 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Computer Systems available today. For example, there (FGCS) is to develop an expert system ... Computer " Project. , ---- +.:--- .. German Plans for4 ifth Generation Computing Systems .................................... J.F. Blackburn 17 Although... systems . The article concentrates on large systems , office systems , computer aided ."-., engineering, and communications. JEARTH SCIENCE " -New

  20. European Stroke Science Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  1. Scientific/Techical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  2. USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

  3. Scientific Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Gross, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scientific misconduct has been defined as fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Scientific misconduct has occurred throughout the history of science. The US government began to take systematic interest in such misconduct in the 1980s. Since then, a number of studies have examined how frequently individual scientists have observed scientific misconduct or were involved in it. Although the studies vary considerably in their methodology and in the nature and size of their samples, in most studies at least 10% of the scientists sampled reported having observed scientific misconduct. In addition to studies of the incidence of scientific misconduct, this review considers the recent increase in paper retractions, the role of social media in scientific ethics, several instructional examples of egregious scientific misconduct, and potential methods to reduce research misconduct.

  4. First-Ever European Space Weather Week

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Sarah

    2004-07-01

    Europe's first Space Weather Week is scheduled to take place at the European Space Agency's European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, for five days beginning 29 November. Modeled after the U.S. Space Weather Week, the European agenda will highlight not only services and applications but also the crucial activity of transitioning scientific discoveries into forecasting capabilities.

  5. Magnetic tape user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. B.; Lee, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    This User Guide provides a general introduction to the structure, use, and handling of magnetic tapes at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The topics covered are tape terminology, physical characteristics, error prevention and detection, and creating, using, and maintaining tapes. Supplementary documentation is referenced where it might be helpful. The documentation is included for the tape utility programs, BLOCK, UNBLOCK, and TAPEDMP, which are available at the Central Scientific Computing Complex at LaRC.

  6. PISCES 2 users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment and set of extensions to Fortran 77 for parallel programming. It is intended to provide a basis for writing programs for scientific and engineering applications on parallel computers in a way that is relatively independent of the particular details of the underlying computer architecture. This user's manual provides a complete description of the PISCES 2 system as it is currently implemented on the 20 processor Flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley Research Center.

  7. GumTree—An integrated scientific experiment environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony; Hauser, Nick; Götz, Andy; Hathaway, Paul; Franceschini, Fredi; Rayner, Hugh; Zhang, Lidia

    2006-11-01

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis.

  8. EPOS Seismology services and their users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Florian; Dupont, Aurelien; Michelini, Alberto; Rietbrock, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Wiemer, Stefan; Basili, Roberto; Bossu, Rémy; Cakti, Eser; Cotton, Fabrice; Crawford, Wayne; Crowley, Helen; Danciu, Laurentiu; Diaz, Jordi; Garth, Tom; Locati, Mario; Luzi, Lucia; Pitilakis, Kyriazis; Roumelioti, Zafeiria; Strollo, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    The construction of seismological community services for the European Plate Observing System Research Infrastructure (EPOS) is by now well under way. A significant number of services are already operational, largely based on those existing at established institutions or collaborations like ORFEUS, EMSC, AHEAD and EFEHR, and more are being added to be ready for internal validation by late 2017. In this presentation we focus on a number of issues related to the interaction of the community of users with the services provided by the seismological part of the EPOS research infrastructure. How users interact with a service (and how satisfied they are with this interaction) is viewed as one important component of the validation of a service within EPOS, and certainly is key to the uptake of a service and from that also it's attributed value. Within EPOS Seismology, the following aspects of user interaction have already surfaced: - user identification (and potential tracking) versus ease-of-access and openness Requesting users to identify themselves when accessing a service provides various advantages to providers and users (e.g. quantifying & qualifying the service use, customization of services and interfaces, handling access rights and quotas), but may impact the ease of access and also shy away users who don't wish to be identified for whatever reason. - service availability versus cost There is a clear and prominent connection between the availability of a service, both regarding uptime and capacity, and its operational cost (IT systems and personnel), and it is often not clear where to draw the line (and based on which considerations). In connection to that, how to best utilize third-party IT infrastructures (either commercial or public), and what the long-term cost implications of that might be, is equally open. - licensing and attribution The issue of intellectual property and associated licensing policies for data, products and services is only recently gaining

  9. The impact of information technology and networks: new perspectives for scientific, technical and medical (STM) publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kemp, Arnoud

    This contribution is a strongly abbreviated notation of a much longer presentation at the Workshop on Strategies and Techniques of Information for Astronomy, organized by the European Science Foundation in Strasbourg on 21/22 June 1996. The process of publishing will undergo dramatic changes due to the influences of information technology and networks. The publishing business as a whole will shift from traditional print- and paper-based organisations to a fully digital workflow from author to end-user. Electronic publishing has moved from pre-print activities to digital preprints on a variety of servers, but still most scientific documentation is printed and not only for archival purposes. In this short contribution, a plea is made for new rules in scientific communication that authors, editors, publishers, societies, libraries and users can recognize. In addition, in the electronic age we need more security for copyright, transactions over networks and against misuse in general.

  10. AVISO user service, at the crossroads between user information, outreach and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.

    2005-06-01

    Initially set up to distribute Topex/Poseidon ocean altimetry satellite data, AVISO user service has been the link between the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 projects, users and the general public. The service has continually broadened the scope of its activities, forging close ties with users to achieve efficient dissemination of general, technical, and scientific information. Such a synergy between user services and outreach has many advantages, both for users and for public outreach, including educational ones.

  11. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element, first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Regner, Peter; Delwart, Steven; Benveniste, Jerome; Engdahl, Marcus; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Gascon, Ferran; Donlon, Craig; Davidson, Malcolm; Pinnock, Simon; Foumelis, Michael; Ramoino, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is a program element within the fourth period (2013-2017) of ESA's Earth Observation Envelope Programme (http://seom.esa.int/). The prime objective is to federate, support and expand the international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have built up over the last 25 years. It aims to further strengthen the leadership of the European Earth Observation research community by enabling them to extensively exploit future European operational EO missions. SEOM will enable the science community to address new scientific research that are opened by free and open access to data from operational EO missions. Based on community-wide recommendations for actions on key research issues, gathered through a series of international thematic workshops and scientific user consultation meetings, a work plan is established and is approved every year by ESA Members States. During 2015 SEOM, Science users consultation workshops have been organized for Sentinel1/3/5P ( Fringe, S3 Symposium and Atmospheric science respectively) , new R&D studies for scientific exploitation of the Sentinels have been launched ( S3 for Science SAR Altimetry and Ocean Color , S2 for Science,) , open-source multi-mission scientific toolboxes have been launched (in particular the SNAP/S1-2-3 Toolbox). In addition two advanced international training courses have been organized in Europe to exploit the new S1-A and S2-A data for Land and Ocean remote sensing (over 120 participants from 25 countries) as well as activities for promoting the first scientific results ( e.g. Chili Earthquake) . In addition the First EO Open Science 2.0 was organised at ESA in October 2015 with 225 participants from 31 countries bringing together young EO scientists and data scientists. During the conference precursor activities in EO Open Science and Innovation were presented, while developing a Roadmap preparing for future ESA scientific exploitation activities. Within the conference, the first

  12. Regional input to joint European space weather service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislawska, I.; Belehaki, A.; Jansen, F.; Heynderickx, D.; Lilensten, J.; Candidi, M.

    The basis for elaborating within COST 724 Action Developing the scientific basis for monitoring modeling and predicting Space Weather European space weather service is rich by many national and international activities which provide instruments and tools for global as well as regional monitoring and modeling COST 724 stimulates coordinates and supports Europe s goals of development and global cooperation by providing standards for timely and high quality information and knowledge in space weather Existing local capabilities are taken into account to develop synergies and avoid duplication The enhancement of environment monitoring networks and associated instruments technology yields mutual advantages for European service and regional services specialized for local users needs It structurally increases the integration of limited-area services generates a platform employing the same approach to each task differing mostly in input and output data In doing so it also provides complementary description of the environmental state within issued information A general scheme of regional services concept within COST 724 activity can be the processing chain from measurements trough algorithms to operational knowledge It provides the platform for interaction among the local end users who define what kind of information they need system providers who elaborate tools necessary to obtain required information and local service providers who do the actual processing of data and tailor it to specific user s needs Such initiative creates a unique possibility for small

  13. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  14. European grid services for global earth science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, S.; Sipos, G.

    2012-04-01

    Force is already providing a cloud infrastructure through a few committed NGIs. This is being made available to research communities participating in the Task Force and the long-term aim is to integrate these national clouds into a pan-European infrastructure for scientific communities. • The MPI group provides support for application developers to port and scale up parallel applications to the global European Grid Infrastructure. • A lively portal developer and provider community that is able to setup and operate custom, application and/or community specific portals for members of the Earth Science community to interact with EGI. • A project to assess the possibilities for federated identity management in EGI and the readiness of EGI member states for federated authentication and authorisation mechanisms. • Operating resources and user support services to process data with new types of services and infrastructures, such as desktop grids, map-reduce frameworks, GPU clusters.

  15. The European Cancer Observatory: A new data resource.

    PubMed

    Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; O'Callaghan, Mark; Ferlay, Jacques; Masuyer, Eric; Rosso, Stefano; Forman, David; Bray, Freddie; Comber, Harry

    2015-06-01

    Population-based cancer registries provide indispensable information on cancer incidence and survival, which cannot be obtained by any other means. It is clear that complete and effective use of these data is essential for cancer control, but sharing this information in a uniform, timely and user-friendly manner has been somewhat limited up to now. The European Cancer Observatory (ECO, http://eco.iarc.fr) has been developed in the framework of the EUROCOURSE project (EUROpe against Cancer: Optimisation of Use of Registries for Scientific Excellence in Research) as a comprehensive resource combining all the information currently available in Europe on cancer incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence. The website provides analytical and presentation tools to examine national estimates for 2012 in 40 European countries (EUCAN), data for 130 national or sub-national areas covered by cancer registries for up to 60 years, until 2011 (EUREG) and a planned mechanism for data download (European Cancer Incidence and Mortality (EUROCIM)). The generated statistics outline the considerable variability across Europe in the rates of all major cancer types and help identify key concerns that need to be addressed by public health policies e.g. the unprecedented rise of lung cancer incidence in women with its full impact expected within a decade or so. The support, maintenance and further development of the ECO website should be a high priority for European cancer policymakers, to continue providing this unique information to health professionals, researchers and the general public in Europe and beyond.

  16. Building a federated data infrastructure for integrating the European Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, Carmela; Cocco, Massimo; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Borgstrom, Sven; Vogfjord, Kristin; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ergintav, Semih; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Consortium, Epos

    2017-04-01

    The integration of satellite and in-situ Earth observations fostered by the GEO Geohazards Supersites and National Laboratories (GSNL) initiative is aimed at providing access to spaceborne and in-situ geoscience data for selected sites prone to earthquake, volcanic eruptions and/or other environmental hazards. The initiative was launched with the "Frascati declaration" at the conclusion of the 3rd International Geohazards workshop of the Group of Earth Observation (GEO) held in November 2007 in Frascati, Italy. The development of the GSNL and the integration of in-situ and space Earth observations require the implementation of in-situ e-infrastructures and services for scientific users and other stakeholders. The European Commission has funded three projects to support the development of the European supersites: FUTUREVOLC for the Icelandic volcanoes, MED-SUV for Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius (Italy), and MARSITE for the Marmara Sea near fault observatory (Turkey). Because the establishment of a network of supersites in Europe will, among other advantages, facilitate the link with the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), EPOS (the European Plate Observing System) has supported these initiatives by integrating the observing systems and infrastructures developed in these three projects in its implementation plan aimed at integrating existing and new research infrastructures for solid Earth sciences. In this contribution we will present the EPOS federated approach and the key actions needed to: i) develop sustainable long-term Earth observation strategies preceding and following earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; ii) develop an innovative integrated e-infrastructure component necessary to create an effective service for users; iii) promote the strategic and outreach actions to meet the specific user needs; iv) develop expertise in the use and interpretation of Supersites data in order to promote capacity building and timely transfer of scientific

  17. ESO's User Portal: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Dorigo, D.; Nass, P.; Fourniol, N.; Sforna, D.; Haggouchi, K.; Dolensky, M.

    2008-07-01

    ESO introduced a User Portal for its scientific services in November 2007. Registered users have a central entry point for the Observatory's offerings, the extent of which depends on the users' roles - see [1]. The project faced and overcame a number of challenging hurdles between inception and deployment, and ESO learned a number of useful lessons along the way. The most significant challenges were not only technical in nature; organization and coordination issues took a significant toll as well. We also indicate the project's roadmap for the future.

  18. [ECRIN (European clinical research infrastructures network), a pan-European infrastructure for clinical research].

    PubMed

    Demotes-Mainard, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Clinical research plays a key role both in the development of innovative health products and in the optimisation of medical strategies, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. ECRIN is a distributed ESFRI-roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific providing services to multinational. Servicing of multinational trials started during the preparatory phase, and ECRIN has applied for ERIC status in 2011. In parallel, ECRIN has also proposed an FP7 integrating activity project to further develop, upgrade and expand the ECRIN infrastructure built up during the past FP6 and FP7 projects, facilitating an efficient organization of clinical research in Europe, with ECRIN developing generic tools and providing generic services for multinational studies, and supporting the construction of pan-European disease-oriented networks that will in turn act as ECRIN users. This organization will improve Europe's attractiveness for industry trials, boost its scientific competitiveness, and result in better healthcare for European citizens. The three medical areas supported in this project (rare diseases, medical devices, and nutrition) will serve as pilots for other biomedical research fields. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this structure will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of research and educational capacities, tackling the major societal challenges (starting with healthy aging), and removing barriers to bringing ideas to the market.

  19. User requirements for information systems in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Todd-Pokropek, A; Vauramo, E; Cosgriff, P; Sippo-Tujunen, I; Britton, K

    1992-05-01

    In the field of COST cooperation (COST = European Cooperation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research) a project B2 for Quality Assurance in Nuclear Medicine Software has been established. In a memorandum of understanding setting up this project, user requirements were to be defined for the hardware and software used for data acquisition, processing and presentation. A subgroup of the management committee of COST B2 were interested in the Advanced Informatics in Medicine, AIM, task T-734 'Quality Assurance of Medical Software', and the AIM Project 'A 1034', coordinated by Dr K. Britton, was initiated. The initial drafts of this document were written in Helsinki during 1988-1990, and submitted for comment by the members of the management committee of COST B2. These comments were integrated in the text and this document was finalized by the UK group so as to make it available for international discussion. It is anticipated that, after appropriate international discussion, these User Requirements for Information Systems in Nuclear Medicine will be adopted by the management committee of COST B2 as a COST document. Towards these ends, a working group chaired by Dr Britton, including the British and Finnish teams and Ulrich Noelpp from Switzerland, was appointed by the management committee of COST B2 in April 1990. While writing it we have had the pleasure of working with referees from different European hospitals in many countries. We are happy to thank all of them for their valuable contributions.

  20. GEO Standard and Interoperability Forum (SIF) European Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    The European GEO SIF has been initiated by the GIGAS project in an effort to better coordinate European requirements for GEO and GEOSS related activities, and is recognised by GEO as a regional SIF. To help advance the interoperability goals of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS), the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Architecture and Data Committee (ADC) has established a Standards and Interoperability Forum (SIF) to support GEO organizations offering components and services to GEOSS. The SIF will help GEOSS contributors understand how to work with the GEOSS interoperability guidelines and how to enter their "interoperability arrangements" (standards or other ad hoc arrangements for interoperability) into the GEOSS registries. This will greatly facilitate the utility of GEOSS and encourage significant increase in participation. To carry out its work most effectively, the SIF promotes to form Regional Teams. They will help to organize and optimize the support coming from the different parts of the World and reach out regional and multi-disciplinary Scientific Communities. This will allow to have true global representation in supporting GEOSS interoperability. A SIF European Team is foreseen. The main role of the SIF is facilitating interoperability and working with members and participating organizations as they offer data and information services to the users of GEOSS. In this framework, the purpose of having a European Regional Team is to increase efficiency in carrying out the work of the SIF. Experts can join the SIF European Team by registering at the SIF European Team wiki site: http://www.thegigasforum.eu/sif/

  1. Vascular surgery: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, P

    1999-09-01

    Isaac Newton, among others, observed that 'we see so far because we are standing upon the shoulders of giants'. In vascular surgery most of the giants have been European, and this is a heritage which we as Europeans can take pride in and build upon if we chose to do so. As in other areas of life, commitment is essential in order to influence the future. For vascular surgeons in Europe this means active participation in the European scientific societies for vascular surgery and in the UEMS. The main value of the EBSQ.VASC assessments to date has been to expose the uneven standards of training in vascular surgery within the European Union. Only if action follows to address these inequalities will the tactics of the European Board of Vascular Surgery be vindicated.

  2. Scientific millenarianism

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1997-12-01

    Today, for the first time, scientific concerns are seriously being addressed that span future times--hundreds, even thousands, or more years in the future. One is witnessing what the author calls scientific millenarianism. Are such concerns for the distant future exercises in futility, or are they real issues that, to the everlasting gratitude of future generations, this generation has identified, warned about and even suggested how to cope with in the distant future? Can the four potential catastrophes--bolide impact, CO{sub 2} warming, radioactive wastes and thermonuclear war--be avoided by technical fixes, institutional responses, religion, or by doing nothing? These are the questions addressed in this paper.

  3. QMRPACK user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  4. Testing strategies in mutagenicity and genetic toxicology: an appraisal of the guidelines of the European Scientific Committee for Cosmetics and Non-Food Products for the evaluation of hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, D J; Henderson, L; Marzin, D; Müller, L; Parry, J M; Speit, G; Tweats, D J; Williams, G M

    2005-12-30

    The European Scientific Committee on Cosmetics and Non-Food Products (SCCNFP) guideline for testing of hair dyes for genotoxic/mutagenic/carcinogenic potential has been reviewed. The battery of six in vitro tests recommended therein differs substantially from the batteries of two or three in vitro tests recommended in other guidelines. Our evaluation of the chemical types used in hair dyes and comparison with other guidelines for testing a wide range of chemical substances, lead to the conclusion that potential genotoxic activity may effectively be determined by the application of a limited number of well-validated test systems that are capable of detecting induced gene mutations and structural and numerical chromosomal changes. We conclude that highly effective screening for genotoxicity of hair dyes can be achieved by the use of three assays, namely the bacterial gene mutation assay, the mammalian cell gene mutation assay (mouse lymphoma tk assay preferred) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. These need to be combined with metabolic activation systems optimised for the individual chemical types. Recent published evidence [D. Kirkland, M. Aardema, L. Henderson, L. Müller, Evaluation of the ability of a battery of three in vitro genotoxicity tests to discriminate rodent carcinogens and non-carcinogens. I. Sensitivity, specificity and relative predictivity, Mutat. Res. 584 (2005) 1-256] suggests that our recommended three tests will detect all known genotoxic carcinogens, and that increasing the number of in vitro assays further would merely reduce specificity (increase false positives). Of course there may be occasions when standard tests need to be modified to take account of special situations such as a specific pathway of biotransformation, but this should be considered as part of routine testing. It is clear that individual dyes and any other novel ingredients should be tested in this three-test battery. However, new products are formed on the scalp by

  5. Identification of User Facility Related Publications

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Stahl, Christopher G; Wells, Jack C; Potok, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Scientific user facilities provide physical resources and technical support that enable scientists to conduct experiments or simulations pertinent to their respective research. One metric for evaluating the scientific value or impact of a facility is the number of publications by users as a direct result of using that facility. Unfortunately, for a variety of reasons, capturing accurate values for this metric proves time consuming and error-prone. This work describes a new approach that leverages automated browser technology combined with text analytics to reduce the time and error involved in identifying publications related to user facilities. With this approach, scientific user facilities gain more accurate measures of their impact as well as insight into policy revisions for user access.

  6. Scientific Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    1919 paper (ref. 9), in which he suggested a Moon rocket. Rock- etry was on a par with extrasensory perception in those days. 38 SCIENTIFIC SA&TLLITES...this way, images of sky can be taken at different wavelengths. The perceptive reader will note that the two zodiacal-light ex- periments described

  7. Scientific Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Gail W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how scientific documentation is taught in three 50-minute sessions in a technical writing course. Tells how session one distinguishes between in-text notes, footnotes, and reference entries; session two discusses the author-year system of citing references; and session three is concerned with the author-number system of reference…

  8. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME III, A. FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS AND CORRELATION, B. RELATIONSHIP AND COMPARISON.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE NATION'S DEFENSE INDUSTRY TO DETERMINE ITS INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION (FLOW PROCESS) NECESSARY TO SATISFY THESE NEEDS. VOLUME I, LI 000 345, OF THE THREE VOLUME FINAL REPORT IS AN OVERVIEW OF THE OTHER TWO VOLUMES AND INCLUDES GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT DECISIONS AND…

  9. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME III, A. FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS AND CORRELATION, B. RELATIONSHIP AND COMPARISON.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE NATION'S DEFENSE INDUSTRY TO DETERMINE ITS INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION (FLOW PROCESS) NECESSARY TO SATISFY THESE NEEDS. VOLUME I, LI 000 345, OF THE THREE VOLUME FINAL REPORT IS AN OVERVIEW OF THE OTHER TWO VOLUMES AND INCLUDES GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT DECISIONS AND…

  10. Relating costs to the user value of farmland biodiversity measurements.

    PubMed

    Targetti, S; Herzog, F; Geijzendorffer, I R; Pointereau, P; Viaggi, D

    2016-01-01

    The impact of agricultural management on global biodiversity highlights the need for farm-scale monitoring programmes capable of determining the performance of agriculture practices. Yet the identification of appropriate indicators is a challenging process and one that involves considering a number of different aspects and requirements. Besides the attention given to scientific effectiveness, relevant but less studied issues related to biodiversity measurements include the economic feasibility of monitoring programmes and the relevance of indicators for different end-users. In this paper, we combine an analytic assessment of costs and a stakeholder-based evaluation of the usefulness of a set of biodiversity-related parameters (habitat mapping, vegetation, bees, earthworms, spiders, and a farmer questionnaire) tested for scientific consistency in 12 European case studies and on more than 14,000 ha of farmland. The results point to the possibility of meeting the expectations of different end-users (administrators, farmers and consumers) with a common indicator set. Combining costs and usefulness also suggests the possibility of designing more efficient monitoring approaches involving private agencies and networks of volunteers and farmers for the field data collection at different stages of a monitoring programme. Although complex, such an approach would make it possible to enhance the effectiveness of available funds for farmland biodiversity monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adding intelligence to scientific data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA plans to solve some of the problems of handling large-scale scientific data bases by turning to artificial intelligence (AI) are discussed. The growth of the information glut and the ways that AI can help alleviate the resulting problems are reviewed. The employment of the Intelligent User Interface prototype, where the user will generate his own natural language query with the assistance of the system, is examined. Spatial data management, scientific data visualization, and data fusion are discussed.

  12. Adding intelligence to scientific data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA plans to solve some of the problems of handling large-scale scientific data bases by turning to artificial intelligence (AI) are discussed. The growth of the information glut and the ways that AI can help alleviate the resulting problems are reviewed. The employment of the Intelligent User Interface prototype, where the user will generate his own natural language query with the assistance of the system, is examined. Spatial data management, scientific data visualization, and data fusion are discussed.

  13. End-User Applications of Real-Time Earthquake Information in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, G. B.; Gasparini, P.; Giardini, D.; Zschau, J.; Filangieri, A. R.; Reakt Wp7 Team

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of European FP7 project REAKT (Strategies and Tools for Real-Time Earthquake Risk Reduction) is to improve the efficiency of real-time earthquake risk mitigation methods and their capability of protecting structures, infrastructures, and populations. REAKT aims to address the issues of real-time earthquake hazard and response from end-to-end, with efforts directed along the full spectrum of methodology development in earthquake forecasting, earthquake early warning, and real-time vulnerability systems, through optimal decision-making, and engagement and cooperation of scientists and end users for the establishment of best practices for use of real-time information. Twelve strategic test cases/end users throughout Europe have been selected. This diverse group of applications/end users includes civil protection authorities, railway systems, hospitals, schools, industrial complexes, nuclear plants, lifeline systems, national seismic networks, and critical structures. The scale of target applications covers a wide range, from two school complexes in Naples, to individual critical structures, such as the Rion Antirion bridge in Patras, and the Fatih Sultan Mehmet bridge in Istanbul, to large complexes, such as the SINES industrial complex in Portugal and the Thessaloniki port area, to distributed lifeline and transportation networks and nuclear plants. Some end-users are interested in in-depth feasibility studies for use of real-time information and development of rapid response plans, while others intend to install real-time instrumentation and develop customized automated control systems. From the onset, REAKT scientists and end-users will work together on concept development and initial implementation efforts using the data products and decision-making methodologies developed with the goal of improving end-user risk mitigation. The aim of this scientific/end-user partnership is to ensure that scientific efforts are applicable to operational

  14. Application of the object-oriented paradigm for scientific experiment monitoring & control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racaud, Thierry; Assis-Arantes, Patrick

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the monitoring and control of scientific experiments. This new approach is based on an object-oriented environment composed of three elements: (a) A graphical environment that allows the creation of an object-oriented model of the experiment based on objects, attributes and methods. (b) A language for writing procedures to access the model by sending messages in order to operate the experiment. (c) A man-machine interface based on an interactive graphical layer above the object-oriented representation for controlling and monitoring the experiment. This new approach has been prototyped in a project called "Man-Machine Interface Software for Ground User Terminal", or User Terminal in short. The project is carried out by SPACEBEL Informatique on behalf of the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC). Although this project has been undertaken for the operation of scientific experiments in space, User Terminal can naturally be used for the monitoring and control of ground based experiments. This article presents the User Terminal system as well as one of the first practical exercises performed in the context of the teleoperation of a liquid science experiment to be shipped into space.

  15. Scientific Claims versus Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John

    1991-01-01

    Provides activities that help students to understand the importance of the scientific method. The activities include the science of fusion and cold fusion; a group activity that analyzes and interprets the events surrounding cold fusion; and an application research project concerning a current science issue. (ZWH)

  16. Scientific Claims versus Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John

    1991-01-01

    Provides activities that help students to understand the importance of the scientific method. The activities include the science of fusion and cold fusion; a group activity that analyzes and interprets the events surrounding cold fusion; and an application research project concerning a current science issue. (ZWH)

  17. Scientific Misconduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2002-12-01

    These cases provide a good basis for discussions of scientific ethics, particularly with respect to the responsibilities of colleagues in collaborative projects. With increasing numbers of students working in cooperative or collaborative groups, there may be opportunities for more than just discussion—similar issues of responsibility apply to the members of such groups. Further, this is an area where, “no clear, widely accepted standards of behavior exist” (1). Thus there is an opportunity to point out to students that scientific ethics, like science itself, is incomplete and needs constant attention to issues that result from new paradigms such as collaborative research. Finally, each of us can resolve to pay more attention to the contributions we and our colleagues make to collaborative projects, applying to our own work no less critical an eye than we would cast on the work of those we don’t know at all.

  18. Unifying access to services: ESO's user portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Canavan, T.; Nass, P.

    2006-06-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is in the process of creating a central access point for all services offered to its user community via the Web. That gateway, called the User Portal, will provide registered users with a personalized set of service access points, the actual set depending on each user's privileges. Correspondence between users and ESO will take place by way of "profiles", that is, contact information. Each user may have several active profiles, so that an investigator may choose, for instance, whether their data should be delivered to their own address or to a collaborator. To application developers, the portal will offer authentication and authorization services, either via database queries or an LDAP server. The User Portal is being developed as a Web application using Java-based technology, including servlets and JSPs.

  19. Bioinformatics meets user-centred design: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Pavelin, Katrina; Cham, Jennifer A; de Matos, Paula; Brooksbank, Cath; Cameron, Graham; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Designers have a saying that "the joy of an early release lasts but a short time. The bitterness of an unusable system lasts for years." It is indeed disappointing to discover that your data resources are not being used to their full potential. Not only have you invested your time, effort, and research grant on the project, but you may face costly redesigns if you want to improve the system later. This scenario would be less likely if the product was designed to provide users with exactly what they need, so that it is fit for purpose before its launch. We work at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and we consult extensively with life science researchers to find out what they need from biological data resources. We have found that although users believe that the bioinformatics community is providing accurate and valuable data, they often find the interfaces to these resources tricky to use and navigate. We believe that if you can find out what your users want even before you create the first mock-up of a system, the final product will provide a better user experience. This would encourage more people to use the resource and they would have greater access to the data, which could ultimately lead to more scientific discoveries. In this paper, we explore the need for a user-centred design (UCD) strategy when designing bioinformatics resources and illustrate this with examples from our work at EMBL-EBI. Our aim is to introduce the reader to how selected UCD techniques may be successfully applied to software design for bioinformatics.

  20. Bioinformatics Meets User-Centred Design: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pavelin, Katrina; Cham, Jennifer A.; de Matos, Paula; Brooksbank, Cath; Cameron, Graham; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Designers have a saying that “the joy of an early release lasts but a short time. The bitterness of an unusable system lasts for years.” It is indeed disappointing to discover that your data resources are not being used to their full potential. Not only have you invested your time, effort, and research grant on the project, but you may face costly redesigns if you want to improve the system later. This scenario would be less likely if the product was designed to provide users with exactly what they need, so that it is fit for purpose before its launch. We work at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and we consult extensively with life science researchers to find out what they need from biological data resources. We have found that although users believe that the bioinformatics community is providing accurate and valuable data, they often find the interfaces to these resources tricky to use and navigate. We believe that if you can find out what your users want even before you create the first mock-up of a system, the final product will provide a better user experience. This would encourage more people to use the resource and they would have greater access to the data, which could ultimately lead to more scientific discoveries. In this paper, we explore the need for a user-centred design (UCD) strategy when designing bioinformatics resources and illustrate this with examples from our work at EMBL-EBI. Our aim is to introduce the reader to how selected UCD techniques may be successfully applied to software design for bioinformatics. PMID:22807660

  1. A European perspective--the European clinical research infrastructures network.

    PubMed

    Demotes-Mainard, J; Kubiak, C

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating research outcomes requires multinational cooperation in clinical research for optimization of treatment strategies and comparative effectiveness research, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) is a distributed ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific potential. Servicing multinational trials started during its preparatory phase, and ECRIN will now apply for an ERIC (European Research Infrastructures Consortium) status by 2011. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this achievement will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of the research and education capacity, tackling the major societal challenges starting with the area of healthy ageing, and removing barriers to bring ideas to the market.

  2. Operating the European Drawer Rack on the ISS.

    PubMed

    Degavre, J C; Taylor, C; Miro, J; Kuijpers, E; Dujardin, P; Steinicke, L; Koenig, H

    2002-05-01

    The Erasmus User Centre, located at ESTEC in Noordwijk, will have overall responsibility for the preparation and execution of operations for the European Drawer Rack (EDR) facility in the European Columbus laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). Together with the national User Support and Operations Centres (USOCs) involved in the operation of experiments on the ISS, it will form the network conducting the decentralised payload operations baselined for the European elements of the ISS.

  3. The new Planetary Science Archive (PSA): Exploration and discovery of scientific datasets from ESA's planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Santa; Besse, Sebastien; Heather, Dave; Barbarisi, Isa; Arviset, Christophe; De Marchi, Guido; Barthelemy, Maud; Docasal, Ruben; Fraga, Diego; Grotheer, Emmanuel; Lim, Tanya; Macfarlane, Alan; Rios, Carlos; Vallejo, Fran; Saiz, Jaime; ESDC (European Space Data Centre) Team

    2016-10-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is the European Space Agency's (ESA) repository of science data from all planetary science and exploration missions. The PSA provides access to scientific datasets through various interfaces at http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa. All datasets are scientifically peer-reviewed by independent scientists, and are compliant with the Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. The PSA is currently implementing a number of significant improvements, mostly driven by the evolution of the PDS standard, and the growing need for better interfaces and advanced applications to support science exploitation. The newly designed PSA will enhance the user experience and will significantly reduce the complexity for users to find their data promoting one-click access to the scientific datasets with more specialised views when needed. This includes a better integration with Planetary GIS analysis tools and Planetary interoperability services (search and retrieve data, supporting e.g. PDAP, EPN-TAP). It will be also up-to-date with versions 3 and 4 of the PDS standards, as PDS4 will be used for ESA's ExoMars and upcoming BepiColombo missions. Users will have direct access to documentation, information and tools that are relevant to the scientific use of the dataset, including ancillary datasets, Software Interface Specification (SIS) documents, and any tools/help that the PSA team can provide. A login mechanism will provide additional functionalities to the users to aid / ease their searches (e.g. saving queries, managing default views). This contribution will introduce the new PSA, its key features and access interfaces.

  4. Scientific computing environment for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    An emerging scientific computing environment in which computers are used not only to solve large-scale models, but are also integrated into the daily activities of scientists and engineers, is discussed. The requirements of the scientific user in this environment are reviewed, and the hardware environment is described, including supercomputers, work stations, mass storage, and communications. Significant increases in memory capacity to keep pace with performance increases, the introduction of powerful graphics displays into the work station, and networking to integrate many computers are stressed. The emerging system software environment is considered, including the operating systems, communications software, and languages. New scientific user tools and utilities that will become available are described.

  5. Laser communication terminals for the European Data Relay System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, Knut; Gregory, Mark; Heine, Frank; Kämpfner, Hartmut; Lange, Robert; Lutzer, Michael; Meyer, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    For the first time, laser communication terminals will be operational in a commercial service, EDRS, the European Data Relay System. Future earth observation satellites call for satellite-to-ground links with high availability to make their data immediately available to the user. High availability is only achieved by GEO relay links, i.e. communication links from LEO satellites to a geostationary relay satellite which transmits the data to the ground. While RF communication limits the GEO relay's data rate to roughly 1 Gbps optical communication will extend its capacity into the 10 Gbps range. Today, laser communication terminals operated in LEO-LEO, LEO-to ground and ground-to-LEO links, all at a data rate of 5.625 Gbps, are applied in campaigns with scientific objectives and for technology demonstrating purposes. Adapted to the larger link distance of the LEO-to-GEO link the laser communication terminals will be applied in the GEO relay EDRS operated for the time being at 1.8 Gbps. Terminals will be delivered for the accommodation on Alphabus, EDRS-A and EDRS-C, European GEO-satellites, and on Sentinel-1a and Sentinel-2a, European LEO satellites.

  6. Scientific Eschatology

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H

    2005-03-18

    The future evolution of the universe suggested by the cosmological model proposed earlier at this meeting by the authors is explored. The fundamental role played by the positive ''cosmological constant'' is emphasized. Dyson's 1979 paper entitled ''Time Without End'' is briefly reviewed. His most optimistic scenario requires that the universe be geometrically open and that biology is structural in the sense that the current complexity of human society can be reproduced by scaling up its (quantum mechanical) structure to arbitrary size. If the recently measured ''cosmological constant'' is indeed a fundamental constant of nature, then Dyson's scenario is, for various reasons, ruled out by the finite (De Sitter) horizon due to exponential expansion of the resulting space. However, the finite temperature of that horizon does open other interesting options. If, as is suggested by the cosmology under consideration, the current exponential expansion of the universe is due to a phase transition which fixes a physical boundary condition during the early radiation dominated era, the behavior of the universe after the relevant scale factor crosses the De Sitter radius opens up still other possibilities. The relevance of Martin Rees' apocalyptic eschatology recently presented in his book ''Our Final Hour'' is mentioned. It is concluded that even for the far future, whether or not cultural and scientific descendants of the current epoch will play a role in it, an understanding (sadly, currently lacking) of community and political evolution and control is essential for a preliminary treatment of what could be even vaguely called scientific eschatology.

  7. Office of Science User Facilities Summary Report, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science provides the Nation’s researchers with worldclass scientific user facilities to propel the U.S. to the forefront of science and innovation. A user facility is a federally sponsored research facility available for external use to advance scientific or technical knowledge under the following conditions: open, accessible, free, collaborative, competitive, and unique.

  8. The Gaia scientific exploitation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.

    2015-05-01

    On July 2014 the Gaia satellite, placed at L2 since January 2014, finished their commissioning phase and started collecting high accurate scientific data. New and more realistic estimations of the astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic accuracy expected after five years mission operation (2014-2019) have been recently published in the Gaia Science Performance Web page. Here we present the coordination efforts and the activities being conducted through the two GREAT (Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training) European Networks, the GREAT-ESF, a programme supported by the European Science Foundation (2010-2015), and the GREAT-ITN network, from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (2011-2015). The main research theme of these networks is to unravel the origin and history of our home galaxy. Emphasis is placed on the research projects being conducted by the Spanish Researchers through these networks, well coordinated by the Red Española de Explotación Científica de Gaia (REG network, with more than 140 participants). Members of the REG play an important role on the collection of complementary spectroscopic data from ground based telescopes, on the development of new tools for an optimal scientific exploitation of Gaia data and on the preparation task to create the Gaia archive.

  9. Design and implementation of the European Space Information System query environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.J. ); Ciarlo, A. ); Benso, S. )

    1993-08-01

    The European Space Information System (ESIS) project is a major pilot project undertaken by the European Space Agency's Research and Information center, ESRIN. It has as its primary aim to design and develop a set of information systems which will form an integrated environment for the retrieval, dissemination, and application of space scientific data. One of these information systems which shall form an important part of the ESIS concept is the ESIS Query Environment (ESIS QE). The ESIS QE project is concerned with the development of a distributed software system which shall provide its users with an environment allowing for uniform and easy access to a set of heterogeneous and geographically distributed databases and space science data archives. (AIP)

  10. Justine user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  11. Screening for gestational diabetes in Europe: where do we stand and how to move forward?: A scientific paper commissioned by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG).

    PubMed

    Benhalima, Katrien; Damm, Peter; Van Assche, André; Mathieu, Chantal; Devlieger, Roland; Mahmood, Tahir; Dunne, Fidelma

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM) is rising globally and it represents an important modifiable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. GDM is also associated with negative long-term health outcomes for both mothers and offspring. Acceptance and implementation of the 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria varies globally and within Europe. There is at present no consensus on the optimal approach to GDM screening in Europe. More uniformity in GDM screening across Europe will lead to an opportunity for more timely diagnosis and treatment for GDM in a greater number of women. More targeted research is necessary to evaluate optimal screening strategies based on the 2013 WHO criteria across different European populations with a focus on implementation strategy. Future research should address these important questions so that solid recommendations for GDM screening can be made to European health organizations based on screening uptake rates, maternal well-being, maternal and neonatal health outcomes, equity and cost-effectiveness. Here we describe the ongoing controversy on GDM screening and diagnosis, and provide an overview of important topics for future research concerning GDM screening in Europe.

  12. Virtual Environments in Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Lisinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a new way of approaching the interface between computers and humans. Emphasizing display and user control that conforms to the user's natural ways of perceiving and thinking about space, virtual environment technologies enhance the ability to perceive and interact with computer generated graphic information. This enhancement potentially has a major effect on the field of scientific visualization. Current examples of this technology include the Virtual Windtunnel being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. Other major institutions such as the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and SRI International are also exploring this technology. This talk will be describe several implementations of virtual environments for use in scientific visualization. Examples include the visualization of unsteady fluid flows (the virtual windtunnel), the visualization of geodesics in curved spacetime, surface manipulation, and examples developed at various laboratories.

  13. Virtual Environments in Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Lisinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a new way of approaching the interface between computers and humans. Emphasizing display and user control that conforms to the user's natural ways of perceiving and thinking about space, virtual environment technologies enhance the ability to perceive and interact with computer generated graphic information. This enhancement potentially has a major effect on the field of scientific visualization. Current examples of this technology include the Virtual Windtunnel being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. Other major institutions such as the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and SRI International are also exploring this technology. This talk will be describe several implementations of virtual environments for use in scientific visualization. Examples include the visualization of unsteady fluid flows (the virtual windtunnel), the visualization of geodesics in curved spacetime, surface manipulation, and examples developed at various laboratories.

  14. Media Selection for Information User Training. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, A. W.

    Undertaken to determine reasons for the lack of success experienced by suppliers of scientific and technical information (STI) services in the promotion of their services to users, this study has identified the attitudes, settings, functions, needs and perceptions of the user audiences. A user panel, selected to interact with the education and…

  15. Library User Education under the Circumstance of Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Tian-hui

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of user education, this paper discusses the necessity of user education in library under the circumstance of network, describes the contents and forms of user education and puts forward the problems that should be paid attention to during education. [This paper was supported by scientific research project of Qufu Normal…

  16. Scientific and educational recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, A. I.; Kireev, V. S.; Bochkarev, P. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Philippov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the questions associated with the use of reference systems in the preparation of graduates in physical function. The objective of this research is creation of model of recommender system user from the sphere of science and education. The detailed review of current scientific and social network for scientists and the problem of constructing recommender systems in this area. The result of this study is to research user information model systems. The model is presented in two versions: the full one - in the form of a semantic network, and short - in a relational form. The relational model is the projection in the form of semantic network, taking into account the restrictions on the amount of bonds that characterize the number of information items (research results), which interact with the system user.

  17. Arianespace: Launch Solutions for Scientific Endeavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, J.-Y.

    Arianespace was established 25 years ago and currently stands as the European operator offering launch services from the Guiana Space Centre CSG according to the mandate given by the European Member States through the European Space Agency ESA While guaranteeing access to space through commercially sustained capabilities Arianespace is first and foremost dedicated to satisfy scientific requests to orbit any mission providing reliable and available market-priced solutions to the scientific community In this regard among the 232 spacecraft deployed by Arianespace include all European space observatories such as Giotto 1985 Hipparcos 1989 ISO 1995 XMM 1999 Envisat 2002 Mars Express 2003 Rosetta 2004 Venus Express 2005 This longstanding heritage illustrates the Arianespace steady commitment toward its scientific customers to tailor launch solutions according to their requirements Arianespace operates a fleet of launch vehicles optimized for each and every scientific mission including the heavy-lift Ariane 5 the mid-size Soyuz currently launched from Baikonur and available from CSG beginning in 2008 and the light Vega starting in 2008 More than a launch Arianespace provides consummate and adapted solutions paving the way for cost-effective and target-oriented scientific endeavours

  18. Multi-year Content Analysis of User Facility Related Publications

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Stahl, Christopher G; Hines, Jayson; Potok, Thomas E; Wells, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    Scientific user facilities provide resources and support that enable scientists to conduct experiments or simulations pertinent to their respective research. Consequently, it is critical to have an informed understanding of the impact and contributions that these facilities have on scientific discoveries. Leveraging insight into scientific publications that acknowledge the use of these facilities enables more informed decisions by facility management and sponsors in regard to policy, resource allocation, and influencing the direction of science as well as more effectively understand the impact of a scientific user facility. This work discusses preliminary results of mining scientific publications that utilized resources at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These results show promise in identifying and leveraging multi-year trends and providing a higher resolution view of the impact that a scientific user facility may have on scientific discoveries.

  19. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Regner, Peter; Zehner, Claus; Engdahl, Marcus; Benveniste, Jerome; Delwart, Steven; Gascon, Ferran; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Bojkov, Bojan; Koetz, Benjamin; Arino, Olivier; Donlon, Craig; Davidson, Malcolm; Goryl, Philippe; Foumelis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) programme element are • to federate, support and expand the research community • to strengthen the leadership of European EO research community • to enable the science community to address new scientific research As a preparation for the SEOM element a series of international science users consultation has been organized by ESA in 2012 and 2013 In particular the ESA Living Planet Symposium was successfully organized in Edinburgh September 2013 and involving 1700 participants from 60 countries. The science users recommendations have been gathered and form the basis for the 2014 SEOM work plan approved by ESA member states. The SEOM element is organized along the following action lines: 1. Developing open-source, multi-mission, scientific toolboxes : the new toolboxes for Sentinel 1/2/3 and 5P will be introduced 2. Research and development studies: the first SEOM studies are being launched such as the INSARAP studies for Sentinel 1 interferometry in orbit demonstration , the IAS study to generate an improved spectroscopic database of the trace gas species CH4, H2O, and CO in the 2.3 μm region and SO2 in the UV region for Sentinel 5 P. In addition larger Sentinels for science call will be tendered in 2014 covering grouped studies for Sentinel 1 Land , Sentinel 1 Ocean , Sentinel 2 Land, Sentinel 3 SAR Altimetry ,Sentinel 3 Ocean color, Sentinel 3 Land and Sentinels Synergy . 3. Science users consultation : the Sentinel 2 for Science workshop is planned from 20 to 22 may 2014 at ESRIN to prepare for scientific exploitation of the Sentinel-2 mission (http://seom.esa.int/S2forScience2014 ) . In addition the FRINGE workshop focusing on scientific explotation of Sentinel1 using SAR interferometry is planned to be held at ESA ESRIN in Q2 2015 4. Training the next generation of European EO scientists on the scientific exploitation of Sentinels data: the Advanced Training course Land

  20. The European Medicines Agency review of vemurafenib (Zelboraf®) for the treatment of adult patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive unresectable or metastatic melanoma: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Dias, Silvy; Salmonson, Tomas; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Jonsson, Bertil; Marchetti, Serena; Schellens, Jan H M; Giuliani, Rosa; Pignatti, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The applicant company Roche Registration Ltd. submitted to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) an application for marketing authorisation for vemurafenib. Vemurafenib is a low molecular weight, orally available, inhibitor of oncogenic V600 BRAF serine-threonine kinase. Mutations in the BRAF gene which substitute the valine at amino acid position 600 constitutively activate BRAF proteins, which will drive cell proliferation in the absence of growth factors. Results from a phase 3 trial (N=675) comparing vemurafenib 960 mg twice daily (taken either with or without food) to standard treatment dacarbazine (DTIC) in patients with BRAF V600E mutation-positive unresectable or metastatic melanoma were submitted. The study met its primary efficacy objective after an interim analysis of overall survival. Patients were allowed to cross-over to the experimental arm following disclosure of the study results after the first interim analysis. In the update of the analysis, the median overall survival (OS) was 9.9 months versus 13.2 months for DTIC and vemurafenib, respectively (HR=0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.54, 0.84; cut-off 3 October 2011). Based on the updated analysis, the CHMP concluded that a survival benefit over DTIC had been convincingly demonstrated, in the overall population. The follow-up was considered sufficiently mature with close to 50% of the events observed. The most common side effects (affecting more than 30% of patients) in vemurafenib treated patients included arthralgia, fatigue, rash, photosensitivity reaction, nausea, alopecia and pruritus. Some patients treated with vemurafenib developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma which was readily treated by local surgery. The objective of this paper is to summarise the scientific review of the application leading to regulatory approval in the European Union (EU). The full scientific assessment report and product information, including the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC), are available on the

  1. The European medicines agency review of bosutinib for the treatment of adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Hanaizi, Zahra; Unkrig, Christoph; Enzmann, Harald; Camarero, Jorge; Sancho-Lopez, Arantxa; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    On March 27, 2013, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union was issued for bosutinib (Bosulif) for the treatment of adult patients with chronic-phase, accelerated-phase, and blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph⁺) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) previously treated with one tyrosine kinase inhibitor or more and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Bosutinib is a kinase inhibitor that targets the BCR-ABL kinase. The recommended dose is 500 mg of bosutinib once daily. The main evidence of efficacy for bosutinib was based on a CML subgroup analysis of study 3160A4-200, a phase I/II study of bosutinib in Ph⁺ leukemia in imatinib-resistant or intolerant CML. The subgroup was defined based on the presence of a BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation that would be expected to confer resistance to dasatinib (F317, E255) or nilotinib (E255, Y253, F359) and expected to have sensitivity to bosutinib or based on the presence of medical conditions or prior toxicities that may predispose the patient to unacceptable risk in the setting of nilotinib or dasatinib therapy. A conditional marketing authorization was granted because of the limited evidence of efficacy and safety currently supporting this last-line indication.

  2. The European Medicines Agency Review of Bosutinib for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Unkrig, Christoph; Enzmann, Harald; Camarero, Jorge; Sancho-Lopez, Arantxa; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 2013, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union was issued for bosutinib (Bosulif) for the treatment of adult patients with chronic-phase, accelerated-phase, and blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) previously treated with one tyrosine kinase inhibitor or more and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Bosutinib is a kinase inhibitor that targets the BCR-ABL kinase. The recommended dose is 500 mg of bosutinib once daily. The main evidence of efficacy for bosutinib was based on a CML subgroup analysis of study 3160A4-200, a phase I/II study of bosutinib in Ph+ leukemia in imatinib-resistant or intolerant CML. The subgroup was defined based on the presence of a BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation that would be expected to confer resistance to dasatinib (F317, E255) or nilotinib (E255, Y253, F359) and expected to have sensitivity to bosutinib or based on the presence of medical conditions or prior toxicities that may predispose the patient to unacceptable risk in the setting of nilotinib or dasatinib therapy. A conditional marketing authorization was granted because of the limited evidence of efficacy and safety currently supporting this last-line indication. PMID:24668331

  3. Role and goals of the EUR-OCEANS Consortium - Bringing marine scientists priorities and strategies to the European research planning agenda.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cury, Philippe; Baisnée, Pierre-François

    2010-05-01

    The EUR-OCEANS Consortium is the follow-up structure of the homonym European Network of Excellence (NoE; 2005-2008, FP6 contract number 511106). It is a scientific network, benefiting from and relying upon the institutional commitment of the 27 research performing organisations forming its core (paying) membership. It aims at the long-term harmonization of European research efforts related to ocean ecosystems undergoing anthropogenic and natural forcing. More specifically, its objectives are to facilitate and promote: (1) top-level scientific research on the impacts of anthropogenic and natural forcing on ocean ecosystems, fostering collaborations across the European Research Area; (2) the optimal use of any shared technical infrastructures and scientific facilities; and (3) activities to spread excellence, such as the training of scientific personnel and students, or knowledge dissemination towards the general public and socio-economic users. A particular focus is put during the first scientific coordination mandate on the building of scenarios for marine ecosystems under anthropogenic and natural forcing in the XXI Century, and on the improvement of the science-policy interface. Through calls for projects and networking activities, the Consortium seeks to favour the emergence of coordinated projects on key hot topics on one hand, and the crystallisation of scientific priorities and strategies that could serve as input to ERA-NETs, ESFRI, Joint Programming Initiatives and European Research Planning actors in general. While being an active standalone structure, the Consortium is also engaged in the Euromarine FP7 project (submitted) aiming at the definition of a common coordinating or integrating structure for the three follow-up entities of FP6 marine science NoEs (Marine Genomics Europe, MarBEF, EUR-OCEANS). The 2009-2011 strategy and activity plan of EUR-OCEANS will be presented and the involvement of EUR-OCEANS members in other key projects or programmes will

  4. The European Medicines Agency Review of Brentuximab Vedotin (Adcetris) for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma or Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Gravanis, Iordanis; Tzogani, Kyriaki; van Hennik, Paula; de Graeff, Pieter; Schmitt, Petra; Mueller-Berghaus, Jan; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Bergmann, Lothar; Pignatti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    On October 25, 2012, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) was issued for brentuximab vedotin for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory CD30+ Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL). For HL, the indication is restricted to treatment after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) or after at least two previous therapies when ASCT or multiagent chemotherapy is not a treatment option. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) composed of a CD30-directed monoclonal antibody (recombinant chimeric IgG1) that is covalently linked to the antimicrotubule agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). Binding of the ADC to CD30 on the cell surface initiates internalization of the MMAE-CD30 complex, followed by proteolytic cleavage that releases MMAE. The recommended dose is 1.8 mg/kg administered as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes every 3 weeks. Brentuximab vedotin as a single agent was evaluated in two single-arm studies. Study SG035-003 included 102 patients with relapsed or refractory HL. An objective response was observed in 76 patients (75%), with complete remission in 34 (33%). Study SG035-004 included 58 patients with relapsed or refractory sALCL. An objective response was observed in 50 patients (86%), with complete remission in 34 (59%). The most frequently observed toxicities were peripheral sensory neuropathy, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, neutropenia, vomiting, pyrexia, and upper respiratory tract infection. The present report summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of the product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). Brentuximab vedotin was approved in the European Union for the treatment of adult

  5. Adding a user and changing user roles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Webmasters can add users to a web area, and assign or change roles, which define the actions a user is able to take in the web area. Non-webmasters must use a request form to add users and change roles.

  6. Display system for imaging scientific telemetric information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabiyakin, G. I.; Rykovanov, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A system for imaging scientific telemetric information, based on the M-6000 minicomputer and the SIGD graphic display, is described. Two dimensional graphic display of telemetric information and interaction with the computer, in analysis and processing of telemetric parameters displayed on the screen is provided. The running parameter information output method is presented. User capabilities in the analysis and processing of telemetric information imaged on the display screen and the user language are discussed and illustrated.

  7. Coordinating Council. Sixth Meeting: Who Are Our Key Users?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program Coordinating Council meeting deals with the topic 'Who are our key users?' Presentations were made on the following subtopics: Key users: Who uses the system the most, Who orders the most documents, Users: What do we know about them?, NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion research project on 'Potential key users', How we meet the user's needs, and STI Council user requirements update. Summaries of discussions after the presentations are included along with visuals for the presentations.

  8. User Working Group Charter

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    ... Amended 2010   The Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) User Working Group (UWG) is chartered by the Earth Observing ... of the ASDC user interface, development of the Information Management System (IMS), and ASDC user conferences requirements for and ...

  9. Vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and management of major chronic diseases not related to mineral homeostasis in adults: research for evidence and a scientific statement from the European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ESCEO).

    PubMed

    Cianferotti, Luisella; Bertoldo, Francesco; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Bruyere, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Cutolo, Maurizio; Kanis, John A; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, Rene; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2017-05-01

    Optimal vitamin D status promotes skeletal health and is recommended with specific treatment in individuals at high risk for fragility fractures. A growing body of literature has provided indirect and some direct evidence for possible extraskeletal vitamin D-related effects. Members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis have reviewed the main evidence for possible proven benefits of vitamin D supplementation in adults at risk of or with overt chronic extra-skeletal diseases, providing recommendations and guidelines for future studies in this field. Robust mechanistic evidence is available from in vitro studies and in vivo animal studies, usually employing cholecalciferol, calcidiol or calcitriol in pharmacologic rather than physiologic doses. Although many cross-sectional and prospective association studies in humans have shown that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (i.e., <50 nmol/L) are consistently associated with chronic diseases, further strengthened by a dose-response relationship, several meta-analyses of clinical trials have shown contradictory results. Overall, large randomized controlled trials with sufficient doses of vitamin D are missing, and available small to moderate-size trials often included people with baseline levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L, did not simultaneously assess multiple outcomes, and did not report overall safety (e.g., falls). Thus, no recommendations can be made to date for the use of vitamin D supplementation in general, parental compounds, or non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analogs in the prevention and treatment of extra-skeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, attainment of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels well above the threshold desired for bone health cannot be recommended based on current evidence, since safety has yet to be confirmed. Finally, the promising findings from mechanistic studies, large cohort studies, and small clinical trials obtained for

  10. Acid Precipitation: Scientific Progress and Public Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowling, Ellis B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes certain perspectives on scientific research and on the public debates about acid deposition and its effects. Although primary attention is given to European/North American research, the ideas developed are relevant in any world region sensitive to acid deposition resulting from intense industrialization. (Author/JN)

  11. Incoherent Scatter Radar User Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, A. D.

    1984-04-01

    The incoherent scatter radar technique has developed over the years into one of the most powerful tools for investigating physical processes in the upper atmosphere. The National Science Foundation (NSF) now supports a chain of four incoherent scatter facilities at Sondrestromfjord (Greenland), Millstone Hill (Massachusetts), Arecibo (Puerto Rico), and Jicamarca (PERU). Six European nations support the EISCAT facility in northern Scandinavia, and France also has a radar at St. Santin. Recently, the organizations reponsible for each of the six radars agreed to participate in a centralized data base being established at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to make their data more readily accessible to the scientific community at large.

  12. Fauna Europaea – all European animal species on the web

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, Melina; Michelsen, Verner; Bjørn, Per de Place; Los, Wouter; Steeman, Fedor; Bailly, Nicolas; Basire, Claire; Chylarecki, Przemek; Stloukal, Eduard; Hagedorn, Gregor; Wetzel, Florian Tobias; Glöckler, Falko; Kroupa, Alexander; Korb, Günther; Hoffmann, Anke; Häuser, Christoph; Kohlbecker, Andreas; Müller, Andreas; Güntsch, Anton; Stoev, Pavel; Penev, Lyubomir

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea is Europe's main zoological taxonomic index, making the scientific names and distributions of all living, currently known, multicellular, European land and freshwater animals species integrally available in one authoritative database. Fauna Europaea covers about 260,000 taxon names, including 145,000 accepted (sub)species, assembled by a large network of (>400) leading specialists, using advanced electronic tools for data collations with data quality assured through sophisticated validation routines. Fauna Europaea started in 2000 as an EC funded FP5 project and provides a unique taxonomic reference for many user-groups such as scientists, governments, industries, nature conservation communities and educational programs. Fauna Europaea was formally accepted as an INSPIRE standard for Europe, as part of the European Taxonomic Backbone established in PESI. Fauna Europaea provides a public web portal at faunaeur.org with links to other key biodiversity services, is installed as a taxonomic backbone in wide range of biodiversity services and actively contributes to biodiversity informatics innovations in various initiatives and EC programs. PMID:25349527

  13. Fauna Europaea - all European animal species on the web.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Yde; Verbeek, Melina; Michelsen, Verner; Bjørn, Per de Place; Los, Wouter; Steeman, Fedor; Bailly, Nicolas; Basire, Claire; Chylarecki, Przemek; Stloukal, Eduard; Hagedorn, Gregor; Wetzel, Florian Tobias; Glöckler, Falko; Kroupa, Alexander; Korb, Günther; Hoffmann, Anke; Häuser, Christoph; Kohlbecker, Andreas; Müller, Andreas; Güntsch, Anton; Stoev, Pavel; Penev, Lyubomir

    2014-01-01

    Fauna Europaea is Europe's main zoological taxonomic index, making the scientific names and distributions of all living, currently known, multicellular, European land and freshwater animals species integrally available in one authoritative database. Fauna Europaea covers about 260,000 taxon names, including 145,000 accepted (sub)species, assembled by a large network of (>400) leading specialists, using advanced electronic tools for data collations with data quality assured through sophisticated validation routines. Fauna Europaea started in 2000 as an EC funded FP5 project and provides a unique taxonomic reference for many user-groups such as scientists, governments, industries, nature conservation communities and educational programs. Fauna Europaea was formally accepted as an INSPIRE standard for Europe, as part of the European Taxonomic Backbone established in PESI. Fauna Europaea provides a public web portal at faunaeur.org with links to other key biodiversity services, is installed as a taxonomic backbone in wide range of biodiversity services and actively contributes to biodiversity informatics innovations in various initiatives and EC programs.

  14. User interface devices for mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The Mission Control Center (MCC) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, is being upgraded with new technology engineering/scientific workstations. These workstations will replace the existing consoles and will emulate the present hardware input and display media. The workstations will be using new and different input devices for the flight controller to interact with the workstation and mainframes. This paper presents the results of the User Interface survey conducted by the Workstation Prototype Lab (WPL). The WPL offered the opportunity for users to do hands-on evaluations of a number of user interface options prototyped by lab personnel.

  15. User Facilities: The Education of New Neutron Users

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Yamali; Brown, Craig M.

    2009-08-19

    Neutron scattering is a particularly useful tool enabling the study of compositional, structural and dynamical properties of materials down to the atomic scale. Due to the complexity of operating an intense source of neutrons, this technique is primarily practiced at large national facilities that cater to the research needs of chemists, biologists, physicists, engineers, and material scientists in general. In particular, these user facilities provide specialized instrumentation along with the scientific and technical support required to efficiently utilize it. Since neutron scattering experiments are performed at central facilities rather than in the home-laboratories of individual investigators, the facilities themselves must play a key role in the education and development of new users. The role of neutron scattering facilities in educating young scientists will be examined using examples from current programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research.

  16. Scientific Programme Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Scientific Programme Committee A. Blondel, University of Geneva A. Cervera, IFIC M. Dracos, IN2P3 I. Efhymiopoulos, CERN J. Ellis, CERN S. Geer, FNAL R. Garoby, CERN M. Goodman, ANL D. Harris, FNAL T. Hasegawa, KEK P. Huber, Virginia Tech. D. Kaplan, IIT Y.D. Kim, Sejong University H. Kirk, BNL Y. Kuno, Osaka University K. Long, Imperial College N.K. Mondal, TIFR J. Morfin, FNAL Y. Mori, Kyoto University K. Nishikawa, KEK V. Palladino, University of Napoli C. Prior, RAL F.J.P. Soler, University of Glasgow J. Strait, FNAL R. Svoboda, University of California Davis F. Terranova, LN Frascati M. Zisman, LBNL Local Organizing Committee E. Benedetto, CERN/NTUA C. Blanchard, University of Geneva A. Blondel, University of Geneva (co-chair) I. Efthymiopoulos, CERN (co-chair) F. Dufour, University of Geneva F. Girard-Madoux, CERN E. Gschwendtner, CERN A. Korzenev, University of Geneva M. Morer-Olafsen, CERN S. Murphy, University of Geneva G. Prior, CERN G. Wikström, University of Geneva E. Wildner, CERN Sponsors EuCARD European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) Swiss Institute for Particle Physics (CHIPP) University of Geneva

  17. Development concept for Dutch user support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronk, C. N. A.; Koopman, N.; Dehoop, D.

    1992-06-01

    The main development approaches and some technologies developed in support of the different objectives of the Dutch Utilization Center (DUC) are reported. The DUC acts as a point of coordination of Dutch user support activities. The support needs of the user are analyzed and from there the required support efforts of the entities in the Dutch User Support Organization (DUSO) are activated. The main objectives of the DUSO are to promote the availability of the Columbus Space Station infrastructure among potential Dutch users, and to assist the users during the process of experiment definition, development, execution, and results evaluation. The DUSO support activities cover promotion and familiarization, and administrative, scientific, technical, and operational support to microgravity and space experimentation. The DUC developmental approaches consist of two approaches: a top down or formal approach; and a bottom up approach.

  18. NASA and ESA astronauts visit ESO. Hubble repair team meets European astronomers in Garching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    On Wednesday, February 16, 1994, seven NASA and ESA astronauts and their spouses will spend a day at the Headquarters of the European Southern Observatory. They are the members of the STS-61 crew that successfully repaired the Hubble Space Telescope during a Space Shuttle mission in December 1993. This will be the only stop in Germany during their current tour of various European countries. ESO houses the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST/ECF), a joint venture by the European Space Agency and ESO. This group of astronomers and computer specialists provide all services needed by European astronomers for observations with the Space Telescope. Currently, the European share is about 20 of the total time available at this telescope. During this visit, a Press Conference will be held on Wednesday, February 16, 11:45 - 12:30 at the ESO Headquarters Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2 D-85748 Garching bei Munchen. Please note that participation in this Press Conference is by invitation only. Media representatives may obtain invitations from Mrs. E. Volk, ESO Information Service at this address (Tel.: +49-89-32006276; Fax.: +49-89-3202362), until Friday, February 11, 1994. After the Press Conference, between 12:30 - 14:00, a light refreshment will be served at the ESO Headquarters to all participants. >From 14:00 - 15:30, the astronauts will meet with students and teachers from the many scientific institutes in Garching in the course of an open presentation at the large lecture hall of the Physics Department of the Technical University. It is a 10 minute walk from ESO to the hall. Later the same day, the astronauts will be back at ESO for a private discussion of various space astronomy issues with their astronomer colleagues, many of whom are users of the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as ground-based telescopes at the ESO La Silla Observatory and elsewhere. The astronauts continue to Switzerland in the evening.

  19. The European Marine Observing Network and the development of an Integrated European Ocean Observing System. An EuroGOOS perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Gorringe, Patrick; Nolan, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The ocean benefits many sectors of society, being the biggest reservoir of heat, water, carbon and oxygen and playing a fundamental role regulating the earth's climate. We rely on the oceans for food, transport, energy and recreation. Therefore, a sustained marine observation network is crucial to further our understanding of the oceanic environment and to supply scientific data to meet society's need. Marine data and observations in Europe, collected primarily by state governmental agencies, is offered via five Regional Operational Oceanographic Systems (ROOS) within the context of EuroGOOS (http://www.eurogos.eu), an International Non-Profit Association of national governmental agencies and research organizations (40 members from 19 member states) committed to European-scale operational oceanography within the context of the Intergovernmental Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Strong cooperation within these regions, enabling the involvement of additional partners and countries, forms the basis of EuroGOOS work. Ocean data collected from different type of sensors (e.g. moored buoys, tide gauges, Ferrybox systems, High Frequency radars, gliders and profiling floats) is accessible to scientist and other end users through data portals and initiatives such as the European Marine Observations and Data Network (EMODnet) (www.emodnet.eu) and the Copernicus Marine Service Copernicus (www.copernicus.eu). Although a relatively mature European ocean observing capability already exists and its well-coordinated at European level, some gaps have been identified, for example the demand for ecosystem products and services, or the case that biogeochemical observations are still relatively sparse particularly in coastal and shelf seas. Assessing gaps based on the capacity of the observing system to answer key societal challenges e.g. site suitability for aquaculture and ocean energy, oil spill response and contextual oceanographic products for fisheries and ecosystems is still

  20. European Organizations of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tederko, Piotr; Kujawa, Jolanta; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) is a basic medical specialty officially recognized in Europe since 1962. This article briefly presents the significance, attainments and tasks recently undertaken by the leading structures responsible for international harmonization and management of the specialty within healthcare systems in Europe and for scientific development: the Section and Board of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS-PRM), European Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine (AEMR) and European Society of PRM (ESPRM). The concept of rehabilitation according to the biopsychosocial model of functioning recently promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO) closely follows the assumptions of the Polish Model of Rehabilitation, formulated in the 1960's and approved by the WHO in 1970. Since its accession to the European Union in 2004, Poland has been gradually increasing active participation in the European structures of PRM.

  1. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  2. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  3. CaWingz user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Ben-chin

    1994-04-25

    This document assumes that you have read and understood the Wingz user`s manuals. CaWingz is an external Wingz program which, when combined with a set of script files, provides easy-to-use EPICS channel access interface functions for Wingz users. The external function run allows Wingz user to invoke any Unix processor within caWingz. Few additional functions for accessing static database field and monitoring of value change event is available for EPICS users after release 3.11. The functions, script files, and usage are briefly described in this document. The script files supplied here serve as examples only. Users are responsible for generating their own spreadsheet and script files. CaWingz communicates with IOC through channel access function calls.

  4. CaWave user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Ben-chin

    1993-09-01

    CaWave User`s Guide explains how to use the CaWave functions which were specifically written in PV-WAVE command language and C language for EPICS users. CaWave consists of a special set of external channel access functions which provides the PV-WAVE users with easy and flexible access of channel information across the IOC networks. It also provides a complete set of process variable event monitoring functions. This document also gives examples how a PV-WAVE user can interface to channel access devices. It is assumed that the user is already familiar with using PV-WAVE. Few simple example modules of using PV-WAVE command language with CaWave functions are also given in this document.

  5. The European Supersites coordination: joining efforts for a federated data infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos; Consortium, Med-Suv; Consortium, Marsite; Consortium, FutureVolc

    2014-05-01

    The integration of satellite and in-situ Earth observations envisioned in the GEO Geohazards Supersites and National Laboratories (GSNL) initiative is aimed at providing access to spaceborne and in-situ geoscience data for selected sites prone to earthquakes, volcanoes or other environmental hazards. The initiative began with the "Frascati declaration" at the conclusion of the 3rd International Geohazards workshop of the Group of Earth Observation (GEO) held in November 2007 in Frascati, Italy. The key players involved in the GSNL initiative are the space agencies and satellite operators providing SAR data, the national agencies in charge of the monitoring of earthquakes and volcanic areas that provide in-situ data and the global geo-hazard scientific community. The development of the GSNL and the integration of in-situ and spaceborne Earth observations require the implementation of in-situ e-infrastructures and services to scientific users and stakeholders. These e-science implementation plans must be coherent and coordinated in order to guarantee interoperability among the different Supersites. In this work, we will present the strategic approach for promoting the European Supersites. The establishment of a network of supersites in Europe will facilitate the link with the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Here we present the EPOS federated approach to integrating Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science in Europe and we will discuss the synergies with the three European supersites projects: FUTUREVOLC for the Icelandic volcanoes, MED-SUV for Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius (Italy), and MARSITE for the Marmara Sea (Turkey). The EPOS federated approach might be considered as an example for other regions of the world and therefore it could contribute to develop the supersite initiative globally. In this work, we will present the key actions needed to: i) develop sustainable long-term Earth observation strategies preceding and following

  6. European eye bank association.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gary L A; Ponzin, Diego; Pels, Elisabeth; Maas, Hanneke; Tullo, Andrew B; Claerhout, Ilse

    2009-01-01

    The European Eye Bank Association (EEBA) is a technical-scientific organization for eye banks. Founded in 1989 with the simple objective of sharing information on eye banking, the Association is today the leading pan-national association in Europe dedicated to the advancement of eye banking and an authoritative reference point for eye banks which work according to quality standards. The Association establishes and maintains an agreed set of medical and technical standards, promotes the collection of data on eye bank activities and processes, provides opportunities for the discussion of all aspects of eye banking practice, including eye donor selection and procurement, relevant research and development, education and training in eye banking, and maintains linkage with national and international corneal transplant communities and relevant bodies. The recent introduction of a more structured and focused committee, a permanent secretariat, the development of a website has enabled the Association to establish closer links and collaborative activities with key regulatory bodies and to provide a more constant exchange of clinical, scientific and technical ideas and best practice with fellow professionals by means of its annual meetings, the EEBA directory and website, and a regular newsletter. The EEBA is a scientific organization committed to defining minimum standards and to encouraging eye banks to maintain the highest possible standards for quality and safety. Through its annual meetings, and the collection and exchange of detailed information from member eye banks, the Association can rightly claim to speak with a confident and representative voice on eye banking in Europe. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. AquaUsers: Improving access to remotely sensed data for non-specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Oliver; Walker, Peter; Calton, Ben; Miller, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In recent years more and more complex remotely sensed data have been made available to the public by national and international agencies. These data are also reprocessed by different organisations to produce secondary products that are of specific need to a community. For instance the production of chlorophyll concentration maps from ocean colour data provided by NASA for the marine community. Providing access to such data has normally been focused on simply making the data available with appropriate metadata so that domain specialists can make use of it. One area that has seen significant investment, both of time and money, has been in the production of web based data portals. Primarily these have focused on spatial data. By providing a web map visualisation users are able to quickly assess both spatial coverage and data values. Data portal improvements have been possible thanks to advancements in back end data servers such as Thredds and ncWMS as well as improvements in front-end libraries for data visualisation including OpenLayers and D3. Data portals that make use of these technological advancements have aimed at improving the access and use of data by trained scientific domain specialists. There is now a push to improve access to these systems by non-scientific domain specialists through several European Commission funded projects, including OPEC and AquaUsers. These projects have improved upon an open source web GIS portal created by Plymouth Marine Laboratory [https://github.com/pmlrsg/GISportal]. We will present the latest version of our GIS portal, discuss the designs steps taken to achieve the latest build and share user stories as to how non-domain specialists are now able to utilise the system and get benefits from remotely sensed data. A first version was produced and disseminated to end users for feedback. At this stage the end users included government advisors, fish farmers and scientific groups with no specific GIS training or knowledge. This

  8. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  9. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  10. Scientific Workflow Management in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Jeroen S.; Deelder, André M.; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Data processing in proteomics can be a challenging endeavor, requiring extensive knowledge of many different software packages, all with different algorithms, data format requirements, and user interfaces. In this article we describe the integration of a number of existing programs and tools in Taverna Workbench, a scientific workflow manager currently being developed in the bioinformatics community. We demonstrate how a workflow manager provides a single, visually clear and intuitive interface to complex data analysis tasks in proteomics, from raw mass spectrometry data to protein identifications and beyond. PMID:22411703

  11. Collaboratively Sharing Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fusheng; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal

    Scientific research becomes increasingly reliant on multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration through sharing experimental data. Indeed, data sharing is mandatory by government research agencies such as NIH. The major hurdles for data sharing come from: i) the lack of data sharing infrastructure to make data sharing convenient for users; ii) users’ fear of losing control of their data; iii) difficulty on sharing schemas and incompatible data from sharing partners; and iv) inconsistent data under schema evolution. In this paper, we develop a collaborative data sharing system SciPort, to support consistency preserved data sharing among multiple distributed organizations. The system first provides Central Server based lightweight data integration architecture, so data and schemas can be conveniently shared across multiple organizations. Through distributed schema management, schema sharing and evolution is made possible, while data consistency is maintained and data compatibility is enforced. With this data sharing system, distributed sites can now consistently share their research data and their associated schemas with much convenience and flexibility. SciPort has been successfully used for data sharing in biomedical research, clinical trials and large scale research collaboration.

  12. User Inspired Management of Scientific Jobs in Grids and Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withana, Eran Chinthaka

    2011-01-01

    From time-critical, real time computational experimentation to applications which process petabytes of data there is a continuing search for faster, more responsive computing platforms capable of supporting computational experimentation. Weather forecast models, for instance, process gigabytes of data to produce regional (mesoscale) predictions on…

  13. The microcomputer scientific software series 6: ECOPHYS user's manual.

    Treesearch

    George E. Host; H. Michael Rauscher; J. G. Isebrands; Donald I. Dickmann; Richard E. Dickson; Thomas R. Crow; D.A. Michael

    1990-01-01

    ECOPHYS is an ecophysiological whole-tree growth process model designed to simulate the growth of poplar in the establishment year. This microcomputer-based model may be used to test the influence of genetically determined physiological or morphological attributes on plant growth. This manual describes the installation, file structures, and operational procedures for...

  14. The microcomputer scientific software series 5: the BIOMASS user's guide.

    Treesearch

    George E. Host; Stephen C. Westin; William G. Cole; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    1989-01-01

    BIOMASS is an interactive microcomputer program that uses allometric regression equations to calculate aboveground biomass of common tree species of the Lake States. The equations are species-specific and most use both diameter and height as independent variables. The program accommodates fixed area and variable radius sample designs and produces both individual tree...

  15. The microcomputer scientific software series 8: the SYCOOR users manual.

    Treesearch

    Edgar E. Gutierrez-Espeleta; Gary J. Brand

    1993-01-01

    Describes how to use SYCOOR, an interactive Macintosh program written in BASIC for computing and adjusting synecological coordinates. Site synecological coordinates are indices of moisture, nutrients, heat, and light computed from lists of plant species present at the site. Graphs of a species` distribution in moisture-nutrient and heat-light space are also displayed...

  16. User Inspired Management of Scientific Jobs in Grids and Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withana, Eran Chinthaka

    2011-01-01

    From time-critical, real time computational experimentation to applications which process petabytes of data there is a continuing search for faster, more responsive computing platforms capable of supporting computational experimentation. Weather forecast models, for instance, process gigabytes of data to produce regional (mesoscale) predictions on…

  17. CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

    2011-12-31

    This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

  18. Supporting National User Communities at NERSC and NCAR

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, Timothy L.; Simon, Horst D.

    2006-05-16

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center(NERSC) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) are twocomputing centers that have traditionally supported large national usercommunities. Both centers have developed responsive approaches to supportthese user communities and their changing needs, providing end-to-endcomputing solutions. In this report we provide a short overview of thestrategies used at our centers in supporting our scientific users, withan emphasis on some examples of effective programs and futureneeds.

  19. Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas S. Kuhn suggested that science progresses discontinuously: As a scientific theory becomes obsolete, a period of crisis results, at the end of which the old theory is overthrown and replaced by a new, sounder, more complete theory [Kuhn, 1962]. After the scientific community has accepted the new [paradigm,] it undertakes only routine research until a new crisis occurs, usually as a result of an anomalous experiment that accidentally happens to be critical.

  20. Scientific Attitudes: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauld, C. F.; Hukins, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the following areas: the nature of scientific attitudes, the development of scientific attitudes as an educational objective, instruments for measuring scientific attitudes, and research concerning relationships between scientific attitudes and other variables; and makes recommendations for changes in research into scientific…

  1. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  2. FAMIAS User Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Wolfgang

    2008-10-01

    The excitation of pulsation modes in Beta Cephei and Slowly Pulsating B stars is known to be very sensitive to opacity changes in the stellar interior where T ~ 2 x 10E5 K. In this region differences in opacity up to ~ 50% can be induced by the choice between OPAL and OP opacity tables, and between two different metal mixtures (Grevesse & Noels 1993 and Asplund et al. 2005). We have extended the non-adiabatic computations presented in Miglio et al. (2007) towards models of higher mass and pulsation modes of degree l = 3, and we present here the instability domains in the HR- and log P-log Teff diagrams resulting from different choices of opacity tables, and for three different metallicities. FAMIAS (Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for AsteroSeismology) is a collection of state-of-the-art software tools for the analysis of photometric and spectroscopic time series data. It is one of the deliverables of the Work Package NA5: Asteroseismology of the European Coordination Action in Helio-and Asteroseismology (HELAS). Two main sets of tools are incorporated in FAMIAS. The first set allows to search for periodicities in the data using Fourier and non-linear least-squares fitting algorithms. The other set allows to carry out a mode identification for the detected pulsation frequencies to determine their pulsational quantum numbers, the harmonic degree, m. The types of stars to which famias is applicable are main-sequence pulsators hotter than the Sun. This includes the Gamma Dor stars, Delta Sct stars, the slowly pulsating B stars and the Beta Cep stars - basically all pulsating main-sequence stars, for which empirical mode identification is required to successfully carry out asteroseismology. This user manual describes how to use the different features of FAMIAS and provides two tutorials that demonstrate the usage of FAMIAS for spectroscopic and photometric mode identification.

  3. WEBSIM-COMPASS: a new generation scientific instrument simulator for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, M.; Yang, Y.; Jégouzo, I.; Marchal, O.; Disseau, K.; Paillous, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Taburet, S.; Clénet, Y.; Gratadour, D.; Flores, H.; Hammer, F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new scientific instrument simulator dedicated to the E-ELT named WEBSIM-COMPASS, and developed in the frame of the COMPASS project. This simulator builds on the previous series of WEBSIM simulators developed during the ESO E-ELT Design Reference Mission and Instrument Phase A studies. The WEBSIM-COMPASS observations simulator consists in a web interface coupled to an IDL code, which allows the user to perform end-to-end simulations of all E-ELT optical/NIR imagers and spectrographs foreseen for the future 39m European Extremely Large Telescope, i.e., MICADO, HARMONI, and MOSAIC. The simulation pipeline produces fake simulations in FITS format that mimic the result of a data reduction pipeline with perfectly extracted/reduced data. We give a functional description of this new simulator, emphasizing the new functionalities and current developments, and present science cases simulated used as test cases.

  4. ENVRI Cluster - a community-driven platform of European environmental research infrastructures for providing common solution for science and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorvari, Sanna; Kutsch, Werner; Laj, Paolo; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    European long-term environmental research infrastructures (often referred as ESFRI RIs) are the core facilities for providing services for scientists in their quest for understanding and predicting the complex Earth system and its functioning that requires long-term efforts to identify environmental changes (trends, thresholds and resilience, interactions and feedbacks). Many of the research infrastructures originally have been developed to respond to the needs of their specific research communities, however, it is clear that strong collaboration among research infrastructures is needed to serve the trans-boundary research requires exploring scientific questions at the intersection of different scientific fields, conducting joint research projects and developing concepts, devices, and methods that can be used to integrate knowledge. European Environmental research infrastructures have already been successfully worked together for many years and have established a cluster - ENVRI cluster - for their collaborative work. ENVRI cluster act as a collaborative platform where the RIs can jointly agree on the common solutions for their operations, draft strategies and policies and share best practices and knowledge. Supporting project for the ENVRI cluster, ENVRIplus project, brings together 21 European research infrastructures and infrastructure networks to work on joint technical solutions, data interoperability, access management, training, strategies and dissemination efforts. ENVRI cluster act as one stop shop for multidisciplinary RI users, other collaborative initiatives, projects and programmes and coordinates and implement jointly agreed RI strategies.

  5. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  6. Networked Services, User Support and Libraries: Mutual Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijne, Maria

    1992-01-01

    Describes the activities of SURFnet BV, a research network that provides information and communication services in higher education and scientific or industrial research in The Netherlands. Topics discussed include standardization; user services, including electronic mail; costs of using SURFnet; user support services; and the role of libraries in…

  7. End-User Training for Sci-Tech Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Ellis, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Issues related to end-user training for scientific and technical online databases are discussed in five articles. Topics covered include instruction in the use of controlled and natural language vocabularies; a planning assessment for end-user searching; the role of the information center in industrial research; training for health care…

  8. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  9. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  10. The Surprising Effectiveness of College Scientific Literacy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2008-10-01

    Research by Jon Miller, professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and director of the International Center for Scientific Literacy at Michigan State University, shows that the U.S. scientific literacy course requirements for nonscience college students pull the United States into second place in international rankings of adult scientific literacy. This despite the poor science scores of U.S. primary and secondary school students as compared with other nations. The far lower adult scientific literacy rankings of most European nations and other industrialized nations appear to be due to the lack of any such college scientific literacy requirement in those nations. Instituting such a requirement in all nations, and improving the quality and quantity of such courses on U.S. campuses, would increase global scientific literacy significantly, arguably doubling Europe's scientific literacy rate. In view of this result and today's crying need for scientific literacy, physics educators should make physics for nonscientists their top priority.

  11. Visualization and characterization of users in a citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Alessandra M. M.; Raddick, Jordan; Coelho dos Santos, Rafael D.

    2013-05-01

    Recent technological advances allowed the creation and use of internet-based systems where many users can collaborate gathering and sharing information for specific or general purposes: social networks, e-commerce review systems, collaborative knowledge systems, etc. Since most of the data collected in these systems is user-generated, understanding of the motivations and general behavior of users is a very important issue. Of particular interest are citizen science projects, where users without scientific training are asked for collaboration labeling and classifying information (either automatically by giving away idle computer time or manually by actually seeing data and providing information about it). Understanding behavior of users of those types of data collection systems may help increase the involvement of the users, categorize users accordingly to different parameters, facilitate their collaboration with the systems, design better user interfaces, and allow better planning and deployment of similar projects and systems. Behavior of those users could be estimated through analysis of their collaboration track: registers of which user did what and when can be easily and unobtrusively collected in several different ways, the simplest being a log of activities. In this paper we present some results on the visualization and characterization of almost 150.000 users with more than 80.000.000 collaborations with a citizen science project - Galaxy Zoo I, which asked users to classify galaxies' images. Basic visualization techniques are not applicable due to the number of users, so techniques to characterize users' behavior based on feature extraction and clustering are used.

  12. SALTON SEA SCIENTIFIC DRILLING PROJECT: SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Elders, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, was spudded on 24 October 1985, and reached a total depth of 10,564 ft. (3. 2 km) on 17 March 1986. There followed a period of logging, a flow test, and downhole scientific measurements. The scientific goals were integrated smoothly with the engineering and economic objectives of the program and the ideal of 'science driving the drill' in continental scientific drilling projects was achieved in large measure. The principal scientific goals of the project were to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active, magmatically driven hydrothermal system. To facilitate these studies, high priority was attached to four areas of sample and data collection, namely: (1) core and cuttings, (2) formation fluids, (3) geophysical logging, and (4) downhole physical measurements, particularly temperatures and pressures.

  13. Ethics of reviewing scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Napolitani, Federica; Petrini, Carlo; Garattini, Silvio

    2017-05-01

    The approval or rejection of scientific publications can have important consequences for scientific knowledge, so considerable responsibility lies on those who have to assess or review them. Today it seems that the peer review process, far from being considered an outdated system to be abandoned, is experiencing a new upturn. This article proposes criteria for the conduct of reviewers and of those who select them. While commenting on new emerging models, it provides practical recommendations for improving the peer-review system, like strengthening the role of guidelines and training and supporting reviewers. The process of peer review is changing, it is getting more open and collaborative, but those same ethical principles which guided it from its very origin should remain untouched and be firmly consolidated. The paper highlights how the ethics of reviewing scientific publications is needed now more than ever, in particular with regard to competence, conflict of interest, willingness to discuss decisions, complete transparency and integrity. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P

    2014-07-17

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 10(33) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s(-1)) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging.

  15. Autonomous European lunar exploration—Entry point for a global cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Heidmann, H.-J.; Apel, U.

    2007-06-01

    Since several years the institutions of the authors have conducted many strategic studies, which are aiming at lunar ventures serving both scientific and commercial applications. The latest mission concept, which has been created in this partnership together with scientific user groups from nine countries is targeting towards the establishment of lunar infrastructures serving multiple sciences. The selected strategy for the implementation of this scenario leads to the definition of the erection of a low frequency radio telescope on the far side of the Moon as initial venture. As starting point the erection of a first hub at a lunar pole was discussed. The further analyses show that the completion of the scenario will demand a global co-operation also in the sense of man tended missions or even permanent human bases. For this reason a global roadmap has to be considered for the generation of a credible programmatic. On the other hand to achieve a sustainable political and public support for this kind of venture it seems mandatory for Europe to achieve a visible contribution in such kind of venture. Therefore the identification of an autonomous European mission element, which allows self-standing execution of missions on one hand, but also provides key contributions to an international road map are major elements of the study. An overview on the current status of the proposed scenario will be given in terms of technical solution but with a strong focus on the programmatic, leading from an autonomous European initial mission to an international lunar venture.

  16. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility

    PubMed Central

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 1033 photons s−1 mm−2 mrad−2 per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s−1) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging. PMID:24914145

  17. The Philosophy of User Interfaces in HELIO and the Importance of CASSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, X.; Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.; Csillaghy, A.; Messerotti, M.; Bentley, R. D.

    2012-09-01

    HELIO is a European project funded under FP7 (Project No. 238969). One of its goals as a Heliospheric Virtual Observatory is to provide an easy access to many datasets scattered all over the world, in the fields of Solar physics, Heliophysics, and Planetary magnetospheres. The efficiency of such a tool is very much related to the quality of the user interface. HELIO infrastructure is based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), regrouping a network of standalone components, which allows four main types of interfaces: - HELIO Front End (HFE) is a browser-based user interface, which offers a centralized access to the HELIO main functionalities. Especially, it provides the possibility to reach data directly, or to refine selection by determination of observing characteristics, such as which instrument was observing at that time, which instrument was at this location, etc. - Many services/components provide their own standalone graphical user interface. While one can directly access individually each of these interfaces, they can also be connected together. - Most services also provide direct access for any tools through a public interface. A small java library, called Java API, simplifies this access by providing client stubs for services and shields the user from security, discovery and failover issues. - Workflows capabilities are available in HELIO, allowing complex combination of queries over several services. We want the user to be able to navigate easily, at his needs, through the various interfaces, and possibly use a specific one in order to make much-dedicated queries. We will also emphasize the importance of the CASSIS project (Coordination Action for the integration of Solar System Infrastructure and Science) in encouraging the interoperability necessary to undertake scientific studies that span disciplinary boundaries. If related projects follow the guidelines being developed by CASSIS then using external resources with HELIO will be greatly simplified.

  18. Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Roger B.; Bley, Dagmar; Manez, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities The overall strategic objective of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI)-Climate is to contribute to highly coordinated knowledge development by not only improving the scientific expertise on climate change risks and adaptation options, but also by connecting that knowledge with decision making. Understanding the nature and scope of those providing climate services and the services being provided and understanding userś needs and requirements is critical to realisation of this strategic objective. The main aim of the JPI-Climate Working Group 2 "Researching and advancing Climate Service Development" is to coordinate knowledge development and transfer to improve the climate (change) services to society and within Europe. In order to avoid duplication of efforts and picking on differences in the quality and nature of information being provided from country to country there is a need for a certain degree of consistency of approaches and quality assurance. The JPI-Climate will bring interaction between the emerging national and European climate services initiatives. Climate services produce strongly science-based client-oriented information. They should be built on a good understanding of the stakeholder needs, and provide easy access to up-to-date information and expertise regarding specific policy or research questions. It is evident from experience that such services need (and are perceived) to be salient, credible and legitimate from the perspective of the intended users and providers of those services, and within the supportive research community. Achieving this aim and developing and delivering the required services necessitates the engagement of the spectrum of users and providers, as well as researchers from the physical, natural, engineering, economics and social sciences - the science underpinning climate services. The JPI-Climate, Module 2 Fast Track Activities (FTAs

  19. NASCAP user's manual, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. J., III

    1978-01-01

    NASCAP simulates the charging process for a complex object in either tenuous plasma (geosynchronous orbit) or ground test (electron gun source) environment. Program control words, the structure of user input files, and various user options available are described in this computer programmer's user manual.

  20. European Nucleotide Archive in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, Ana Luisa; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tarrága, Ana; Clarke, Laura; Cleland, Iain; Fairley, Susan; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Martínez-Villacorta, Josué; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Reddy, Kethi; Rosello, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) offers a rich platform for data sharing, publishing and archiving and a globally comprehensive data set for onward use by the scientific community. With a broad scope spanning raw sequencing reads, genome assemblies and functional annotation, the resource provides extensive data submission, search and download facilities across web and programmatic interfaces. Here, we outline ENA content and major access modalities, highlight major developments in 2016 and outline a number of examples of data reuse from ENA. PMID:27899630

  1. CaMath user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Ben-chin; Daly, B.

    1994-07-13

    CaMath is an external Mathematica package which can be loaded into Mathematica by a user. CaMath consists of a special set of channel access functions which provides the Mathematica users with easy and flexible access of channel information across the IOC networks. It also provides a complete set of process variable event monitoring functions. The available functions for CaMath, their functionality, and their syntax are described herein. This document also gives examples how a Mathematica user can interface to channel access devices. It is assumed that the user is already familiar with using Mathematica. Few examples of Mathematica module of using CaMath functions are also given in this document.

  2. Scientific integrity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific offices to investigate suspected cases of misconduct and policies to deal with scientific dishonesty.

  3. DOSFAC2 user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.L.; Chanin, D.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the DOSFAC2 code, which is used for generating dose-to-source conversion factors for the MACCS2 code. DOSFAC2 is a revised and updated version of the DOSFAC code that was distributed with version 1.5.11 of the MACCS code. included are (1) an overview and background of DOSFAC2, (2) a summary of two new functional capabilities, and (3) a user`s guide. 20 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Fostering successful scientific software communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangerth, W.; Heister, T.; Hwang, L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2016-12-01

    Developing sustainable open source software packages for the sciences appears at first to be primarily a technical challenge: How can one create stable and robust algorithms, appropriate software designs, sufficient documentation, quality assurance strategies such as continuous integration and test suites, or backward compatibility approaches that yield high-quality software usable not only by the authors, but also the broader community of scientists? However, our experience from almost two decades of leading the development of the deal.II software library (http://www.dealii.org, a widely-used finite element package) and the ASPECT code (http://aspect.dealii.org, used to simulate convection in the Earth's mantle) has taught us that technical aspects are not the most difficult ones in scientific open source software. Rather, it is the social challenge of building and maintaining a community of users and developers interested in answering questions on user forums, contributing code, and jointly finding solutions to common technical and non-technical challenges. These problems are posed in an environment where project leaders typically have no resources to reward the majority of contributors, where very few people are specifically paid for the work they do on the project, and with frequent turnover of contributors as project members rotate into and out of jobs. In particular, much software work is done by graduate students who may become fluent enough in a software only a year or two before they leave academia. We will discuss strategies we have found do and do not work in maintaining and growing communities around the scientific software projects we lead. Specifically, we will discuss the management style necessary to keep contributors engaged, ways to give credit where credit is due, and structuring documentation to decrease reliance on forums and thereby allow user communities to grow without straining those who answer questions.

  5. European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management - Project Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggi, A.; Jean, Y.; Weigelt, M. L. B.; Flechtner, F.; Gruber, C.; Guntner, A.; Gouweleeuw, B.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; Kvas, A.; Martinis, S.; Zwenzer, H.; Bruinsma, S.; Lemoine, J. M.; Flury, J.; Bourgogne, S.

    2015-12-01

    The project European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM) of the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation of the European Commission has started in January 2015. EGSIEM shall demonstrate that observations of the redistribution of water and ice mass derived from the current GRACE mission, the future GRACE-FO mission, and additional data provide critical and complementary information to more traditional Earth Observation products and open the door for innovative approaches to flood and drought monitoring and forecasting. We give an overview of the project and present first results from the three key objectives that EGSIEM shall address: 1) to establish a scientific combination service to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community, 2) to establish a near real-time and regional service to reduce the latency and increase the temporal resolution of the mass redistribution products, and 3) to establish a hydrological and early warning service to develop gravity-based indicators for extreme hydrological events and to demonstrate their value for flood and drought forecasting and monitoring services. All of these services shall be tailored to the various needs of the respective communities. Significant efforts shall also be devoted to transform the service products into user-friendly and easy-to-interpret data sets and the development of visualization tools.

  6. European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management - Status and project highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer-Guerr, Torsten; Adrian, Jäggi; Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Susnik, Andreja; Weigelt, Matthias; van Dam, Tonie; Flechtner, Frank; Gruber, Christian; Güntner, Andreas; Gouweleeuw, Ben; Kvas, Andreas; Klinger, Beate; Flury, Jakob; Bruinsma, Sean; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Zwenzner, Hendrik; Bourgogne, Stephane; Bandikova, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    The European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM) is a project of the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation of the European Commission. EGSIEM shall demonstrate that observations of the redistribution of water and ice mass derived from the current GRACE mission, the future GRACE-FO mission, and additional data provide critical and complementary information to more traditional Earth Observation products and open the door for innovative approaches to flood and drought monitoring and forecasting. In the frame of EGSIEM three key services should established: 1) a scientific combination service to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community, 2) a near real-time and regional service to reduce the latency and increase the temporal resolution of the mass redistribution products, and 3) a hydrological and early warning service to develop gravity-based indicators for extreme hydrological events and to demonstrate their value for flood and drought forecasting and monitoring services. All of these services shall be tailored to the various needs of the respective communities. Significant efforts shall also be devoted to transform the service products into user-friendly and easy-to-interpret data sets and the development of visualization tools. In this talk the status of the ongoing project is presented and selected results are discussed.

  7. MeshTV: scientific visualization and graphical analysis software

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, E S; Roberts, L; Wookey, S G

    1999-02-08

    The increasing data complexity engendered by the Accelerated Scientific Computing Initiative (ASCI) requires more capability in our scientific visualization software. B Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) addresses these new and changing requirements with MeshTV. We began work on MeshTV around eight years ago, and have progressively refined the software to provide improved scientific analysis and visualization to well over 100 users at Liver-more, Los Alamos, Sandia, and in private industry. (U)

  8. Making CORDEX accessible to users: case studies in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Ghislain

    2017-04-01

    The current demand of long term climate projections corresponds to more applied requests from users: climate data and services are supposed to enable robust decision making in very diversified environments…Issues like uncertainty management (elaborating probabilistic projections based on full ensembles analysis) or tailoring of indicators should be central. However, an assessment of a sample of local, regional and national climate change adaptation strategies, in Europe and in the Med (Stoverinck, Dubois and Amelung 2013) highlighted the frequent insufficient robustness of climate information used to inform policy making. Some initiatives only refer to past climate data, use only one SRES or RCP scenario, one model or a too limited set of downscaling techniques. The CORDEX program (Coordinated regional climate downscaling experiment, coordinated by WCRP) forms the largest effort of climate downscaling so far. Its datasets, initially developed for scientific purposes have strong potential to improve regional and local adaptation policies. They can be considered as reference for the coming years, not only reflecting the improvement of our knowledge of climate, but also offering data in a much more harmonized and accessible way. The PROCLIM initiative (www.pro-clim.org) aims at developing a European climate service, proposing territorialized climate projections, supporting local adaptation frameworks, derived from CORDEX. This encompasses several methodological challenges: understanding users' needs at the European level, specifying indices, selecting relevant geographical domains, correcting systematic biases, selecting sub-ensembles of the CORDEX datasets so as to provide a sound uncertainty analysis, representing results in an user-friendly manner. The presentation will detail some features of PROCLIM, based on two recent experiments: the elaboration of long term climate projections, based on AFRICA-CORDEX, supporting the elaboration of the third national

  9. European Scientific Notes. Volume 37, Numbers 10/11.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    certain ITC affect the healing of recalcitrant parts of Europe and Great Britain • decubitus ulcers ( bedsores ) and leg because the restrictions for the...use of " ulcers (of varicose veins). This is a human volunteers are much less severe " double blind study seeking to confirm than in the US and Canada...There suitable, inexpensive model that will are now 35 patients with decubitus provide consistent information about ulcers and 36 with leg ulcers . Prelimi

  10. An Experiment in Scientific Program Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.; Owen, Karl (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper concerns a procedure that analyzes aspects of the meaning or semantics of scientific and engineering code. This procedure involves taking a user's existing code, adding semantic declarations for some primitive variables, and parsing this annotated code using multiple, independent expert parsers. These semantic parsers encode domain knowledge and recognize formulae in different disciplines including physics, numerical methods, mathematics, and geometry. The parsers will automatically recognize and document some static, semantic concepts and help locate some program semantic errors. Results are shown for three intensively studied codes and seven blind test cases; all test cases are state of the art scientific codes. These techniques may apply to a wider range of scientific codes. If so, the techniques could reduce the time, risk, and effort required to develop and modify scientific codes.

  11. FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Experts on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel provide independent scientific advice to the EPA on a wide range of health and safety issues related to pesticides.

  12. Museology and Scientific Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunier, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the period of transition and self examination of the museology of science. Defines the main issues and limits of the museum as a means of transmitting a scientific culture and scientific ways. (Author/RT)

  13. A European Federated Cloud: Innovative distributed computing solutions by EGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Gergely; Turilli, Matteo; Newhouse, Steven; Kacsuk, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) is the result of pioneering work that has, over the last decade, built a collaborative production infrastructure of uniform services through the federation of national resource providers that supports multi-disciplinary science across Europe and around the world. This presentation will provide an overview of the recently established 'federated cloud computing services' that the National Grid Initiatives (NGIs), operators of EGI, offer to scientific communities. The presentation will explain the technical capabilities of the 'EGI Federated Cloud' and the processes whereby earth and space science researchers can engage with it. EGI's resource centres have been providing services for collaborative, compute- and data-intensive applications for over a decade. Besides the well-established 'grid services', several NGIs already offer privately run cloud services to their national researchers. Many of these researchers recently expressed the need to share these cloud capabilities within their international research collaborations - a model similar to the way the grid emerged through the federation of institutional batch computing and file storage servers. To facilitate the setup of a pan-European cloud service from the NGIs' resources, the EGI-InSPIRE project established a Federated Cloud Task Force in September 2011. The Task Force has a mandate to identify and test technologies for a multinational federated cloud that could be provisioned within EGI by the NGIs. A guiding principle for the EGI Federated Cloud is to remain technology neutral and flexible for both resource providers and users: • Resource providers are allowed to use any cloud hypervisor and management technology to join virtualised resources into the EGI Federated Cloud as long as the site is subscribed to the user-facing interfaces selected by the EGI community. • Users can integrate high level services - such as brokers, portals and customised Virtual Research

  14. Extensional scientific realism vs. intensional scientific realism.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungbae

    2016-10-01

    Extensional scientific realism is the view that each believable scientific theory is supported by the unique first-order evidence for it and that if we want to believe that it is true, we should rely on its unique first-order evidence. In contrast, intensional scientific realism is the view that all believable scientific theories have a common feature and that we should rely on it to determine whether a theory is believable or not. Fitzpatrick argues that extensional realism is immune, while intensional realism is not, to the pessimistic induction. I reply that if extensional realism overcomes the pessimistic induction at all, that is because it implicitly relies on the theoretical resource of intensional realism. I also argue that extensional realism, by nature, cannot embed a criterion for distinguishing between believable and unbelievable theories.

  15. Summary Scientific Performance of EUCLID Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) plan to partner to build the EUCLID mission. EUCLID is a mission concept for studying the Dark Energy that is hypothesized to account for the accelerating cosmic expansion. For the past year, NASA has been building detector prototypes at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. This talk will summarize the measured scientific performance of these detector prototypes for astrophysical and cosmological applications.

  16. Coastal Operational Oceanography: understanding user needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Lopez, J.; Jerez, F.; Hermosilla, F.; Espino, M.

    2012-04-01

    Within the framework of the 7th Framework European project FIELD_AC, SIMO and the LIM/UPC have undertaken a study about the operational oceanography requirements of a selected group of specific end-users in four different European coastal regions, namely Hamburg, Liverpool, Barcelona and Venice. The activities of all the target organisations are related to coastal issues, varying from aquaculture to marinas and port management, Water Framework Directive implementation, renewable energies and flooding alerts. Information has been compiled using a specific questionnaire that has been distributed to all potential users, in addition to workshops held in the four mentioned regions. A total number of 25 questionnaires have been collected in all the locations from a variety of users. Results have been analysed depending on the location but also considering the type of organisation. Information about the spatial and temporal resolution requirements, variables needed, locations to be considered, frequency of data delivery and formats requirements have been gathered. This input from the end-users is being used both in the FIELD_AC modelling set up and also in the development of an application to visualise the results. Regarding the latter, all the modelling results and observational data will be handled using a THREDDS catalogue linked to a web-based GIS application.

  17. Current status of the HED instrument design at the European XFEL for studying plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Appel, K.; Thorpe, I.; Priebe, G.; Pelka, A.; Cowan, T.; Tschentscher, Th.

    2014-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics (HED) instrument at the European XFEL will provide an unique platform for experiments combining hard x-ray FEL radiation (3 -- 24 keV range) and the capability to generate matter under extreme conditions of pressure, temperature or electric field using high energy optical lasers (100 TW Ti-Sapphire and 100 J/ns diode-pumped laser) or pulsed magnets (30 T). Scientific applications will be studies of matter occurring inside exoplanets, of new extreme-pressure phases and solid-density plasmas, and of structural phase transitions of complex solids in high magnetic fields. Following the delivery of the technical design documents, the HED instrument is presently completed with the goal of first x-ray beam in spring 2017. User operation shall start at the end of 2017. The talk includes a presentation of the current HED instrument design as following from specific experiment requirements, which will be discussed.

  18. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  19. Redefining the "Scientific Method".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiece, Kelly R.; Colosi, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Surveys 15 introductory biology textbooks for their presentation of the scientific method. Teaching the scientific method involves more than simplified steps and subjectivity--human politics, cultural influences, and chance are all a part of science. Presents an activity for students to experience the scientific method. (Contains 34 references.)…

  20. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  1. The Institute for Scientific Information Electronic Library Project: Partnering as the Predominant Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trolley, Jacqueline H.; Cody, Julianne W.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute for Scientific Information Electronic Library Project (ELP) is a result of user demand for electronic access to scientific journal literature as well as to those journals themselves. This article describes the ELP; examines ELP's partnerships with technological organizations, publishers, librarians, and users; and discusses two core…

  2. Proceedings of the 6th European VLBI Network Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Eduardo; Porcas, Richard W.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 6th Symposium of the European VLBI Network, held in Bonn on 25-28 June 2002. The initial aim of these biennial gatherings of European VLBI practitioners was to review in a timely manner new results and technical developments related to Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Now, however, interest and participation in the EVN Symposia reaches far beyond Europe, reflecting the fact that scientific research and development programs are carried out to a high degree in international and often truly global collaborations. More than 120 scientists from around the world registered for participation in the Symposium. The Symposium was hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie and was held at the Gustav Stresemann Institut. In addition to the scientific sessions and poster presentations, the program included an EVN Users Meeting, an MPIfR versus Rest-of-the-World football match (highly appropriate given the competing World Cup event!), a visit to the MPIfR's 100m radio telescope in Effelsberg, and a Conference Dinner held in the nearby old walled town of Bad Müunstereifel. To maximize the usefulness of these proceedings (and possibly as a daring precedent) the Editors decided to demand the written versions of talks and posters and to complete the editorial work before the meeting, and to deliver the book to the participants at the beginning of the Symposium. We thank the authors for their cooperation in delivering publication-ready electronic manuscripts and for meeting the strict deadlines. It is highly gratifying that only a handful of the 100 presentations are not represented in this volume. The editors have made minor changes to some of the contributions in order to improve readability, and take responsibility for any errors arising from these changes. Besides the authors, many individuals have contributed to the preparation of the meeting and its proceedings. In addition to many members of the MPIfR staff, we

  3. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Per; Benveniste, Jerome

    2017-04-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products.
GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information
and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced
computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations,
and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT
Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development
of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for
oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming
on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy,
Oceanography and Solid earth studies.
Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has:
 - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox,
 - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients,
anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies.
 - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  4. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Knudsen, Per

    2016-07-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products. GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations, and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid earth studies. Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has: - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox, - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients, anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies. - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  5. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Per; Benveniste, Jerome; Team Gut

    2016-04-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products.
GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information
and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced
computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations,
and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT
Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development
of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for
oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming
on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy,
Oceanography and Solid earth studies.
Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has:
 - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox,
 - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients,
anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies.
 - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  6. Sentinel-1 mission scientific exploitation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnos, Yves louis; Foumelis, Michael; Engdahl, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    The Sentinel-1 mission is the European Imaging Radar Observatory for the Copernicus joint initiative of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA). Sentinel-1 mission is composed of a constellation of two satellites, Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B (launched in April 2014 and April 2016, respectively), sharing the same orbital plane and featuring a short repeat cycle of 6 days optimised for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry science and applications. The full operation capacity was achieved after the completion of the Sentinel-1B in-orbit commissioning on 14 September 2016. Sentinel-1 data are freely available via the ESA's Sentinels Scientific Data Hub since October 2014. The data uptake by the science community has been unprecedented and numerous results have been published to date. The objective of the current paper is to provide a brief overview of the latest ESA activities, in the frame of the Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) programme, aimed to facilitate the scientific exploitation of Sentinel-1 mission as well as discuss future opportunities for research.

  7. EUDAT and EPOS moving towards the efficient management of scientific data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiameni, Giuseppe; Bailo, Daniele; Cacciari, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    This abstract presents the collaboration between the European Collaborative Data Infrastructure (EUDAT) and the pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science (EPOS) which draws on the management of scientific data sets through a reciprocal support agreement. EUDAT is a Consortium of European Data Centers and Scientific Communities whose focus is the development and realisation of the Collaborative Data Infrastructure (CDI), a common model for managing data spanning all European research data centres and data repositories and providing an interoperable layer of common data services. The EUDAT Service Suite is a set of a) implementations of the CDI model and b) standards, developed and offered by members of the EUDAT Consortium. These EUDAT Services include a baseline of CDI-compliant interface and API services - a "CDI Gateway" - plus a number of web-based GUIs and command-line client tools. On the other hand,the EPOS initiative aims at creating a pan-European infrastructure for the solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the mission of EPOS is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth Science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Through the integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. To achieve this integration challenge and the

  8. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database.

  9. NOAA's Scientific Data Stewardship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    The NOAA mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment and conserve and manage coastal and marine resources to meet the Nation's economic, social and environmental needs. NOAA has responsibility for long-term archiving of the United States environmental data and has recently integrated several data management functions into a concept called Scientific Data Stewardship. Scientific Data Stewardship a new paradigm in data management consisting of an integrated suite of functions to preserve and exploit the full scientific value of NOAA's, and the world's, environmental data These functions include careful monitoring of observing system performance for long-term applications, the generation of authoritative long-term climate records from multiple observing platforms, and the proper archival of and timely access to data and metadata. NOAA has developed a conceptual framework to implement the functions of scientific data stewardship. This framework has five objectives: 1) develop real-time monitoring of all satellite observing systems for climate applications, 2) process large volumes of satellite data extending up to decades in length to account for systematic errors and to eliminate artifacts in the raw data (referred to as fundamental climate data records, FCDRs), 3) generate retrieved geophysical parameters from the FCDRs (referred to as thematic climate data records TCDRs) including combining observations from all sources, 4) conduct monitoring and research by analyzing data sets to uncover climate trends and to provide evaluation and feedback for steps 2) and 3), and 5) provide archives of metadata, FCDRs, and TCDRs, and facilitate distribution of these data to the user community. The term `climate data record' and related terms, such as climate data set, have been used for some time, but the climate community has yet to settle on a concensus definition. A recent United States National Academy of Sciences report recommends using the

  10. The Chaco user`s guide. Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-11-01

    Graph partitioning is a fundamental problem in many scientific settings. This document describes the capabilities and operation of Chaco, a software package designed to partition graphs. Chaco allows for recursive application of any of several different methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan-Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these methods can be used to partition the graph into two, four or eight pieces at each level of recursion. In addition, the Kernighan-Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other methods. Brief descriptions of these methods are provided, along with references to relevant literature. The user interface, input/output formats and appropriate settings for a variety of code parameters are discussed in detail, and some suggestions on algorithm selection are offered.

  11. Third European Stroke Science Workshop.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Planas, Anna M; Biessels, Geert Jan; van der Worp, Bart; Sudlow, Cathie; Norrving, Bo; Lees, Kennedy; Mattle, Heinrich P

    2016-07-01

    Lake Eibsee, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, November 19 to 21, 2015: The European Stroke Organization convened >120 stroke experts from 27 countries to discuss latest results and hot topics in clinical, translational, and basic stroke research. Since its inception in 2011, the European Stroke Science Workshop has become a cornerstone of European Stroke Organization's academic activities and major highlight for researchers in the field. Participants include stroke researchers at all career stages who convene for plenary lectures and discussions, thus facilitating crosstalk among researchers from different fields. As in previous years, the workshop was organized into 7 scientific sessions each focusing on a major research topic. All sessions started with a keynote lecture that provided an overview on current developments and set the scene for the following presentations. The latter were short focused talks on a timely topic and included the most recent findings, including unpublished data. A new element at this year's meeting was a hot topic session in which speakers had to present a provocative concept or update sharply within 5 minutes. In the following, we summarize the key contents of the meeting. The program is provided in the online-only Data Supplement. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. MADS Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    MADS (Minimization Assistant for Dynamical Systems) is a trajectory optimization code in which a user-specified performance measure is directly minimized, subject to constraints placed on a low-order discretization of user-supplied plant ordinary differential equations. This document describes the mathematical formulation of the set of trajectory optimization problems for which MADS is suitable, and describes the user interface. Usage examples are provided.

  13. Investigating Users' Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deborah S.; Lee, Wen-Yu; Skov, Neil M.; Berger, Carl F.; Athley, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: User data and information about anatomy education were used to guide development of a learning environment that is efficient and effective. The research question focused on how to design instructional software suitable for the educational goals of different groups of users of the Visible Human data set. The ultimate goal of the study was to provide options for students and teachers to use different anatomy learning modules corresponding to key topics, for course work and professional training. Design: The research used both qualitative and quantitative methods. It was driven by the belief that good instructional design must address learning context information and pedagogic content information. The data collection emphasized measurement of users' perspectives, experience, and demands in anatomy learning. Measurement: Users' requirements elicited from 12 focus groups were combined and rated by 11 researchers. Collective data were sorted and analyzed by use of multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. Results: A set of functions and features in high demand across all groups of users was suggested by the results. However, several subgroups of users shared distinct demands. The design of the learning modules will encompass both unified core components and user-specific applications. The design templates will allow sufficient flexibility for dynamic insertion of different learning applications for different users. Conclusion: This study describes how users' requirements, associated with users' learning experiences, were systematically collected and analyzed and then transformed into guidelines informing the iterative design of multiple learning modules. Information about learning challenges and processes was gathered to define essential anatomy teaching strategies. A prototype instrument to design and polish the Visible Human user interface system is currently being developed using ideas and feedback from users. PMID:12087112

  14. LIMS user acceptance testing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Corbett S

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) play a key role in the pharmaceutical industry. Thorough and accurate validation of such systems is critical and is a regulatory requirement. LIMS user acceptance testing is one aspect of this testing and enables the user to make a decision to accept or reject implementation of the system. This paper discusses key elements in facilitating the development and execution of a LIMS User Acceptance Test Plan (UATP).

  15. An ASCI user perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The ASCI project supports the hardware and software projects that ultimately are put to use by the nuclear weapon design community in order to solve problems relevant to the stockpile. This talk describes a group of ASCI code project users and an example problem from one of those users in terms of its computing resources. Significant discussion focuses Ion important considerations as a user when interacting with ASCI hardware and software.

  16. Scientific dishonesty and good scientific practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, D; Axelsen, N H; Riis, P

    1993-04-01

    Scientific dishonesty has been the subject of much public interest in recent years. Although the problem has had a low profile in Denmark, there is no reason to believe that it is non-existent. Several preconditions known to be important prevail here as well as in other countries, such as pressure to publish and severe competition for research grants and senior academic positions. The Danish Medical Research Council (DMRC) decided to respond to this problem by preparing a report on scientific dishonesty with suggestions to the research institutions on rules for good scientific practice and procedures for investigation of suspected dishonesty. To this end, an investigatory system was suggested. The system should consist of two regional committees and one national committee. They should be headed by high court judges and experienced health sciences researchers as members. The committees will investigate cases reported to them and conclude on whether dishonesty has been established and on whether the scientific work should be retracted. Sanctions shall remain the task of the institutions. Preventive measures comprise open access to and a long storage period for scientific data.

  17. User Registration in EOSDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the lifetime of EOSDIS the topic of user registration has received varied attention. Initially, for example, users ordering data from the Earth Science Data Gateway were required to register for delivery of media orders, to check order status and save profile information for future interactions. As EOSDIS embraced evolution of its data systems, the mostly centralized search and order system was replaced with a more diverse set of interfaces allowing (mostly) anonymous online access to data, tools and services. The changes to EOSDIS were embraced by users but the anonymous nature of the interaction made it more difficult to characterize users, capture metrics and provide customized services that benefit users. Additionally, new tools and interfaces have been developed without a centralized registration system. Currently a patchwork of independent registration systems exists throughout EOSDIS for ordering data and interacting with online tools and services. Each requires a separate username and password that must be managed by users. A consolidation of registration systems presents an opportunity to improve not only the user experience through tool customization and simplification of password management, but the understanding of users. This work discusses the options for implementing a common user registration for the EOSDIS, anticipated benefits and pitfalls.

  18. Preliminary ISIS users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, C.

    1979-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation (ISIS), an interactive data management system, was developed to act as a buffer between the user and host computer system. The user is provided by ISIS with a powerful system for developing software or systems in the interactive environment. The user is protected from the idiosyncracies of the host computer system by providing such a complete range of capabilities that the user should have no need for direct access to the host computer. These capabilities are divided into four areas: desk top calculator, data editor, file manager, and tool invoker.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  20. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  1. European Science Notes, volume 40, number 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, L. E.

    1986-02-01

    ESN is a monthly publication with brief articles on recent developments in European scientific research. Its partial contents are: Biotechnology Research at GBF, and at the Inst. of Technical Chemistry, Univ. of Hanover, West Germany; 7th European Immunology Congress; Biotechnia '85 - First International Congress for Biotechnology; Acoustic Cavitation Generated by Clinical Ultrasound; Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics; Geophysics Research in Israel; Fiber Composite Research at Paisley College of Technology, Scotland; A review of International Research on the Physical Metallurgy of Welding; Silicon Metallurgy at the Helsinki Technical Univ.; A Conference on Guided Optical Structures and Their Applications; Optoelectronics Research at Oxford Univ.; and Fractal Conferences in Europe.

  2. European biofuel plan snagged

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, E.

    1992-12-16

    European Commission proposals for a directive aimed at boosting production of biofuels have been set back by the European Parliament and will not be implemented on the January 1, 1993 deadline. Furthermore, the commission has agreed to carry out an environmental impact study on biofuels. European industrial ethanol, fatty acid, and glycerin producers oppose the directive proposals fearing distortions in their markets.

  3. European Elder (Elderberry)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Names: European elder, black elder, elderberry, elder flower, sambucus Latin Name: Sambucus nigra Background European elder ... Saxon word “aeld,” meaning fire. The terms “elder flower” and “elderberry” may refer to either European elder ...

  4. EUROPLANET-RI modelling service for the planetary science community: European Modelling and Data Analysis Facility (EMDAF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, Maxim; Miller, Steven; Stoeckler, Robert; Topf, Florian

    2010-05-01

    involved computational modelling, research and data analysis expert teams and their related research infrastructures, EMDAF will provide a 1) flexible, 2) scientific user oriented, 3) continuously developing and fast upgrading computational and data analysis service to support and intensify the European planetary scientific research. At the beginning EMDAF will create a set of demonstrators and operational tests of this service in key areas of European planetary science. This work will aim at the following objectives: (a) Development and implementation of tools for distant interactive communication between the planetary scientists and computing experts (including related RIs); (b) Development of standard routine packages, and user-friendly interfaces for operation of the existing numerical codes and data analysis algorithms by the specialized planetary scientists; (c) Development of a prototype of numerical modelling services "on demand" for space missions and planetary researchers; (d) Development of a prototype of data analysis services "on demand" for space missions and planetary researchers; (e) Development of a prototype of coordinated interconnected simulations of planetary phenomena and objects (global multi-model simulators); (f) Providing the demonstrators of a coordinated use of high performance computing facilities (super-computer networks), done in cooperation with European HPC Grid DEISA.

  5. SCE: Grid Environment for Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Haili; Wu, Hong; Chi, Xuebin

    Over the last few years Grid computing has evolved into an innovating technology and gotten increased commercial adoption. However, existing Grids do not have enough users as for sustainable development in the long term. This paper proposes several suggestions to this problem on the basis of long-term experience and careful analysis. The Scientific Computing Environment (SCE) in the Chinese Academy of Sciences is introduced as a completely new model and a feasible solution to this problem.

  6. European psychiatry: moving towards integration and harmony.

    PubMed

    Cox, John L

    2007-02-01

    This paper summarizes political and social changes in Europe that directly affect the training of psychiatrists and the provision of mental health services. In Western Europe the demands of service users have led to a closer integration of social and health services, and a closer working and training of health professionals. The European psychiatrist of the future will be an internationalist, familiar with the impact of culture on mental disorders and able to work in a multi-professional team.

  7. European psychiatry: moving towards integration and harmony

    PubMed Central

    COX, JOHN L

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes political and social changes in Europe that directly affect the training of psychiatrists and the provision of mental health services. In Western Europe the demands of service users have led to a closer integration of social and health services, and a closer working and training of health professionals. The European psychiatrist of the future will be an internationalist, familiar with the impact of culture on mental disorders and able to work in a multi-professional team. PMID:17342228

  8. European Community Projects on Surface Electromyography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    surface EMG and provided insight in muscular disorders in computer users. Neuromuscular assessment in the Elderly Worker (NEW, 2001-2004) will apply...sport and geriatric medicine. Keywords - electromyography, surface EMG, fine wire EMG, needle EMG, muscles, European Union I. INTRODUCTION...Pullman et al. [3] are “SEMG is considered unacceptable as a clinical t ool i n the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease at t his time.” a nd “SEMG

  9. The European Location Framework - from National to European

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauknerova, E.; Sidlichovsky, P.; Urbanas, S.; Med, M.

    2016-06-01

    The European Location Framework (ELF) means a technical infrastructure which will deliver authoritative, interoperable geospatial reference data from all over Europe for analysing and understanding information connected to places and features. The ELF has been developed and set up through the ELF Project, which has been realized by a consortium of partners (public, private and academic organisations) since March 2013. Their number increased from thirty to forty in the year 2016, together with a project extension from 36 to 44 months. The project is co-funded by the European Commission's Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP) and will end in October 2016. In broad terms, the ELF Project will deliver a unique gateway to the authoritative reference geospatial information for Europe (harmonised pan-European maps, geographic and land information) sourced from the National Mapping and Cadastral Authorities (NMCAs) around Europe and including transparent licensing. This will be provided as an online ELF web service that will deliver an up-to-date topographic base map and also as view & download services for access to the ELF datasets. To develop and build up the ELF, NMCAs are accompanied and collaborate with several research & academia institutes, a standardisation body, system integrators, software developers and application providers. The harmonisation is in progress developing and triggering a number of geo-tools like edge-matching, generalisation, transformation and others. ELF will provide also some centralised tools like Geo Locator for searching location based on geographical names, addresses and administrative units, and GeoProduct Finder for discovering the available web-services and licensing them. ELF combines national reference geo-information through the ELF platform. ELF web services will be offered to users and application developers through open source (OSKARI) and proprietary (ArcGIS Online) cloud platforms. Recently, 29 NMCAs plus the

  10. Scientific integrity memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-03-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum on 9 March to help restore scientific integrity in government decision making. The memorandum directs the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to develop a strategy within 120 days that ensures that "the selection of scientists and technology professionals for science and technology positions in the executive branch is based on those individuals' scientific and technological knowledge, credentials, and experience; agencies make available to the public the scientific or technological findings or conclusions considered or relied upon in policy decisions; agencies use scientific and technological information that has been subject to well-established scientific processes such as peer review; and agencies have appropriate rules and procedures to ensure the integrity of the scientific process within the agency, including whistleblower protection."

  11. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Tobacco and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leon, Maria E; Peruga, Armando; McNeill, Ann; Kralikova, Eva; Guha, Neela; Minozzi, Silvia; Espina, Carolina; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco use, and in particular cigarette smoking, is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the European Union (EU). All tobacco products contain a wide range of carcinogens. The main cancer-causing agents in tobacco smoke are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines, aromatic amines, aldehydes, and certain volatile organic compounds. Tobacco consumers are also exposed to nicotine, leading to tobacco addiction in many users. Cigarette smoking causes cancer in multiple organs and is the main cause of lung cancer, responsible for approximately 82% of cases. In 2012, about 313,000 new cases of lung cancer and 268,000 lung cancer deaths were reported in the EU; 28% of adults in the EU smoked tobacco, and the overall prevalence of current use of smokeless tobacco products was almost 2%. Smokeless tobacco products, a heterogeneous category, are also carcinogenic but cause a lower burden of cancer deaths than tobacco smoking. One low-nitrosamine product, snus, is associated with much lower cancer risk than other smokeless tobacco products. Smoking generates second-hand smoke (SHS), an established cause of lung cancer, and inhalation of SHS by non-smokers is still common in indoor workplaces as well as indoor public places, and more so in the homes of smokers. Several interventions have proved effective for stopping smoking; the most effective intervention is the use of a combination of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support. Scientific evidence leads to the following two recommendations for individual action on tobacco in the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer: (1) "Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco"; (2) "Make your home smoke-free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace".

  12. EST: The European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collados, M.

    2008-09-01

    The European Solar Telescope (EST) is a project for a 4 meter-class ground-based telescope, to be located in the Canary Islands. The project is promoted by the European Association for Solar Telescopes (EAST), a consortium formed by research organizations from 15 European countries. EST will be optimized for studies of magnetic coupling between the deep photosphere and upper chromosphere. The project has been approved for funds by the European Union, within the FP-7 framework, to produce the design of all systems and subsystems of the telescope during the next three years. This includes the optical and optomechanical design of the telescope itself and of the instruments and their control. MCAO will be included in the optical path in a natural way to compensate for atmospheric disturbances in an optimum way. The design of EST will strongly emphasize the use of a large number of visible and near-infrared instruments simultaneously which will influence the telescope design from the very beginning. This communication will center mainly on the scientific objectives that EST will address. Generally speaking, they involve understanding how the magnetic field emerges through the solar surface, interacts with the plasma dynamics to transfer energy between different regions, and finally releases it in the form of heat or as violent events in the solar chromosphere and corona. Among the many topics of interest, one may cite, as described in the EST Science Requirements Document: small-scale flux emergence in quiet sun regions, large-scale magnetic structures, magnetic flux cancellation processes, polar magnetic fields, magnetic topology of the photosphere and chromosphere, conversion of mechanical to magnetic energy in the photosphere, wave propagation from photosphere to chromosphere, energy dissipation in the chromosphere at small and large scales, etc. The present status and future perspectives of the project will also be outlined.

  13. Scientific Journalism in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the problems of scientific journalism and activities of Armenian science journalists are presented. Scientific journalism in the world, forms of its activities, Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) press-releases and their subjects, ArAS website "Mass Media News" section, annual and monthly calendars of astronomical events, and "Astghagitak" online journal are described. Most interesting astronomical subjects involved in scientific journalism, reasons for non-satisfactory science outreach and possible solutions are discussed.

  14. User Language Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    this can be assisted by using an automated complaint log for user comments. User acceptance of a language is almost impossible to verify in the...of libaries of pro- grams where each library represents a coherent set of data types and parameterized nodes which operate on those types. * Allow

  15. User's Guide for SKETCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgley, David R., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program SKETCH is presented on this disk. SKETCH solves a popular problem in computer graphics-the removal of hidden lines from images of solid objects. Examples and illustrations are included in the guide. Also included is the SKETCH program, so a user can incorporate the information into a particular software system.

  16. NASTRAN: Users' experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) to analyze the experiences of users of the program are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) statics and buckling, (2) vibrations and dynamics, (3) substructing, (4) new capability, (5) user's experience, and (6) system experience. Specific applications of NASTRAN to spacecraft, aircraft, nuclear power plants, and materials tests are reported.

  17. User's guide to SILVAH

    Treesearch

    Peter D. Knopp; Susan L. Stout

    2014-01-01

    This user's guide for the SILVAH computer program, version 6.2, supersedes the 1992 user's guide (Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-162). Designed for stand-alone Windows-based personal computers, SILVAH recommends a silvicultural prescription for a forest stand based on a summary and analysis of field inventory data. The program also includes a simulator that can be used...

  18. SOSS User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Gridnev, Sergei; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    This User Guide describes SOSS (Surface Operations Simulator and Scheduler) software build and graphic user interface. SOSS is a desktop application that simulates airport surface operations in fast time using traffic management algorithms. It moves aircraft on the airport surface based on information provided by scheduling algorithm prototypes, monitors separation violation and scheduling conformance, and produces scheduling algorithm performance data.

  19. Online Access: User Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawley, Carolyn

    1982-01-01

    Surveys reactions of students and faculty to the online circulation system at University of Guelph Library, Ontario. Findings concerning status of users, frequency of use, effectiveness of instructions on screen, convenience of terminal locations, type of information required by user, and general comments are noted. Four references are provided.…

  20. PP prune users guide.

    Treesearch

    N.A. Bolon; R.D. Fight; J.M. Cahill

    1992-01-01

    The PP PRUNE program allows users to conduct a financial analysis of pruning ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.). The increase in product value and rate of return from pruning the butt 16.5-foot log can be estimated. Lumber recovery information is based on actual mill experience with pruned and unpruned logs. Users supply lumber prices...