Science.gov

Sample records for eva operations post-space

  1. EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than

  2. EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than

  3. EVA-SCRAM operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanigan, Lee A.; Tamir, David; Weeks, Jack L.; Mcclure, Sidney R.; Kimbrough, Andrew G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper wrestles with the on-orbit operational challenges introduced by the proposed Space Construction, Repair, and Maintenance (SCRAM) tool kit for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). SCRAM undertakes a new challenging series of on-orbit tasks in support of the near-term Hubble Space Telescope, Extended Duration Orbiter, Long Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, other orbital platforms, and even the future manned Lunar/Mars missions. These new EVA tasks involve welding, brazing, cutting, coating, heat-treating, and cleaning operations. Anticipated near-term EVA-SCRAM applications include construction of fluid lines and structural members, repair of punctures by orbital debris, refurbishment of surfaces eroded by atomic oxygen, and cleaning of optical, solar panel, and high emissivity radiator surfaces which have been degraded by contaminants. Future EVA-SCRAM applications are also examined, involving mass production tasks automated with robotics and artificial intelligence, for construction of large truss, aerobrake, and reactor shadow shield structures. Realistically achieving EVA-SCRAM is examined by addressing manual, teleoperated, semi-automated, and fully-automated operation modes. The operational challenges posed by EVA-SCRAM tasks are reviewed with respect to capabilities of existing and upcoming EVA systems, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit, the Shuttle Remote Manipulating System, the Dexterous End Effector, and the Servicing Aid Tool.

  4. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware & Operations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Sandra; Marmolejo, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to: Define Extravehicular Activity (EVA), identify the reasons for conducting an EVA, and review the role that EVA has played in the space program; Identify the types of EVAs that may be performed; Describe some of the U.S. Space Station equipment and tools that are used during an EVA, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER), the International Space Station (ISS) Joint Airlock and Russian Docking Compartment 1 (DC-1), and EVA Tools & Equipment; Outline the methods and procedures of EVA Preparation, EVA, and Post-EVA operations; Describe the Russian spacesuit used to perform an EVA; Provide a comparison between U.S. and Russian spacesuit hardware and EVA support; and Define the roles that different training facilities play in EVA training.

  5. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Bill; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The EVA hardware used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed with the assumption that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for ground processing, refurbishment, or failure investigation (if necessary). With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (EMU, Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support equipment and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2016 and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, NASA and the One EVA contractor team jointly initiated the EVA 2010 Project. Challenges were addressed to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, and protect EMU hardware operability on orbit for long durations.

  6. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the One EVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more

  7. Application of shuttle EVA systems to payloads. Volume 1: EVA systems and operational modes description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Descriptions of the EVA system baselined for the space shuttle program were provided, as well as a compendium of data on available EVA operational modes for payload and orbiter servicing. Operational concepts and techniques to accomplish representative EVA payload tasks are proposed. Some of the subjects discussed include: extravehicular mobility unit, remote manipulator system, airlock, EVA translation aids, restraints, workstations, tools and support equipment.

  8. EVA worksite analysis--use of computer analysis for EVA operations development and execution.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D

    1999-01-01

    To sustain the rate of extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble and maintain the International Space Station, we must enhance our ability to plan, train for, and execute EVAs. An underlying analysis capability has been developed to ensure EVA access to all external worksites as a starting point for ground training, to generate information needed for on-orbit training, and to react quickly to develop contingency EVA plans, techniques, and procedures. This paper describes the use of computer-based EVA worksite analysis techniques for EVA worksite design. EVA worksite analysis has been used to design 80% of EVA worksites on the U.S. portion of the International Space Station. With the launch of the first U.S. element of the station, EVA worksite analysis is being developed further to support real-time analysis of unplanned EVA operations. This paper describes this development and deployment of EVA worksite analysis for International Space Station (ISS) mission support.

  9. Students Speak With EVA Operations Specialist Glenda Brown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center, EVA Operations Specialist Glenda Brown participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Victory Lakes Interm...

  10. Foreman completes EVA 2 during Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006420 (16 March 2008) --- Attired in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, astronaut Mike Foreman, STS-123 mission specialist, gives a "thumbs-up" signal in the Quest Airlock of the International Space Station as the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) draws to a close. Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, assisted Foreman.

  11. EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-23

    ISS032-E-024171 (30 Aug. 2012) --- Backdropped over Andros Island and other parts of the Bahamas, NASA astronaut Sunita Williams and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide (out of frame), both Expedition 32 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station.

  12. Study of EVA operations associated with satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. O.; Wilde, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) factors associated with satellite servicing activities are identified and the EMU improvements necessary to enhance satellite servicing operations are outlined. Areas of EMU capabilities, equipment and structural interfaces, time lines, EMU modifications for satellite servicing, environmental hazards, and crew training are vital to manned Eva/satellite services and as such are detailed. Evaluation of EMU capabilities indicates that the EMU can be used in performing near term, basic satellite servicing tasks; however, satellite servicing is greatly enhanced by incorporating key modifications into the EMU. The servicing missions involved in contamination sensitive payload repair are illustrated. EVA procedures and equipment can be standardized, reducing both crew training time and in orbit operations time. By standardizing and coordinating procedures, mission cumulative time lines fall well within the EMU capability.

  13. EVA Requirements for Exploration EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce; Luna, Bernadette

    2005-01-01

    The exploration program proposed by the President will require extensive extravehicular operations in a wide range of environments. These include Og EVAs in planetary orbits as well as potential contingency EVAs during inter-planetary flight and surface operations on the moon and Mars. The EVA environments and mission requirements are very different for each of these. Commonality among such systems is highly desirable from the programmatic standpoint but the dramatic differences in EVA environments will have a profound impact on EVA system design. This paper will examine the relevant environmental parameters and discuss their impacts on EVA system design. An EVA design philosophy that maximizes EVA system commonality will be discussed.

  14. EVA Design, Verification, and On-Orbit Operations Support Using Worksite Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagale, Thomas J.; Price, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) design is a very large and complex orbiting structure with thousands of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) worksites. These worksites are used to assemble and maintain the ISS. The challenge facing EVA designers was how to design, verify, and operationally support such a large number of worksites within cost and schedule. This has been solved through the practical use of computer aided design (CAD) graphical techniques that have been developed and used with a high degree of success over the past decade. The EVA design process allows analysts to work concurrently with hardware designers so that EVA equipment can be incorporated and structures configured to allow for EVA access and manipulation. Compliance with EVA requirements is strictly enforced during the design process. These techniques and procedures, coupled with neutral buoyancy underwater testing, have proven most valuable in the development, verification, and on-orbit support of planned or contingency EVA worksites.

  15. Testing and evaluation for astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) operability.

    PubMed

    Shields, N; King, L C

    1998-09-01

    Because it is the human component that defines space mission success, careful planning is required to ensure that hardware can be operated and maintained by crews on-orbit. Several methods exist to allow researchers and designers to better predict how hardware designs will behave under the harsh environment of low Earth orbit, and whether designs incorporate the necessary features for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) operability. Testing under conditions of simulated microgravity can occur during the design concept phase when verifying design operability, during mission training, or concurrently with on-orbit mission operations. The bulk of testing is focused on normal operations, but also includes evaluation of credible mission contingencies or "what would happen if" planning. The astronauts and cosmonauts who fly these space missions are well prepared and trained to survive and be productive in Earth's orbit. The engineers, designers, and training crews involved in space missions subject themselves to Earth based simulation techniques that also expose them to extreme environments. Aircraft falling ten thousand feet, alternating g-loads, underwater testing at 45 foot depth, enclosure in a vacuum chamber and subject to thermal extremes, each carries with it inherent risks to the humans preparing for space missions.

  16. The First Results of the Russian EVA Space Suits Operation in the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. P.; Albats, E. A.; Glazov, G. M.

    The year of 2001 saw the first EVAs of the International Space Station (ISS) crews using the Russian "Orlan-M" space suits. This marked the beginning of a new stage of activities on putting into operation of the next ISS modules. The paper reviews the results of the Russian space suits' operation in the course of extravehicular activity (EVA) by the crews of the first ISS expeditions. The paper also reviews differences in operation of the "Orlan-M" in the ISS and "Mir" orbiting station resulting from space suit (SS) systems design, peculiarities of the station airlocks and EVA performance methods. The paper presents data on EVA results and comments on space suit systems' operation. The paper gives diagrams for main parameters of the space suits' life support systems (LSS) and comments about them. In conclusion the paper reviews the "Orlan-M" improvements being performed and prospects of "Orlan-M" usage in the ISS.

  17. Utilization of ISS to Develop and Test Operational Concepts and Hardware for Low-Gravity Terrestrial EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA has considerable experience in two areas of Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The first can be defined as microgravity, orbital EVAs. This consists of everything done in low Earth orbit (LEO), from the early, proof of concept EVAs conducted during the Gemini program of the 1960s, to the complex International Space Station (ISS) assembly tasks of the first decade of the 21st century. The second area of expertise is comprised of those EVAs conducted on the lunar surface, under a gravitational force one-sixth that of Earth. This EVA expertise encapsulates two extremes - microgravity and Earthlike gravitation - but is insufficient as humans expand their exploration purview, most notably with respect to spacewalks conducted on very low-gravity bodies, such as near- Earth objects (NEO) and the moons of Mars. The operational and technical challenges of this category of EVA have yet to be significantly examined, and as such, only a small number of operational concepts have been proposed thus far. To ensure mission success, however, EVA techniques must be developed and vetted to allow the selection of operational concepts that can be utilized across an assortment of destinations whose physical characteristics vary. This paper examines the utilization of ISS-based EVAs to test operational concepts and hardware in preparation for a low-gravity terrestrial EVA. While the ISS cannot mimic some of the fundamental challenges of a low-gravity terrestrial EVA - such as rotation rate and surface composition - it may be the most effective test bed available.

  18. Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations for EVA and Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R. A.; Davis, J. R.; Duncan, J. M.; Polk, J. D.; Jones, J. A.; Gillis, D. B.; Novak, J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential risk of injury to crewmembers is inherent in aggressive surface activities, whether they be Moon-, Mars-, or asteroid-based. In December 2005, the Space Medicine Division at JSC requested a study to identify Apollo mission issues that had an impact to crew health or performance or both. This talk focused on the Apollo EVA suit and lunar surface operations concerning crew health and performance. There were roughly 20 recommendations from this study of Apollo for improving these two areas for future exploration missions, a few of which were incorporated into the Human Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR). Dr. Richard Scheuring covered these topics along with some of the analog work that has been done regarding surface operations and medical contingencies.

  19. Neutral buoyancy evaluation of technologies for space station external operations. [EVA weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.; Spofford, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to perform a complete systems analysis for almost any large space program, it is vital to have a thorough understanding of human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The present investigation is concerned with the most significant results from the MIT Space Systems Lab's neutral buoyancy tests. An evaluation of neutral buoyancy is considered along with the tested structures, aspects of learning, productivity, time and motion analysis, and assembly loads. Attention is given to EVA assembly with a manned maneuvering unit, teleoperated structural assembly, an integrated control station, a beam assembly teleoperator, and space station proximity operations.

  20. Behnken during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007906 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  1. Foreman during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007832 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Mike Foreman, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Foreman and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  2. Behnken during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007816 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  3. Behnken during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007907 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  4. Behnken during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007909 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  5. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006086 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan (left), STS-123 mission specialist; and Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participate in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Reisman prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  6. Behnken during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006762 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Rick Linnehan (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  7. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-007027 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  8. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-17

    S123-E-006902 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  9. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-17

    S123-E-006901 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  10. Behnken during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006758 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Rick Linnehan (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  11. Behnken during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006767 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Rick Linnehan (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  12. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-007028 (17/18 March 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  13. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-007021 (17/18 March 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  14. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006749 (17/18 March 2008) --- Visible through a window on Endeavour's aft flight deck, astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  15. Behnken during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006764 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Rick Linnehan (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  16. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-007023 (17/18 March 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  17. Linnehan during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006745 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  18. Behnken during EVA 3 - Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-18

    S123-E-006771 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Rick Linnehan (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  19. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006078 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Reisman and astronaut Rick Linnehan (out of frame), STS-123 mission specialist, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  20. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006090 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Reisman and astronaut Rick Linnehan (out of frame), STS-123 mission specialist, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  1. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006079 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), Expedition 16 flight engineer, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  2. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006082 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), Expedition 16 flight engineer, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  3. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006087 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan (right), STS-123 mission specialist; and Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participate in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Reisman prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  4. First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006101 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), Expedition 16 flight engineer, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  5. Evidence Report: Risk of Injury and Compromised Performance due to EVA Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Bekdash, Omar S.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Jarvis, Sarah L.; Conkin, Johnny; Gernhardt, Michael L.; House, Nancy; Jadwick, Jennifer; hide

    2017-01-01

    Given the high physiological and functional demands of operating in a self-contained EVA or training suit in various gravity fields and system environments, there is a possibility that crew injury can occur and physiological and functional performance may be comprised.

  6. Robonaut activities involving joint task operations with a EVA suited astronaut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-17

    Photographic documentation of Robonaut activities involving joint task operations with a EVA suited astronaut (Nancy Currie) in bldg 9N,rm 1113 (Robonaut lab). Close-up view of Currie (in her EMU) working with the Robonauts (00299). Currie and one Robonaut work at a task .

  7. Interoperability Trends in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Space Operations for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Gerald E.

    1999-01-01

    No other space operations in the 21 st century more comprehensively embody the challenges and dependencies of interoperability than EVA. This discipline is already functioning at an W1paralleled level of interagency, inter-organizational and international cooperation. This trend will only increase as space programs endeavor to expand in the face of shrinking budgets. Among the topics examined in this paper are hardware-oriented issues. Differences in design standards among various space participants dictate differences in the EVA tools that must be manufactured, flown and maintained on-orbit. Presently only two types of functional space suits exist in the world. However, three versions of functional airlocks are in operation. Of the three airlocks, only the International Space Station (ISS) Joint Airlock can accommodate both types of suits. Due to functional differences in the suits, completely different operating protocols are required for each. Should additional space suit or airlock designs become available, the complexity will increase. The lessons learned as a result of designing and operating within such a system are explored. This paper also examines the non-hardware challenges presented by interoperability for a discipline that is as uniquely dependent upon the individual as EVA. Operation of space suits (essentially single-person spacecrafts) by persons whose native language is not that of the suits' designers is explored. The intricacies of shared mission planning, shared control and shared execution of joint EVA's are explained. For example, once ISS is fully functional, the potential exists for two crewmembers of different nationality to be wearing suits manufactured and controlled by a third nation, while operating within an airlock manufactured and controlled by a fourth nation, in an effort to perform tasks upon hardware belonging to a fifth nation. Everything from training issues, to procedures development and writing, to real-time operations is

  8. Ensuring of long operation life of the orbiting station EVA space suit.

    PubMed

    Abramov, I P; Glazov, G M; Svertshek, V I; Stoklitsky AYu

    1997-01-01

    Russia has gained a lot of experience in operating the space suits (SS) during the extravehicular activities (EVA) by the crews of SALYUT-6, SALYUT-7 and MIR orbiting stations. A total of 21 Orlan-type space suits of various models were operated onboard the orbiting stations (OS) during almost 20 years period. Some of these space suits served up to 3 years in orbit. The paper reviews special features of long SS operation (without return to the Earth) onboard an orbiting station as well as the problems associated with SS repeated use by several crews. An analysis of measures to support solving of the problems of SS long stay and reliable operation onboard the orbiting station is made: selection of a corresponding SS type and separate elements design; selection of the materials; routine and preventive maintenance; development tests. The advantages of the space suit of a semi-rigid type for solving the above problems are shown. The paper includes a short analysis of space suits' operation onboard the Russian orbiting station MIR, and some restuts of inspection of the Orlan-DMA space suit returned to the Earth from orbit by STS-79 alter long operation in orbit. Recommendations on further improvement of the space suits for EVA operations in the International Space Station (ISS) are given.

  9. Ensuring of long operation life of the orbiting station EVA space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. P.; Glazov, G. M.; Svertshek, V. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

    Russia has gained a lot of experience in operating the space suits (SS) during the extravehicular activities (EVA) by the crews of SALYUT-6, SALYUT-7 and MIR orbiting stations. A total of 21 Orlan-type space suits of various models were operated onboard the orbiting stations (OS) during almost 20 years period. Some of these space suits served up to 3 years in orbit. The paper reviews special features of long SS operation (without return to the Earth) onboard an orbiting station as well as the problems associated with SS repeated use by several crews. An analysis of measures to support solving of the problems of SS long stay and reliable operation onboard the orbiting station is made: selection of a corresponding SS type and separate elements design selection of the materials routine and preventive maintenance development tests. The advantages of the space suit of a semirigid type for solving the above problems are shown. The paper includes a short analysis of space suits' operation onboard the Russian orbiting station MIR, and some results of inspection of the Orian-DMA space suit returned to the Earth from orbit by STS-79 after long operation in orbit. Recommendations on further improvement of the space suits for EVA operations in the International Space Station (ISS) are given.

  10. Crew/Robot Coordinated Planetary EVA Operations at a Lunar Base Analog Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Delgado, F. J.; Herrera, E.; Kosmo, J. J.; Janoiko, B. A.; Wilcox, B. H.; Townsend, J. A.; Matthews, J. B.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Under the direction of NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program, robots and space suited subjects from several NASA centers recently completed a very successful demonstration of coordinated activities indicative of base camp operations on the lunar surface. For these activities, NASA chose a site near Meteor Crater, Arizona close to where Apollo Astronauts previously trained. The main scenario demonstrated crew returning from a planetary EVA (extra-vehicular activity) to a temporary base camp and entering a pressurized rover compartment while robots performed tasks in preparation for the next EVA. Scenario tasks included: rover operations under direct human control and autonomous modes, crew ingress and egress activities, autonomous robotic payload removal and stowage operations under both local control and remote control from Houston, and autonomous robotic navigation and inspection. In addition to the main scenario, participants had an opportunity to explore additional robotic operations: hill climbing, maneuvering heaving loads, gathering geo-logical samples, drilling, and tether operations. In this analog environment, the suited subjects and robots experienced high levels of dust, rough terrain, and harsh lighting.

  11. Cooperative EVA/Telerobotic Surface Operations in Support of Exploration Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, David L.

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Planetary Surface Robotics; 2) EVA Difficulties from Apollo; 3) Robotic Capabilities for EVA Support; 4) Astronaut Support Vehicle; 5) Three ASV Preliminary Designs; 6) Small Single-arm Assistant; 7) Dual-arm Assistant; 8) Large EVA Assistant; 9) Lessons Learned-Preliminary Designs; 10) Rover Design Assumptions; 11) Design Requirements-Terrain; 12) Design Requirements; 13) Science Payload; 14) Manipulator Arm; 15) EVA Multiple Robot Cooperation; 16) SSL Rover Body Concept; 17) Advanced EVA Support Rover Concept; 18) Robotic Access to Restricted Sites; 19) Robotic Rescue of EVA crew; and 19) Why Do We Need Humans? This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Blome, Elizabeth; Tetsuya, Sakashita

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new operations concept will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA s) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

  13. H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new concept of operations will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Boeing Delta IV Heavy (DIV-H). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

  14. EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

    1995-01-01

    The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

  15. EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

    1995-01-01

    The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

  16. TUS-RA removal from the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06199 (10 July 2006) --- Astronauts Michael E. Fossum and Piers J. Sellers (partially out of frame), STS-121 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During today's six-hour 47-minute spacewalk, Sellers and Fossum restored the International Space Station's Mobile Transporter rail car to full operation and delivered a spare pump module for the station's cooling system.

  17. Sellers routes new TUS-RA cable during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06224 (10 July 2006) --- Astronaut Piers J. Sellers, STS-121 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During today's six-hour 47-minute spacewalk, Sellers and astronaut Michael E. Fossum (out of frame), mission specialist, restored the International Space Station's Mobile Transporter rail car to full operation and delivered a spare pump module for the station's cooling system.

  18. Reilly during a session of EVA during Expedition 15/STS-117 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-15

    ISS015-E-12878 (15 June 2007) --- Astronaut Jim Reilly, STS-117 mission specialist, enters the Quest Airlock on the International Space Station at the conclusion of the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the station.

  19. Reilly during a session of EVA during Expedition 15/STS-117 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-15

    ISS015-E-12877 (15 June 2007) --- Astronaut Jim Reilly, STS-117 mission specialist, enters the Quest Airlock on the International Space Station at the conclusion of the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the station.

  20. Application of Shuttle EVA Systems to Payloads. Volume 2: Payload EVA Task Completion Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Candidate payload tasks for EVA application were identified and selected, based on an analysis of four representative space shuttle payloads, and typical EVA scenarios with supporting crew timelines and procedures were developed. The EVA preparations and post EVA operations, as well as the timelines emphasizing concurrent payload support functions, were also summarized.

  1. Olivas and Reilly participating in EVA during Expedition/STS-117 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-11

    ISS015-E-12926 (11 June 2007) --- Astronauts Jim Reilly (right) and John "Danny" Olivas, both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and Olivas connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4.

  2. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06309 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  3. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06297 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  4. View of Williams on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06291 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Dave Williams, STS-118 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk, Williams and astronaut Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  5. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06305 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  6. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06313 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  7. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06282 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  8. View of Williams on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06286 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Dave Williams, STS-118 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk, Williams and astronaut Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  9. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06304 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  10. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06312 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  11. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06283 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  12. View of Williams on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06285 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Dave Williams, STS-118 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk, Williams and astronaut Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  13. View of Mastracchio and Williams on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06281 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio (left) and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams, both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  14. View of Mastracchio on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06296 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  15. Olivas and Reilly participate in an EVA during Expedition 15/STS-117 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-11

    ISS015-E-12863 (11 June 2007) --- Astronauts Jim Reilly (left) and John "Danny" Olivas, both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and Olivas connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  16. View of Mastracchio working on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06259 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Canadian Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), both STS-118 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk Mastracchio and Williams attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  17. View of Williams on EVA 1 during STS-118/Expedition 15 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-11

    S118-E-06298 (11 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Dave Williams, STS-118 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 17-minute spacewalk, Williams and astronaut Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station's truss, retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station's Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get-ahead tasks.

  18. View of MS Mastracchio during EVA 3 for Expedition 15 / STS-118 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-15

    ISS015-E-22527 (15 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-118 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 5-hour, 28-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clay Anderson (out of frame), Expedition 15 flight engineer, relocated the S-Band Antenna Sub-Assembly from Port 6 (P6) to Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  19. Stefanyshyn-Piper performs first EVA during STS-115 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-12

    S115-E-05719 (12 Sept. 2006) --- Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-115 mission specialist, exposed this self-portrait during the Sept. 12 space walk that marked the resumption of construction on the International Space Station. The mission specialist had just unstowed the forward Solar Array Blanket Box (SABB). She shared the day's work with astronaut Joseph R. Tanner, who appears just below the glare in her helmet visor. The two participated in the first of three scheduled STS-115 extravehicular activity (EVA) sessions as the Atlantis astronauts and the Expedition 13 crew members join efforts this week to resume construction of the International Space Station.

  20. Behnken and Foreman during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007838 (21 March 2008) --- Astronauts Robert L. Behnken (top) and Mike Foreman, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Foreman replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  1. Behnken and Foreman during EVA 4 - Expedition 16 / STS-13 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-21

    S123-E-007839 (21 March 2008) --- Astronauts Mike Foreman (foreground) and Robert L. Behnken, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Foreman and Behnken replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  2. Linnehan on EVA 2 - during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006790 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Mike Foreman and Rick Linnehan (partially out of frame), both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  3. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006400 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan and Mike Foreman, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  4. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 - during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006787 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Mike Foreman and Rick Linnehan (partially out of frame), both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  5. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 - during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006788 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Mike Foreman (left) and Rick Linnehan, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  6. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006403 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan and Mike Foreman, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  7. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 - during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006786 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  8. Linnehan and Foreman on EVA 2 - during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006781 (15/16 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan (right) and Mike Foreman, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Foreman, assembled the stick-figure-shaped Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a task that included attaching its two arms. Designed for station maintenance and service, Dextre is capable of sensing forces and movement of objects it is manipulating. It can automatically compensate for those forces and movements to ensure an object is moved smoothly. Dextre is the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  9. Linnehan during first EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006002 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Rick Linnehan (center), STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), Expedition 16 flight engineer, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system (center left), the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.

  10. Reisman on First EVA during STS-123 / Expedition 16 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-006057 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Reisman and astronaut Rick Linnehan (out of frame), STS-123 mission specialist, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System. Visible in the reflections in Reisman's visor are various components of the station and the docked Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  11. Reisman works near S4 Truss on first EVA during Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-14

    S123-E-005981 (13/14 March 2008) --- Astronaut Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the STS-123 mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour and one-minute spacewalk, Reisman and astronaut Rick Linnehan (out of frame), STS-123 mission specialist, prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section (JLP) (top left) for removal from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System. The blackness of space and a blue and white Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.

  12. EVA Physiology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An introduction to the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in astronauts during EVA. This will include an explanation of Prebreathe Protocols (PB), to affect nitrogen washout as a primary risk mit...

  13. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6893 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  14. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6897 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  15. EVA 25

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-24

    View of Rick Mastracchio,in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU),working to mate spare Pump Module (PM) Quick Disconnects (QDs) during International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 25. Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  16. EVA Systems Technology Gaps and Priorities 2017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Buffington, Jesse A.

    2017-01-01

    Performance of Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) has been and will continue to be a critical capability for human space flight. Human exploration missions beyond LEO will require EVA capability for either contingency or nominal activities to support mission objectives and reduce mission risk. EVA systems encompass a wide array of products across pressure suits, life support systems, EVA tools and unique spacecraft interface hardware (i.e. EVA Translation Paths and EVA Worksites). In a fiscally limited environment with evolving transportation and habitation options, it is paramount that the EVA community's strategic planning and architecture integration products be reviewed and vetted for traceability between the mission needs far into the future to the known technology and knowledge gaps to the current investments across EVA systems. To ascertain EVA technology and knowledge gaps many things need to be brought together, assessed and analyzed. This includes an understanding of the destination environments, various mission concept of operations, current state of the art of EVA systems, EVA operational lessons learned, and reference advanced capabilities. A combined assessment of these inputs should result in well-defined list of gaps. This list can then be prioritized depending on the mission need dates and time scale of the technology or knowledge gap closure plan. This paper will summarize the current state of EVA related technology and knowledge gaps derived from NASA's Exploration EVA Reference Architecture and Operations Concept products. By linking these products and articulating NASA's approach to strategic development for EVA across all credible destinations an EVA could be done in, the identification of these gaps is then used to illustrate the tactical and strategic planning for the EVA technology development portfolio. Finally, this paper illustrates the various "touch points" with other human exploration risk identification areas including human health and

  17. Post space preparation: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will focus on post space preparation.

  18. Fossum completes installation of the TUS-RA to the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06223 (10 July 2006) --- Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During today's six-hour 47-minute spacewalk, Fossum and astronaut Piers J. Sellers (out of frame), mission specialist, restored the International Space Station's Mobile Transporter rail car to full operation and delivered a spare pump module for the station's cooling system.

  19. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-06919 (3 Aug. 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the extended International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  20. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-03

    S114-E-6856 (3 August 2005) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space, astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), traverses along the P6 truss near the arrays on the international space station during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  1. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6918 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the extended International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  2. Lateral perforation in parallel post space preparations.

    PubMed

    Tinaz, A Cemal; Alaçam, Tayfun; Topuz, Ozgur; Er, Ozgur; Maden, Murat

    2004-08-15

    This study evaluates the amount of remaining tooth structure and possibility of producing lateral perforation following the use of different diameters of parallel-sided Parapost drills in groups of different canal curvatures (0 degrees-15 degrees, 16 degrees-25 degrees, 26 degrees <) in distal canals of first and second mandibular molar teeth. After enlargement of root canals using the crown-down pressureless technique, Parapost drills #1, #2, and #3 were used in the different canal groups for the preparation of a post space. Standardized digital radiographs were taken before the post space preparation and after each Parapost drill application. Four horizontal lines (a, b, c, and d) were drawn at equal distances on these images, starting from the pulp chamber floor moving apically at 2 mm increments. There were no significant differences between the different curvature groups at the a, b, c, and d levels for the critical level of the remaining tooth structure (multiple comparison test; p>0.05). However, in considering root perforation, both at the inner and outer side of the roots, there were statistically significant differences at "c" and "d" levels in group 3 (#3 drill) without taking into account the root curvature (ANOVA; p< 0.5). None of the specimens showed strip perforation.

  3. EVA 4 - Massimino during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-07

    STS109-323-013 (7 March 2002) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino moves about in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia while performing work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), partially visible behind him. Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman (out of frame), mission specialists, were participating in the fourth STS-109 space walk (EVA-4).

  4. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  5. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  6. EVA Skills Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

  7. Understanding Skill in EVA Mass Handling. Volume 1; Theoretical and Operational Foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccio, Gary; McDonald, Vernon; Peters, Brian; Layne, Charles; Bloomberg, Jacob

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the theoretical and operational foundations for our analysis of skill in extravehicular mass handling. A review of our research on postural control, human-environment interactions, and exploratory behavior in skill acquisition is used to motivate our analysis. This scientific material is presented within the context of operationally valid issues concerning extravehicular mass handling. We describe the development of meaningful empirical measures that are relevant to a special class of nested control systems: manual interactions between an individual and the substantial environment. These measures are incorporated into a unique empirical protocol implemented on NASA's principal mass handling simulator, the precision air-bearing floor, in order to evaluate skill in extravehicular mass handling. We discuss the components of such skill with reference to the relationship between postural configuration and controllability of an orbital replacement unit, the relationship between orbital replacement unit control and postural stability, the relationship between antecedent and consequent movements of an orbital replacement unit, and the relationship between antecedent and consequent postural movements. Finally, we describe our expectations regarding the operational relevance of the empirical results as it pertains to extravehicular activity tools, training, monitoring, and planning.

  8. Design and Verification of Space Station EVA-Operated Truss Attachment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katell, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design and verification of a system used to attach two segments of the International Space Station (ISS). This system was first used in space to mate the P6 and Z1 trusses together in December 2000, through a combination of robotic and extravehicular tasks. Features that provided capture, coarse alignment, and fine alignment during the berthing process are described. Attachment of this high value hardware was critical to the ISS's sequential assembly, necessitating the inclusion of backup design and operational features. Astronauts checked for the proper performance of the alignment and bolting features during on-orbit operations. During berthing, the system accommodates truss-to-truss relative displacements that are caused by manufacturing tolerances and on-orbit thermal gradients. After bolt installation, the truss interface becomes statically determinate with respect to in-plane shear loads and isolates attach bolts from bending moments. The approach used to estimate relative displacements and the means of accommodating them is explained. Confidence in system performance was achieved through a cost-effective collection of tests and analyses, including thermal, structural, vibration, misalignment, contact dynamics, underwater simulation, and full-scale functional testing. Design considerations that have potential application to other mechanisms include accommodating variations of friction coefficients in the on-orbit joints, wrench torque tolerances, joint preload, moving element clearances at temperature extremes, and bolt-nut torque reaction.

  9. EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-18

    ISS014-E-10063 (18 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, works with the port overhead solar array wing on the International Space Station's P6 truss during the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Curbeam, using specially prepared, tape-insulated tools, to guide the array wing neatly inside its blanket box during the 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk.

  10. TUS-RA removal from the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06219 (10 July 2006) --- Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, removes the trailing umbilical system-reel assembly (TUS-RA) from the S0 truss on the International Space Station during the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Fossum is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the Canadarm2.

  11. TUS-RA removal from the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06210 (10 July 2006) --- Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, removes the trailing umbilical system-reel assembly (TUS-RA) from the S0 truss on the International Space Station during the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Fossum is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the Canadarm2.

  12. TUS-RA removal from the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06211 (10 July 2006) --- Astronauts Michael E. Fossum and Piers J. Sellers (out of frame), STS-121 mission specialists, install the new trailing umbilical system in the mobile transporter on the International Space Station during the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  13. Climbing the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Wall - Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, Jose; Greene, Stacie

    2010-01-01

    The success of the EVA team, that includes the EVA project office, Crew Office, Mission Operations, Engineering and Safety, is assured by the full integration of all necessary disciplines. Safety participation in all activities from hardware development concepts, certification and crew training, provides for a strong partnership within the team. Early involvement of Safety on the EVA team has mitigated risk and produced a high degree of mission success.

  14. Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

  15. TUS-RA removal from the S0 Truss during EVA2 for STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    S121-E-06207 (10 July 2006) --- While anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the Canadarm2, astronaut Michael E. Fossum (left), STS-121 mission specialist, removes the trailing umbilical system-reel assembly (TUS-RA) from the S0 truss on the International Space Station during the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist, assisted Fossum by checking the clearance of the TUS-RA as it was lifted from the bay.

  16. Sellers and Fossum on the end of the OBSS during EVA1 on STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-08

    STS121-323-011 (8 July 2006) --- Astronauts Piers J. Sellers and Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialists, work in tandem on Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System (RMS/OBSS) during the mission's first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Also visible on the OBSS are the Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI), Intensified Television Camera (ITVC) and Laser Camera System (LCS).

  17. View of Swanson working on the S3 Truss for STS-117 EVA2 during Joint Operations with Expedition 15

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-14

    ISS015-E-12063 (13 June 2007) --- Astronauts Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and Swanson removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction.

  18. Risk Management in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jonathan; Lutomski, M.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of risk management in Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The contents include: 1) EVA Office at NASA - JSC; 2) EVA Project Risk Management: Why and When; 3) EVA Office Risk Management: How; 4) Criteria for Closing a Risk; 5) Criteria for Accepting a Risk; 6) ISS IRMA Reference Card Data Entry Requirement s; 7) XA/ EVA Office Risk Activity Summary; 8) EVA Significant Change Summary; 9) Integrated Risk Management Application (XA) Matrix, March 31, 2004; 10) ISS Watch Item: 50XX Summary Report; and 11) EVA Project RM Usefulness

  19. Advanced EVA system design requirements study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the space station advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related EVA support equipment were established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as operational, procedures and training issues were considered.

  20. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie S.; Alpert, Brian K.; Montalvo, Edwin James; Welsh, Lawrence Daren; Wray, Scott; Mavridis, Costa

    2016-01-01

    The EVA Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, easy to search repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision controlled system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, as well as hundreds of others that support the EVA. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  1. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie S.; Alpert, Brian K.; Montalvo, Edwin James; Welsh, Lawrence Daren; Wray, Scott; Mavridis, Costa

    2016-01-01

    The EVA Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, easy to search repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision controlled system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, as well as hundreds of others that support EVA. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  2. MS Mastracchio working on the S1 Truss during EVA 3 for Expedition 15 / STS-118 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-15

    ISS015-E-22539 (15 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-118 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 5-hour, 28-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clay Anderson (out of frame), Expedition 15 flight engineer, relocated the S-Band Antenna Sub-Assembly from Port 6 (P6) to Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  3. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  4. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, searchable repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, the one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision control system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, and also for hundreds of other NASA and contract employees. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  5. Linnehan and Behnken work on the Dextre on EVA 3 during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-17

    S123-E-006729 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan (right) and Robert L. Behnken, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Behnken installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  6. Linnehan and Behnken work on the Dextre on EVA 3 during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-17

    S123-E-006728 (17/18 March 2008) --- Astronauts Rick Linnehan (right) and Robert L. Behnken, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and Behnken installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine.

  7. Applications of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model formating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a model for estimating the impact of manned EVA costs on future payloads is discussed. Basic information on the EV crewman requirements, equipment, physical and operational characteristics, and vehicle interfaces is provided. The cost model is being designed to allow system designers to quantify the impact of EVA on vehicle and payload systems.

  8. EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance [EPSP] Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the biomedical and technological challenges of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The topics covered include: 1) Prebreathe Protocols; 2) Lunar Suit Testing and Development; and 3) Lunar Electric Rover and Exploration Operations Concepts.

  9. Studies Relating to EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JA1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: The Staged Decompression to the Hypobaric Atmosphere as a Prophylactic Measure Against Decompression Sickness During Repetitive EVA; A New Preoxygenation Procedure for Extravehicular Activity (EVA); Metabolic Assessments During Extra-Vehicular Activity; Evaluation of Safety of Hypobaric Decompressions and EVA From Positions of Probabilistic Theory; Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Lipids and Erythrocyte Membranes During Simulation of Extravehicular Activity; Biomedical Studies Relating to Decompression Stress with Simulated EVA, Overview; The Joint Angle and Muscle Signature (JAMS) System - Current Uses and Future Applications; and Experimental Investigation of Cooperative Human-Robotic Roles in an EVA Work Site.

  10. EVA Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, Brian; Maida, James; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2004-01-01

    out for EVA activities are based more on extensive domain experience than any formal analytic structure. Conversely, physical task analysis for industrial and structured evidence from training and EV A contexts. Again on earth there is considerable evidence of human performance degradation due to encumbrance and fatigue. These industrial models generally take the form of a discounting equation. The development of performance estimates for space operations, such as timeline predictions for EVA is generally based on specific input from training activity, for example in the NBL or KC135. uniformed services tasks on earth are much more formalized. Human performance data in the space context has two sources: first there is the micro analysis of performance in structured tasks by the space physiology community and second there is the less structured evidence from training and EV A contexts.

  11. EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This "EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit" presentation covers several topics related to the medical implications and physiological effects of suited operations in space from the perspective of a physician with considerable first-hand Extravehicular Activity (EVA) experience. Key themes include EVA physiology working in a pressure suit in the vacuum of space, basic EVA life support and work support, Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspections and repairs, and discussions of the physical challenges of an EVA. Parazynski covers the common injuries and significant risks during EVAs, as well as physical training required to prepare for EVAs. He also shares overall suit physiological and medical knowledge with the next generation of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) system designers.

  12. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  13. EVA medical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A. S.

    The experience gained in the USSR allows the following conclusions: physiological responses to EVA do not depend on flight duration in qualitative and quantative terms. Physiological responses to EVA are mainly determined by following 3 factors: physiological activities; space suit environmental parameters; physiological stress. This paper reviews problems, associated with altitude decompression sickness; thermal regulation of the body, visual function and physiological psychological stress as well as individual EVA experience in physiological responses.

  14. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation

  15. Antarctica EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stan

    2013-01-01

    NASA astronaut Stan Love shared his experiences with the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET), an annual expedition to the southern continent to collect valuable samples for research in planetary science. ANSMET teams operate from isolated, remote field camps on the polar plateau, where windchill factors often reach -40? F. Several astronaut participants have noted ANSMET's similarity to a space mission. Some of the operational concepts, tools, and equipment employed by ANSMET teams may offer valuable insights to designers of future planetary surface exploration hardware.

  16. Mission Specialists Mario Runco and Greg Harbaugh suiting up for EVA.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Candid view of EVA Mission Specialists Mario Runco and Greg Harbaugh suiting up for EVA in the middeck with the assistance of Mission Specialist Susan Helms (reviewing the operation with a procedural checklist).

  17. Collaborative Human Engineering Work in Space Exploration Extravehicular Activities (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSantis, Lena; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on extravehicular activities in space exploration in collaboration with other NASA centers, industries, and universities is shown. The topics include: 1) Concept of Operations for Future EVA activities; 2) Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS); 3) Advanced EVA Walkback Test; 4) Walkback Subjective Results; 5) Integrated Suit Test 1; 6) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS); 7) Flex PLSS Design Process; and 8) EVA Information System; 9)

  18. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  19. EVA Health and Human Performance Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, A. F.; Norcross, J.; Jarvis, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple HRP Risks and Gaps require detailed characterization of human health and performance during exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks; however, a rigorous and comprehensive methodology for characterizing and comparing the health and human performance implications of current and future EVA spacesuit designs does not exist. This study will identify and implement functional tasks and metrics, both objective and subjective, that are relevant to health and human performance, such as metabolic expenditure, suit fit, discomfort, suited postural stability, cognitive performance, and potentially biochemical responses for humans working inside different EVA suits doing functional tasks under the appropriate simulated reduced gravity environments. This study will provide health and human performance benchmark data for humans working in current EVA suits (EMU, Mark III, and Z2) as well as shirtsleeves using a standard set of tasks and metrics with quantified reliability. Results and methodologies developed during this test will provide benchmark data against which future EVA suits, and different suit configurations (eg, varied pressure, mass, CG) may be reliably compared in subsequent tests. Results will also inform fitness for duty standards as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  20. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  1. Ultrasound effects after post space preparation: An SEM study.

    PubMed

    Serafino, Cinzia; Gallina, Giuseppe; Cumbo, Enzo; Monticelli, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic treatment on occlusion of dentine tubules in root canal walls after post space preparation in endodontically treated teeth. Twenty-four premolars were instrumented and filled using warm vertical condensation; after post space preparation, they were divided into two groups. The control group was treated using the etching procedure. The experiment samples were treated with EDTA irrigation and ultrasound activation for 30 s before the etching procedure. The roots were divided and the canal walls were examined under SEM at 1000x magnification. The debris and open tubule marks were observed at 2, 6, and 10 mm levels using a three-step scale and the differences in marks among the groups were tested for statistical significance. The following were observed: (a) A decrease in debris and open tubule marks in the samples treated with ultrasounds and the control group (p < 0.05), (b) no significant differences between the three levels of post space in debris and open tubule marks in the experiment samples, and (c) significant differences between the apical and coronal levels in debris and open tubule marks in the control group.

  2. Compiling a Comprehensive EVA Training Dataset for NASA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murry, J. D.; Lee, L. R.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Training for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) is considered hazardous duty for NASA astronauts. This activity places astronauts at risk for decompression sickness as well as various musculoskeletal disorders from working in the spacesuit. As a result, the operational and research communities over the years have requested access to EVA training data to supplement their studies.

  3. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  4. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    View of Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participating in Russian extravehicular activity (EVA) 33. Also visible are the Progress spacecraft docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (DC1) with the Service Module (SM) .

  5. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  6. Williams during EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-19

    Extravehicular crewmember 1 (EV1) Jeff Williams pauses for a photo after installing a Hemispherical (Hemi) Reflector Cover on Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA-2) during Extravehicular Activity 36 (EVA 36).

  7. Artemyev post-EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev, Expedition 40 flight engineer, is photographed still wearing his liquid cooling and ventilation garment after a Russian Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Artemyev is standing in his crew quarters (CQ).

  8. EVA: Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Law, N.; Tasuya, O.; Fors, O.; Dennihy, E.; Carlberg, R.; Tuthill, P.; Ashley, M.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2017-06-01

    We are planning to build Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic (EVA), which will enable the first ultra-wide-field, high-cadence sky survey to be conducted from both Poles. The system is based on the successful Evryscope concept, already installed and operating since 2015 at Cerro Tololo in Chile with the following characteristics: robotic operation, 8,000 square degrees simultaneous sky coverage, 2-minute cadence, milli-mag level photometric accuracy, pipelined data processing for real-time analysis and full data storage for off-line analysis. The initial location proposed for EVA is the PEARL station on Ellesmere island; later also an antarctic location shall be selected. The science goals enabled by this unique combination of almost full-sky coverage and high temporal cadence are numerous, and include among others ground-breaking forays in the fields of exoplanets, stellar variability, asteroseismology, supernovae and other transient events. The EVA polar locations will enable uninterrupted observations lasting in principle over weeks and months. EVA will be fully robotic. We discuss the EVA science drivers and expected results, and present the logistics and the outline of the project which is expected to have first light in the winter of 2018. The cost envelope can be kept very competitive thanks to R&D already employed for the CTIO Evryscope, to our experience with both Arctic and Antarctic locations, and to the use of off-the-shelf components.

  9. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028082 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Ryazanskiy and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  10. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028094 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  11. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028101 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  12. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028107 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  13. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028067 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  14. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028102 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  15. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028569 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, uses a still camera during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  16. Effective Teamwork: The EVA NBL Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Lori

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the experience of improving the operation of the ExtraVehiclar Activity (EVA) Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory as a team of NASA employees and contractors. It reviews specific recommendations to use in turning a struggling organization around as a NASA/contractor team

  17. Astronaut hazard during free-flight polar EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. N.

    1985-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) during Shuttle flights planned for the late 1980's includes several factors which together may constitute an astronaut hazard. Free-flight EVA is planned whereas prior United States Earth orbit EVA has used umbilical tethers carrying communications, coolant, and oxygen. EVA associated with missions like LANDSAT Retrieval will be in orbits through the auroral oval where charging of spacecraft may occur. The astronaut performing free flight EVA constitutes an independent spacecraft. The astronaut and the Shuttle make up a system of electrically isolated spacecraft with a wide disparity in size. Unique situations, such as the astronaut being in the wake of the Shuttle while traversing an auroral disturbance, could result in significant astronaut and Shuttle charging. Charging and subsequent arc discharge are important because they have been associated with operating upsets and even satellite failure at geosynchronous orbit. Spacecraft charging theory and experiments are examined to evaluate charging for Shuttle size spacecraft in the polar ionosphere.

  18. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  19. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  20. Power assist EVA glove development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1992-01-01

    The design of the EVA glove is examined, emphasizing the development of a more flexible metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint for the EVA glove. The analysis of the EVA glove MCP joint is reviewed and the glove design process is recapitulated. Experimental tests of the glove are summarized.

  1. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028076 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, uses a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. Also visible in the reflections in the visor are Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, flight engineer, and various components of the space station and a blue and white portion of Earth. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  2. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028789 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, is pictured during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Ryazanskiy and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  3. EVA Glove Research Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Alvin M.; Peterson, Steven W.; Main, John A.; Dickenson, Rueben D.; Shields, Bobby L.; Lorenz, Christine H.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the basic research portion of the extravehicular activity (EVA) glove research program is to gain a greater understanding of the kinematics of the hand, the characteristics of the pressurized EVA glove, and the interaction of the two. Examination of the literature showed that there existed no acceptable, non-invasive method of obtaining accurate biomechanical data on the hand. For this reason a project was initiated to develop magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for biomechanical data acquisition and visualization. Literature reviews also revealed a lack of practical modeling methods for fabric structures, so a basic science research program was also initiated in this area.

  4. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028788 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy (mostly out of frame at bottom right), both Expedition 37 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  5. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11948 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  6. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11958 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  7. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11947 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  8. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11949 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  9. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11944 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  10. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028787 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (left) and Sergey Ryazanskiy, both Expedition 37 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  11. Real-Time EVA Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leestma, David

    2013-01-01

    David Leestma was EV-1 for the STS-41G extravehicular activity (EVA) with Kathy Sullivan (first American female spacewalker). They conducted an EVA to fully demonstrate the feasibility of refueling satellites from the Space Shuttle, and performed the first contingency EVA task involving the Ku-band antenna. STS-41G was the fourth Space Shuttle mission to perform an EVA, and Leestma related his experiences with training, the spacesuit, and EVA tasks that were conducted on October 11, 1984 during this mission.

  12. Russian EVA 39

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099874 (08/18/2014) --- Cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov (red stripe - foreground) and Oleg Artemyev (blue stripe - background), Expedition 40 flight engineers, move to the Russian Service Module for repairs during International Space Station Russian EVA 39 on Aug. 18, 2014.

  13. Russian EVA no. 39.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099355 (08/18/2014) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov (red stripes), Expedition 40 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit outside the International Space Station, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) number 39 in support of science and maintenance. The Solar array is visible in the background.

  14. Russian EVA 39.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099104 (08/18/2014) --- View of Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev (blue stripe), Expedition 40 flight engineer outside the International Space Station, taken while performing maintenance work on the Russian segment during the Russian EVA 39 on Aug 18 2014.

  15. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035256 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (top) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, are pictured in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station following a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Misurkin and Yurchikhin are wearing blue thermal undergarments that complement the Russian Orlan spacesuit.

  16. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008149 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Anchored to a foot restraint on the station's robotic Canadarm2, astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, transfers a large nitrogen tank assembly -- used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system -- during the second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station.

  17. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    NASA has a strategic knowledge gap (B5-3) about what life signatures leak/vent from our Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems. This will impact how we search for evidence of life on Mars. Characterizing contamination leaks from our suits will help us comply with planetary protection guidelines, and better plan human exploration missions.

  18. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The EVA systems cost model presented is based on proposed EVA equipment for the space shuttle program. General information on EVA crewman requirements in a weightless environment and an EVA capabilities overview are provided.

  19. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 2: EVA/IVA tasks, guidelines, and constraints definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The guidelines for EVA and IVA tasks to be performed on the space shuttle are defined. In deriving tasks, guidelines, and constraints, payloads were first identified from the mission model. Payload requirements, together with man and manipulator capabilities, vehicle characteristics and operation, and safety considerations led to a definition of candidate tasks. Guidelines and constraints were also established from these considerations. Scenarios were established, and screening criteria, such as commonality of EVA and IVA activities, were applied to derive representative planned and unplanned tasks. The whole spectrum of credible contingency situations with a potential requirement for EVA/IVA was analyzed.

  20. CETA truck and EVA restraint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C.; Merson, Wayne R.

    1991-01-01

    The Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment is an extravehicular activity (EVA) Space Transportation System (STS) based flight experiment which will explore various modes of transporting astronauts and light equipment for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The basic elements of CETA are: (1) two 25 foot long sections of monorail, which will be EVA assembled in the STS cargo bay to become a single 50 ft. rail called the track; (2) a wheeled baseplate called the truck which rolls along the track and can accept three cart concepts; and (3) the three carts which are designated manual, electric, and mechanical. The three carts serve as the astronaut restraint and locomotive interfaces with the track. The manual cart is powered by the astronaut grasping the track's handrail and pulling himself along. The electric cart is operated by an astronaut turning a generator which powers the electric motor and drives the cart. The mechanical cart is driven by a Bendix type transmission and is similar in concept to a man-propelled railroad cart. During launch and landing, the truck is attached to the deployable track by means of EVA removable restraint bolts and held in position by a system of retractable shims. These shims are positioned on the exterior of the rail for launch and landing and rotate out of the way for the duration of the experiment. The shims are held in position by strips of Velcro nap, which rub against the sides of the shim and exert a tailored force. The amount of force required to rotate the shims was a major EVA concern, along with operational repeatability and extreme temperature effects. The restraint system was tested in a thermal-vac and vibration environment and was shown to meet all of the initial design requirements. Using design inputs from the astronauts who will perform the EVA, CETA evolved through an iterative design process and represented a cooperative effort.

  1. Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

  2. What's NEXT for EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, R. K.

    The NASA Exploration Team (NEXT) promotes a vision of new capabilities through an ongoing, integrated and prioritized investment in leap ahead concepts and technologies. The wise marriage of robotic and human work systems is a key element of this vision. To enable a wide array of future destinations and applications, it is important to develop and implement systems which are scalable, environmentally adaptable, reliable and efficiently productive. This paper highlights a few of the recently envisioned customers and applications for advanced extravehicular activity (EVA) systems. It also summarizes recent conceptual and practical studies to define the features and options of such a system. More importantly, it communicates the need and progress of knowledge capture, clearly defined performance targets, credible decision making tools, tangible benefits and creative leverage. With this integrated long range approach, space exploration and EVA can accelerate and enable the future for all generations.

  3. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033402 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  4. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035204 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  5. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035205 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  6. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035126 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  7. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035130 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  8. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035133 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  9. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035124 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  10. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035129 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  11. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033400 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  12. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035163 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  13. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008221 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, works on the new Columbus laboratory as he participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  14. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008325 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  15. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008315 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  16. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008219 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  17. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008195 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  18. Fuglesang during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-14

    ISS014-E-09800 (14 Dec. 2006) --- Anchored to the International Space Station's Canadarm2 foot restraint, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. (out of frame), mission specialist, also participated in the spacewalk. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  19. Walheim during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-008913 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, holds onto a handrail on the Columbus laboratory, the newest piece of hardware on the International Space Station. In his helmet visor is mirrored the forward section of the Space Shuttle Atlantis, to which the station is docked. Astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, shared this final period of STS-122 extravehicular activity (EVA) with Walheim.

  20. Robinson during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-29

    S114-E-6221 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, on the end of the station’s Canadarm2 (out of frame), slowly and cautiously makes his way to the underside of Space Shuttle Discovery to remove gap fillers from between the orbiter’s heat-shielding tiles during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  1. Robinson during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6215 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, on the end of the station’s Canadarm2 (out of frame), slowly and cautiously makes his way to the underside of Space Shuttle Discovery to remove gap fillers from between the orbiter’s heat-shielding tiles during the mission’s third of three sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  2. Curbeam during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-18

    ISS014-E-10084 (18 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, works with the port overhead solar array wing on the International Space Station's P6 truss during the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Curbeam, using specially prepared, tape-insulated tools, to guide the array wing neatly inside its blanket box during the 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk.

  3. Russian EVA 38.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev (EV2),in the blue striped Orlan suit,and Cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov,in the red striped Orlan suit,are photographed at work during Russian EVA 38 by Expedition 40 crewmembers aboard the ISS. They are working to Installed the AFAR (Automatic Phased Array Antenna) Unit of the [EKTC] (Integrated Command and Telemetry System) external FU (Feeder Unit) between PI.II-III on Service Module (SM) circumferential handrails.

  4. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008222 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, works on the new Columbus laboratory as he participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  5. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008357 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  6. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008317 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  7. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008401 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  8. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008312 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  9. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008327 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  10. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008323 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  11. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008218 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  12. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008395 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  13. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008153 (13 Feb. 2008) --- In the darkness of space, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  14. EVA Suits Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits packed inside containers arrive at the Space Station Processing Facility from Johnson Space Center in Texas. The suits will be used by STS-117 crew members to perform several spacewalks during the mission. The mission payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is the S3/S4 integrated truss structure, along with a third set of solar arrays and batteries. The crew of six astronauts will install the truss to continue assembly of the International Space Station.

  15. Space Shuttle/Orbiter EVA and EVA provisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    EVA objectives, procedures, and equipment for the Shuttle are reviewed. The EVA will occur as a planned excursion, to complete a mission objective, or on a contingency basis as support for the mission or to effect repairs to the Orbiter or its payload. Configurations for the placement of the airlock for EVA with and without Spacelab payloads are discussed, along with the various EVA tasks which could be expected as necessary for mission completion. Handholds have been placed in strategic positions on the RMS and along the payload doors, and a safety tether has been incorporated with line extension out to 25 ft. Off-the-shelf tools such as needlenose pliers, forceps, diagonal cutters, etc. are carried as standard equipment for the repair of malfunctioning equipment and doorlatches. Finally, attention is given to EVA lighting, communication, life-support, and work station restraint systems.

  16. Extravehicular activities limitations study. Volume 2: Establishment of physiological and performance criteria for EVA gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

    1988-01-01

    One of the major probelms faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human hand capabilities. This report describes the development of a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six measurement domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based on an assessment of general human hand functioning and EVA task requirements several tests within each measurement domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand as a baseline and the EVA glove at operating pressure. A test program was conducted to evaluate the tests using a representative EVA glove. Eleven test subjects participated in a repeated-measures design. The report presents the results of the tests in each capability domain.

  17. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027662 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  18. Russian EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027391 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  19. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027667 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  20. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027640 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  1. Kondratyev during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027368 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  2. Kondratyev during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027361 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  3. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021080 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  4. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015238 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  5. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021293 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  6. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020892 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  7. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020576 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  8. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021028 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  9. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021024 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  10. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015066 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  11. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015217 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  12. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020884 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  13. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035200 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. A section of the space station is visible in the reflections in his helmet visor.

  14. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015071 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  15. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007794 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  16. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007771 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  17. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007853 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  18. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007850 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  19. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035177 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. Parts of solar array panels on the orbital outpost are visible in the background,

  20. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035198 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. A section of the space station is visible in the reflections in his helmet visor.

  1. Tani during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026454 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Daniel Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Tani and astronaut Peggy Whitson (out of frame), commander, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8.

  2. Whitson during EVA 13

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    ISS016-E-017370 (18 Dec. 2007) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During the 6-hour, 56-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, looked for the cause of partial loss of electrical power to one of the International Space Station's two Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA) for starboard solar wings and examined damage to the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The spacewalk was the 100th for the construction and maintenance of the station.

  3. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021525 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  4. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021558 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  5. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065750 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  6. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007862 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  7. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021537 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  8. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007858 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  9. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065731 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  10. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021535 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  11. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065733 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  12. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021506 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  13. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065751 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  14. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021515 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  15. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065722 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  16. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021561 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  17. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065736 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  18. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021562 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  19. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021569 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  20. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065735 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  1. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065734 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  2. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021529 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  3. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065720 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  4. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065758 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  5. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021503 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  6. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021510 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  7. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007828 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  8. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007884 (11 Feb.2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  9. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007830 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  10. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007833 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  11. Williams during EVA 6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-31

    ISS014-E-13053 (31 Jan. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, participates in the first of three sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) in nine days, as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour 55-minute spacewalk, Williams and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, reconfigured one of two cooling loops for the Destiny laboratory module, rearranged electrical connections and secured the starboard radiator of the P6 truss after retraction.

  12. Williams during EVA 7

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-02-04

    ISS014-E-13328 (4 Feb. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, uses a digital still camera to expose a photo of her helmet visor during today's session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the spacewalk, Williams and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, reconfigured the second of two cooling loops for the Destiny laboratory module, secured the aft radiator of the P6 truss after retraction and prepared the obsolete Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) for removal this summer.

  13. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026031 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  14. Tani during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026022 (30 Jan. 2008) --- The face of astronaut Daniel Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer, is easily recognizable as he participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Tani and astronaut Peggy Whitson (out of frame), commander, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8.

  15. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025993 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  16. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025998 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  17. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025989 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  18. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035206 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, nears the completion of his role in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  19. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035219 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  20. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035215 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  1. Parazynski during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-30

    ISS016-E-007423 (30 Oct. 2007) --- Astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participates in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk Parazynski and astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks. Also, Parazynski inspected the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to gather comparison data for the starboard rotary joint.

  2. Kimbrough during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-20

    S126-E-008324 (20 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Shane Kimbrough, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, Kimbrough and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, continued the process of removing debris and applying lubrication around the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ), replaced four more of the SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies, relocated two equipment carts and applied lubrication to the station's robotic Canadarm2.

  3. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007797 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  4. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007864 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  5. Whitson during EVA 13

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    ISS016-E-017499 (18 Dec. 2007) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During the 6-hour, 56-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, looked for the cause of partial loss of electrical power to one of the International Space Station's two Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA) for starboard solar wings and examined damage to the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The spacewalk was the 100th for the construction and maintenance of the station. A blue and white Earth provides the background for the scene.

  6. Views of EVA performed during STS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Two STS-6 mission specialists busy near the aft bulkhead were photographed with a 70mm camera. Astronauts F. Story Musgrave (at winch device near center) and Donald H. Peterson are setting up winch operations at the aft bulkhead as a simulation for a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA). The orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods are seen in the background (30211); Musgrave translates down the Challenger's payload bay door hinge line with a bag of latch tools. In the lower left foreground are three canisters containing three getaway special (GAS) experiments. Part of the starboard wing and OMS pod are seen in the background. The gold-foil protected object on the right is the airborne support equipment for the inertial upper stage (IUS) (30212); Peterson (starboard side) and Musgrave evaluate the handrail system on the starboard longeron and aft bulkhead during an EVA. Behind them the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods frame a portion of Mexico's state of Jalisco (30213); Musgrave sus

  7. Health and Safety Benefits of Small Pressurized Suitport Rovers as EVA Surface Support Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized safe-haven providing SPE protection and decompression sickness (DCS) treatment capabilities within 20 mins at all times. Up to 50% reduction in time spent in EVA suits (vs. Unpressurized Rovers) for equal or greater Boots-on-Surface EVA exploration time. Reduces suit-induced trauma and provides improved options for nutrition, hydration, and waste-management. Time spent inside SPR during long translations may be spent performing resistive and cardiovascular exercise. Multiple shorter EVAs versus single 8 hr EVAs increases DCS safety and decreases prebreathe requirements. SPRs also offer many potential operational, engineering and exploration benefits not addressed here.

  8. A Human Machine Interface for EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.

    EVA astronauts work in a challenging environment that includes high rate of muscle fatigue, haptic and proprioception impairment, lack of dexterity and interaction with robotic equipment. Currently they are heavily dependent on support from on-board crew and ground station staff for information and robotics operation. They are limited to the operation of simple controls on the suit exterior and external robot controls that are difficult to operate because of the heavy gloves that are part of the EVA suit. A wearable human machine interface (HMI) inside the suit provides a powerful alternative for robot teleoperation, procedure checklist access, generic equipment operation via virtual control panels and general information retrieval and presentation. The HMI proposed here includes speech input and output, a simple 6 degree of freedom (dof) pointing device and a heads up display (HUD). The essential characteristic of this interface is that it offers an alternative to the standard keyboard and mouse interface of a desktop computer. The astronaut's speech is used as input to command mode changes, execute arbitrary computer commands and generate text. The HMI can respond with speech also in order to confirm selections, provide status and feedback and present text output. A candidate 6 dof pointing device is Measurand's Shapetape, a flexible "tape" substrate to which is attached an optic fiber with embedded sensors. Measurement of the modulation of the light passing through the fiber can be used to compute the shape of the tape and, in particular, the position and orientation of the end of the Shapetape. It can be used to provide any kind of 3d geometric information including robot teleoperation control. The HUD can overlay graphical information onto the astronaut's visual field including robot joint torques, end effector configuration, procedure checklists and virtual control panels. With suitable tracking information about the position and orientation of the EVA suit

  9. Space shuttle EVA opportunities. [a technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, D. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A technology assessment is presented on space extravehicular activities (EVA) that will be possible when the space shuttle orbiter is completed and launched. The use of EVA in payload systems design is discussed. Also discussed is space crew training. The role of EVA in connection with the Large Space Telescope and Skylab are described. The value of EVA in constructing structures in space and orbital assembly is examined. Excellent color illustrations are provided which show the proposed EVA functions that were described.

  10. ChEVAS: Combining Suprarenal EVAS with Chimney Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, Francesco; Chan, Tze Y. Shaikh, Usman; England, Andrew; Fisher, Robert K.; McWilliams, Richard G.

    2015-10-15

    Endovascular sealing with the Nellix{sup ®} endoprosthesis (EVAS) is a new technique to treat infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. We describe the use of endovascular sealing in conjunction with chimney stents for the renal arteries (chEVAS) in two patients, one with a refractory type Ia endoleak and an expanding aneurysm, and one with a large juxtarenal aneurysm unsuitable for fenestrated endovascular repair (EVAR). Both aneurysms were successfully excluded. Our report confirms the utility of chEVAS in challenging cases, where suprarenal seal is necessary. We suggest that, due to lack of knowledge on its durability, chEVAS should only been considered when more conventional treatment modalities (open repair and fenestrated EVAR) are deemed difficult or unfeasible.

  11. The feasibility of Doppler monitoring during EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A.; Filipenkov, S.; Katuntsev, V.; Vogt, L.; Wenzel, J.

    1995-07-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVA) outside the spacecraft, astronauts have to work under reduced pressure in a space suit. This pressure reduction induces the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) by the formation of gas bubbles from excess nitrogen dissolved in the organism by breathing air at normal pressure. Under laboratory conditions the gas bubbles moving in the blood stream can be detected by the non-invasive ultrasonic Doppler method. By early detection of excessive bubble formation the development of DCS symptoms may be prevented by early application of preventative measures. The method could also be useful when applied in the space suit in order to compare the results of laboratory tests with operational results, because there is a discrepancy according to the DCS risk of laboratory experiments and actual EVA missions, where no symptoms have been reported yet. A prototype Doppler sensor has been developed and implemented in the Russian Orlan suit. To investigate the feasibility of this method under simulated space conditions, the equipment has been used in a series of 12 thermovacuum chamber tests with suited subjects, where intravenous bubble formation was compared to unsuited control experiments. In more than 50% of the suited tests good Doppler recordings could be achieved. In some cases with unsatisfying results the signal could be improved by breathholding. Although the results do not yet allow any conclusion about a possible difference between suited and unsuited subjects due to the small number of tests performed, the method proved its feasibility for use in EVA suits and should be further developed to enhance the safety of EVA procedures.

  12. The feasibility of Doppler monitoring during EVA.

    PubMed

    Barer, A; Filipenkov, S; Katuntsev, V; Vogt, L; Wenzel, J

    1995-07-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVA) outside the spacecraft, astronauts have to work under reduced pressure in a space suit. This pressure reduction induces the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) by the formation of gas bubbles from excess nitrogen dissolved in the organism by breathing air at normal pressure. Under laboratory conditions the gas bubbles moving in the blood stream can be detected by the non-invasive ultrasonic Doppler method. By early detection of excessive bubble formation the development of DCS symptoms may be prevented by early application of preventative measures. The method could also be useful when applied in the space suit in order to compare the results of laboratory tests with operational results, because there is a discrepancy according to the DCS risk of laboratory experiments and actual EVA missions, where no symptoms have been reported yet. A prototype Doppler sensor has been developed and implemented in the Russian Orlan suit. To investigate the feasibility of this method under simulated space conditions, the equipment has been used in a series of 12 thermovacuum chamber tests with suited subjects, where intravenous bubble formation was compared to unsuited control experiments. In more than 50% of the suited tests good Doppler recordings could be achieved. In some cases with unsatisfying results the signal could be improved by breathholding. Although the results do not yet allow any conclusion about a possible difference between suited and unsuited subjects due to the small number of tests performed, the method proved its feasibility for use in EVA suits and should be further developed to enhance the safety of EVA procedures.

  13. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011440 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  14. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011439 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  15. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011480 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  16. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011747 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  17. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011459 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  18. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011479 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  19. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011642 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  20. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011640 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  1. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011481 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  2. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011477 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  3. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011608 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  4. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011598 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  5. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011441 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  6. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011745 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  7. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011593 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (left) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Yurchikhin replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  8. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011590 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (left) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Yurchikhin replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  9. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008239 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  10. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008222 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  11. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008078 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  12. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008224 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  13. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008243 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  14. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008053 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  15. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008075 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  16. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008244 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  17. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008050 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  18. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008250 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  19. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008052 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  20. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008241 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  1. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008048 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  2. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008074 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  3. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009322 (27 July 2009) --- Astronauts Tom Marshburn (left) and Christopher Cassidy, both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and Cassidy secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  4. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009248 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  5. Marshburn during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009303 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Tom Marshburn, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and astronaut Christopher Cassidy (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  6. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009315 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  7. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009347 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  8. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009727 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  9. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009942 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  10. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009941 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  11. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009939 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  12. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009932 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  13. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009915 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  14. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009940 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  15. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009726 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  16. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009930 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  17. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009897 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  18. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  19. Push-out bond strength of a new post system after various post space treatments.

    PubMed

    Akman, Melek; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Ince, Selen; Guneser, Mehmet Burak

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of post-space treatment with chelating agents on the push-out bond-strength of a glass fiber post-system. Fortyeight human teeth were decoronated. The roots were prepared to size 40 and obturated. The post-spaces were prepared with PeesoReamer drills. The post-spaces were irrigated with (i) NaOCl and EDTA with chlorhexidine (QMix), (ii) NaOCl and EDTA, (iii) NaOCl and Citric acid, (iv) NaOCl and saline as a control group. i-TFC glass fiber posts were then luted with i-TFC bond system. The samples were horizontally sectioned. The displacement resistance was measured. Push-out bond-strength (MPa) was calculated. Data were analyzed. NaOCl/QMix group showed highest values to dentine whereas NaOCl/Citric acid group showed lowest values. i-TFC post-system demonstrated equal bond strength values when post-space treated with either NaOCl/EDTA or NaOCl/Saline. It can be concluded that post-space could be treated with NaOCl and QMix in order to increase adhesion of i-TFC post-system to rootdentine.

  20. APOLLO 17 - INFLIGHT (1ST EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    S72-55064 (11 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan operates the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, in this black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the RCA color TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Cernan is the commander of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit while astronaut Cernan and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module to explore the moon.

  1. EVA: Visual Analytics to Identify Fraudulent Events.

    PubMed

    Leite, Roger A; Gschwandtner, Theresia; Miksch, Silvia; Kriglstein, Simone; Pohl, Margit; Gstrein, Erich; Kuntner, Johannes

    2017-08-31

    Financial institutions are interested in ensuring security and quality for their customers. Banks, for instance, need to identify and stop harmful transactions in a timely manner. In order to detect fraudulent operations, data mining techniques and customer profile analysis are commonly used. However, these approaches are not supported by Visual Analytics techniques yet. Visual Analytics techniques have potential to considerably enhance the knowledge discovery process and increase the detection and prediction accuracy of financial fraud detection systems. Thus, we propose EVA, a Visual Analytics approach for supporting fraud investigation, fine-tuning fraud detection algorithms, and thus, reducing false positive alarms.

  2. Improvement of the performances of modified bituminous concrete with EVA and EVA-waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saoula, S.; Ait Mokhtar, K.; Haddadi, S.; Ghorbel, E.

    2009-11-01

    The improvement of the characteristics of the road flexible pavements is essential in regard to the growth of the traffics and the increasingly large performances of the vehicles. This improvement was made possible by the introduction of new methods and processes of modification of the products. The modification of the bituminous mix can be made in two manners: the first one is the modification of the bitumen binder (process A), the other one consists of the direct addition of a modifier during mixing operation (process B). It should be noted that one of the difficulties in Algeria is the absence of manufacturing units of the modified binders. For this reason, it is recommended to use the process B. In this article, the results of the influence of the modification of a bituminous concrete on its mechanical behaviour have been presented, using laboratory tests by the addition of EVA (Acetate of vinyl and ethylene) and of EVA-waste (waste of sole of shoes).

  3. Russian-American Cooperation in EVA Area (from Russian Perspective)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, O. S.; Alexandrov, A. P.; Poleschuk, A. F.

    Russian and American extravehicular activity (EVA) specialists started cooperation after Russia entered the ISS Program. Practical work began in the framework of the Mir-NASA Program, when astronauts J. Linenger, M. Foale and D. Wolf were trained in Russia and participated in the EVA on MIR. This was the intercourse of two experiences, two equal schools each formed under specific conditions. The Report studies the peculiarities of national EVA schools, shows the experience in their integration for the ISS purposes. Organizational aspects of the ISS Program to optimize the implementation of the EVA tasks are presented. It gives examples of the cooperation and development of the hardware equally compatible both with EMU and ORLAN-M space suits, impacts of different schools on the operational methods. It presents proposals on the further integration of the Russian and American schools, considers the prerequisites and perspectives of maximally integrated EVA system for the ISS and the possibility of its incorporation in future in to the mission to Mars.

  4. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  5. EVA crew workstation provisions for Skylab and Space Shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.; Saenger, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A synopsis of scheduled extravehicular activities (EVA) for a nominal Skylab mission is presented with an overview of EV workstation equipment developed for the program. Also included are the unprogrammed extravehicular activities and supporting equipment that was quickly developed and retrofitted in a series of successful operations to salvage the crippled Skylab Cluster during the Skylab 1 Mission. Because EVA appears to be a requirement for the Space Shuttle Program, candidate EV workstations are discussed in terms of effective and economical Shuttle payload servicing and maintenance. Several such concepts, which could provide a versatile, portable EV support system, are presented.

  6. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  7. Electrostatic Discharge Issues in International Space Station Program EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    EVA activity in the ISS program encounters several dangerous ESD conditions. The ISS program has been aggressive for many years to find ways to mitigate or to eliminate the associated risks. Investments have included: (1) Major mods to EVA tools, suit connectors & analytical tools (2) Floating Potential Measurement Unit (3) Plasma Contactor Units (4) Certification of new ISS flight attitudes (5) Teraflops of computation (6) Thousands of hours of work by scores of specialists (7) Monthly management attention at the highest program levels. The risks are now mitigated to a level that is orders of magnitude safer than prior operations

  8. Astronaut Russell Schweickart inside simulator for EVA training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-11

    S68-55391 (11 Dec. 1968) --- Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/Saturn 504) space mission, is seen inside Chamber "A," Space Environment Simulation Laboratory, Building 32, participating in dry run activity in preparation for extravehicular activity which is scheduled in Chamber "A." The purpose of the scheduled training is to familiarize the crewmen with the operation of EVA equipment in a simulated space environment. In addition, metabolic and workload profiles will be simulated on each crewman. Astronauts Schweickart and Alan L. Bean, backup lunar module pilot, are scheduled to receive thermal-vacuum training simulating Earth-orbital EVA.

  9. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  10. Space Station Freedom airlock - The integration of IVA and EVA capabilities in an orbital element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas O., Jr.; Matthews, Anthony P.

    1992-07-01

    In order to meet mission goals, the Space Station Freedom (SSF) airlock must maximize crew efficiency while supporting a range of extravehicular activity (EVA) and intravehicular activity (IVA) operations. EVA will be a frequently planned occurrence on SSF. In order to maximize the usefulness of the limited EVA resource, overhead times must be minimized. This paper discusses how the SSF airlock outfitting design responds to both IVA and EVA requirements. An overview of the SSF airlock and the missions it must accomplish are also provided. The focus of this paper is on how the outfitting and man systems designs provide solutions to multiple requirements, explicitly stated as well as derived requirements. The Space Station airlock is evaluated as an integrated system in the functional assessments of the EVA task, and this paper explains how station common hardware and systems are adapted to the unique airlock environment.

  11. Real-Time EVA Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski focused on the Shuttle Transportation System (STS)-120 Solar Array Repair Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with personal anecdotes and then spoke about what it takes to have a successful EVA during the event, what types of problems can occur during an EVA, particularly with the spacesuit and the safety of the crew, and how to resolve these quickly, safely, and efficiently. He also described the participants and the types of decisions and actions each had to take to ensure success. He described "Team 4," in Houston and on-orbit, as well as anecdotes from his STS-86 and STS-100 missions. Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures NASA used in the aftermath of Columbia for shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He described his role as the lead astronaut during this effort, and covered all the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), KC-135, precision air-bearing floor (PABF), vacuum chamber, and 1-G testing performed to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski discussed how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.

  12. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Thomson, I

    1999-12-06

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space.

  13. Generic extravehicular (EVA) and telerobot task primitives for analysis, design, and integration. Version 1.0: Reference compilation for the EVA and telerobotics communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Drews, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The results are described of an effort to establish commonality and standardization of generic crew extravehicular (crew-EVA) and telerobotic task analysis primitives used for the study of spaceborne operations. Although direct crew-EVA plans are the most visible output of spaceborne operations, significant ongoing efforts by a wide variety of projects and organizations also require tools for estimation of crew-EVA and telerobotic times. Task analysis tools provide estimates for input to technical and cost tradeoff studies. A workshop was convened to identify the issues and needs to establish a common language and syntax for task analysis primitives. In addition, the importance of such a syntax was shown to have precedence over the level to which such a syntax is applied. The syntax, lists of crew-EVA and telerobotic primitives, and the data base in diskette form are presented.

  14. EVA console personnel during STS-61 simulations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-01

    Susan P. Rainwater monitors an extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation from the EVA console at JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) during joint integrated simulations for the STS-61 mission. Astronauts assigned to extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were simultaneously rehearsing in a neutral buoyancy tank at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama.

  15. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the Space Station Advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related extravehicular activity (EVA) support equipment were defined and established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as opertional, procedures, and training issues were considered.

  16. The Effects of Liquid Cooling Garments on Post-Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Kraft, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Post space flight orthostatic intolerance among Space Shuttle crew members following exposure to extended periods of microgravity has been of significant concern to the safety of the shuttle program. Following the Challenger accident, flight crews were required to wear launch and entry suits (LES). It was noted that overall, there appeared to be a higher degree of orthostatic intolerance among the post-Challenger crews (approaching 30%). It was hypothesized that the increased heat load incurred when wearing the LES, contributed to an increased degree of orthostatic intolerance, possibly mediated through increased peripheral vasodilatation triggered by the heat load. The use of liquid cooling garments (LCG) beneath the launch and entry suits was gradually implemented among flight crews in an attempt to decrease heat load, increase crew comfort, and hopefully improve orthostatic tolerance during reentry and landing. The hypothesis that the use of the LCG during reentry and landing would decrease the degree of orthostasis has not been previously tested. Operational stand-tests were performed pre and post flight to assess crewmember's cardiovascular system's ability to respond to gravitational stress. Stand test and debrief information were collected and databased for 27 space shuttle missions. 63 crewpersons wearing the LCG, and 70 crewpersons not wearing the LCG were entered into the database for analysis. Of 17 crewmembers who exhibited pre-syncopal symptoms at the R+O analysis, 15 were not wearing the LCG. This corresponds to a 21% rate of postflight orthostatic intolerance among those without the LCG, and a 3% rate for those wearing LCG. There were differences in these individual's average post-flight maximal systolic blood pressure, and lower minimal Systolic Blood pressures in those without LCG. Though other factors, such as type of fluid loading, and exercise have improved concurrently with LCG introduction, from this data analysis, it appears that LCG usage

  17. Design, development and evaluation of Stanford/Ames EVA prehensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry J.; Aldrich, J.; Leblanc, M.; Sabelman, E.; Schwandt, D.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station operations and maintenance are expected to make unprecedented demands on astronaut EVA. With Space Station expected to operate with an 8 to 10 psi atmosphere (4 psi for Shuttle operations), the effectivness of pressurized gloves is called into doubt at the same time that EVA activity levels are to be increased. To address the need for more frequent and complex EVA missions and also to extend the dexterity, duration, and safety of EVA astronauts, NASA Ames and Stanford University have an ongoing cooperative agreement to explore and compare alternatives. This is the final Stanford/Ames report on manually powered Prehensors, each of which consists of a shroud forming a pressure enclosure around the astronaut's hand, and a linkage system to transfer the motions and forces of the hand to mechanical digits attached to the shroud. All prehensors are intended for attachment to a standard wrist coupling, as found on the AX-5 hard suit prototype, so that realistic tests can be performed under normal and reduced gravity as simulated by water flotation.

  18. EVA 2000: A European/Russian space suit concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. I.; Abramov, I. P.

    1995-07-01

    For the European manned space activities an EVA space suit system was being developed in the frame of the Hermes Space Vehicle Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The space suit was to serve the needs for all relevant extravehicular activities for the Hermes/Columbus operations planned to begin in 2004. For the present Russian manned space programme the relevant EVAs are performed by the Orlan-DMA semi-rigid space suit. The origin of its development reaches back to the 1970s and has since been adapted to cover the needs for extravehicular activities on Salyut and MIR until today. The latest modification of the space suit, which guaranteed its completely self-contained operation, was made in 1988. However, Russian specialists considered it necessary to start developing an EVA space suit of a new generation, which would have improved performance and would cover the needs by the turn of the century and into the beginning of the next century. Potentially these two suit developments could have a lot in common based on similarities in present concepts. As future manned space activities become more and more an international effort, a safe and reliable interoperability of the different space suit systems is required. Based on the results of the Munich Minister Conference in 1991, the European Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency agreed to initiate a requirements analysis and conceptual design study to determine the feasibility of a joint space suit development, EVA 2000. The design philosophy for the EVA 2000 study was oriented on a space suit system design of: —space suit commonality and interoperability —increased crew productivity and safety —increase in useful life and reduced maintainability —reduced development and production cost. The EVA 2000 feasibility study was performed in 1992, and with the positive conclusions for EVA 2000, this approach became the new joint European/Russian EVA Suit 2000 Development Programme. This paper gives an

  19. EVA 2000: a European/Russian space suit concept.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I; Abramov, I P

    1995-07-01

    For the European manned space activities an EVA space suit system was being developed in the frame of the Hermes Space Vehicle Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The space suit was to serve the needs for all relevant extravehicular activities for the Hermes Columbus operations planned to begin in 2004. For the present Russian manned space programme the relevant EVAs are performed by the Orlan-DMA semi-rigid space suit. The origin of its development reaches back to the 1970s and has since been adapted to cover the needs for extravehicular activities on Salyut and MIR until today. The latest modification of the space suit, which guaranteed its completely self-contained operation, was made in 1988. However, Russian specialists considered it necessary to start developing an EVA space suit of a new generation, which would have improved performance and would cover the needs by the turn of the century and into the beginning of the next century. Potentially these two suit developments could have a lot in common based on similarities in present concepts. As future manned space activities become more and more an international effort, a safe and reliable interoperability of the different space suit systems is required. Based on the results of the Munich Minister Conference in 1991, the European Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency agreed to initiate a requirements analysis and conceptual design study to determine the feasibility of a joint space suit development, EVA 2000. The design philosophy for the EVA 2000 study was oriented on a space suit system design of: space suit commonality and interoperability; increased crew productivity and safety; increase in useful life and reduced maintainability; reduced development and production cost. The EVA 2000 feasibility study was performed in 1992, and with the positive conclusions for EVA 2000, this approach became the new joint European Russian EVA Suit 2000 Development Programme. This paper gives an overview of

  20. Post space cleaning using a new nickel titanium endodontic drill combined with different cleaning regimens.

    PubMed

    Coniglio, Ivanovic; Magni, Elisa; Goracci, Cecilia; Radovic, Ivana; Carvalho, Carlos Augusto; Grandini, Simone; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the effect of two drills and five cleaning regimens on post space debridement. One hundred extracted premolars were instrumented and obturated with warm vertical compaction of gutta percha. The teeth were divided into two groups according to the drill used to remove gutta percha/sealer and for post space preparation: a Largo drill (Largo; Dentsply, St Quentin en Yvelines, France) or a MTwo-PF drill (Sweden&Martina, Due Carrare, Padova, Italy). The following cleaning regimens were used: EDTA, ultrasonics, ultrasonics + EDTA, phosphoric acid, and distilled water. Scanning electron microscopic images of the post spaces were taken, and the presence of debris and of open dentin tubules were evaluated. The ultrasonics + EDTA, phosphoric acid, and EDTA groups were comparable in open tubules scores for both drills and in debris scores after the use of MTwo-PF (p > 0.05). The ultrasonics and control groups performed significantly worse (p < 0.05). The MTwo-PF drill resulted as effective as the Largo drill in obtaining a good post space cleaning, especially when followed by ultrasonics + EDTA irrigant regimen.

  1. The Effect of Different Cleaning Protocols on Post Space: A SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Lizio, Angelo; Giudice, Roberto Lo; Centofanti, Antonio; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Runci, Michele; Alibrandi, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Purpose of the present paper is to analyze the efficiency of different post-space irrigation protocols. Methods. 28 single rooted teeth were endodontically treated. After post-space preparation every sample was assigned to one of three experimental groups and to one control group. In each group different irrigation protocols were performed as follows: EDTA (Group A), 37% orthophosphoric acid (Group B), and EDTA + 37% orthophosphoric acid with ultrasounds activation (Group C). In the control group (Group D) the irrigate association was not activated by ultrasounds. Three zones (coronal, middle, and apical) of each sample were analyzed by using Scan Electron Microscopy (SEM) without any metallization procedures. The presence of smear layer on the canal surface was qualitatively evaluated by applying Serafino's score with values included between 0 and 2. Results. The results of the research showed how Group C recorded the better results (0.81 ± 0.72). Group A and Group B showed lower mean scores (1.06 ± 0.69 and 1.08 ± 0.77); Group D showed the lowest mean score of 1.30 ± 0.69. The SEM observation analysis demonstrated how the smear layer presence decreased in the crown-apical direction. Conclusions. The different post-space treatments statistically determine significant differences on the dentinal surfaces cleansing. The absence of ultrasonic activation lowers the cleansing efficacy of endocanalar irrigants, showing sensible differences among each post-space zone. PMID:27766106

  2. An EVA Suit Fatigue, Strength, and Reach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The number of Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) performed will increase dramatically with the upcoming Space Station assembly missions. It is estimated that up to 900 EVA hours may be required to assemble the Space Station with an additional 200 hours per year for maintenance requirements. Efficient modeling tools will be essential to assist in planning these EVAS. Important components include strength and fatigue parameters, multi-body dynamics and kinematics. This project is focused on building a model of the EVA crew member encompassing all these capabilities. Phase 1, which is currently underway, involves collecting EMU suited and unsuited fatigue, strength and range of motion data, for all major joints of the body. Phase 2 involves processing the data for model input, formulating comparisons between the EMU suits and deriving generalized relationships between suited and unsuited data. Phase 3 will be formulation of a multi-body dynamics model of the EMU capable of predicting mass handling properties and integration of empirical data into the model. Phase 4 will be validation of the model with collected EMU data from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA/JSC. Engineers and designers will use tie EVA suit database to better understand the capabilities of the suited individuals. This knowledge will lead to better design of tools and planned operations. Mission planners can use the modeling system and view the animations and the visualizations of the various parameters, such as overall fatigue, motion, timelines, reach, and strength to streamline the timing, duration, task arrangement, personnel and overall efficiency of the EVA tasks. Suit designers can use quantifiable data at common biomechanical structure points to better analyze and compare suit performance.

  3. A new method of measuring the stiffness of astronauts' EVA gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Bonanno, Alberto; Chen Chen, Fai; Crepaldi, Marco; Demarchi, Danilo; Favetto, Alain; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Hand fatigue is one of the most important problems of astronauts during their missions to space. This fatigue is due to the stiffness of the astronauts' gloves known as Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves. The EVA glove has a multilayered, bulky structure and is pressurized against the vacuum of space. In order to evaluate the stiffness of EVA gloves, different methods have been proposed in the past. In particular, the effects of wearing an EVA glove on the performance of the hands have been published by many researchers to represent the stiffness of the EVA glove. In this paper, a new method for measuring the stiffness of EVA gloves is proposed. A tendon-actuated finger probe is designed and used as an alternative to the human index finger in order to be placed inside an EVA glove and measure its stiffness. The finger probe is equipped with accelerometers, which work as tilt sensors, to measure the angles of its phalanges. The phalanges are actuated by applying different amount of torque using the tendons of the finger probe. Moreover, a hypobaric glove box is designed and realized to simulate the actual operating pressure of the EVA glove and to measure its stiffness in both pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. In order to prove the right performance of the proposed finger probe, an Orlam-DM EVA glove is used to perform a number of tests. The equation of stiffness for the PIP joint of this glove is extracted from the results acquired from the tests. This equation presents the torque required to flex the middle phalanx of the glove. Then, the effect of pressurization on the stiffness is highlighted in the last section. This setup can be used to measure the stiffness of different kinds of EVA gloves and allows direct, numerical comparison of their stiffness.

  4. Space Station EVA System Evolution Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouen, Michael N. (Technical Monitor); Slade, H. G.; Panzarella, L. N.; Anderson, D. E.; Simonds, C.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluation of Space Station Freedom support of manned exploration is in progress to identify SSF EVA system evolution requirements and capabilities. The output from these studies will provide data to support the preliminary design process to ensure that Space Station EVA system requirements for future missions (including the Transportation Node) are adequately considered and reflected. The study considers SSF support of future missions and the EVA system baseline to determine adequacy of EVA requirements and capabilities, and to identify additional requirements, capabilities, and necessary technology upgrades. EVA demands levied by formal requirements and indicated by evolution mission scenarios are high for the out-years of Space Station Freedom. An EVA system designed to meet the baseline requirements can easily evolve to meet evolution demands with few exceptions. Results to date indicate that upgrades or modifications to the EVA system may be necessary to meet all forseeable hangar induced EVA environments. Work continues to quantity the EVA capability in this regard. Evolution mission scenarios with EVA in and around unshielded nuclear propulsion engines are inconsistent with anthropomorphic EVA capabilities.

  5. Advanced EVA Capabilities: A Study for NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concept Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study carried out as part of NASA s Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Program examining the future technology needs of extravehicular activities (EVAs). The intent of this study is to produce a comprehensive report that identifies various design concepts for human-related advanced EVA systems necessary to achieve the goals of supporting future space exploration and development customers in free space and on planetary surfaces for space missions in the post-2020 timeframe. The design concepts studied and evaluated are not limited to anthropomorphic space suits, but include a wide range of human-enhancing EVA technologies as well as consideration of coordination and integration with advanced robotics. The goal of the study effort is to establish a baseline technology "road map" that identifies and describes an investment and technical development strategy, including recommendations that will lead to future enhanced synergistic human/robot EVA operations. The eventual use of this study effort is to focus evolving performance capabilities of various EVA system elements toward the goal of providing high performance human operational capabilities for a multitude of future space applications and destinations. The data collected for this study indicate a rich and diverse history of systems that have been developed to perform a variety of EVA tasks, indicating what is possible. However, the data gathered for this study also indicate a paucity of new concepts and technologies for advanced EVA missions - at least any that researchers are willing to discuss in this type of forum.

  6. GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-05

    S66-38050 (5 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this close-up view of the Gemini-9A spacecraft during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini-9A mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the 72-hour, 21-minute spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  7. The Education of Eva Hoffman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proefriedt, William

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the autobiography of Eva Hoffman, "Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language" (Dutton, 1989). Hoffman, whose family left Poland in the 1950s, offers a consciously bicultural view of the immigrant experience, in contrast to many autobiographies of those who forsake the old world for the new. (DM)

  8. EVA Human Health and Performance Benchmarking Study Overview and Development of a Microgravity Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason; Jarvis, Sarah; Bekdash, Omar; Cupples, Scott; Abercromby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop a protocol to reliably characterize human health and performance metrics for individuals working inside various EVA suits under realistic spaceflight conditions. Expected results and methodologies developed during this study will provide the baseline benchmarking data and protocols with which future EVA suits and suit configurations (e.g., varied pressure, mass, center of gravity [CG]) and different test subject populations (e.g., deconditioned crewmembers) may be reliably assessed and compared. Results may also be used, in conjunction with subsequent testing, to inform fitness-for-duty standards, as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  9. STS-34 Mission Specialists Chang-Diaz and Baker with EVA tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and MS Ellen S. Baker (right) examine extravehicular activity (EVA) tools along with Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Wayne J. Wedlake prior EVA contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz and Baker will practice using the EVA tools and rehearse chores which would require manual action outside the spacecraft in the event of failure of remote systems in the WETF's 25 ft pool.

  10. The EVA space suit development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar

    The progress of the European EVA space suit predevelopment activities has resulted in an improved technical reference concept, which will form the basis for a start of the Phase C/D development work in 1992. Technology development work over the last 2 years has resulted in a considerable amount of test data and a better understanding of the characteristics and behaviour of individual parts of the space suit system, in particular in the areas of suits' mobility and life support functions. This information has enabled a consolidation of certain design features on the one hand, but also led to the challenging of some of the design solutions on the other hand. While working towards an improved situation with respect to the main design drivers mass and cost, the technical concept has been improved with respect to functional safety and ease of handling, taking the evolving Hermes spaceplane requirements into consideration. Necessary hardware and functional redundancies have been implemented taking the operational scenario with Hermes and Columbus servicing into consideration. This paper presents the latest design status of the European EVA space suit concept, with particular emphasis on crew safety, comfort and productivity, in the frame of the predevelopment work for the European Space Agency.

  11. Experiments with an EVA Assistant Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burridge, Robert R.; Graham, Jeffrey; Shillcutt, Kim; Hirsh, Robert; Kortenkamp, David

    2003-01-01

    Human missions to the Moon or Mars will likely be accompanied by many useful robots that will assist in all aspects of the mission, from construction to maintenance to surface exploration. Such robots might scout terrain, carry tools, take pictures, curate samples, or provide status information during a traverse. At NASA/JSC, the EVA Robotic Assistant (ERA) project has developed a robot testbed for exploring the issues of astronaut-robot interaction. Together with JSC's Advanced Spacesuit Lab, the ERA team has been developing robot capabilities and testing them with space-suited test subjects at planetary surface analog sites. In this paper, we describe the current state of the ERA testbed and two weeks of remote field tests in Arizona in September 2002. A number of teams with a broad range of interests participated in these experiments to explore different aspects of what must be done to develop a program for robotic assistance to surface EVA. Technologies explored in the field experiments included a fuel cell, new mobility platform and manipulator, novel software and communications infrastructure for multi-agent modeling and planning, a mobile science lab, an "InfoPak" for monitoring the spacesuit, and delayed satellite communication to a remote operations team. In this paper, we will describe this latest round of field tests in detail.

  12. NEEMO 21: Tools, Techniques, Technologies & Training for Science Exploration EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The 21st mission of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated operational test and evaluation of tools, techniques, technologies, and training for science driven exploration during Extravehicular Activity (EVA).The 16-day mission was conducted from the Aquarius habitat, an underwater laboratory, off the coast of Key Largo, FL. The unique facility, authentic science objectives, and diverse skill-sets of the crew/team facilitate the planning and design for future space exploration.

  13. Dust Tolerant EVA-Compatible Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop connectors (quick disconnects and umbilical systems) that can be repetitively and reliably mated and de-mated during Lunar surface extra-vehicular activities. These standardized interfaces will be required for structural integrity and commodities transfer between linked surface elements. QD's fittings are needed for EVA spacesuit Primary Life Support Systems as well as liquid cooled garment circulation and suit heat rejection. Umbilical electro-mechanical systems (connectors) are needed between discrete surface systems for transfer of air, power, fluid (water), and data must be capable of being operated by extra vehicular astronaut crew members and/or robotic assistants. There exists an urgent need to prevent electro-statically charged dust and debris from clogging and degrading the interface seals and causing leakage and spills of hazardous commodities, contaminating the flowstream, and degrading the mechanisms needed for umbilical connection. Other challenges include modularity, standardization, autonomous operation, and lifetime sealing issues.

  14. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jairala, Juniper; Durkin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in preparing for future EVAs, astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. To date, neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA JSC's Sonny Carter Training Facility have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the ISS. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial participants for human transportation into space, evaluations at the NBL will take on a new focus. In this session, Juniper Jairala briefly discussed the design of the NBL and, in more detail, described the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated. Robert Durkin discussed the new and potential types of uses for the NBL, including those by non-NASA external customers.

  15. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jairala, Juniper; Durkin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in preparing for future EVAs, astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. To date, neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA JSC’s Sonny Carter Training Facility have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the ISS. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial participants for human transportation into space, evaluations at the NBL will take on a new focus. In this session, Juniper Jairala briefly discussed the design of the NBL and, in more detail, described the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated. Robert Durkin discussed the new and potential types of uses for the NBL, including those by non-NASA external customers.

  16. EVA 2 - MS Wolf with EVA tool kit on SSRMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-10

    STS112-709-073K (10 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, carries the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera. The camera was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS) during the mission’s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  17. EVA 2 - MS Wolf with EVA tool kit on SSRMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-10

    STS112-709-073N (10 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, carries the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera. The camera was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS) during the mission’s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  18. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

  19. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanco, Raul A.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Watson, Richard D.; Sipila, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability for Orion. The EVAs will involve a two-person crew for approximately four hours. Currently, two EVAs are planned with one contingency EVA in reserve. Providing this EVA capability is very challenging due to system level constraints and a new and unknown environment. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is one that builds upon previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and that accomplishes the ARCM mission while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations. The primary system level constraints are to 1) minimize system mass and volume and 2) minimize the interfacing impacts to the baseline Orion design. In order to minimize the interfacing impacts and to not perturb the baseline Orion schedule, the concept of adding "kits" to the baseline system is proposed. These kits consist of: an EVA kit (converts LEA suit to EVA suit), EVA Servicing and Recharge Kit (provides suit consumables), the EVA Tools, Translation Aids & Sample Container Kit (the tools and mobility aids to complete the tasks), the EVA Communications Kit (interface between the EVA radio and the MPCV), and the Cabin Repress Kit (represses the MPCV between EVAs). This paper will focus on the trade space, analysis, and testing regarding the space suit (pressure garment and life support system). Historical approaches and lessons learned from all past EVA operations were researched. Previous and current, successfully operated EVA hardware and high technology readiness level (TRL) hardware were evaluated, and a trade study was conducted for all possible pressure garment and life support options. Testing and analysis was conducted and a recommended EVA system architecture was proposed. Pressure garment options that were considered for this mission include the currently in-use ISS EVA Mobility Unit (EMU), all variations of

  20. Post space preparation timing of root canals sealed with AH Plus sealer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Ri; Kim, Young Kyung; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2017-02-01

    To determine the optimal timing for post space preparation of root canals sealed with epoxy resin-based AH Plus sealer in terms of its polymerization and influence on apical leakage. The epoxy polymerization of AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey) as a function of time after mixing (8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week) was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness measurements. The change in the glass transition temperature (Tg ) of the material with time was also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fifty extracted human single-rooted premolars were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus, and randomly separated into five groups (n = 10) based on post space preparation timing (immediately after root canal obturation and 8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week after root canal obturation). The extent of apical leakage (mm) of the five groups was compared using a dye leakage test. Each dataset was statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Continuous epoxy polymerization of the material with time was observed. Although the Tg values of the material gradually increased with time, the specimens presented no clear Tg value at 1 week after mixing. When the post space was prepared 1 week after root canal obturation, the leakage was significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.05), among which there was no significant difference in leakage. Poor apical seal was detected when post space preparation was delayed until 1 week after root canal obturation.

  1. [Effect of different irrigants on radicular dentin cleansing and resin tag formation after post space preparation].

    PubMed

    Mao, Cai-Yun; Gu, Xin-Hua

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of different root canal irrigants on smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces after post space preparation. Thirty maxillary anteriors were endodontically treated. After post space preparation, the teeth were assigned to three groups with ten teeth each: group A, B, C. 3% H2O2, 15% ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid(EDTA), 15% EDTA and 3% NaClO were used as irrigant of group A, B, C. After post space irrigation, eight teeth of each group were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) for smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening. The left two specimens were restored with fiber posts and prepared for evaluation of resin tag formation. The cleansing effectiveness of group A, B and C was respectively 3.89 +/- 0.36, 1.77 +/- 0.30, 1.25 +/- 0.21. The dentinal tubule opening of group A, B and C was respectively (2.53 +/- 0.19), (3 11 +/- 023) (3.83 +/- 0.52) microm. The cleansing effectiveness and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces were significantly affected by different root canal irrigants (P < 0.05). Excessive erosion of the dentin was observed in group C. Resin tag formation differed between the three irrigant groups, and group B showed excellent resin tag formation. Irrigation with 15% EDTA after post space preparation can excellently remove the smear layer and improve dentinal tubule opening, permitting well penetration of resin adhesive into the dentinal tubules and collagen fibrillar structure.

  2. Post space preparation timing of root canals sealed with AH Plus sealer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Ri; Kim, Young Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the optimal timing for post space preparation of root canals sealed with epoxy resin-based AH Plus sealer in terms of its polymerization and influence on apical leakage. Materials and Methods The epoxy polymerization of AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey) as a function of time after mixing (8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week) was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness measurements. The change in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material with time was also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fifty extracted human single-rooted premolars were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus, and randomly separated into five groups (n = 10) based on post space preparation timing (immediately after root canal obturation and 8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week after root canal obturation). The extent of apical leakage (mm) of the five groups was compared using a dye leakage test. Each dataset was statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results Continuous epoxy polymerization of the material with time was observed. Although the Tg values of the material gradually increased with time, the specimens presented no clear Tg value at 1 week after mixing. When the post space was prepared 1 week after root canal obturation, the leakage was significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.05), among which there was no significant difference in leakage. Conclusions Poor apical seal was detected when post space preparation was delayed until 1 week after root canal obturation. PMID:28194361

  3. Compiling a Comprehensive EVA Training Dataset for NASA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Lee, L. R.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Training for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) is considered a hazardous duty for NASA astronauts. This places astronauts at risk for decompression sickness as well as various musculoskeletal disorders from working in the spacesuit. As a result, the operational and research communities over the years have requested access to EVA training data to supplement their studies. The purpose of this paper is to document the comprehensive EVA training data set that was compiled from multiple sources by the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) epidemiologists to investigate musculoskeletal injuries. The EVA training dataset does not contain any medical data, rather it only documents when EVA training was performed, by whom and other details about the session. The first activities practicing EVA maneuvers in water were performed at the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility opened in 1967 and was used for EVA training until the early Space Shuttle program days. Although several photographs show astronauts performing EVA training in the NBS, records detailing who performed the training and the frequency of training are unavailable. Paper training records were stored within the NBS after it was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1985 and closed in 1997, but significant resources would be needed to identify and secure these records, and at this time LSAH has not pursued acquisition of these early training records. Training in the NBS decreased when the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, opened the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) in 1980. Early training records from the WETF consist of 11 hand-written dive logbooks compiled by individual workers that were digitized at the request of LSAH. The WETF was integral in the training for Space Shuttle EVAs until its closure in 1998. The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near JSC

  4. Temperature Increase during Different Post Space Preparation Systems: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nazari Moghadam, Kiumars; Shahab, Shahriar; Shirvani, Soghra; Kazemi, Ali

    2011-01-01

     INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate external root surface temperature rise during post space preparation using LA Axxess bur, Beefill pack System, and Peeso Reamer drill. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The distal canals of forty-five extracted human permanent mandibular first molars were instrumented in crown-apical manner and obturated with lateral condensation technique. Teeth were then randomly divided into three groups according to post space preparation technique including: group 1. LA Axxess bur (Sybronendo Co., CA, USA), group 2 Beefill pack System (VD W Co., Munich, Germany) and group 3 Peeso Reamer drill (Mani Co., Tochigi-ken, Japan). Temperature was measured by means of digital thermometer MT-405 (Comercio Co., Sao Paulo, Brazil) which was installed on the root surfaces. Data was collected and submitted to one-way ANOVA and Post hoc analysis. RESULTS: Root surface temperatures were found to be significantly higher (7.3±2.7 vs. 4.3±2.1 and 4±2.4,) in samples of Beefill pack System compared with the two other groups (P<0.02). CONCLUSION: Using Beefill pack System during post space preparation may be potentially hazardous for periodontal tissues. PMID:24778690

  5. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  6. Approaches to decompression safety support of EVA for orbital and interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katuntsev, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of possible methods for decompression safety support of extravehicular activity (EVA) in order to ground the perspective approaches for solution of decompression sickness (DCS) problem in space missions of the near and distant future. Current DCS risk mitigation strategies reduce operational efficiency: preoxygenation extends the time required on preparation to EVA. The crewmembers often experience general and hand fatigue during long EVA due to the lack of flexibility of space suits enclosure operated at 30-40 kPa. To create the safe and comfortable working conditions for EVA crewmembers on the Lunar and Martian surfaces the main biomedical requirements to a planetary space suit have to include low mass of EVA system, high mobility and flexibility of space suit enclosure and reliable protection against DCS with a short or zero preoxygenation period. Reviewed here are the possibilities for the use of preoxygenation, hypobaric gas atmosphere in space cabin and/or planetary habitat, idea of substitution of nitrogen in normobaric gas atmosphere to another inert gas (helium and neon) as countermeasures against DCS in EVA crewmembers. Physiological aspects of the conception for space suit with high operating pressure are considered.

  7. STS-120 EVA - Thermal Blanket Repair Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-03

    JSC2007-E-095996 (3 Nov. 2007) ---Astronaut Steve Swanson, standing near the spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) console in the space station control room of JSC's Mission Control Center, communicates with astronauts in space during the Nov. 3 spacewalk planned to repair a tear in a solar panel on the International Space Station.

  8. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  9. EVA 22 photos camera 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-09

    ISS036-E-016625 (9 July 2013) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame), flight engineer, prepared the space station for a new Russian module and performed additional installations on the station’s backbone.

  10. EVA 22 photos camera 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-09

    ISS036-E-016630 (9 July 2013) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame), flight engineer, prepared the space station for a new Russian module and performed additional installations on the station’s backbone.

  11. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020778 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  12. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020805 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  13. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020792 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  14. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020782 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  15. STS-64 Mission Photograph - Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Mark Lee floats freely as he tests the new backpack called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. SAFER is designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA. The STS-64 mission marked the first untethered U.S. EVA in 10 years, and was launched on September 9, 1994, aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  16. EVA space construction - Experience and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Ross, Jerry L.; Spring, Sherwood C.; Havens, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from EVA space construction studies performed in 1 g, simulated 0 g, and on-orbit. The studies include tests of astronaut participation on the Mobile Work Station concept and the Swing-Arm Beam Erector. Also, results from the Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure programs are summarized. EVA construction applications for the Space Station are discussed and construction scenarios are developed.

  17. Astronaut Russell Schweickart photographed during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-06

    AS09-19-2983 (6 March 1969) --- Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, operates a 70mm Hasselblad camera during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The Command and Service Modules (CSM) and Lunar Module (LM) "Spider" are docked. This view was taken from the Command Module (CM) "Gumdrop". Schweickart, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), is standing in "golden slippers" on the LM porch. On his back, partially visible, are a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and an Oxygen Purge System (OPS). Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander, was inside the "Spider". Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the CM.

  18. STS-121 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, used a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space Station (ISS). Also visible in the visor reflections are fellow space walker Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist, Earth's horizon, and a station solar array. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  19. EVA Systems Flight Controller Talks With Students

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, EVA Systems Flight Controller Sandy Fletcher participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students from Northtowne Ele...

  20. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  1. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan T.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Watson, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected, for both functions, is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations have been completed in the NBL and interfacing options have been prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. For NBL EVA simulations, in 2013, components were procured to allow in-house build up for four new suits with mobility enhancements built into the arms. Boots outfitted with clips that fit into foot restraints have also been added to the suit and analyzed for possible loads. Major suit objectives accomplished this year in testing include: evaluation of mobility enhancements, ingress/egress of foot restraint, use of foot restraint for worksite stability, ingress/egress of Orion hatch with PLSS mockup, and testing with two crew members in the water at one time to evaluate the crew's ability to help one another. Major tool objectives accomplished this year include using various other methods for worksite stability, testing new methods for asteroid geologic sampling and improving the fidelity of the mockups and crew equipment. These tests were completed on a medium fidelity capsule mockup, asteroid vehicle mockup, and asteroid mockups that were more accurate for an asteroid type EVA than previous tests. Another focus was the

  2. Mission control activity during STS-61 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-07

    Flight controller Susan P. Rainwater observes as two astronauts work through a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-looking Space Shuttle Endeavour. Rainwater's EVA console was one of Mission Control's busiest during this eleven-day Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission in Earth orbit.

  3. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to identify specific criteria regarding space station extravehicular activity system (EVAS) hardware requirements. Key EVA design issues include maintainability, technology readiness, LSS volume vs. EVA time available, suit pressure/cabin pressure relationship and productivity effects, crew autonomy, integration of EVA as a program resource, and standardization of task interfaces. A variety of DOD EVA systems issues were taken into consideration. Recommendations include: (1) crew limitations, not hardware limitations; (2) capability to perform all of 15 generic missions; (3) 90 days on-orbit maintainability with 50 percent duty cycle as minimum; and (4) use by payload sponsors of JSC document 10615A plus a Generic Tool Kit and Specialized Tool Kit description. EVA baseline design requirements and criteria, including requirements of various subsystems, are outlined. Space station/EVA system interface requirements and EVA accommodations are discussed in the areas of atmosphere composition and pressure, communications, data management, logistics, safe haven, SS exterior and interior requirements, and SS airlock.

  4. "Astronaut STS-123 EVA 1, NBL Training"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-18

    • Event (Mission for flight / Class for training): STS-118 (13A.1) • Title: STS-118 EVA 1 NBL • Date: 4-18-07 • Location: NBL • Key words: 118, 13A.1, S5, NBL • Description: NBL underwater photos of STS-118 EVA 1 S5 install.

  5. Emergency vehicle alert system (EVAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Bill; Crump, Roger; Harper, Warren; Myneni, Krishna

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small device which can be located in a personal vehicle and warn the driver, via a visual means, of the approach of an emergency vehicle. Many different technologies might be developed for this purpose and each has its own advantages and drawbacks. The requirements for an acoustic detection system, appear to be pretty stringent and may not allow the development of a reliable, low-cost device in the near future. The problems include variations in the sirens between various types of emergency vehicles, distortions due to wind and surrounding objects, competing background noise, sophisticated signal processing requirements, and omni-directional coverage requirements. Another approach is to use a Radio Frequency (RF) signal between the Emergency Vehicle (EV) and the Personal Vehicle (PV). This approach requires a transmitter on each EV and a receiver in each PV, however it is virtually assured that a system can be developed which works. With this approach, the real technology issue is how to make a system work as inexpensively as possible. This report gives a brief summary of the EVAS program from its inception and concentrates on describing the activities that occurred during Phase 4. References 1-3 describe activities under Phases 1-3. In the fourth phase of the program, the major effort to be expended was in development of the microcontroller system for the PV, refinement of some system elements and packaging for demonstration purposes. An EVAS system was developed and demonstrated which used standard spread spectrum modems with minor modifications.

  6. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  7. Whitson after EVA 1 completed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-14

    ISS005-E-09719 (14 August 2002) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineer, photographed in her thermal undergarment prior to donning a Russian Orlan spacesuit, prepares for an upcoming session of extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Pirs docking compartment on the International Space Station (ISS). The spacewalk is scheduled for August 16, 2002, which will be the 42nd spacewalk at the station and the 17th based out of the station. Whitson and cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander, will install six debris panels on the Zvezda Service Module. The panels are designed to shield Zvezda from potential space debris impacts.

  8. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Campbell, Colin

    2011-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  9. View taken during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-07

    S88-E-5060 (12-08-98) --- Astronaut James H. Newman is seen near the Unity module during late phases of the first of three scheduled spacewalks on STS-88. At the end of the extravehicular activity (EVA), astronauts Newman and Jerry L. Ross, both mission specialists, were successful in mating 40 cables and connectors running 76 feet from the Zarya control module to Unity, with the 35-ton complex towering over Endeavour's cargo bay. The spacewalk last 7 hours and 21 minutes. This photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 03:50:28 GMT, Dec. 8.

  10. Feustel during EVA 1 Ingress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035287 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, is pictured during the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  11. Feustel during EVA 1 Ingress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035266 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, is pictured during the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  12. EVA 5 - Grunsfeld installs radiator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-08

    STS109-315-007 (8 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, STS-109 payload commander, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia’s Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm, moves toward the giant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) temporarily hosted in the orbiter’s cargo bay. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan (out of frame) works in tandem with Grunsfeld during this fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Activities for the space walk centered around the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) to install a Cryogenic Cooler and its Cooling System Radiator.

  13. Surface debris of canal walls after post space preparation in endodontically treated teeth: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Serafino, Cinzia; Gallina, Giuseppe; Cumbo, Enzo; Ferrari, Marco

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate surface cleanliness of root canal walls along post space after endodontic treatment using 2 different irrigant regimens, obturation techniques, and post space preparation for adhesive bonding. Forty teeth, divided into 4 groups, were instrumented, using Ni-Ti rotary files, irrigated with NaOCl or NaOCl+EDTA and obturated with cold lateral condensation (CLC) or warm vertical condensation (WVC) of gutta-percha. After post space preparation, etching, and washing procedure, canal walls were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Amount of debris, smear layer, sealer/gutta-percha remnants, and visibility of open tubules were rated. Higher amounts of rough debris, large sealer/gutta-percha remnants, thick smear layer, and no visibility of tubule orifices were recorded in all the groups at apical level of post space. At middle and coronal levels areas of clean dentin, alternating with areas covered by thin smear layer, smaller debris, gutta-percha remnants, and orifices of tubules partially or totally occluded by plugs were frequently observed. After endodontic treatment, obturation, and post space preparation SEM analysis of canal walls along post space shows large areas (covered by smear layer, debris, and sealer/gutta-percha remnants) not available for adhesive bonding and resin cementation of fiber posts.

  14. Effect of different irrigation on smear layer removal after post space preparation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xin-Hua; Mao, Cai-Yun; Kern, Matthias

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different irrigating solutions on smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening on root canal surfaces after post space preparation and to study whether additional ultrasonic irrigation has any effect on smear layer removal. Forty-eight anterior teeth were treated endodontically. After post space preparation, they were assigned to six groups: group 1, EDTA; group 2, EDTA with ultrasonic activation; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); group 4, NaOCl with ultrasonic activation; group 5, sodium chloride (NaCl); and group 6, NaCl with ultrasonic activation. Specimens were examined under a field-emission scanning electron microscope and scored for debris removal and dentinal tubule opening at the coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the root canal. The results showed that EDTA performed significantly better than NaCl and NaOCl in smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening. Additional ultrasonic irrigation did not improve smear layer removal significantly.

  15. Manned NEO Mission EVA Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The President has proposed to land astronauts on an asteroid by 2025. However, Manned NEO (Near Earth Objects) Missions will present a host of new and exciting problems that will need to be better defined and solved before such a mission is launched. Here I will focus on the challenges for conducting asteroidal EVAs. Specfically, crew locomotion, sampling, drilling, documentation, and instrument deployment issues arising from the micro gravity environments associated with NEOs. Therefore, novel methods and techniques will need to be developed and tested in order to achieve specific mission science objectives. Walking or driving on the surface will not be a realistic option due to the small sizes (10 s to 100 s of meters in diameter) and hence extremely low gravity of the present day known candidate NEOs. EVAs will have to be carried out with crew members either using a self propelled device (akin to the MMU and SAFER units used on Shuttle/ISS) and or tethers. When using tethers a grid system could be deployed which is anchored to the asteroid. These anchor points could be inserted by firing penetrators into the surface from the spacecraft while it is still at a safe standoff distance. These penetrators would pull double duty by being laden with scientific instrumentation to probe the subsurface. Dust and debris generated by sample collection and locomotion in a microgravity environment could also pose some problems that will require forethought.

  16. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    Spacewalkers enjoy a view of Earth once reserved for Apollo, Zeus, and other denizens of Mt. Olympus. During humanity's first extravehicular activity (EVA), Alexei Leonov floated above Gibraltar, the rock ancient seafarers saw as the gateway to the great unknown Atlantic. The symbolism was clear, Leonov stepped past a new Gibraltar when he stepped into space. More than 32 years and 154 EVAs later, Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space Station Phase 1. They floated together above Gibraltar. Today the symbolism has new meaning: humanity is starting to think of stepping out of Earth orbit, space travel's new Gibraltar, and perhaps obtaining a new olympian view, a close-up look at Olympus Mons on Mars. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology chronicles the 154 EVAs conducted from March 1965 to April 1997. It is intended to make clear the crucial role played by EVA in the history of spaceflight, as well as to chronicle the large body of EVA "lessons learned." Russia and the U.S. define EVA differently. Russian cosmonauts are said to perform EVA any time they are in vacuum in a space suit. A U.S. astronaut must have at least his head outside his spacecraft before he is said to perform an EVA. The difference is based in differing spacecraft design philoso- phies. Russian and Soviet spacecraft have always had a specialized airlock through which the EVA cosmonaut egressed, leaving the main habitable volume of the spacecraft pressurized. The U.S. Gemini and Apollo vehicles, on the other hand, depressurized their entire habitable volume for egress. In this document, we apply the Russian definition to Russian EVAS, and the U.S. definition to U.S. EVAS. Thus, for example, Gemini 4 Command Pilot James McDivitt does not share the honor of being first American spacewalker with Ed White, even though he was suited and in vacuum when White stepped out into space. Non-EVA spaceflights are listed in the chronology to provide context and to

  17. Software For Integration Of EVA And Telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael L.; Smith, Jeffrey H.; Estus, Jay M.; Heneghan, Cate; Zimmerman, Wayne; Fiorini, Paolo; Schenker, Paul S.; Mcaffee, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) computer program is hypermedia information software system using object-oriented programming to bridge gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains 20 HyperCard stacks using visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space-telerobot or crew-EVA tasks. Runs on any Apple MacIntosh personal computer.

  18. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, Jay; Baker, Christopher; Clayton, Ronald; Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during simulated planetary exploration activities. Data will be released to the planetary protection and science communities, and advanced EVA system designers. In the best case scenario, we will discover that very little microbial contamination leaks from our current or prototype suit designs, in the worst case scenario, we will identify leak paths, learn more about what affects leakage--and we'll have a new, flight-certified swab tool for our EVA toolbox.

  19. Helms during EVA on the ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-06

    STS102-325-023 (11 March 2001) --- Astronaut Susan J. Helms completes a scheduled space walk task on the International Space Station (ISS). This extravehicular activity (EVA), on which Helms was joined by astronaut James S. Voss (out of frame), was the first of two scheduled STS-102 EVA sessions. The pair, destined to become members of the Expedition Two crew aboard the station later in the mission, rode aboard Discovery into orbit and at the time of this EVA were still regarded as STS-102 mission specialists.

  20. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan; Buffington, Jesse; Hood, Drew; Kelly, Cody; Naids, Adam; Watson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment selected for both functions is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development for Advanced Exploration Systems (AES). The proposed architecture meets the ARCM constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the tools and equipment necessary to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations were completed in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and interfacing options were prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. This paper discusses the work done over the last year on the MACES enhancements, the use of tools while using the suit, and the integration of the PLSS with the MACES.

  1. Planetary Protection Considerations in EVA System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Kosmo, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    very little expression of these anomalies. hardware from the human-occupied area may limit (although not likely eliminate) external materials in the human habitat. Definition of design-to requirements is critical to understanding technical feasibility and costs. The definition of Planetary Protection needs in relation to EVA mission and system element development cost impacts should be considered and interpreted in terms of Plausible Protection criteria. Since EVA operations will have the most direct physical interaction with the Martian surface, PP needs should be considered in the terms of mitigating hardware and operations impacts and costs.

  2. Korzun after EVA 1 completed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-14

    ISS005-E-09725 (14 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, Expedition Five mission commander, attired in his thermal undergarment prior to donning a Russian Orlan spacesuit, prepares for an upcoming session of extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Pirs docking compartment on the International Space Station (ISS). The spacewalk is scheduled for August 16, 2002, which will be the 42nd spacewalk at the station and the 17th based out of the station. Korzun and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, flight engineer, will install six debris panels on the Zvezda Service Module. The panels are designed to shield Zvezda from potential space debris impacts. Korzun, who represents Rosaviakosmos, is also scheduled for a spacewalk on August 22, 2002.

  3. Simulation of Martian EVA at the Mars Society Arctic Research Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Zubrin, R.; Quinn, K.

    The Mars Society has established a Mars Arctic Research Station (M.A.R.S.) on Devon Island, North of Canada, in the middle of the Haughton crater formed by the impact of a large meteorite several million years ago. The site was selected for its similarities with the surface of the Mars planet. During the Summer 2001, the MARS Flashline Research Station supported an extended international simulation campaign of human Mars exploration operations. Six rotations of six person crews spent up to ten days each at the MARS Flashline Research Station. International crews, of mixed gender and professional qualifications, conducted various tasks as a Martian crew would do and performed scientific experiments in several fields (Geophysics, Biology, Psychology). One of the goals of this simulation campaign was to assess the operational and technical feasibility of sustaining a crew in an autonomous habitat, conducting a field scientific research program. Operations were conducted as they would be during a Martian mission, including Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) with specially designed unpressurized suits. The second rotation crew conducted seven simulated EVAs for a total of 17 hours, including motorized EVAs with All Terrain Vehicles, to perform field scientific experiments in Biology and Geophysics. Some EVAs were highly successful. For some others, several problems were encountered related to hardware technical failures and to bad weather conditions. The paper will present the experiment programme conducted at the Mars Flashline Research Station, the problems encountered and the lessons learned from an EVA operational point of view. Suggestions to improve foreseen Martian EVA operations will be discussed.

  4. Post space debridement in oval-shaped canals: the use of a new ultrasonic tip with oval section.

    PubMed

    Coniglio, Ivanovic; Carvalho, Carlos Augusto; Magni, Elisa; Cantoro, Amerigo; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect on post space debridement in oval-shaped canals of an experimental ultrasonic tip with oval section (Satelec) compared with a circular ultrasonic tip (KaVo). Thirty teeth with an oval-shaped canal were endodontically treated and obturated and then randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 10) according to the procedure used for post space debridement: Satelec tip, Largo #2 drill + KaVo file, and Largo #2 drill + water. Debris and dentin tubules were evaluated by assigning scores to scanning electron microscope post spaces images; lower scores corresponded to fewer debris and higher number of open tubules. The Satelec group showed significantly lower debris and open tubules scores than KaVo group (p < .05) and control group (p < .05), which differed significantly between each other (p < .05). Also the debris and open tubules scores in different post space regions differed significantly among the experimental groups (p < .001). The oval ultrasonic tip resulted in a better post space debridement than a circular ultrasonic tip in oval-shaped canals.

  5. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, watches astronaut C. Michael Foale (out of frame), mission specialist, during the late phases of their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the STS-63 Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  6. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, standing on a foot restraint attached to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm carries astronaut C. Michael Foale, mission specialist, during their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  7. Virts Self-Portrait during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-21

    The camera is reflected in his helmet visor as Extravehicular crewmember 2 (EV2) Terry Virts takes a self-portrait during Extravehicular Activity 29 (EVA 29). Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  8. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63011 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Views - STS-41B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-02-12

    Astronaut Robert L. Stewart, Mission Specialist (MS), uses his hands to control his movement in space while using the nitrogen propelled Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). He is participating in a EVA, a few meters away from the cabin of the Shuttle Challenger. MS Stewart is centered in a background of clouds and Earth in this view of his EVA. He is floating without tethers attaching him to the Shuttle.

  10. STS-64 extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-21

    S93-26920 (8 Sept. 1994) --- Scott Bleisath, an extravehicular activity (EVA) engineer, demonstrates the hand control module for the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system making its first flight on the scheduled September STS-64 mission. Astronauts Mark C. Lee and Carl J. Meade are the spacewalkers assigned to test the system in space. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. STS-64 extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-21

    S93-26918 (8 Sept. 1994) --- Scott Bleisath, an extravehicular activity (EVA) engineer, demonstrates the hand control module for the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system making its first flight on the scheduled September STS-64 mission. Astronauts Mark C. Lee and Carl J. Meade are the spacewalkers assigned to test the system in space. Unidentified technicians and engineers look on. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  12. A laboratory comparison of apical leakage between immediate versus delayed post space preparation in root canals filled with Resilon.

    PubMed

    Attam, K; Talwar, S

    2010-09-01

    To analyse ex vivo the integrity of the apical seal of Resilon root fillings following immediate post space preparation or after 1 week when leaving either 5 mm or 3 mm of remaining filling material. One hundred and fifty freshly extracted mandibular premolar teeth with single, straight root canals were used. Teeth were autoclaved and cleaned of debris and soft tissue. After decoronation at 16 mm length, the root canals were instrumented using the K3 rotary system to apical file size 45, 0.04 taper with intermittent irrigation using 1% sodium hypochlorite. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups with 30 teeth in each group. Group 1: control group in which the root canals were not filled. Group 2: the canals were filled with Resilon and a post space prepared immediately leaving 5 mm of apical filling. Group 3: the canals were filled and post space preparation delayed for 1 week leaving 5 mm of material apically. Group 4: post space preparation in the canals was initiated immediately after filling leaving 3 mm of material apically. Group 5: the root canals were filled and post space preparation was delayed for 1 week leaving 3 mm of material apically. Microleakage was evaluated using a fluid transport device. The results were analysed statistically using one-way anova followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. There was a highly significant difference amongst the groups (P < 0.001). The maximum mean leakage was observed in group 5 (141.63 x 10(-6) microL min(-1) cm(-1)) and the least microleakage in group 2 (99.87 x 10(-6) microL min(-1) cm(-1)). Immediate post space preparation was associated with less microleakage than delayed preparation when both 5 mm and 3 mm of apical filling remained. Leaving 5 mm of Resilon provided a significantly better seal compared to leaving 3 mm of material.

  13. EVA tools and equipment reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a mixture of tools and equipment used throughout the space shuttle-based extravehicular activity (EVA) program. Promising items which have reached the prototype stage of development are also included, but should not be considered certified ready for flight. Each item is described with a photo, a written discussion, technical specifications, dimensional drawings, and points of contact for additional information. Numbers on the upper left-hand corner of each photo may be used to order specific pictures from NASA and contractor photo libraries. Points of contact were classified as either operational or technical. An operational contact is an engineer from JSC Mission Operations Directorate who is familiar with the basic function and on-orbit use of the tool. A technical contact would be the best source of detailed technical specifications and is typically the NASA subsystem manager. The technical information table for each item uses the following terms to describe the availability or status of each hardware item: Standard - Flown on every mission as standard manifest; Flight specific - Potentially available for flight, not flown every mission (flight certification cannot be guaranteed and recertification may be required); Reference only - Item no longer in active inventory or not recommended for future use, some items may be too application-specific for general use; and Developmental - In the prototype stage only and not yet available for flight. The current availability and certification of any flight-specific tool should be verified with the technical point of contact. Those tools built and fit checked for Hubble Space Telescope maintenance are program dedicated and are not available to other customers. Other customers may have identical tools built from the existing, already certified designs as an optional service.

  14. Power assist EVA glove development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1992-01-01

    Structural modeling of the EVA glove indicates that flexibility in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint can be improved by selectively lowering the elasticity of the glove fabric. Two strategies are used to accomplish this. One method uses coil springs on the back of the glove to carry the tension in the glove skin due to pressurization. These springs carry the loads normally borne by the glove fabric, but are more easily deformed. An active system was also designed for the same purpose and uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove that change the dimensions of the back of the glove and allow the glove to bend at the MCP joint, thus providing greater flexibility at this joint. A threshold control scheme was devised to control the action of the joint actuators. Input to the controller was provided by thin resistive pressure sensors placed between the hand and the pressurized glove. The pressure sensors consist of a layer of polyester film that has a thin layer of ink screened on the surface. The resistivity of the ink is pressure dependent, so an extremely thin pressure sensor can be fabricated by covering the ink patch with another layer of polyester film and measuring the changing resistance of the ink with a bridge circuit. In order to sense the force between the hand and the glove at the MCP joint, a sensor was placed on the palmar face of the middle finger. The resultant signal was used by the controller to decide whether to fill or exhaust the bladder actuators on the back of the glove. The information from the sensor can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a given control scheme or glove design since the magnitude of the measured pressures gives some idea of the torque required to bend a glove finger at the MCP joint. Tests of this actuator, sensor, and control system were conducted in an 57.2 kPa glove box by performing a series of 90 degree finger bends with a glove without an MCP joint assembly, a glove with the coil spring

  15. Acaba during STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    ISS018-E-042502 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  16. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007154 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  17. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007129 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  18. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007137 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  19. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007128 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  20. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007165 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  1. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007134 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  2. STS-119 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 3 Clean-Up OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-23

    S119-E-007123 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Joseph Acaba, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Acaba and Richard Arnold (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.

  3. Astronauts Mitchell and Shepard during first Apollo 14 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    S71-19509 (5 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, operates the Active Seismic Experiment's (ASE) thumper during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, walks near deployed components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) in the background. This photograph was taken by an automatic 16mm camera mounted on the Apollo lunar hand tool carrier aboard the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET). While astronauts Shepard and Mitchell descended in the LM to explore the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  4. STS-54 EV1 Harbaugh carries EV2 Runco during DTO 1210 EVA in OV-105's PLB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-54 Mission Specialist (MS2) and extravehicular crewmember 1 (EV1) Gregory J. Harbaugh, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) (red stripes),carries EMU-suited MS1 and EV2 Mario Runco, Jr along Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, payload bay (PLB) starboard sill longeron during Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 1210, extravehicular activity (EVA) operations procedure/ training. Harbaugh uses Runco's EMU mini-workstation as a handhold. The objective of this exercise is to simulate carrying a large object. It will also evaluate the ability of an astronaut to move about it space with a 'bulky' object in hand. The empty airborne support equipment (ASE) frames appear below the crewmembers and the PLB aft bulkhead behind them. This EVA is the first in a series to broaden EVA procedures and training experience bases and proficiency in preparation for future EVAs such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Space Station Freedom (SSF).

  5. STS-57 astronauts Low and Wisoff perform DTO 1210 EVA in OV-105's payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During STS-57 extravehicular activity (EVA), Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low (foreground) secures portable foot restraint (PFR) (manipulator foot restraint (MFR)) to the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector using a PFR attachment device (PAD). MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff performs operations next to Low at the stowed European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). This EVA, designated Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 1210, included evaluation of procedures being developed to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on mission STS-61 in December 1993. The scene is backdropped against the blackness of space with Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, payload bay (PLB) and payloads appearing in the foreground.

  6. STS-57 astronauts Low and Wisoff perform DTO 1210 EVA in OV-105's payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During STS-57 extravehicular activity (EVA), Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low (foreground) secures portable foot restraint (PFR) (manipulator foot restraint (MFR)) to the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector using a PFR attachment device (PAD). MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff performs operations next to Low at the stowed European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). This EVA, designated Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 1210, included evaluation of procedures being developed to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on mission STS-61 in December 1993. The scene is backdropped against the blackness of space with Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, payload bay (PLB) and payloads appearing in the foreground.

  7. Synergistic effects of EB irradiation and heat on EVA electrical insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipa, S.; Zaharescu, T.; Maˇrcuţaˇ, M.; Setnescu, R.; Gorghiu, L. M.; Dumitrescu, C.

    2005-07-01

    Radiation/thermal degradation is discussed as a successful endurance check. EVA samples were subjected to electron beam irradiation at 12, 30, 60 and 90 kGy. Heat treatment was performed in air at 120 °C for 72 h and 120 h. Chemiluminescence (CL) investigations on EVA specimens were carried out at 200, 210 and 220 °C. Several kinetic parameters such as oxidation induction time (ti), half-oxidation time (t1/2), maximum oxidation rate (voxmax), maximum time of thermal oxidation (tmax) and other chemiluminescence features were obtained from the time dependencies of the CL intensity. While the ageing factors of processed EVA samples reveal a constant value for two testing temperatures (200 and 210 °C), the co-operative factors that describe a combined (synergistic) degradation present higher than unity values, either for the oxidation rates or for the maximum CL intensity measured for all irradiation doses. They increase linearly with dose.

  8. Study to evaluate the effect of EVA on payload systems. Volume 1: Executive summary. [project planning of space missions employing extravehicular activity as a means of cost reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, J. W.; Kraly, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    Programmatic benefits to payloads are examined which can result from the routine use of extravehicular activity (EVA) during space missions. Design and operations costs were compared for 13 representative baseline payloads to the costs of those payloads adapted for EVA operations. The EVA-oriented concepts developed in the study were derived from these baseline concepts and maintained mission and program objectives as well as basic configurations. This permitted isolation of cost saving factors associated specifically with incorporation of EVA in a variety of payload designs and operations. The study results were extrapolated to a total of 74 payload programs. Using appropriate complexity and learning factors, net EVA savings were extrapolated to over $551M for NASA and U.S. civil payloads for routine operations. Adding DOD and ESRO payloads increases the net estimated savings of $776M. Planned maintenance by EVA indicated an estimated $168M savings due to elimination of automated service equipment. Contingency problems of payloads were also analyzed to establish expected failure rates for shuttle payloads. The failure information resulted in an estimated potential for EVA savings of $1.9 B.

  9. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  10. Efficacy of Different Root Canal Irrigants on Smear Layer Removal after Post Space Preparation: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mirseifinejad, Rahele; Tabrizizade, Mehdi; Davari, Abdolrahim; Mehravar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    Effective durable adhesion between post material and dentine using resin cements is essential for longevity of restoration. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of different irrigants on smear layer removal after post space preparation. A total of 75 extracted anterior human teeth were selected. The canals were instrumented by rotary system and then were filled. After preparing the post space, teeth were divided into 5 groups according to irrigants: 17% EDTA; 17% EDTA+2% CHX; 5.25% NaOCl; 17% EDTA+5.25% NaOCl; and saline. The canals were irrigated with 5 cc of each irrigants for 1 min. Specimens were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hulsmann's score was used for marking of smear layer removal at coronal, middle and apical thirds of post space. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The results revealed that subsequent use of 17% EDTA+5.25% NaOCl was more effective than the other groups in smear layer removal. No statistical difference was found among different levels of root canal within each group. It can be concluded that 17% EDTA+5.25% NaOCl could be an effective irrigant for smear layer removal after post space preparation.

  11. Payload bay activity during second EVA of STS-72 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-16

    STS072-393-008 (17 Jan. 1996) --- Astronaut Leroy Chiao gives a thumbs up signal, marking the success of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) in three days. Chiao was joined by astronaut Winston E. Scott on this EVA.

  12. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  13. Overview of Umbilical Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Interfaces in Life Support Systems on Spacecraft Vehicles and Applications for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie J.; Jordan, Nicole C.; Barido, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) for manned spacecraft vehicles have been performed for contingencies and nominal operations numerous times throughout history. This paper will investigate how previous U.S. manned spacecraft vehicles provided life support to crewmembers performing the EVA. Specifically defined are umbilical interfaces with respect to crewmember cooling, drinking water, air (or oxygen), humidity control, and carbon dioxide removal. As historical data is available, the need for planned versus contingency EVAs in previous vehicles as well as details for a nominal EVA day versus a contingency EVA day will be discussed. The hardware used to provide the cooling, drinking water, air (or oxygen), humidity control, and carbon dioxide removal, and the general functions of that hardware, will also be detailed, as information is available. The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV or Orion) EVA interfaces will be generically discussed to provide a glimpse of how similar they are to the EVA interfaces in previous vehicles. Conclusions on strategies that should be used for CEV based on previous spacecraft EVA interfaces will be made in the form of questions and recommendations.

  14. Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) and Mission Support Center (MSC) Design Elements for Future Human Scientific Exploration of Our Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. J.; Abercromby, A. F. J.; Chappell, S.; Beaton, K.; Kobs Nawotniak, S.; Brady, A. L.; Garry, W. B.; Lim, D. S. S.

    2017-02-01

    For future missions, there is a need to better understand how we can merge EVA operations concepts with the established purpose of performing scientific exploration and examine how human spaceflight could be successful under communication latency.

  15. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements--and to protect our science from human contamination--we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and surfaces for analysis, but there was no US EVA tool for that job. NASA engineers developed an EVA-compatible swab tool that can be used to collect data on current hardware, which will influence eventual Mars life support and EVA hardware designs.

  16. A prototype power assist EVA glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1991-01-01

    The most recent generation of space suit EVA gloves has addressed the problem of loose fit and stiffness in the fingers, but it remains difficult to build a glove assembly with low metacarpophalangeal joint stiffness. Fatigue due to constantly displacing the glove from a neutral position has been reported as the limiting factor in some EVA activities. This paper outlines an actuation system that uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove to provide the necessary force to bend the glove at the metacarpal joint, thus providing greater endurance during finger grasping tasks. A simple on-off controller senses hand movement through small pressure sensors between the finger and the glove restraint. The controller then fills or exhausts the bladders on the back of the glove to effectively move the neutral position of the glove as the hand inside moves.

  17. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin work in tandem on the fourth scheduled EVA session for the STS-110 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis. Ross is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the International Space Station's (ISS) Canadarm2, while Morin works inside the S0 (S-zero) truss. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  18. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronauts Steven L. Smith (right) and Rex J. Walheim work in tandem on the third scheduled EVA session in which they released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm (out of frame). Part of the Destiny laboratory and a glimpse of the Earth's horizon are seen in the lower portion of this digital image. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  19. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  20. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope EVA Power Ratchet Tool redesign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Paul W.; Park, Chan; Brown, Lee

    The Power Ratchet Tool (PRT) is a self contained, power-driven, 3/8 inch drive ratchet wrench which will be used by astronauts during Extravehicular Activities (EVA). This battery-powered tool is controlled by a dedicated electonic controller. The PRT was flown during the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Deployment Mission STS-31 to deploy the solar arrays if the automatic mechanisms failed. The PRT is currently intended for use during the first HST Servicing Mission STS-61 as a general purpose power tool. The PRT consists of three major components; the wrench, the controller, and the battery module. Fourteen discrete combinations of torque, turns, and speed may be programmed into the controller before the EVA. The crewmember selects the desired parameter profile by a switch mounted on the controller. The tool may also be used in the manual mode as a non-powered ratchet wrench. The power is provided by a silver-zinc battery module, which fits into the controller and is replaceable during an EVA. The original PRT did not meet the design specification of torque output and hours of operation. To increase efficiency and reliability the PRT underwent a redesign effort. The majority of this effort focused on the wrench. The original PRT drive train consisted of a low torque, high speed brushless DC motor, a face gear set, and a planocentric gear assembly. The total gear reduction was 300:1. The new PRT wrench consists of a low speed, high torque brushless DC motor, two planetary gear sets and a bevel gear set. The total gear reduction is now 75:1. A spline clutch has also been added to disengage the drive train in the manual mode. The design changes to the controller will consist of only those modifications necessary to accomodate the redesigned wrench.

  2. Preparing for space - EVA training at the European Astronaut Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolender, Hans; Stevenin, Hervé; Bessone, Loredana; Torres, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The European Astronaut Centre has developed an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training course for ESA astronauts to bridge the gap between their scuba diving certification and the spacesuit qualification provided by NASA. ESA astronauts André Kuipers and Frank De Winne have already completed this "EVA Pre-Familiarisation Training Programme" before their training at NASA. In June 2006, an international crew of experienced EVA astronauts approved the course as good preparation for suited EVA training; they recommended that portions of it be used to help maintain EVA proficiency for astronauts.

  3. First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Carl J.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

  4. First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Carl J.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

  5. Techniques for Improving the Performance of Future EVA Maneuvering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor W.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small propulsive backpack that was developed as an in-house effort at Johnson Space Center; it is a lightweight system which attaches to the underside of the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) backpack of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). SAFER provides full six-axis control, as well as Automatic Attitude Hold (AAH), by means of a set of cold-gas nitrogen thrusters and a rate sensor-based control system. For compactness, a single hand controller is used, together with mode switching, to command all six axes. SAFER was successfully test-flown on the STS-64 mission in September 1994 as a Development Test Objective (DTO); development of an operational version is now proceeding. This version will be available for EVA self-rescue on the International Space Station and Mir, starting with the STS-86/Mir-7 mission in September 1997. The DTO SAFER was heavily instrumented, and produced in-flight data that was stored in a 12 MB computer memory on-board. This has allowed post-flight analysis to yield good estimates for the actual mass properties (moments and products of inertia and center of mass location) encountered on-orbit. By contrast, Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) post-flight results were generated mainly from analysis of video images, and so were not very accurate. The main goal of the research reported here was to use the detailed SAFER on-orbit mass properties data to optimize the design of future EVA maneuvering systems, with the aim being to improve flying qualities and/or reduce propellant consumption. The Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division Virtual Reality (VR) Laboratory proved to be a valuable research tool for such studies. A second objective of the grant was to generate an accurate dynamics model in support of the reflight of the DTO SAFER on STS-76/Mir-3. One complicating factor was the fact that a hand controller stowage box was added to the underside of SAFER on this flight; the position of

  6. Modified EVA Encapsulant Formulations for Low Temperature Processing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: We have developed several new ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) formulations modified on the basis of NREL patented EVA formulations [1]. The new formulations can be cured to a desired gel content of {approx}80% in the ambient at temperatures 20-30 C lower than the typical conditions in vacuum (i.e. {approx}150 C). Glass/glass laminates showed transmittance spectra that are essentially the same as that of EVA 15295P in the visible and NIR regions but higher in the UV region. Results of fluorescence analysis of the ambient-processed new EVA formulations showed the concentrations of the curing-generated {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl chromophores, which are responsible for the UV induced EVA discoloration and photodegradation, were considerably lower than that of EVA 15295P, therefore suggesting a better photochemical stability of new EVA formulations.

  7. EVA suit 2000: A joint European/Russian space suit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, P.; Loewens, R.; Abramov, I. P.; Albats, E. A.

    1995-07-01

    A feasibility study in 1992 showed the benefits of a common European/Russian space suit development, EVA Suit 2000, replacing the Russian space suit Orlan-DMA and the planned European Hermes EVA space suit at the turn of the century. This EVA Suit 2000 is a joint development initiated by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Space Agency (RKA). The main objectives of this development program are: • first utilization aboard the Russian Space Station MIR-2 • performance improvement with respect to current operational suits • development cost reduction. Russian experience gained with the present extravehicular activity (EVA) suit on the MIR Space Station and extensive application of European Technologies will be needed to achieve these ambitious goals. This paper presents the current status of the development activities, the space suit system design and concentrates in more detail on life support aspects. Specific subjects addressed will include the overall life support conceptual architecture, design features, crew comfort and operational considerations.

  8. Development of Damp-Heat Resistant Self-Primed EVA and Non-EVA Encapsulant Formulations at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2005-11-01

    Self-primed ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and non-EVA (PMG) encapsulant formulations were developed that have greater resistance to damp heat exposure at 85 deg C and 85% relative humidity (RH) (in terms of adhesion strength to glass substrates) than a commonly used commercial EVA product. The self-primed EVA formulations were developed on the basis of high-performing glass priming formulations that have previously proven to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of unprimed and primed EVA films on glass substrates during damp heat exposure. The PMG encapsulant formulations were based on an ethylene-methylacrylate copolymer containing glycidyl methacrylate.

  9. The Effect of Time of Post Space Preparation on the Seal and Adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer- An Sem Study.

    PubMed

    Dhaded, Neha; Dhaded, Sunil; Patil, Chetan; Patil, Roopa; Roshan, Joan Maria

    2014-01-01

    The field of endodontics is dynamic & ever expanding. With the availability of a wide array of products in the dental market it's an absolute necessity to evaluate their efficiency before including them into routine clinical practice.Hence, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of immediate & delayed post space preparation & sealing ability of new root canal filling material & sealers. The effect of time of post space preparation on the seal and adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer - An SEM study. Eighty extracted permanent maxillary central and lateral incisors selected for the study were decoronated. Roots canals were prepared and obturated. Samples were divided into four groups depending on the time of post, space, preparation and obturated material.GROUP I & II: Immediate and Delayed post space preparation respectively with Gutta-percha / AH Plus as obturating material. GROUP III & IV Immediate and Delayed post space preparation with Resilon / Epiphany as the obturating material. The samples were sectioned, then measured and studied by Scanning Electron Microscope. There was a significant difference found between immediate and delayed post space preparation in resilon -epiphany group (p<0.001). Similarly significant difference was seen between immediate and delayed post space preparation in AH Plus-GP group (p<0.001). Difference in the adaptation of the two materials was seen in the delayed group (p = 0.030) but the immediate group showed no signifcant difference (p =0.971). Within the limitations of this study, immediate post space preparation shows less leakage in both the groups. Resilon-Epiphany shows better results when post space is delayed amongst the two whereas in immediate post space preparation there is no significant difference.

  10. The Effect of Time of Post Space Preparation on the Seal and Adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer- An Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhaded, Neha; Dhaded, Sunil; Patil, Chetan; Patil, Roopa; Roshan, Joan Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: The field of endodontics is dynamic & ever expanding. With the availability of a wide array of products in the dental market it’s an absolute necessity to evaluate their efficiency before including them into routine clinical practice.Hence, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of immediate & delayed post space preparation & sealing ability of new root canal filling material & sealers. Aim: The effect of time of post space preparation on the seal and adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer - An SEM study. Settings and design: Eighty extracted permanent maxillary central and lateral incisors selected for the study were decoronated. Roots canals were prepared and obturated. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into four groups depending on the time of post, space, preparation and obturated material.GROUP I & II: Immediate and Delayed post space preparation respectively with Gutta-percha / AH Plus as obturating material. GROUP III & IV Immediate and Delayed post space preparation with Resilon / Epiphany as the obturating material. The samples were sectioned, then measured and studied by Scanning Electron Microscope. Results: There was a significant difference found between immediate and delayed post space preparation in resilon –epiphany group (p<0.001). Similarly significant difference was seen between immediate and delayed post space preparation in AH Plus-GP group (p<0.001). Difference in the adaptation of the two materials was seen in the delayed group (p = 0.030) but the immediate group showed no signifcant difference (p =0.971). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, immediate post space preparation shows less leakage in both the groups. Resilon–Epiphany shows better results when post space is delayed amongst the two whereas in immediate post space preparation there is no significant difference. PMID:24596779

  11. Fabrication of Essex EVA ratchet wrenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvalkenburgh, C. N.; Loughead, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    The extravehicular activity (EVA) ratchet wrench was developed. Shortly after Space Telescope (ST) maintenance simulations began, the need for a specialized maintenance tool arose. With inputs of tool requirements and design recommendations, several development model wrenches were tested in conjunction with ST neutral buoyancy simulations. The wrench design was modified and refined.

  12. STS-125 Preflight Training - EVA RCC Repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-02

    JSC2008-E-031816 (2 April 2008) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (right), Michael J. Massimino, Andrew J. Feustel and Michael T. Good, all STS-125 mission specialists, participate in an extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Tomas Gonzalez-Torres (left) assisted the crewmembers.

  13. STS-125 Preflight Training - EVA RCC Repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-02

    JSC2008-E-031808 (2 April 2008) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (right), Andrew J. Feustel, Michael T. Good and Michael J. Massimino (second left), all STS-125 mission specialists, participate in an extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Tomas Gonzalez-Torres (left) assisted the crewmembers.

  14. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner works to deploy a large stinger device designed for locking onto the orbiting satellites via entering a spent engine's nozzle.

  15. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner handles a stinger device to make initial contact with one of the two satellites they will be working with.

  16. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63007 (12 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view looking forward showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-62920 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view to the rear showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  18. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6644 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  19. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6650 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Robinson holds a digital still camera, updated for use on spacewalks, in his left hand.

  20. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6646 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  1. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6642 (3 Aug. 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  2. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6647 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  3. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6652 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). A blue and white Earth forms the backdrop for the image.

  4. Walheim and Love during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-008750 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim (foreground), mission specialist, shares a spacewalk task with astronaut Stanley Love (partially obscured at top of frame), mission specialist. The two astronauts had paired up for the first of three scheduled STS-122 sessions of extravehicular activity earlier in the week and came back out for this final EVA on Feb. 15.

  5. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner handles a stinger device to make initial contact with one of the two satellites they will be working with.

  6. Tile survey seen during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6396 (3 August 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery’s underside thermal protection tiles are featured in this image photographed by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). Lake Nasser along the Nile River, Egypt is visible near Discovery’s starboard wing.

  7. Fuglesang replaces TV Camera during first EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-13

    ISS014-E-09561 (12 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, replaces a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station during the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. (out of frame), mission specialist, also participated in the 6-hour, 36-minute spacewalk.

  8. Scott and Doi conduct second EVA activities.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-12-03

    STS087-375-015 (19 November – 5 December 1997) --- Astronaut Winston E. Scott, mission specialist, during one of two extravehicular activities (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, is backdropped against a blue “blanket” of ocean water. This view was taken with a 35mm camera.

  9. MS Wolf leaves airlock during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-14

    STS112-E-05516 (14 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, exits the Quest Airlock on the International Space Station (ISS) to begin the third and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-112 mission. Astronaut Piers J. Sellers (out of frame), mission specialist, joined Wolf on the spacewalk.

  10. MS Wolf prepares for EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-12

    STS112-E-5239 (12 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, is only a helmet donning and several minutes away from being ready for the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA). Wolf was later joined by astronaut Piers J. Sellers for the six hour, four minute spacewalk.

  11. Improved flexibility of an EVA glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggeman, G. W.; Held, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A student design contest was held between four universities. The project was to improve the flexibility of the NASA extra-vehicular activities (EVA) glove with the internal pressure increased from 4 psi to 8 psi. The Kansas State University team used an experimental design methodology and an industrial management scheme. This approach succeeded in making Kansas State University the winner of the competition.

  12. EVA - A Textual Data Processing Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakopin, Primoz

    EVA, a text processing tool designed to be self-contained and useful for a variety of languages, is described briefly, and its extensive coded character set is illustrated. Features, specifications, and database functions are noted. Its application in development of a Slovenian literary dictionary is also described. (MSE)

  13. Effect of post-space treatments on the push-out bond strength and failure modes of glass fibre posts.

    PubMed

    Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Kivanç, Bağdagül Helvacioğlu; Sağlam, Baran C; Şimşek, Eser; Görgül, Güliz

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different post-space treatments on the push-out bond strength and failure modes of glass fibre posts. Forty mandibular premolar roots were cut and endodontically treated. Post spaces were prepared and roots were divided into four groups. In group 1 distilled water irrigation (control), in group 2 2.25% NaOCl irrigation, in group 3 2.25% NaOCl + 17% EDTA irrigation were done and in group 4 diode laser was applied to the prepared post spaces. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was made for each group. Fibre posts were then luted with resin cement. Each root was prepared for push-out test. Data were statistically analysed with anova (P = 0.05). After push-out test, the failure modes were observed but not statistically analysed. There were statistically significant differences between Group 3 and Group 2 in both regions (P < 0.05), also in the middle region of Group 4 and Group 2 (P < 0.05). Cervical root segments showed higher bond strengths than middle ones in all groups (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were obtained from NaOCl/EDTA and the lowest bond strength values were obtained from NaOCl for both regions. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  14. One hundred US EVAs: a perspective on spacewalks.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Richard C; McBarron, James W; Manatt, Scott A; McMann, Harold J; Fullerton, Richard K

    2002-01-01

    In the 36 years between June 1965 and February 2001, the US human space flight program has conducted 100 spacewalks, or extravehicular activities (EVAs), as NASA officially calls them. EVA occurs when astronauts wearing spacesuits travel outside their protective spacecraft to perform tasks in the space vacuum environment. US EVA started with pioneering feasibility tests during the Gemini Program. The Apollo Program required sending astronauts to the moon and performing EVA to explore the lunar surface. EVA supported scientific mission objectives of the Skylab program, but may be best remembered for repairing launch damage to the vehicle and thus saving the program. EVA capability on Shuttle was initially planned to be a kit that could be flown at will, and was primarily intended for coping with vehicle return emergencies. The Skylab emergency and the pivotal role of EVA in salvaging that program quickly promoted Shuttle EVA to an essential element for achieving mission objectives, including retrieving satellites and developing techniques to assemble and maintain the International Space Station (ISS). Now, EVA is supporting assembly of ISS. This paper highlights development of US EVA capability within the context of the overarching mission objectives of the US human space flight program. c2002 International Astronautical Federation. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. EVA Swab Tool to Support Planetary Protection and Astrobiology Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Hood, Drew; Walker, Mary; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2018-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on other planets, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed systems meet planetary protection requirements-and to protect our science from human contamination-we'll need to assess whether microorganisms may be leaking or venting from our spacecraft. Microbial sample collection outside of a pressurized spacecraft is complicated by temperature extremes, low pressures that preclude the use of laboratory standard (wetted) swabs, and operation either in bulky spacesuits or with robotic assistance. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed a swab kit for use in collecting microbial samples from the external surfaces of crewed spacecraft, including spacesuits. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Swab Kit consists of a single swab tool handle and an eight-canister sample caddy. The design team minimized development cost by re-purposing a heritage Space Shuttle tile repair handle that was designed to quickly snap into different tool attachments by engaging a mating device in each attachment. This allowed the tool handle to snap onto a fresh swab attachment much like popular shaving razor handles can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. To disengage the handle from a swab, the user performs two independent functions, which can be done with a single hand. This dual operation mitigates the risk that a swab will be inadvertently released and lost in microgravity. Each swab attachment is fitted with commercially available foam swab tips, vendor-certified to be sterile for Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). A microbial filter installed in the bottom of each sample container allows the container to outgas and repressurize without introducing microbial contaminants to internal void spaces. Extensive ground testing, post-test handling, and sample analysis confirmed the design is able to maintain sterile conditions as the canister moves between

  16. Evaluation of safety of hypobaric decompressions and EVA from positions of probabilistic theory.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, V P

    1998-01-01

    Formation and subsequent evolution of gas bubbles in blood and tissues of subjects exposed to decompression are casual processes in their nature. Such character of bubbling processes in a body predetermines probabilistic character of decompression sickness (DCS) incidence in divers, aviators and astronauts. Our original probabilistic theory of decompression safety is based on stochastic models of these processes and on the concept of critical volume of a free gas phase in body tissues. From positions of this theory, the probability of DCS incidence during single-stage decompressions and during hypobaric decompressions under EVA in particular, is defined by the distribution of possible values of nucleation efficiency in "pain" tissues and by its critical significance depended on the parameters of a concrete decompression. In the present study the following is shown: 1) the dimensionless index of critical nucleation efficiency for "pain" body tissues is a more adequate index of decompression stress in comparison with Tissue Ratio, TR; 2) a priory the decompression under EVA performed according to the Russian protocol is more safe than decompression under EVA performed in accordance with the U.S. protocol; 3) the Russian space suit operated at a higher pressure and having a higher "rigidity" induces a stronger inhibition of mechanisms of cavitation and gas bubbles formation in tissues of a subject located in it, and by that provides a more considerable reduction of the DCS risk during real EVA performance.

  17. Evaluation of safety of hypobaric decompressions and EVA from positions of probabilistic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, V. P.

    Formation and subsequent evolution of gas bubbles in blood and tissues of subjects exposed to decompression are casual processes in their nature. Such character of bubbling processes in a body predetermines probabilistic character of decompression sickness (DCS) incidence in divers, aviators and astronauts. Our original probabilistic theory of decompression safety is based on stochastic models of these processes and on the concept of critical volume of a free gas phase in body tissues. From positions of this theory, the probability of DCS incidence during single-stage decompressions and during hypobaric decompressions under EVA in particular, is defined by the distribution of possible values of nucleation efficiency in "pain" tissues and by its critical significance depended on the parameters of a concrete decompression. In the present study the following is shown: 1) the dimensionless index of critical nucleation efficiency for "pain" body tissues is a more adequate index of decompression stress in comparison with Tissue Ratio, TR; 2) a priory the decompression under EVA performed according to the Russian protocol is more safe than decompression under EVA performed in accordance with the U.S. protocol; 3) the Russian space suit operated at a higher pressure and having a higher "rigidity" induces a stronger inhibition of mechanisms of cavitation and gas bubbles formation in tissues of a subject located in it, and by that provides a more considerable reduction of the DCS risk during real EVA performance.

  18. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  19. The Evolution of Extravehicular Activity Operations to Lunar Exploration Based on Operational Lessons Learned During 2009 NASA Desert RATS Field Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ernest R., Jr.; Welsh, Daren; Coan, Dave; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; McDaniel, Randall; Looper, Chris; Guirgis, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will present options to evolutionary changes in several philosophical areas of extravehicular activity (EVA) operations. These areas will include single person verses team EVAs; various loss of communications scenarios (with Mission Control, between suited crew, suited crew to rover crew, and rover crew A to rover crew B); EVA termination and abort time requirements; incapacitated crew ingress time requirements; autonomous crew operations during loss of signal periods including crew decisions on EVA execution (including decision for single verses team EVA). Additionally, suggestions as to the evolution of the make-up of the EVA flight control team from the current standard will be presented. With respect to the flight control team, the major areas of EVA flight control, EVA Systems and EVA Tasks, will be reviewed, and suggested evolutions of each will be presented. Currently both areas receive real-time information, and provide immediate feedback during EVAs as well as spacesuit (extravehicular mobility unit - EMU) maintenance and servicing periods. With respect to the tasks being performed, either EMU servicing and maintenance, or the specific EVA tasks, daily revising of plans will need to be able to be smoothly implemented to account for unforeseen situations and findings. Many of the presented ideas are a result of lessons learned by the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate operations team support during the 2009 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS). It is important that the philosophy of both EVA crew operations and flight control be examined now, so that, where required, adjustments can be made to a next generation EMU and EVA equipment that will complement the anticipated needs of both the EVA flight control team and the crews.

  20. The Evolution of Extravehicular Activity Operations to Lunar Exploration Based on Operational Lessons Learned During 2009 NASA Desert RATS Field Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ernest R., Jr.; Welsh, Daren; Coan, Dave; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; McDaniel, Randall; Looper, Chris; Guirgis, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will present options to evolutionary changes in several philosophical areas of extravehicular activity (EVA) operations. These areas will include single person verses team EVAs; various loss of communications scenarios (with Mission Control, between suited crew, suited crew to rover crew, and rover crew A to rover crew B); EVA termination and abort time requirements; incapacitated crew ingress time requirements; autonomous crew operations during loss of signal periods including crew decisions on EVA execution (including decision for single verses team EVA). Additionally, suggestions as to the evolution of the make-up of the EVA flight control team from the current standard will be presented. With respect to the flight control team, the major areas of EVA flight control, EVA Systems and EVA Tasks, will be reviewed, and suggested evolutions of each will be presented. Currently both areas receive real-time information, and provide immediate feedback during EVAs as well as spacesuit (extravehicular mobility unit - EMU) maintenance and servicing periods. With respect to the tasks being performed, either EMU servicing and maintenance, or the specific EVA tasks, daily revising of plans will need to be able to be smoothly implemented to account for unforeseen situations and findings. Many of the presented ideas are a result of lessons learned by the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate operations team support during the 2009 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS). It is important that the philosophy of both EVA crew operations and flight control be examined now, so that, where required, adjustments can be made to a next generation EMU and EVA equipment that will complement the anticipated needs of both the EVA flight control team and the crews.