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Sample records for evaluate anti-hiv therapy

  1. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nalla, Arun K.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV. PMID:28536375

  2. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  3. Lentiviral vector engineering for anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy.

    PubMed

    ter Brake, Olivier; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference or RNAi-based gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection has recently emerged as a highly effective antiviral approach. The lentiviral vector system is a good candidate for the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) in HIV-susceptible cells. However, this strategy can give rise to vector problems because the anti-HIV shRNAs can also target the HIV-based lentiviral vector system. In addition, there may be self-targeting of the shRNA-encoding sequences within the vector RNA genome in the producer cell. The insertion of microRNA (miRNA) cassettes in the vector may introduce Drosha cleavage sites that will also result in the destruction of the vector genome during the production and/or the transduction process. Here, we describe possible solutions to these lentiviral-RNAi problems. We also describe a strategy for multiple shRNA expression to establish a combinatorial RNAi therapy.

  4. CD25 preselective anti-HIV vectors for improved HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Lawson, Je'tai; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-12-01

    As HIV continues to be a global public health problem with no effective vaccine available, new and innovative therapies, including HIV gene therapies, need to be developed. Due to low transduction efficiencies that lead to low in vivo gene marking, therapeutically relevant efficacy of HIV gene therapy has been difficult to achieve in a clinical setting. Methods to improve the transplantation of enriched populations of anti-HIV vector-transduced cells may greatly increase the in vivo efficacy of HIV gene therapies. Here we describe the development of preselective anti-HIV lentiviral vectors that allow for the purification of vector-transduced cells to achieve an enriched population of HIV-resistant cells. A selectable protein, human CD25, not normally found on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), was incorporated into a triple combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector. Upon purification of cells transduced with the preselective anti-HIV vector, safety was demonstrated in CD34+ HPCs and in HPC-derived macrophages in vitro. Upon challenge with HIV-1, improved efficacy was observed in purified preselective anti-HIV vector-transduced macrophages compared to unpurified cells. These proof-of-concept results highlight the potential use of this method to improve HIV stem cell gene therapy for future clinical applications.

  5. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  6. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds.

  7. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds. PMID:26598461

  8. Current developments in anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Alexander Y

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, dramatic improvements in therapeutic treatment modalities for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection have occurred. Potent drug combinations in HAART regimens efficiently block HIV-1 replication in most patients; however, multiple shortcomings of HAART are apparent and require novel treatments that can be utilized in combination with HAART or as stand-alone therapies. Gene therapy of HIV-1 represents one such treatment and several strategies are currently under development. This review focuses on advancements in the gene therapy of HIV/AIDS by highlighting the progress made in selecting new therapeutic targets and developing novel tools to exert an effect on these targets. In addition, new trends emerging from this progress are summarized. This review is based primarily on literature published between 2006 and 2008.

  9. Evaluation of Atazanavir and Darunavir Interactions with Lipids for Developing pH-responsive Anti-HIV Drug Combination Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jinghua; Freeling, Jennifer P.; Koehn, Josefin; Shu, Cuiling; Ho, Rodney J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated two HIV protease inhibitors, atazanavir and darunavir, for pH-dependent solubility, lipid binding, and drug release from lipid nanoparticles. Both atazanavir and darunavir incorporated into lipid nanoparticles composed of pegylated and non-pegylated phospholipids with nearly 100% efficiency, but only atazanavir lipid nanoparticles formed stable lipid-drug particles and exhibited pH-dependent drug release. Darunavir lipid nanoparticles were unstable and formed mixed micelles at low drug-lipid concentrations, and thus are not suitable for lipid-drug particle development. When atazanavir lipid nanoparticles were prepared with ritonavir, a metabolic and cellular membrane exporter inhibitor, and tenofovir, an HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, stable, scalable, and reproducible anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles were produced. Drug incorporation efficiencies of 85.5 ± 8.2, 85.1 ± 7.1, and 6.1 ± 0.8 % for atazanavir, ritonavir, and tenofovir, respectively, were achieved. Preliminary primate pharmacokinetic studies with these pH-responsive anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles administered subcutaneously produced detectable plasma concentrations that lasted for 7 days for all three drugs. These anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles could be developed as a long-acting targeted antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24948204

  10. Stem cell based anti-HIV Gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Shimizu, Saki; An, Dong Sung

    2011-01-01

    Human stem cell-based therapeutic intervention strategies for treating HIV infection have recently undergone a renaissance as a major focus of investigation. Unlike most conventional antiviral therapies, genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells possess the capacity for prolonged self-renewal that would continuously produce protected immune cells to fight against HIV. A successful strategy therefore has the potential to stably control and ultimately eradicate HIV from patients by a single or minimal treatment. Recent progress in the development of new technologies and clinical trials sets the stage for the current generation of gene therapy approaches to combat HIV infection. In this review, we will discuss two major approaches that are currently underway in the development of stem cell-based gene therapy to target HIV: One that focuses on the protection of cells from productive infection with HIV, and the other that focuses on targeting immune cells to directly combat HIV infection. PMID:21247612

  11. Combinatorial anti-HIV gene therapy: using a multipronged approach to reach beyond HAART.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C W; Younan, P; Jerome, K R; Kiem, H-P

    2013-07-01

    The 'Berlin Patient', who maintains suppressed levels of HIV viremia in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, continues to be a standard bearer in HIV eradication research. However, the unique circumstances surrounding his functional cure are not applicable to most HIV(+) patients. To achieve a functional or sterilizing cure in a greater number of infected individuals worldwide, combinatorial treatments, targeting multiple stages of the viral life cycle, will be essential. Several anti-HIV gene therapy approaches have been explored recently, including disruption of the C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) coreceptor loci in CD4(+) T cells and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. However, less is known about the efficacy of these strategies in patients and more relevant HIV model systems such as non-human primates (NHPs). Combinatorial approaches, including genetic disruption of integrated provirus, functional enhancement of endogenous restriction factors and/or the use of pharmacological adjuvants, could amplify the anti-HIV effects of CCR5/CXCR4 gene disruption. Importantly, delivering gene disruption molecules to genetic sites of interest will likely require optimization on a cell type-by-cell type basis. In this review, we highlight the most promising gene therapy approaches to combat HIV infection, methods to deliver these therapies to hematopoietic cells and emphasize the need to target viral replication pre- and post-entry to mount a suitably robust defense against spreading infection.

  12. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy. PMID:26800572

  13. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy.

  14. A therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine enhances anti-HIV-1 immune responses in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Tung, Frank Y; Tung, Jack K; Pallikkuth, Suresh; Pahwa, Savita; Fischl, Margaret A

    2016-04-27

    HIV-1 specific cellular immunity plays an important role in controlling viral replication. In this first-in-human therapeutic vaccination study, a replication-defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) was tested in HIV-1 infected participants undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to enhance anti-HIV immunity (Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01428596). A010 was a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and the immunogenicity of a replication defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) given as a subcutaneous injection to HIV-1 infected participants who were receiving HAART with HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/ml and CD4 cell count >500 cells/mm(3). HIV-1 specific immune responses were monitored by INF-γ enzyme linked immunospot (Elispot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay after vaccination. Following the randomized placebo-controlled vaccination phase, subjects who received HIVAX vaccine and who met eligibility underwent a 12-week analytical antiretroviral treatment interruption (ATI). Viral load was monitored throughout the study. HIVAX was well tolerated in trial participants. Transient grade 1 to 2 (mild to moderate) injection site reactions occurred in 8 of 10 vaccinated participants. HIVAX was immunogenic in all vaccinated participants. The functionality of T cells was significantly enhanced after vaccination. Median viral load (3.45 log10 copies/ml, range of 96-12,830 copies/ml) at the end of the 12-week treatment interruption in HIVAX vaccinated group was significantly lower than the pre-treatment levels. Three vaccinated participants extended ATI for up to 2 years with stable CD4 cells and low viral loads. HIVAX vaccine is generally safe, elicits strong anti-HIV-1 immune responses, and may play an important role in controlling viral load during treatment interruption in HIV-1 infected participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of needle exchange in central London: behaviour change and anti-HIV status over one year.

    PubMed

    Hart, G J; Carvell, A L; Woodward, N; Johnson, A M; Williams, P; Parry, J V

    1989-05-01

    From November 1987 to October 1988, numbers of clients, visits made and syringes dispensed and returned were monitored at the needle exchange of the Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. A sample of clients were interviewed 1 month after entry to the scheme and again 3 months later to evaluate changes in injecting and sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection. Clients were asked to donate saliva for anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody capture radioimmunoassay (GACRIA). The rate of lending and borrowing used injecting equipment fell, both compared with rates prior to entry to the scheme and during the period of study. Frequency of injecting did not increase and there was reduced incidence of abscesses. There was a highly significant correlation between multiple sexual partners and condom use and a reduction in the proportion of clients with multiple partners. On entry to the study, seven out of 121 (6%) clients were anti-HIV positive; after 3 months, a further two clients tested were found to be anti-HIV positive. Anti-HIV positivity prevalence for the year of study was nine out of 121 (7%). The scheme attracts clients, reduces injecting-related risk for HIV infection and has high equipment return rates. Saliva testing is acceptable to clients. Continued monitoring of anti-HIV in saliva is indicated.

  16. Comparison of classifier fusion methods for predicting response to anti HIV-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Altmann, André; Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Prosperi, Mattia; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani; Schülter, Eugen; Büch, Joachim; Struck, Daniel; Peres, Yardena; Incardona, Francesca; Sönnerborg, Anders; Kaiser, Rolf; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lengauer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the viral genome for drug resistance mutations is state-of-the-art for guiding treatment selection for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. These mutations alter the structure of viral target proteins and reduce or in the worst case completely inhibit the effect of antiretroviral compounds while maintaining the ability for effective replication. Modern anti-HIV-1 regimens comprise multiple drugs in order to prevent or at least delay the development of resistance mutations. However, commonly used HIV-1 genotype interpretation systems provide only classifications for single drugs. The EuResist initiative has collected data from about 18,500 patients to train three classifiers for predicting response to combination antiretroviral therapy, given the viral genotype and further information. In this work we compare different classifier fusion methods for combining the individual classifiers. The individual classifiers yielded similar performance, and all the combination approaches considered performed equally well. The gain in performance due to combining methods did not reach statistical significance compared to the single best individual classifier on the complete training set. However, on smaller training set sizes (200 to 1,600 instances compared to 2,700) the combination significantly outperformed the individual classifiers (p<0.01; paired one-sided Wilcoxon test). Together with a consistent reduction of the standard deviation compared to the individual prediction engines this shows a more robust behavior of the combined system. Moreover, using the combined system we were able to identify a class of therapy courses that led to a consistent underestimation (about 0.05 AUC) of the system performance. Discovery of these therapy courses is a further hint for the robustness of the combined system. The combined EuResist prediction engine is freely available at http://engine.euresist.org.

  17. [Retrospective evaluation of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and syphilis reagin antibody seropositivity in blood donors at the Trabzon Farabi Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Faruk; Cubukçu, Kivanç; Yetişkul, Serpil; Yazici, Yelda; Kaklikkaya, Neşe

    2002-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products is a widely used method for therapy in medicine, however it may result with the transmission of infectious agents from donor to recipient. In order to achieve safe blood transfusions and to minimize post-transfusion infections, several screening tests for infectious agents are routinely done all around the world as well as in our country. In this study, HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and syphilis reagin antibody tests results have been retrospectively evaluated for 33.766 blood donors during January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2000 in Blood Center of Farabi Hospital, Black Sea Technical University. Testing for HBsAg, anti-HIV and anti-HCV has been done by using commercially available micro and/or macro enzyme immunoassays, and syphilis reagin antibody test by latex agglutination (RPR) method. The indeterminate results were confirmed by retesting of sera with microparticle enzyme immunoassay and Western blot methods. As a result, in 1331 (3.94%) subjects HBsAg, in 250 (0.74%) subjects anti-HCV, and in 161 (0.47%) subjects RPR were found positive. Twenty samples which have had the results in gray-zone for anti-HIV, have been found negative with the confirmation tests.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV microbicide products: New models and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Clark, Meredith R

    2010-12-01

    A safe and effective microbicide product designed to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 rests on a solid foundation provided by the proper selection and preclinical characterization of both its active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and formulation. The evaluation of API and formulation physicochemical properties, drug release, specific antiviral activity, cell and tissue toxicity, organ toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics and efficacy provides information to understand the product, make go/no go decisions in the critical path of product development and complete a regulatory dossier to file an investigational new drug (IND) with the US Food and Drug Administration. Incorporation of new models, assays and biomarkers has expanded our ability to understand the mechanisms of action underlying microbicide toxicity and efficacy, enabling a more rational selection of drug and formulation candidates. This review presents an overview of the models and endpoints used to comprehensively evaluate an anti-HIV microbicide in preclinical development. This article forms part of a special supplement on presentations covering HIV transmission and microbicides, based on the symposium "Trends in Microbicide Formulations", held on 25 and 26 January 2010, Arlington, VA.

  19. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; LeBlanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  20. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  1. A quantitative comparison of anti-HIV gene therapy delivered to hematopoietic stem cells versus CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Savkovic, Borislav; Nichols, James; Birkett, Donald; Applegate, Tanya; Ledger, Scott; Symonds, Geoff; Murray, John M

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy represents an alternative and promising anti-HIV modality to highly active antiretroviral therapy. It involves the introduction of a protective gene into a cell, thereby conferring protection against HIV. While clinical trials to date have delivered gene therapy to CD4+T cells or to CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the relative benefits of each of these two cellular targets have not been conclusively determined. In the present analysis, we investigated the relative merits of delivering a dual construct (CCR5 entry inhibitor + C46 fusion inhibitor) to either CD4+T cells or to CD34+ HSC. Using mathematical modelling, we determined the impact of each scenario in terms of total CD4+T cell counts over a 10 year period, and also in terms of inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 tropic virus. Our modelling determined that therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC generally resulted in better outcomes than delivery to CD4+T cells. An early one-off therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC, assuming that 20% of CD34+ HSC in the bone marrow were gene-modified (G+), resulted in total CD4+T cell counts ≥ 180 cells/ µL in peripheral blood after 10 years. If the uninfected G+ CD4+T cells (in addition to exhibiting lower likelihood of becoming productively infected) also exhibited reduced levels of bystander apoptosis (92.5% reduction) over non gene-modified (G-) CD4+T cells, then total CD4+T cell counts of ≥ 350 cells/ µL were observed after 10 years, even if initially only 10% of CD34+ HSC in the bone marrow received the protective gene. Taken together our results indicate that: 1.) therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC will result in better outcomes than delivery to CD4+T cells, and 2.) a greater impact of gene therapy will be observed if G+ CD4+T cells exhibit reduced levels of bystander apoptosis over G- CD4+T cells.

  2. A Quantitative Comparison of Anti-HIV Gene Therapy Delivered to Hematopoietic Stem Cells versus CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savkovic, Borislav; Nichols, James; Birkett, Donald; Applegate, Tanya; Ledger, Scott; Symonds, Geoff; Murray, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy represents an alternative and promising anti-HIV modality to highly active antiretroviral therapy. It involves the introduction of a protective gene into a cell, thereby conferring protection against HIV. While clinical trials to date have delivered gene therapy to CD4+T cells or to CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the relative benefits of each of these two cellular targets have not been conclusively determined. In the present analysis, we investigated the relative merits of delivering a dual construct (CCR5 entry inhibitor + C46 fusion inhibitor) to either CD4+T cells or to CD34+ HSC. Using mathematical modelling, we determined the impact of each scenario in terms of total CD4+T cell counts over a 10 year period, and also in terms of inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 tropic virus. Our modelling determined that therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC generally resulted in better outcomes than delivery to CD4+T cells. An early one-off therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC, assuming that 20% of CD34+ HSC in the bone marrow were gene-modified (G+), resulted in total CD4+T cell counts ≥180 cells/ µL in peripheral blood after 10 years. If the uninfected G+ CD4+T cells (in addition to exhibiting lower likelihood of becoming productively infected) also exhibited reduced levels of bystander apoptosis (92.5% reduction) over non gene-modified (G-) CD4+T cells, then total CD4+T cell counts of ≥350 cells/ µL were observed after 10 years, even if initially only 10% of CD34+ HSC in the bone marrow received the protective gene. Taken together our results indicate that: 1.) therapy delivery to CD34+ HSC will result in better outcomes than delivery to CD4+T cells, and 2.) a greater impact of gene therapy will be observed if G+ CD4+T cells exhibit reduced levels of bystander apoptosis over G- CD4+T cells. PMID:24945407

  3. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5'-O-Dicarboxylic Fatty Acyl Monoester Derivatives of Anti-HIV Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Bhanu; Agarwal, Hitesh K; Oh, Donghoon; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Tiwari, Rakesh; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-03-19

    A number of 5'-O-dicarboxylic fatty acyl monoester derivatives of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (stavudine, d4T), and 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (alovudine, FLT) were synthesized to improve the lipophilicity and potentially the cellular delivery of parent polar 2', 3'-dideoxynucleoside (ddN) analogues. The compounds were evaluated for their anti-HIV activity. Three different fatty acids with varying chain length of suberic acid (octanedioic acid), sebacic acid (decanedioic acid), and dodecanedioic acid were used for the conjugation with the nucleosides. The compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity. All dicarboxylic ester conjugates of nucleosides exhibited significantly higher anti-HIV activity than that of the corresponding parent nucleoside analogs. Among all the tested conjugates, 5'-O-suberate derivative of AZT (EC50 = 0.10 nM) was found to be the most potent compound and showed 80-fold higher anti-HIV activity than AZT without any significant toxicity (TC50 > 500 nM).

  4. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  5. Selecting anti-HIV therapies based on a variety of genomic and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Altmann, Andre; Prosperi, Mattia; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani; Sönnerborg, Anders; Schülter, Eugen; Struck, Daniel; Peres, Yardena; Incardona, Francesca; Kaiser, Rolf; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lengauer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Optimizing HIV therapies is crucial since the virus rapidly develops mutations to evade drug pressure. Recent studies have shown that genotypic information might not be sufficient for the design of therapies and that other clinical and demographical factors may play a role in therapy failure. This study is designed to assess the improvement in prediction achieved when such information is taken into account. We use these factors to generate a prediction engine using a variety of machine learning methods and to determine which clinical conditions are most misleading in terms of predicting the outcome of a therapy. Results: Three different machine learning techniques were used: generative–discriminative method, regression with derived evolutionary features, and regression with a mixture of effects. All three methods had similar performances with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77. A set of three similar engines limited to genotypic information only achieved an AUC of 0.75. A straightforward combination of the three engines consistently improves the prediction, with significantly better prediction when the full set of features is employed. The combined engine improves on predictions obtained from an online state-of-the-art resistance interpretation system. Moreover, engines tend to disagree more on the outcome of failure therapies than regarding successful ones. Careful analysis of the differences between the engines revealed those mutations and drugs most closely associated with uncertainty of the therapy outcome. Availability: The combined prediction engine will be available from July 2008, see http://engine.euresist.org Contact: rosen@il.ibm.com PMID:18586740

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  7. Evaluation of LIAISON® XL system for HBsAg, and anti-HCV and anti-HIV/Ag p24.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Manco, Maria Teresa; Belvisi, Luisa; Cagnin, Debora; Cerulli, Teresa; Paganini, Alessia; Arpino, Olivia; Cianflone, Annalisa; Agrappi, Carlo; Mirri, Paola; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the data obtained using the new LIAISON® XL chemiluminescence system to search for HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV1-2/p24 Ag with those obtained using the VITROS system currently adopted by the Microbiology Unit of the Hospital of Legnano. Routine samples of patients who were referred by practitioners for the determination of HBsAg (1,000 samples) and/or anti-HCV (1,002 samples) and/or anti-HIV1-2 (995 samples) were simultaneously analyzed using both systems. The concordant positive and discordant samples were re-examined for confirmation by means of an HBsAg neutralization assay, anti-HCV immunoblot, or anti-HIV1-2 Western blot; HBV-DNA, or HCV-RNA or HIV-RNA was also sought in the discordant samples. Samples of patients known to be positive were tested (100 HBsAg positive, 100 anti-HCV positive, and 100 HIV 1-2 positive) as well throughout treatment, with viremia levels becoming undetectable after treatment. The HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV1-2 concordance between the two systems in routine series was respectively 99.8%, 98.5% and 99.7%, and 100% for all markers in samples known positive. The various molecular biology and confirmatory tests of the discordant samples were all negative (except for one anti-HCV positive sample). Measure of Cohen's kappa coefficient for HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV gave K values of respectively 0.992, 0.946, and 0.980. In conclusion, the performance of the LIAISON® XL system in the routine laboratory determination for all three markers was comparable with that of the VITROS system. J. Med. Virol. 89:489-496, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A novel gene therapy strategy using secreted multifunctional anti-HIV proteins to confer protection to gene-modified and unmodified target cells.

    PubMed

    Falkenhagen, A; Ameli, M; Asad, S; Read, S E; Joshi, S

    2014-02-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV) gene therapy strategies focus on rendering HIV target cells non-permissive to viral replication. However, gene-modified cells fail to accumulate in patients and the virus continues to replicate in the unmodified target cell population. We have designed lentiviral vectors encoding secreted anti-HIV proteins to protect both gene-modified and unmodified cells from infection. Soluble CD4 (sCD4), a secreted single chain variable fragment (sscFv(17b)) and a secreted fusion inhibitor (sFI(T45)) were used to target receptor binding, co-receptor binding and membrane fusion, respectively. Additionally, we designed bi- and tri-functional fusion proteins to exploit the multistep nature of HIV entry. Of the seven antiviral proteins tested, sCD4, sCD4-scFv(17b), sCD4-FI(T45) and sCD4-scFv(17b)-FI(T45) efficiently inhibited HIV entry. The neutralization potency of the bi-functional fusion proteins sCD4-scFv(17b) and sCD4-FI(T45) was superior to that of sCD4 and the Food and Drug Administration-approved fusion inhibitor T-20. In co-culture experiments, sCD4, sCD4-scFv(17b) and sCD4-FI(T45) secreted from gene-modified producer cells conferred substantial protection to unmodified peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, continuous delivery of secreted anti-HIV proteins via gene therapy may be a promising strategy to overcome the limitations of the current treatment.

  9. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Eight Monofloral Iranian Honey Types

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z.multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P.sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies. PMID:25333699

  11. Anti-HIV activity of some synthetic lignanolides and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Rocío; Medarde, Manuel; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Madrigal, Blanca M; Alcamí, José; Muñoz, Eduardo; San Feliciano, Arturo

    2004-09-06

    The evaluation of the anti-HIV-1 activity of synthetic lignanolides and their intermediates is reported. The antiviral activity was studied through luciferase-based assays targeting the HIV-1 promoter activation induced by either, the HIV-1 Tat protein or the cellular transcription factor NF-kappaB, both known as crucial factors in HIV-1 replication. Among the compounds tested, three of them 2, 4 and 13 were further analysed for their anti-HIV-1 activity by recombinant virus assays, showing a suitable profile for development of novel anti-HIV-1 drugs.

  12. RD2-MolPack-Chim3, a Packaging Cell Line for Stable Production of Lentiviral Vectors for Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovani, Bianca Maria; Bossi, Sergio; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Corna, Stefano; Salvatori, Francesca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the last two decades, several attempts to generate packaging cells for lentiviral vectors (LV) have been made. Despite different technologies, no packaging clone is currently employed in clinical trials. We developed a new strategy for LV stable production based on the HEK-293T progenitor cells; the sequential insertion of the viral genes by integrating vectors; the constitutive expression of the viral components; and the RD114-TR envelope pseudotyping. We generated the intermediate clone PK-7 expressing constitutively gag/pol and rev genes and, by adding tat and rd114-tr genes, the stable packaging cell line RD2-MolPack, which can produce LV carrying any transfer vector (TV). Finally, we obtained the RD2-MolPack-Chim3 producer clone by transducing RD2-MolPack cells with the TV expressing the anti-HIV transgene Chim3. Remarkably, RD114-TR pseudovirions have much higher potency when produced by stable compared with transient technology. Most importantly, comparable transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is obtained with 2-logs less physical particles respect to VSV-G pseudovirions produced by transient transfection. Altogether, RD2-MolPack technology should be considered a valid option for large-scale production of LV to be used in gene therapy protocols employing HSC, resulting in the possibility of downsizing the manufacturing scale by about 10-fold in respect to transient technology. PMID:23767932

  13. Anti-AIDS agents 89. Identification of DCX derivatives as anti-HIV and chemosensitizing dual function agents to overcome P-gp-mediated drug resistance for AIDS therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Ohkoshi, Emika; Shi, Qian; Bastow, Kenneth F.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 19 dicamphanoyl-dihydropyranochromone (DCP) and dicamphanoyl-dihydropyranoxanthone (DCX) derivatives, previously discovered as novel anti-HIV agents, were evaluated for their potential to reverse multi-drug resistance (MDR) in a cancer cell line over-expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Seven compounds fully reversed resistance to vincristine (VCR) at 4 μM, a 20-fold enhancement compared to the first generation chemosensitizer, verapamil (4 μM). The mechanism of action of DCPs and DCXs was also resolved, since the most active compounds (3, 4, and 7) significantly increased intracellular drug accumulation due, in part, to inhibiting the P-gp mediated drug efflux from cells. We conclude that DCPs (3 and 4) and DCXs (7, 11, and 17) can exhibit polypharmacologic behavior by acting as dual inhibitors of HIV replication and chemoresistance mediated by P-gp. As such, they may be useful in combination therapy to overcome P-gp-associated drug resistance for AIDS treatment. PMID:22465634

  14. Anti-AIDS agents 85. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 1R,2R-dicamphanoyl-3,3-dimethyldihydropyrano-[2,3-c]xanthen-7(1H)-one (DCX) derivatives as novel anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 1R,2R-dicamphanoyl-3,3-dimethydihydropyrano[2,3-c]xanthen-7(1H)-one (DCX) derivatives were designed and synthesized as novel anti-HIV agents against both wild-type and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 (RTMDR-1) strains. Twenty-four DCX analogs (6-29) were synthesized and evaluated against the non-drug-resistant HIV-1 NL4-3 strain, and selected analogs were also screened for their ability to inhibit the RTMDR-1 strain. Compared with the control 2-ethyl-3′,4′-di-O-(-)-camphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (2-EDCP, 2), one of the best anti-HIV coumarin derivatives in our prior study, three DCX compounds (7, 12, and 22) showed better activity against both HIV strains with an EC50 range of 0.062 – 0.081 μM, and five additional compounds (8, 11, 16, 18, and 21) exhibited comparable anti-HIV potency. Six DCX analogs (7, 11-12, 18, and 21-22) also showed enhanced selectivity index (SI) values in comparison to the control. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) information suggested that the extended conjugated system of the pyranoxanthone skeleton facilitates the interaction of the small DCX molecule within the viral binding pocket, consequently leading to enhanced anti-HIV activity and selectivity. Compared to DCP compounds, DCX analogs are a more promising new class of anti-HIV agents. PMID:22063755

  15. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed.

  16. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Macrocyclized Betulin Derivatives as a Novel Class of Anti-HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Jones, Stacey A; Jeffery, Jerry L; Miranda, Sonia R; Galardi, Cristin M; Irlbeck, David M; Brown, Kevin W; McDanal, Charlene B; Han, Nianhe; Gao, Daxin; Wu, Yongyong; Shen, Bin; Liu, Chunyu; Xi, Caiming; Yang, Heping; Li, Rui; Yu, Yajun; Sun, Yufei; Jin, Zhimin; Wang, Erjuan; Johns, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    A macrocycle provides diverse functionality and stereochemical complexity in a conformationally preorganized ring structure, and it occupies a unique chemical space in drug discovery. However, the synthetic challenge to access this structural class is high and hinders the exploration of macrocycles. In this study, efficient synthetic routes to macrocyclized betulin derivatives have been established. The macrocycle containing compounds showed equal potency compared to bevirimat in multiple HIV-1 antiviral assays. The synthesis and biological evaluation of this novel series of HIV-1 maturation inhibitors will be discussed.

  19. Anti-AIDS agents 86. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of 2′,3′-seco-3′-nor DCP and DCK analogues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Cheng, Ming; Liu, Faqiang; Xia, Peng; Qian, Keduo; Yu, Donglei; Xia, Yi; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Chen, Chin-Ho; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing study of novel anti-HIV agents with drug-like structures and properties, 30 1′-O-, 1′-S-, 4′-O- and 4′-substituted-2′,3′-seco-3′-nor DCP and DCK analogues (8–37) were designed and synthesized. All newly synthesized seco-compounds were screened against HIV-1NL4-3 and a multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR) strain in the TZM-bl cell line, using seco-DCK (7) and 2-ethyl-DCP (4) as controls. Several compounds (14, 18, 19, 22–24, and 32) exhibited potent anti-HIV activity with EC50 values ranging from 0.93 to 1.93 μM and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 20 to 39. 1′-O-Isopropoxy-2′,3′-seco-3′-nor-DCP (12) showed the greatest potency among the newly synthesized compounds with EC50 values of 0.47 and 0.88 μM, and TI of 96 and 51, respectively, against HIV-1NL4-3 and RTMDR strains. The seco-compounds exhibited better chemical stability in acidic conditions compared with DCP and DCK compounds. Overall, the results suggested that seco-DCP analogues with simplified structures may be more favorable for development as novel anti-HIV candidates. PMID:21864952

  20. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group.

  1. Quantitative evaluation and optimization of co-drugging to improve anti-HIV latency therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor C.; Fong, Linda E.; Adams, Nicholas M.; Xue, Qiong; Dey, Siddharth S.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) latency remains a significant obstacle to curing infected patients. One promising therapeutic strategy is to purge the latent cellular reservoir by activating latent HIV with latency-reversing agents (LRAs). In some cases, co-drugging with multiple LRAs is necessary to activate latent infections, but few studies have established quantitative criteria for determining when co-drugging is required. Here we systematically quantified drug interactions between histone deacetylase inhibitors and transcriptional activators of HIV and found that the need for co-drugging is determined by the proximity of latent infections to the chromatin-regulated viral gene activation threshold at the viral promoter. Our results suggest two classes of latent viral integrations: those far from the activation threshold that benefit from co-drugging, and those close to the threshold that are efficiently activated by a single drug. Using a primary T cell model of latency, we further demonstrated that the requirement for co-drugging was donor dependent, suggesting that the host may set the level of repression of latent infections. Finally, we showed that single drug or co-drugging doses could be optimized, via repeat stimulations, to minimize unwanted side effects while maintaining robust viral activation. Our results motivate further study of patient-specific latency-reversing strategies. PMID:26191086

  2. Synthesis and bioevaluation of substituted chalcones, coumaranones and other flavonoids as anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Cole, Amy L; Hossain, Sandra; Cole, Alex M; Phanstiel, Otto

    2016-06-15

    A series of chalcone, flavone, coumaranone and other flavonoid compounds were screened for their anti HIV-1 activity in two cell culture models using TZM-bl and PM1 cells. Within the systems evaluated, the most promising compounds contained either an α- or β-hydroxy-carbonyl motif within their structure (e.g., 8 and 9). Efficacious substituents were identified and used to design new HIV inhibitors with increased potency and lower cytotoxicity. Of the scaffolds evaluated, specific chalcones were found to provide the best balance between anti-HIV potency and low host cell toxicity. Chalcone 8l was shown to inhibit different clinical isolates of HIV in a dose-dependent manner (e.g., IC50 typically⩽5μM). Inhibition of HIV infection experiments using TZM-bl cells demonstrated that chalcone 8l and flavonol 9c had IC50 values of 4.7μM and 10.4μM, respectively. These insights were used to design new chalcones 8o and 8p. Rewardingly, chalcones 8o and 8p (at 10μM) each gave >92% inhibition of viral propagation without impacting PM1 host cell viability. Inhibition of viral propagation significantly increased (60-90%) when PM1 cells were pre-incubated with chalcone 8o, but not with the related flavonol 9c. These results suggested that chalcone 8o may be of value as both a HIV prophylactic and therapy. In summary, O-benzyl-substituted chalcones were identified as promising anti-HIV agents for future investigation.

  3. The validation and evaluation of anti-HIV testing algorithm used in mobile clinic setting for men who have sex with men in metropolitan Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pankam, Tippawan; Saensiriphan, Sarun; Areeyolwattana, Suphackok; Barisri, Napapat; Pengnonyang, Supabhorn; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2017-04-01

    Same-day anti-HIV testing algorithm is recommended by Thai National Guidelines. We compared performance characteristics of algorithms used in a mobile clinic and a facility-based clinic for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Bangkok. Mobile clinic samples collected from 4 saunas and 2 spa venues were tested by Alere DetermineTM HIV 1/2, followed by DoubleCheck GoldTM Ultra HIV 1/2 and SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0. All samples were re-tested at the Thai Red Cross Anonymous Clinic (TRCAC) by Architect HIV Ag/Ab or Elecsys HIV combi PT, followed by Alere DetermineTM HIV 1/2 and Serodia HIV 1/2. Non-reactive samples were tested by Aptima nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and reactive/inconclusive samples were tested by less-sensitive immunoassays (IA) and HIV-1 RNA to detect acute HIV infection (positive NAAT or non-reactive IA/positive HIV-1 RNA). Of 233 MSM, 36 (15.5%) had HIV infection diagnosed using mobile clinic algorithm. Two additional acute HIV cases (1 positive NAAT and 1 reactive Architect with detectable HIV-1 RNA) were diagnosed using TRCAC algorithm. The mobile clinic algorithm had a sensitivity of 94.9% (95% CI: 82.7, 99.4) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 98.1, 100). Use of whole blood on rapid test kits demonstrated satisfactory performance and allowed same-day HIV test result through a mobile clinic model. For populations with high HIV incidence, careful history taking to define the window period is crucial and repeat testing must be encouraged if the testing algorithm does not include 4th generation anti-HIV assay or NAAT.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 activities of extracts and phenolics from Smilax china L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Xin; Qian, Jing-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Four extracts (EtOH, CHCl3, EtOAc, and BuOH) and five phenolics (dihydrokaempferol (1), resveratrol (2), kaempferol-7-O-β-D-glucoside (3), dihydrokaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside (4), oxyresveratrol (5)) from Smilax china L. was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activities and cytotoxicity activities in vitro. All these extracts and phenolics showed lower or no cytotoxicity at a concentration ranged from 0.8 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL, but some showed potential anti-HIV-1 activities, that is, BuOH extract and compound 2 showed higher anti-HIV-1 activities than other extracts and compounds in the tested concentrations. EtOAc extract and compound 1 and 3 showed moderate anti-HIV-1 activities at a concentration higher than 4 μg/mL. In the end, the structure-activity relationship of four extracts and five phenolics was discussed.

  5. Peltophorum africanum, a traditional South African medicinal plant, contains an anti HIV-1 constituent, betulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Theo, Andros; Masebe, Tracy; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Wada, Shoko; Obi, Chikwelu Larry; Bessong, Pascal Obong; Usuzawa, Motoki; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Hattori, Toshio

    2009-02-01

    The biodiversity of medicinal plants in South Africa makes them rich sources of leading compounds for the development of novel drugs. Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae) is a deciduous tree widespread in South Africa. The stem bark has been traditionally employed to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throat, wounds, human immunodeficiency virus/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), venereal diseases and infertility. To evaluate these ethnobotanical clues and isolate lead compounds, butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the stem bark were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 using MAGI CCR5+ cells, which are derived from HeLa cervical cancer cells and express HIV receptor CD4, a chemokine receptor CCR5 and HIV-LTR-beta- galactosidase. Bioassay-guided fractionation using silica gel chromatography was also conducted. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of the stem bark of Peltophorum africanum showed inhibitory activity against HIV-1, CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic viruses. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts yielded previously reported anti-HIV compounds, (+)-catechin, a flavonoid, and bergenin, a C-galloylglycoside, respectively. Furthermore, we identified betulinic acid from the ethyl acetate fraction for the first time. The fractions, which contained betulinic acid, showed the highest selective index. We therefore describe the presence of betulinic acid, a not well-known anti-HIV compound, in an African medicinal herb, which has been used for therapy, and claim that betulinic acid is the predominant anti-HIV-1 constituent of Peltophorum africanum. These data suggest that betulinic acid and its analogues could be used as potential therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

  6. Tricyclononene carboxamide derivatives as novel anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming-xin; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Xu-qing; Lu, Hong; Yun, Liu-hong; Jiang, Shibo; Dai, Qiu-yun

    2010-09-01

    By modifying the chemical structure of anti-orthopoxvirus compound ST-246, we designed and synthesized a series of tricyclononene carboxamide derivatives and tested their anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity. We found that benzoimidazol-containing compound 7g was highly effective in inhibiting HIV-1 R5 infection with an IC(50) value of 0.41 microM and a selectivity index of 292, but it exhibited no significant inhibitory activity on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease. CoMFA was used to analyze structure-activity relationships with good predictive power (r(2) = 0.921; q(2) = 0.582). Moreover, the CoMFA model showed that the length of the molecule, the amide, and the amine moieties all played crucial roles in anti-HIV activity. These results suggest that 7g may serve as a lead for the development of novel anti-HIV-1 therapies. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Naturally derived anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Asres, Kaleab; Seyoum, Ameha; Veeresham, Ciddi; Bucar, Franz; Gibbons, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The urgent need for new anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is a global concern. In addition to obvious economical and commercial hurdles, HIV/AIDS patients are faced with multifarious difficulties associated with the currently approved anti-HIV drugs. Adverse effects, the emergence of drug resistance and the narrow spectrum of activity have limited the therapeutic usefulness of the various reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors that are currently available on the market. This has driven many scientists to look for new anti-retrovirals with better efficacy, safety and affordability. As has always been the case in the search for cures, natural sources offer great promise. Several natural products, mostly of plant origin have been shown to possess promising activities that could assist in the prevention and/or amelioration of the disease. Many of these anti-HIV agents have other medicinal values as well, which afford them further prospective as novel leads for the development of new drugs that can deal with both the virus and the various disorders that characterize HIV/AIDS. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HIV natural products. In the review anti-HIV agents have been classified according to their chemical classes rather than their target in the HIV replicative cycle, which is the most frequently encountered approach. Perusal of the literature revealed that most of these promising naturally derived anti-HIV compounds are flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polysaccharides or proteins. It is our strong conviction that the results and experiences with many of the anti-HIV natural products will inspire and motivate even more researchers to look for new leads from plants and other natural sources.

  8. Rationally designed multitarget anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhan, P; Liu, X

    2013-01-01

    Multitarget-directed ligands (MTDLs), an emerging and appealing drug discovery strategy, utilizing a single chemical entity to inhibit multitargets, was confirmed to be effective in reducing the likelihood of drug resistance, diminishing problems of dosing complexity, drug-drug interactions and toxicities, as well as improving patient compliance. The exploration of MTDL strategy should be valuable in anti-HIV drug discovery. In this article, current knowledge and strategies for the rational design of the multitarget and selective anti-HIV agents are described and a number of illustrative examples are given. Moreover, the challenges, limitations and outlook of such novel drug design strategies are also presented, with a goal to highlight the representative paradigms in the rational design of MTDLs, and to help medicinal chemists discover the next generation of multitarget anti-HIV agents.

  9. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Setting the stage for bench-to-bedside movement of anti-HIV RNA inhibitors-gene therapy for AIDS in macaques.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stephen E; Johnson, R Paul

    2006-01-01

    Despite significant progress over the last two decades, treatment of HIV infection remains a tremendous challenge. Although antiretroviral therapy has proved quite effective in most HIV-infected patients, increasing recognition of toxicity and the emergence of multidrug resistant HIV strains has fueled the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Introduction of genes to inhibit HIV replication into CD4+ T lymphocytes or hematopoietic stem cells represents a potentially attractive but still unproven strategy. Despite the availability of a diverse range of molecular strategies that are able to provide potent inhibition of HIV replication in the laboratory, translation of these in vitro successes to in vivo therapies has been difficult. Fundamental challenges facing AIDS gene therapy at the present time includes the need to increase the efficiency of gene transfer in vivo, to confer upon genetically-modified T cells the ability to have a selective growth advantage in vivo, and the development of additional techniques to decrease the probability of emergence of resistant viruses. As one of the leading animal models for AIDS and for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, nonhuman primates are ideally suited to help address many of these basic questions. This review will provide a general overview of RNA-based genetic strategies for inhibition of HIV and SIV replication, criteria to be considered in the selection of promising inhibitory strategies for in vivo use, and key questions that can be addressed in the macaque model.

  11. Natural Products as Anti-HIV Agents and Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND): A Brief Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao V.; Atluri, Venkata S.; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Garcia, Gabriella; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    As the threat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) persists to rise, effective drug treatments are required to treat the infected people. Even though combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) provides stable viral suppression, it is not devoid of undesirable side effects, especially in persons undergoing long-term treatment. The present therapy finds its limitations in the emergence of multidrug resistance and accordingly finding new drugs and novel targets is the need of the hour to treat the infected persons and further to attack HIV reservoirs in the body like brain, lymph nodes to achieve the ultimate goal of complete eradication of HIV and AIDS. Natural products such as plant-originated compounds and plant extracts have enormous potential to become drug leads with anti-HIV and neuroprotective activity. Accordingly, many research groups are exploring the biodiversity of the plant kingdom to find new and better anti-HIV drugs with novel mechanisms of action and for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The basic challenge that still persists is to develop viral replication-targeted therapy using novel anti-HIV compounds with new mode of action, accepted toxicity and less resistance profile. Against this backdrop, the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested the need to evaluate ethno-medicines for the management of HIV/AIDS. Consequently, there is need to evaluate traditional medicine, particularly medicinal plants and other natural products that may yield effective and affordable therapeutic agents. Although there are a good number of reports on traditional uses of plants to treat various diseases, knowledge of herbal remedies used to manage HIV/AIDS and HAND are scanty, vague and not well documented. In this review, plant substances showing a promising action that is anti-HIV and HAND will be explored along with what they interact. Since some plant substances are also known to modulate several cellular

  12. [Anti-HIV activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal fromula Liangcha].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu-Qing; Li, Lei-Ke; Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Peng, Tao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2010-09-01

    To screen and evaluate the anti-HIV activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha. The anti-HIV-1 activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha were evaluated by cytotoxicity assay,syncytium reduction assay, protection for HIV-1 induced lytic assay, and ELISA assay for HIV-1 p24 antigen expression. The primary mechanisms were investigated by fusion inhibition assay, inhibition of viral replication in HIV-1 chronically infected H9 cell and inhibition assay of HIV-1 RT activity. The extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha exhibited potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity on different HIV-1 strains with EC50 range 12.74 -116.87 microg/mL, but weakly inhibited HIV-2 replication. Meantime, it was not significantly cytotoxic in several T lymphocytes cell lines with CC50 range 564.79 - 1699.22 microg/mL. The activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha, inhibition rate more than 50% at the concentration of 5.3 microg/mL. It also weakly inhibited the cell-to-cell fusion in co-culture with EC50 of 101.94 microg/mL. The extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha exhibited potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity on different HIV-1 strains in vitro. Its anti-HIV-1 mechanism might be inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and cell entry.

  13. Thiazoline Peptides and a Tris-Phenethyl Urea from Didemnum molle with Anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Harper, Mary Kay; Pond, Christopher D.; Barrows, Louis R.; Ireland, Chris M.; Wagoner, Ryan M. Van

    2012-01-01

    Summary As part of our screening for anti-HIV agents from marine invertebrates, the MeOH extract of Didemnum molle was tested and showed moderate in vitro anti-HIV activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a large scale extract allowed the identification of two new cyclopeptides, mollamides E and F (1 and 2), and one new tris-phenethyl urea, molleurea A (3). The absolute configurations were established using the advanced Marfey’s method. The three compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity in both an HIV integrase inhibition assay and a cytoprotective cell-based assay. Compound 2 was active in both assays with IC50 values of 39 and 78 µM, respectively. Compound 3 was only active in the cytoprotective cell-based assay with an IC50 value of 60 µM. PMID:22845329

  14. Thiazoline peptides and a tris-phenethyl urea from Didemnum molle with anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Harper, Mary Kay; Pond, Christopher D; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M; Van Wagoner, Ryan M

    2012-08-24

    As part of our screening for anti-HIV agents from marine invertebrates, the MeOH extract of Didemnum molle was tested and showed moderate in vitro anti-HIV activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a large-scale extract allowed the identification of two new cyclopeptides, mollamides E and F (1 and 2), and one new tris-phenethyl urea, molleurea A (3). The absolute configurations were established using the advanced Marfey's method. The three compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity in both an HIV integrase inhibition assay and a cytoprotective cell-based assay. Compound 2 was active in both assays with IC(50) values of 39 and 78 μM, respectively. Compound 3 was active only in the cytoprotective cell-based assay, with an IC(50) value of 60 μM.

  15. Synthesis of 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 activity through an efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling approach.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Esther; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; Gago, Federico; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2002-08-29

    Various synthetic studies for the introduction of several functional groups at position 3' ' of the spiro moiety of TSAO derivatives have been explored. Among them, Stille cross-coupling of 3' '-iodo-TSAO derivatives with different stannanes provided an efficient and straightforward route for the direct and selective functionalization of the 3' '-position of the sultone spiro moiety via carbon-carbon bond formation. The compounds synthesized were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 and HIV-2 replication in cell culture. The introduction of a bromine and particularly an iodine at the 3' '-position conferred the highest anti-HIV-1 activity. In contrast, the presence at this position of (un)substituted vinyl, alkynyl, phenyl, or thienyl groups markedly diminished the anti-HIV-1 activity. Surprisingly, several of the 3' '-alkenyl-substituted TSAO derivatives also gained anti-HIV-2 activity at subtoxic concentrations, an observation that is very unusual for NNRTIs and never observed before for TSAO derivatives. Finally, the anti-HIV-1 activity of some of the 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives is discussed in light of our recently proposed molecular model of interaction of TSAO derivatives with the interphase between the two subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  16. Anti-HIV activities of natural antioxidant caffeic acid derivatives: toward an antiviral supplementation diet.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Fabrice; Cotelle, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was designed to rapidly control HIV replication. It has had a significant impact on patient health and progression of AIDS in developed countries, but its success has not been complete. HAART strategy still suffers from issues of patient compliance, cost, deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, expansion of novel anti-HIV drugs and targets will be critical in the coming years. In this context, discovering anti-HIV agents from natural sources and particularly from plants, may highlight the principle of a nutritional antioxidant antiretroviral diet. In this paper, we review the putative anti-HIV activity of simple caffeic acid derivatives, together with their antioxidant properties. Toxicity, metabolism and bioavailability, when known, will also be detailed. Well-known caffeic acid derivatives, such as chicoric, rosmarinic and lithospermic acids, may be designed as future leads multi-target anti-HIV compounds and the plants and vegetables containing them as potent nutritional therapeutic supplementation source. They are not expected to replace the actual antiretroviral therapy, but more likely, to complete and perhaps lighten it by adapted diet.

  17. Clinical trial methodology and clinical cohorts: the importance of complete follow-up in trials evaluating the virological efficacy of anti-HIV medicines.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens D

    2004-02-01

    It has been common practice in randomized trials of HIV medicines to classify switches away from the original therapy as failures in analyses of virological effect, in line with an HIV-RNA measurement above a given level of quantification. This approach precludes the ability to identify the possible effects of a given therapy on those of a subsequent therapy. This review explores whether there have been changes in the reporting of randomized trials since the importance of continuous follow-up throughout the study period was initially raised 2 years ago. Follow-up is still likely to be discontinued at a premature switch from study medication in a large number of the randomized trials published in 2002-2003. However, some studies, all initiated by investigators, did follow patients throughout the study period. In three of the studies, the proportions of patients with virological failure assessed with and without data after the premature discontinuation of randomized therapy could be elicited. Substantial differences were seen in the comparisons of two highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens according to the choice of analytical approach. In all three studies significant differences were observed between the regimens according to one approach, but not to the other. The notation of treatment switch equals failure leads to an imprecise measurement of virological effect, and complete follow-up throughout the study period should be strongly encouraged, thus enabling several supplementary analyses of the virological effect of the treatment strategies being compared.

  18. The anti-HIV activities of photoactive terthiophenes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Harris, L; Marles, R J; Arnason, J T

    1993-08-01

    Various synthetic analogues of the naturally occurring terthiophene, alpha-terthienyl (alpha T), were evaluated for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds were incubated individually with a known amount of the virus, with or without UVA radiation (long-wavelength ultraviolet) and residual virus was monitored for its ability to produce cytopathic effects in cell culture and the production of virus-specific protein (p24). The basic terthiophene structure was essential for good anti-HIV activity, although various side chains, such as alcohols, bromo, methyl, thiomethyl and trimethylsilyl groups, permitted retention of maximum activity. Under optimum conditions, as little as 12 ng/mL of these compounds (i.e. approximately 3 x 10(-8) M) could inactivate 10(3) infectious virions. None of the compounds however were more active than alpha T itself. In all cases, UVA radiation was essential. Several side chains decreased the antiviral efficacy, and some side chains abrogated the activity.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of tricyclic guanidine analogues of batzelladine K for antimalarial, antileishmanial, antibacterial, antifungal and anti-HIV activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nafees; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G.; Khan, Shabana I.; Jacob, Melissa; Tekwani, Babu L.; Sabde, Sudeep; Mitra, Debashis; Singh, Inder Pal; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Bhutani, Kamlesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Fifty analogues of batzelladine K were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antimalarial (Plasmodium falciparum), antileishmanial (Leishmania donovani), antimicrobial (panel of bacteria and fungi), antiviral (HIV-1) activities. Analogues 14h and 20l exhibited potential antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive D6 strain with IC50 1.25 and 0.88 μM and chloroquine-resistant W2 strain with IC50 1.64 and 1.07 μM, respectively. Analogues 12c and 14c having nonyl substitution showed the most potent antileishmanial activity with IC50 2.39 and 2.78 μM and IC90 11.27 and 12.76 μM respectively. Three analogues 12c, 14c and 14i were the most active against various pathogenic bacteria and fungi with IC50 <3.02 μM and MIC/MBC/MFC <6 μM. Analogue 20l having pentyl and methyl substituents on tricycle showed promising activities against all pathogens. However, none was found active against HIV-1. Our study demonstrated that the tricyclic guanidine compounds provide new structral class for broad spectrum activity. PMID:23534411

  20. Anti-HIV activity of Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sabde, Sudeep; Bodiwala, Hardik S; Karmase, Aniket; Deshpande, Preeti J; Kaur, Amandeep; Ahmed, Nafees; Chauthe, Siddheshwar K; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G; Phadke, Rasika U; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients face great socio-economic difficulties in obtaining treatment. There is an urgent need for new, safe, and cheap anti-HIV agents. Traditional medicinal plants are a valuable source of novel anti-HIV agents and may offer alternatives to expensive medicines in future. Various medicinal plants or plant-derived natural products have shown strong anti-HIV activity and are under various stages of clinical development in different parts of the world. The present study was directed towards assessment of anti-HIV activity of various extracts prepared from Indian medicinal plants. The plants were chosen on the basis of similarity of chemical constituents with reported anti-HIV compounds or on the basis of their traditional usage as immunomodulators. Different extracts were prepared by Soxhlet extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning. Ninety-two extracts were prepared from 23 plants. Anti-HIV activity was measured in a human CD4+ T-cell line, CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Nine extracts of 8 different plants significantly reduced viral production in CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Aegle marmelos, Argemone mexicana, Asparagus racemosus, Coleus forskohlii, and Rubia cordifolia demonstrated promising anti-HIV potential and were investigated for their active principles.

  1. Development of an implantable infusion pump for sustained anti-HIV drug administration.

    PubMed

    Baert, Lieven; Schueller, Laurent; Tardy, Yanik; Macbride, Doug; Klooster, Gerben van't; Borghys, Herman; Clessens, Ellen; Van Den Mooter, Guy; Van Gyseghem, Elke; Van Remoortere, Pieter; Wigerinck, Piet; Rosier, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Factors such as insufficient drug potency, non-compliance and restricted tissue penetration contribute to incomplete suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the difficulty to control this infection. Infusion via standard catheters can be a source of infection, which is potentially life threatening in these patients. We developed an implantable infusion pump, allowing to accommodate large volumes (16-50mL) of high viscous solutions (up to 23.96mPas at 39 degrees C) of anti-HIV agents and providing sustained release of medication: a standard Codman 3000 pump, which was initially developed to release aqueous solutions ( approximately 0.7mPas) into the spinal cord such as for pain medication, was transformed for release of viscous solutions up to 40mPas by adapting the diameter of the capillary flow restrictor, the capillary length and way of catheterisation--by placing the indwelling catheter in the vena cava. A pilot study of the pump implanted in 2 dogs showed continuous steady-state release of the protease inhibitor darunavir (25mg/dog/day administered for 25 days), thereby achieving plasma concentration levels of approximately 40ng/mL. Steady-state plasma levels were reproducible after monthly refill of the pumps. In conclusion, the implantable adapted Codman 3000 constant-flow infusion pump customized to anti-HIV therapy allows sustained release of anti-HIV medication and may represent an opportunity to reduce the pill burden and complexity of dosing schemes associated with common anti-HIV therapy.

  2. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery.

  3. Efficient transduction of cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 genes by a gene-regulatable lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Yasuhiko; Hieda, Kuniko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2009-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors modified from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) offer a promising approach for gene therapy, facilitating transduction of genes into non-dividing cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transducing cytotoxic or anti-HIV genes, however, the vector must avoid self-inhibition by the transgene that can lead to a disruption in production of infectious virions. In this study, we constructed two HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors harboring the mifepristone-inducible gene expression unit in either the forward or the reverse orientation with respect to the direction of viral genomic RNA. The ability of these vectors to transduce cytotoxic and anti-HIV genes was evaluated. When human CD14 was used as a transgene, infectious lentiviral vectors were produced by both forward and reverse vector systems. CD14 expression was efficiently induced in cells transduced by both lentiviral vectors following treatment with mifepristone. However, a higher level of basal transgene expression was observed in the forward vector system in the absence of mifepristone. In contrast, high titers of infectious lentiviral vector containing the cytotoxic vesicular stomatitis virus M gene were successfully generated using the reverse vector, but not the forward vector. In addition, when a VPS4Bdominant negative mutant against HIV-1 budding was cloned into the reverse vector, significant amounts of lentiviral vector were obtained. Subsequent transduction of cells with the VPS4B mutant resulted in approximately 50% inhibition of HIV-1 production only in the presence of mifepristone. Our study thus demonstrates that incorporation of a mifepristone-regulatable gene expression unit in the reverse orientation makes significant advances toward development of a lentiviral vector that allows transduction of harmful genes.

  4. Zinc coupling potentiates anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Tian; Pu, Shao-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2004-11-12

    Baicalin (BA) has been shown with anti-HIV-1 activity. Zinc is a nutrient element. The anti-HIV-1 activity of zinc complex of baicalin (BA-Zn) in vitro was studied and compared with the anti-HIV-1 activities between BA and BA-Zn in the present study. Our results suggested that BA-Zn has lower cytotoxicity and higher anti-HIV-1 activity compared with those of BA in vitro. The CC50s of BA-Zn and BA were 221.52 and 101.73 microM, respectively. The cytotoxicity of BA-Zn was about 1.2-fold lower than that of BA. The BA and BA-Zn inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytium formation, HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 RT production. The EC50s of BA-Zn on inhibiting HIV-1 induced syncytium formation (29.08 microM) and RT production (31.17 microM) were lower than those of BA (43.27 and 47.34 microM, respectively). BA-Zn was more effective than BA in inhibiting the activities of recombinant RT and HIV-1 entry into host cells. Zinc coupling enhanced the anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

  5. 2'-Deoxythymidine adducts from the anti-HIV drug nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Alexandra M M; Wolf, Benjamin; Oliveira, M Conceição; Beland, Frederick A; Marques, M Matilde

    2013-04-26

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) used against HIV-1. Currently, NVP is the most widely used anti-HIV drug in developing countries, both in combination therapy and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Despite its efficacy against HIV, NVP produces a variety of toxic responses, including hepatotoxicity and skin rash. It is also associated with increased incidences of hepatoneoplasias in rodents. In addition, epidemiological data suggest that NNRTI use is a risk factor for non-AIDS-defining cancers in HIV-positive patients. Current evidence supports the involvement of metabolic activation to reactive electrophiles in NVP toxicity. NVP metabolism includes oxidation to 12-hydroxy-NVP; subsequent Phase II sulfonation produces an electrophilic metabolite, 12-sulfoxy-NVP, capable of reacting with DNA to yield covalent adducts. Since 2'-deoxythymidine (dT) adducts from several alkylating agents are regarded as having significant mutagenic/carcinogenic potential, we investigated the formation of NVP-dT adducts under biomimetic conditions. Toward this goal, we initially prepared and characterized synthetic NVP-dT adduct standards using a palladium-mediated Buchwald-Hartwig coupling strategy. The synthetic standards enabled the identification, by LC-ESI-MS, of 12-(2'-deoxythymidin-N3-yl)-nevirapine (N3-NVP-dT) in the enzymatic hydrolysate of salmon testis DNA reacted with 12-mesyloxy-NVP, a synthetic surrogate for 12-sulfoxy-NVP. N3-NVP-dT, a potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA lesion, was also the only dT-specific adduct detected upon reaction of dT with 12-mesyloxy-NVP. Our data suggest that N3-NVP-dT may be formed in vivo and play a role in the hepatotoxicity and/or putative hepatocarcinogenicity of NVP.

  6. Designed multiple ligands: an emerging anti-HIV drug discovery paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the effect of AIDS single-target chemotherapy is severely compromised by the quick emergence of resistant HIV strains. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) combines HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors with protease inhibitors or integrase inhibitors, and successfully suppresses HIV viral load to an undetectable level, dramatically improving the life quality of AIDS patients. However, the benefits of this approach are often compromised by poor patient compliance. Recently, there has been a move toward multicomponent drugs whereby two or more agents are coformulated in a single tablet to make dosing regimes simpler and thereby to improve patient compliance, but there are significant risks involved in the development of multicomponent drugs. Designed multiple ligands (DMLs) therapy as an emerging anti-HIV drug discovery paradigm, using a single entity to inhibit multitargets could yield improved patient compliance, thus reducing the likelihood of drug resistance. The exploration of such multifunctional ligands has proven valuable for anti-HIV leads discovery. However, presently many multifunctional scaffolds were first discovered by serendipity or screening; rational design by combining existing monofunctional scaffolds remains an enormous challenge. A key issue in the design of multiple ligands is attaining a balanced activity at each target of interest while simultaneously achieving a wider selectivity and a suitable pharmacokinetic profile. This review of literature examples introduce numerous attractive lead compounds, capable of interfering with different stages of HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis, which reveals trends and insights that might provide valuable clues for novel anti-HIV drug design and help medicinal chemists discover the next generation of multiple ligands.

  7. Hydroxytyrosol: a new class of microbicide displaying broad anti-HIV-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Luis M.; Beltrán, Manuela; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; García-Pérez, Javier; de la Torre, Humberto E.; González, Nuria; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; Auñón, David; Capa, Laura; Gómez-Acebo, Eduardo; Alcamí, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity and activity against HIV of 5-hydroxytyrosol as a potential microbicide. Design: The anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenolic compound, was tested against wild-type HIV-1 and viral clones resistant to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. In addition to its activity against founder viruses, different viral subtypes and potential synergy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and emtricitabine was also tested. 5-Hydroxytyrosol toxicity was evaluated in vivo in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Methods: We have cloned pol gene from drug-resistant HIV-1 isolated from infected patients and env gene from Fiebeg III/IV patients or A, C, D, E, F and G subtypes in the NL4.3-Ren backbone. 5-Hydroxytyrosol anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated in infections of MT-2, U87-CCR5 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin + interleukin-2 with viruses obtained through 293T transfections. Inhibitory concentration 50% and cytotoxic concentration 50% were calculated. Synergy was analysed according to Chou and Talalay method. In-vivo toxicity was evaluated for 14 days in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Results: 5-Hydroxytyrosol inhibited HIV-1 infections of recombinant or wild-type viruses in all the target cells tested. Moreover, 5-hydroxytyrosol showed similar inhibitory concentration 50% values for infections with NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and INIs resistant viruses; founder viruses and all the subtypes tested. Combination of 5-hydroxytyrosol with tenofovir was found to be synergistic, whereas it was additive with lamivudine and emtricitabine. In-vivo toxicity of 5-hydroxytyrosol was very low even at the highest tested doses. Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytyrosol displayed a broad anti-HIV-1 activity in different cells systems in the absent of in-vivo toxicity, therefore supporting its

  8. Henrin A: A New Anti-HIV Ent-Kaurane Diterpene from Pteris henryi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan-Fei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jing-Jie; Song, Xun; Ku, Chuen-Fai; Zou, Juan; Li, Ji-Xin; Rong, Li-Jun; Pan, Lu-Tai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Henrin A (1), a new ent-kaurane diterpene, was isolated from the leaves of Pteris henryi. The chemical structure was elucidated by analysis of the spectroscopic data including one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, and was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The compound was evaluated for its biological activities against a panel of cancer cell lines, dental bacterial biofilm formation, and HIV. It displayed anti-HIV potential with an IC50 value of 9.1 µM (SI = 12.2). PMID:26610490

  9. Synthetic galactomannans with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Bai, Shiming; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Han, Shuqin; Yoshida, Takashi

    2015-10-05

    Ring-opening polymerization of a new 1,6-anhydro disaccharide monomer, 1, 6-anhydro-2, 3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-(2', 3', 4', 6'-tetra-O-benzyl-α-d-galactopyranosyl)-α-d-mannopyranose, was carried out using PF5 as a catalyst under high vacuum at -60°C to give galactose branched mannopyranan (synthetic galactomannan), 4-O-α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-d-mannopyranan, after debenzylation with Na in liquid NH3. The ring-opening copolymerization with 1, 6-anhydro-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranose in various feeds was also performed to give synthetic galactomannans with various proportions of galactose branches. After sulfation, sulfated synthetic galactomannans were found to have anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity as high and low as those of standard curdlan and dextran sulfates, respectively, which are potent anti-HIV sulfated polysaccharides with low cytotoxicity. The anti-HIV mechanism of sulfated synthetic galactomannans used by poly-l-lysine as a model peptide of the HIV surface protein was estimated by using SPR, DSL, and zeta potential measurements, revealing the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged amino groups.

  10. Anti-HIV diphyllin glycosides from Justicia gendarussa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Liu, Kang-Lun; Wang, Dong-Ying; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van Hung; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-04-01

    In a search for new anti-HIV active leads from over several thousands of plant extracts, we have identified a potent plant lead. The active plant is determined as Justicia gendarussa (Acanthaceae), a medicinal plant that has been used for the treatment of injury, arthritis and rheumatism in Asia including China. Our bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol extract of the stems and barks of the plant led to the isolation of two anti-HIV compounds, justiprocumins A and B. The compounds are identified as new arylnaphthalide lignans (ANL) glycosides. We further determined that the ANL glycosides are the chemical constituents that contribute to the anti-HIV activity of this plant. Justiprocumin B displayed potent activity against a broad spectrum of HIV strains with IC50 values in the range of 15-21 nM (AZT, IC50 77-95 nM). The compound also displayed potent inhibitory activity against the NRTI (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-11617-1) of the analogue (AZT) as well as the NNRTI (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-1N119) of the analogue (nevaripine). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural antimicrobial peptides as promising anti-HIV candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains to be one of the major global health problems. It is thus necessary to identify novel therapeutic molecules to combat HIV-1. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been recognized as promising templates for developing topical microbicides. This review systematically discusses over 80 anti-HIV peptides annotated in the antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP). Such peptides have been discovered from bacteria, plants, and animals. Examples include gramicidin and bacteriocins from bacteria, cyclotides from plants, melittins and cecropins from insects, piscidins from fish, ascaphins, caerins, dermaseptins, esculentins, and maximins from amphibians, and cathelicidins and defensins from vertebrates. These peptides appear to work by different mechanisms and could block viral entry in multiple ways. As additional advantages, such anti-HIV peptides may possess other desired features such as antibacterial, antiparasital, spermicidal, and anticancer activity. With continued optimization of peptide stability, production, formulation and delivery methods, it is anticipated that some of these compounds may eventually become new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26834391

  12. Stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles for multiple anti-HIV microbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Namita; Oh, Byeongtaek; Lee, Chi H.

    2016-05-01

    This study is aimed to develop and evaluate an advanced intravaginal formulation for the delivery of multiple anti-HIV microbicides. Novel stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles (NPs) which protected the encapsulated drugs from being degraded in acidic pH conditions were made of Eudragit S-100® (ES100®), a pH-sensitive polymer. ES100® NPs were prepared using the quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique and loaded with two microbicides namely Tenofovir (TNF) and Etravirine (ETV). The effects of various fabrication parameters on the formulation properties were evaluated for the optimization of ES100® NPs. The morphology of the ES100® NPs was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of NPs containing microbicides individually or in a combination was assessed using cell viability and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. The cellular uptake rates of the model microbicides by human vaginal epithelial cells, VK2 E6/E7 cells, were evaluated using confocal microscopy and florescence-assisted cell sorting technique. ES100® NPs had a spherical shape, smooth surface, and uniform texture with a little aggregation. The average particle size for NPs loaded with TNF ranged from 125 to 230 nm, whereas those for ETV-loaded NPs ranged from 160 to 280 nm. ES100® NPs had zeta potential in the range of -5 to -10 mV. In-vitro release studies displayed the potential benefits of ES100® NPs in retaining and protecting the loaded microbicides at vaginal pH (acidic), but immediately releasing them as the pH changes to neutral or 7.4 (physiological pH). Cell viability studies demonstrated that ES100® NPs did not exert any cytotoxicity individually or in a combination of both microbicides. TEER measurements confirmed that ES100® NPs loaded with TNF and ETV did not cause any changes in the barrier integrity of VK2 E6/E7 cell monolayer. The cellular uptake study revealed that ES100® NPs were taken by vaginal epithelial cells through the endocytosis

  13. A new vinyl selenone-based domino approach to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles endowed with anti-HIV RT activity.

    PubMed

    Palomba, M; Rossi, L; Sancineto, L; Tramontano, E; Corona, A; Bagnoli, L; Santi, C; Pannecouque, C; Tabarrini, O; Marini, F

    2016-02-14

    Herein, we disclose a general and flexible access to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles by a domino Michael/intramolecular nucleophilic substitution pathway with variously substituted vinyl selenones and enolizable oxindoles in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The spirocyclopropyl oxindole being a privileged scaffold, some of the synthesized compounds were selected for biological evaluation. Compound showed selective anti-HIV-1 activity thanks to its ability to inhibit the reverse transcriptase.

  14. The rate of anti-HIV seropositivity among donated cadavers: experience in a cadaver donation center.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Agthong, Sithiporn

    2002-01-01

    Cadavers are crucial for the medical education provided by medical schools. However, currently, donation is the only way to obtain cadavers for education in Thailand. Moreover, some traditional beliefs result in insufficient numbers of cadavers. Apart from finding donors, the occupational health of the workers in the cadaver donation center and the users, the medical students, residents, and staffs should be addressed. Screening for anti-HIV in donated organs is the current trend in transplantation medicine. Therefore, screening for anti-HIV in donated cadavers is useful. Here, we report the rate of anti-HIV seropositivity in cadavers in a 1-year period in our setting, the largest Thai Red Cross Society hospital. Of the total 84 cadavers received, two cadavers (2.4%) were anti-HIV seropositive. With the increasing rate of anti-HIV, screening for anti-HIV serology in donated cadavers for medical teaching is of great benefit.

  15. Anti-Tat and anti-HIV activities of trimers of n-alkylglycines.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Moure, Alejandra; Masip, Isabel; Messeguer, Angel; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2006-02-28

    Transcription of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is activated by viral Tat protein which regulates HIV-LTR transcription and elongation. In the present report, the evaluation of the anti-Tat activity of a combinatorial library composed of 5120 N-trialkylglycines is reported. The antiviral activity was studied through luciferase-based assays targeting the HIV-1 promoter activation induced by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We identified five peptoids with specific anti-HIV-1 Tat activity; none of these peptoids affected the binding of HIV-1 Tat protein to the viral TAR RNA. Using a recombinant-virus assay in which luciferase activity correlates with the rate of HIV-1 transcription we have detected that one of the five selected peptoids, NC37-37-15C, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1-LTR transcription in both primary T lymphocytes and transformed cell lines. The inhibitory effect of NC37-37-15C, which is additive with azidothymidine (AZT), correlates with its ability to inhibit CTD phosphorylation and shows a suitable profile for development of novel anti-HIV-1 drugs. Likewise, the structural simplicity of N-alkylglycine oligomers makes these peptidomimetics amenable to structural manipulation, thus facilitating the optimisation of lead molecules for drug-like properties.

  16. Development of water-soluble polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers as novel and highly potent topical anti-HIV-2 microbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briz, Verónica; Sepúlveda-Crespo, Daniel; Diniz, Ana Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Rodes, Berta; de La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Taveira, Nuno; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    The development of topical microbicide formulations for vaginal delivery to prevent HIV-2 sexual transmission is urgently needed. Second- and third-generation polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers with a silicon atom core and 16 sulfonate (G2-S16), napthylsulfonate (G2-NS16) and sulphate (G3-Sh16) end-groups have shown potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. However, their antiviral activity against HIV-2 and mode of action have not been probed. Cytotoxicity, anti-HIV-2, anti-sperm and antimicrobial activities of dendrimers were determined. Analysis of combined effects of triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir was performed by using CalcuSyn software. We also assessed the mode of antiviral action on the inhibition of HIV-2 infection through a panel of different in vitro antiviral assays: attachment, internalization in PBMCs, inactivation and cell-based fusion. Vaginal irritation and histological analysis in female BALB/c mice were evaluated. Our results suggest that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 exert anti-HIV-2 activity at an early stage of viral replication inactivating the virus, inhibiting cell-to-cell HIV-2 transmission, and blocking the binding of gp120 to CD4, and the HIV-2 entry. Triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir increased the anti-HIV-2 activity, consistent with synergistic interactions (CIwt: 0.33-0.66). No vaginal irritation was detected in BALB/c mice after two consecutive applications for 2 days with 3% G2-S16. Our results have clearly shown that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 have high potency against HIV-2 infection. The modes of action confirm their multifactorial and non-specific ability, suggesting that these dendrimers deserve further studies as potential candidate microbicides to prevent vaginal/rectal HIV-1/HIV-2 transmission in humans.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 potency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system insufficient to fully inhibit viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ebina, Hirotaka; Kanemura, Yuka; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    The range of genome-editing tools has recently been expanded. In particular, an RNA-guided genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated 9 (Cas9) system, has many applications for human diseases. In this study, guide RNA (gRNA) to target gag, pol and a long terminal repeat of HIV-1 was designed and used to generate gRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors. An HIV-1-specific gRNA and Cas9 were stably dually transduced into a highly HIV-1-susceptible human T-cell line and the inhibitory ability of the anti-HIV-1 CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vector assessed. Although clear inhibition of the early phase of HIV-1 infection was observed, as evaluated by a VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 reporter system, the anti-HIV-1 potency in multiple rounds of wild type (WT) viral replication was insufficient, either because of generation of resistant viruses or overcoming of the activity of the WT virus. Thus, there are potential difficulties that must be addressed when considering anti-HIV-1 treatment with the CRISPR/Cas9 system alone.

  18. Developments of indoles as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Lv, Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS has always been a global health threat and the leading cause of deaths due to the rapid emergence of drug-resistance and unwanted metabolic side effects. Every day in 2007 an estimated 6850 people were newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the past 28 years the rapid worldwide spread of AIDS has prompted an intense research effort to discover compounds that could effectively inhibit HIV. The development of new, selective and safe inhibitors for the treatment of HIV, therefore, still remains a high priority for medical research. To the best of our knowledge, the indole derivatives have been considered as one class of promising HIV-1 inhibitors, such as delavirdine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997 for use in combination with other antiretrovirals in adults with HIV infection. In this review we focus on the synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of indole derivatives, in the meantime, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for some derivatives are also surveyed. It will pave the way for the design of indole derivatives as anti-HIV-1 drugs in the future.

  19. AIDS: Anti-HIV Agents, Therapies, and Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-26

    GOTZSCHE, M. BUHL, Y. SALIM & K. SCHMIDT. 1990. Opportunistic infections and malignancies in 231 Danish AIDS patients. AIDS 4: 233-238. 6. GARDNER, M. B...ittractable lupus nephiritis with total Ixio1phoid irrad’atiot.. Ann. Intern. Med. 102: "~ .58, 53. FUKS, Z. S. SrRoBLR. A. -M. BoR01oxi. T SxSAx/lKi. A.%I

  20. Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Rayevskaya, G; Pilipenko, V G; Tkáciková, L; Spivak, N Y; Mikula, I; Chumak, R M

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.

  1. Newer tetracycline derivatives: synthesis, anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and inhibition of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Senchani, Geetha; Banerjee, Debjani

    2007-04-15

    A series of new tetracycline derivatives has been synthesized by reacting appropriate tetracyclines, formaldehyde and secondary amino (piperazino) function of fluoroquinolones using microwave irradiation with the yield ranging from 41 evaluated for its anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme inhibition studies. Among the synthesized compounds, compound 10 was found to be the most promising compound active against HIV-1 replication with EC(50) of 5.2 microM and was nontoxic to the CEM cells until 200 microM, and MIC of 0.2 microg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with moderate inhibition of both 3'-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 IN.

  2. 2-Aminothiazolones as Anti-HIV Agents That Act as gp120-CD4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tiberi, Marika; Tintori, Cristina; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Fazi, Roberta; Zamperini, Claudio; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Franchi, Luigi; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Botta, Lorenzo; Sampaolo, Michela; Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of 2-aminothiazolones along with their biological properties as novel anti-HIV agents. Such compounds have proven to act through the inhibition of the gp120-CD4 protein-protein interaction that occurs at the very early stage of the HIV-1 entry process. No cytotoxicity was found for these compounds, and broad antiviral activities against laboratory strains and pseudotyped viruses were documented. Docking simulations have also been applied to predict the mechanism, at the molecular level, by which the inhibitors were able to interact within the Phe43 cavity of HIV-1 gp120. Furthermore, a preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) evaluation was performed. Overall, this study led the basis for the development of more potent HIV entry inhibitors. PMID:24614386

  3. Ligand-Based Virtual Screening in a Search for Novel Anti-HIV-1 Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Kurczyk, Agata; Warszycki, Dawid; Musiol, Robert; Kafel, Rafał; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-10-26

    In a search for new anti-HIV-1 chemotypes, we developed a multistep ligand-based virtual screening (VS) protocol combining machine learning (ML) methods with the privileged structures (PS) concept. In its learning step, the VS protocol was based on HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors fetched from the ChEMBL database. The performances of various ML methods and PS weighting scheme were evaluated and applied as VS filtering criteria. Finally, a database of 1.5 million commercially available compounds was virtually screened using a multistep ligand-based cascade, and 13 selected unique structures were tested by measuring the inhibition of HIV replication in infected cells. This approach resulted in the discovery of two novel chemotypes with moderate antiretroviral activity, that, together with their topological diversity, make them good candidates as lead structures for future optimization.

  4. Electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of anti-HIV active aminophenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyl', O. K.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Maier, G. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Raichenok, T. F.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the absorption and fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quantum yields of sulphone-containing anti-HIV active o-aminophenol molecules in an inert solvent, hexane, and in a polar solvent, acetonitrile. We have studied IR Fourier-transform spectra and examined structural features of o-aminophenols with different substituents in solutions and crystals. Functional groups of molecules that are involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds have been revealed. Proton acceptor properties of o-aminophenol molecules have been theoretically evaluated using the method of molecular electrostatic potential. Using quantum chemistry methods, we have calculated and interpreted absorption and fluorescence spectra of o-aminophenols. Calculation data are compared with experimental results. We have determined the main channels and mechanisms of photophysical relaxation processes in o-aminophenols.

  5. The anti-HIV activity of the phytochemical alpha-terthienyl.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Harris, L; Teeple, A; Towers, G H

    1993-01-01

    The plant trithiophene, alpha-terthienyl (alpha T), was evaluated for activity against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). Antiviral activity specifically required long wavelength light (UVA, 320-400 nm). The compound had little or no activity in visible light or in the dark. The anti-HIV effect was UVA-dose dependent and was proportional to the concentration of alpha T, according to several parameters of virus infectivity and replication. The efficacy was decreased to some extent by the presence of bovine serum in the reactions; but under optimal conditions 0.1 microgram/ml. alpha T (3 x 10(-7) M) could inactivate 10(4)-10(5) infectious particles. In contrast poliovirus and Coxsackievirus infectivity were relatively resistant to alpha T + UVA.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of Trim 37.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Azah A; Tardif, Keith; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-04-01

    Trim 5α was the first member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins that was identified to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. The breadth of antiretroviral activity of TRIM family members is an active area of investigation. In this study, we demonstrate that human Trim 37 possesses anti-HIV-1 activity. This antiretroviral activity and the manner in which it was displayed were implicated by (1) decreased viral replication upon Trim 37 transient overexpression in virus-producing cells, (2) correlation of the reduction of viral infectivity with Trim 37 virion incorporation, (3) increased HIV-1 replication during siRNA depletion of Trim 37 expression, and (4) reduction in viral DNA synthesis upon Trim 37 transient overexpression. Our findings provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of the potent antiviral activity of human Trim 37, and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby Trim 37 interferes with viral DNA synthesis.

  7. International award received recognizing anti-HIV spermicide.

    PubMed

    1998-10-19

    Until recently, the only topical microbicide being considered for protection against sexually transmitted HIV infection contains nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a detergent ingredient widely used for more than 30 years in the form of gels, foams, aerosols, creams, sponges, suppositories, films, and foaming tablets. While N-9 has both spermicidal and antibacterial/antiviral properties against pathogens responsible for STDs, including HIV, recent clinical studies have found it to be ineffective in protecting against HIV and other STDs. Moreover, N-9 disrupts cell membranes, damages cervicovaginal epithelia, and causes an acute tissue inflammatory response, thus enhancing the likelihood of HIV infection. There is therefore an urgent need for new, effective, safe, and easy-to-use microbicides with anti-HIV activity lacking detergent-type membrane toxicity. Dr. Osmond D'Cruz et al. of the Hughes Institute in St. Paul, Minnesota, have developed an anti-HIV spermicide with the potential of becoming the active ingredient in many beneficial products. Its lead compound is 400 times more potent than N-9 against HIV and at least 10 times more potent than N-9 as a spermicide. These dual-function compounds are non-inflammatory by their nature. Hughes et al.'s discovery is expected to enter human clinical trials within 12 months. A clinical paper describing their achievement won the prestigious Prize Paper Award for the Plenary Session of the Conjoint 16th World Congress on Fertility and Sterility at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, held in San Francisco, California, during October 4-9, 1998.

  8. Inhibition of clinical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 isolates in primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by retroviral vectors expressing anti-HIV genes.

    PubMed Central

    Vandendriessche, T; Chuah, M K; Chiang, L; Chang, H K; Ensoli, B; Morgan, R A

    1995-01-01

    Gene therapy may be of benefit in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals by virtue of its ability to inhibit virus replication and prevent viral gene expression. It is not known whether anti-HIV-1 gene therapy strategies based on antisense or transdominant HIV-1 mutant proteins can inhibit the replication and expression of clinical HIV-1 isolates in primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. We therefore transduced CD4+ T lymphocytes from uninfected individuals with retroviral vectors expressing either HIV-1-specific antisense-TAR or antisense-Tat/Rev RNA, transdominant HIV-1 Rev protein, and a combination of antisense-TAR and transdominant Rev. The engineered CD4+ T lymphocytes were then infected with four different clinical HIV-1 isolates. We found that replication of all HIV-1 isolates was inhibited by all the anti-HIV vectors tested. Greater inhibition of HIV-1 was observed with transdominant Rev than with antisense RNA. We hereby demonstrated effective protection by antisense RNA or transdominant mutant proteins against HIV-1 infection in primary CD4+ T lymphocytes using clinical HIV-1 isolates, and this represents an essential step toward clinical anti-HIV-1 gene therapy. PMID:7769662

  9. Flazinamide, a novel {beta}-carboline compound with anti-HIV actions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunhua; Tang Jianguo; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Dong Zejun; Du Li; Shen Xu; Liu Jikai; Zheng Yongtang . E-mail: zhengyt@mail.kiz.ac.cn

    2007-04-20

    A {beta}-carboline compound, flazin isolated from Suillus granulatus has been shown weak anti-HIV-1 activity. Based on the structure of flazin, flazinamide [1-(5'- hydromethyl-2'-furyl)-{beta}-carboline-3-carboxamide] was synthesized and its anti-HIV activities were evaluated in the present study. The cytotoxicity of flazinamide was about 4.1-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide potently reduced syncytium formation induced by HIV-1IIIB with EC50 value of 0.38 {mu}M, the EC50 of flazinamide was about 6.2-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide also inhibited HIV-2ROD and HIV-2CBL-20 infection with EC50 values of 0.57 and 0.89 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide reduced p24 antigen expression in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 and in clinical isolated strain HIV-1KM018 infected PBMC, with EC50 values of 1.45 and 0.77 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide did not suppress HIV-1 replication in chronically infected H9 cells. Flazinamide blocked the fusion between normal cells and HIV-1 or HIV-2 chronically infected cells. It weakly inhibited activities of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease or integrase at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the conversion of the carboxyl group in 3 position of flazin markedly enhanced the anti-viral activity (TI value increased from 12.1 to 312.2) and flazinamide might interfere in the early stage of HIV life cycle.

  10. In vitro testing of African traditional medicines for cytotoxic, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Gqaleni, Nceba; Ngcobo, Mlungisi; Parboosing, Raveen; Naidoo, Anneta

    2012-01-01

    African Traditional Medicines (ATMs) serve as a major source of primary healthcare for African people. The reasons for their use range from easy access, affordability, beliefs in traditional systems and long term safety. ATMs have been used to treat individuals infected with HIV and therefore need scientific validation; a view supported by Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs). This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities of traditional multiple herbal preparations from local THPs. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene, Product Blue, SPNa and SDKc ATM were supplied by local THPs. Changes in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) & glutathione (GSH) over 24 hours were measured using luminometry. Changes in 12 cytokines were assayed using an ELISA-based absorbance assay. Protective effects against HIV killing of MT-4 cells were tested using the XTT assay and antiviral activity was measured using an HIV-1 viral load assay. Cyclosporine and AZT were used as positive controls. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene and SDKc induced a dose dependent toxicity on treated PBMCs by reducing ATP and GSH at high doses (p< 0.001). These medicinal preparations, along with SPNa, showed immunomodulatory activity by significantly (p< 0.001) changing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Product Blue stimulated the levels of ATP and GSH in treated PBMCs at all doses however this product did not show any immunomodulatory activity on cytokine secretion when compared to control cells. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene showed promising anti-HIV activity relative to AZT (p< 0.01). This study has shown that some of these traditional medicinal preparations have at least one or all the properties of immunostimulation, immunomodulation or antiretroviral effects. The mechanism of action of the shown activities should further be investigated.

  11. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-{alpha} in patients with acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-α2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive anti-retroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-α2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-α2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-α2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5–10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0–10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-α2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies. PMID:18182457

  12. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-alpha in patients with acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chene, Genevieve; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-alpha2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-alpha2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-alpha2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-alpha2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5-10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0-10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-alpha2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of the Anti-HIV Activity of Mifepristone in HIV-Infected Subjects ACTG 5200

    PubMed Central

    Para, Michael F.; Schouten, Jeff; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Yu, Song; Weiner, David; Tebas, Pablo; White, C. Jo; Reeds, Dominic; Lertora, Juan; Patterson, Kristine B.; Daar, Eric S.; Cavert, Wintson; Brizz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background Mifepristone is a glucocorticoid receptor inhibitor shown in vitro to have anti-HIV activity and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus activity in a macaque model. A phase I/II trial was performed to assess the drug’s safety and anti-HIV activity. Methods A 28-day double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of mifepristone at doses of 75 mg, 150 mg, and 225 mg given daily was conducted in HIV+ persons with CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≥350 cells per cubic millimeter who had no recent antiretroviral therapy. Results Fifty-six male and 1 female subjects with a median entry CD4+ lymphocyte count of 555 cells per cubic millimeter and plasma HIV-1 RNA of 15,623 copies per milliliter were accrued. Forty-five subjects (78.9%) were available for endpoint analysis. In each arm, changes from baseline to day 28 in plasma HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ lymphocyte count were not significantly different from zero (no change). There was no relationship between mifepristone trough concentrations and plasma HIV-1 RNA. Day 28 morning plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in the 150 mg and 225 mg arms compared with placebo, confirming biologic activity, and returned to baseline by day 56. Serum lipids did not change during the trial. Fasting blood sugar was 2.5 mg/dL higher on day 28 in the mifepristone arms, but the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) did not change. Three subjects (7.3%) receiving mifepristone developed a grade 2 rash. Conclusions Mifepristone at doses of 75–225 mg daily was safe and well-tolerated, but did not show significant anti-HIV activity. PMID:20130470

  14. Anti-HIV antibodies in the CSF of AIDS patients: a serological and immunoblotting study.

    PubMed Central

    Bukasa, K S; Sindic, C J; Bodeus, M; Burtonboy, G; Laterre, C; Sonnet, J

    1988-01-01

    CSF and serum samples from 16 AIDS patients were tested for the presence of anti-HIV antibodies either by classical serological methods or by an immunoblot technique based on agarose gel isoelectric focusing and transfer of the specific IgG antibodies onto HIV antigens-loaded nitrocellulose sheets. This method enabled the demonstration of an intrathecal synthesis of anti-HIV oligoclonal IgG antibodies, often superimposed on diffuse polyclonal production, in 14 patients. The two negative cases were devoid of neurological signs or symptoms. However, two patients classified in stage II of the disease (asymptomatic infection) displayed an intrathecal synthesis of anti-HIV antibodies. Images PMID:3216207

  15. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4(+) T cells, and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4(+) T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing.

  16. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Summary The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4+ T cells, and causes CD4+ T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4+ T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing. PMID:24117829

  17. Exploiting the Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Acyclovir: Suppression of Primary and Drug-Resistant HIV Isolates and Potentiation of the Activity by Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Introini, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Munawwar, Arshi; Merbah, Melanie; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Derudas, Marco; McGuigan, Christopher; Balzarini, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) suppressive therapy using acyclovir (ACV) or valacyclovir in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected persons increased the patient's survival and decreased the HIV-1 load. It has been shown that the incorporation of ACV-monophosphate into the nascent DNA chain instead of dGMP results in the termination of viral DNA elongation and directly inhibits laboratory strains of HIV-1. We evaluated here the anti-HIV activity of ACV against primary HIV-1 isolates of different clades and coreceptor specificity and against viral isolates resistant to currently used drugs, including zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine, a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), a fusion inhibitor, and two protease inhibitors. We found that, at clinically relevant concentrations, ACV inhibits the replication of these isolates in human tissues infected ex vivo. Moreover, addition of ribavirin, an antiviral capable of depleting the pool of intracellular dGTP, potentiated the ACV-mediated HIV-1 suppression. These data warrant further clinical investigations of the benefits of using inexpensive and safe ACV alone or in combination with other drugs against HIV-1, especially to complement or delay highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation in low-resource settings. PMID:22314523

  18. Synthesis of single- and double-chain fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon galactosyl amphiphiles and their anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Faroux-Corlay, B; Clary, L; Gadras, C; Hammache, D; Greiner, J; Santaella, C; Aubertin, A M; Vierling, P; Fantini, J

    2000-07-24

    Galactosylceramide (GalCer) is an alternative receptor allowing HIV-1 entry into CD4(-)/GalCer(+) cells. This glycosphingolipid recognizes the V3 loop of HIV gp120, which plays a key role in the fusion of the HIV envelope and cellular membrane. To inhibit HIV uptake and infection, we designed and synthesized analogs of GalCer. These amphiphiles and bolaamphiphiles consist of single and double hydrocarbon and/or fluorocarbon chain beta-linked to galactose and galactosamine. They derive from serine (GalSer), cysteine (GalCys), and ethanolamine (GalAE). The anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity of these galactolipids were evaluated in vitro on CEM-SS (a CD4(+) cell line), HT-29, a CD4(-) cell line expressing high levels of GalCer receptor, and/or HT29 genetically modified to express CD4. GalSer and GalAE derivatives, tested in aqueous medium or as part of liposome preparation, showed moderate anti-HIV-1 activities (IC50 in the 20-220 microM range), whereas none of the GalCys derivatives was found to be active. Moreover, only some of these anti-HIV active analogs inhibited the binding of [3H]suramin (a polysulfonyl compound which displays a high affinity for the V3 loop) to SPC3, a synthetic peptide which contains the conserved GPGRAF region of the V3 loop. Our results most likely indicate that the neutralization of the virion through masking of this conserved V3 loop region is not the only mechanism involved in the HIV-1 antiviral activity of our GalCer analogs.

  19. L-chicoric acid, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase, improves on the in vitro anti-HIV-1 effect of Zidovudine plus a protease inhibitor (AG1350).

    PubMed

    Robinson, W E

    1998-08-01

    Combinations of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs, including reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, have proven immensely potent in the therapy of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). To determine whether HIV integrase is a suitable target for combination therapy, the ability of an HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, to work in combination with a protease inhibitor and Zidovudine was tested in vitro. The addition of L-chicoric acid to either Zidovudine or protease inhibitor improved upon the observed anti-HIV activity of either compound alone. When all three drugs were combined, the anti-HIV activity was substantially better than either of the three compounds alone or any combination of two inhibitors. Doses of both Zidovudine and protease inhibitor could be reduced by more than 33% for an equivalent anti-HIV effect if L-chicoric acid was added. The improved anti-HIV activity was observed with a tissue culture adapted strain of HIV (HIV(LAI)) and with limited passage clinical isolates of HIV (HIV(R19) and HIV(R45)). These data demonstrate that a first generation HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, is at least additive in combination with existing multi-drug regimens and suggest that HIV integrase will be an excellent target for combination therapy of HIV infection.

  20. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice

    2015-07-13

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3'-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of "no-return" in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST) step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50) improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively) and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively). Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96.

  1. Mechanisms and Modifications of Naturally Occurring Host Defense Peptides for Anti-HIV Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Colleen R.; Wood, Matthew P.; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of HIV infection, heterosexual transmission of HIV remains high, and vaccines to prevent HIV acquisition have been unfruitful. Vaginal microbicides, on the other hand, have demonstrated considerable potential for HIV prevention, and a variety of compounds have been screened for their activity and safety as anti-HIV microbicides. Among these are the naturally occurring host defense peptides, small peptides from diverse lineages with intrinsic antiviral activity. Naturally occurring host defense peptides with anti-HIV activity are promising candidates for vaginal microbicide development. Their structural variance and accompanying mechanistic diversity provide a wide range of inhibitors whose antiviral activity can be exerted at nearly every stage of the HIV lifecycle. Additionally, peptide modification has been explored as a method for improving the anti-HIV activity of host defense peptides. Structure- and sequence-based alterations have achieved varying success in improving the potency and specificity of anti-HIV peptides. Overall, peptides have been discovered or engineered to inhibit HIV with therapeutic indices of >1000, encouraging their advancement toward clinical trials. Here we review the naturally occurring anti-HIV host defense peptides, demonstrating their breadth of mechanistic diversity, and exploring approaches to enhance and optimize their activity in order to expedite their development as safe and effective anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. PMID:22264047

  2. Evaluation of Anti-HIV-1 Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogues*

    PubMed Central

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P.; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of “lethal mutagenesis” that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  3. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  4. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive brief, about 2 sec, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. PMID:22226641

  5. Differential in vitro anti-HIV activity of natural lignans.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H C; Merz, H; Steffen, R; Müller, W E; Sarin, P S; Trumm, S; Schulz, J; Eich, E

    1990-01-01

    Two naturally occurring lignanolides, isolated from the tropical climbing shrub Ipomoea cairica, (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin, were found to inhibit strongly replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; strain HTLV-III B) in vitro. At a concentration of 0.5 microM, (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin inhibited the expression of HIV-1 proteins p17 and p24 by 80-90% and 60-70%, respectively. The reverse transcriptase activity in the culture fluids was reduced by 80-90% when the cells (HTLV-III B/H9) were cultivated in the presence of 0.5 microM (-)-arctigenin or 1 microM (-)-trachelogenin. At the same concentrations, the formation of syncytia in the HTLV-III B/H9-Jurkat cell system was inhibited by the compounds by more than 80%. A series of other lignan type compounds displayed no anti-HIV activity. Studying the molecular mechanism of action of (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin we found that both compounds are efficient inhibitors of the nuclear matrix-associated DNA topoisomerase II activity, particularly of the enzyme from HIV-1-infected cells. Our results suggest that both compounds prevent the increase of topoisomerase II activity, involved in virus replication, after infection of cells with HIV-1.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of anti-HIV agents--a review.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Nagappa, Ananantha Naik

    2005-08-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has been well recognized as an important tool of drug discovery. An ongoing hand is to integrate the combinatorial approach with fundamentals of medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. The last five years has seen an explosion in the exploration and adoption of combinatorial techniques. Indeed, it is difficult to identify any other topic in chemistry that has ever caught the imagination of chemists with such fervor and with the continuous development of high throughput screening methods. There is a growing need for the synthesis of a large number of molecules. Compound libraries designed to produce specific inhibitors of therapeutic target proteins have generated significant interest in drug discovery research. Combinatorial chemistry provides the opportunity to generate large libraries of compounds for biological testing. A literature search revealed that many lead compounds have indeed been discovered from libraries and this review presents a survey of combinatorial synthesis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, HIV-1 function inhibitors such as adsorption inhibitors, CCR5 antagonists and HIV-1 Tat-tar inhibitors that can be developed as potential anti-HIV drugs.

  7. Impact of the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs cohort study on abacavir prescription among treatment-naive, HIV-infected patients in Canada.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Tony; Gillis, Jennifer; Loutfy, Mona R; Cooper, Curtis; Hogg, Robert S; Klein, Marina B; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S G; Rourke, Sean B; Tsoukas, Chris; Raboud, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the trends in abacavir (ABC) prescription among antiretroviral (ARV) medication-naive individuals following the presentation of the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (DAD) cohort study. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of ARV medication-naive individuals in the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC). Between January 1, 2000, and February 28, 2010, a total of 7280 ARV medication-naive patients were included in CANOC. We observed a significant change in the proportion of new ABC prescriptions immediately following the release of DAD (-11%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -20% to -2.4%) and in the months following the presentation of these data (-0.66% per month; 95% CI: -1.2% to -0.073%). A post-DAD presentation decrease in the odds of being prescribed ABC versus tenofovir (TDF) was observed (adjusted odds ratio, 0.72 per year, 95% CI: 0.54-0.97). Presentation of the DAD was associated with a significant decrease in ABC use among ARV medication-naive, HIV-positive patients initiating therapy.

  8. Synthesis, anti-HIV activity, integrase enzyme inhibition and molecular modeling of catechol, hydroquinone and quinol labdane analogs.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohan; Das, Tiyasa; Mishra, Sanjay; Nutan; Pancholi, Boskey; Gupta, Satish K; Bhat, Sujata V

    2014-01-01

    Labdane analogs with o-quinol, catechol and hydroquinone moiety have been synthesized using Diels-Alder reaction of methyl 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylate, 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylic acid and 3,6-dioxocyclohexa-1,4-dienecarboxylic acid with mono terpene 1,3-dienes, namely ocimene and myrcene. The resulting molecules and their derivatives were evaluated for their anti-HIV-1 activity using TZM-bl cell based virus infectivity assay. Two molecules 13 and 18 showed anti-HIV activity with IC50 values 5.0 (TI=11) and 4.6 (TI=46)μM, respectively. The compounds 17, 18 and 20 showed efficacy against HIV-1 integrase activity and showed inhibition with IC50 13.4, 11.1 and 11.5μM, respectively. The HIV-1 integrase inhibition activity of these synthetic molecules was comparable with integric acid, the natural fungal metabolite. Molecular modeling studies for the HIV-1 integrase inhibition of these active synthetic molecules indicated the binding to the active site residues of the enzyme.

  9. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-01-01

    Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN.

  10. Anti-HIV cyclotides from the Chinese medicinal herb Viola yedoensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Conan K L; Colgrave, Michelle L; Gustafson, Kirk R; Ireland, David C; Goransson, Ulf; Craik, David J

    2008-01-01

    Cyclotides are macrocyclic plant peptides characterized by a knotted arrangement of three disulfide bonds. They display a range of interesting bioactivities, including anti-HIV and insecticidal activities. More than 100 different cyclotides have been isolated from two phylogenetically distant plant families, the Rubiaceae and Violaceae. In this study we have characterized the cyclotides from Viola yedoensis, an important Chinese herb from the Violaceae family that has been reported to contain potential anti-HIV agents. From V. yedoensis five new and three known cyclotides were identified and shown to have anti-HIV activity. The most active of these is cycloviolacin Y5, which is one of the most potent of all cyclotides tested so far using in vitro XTT-based anti-HIV assays. Cycloviolacin Y5 is the most hydrophobic of the cyclotides from V. yedoensis. We show that there is a positive correlation between the hydrophobicity and the anti-HIV activity of the new cyclotides and that this trend tracks with their ability to disrupt membranes, as judged from hemolytic assays on human erythrocytes.

  11. Array-in-well platform-based multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies, and Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Saviranta, Petri; Hattara, Liisa; Vuorinen, Tytti; Hytönen, Jukka; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-02-01

    Multiplex assays detecting sets of related clinical analytes simultaneously can save considerable amount of time and resources. Array-in-well (AIW) is a powerful platform for the multiplex detection of different analytes where microarrays can be printed at the bottom of microtiter wells, thus combining the potential of microarrays with the ease of handling microtiter wells. We have developed a single-step AIW assay for the simultaneous screening of HIV, Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (causing syphilis) and Hepatitis B virus infections targeting the specific detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), respectively, using two different fluorescent label technologies i.e. DyLight 633 and europium nanoparticle. Double-antigen assay formats were used for anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibody detection that can simultaneously detect both IgG and IgM, and thus reduce the window period of detection. AIW assay was evaluated with well characterized serum/plasma samples (n=111), and the qualitative results were in near complete agreement with those of the reference assays. The AIW assay exhibited 100% sensitivities for all three analytes, and 100% specificities for anti-HIV antibodies and HBsAg, and 98.6% specificity for treponemal antibodies. The limit of detection of HBsAg in AIW assay was 0.18 ng/ml. This high performing AIW assay has the potential to be used as a multiplex screening test for these three infections.

  12. [Sensitivity of screening kits for anti-HIV antibodies. 1999 update. Retrovirus Working Group of the French Society for Blood Transfusion].

    PubMed

    Couroucé, A M

    1999-12-01

    A comparative evaluation of the sensitivity of anti-HIV screening assays has been recently performed with a selected panel of 65 samples which included HIV1 group M (per-seroconversions, seroconversions and seropositives infected with genotypes A, B, C, D, E), HIV1 group O and HIV2. The results obtained with the 21 ELISA HIV1 + HIV2 screening assays are presented. Among these 21 assays, four are combined anti-HIV and p24 Ag assays. All the assays except four fulfilled the criteria defined at the beginning of the study, i.e., positive results on all the seropositives including seroconversions and positive results on at least 50% of the per-seroconversions. The main differences were observed with the ten per-seroconversion samples, the number of positive results on such samples varying from three to ten. The constant improvement of anti-HIV screening tests which leads one to shorten the 'window' period permits and earlier diagnosis of HIV infection and a progressive decrease of the transfusional risk.

  13. Pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the improved solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puneet; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-03-18

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been devastating with nearly 7400 new infections every day. Although, the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made a tremendous contribution in reducing the morbidity and mortality in developed countries, the situation in developing countries is still grim with millions of people being infected by this disease. The new advancements in the field of nanotechnology based drug delivery systems hold promise to improve the situation. These nanoscale systems have been successfully employed in other diseases such as cancer, and therefore, we now have a better understanding of the practicalities and technicalities associated with their clinical development. Nanotechnology based approaches offer some unique opportunities specifically for the improvement of water solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of antiretroviral drugs. This review presents discussion on the contribution of pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the delivery anti-HIV drugs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochemical and functional characterization of anti-HIV antibody-ELP fusion proteins from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen M; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Rademacher, Thomas; Scheller, Jürgen; Stöger, Eva; Fischer, Rainer; Conrad, Udo

    2008-05-01

    The stability and recovery of recombinant proteins expressed in plants are improved by fusion to elastin-like peptides (ELPs). In order to test the suitability of ELP for the production of pharmaceutical proteins, transgenic plants were created that individually expressed the light and heavy chains of the broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) monoclonal antibody 2F5, which is being evaluated as a microbicide component. The antibody chains were expressed both with and without a C-terminal ELP fusion. Crossing these plants in all combinations resulted in transgenic lines producing the full antibody in four formats, with ELP on either the light or heavy chains, on both or on neither. Characterization of the affinity-purified antibodies by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that the kinetic binding parameters were identical to those of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell counterpart lacking ELP. N-Glycan analysis showed that all four derivatives contained predominantly oligo-mannose-type N-glycans and that the ELP fusions had no significant effect on N-glycan structure. It was concluded that ELP fusion to the light chain, heavy chain or both chains of a plant-derived antibody had no adverse affects on protein quality, but had a positive impact on the yield. ELP fusions do not interfere with folding, assembly, trafficking in the secretory pathway or post-translational modification, but enhance stability whilst at the same time simplifying recovery.

  15. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  16. Novel anti-HIV peptides containing multiple copies of artificially designed heptad repeat motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Weiguo; Qi Zhi; Pan Chungen; Xue Na; Debnath, Asim K.; Qie Jiankun; Jiang Shibo Liu Keliang

    2008-10-03

    The peptidic anti-HIV drug T20 (Fuzeon) and its analog C34 share a common heptad repeat (HR) sequence, but they have different functional domains, i.e., pocket- and lipid-binding domains (PBD and LBD, respectively). We hypothesize that novel anti-HIV peptides may be designed by using artificial sequences containing multiple copies of HR motifs plus zero, one or two functional domains. Surprisingly, we found that the peptides containing only the non-natural HR sequences could significantly inhibit HIV-1 infection, while addition of PBD and/or LBD to the peptides resulted in significant improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. These results suggest that these artificial HR sequences, which may serve as structural domains, could be used as templates for the design of novel antiviral peptides against HIV and other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  17. Role of nucleoside diphosphate kinase in the activation of anti-HIV nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Sarfati, R; Deville-Bonne, D; Véron, M

    2000-06-01

    Nucleoside analogs are currently used in antiretrovirus therapies. The best known example is AZT one of the first drug to be used for the treatment of AIDS. However, only the triphosphate derivatives of these compounds act as substrates of the viral reverse transcriptase. Since they do not enter cells, nucleoside analogs are administered and phosphorylated by cellular kinases. The last step in this phosphorylation pathway is catalyzed by nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase. The incorporation of the nucleoside triphosphates into nascent viral DNA chain results in termination of the elongation process. We have performed kinetics studies of the phosphorylation reaction by NDP kinase of dideoxynucleoside diphosphates such as 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-azidothymidine diphosphate (AZT-DP) and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine diphosphate (d4T-DP). We show that the catalytic efficiency is strongly decreased and, therefore, that the reaction step catalyzed by NDP kinase constitutes a bottleneck in the processing pathway of anti-HIV compounds. In addition, the affinity of the analogs in the absence of catalysis was determined using a catalytically inactive NDP kinase mutant, showing a reduction of affinity by a factor of 2 to 30, depending on the analog. The structure of NDP kinase provides a structural explanation for these results. Indeed, all nucleoside analogs acting as chain terminators must lack a 3'-OH in the nucleotide deoxyribose. Unfortunately, this same substitution is detrimental for their capacity to be phosphorylated by NDP kinase. This defines the framework for the design of new nucleoside analogs with increased efficiency in antiretroviral therapies.

  18. Synthesis and Anti-HIV Activity of Novel 4'-Trifluoromethylated 5'-Deoxycarbocyclic Nucleoside Phosphonic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jee, Jun-Pil; Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthetic route to novel 4'-trifluoromethylated 5'-deoxycarbocyclic nucleoside phosphonic acids was described from α-trifluoromethyl-α,β-unsaturated ester. Coupling of purine nucleosidic bases with cyclopentanol using a Mitsunobu reaction gave the nucleoside intermediates which were further phosphonated and hydrolyzed to reach desired nucleoside analogs. Synthesized nucleoside analogs were tested for anti-HIV activity as well as cytotoxicity. Adenine analog 22 shows significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 = 8.3 μM) up to 100 μM.

  19. New anti-HIV aptamers based on tetra-end-linked DNA G-quadruplexes: effect of the base sequence on anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, Valentina; Oliviero, Giorgia; Amato, Jussara; Borbone, Nicola; D'Errico, Stefano; Mayol, Luciano; Piccialli, Vincenzo; Haider, Shozeb; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Balzarini, Jan; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2012-10-04

    This communication reports on the synthesis and biophysical, biological and SAR studies of a small library of new anti-HIV aptamers based on the tetra-end-linked G-quadruplex structure. The new aptamers showed EC(50) values against HIV-1 in the range of 0.04-0.15 μM as well as affinities for the HIV-1 gp120 envelope in the same order of magnitude.

  20. Preparation and characterization of anti-HIV nanodrug targeted to microfold cell of gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Ding, Hong; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea D; Atluri, Venkata; Yndart, Adriana; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Batrakova, Elena; Agudelo, Marisela; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) still remains one of the leading life-threatening diseases in the world. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced disease morbidity and mortality. However, most of the drugs have variable penetrance into viral reservoir sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Being the largest lymphoid organ, GALT plays a key role in early HIV infection and host–pathogen interaction. Many different treatment options have been proposed to eradicate the virus from GALT. However, it becomes difficult to deliver traditional drugs to the GALT because of its complex physiology. In this regard, we developed a polymer-based Pluronic nanocarrier containing anti-HIV drug called efavirenz (EFV) targeting Microfold cells (M-cells) in the GALT. M-cells are specialized epithelial cells that are predominantly present in the GALT. In this work, we have exploited this paracellular transport property of M-cells for targeted delivery of Pluronic nanocarrier tagged EFV, bioconjugated with anti-M-cell-specific antibodies to the GALT (nanodrug). Preliminary characterization showed that the nanodrug (EFV-F12-COOH) is of 140 nm size with 0.3 polydispersion index, and the zeta potential of the particles was −19.38±2.2 mV. Further, drug dissolution study has shown a significantly improved sustained release over free drugs. Binding potential of nanodrug with M-cell was also confirmed with fluorescence microscopy and in vitro uptake and release studies. The anti-HIV activity of the nanodrug was also significantly higher compared to that of free drug. This novel formulation was able to show sustained release of EFV and inhibit the HIV-1 infection in the GALT compared to the free drug. The present study has potential for our in vivo targeted nanodrug delivery system by combining traditional enteric-coated capsule technique via oral administration. PMID:26425084

  1. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA by in situ hybridization in oral mucosa epithelial cells from anti-HIV-1 positive patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Jiménez, Esther; Bartolomé, Javier; Ortiz-Movilla, Nuria; Bartolomé Villar, Begoña; José Arrieta, Juan; Manzarbeitia, Felix; Carreño, Vicente

    2005-09-01

    Several in vitro studies have shown that HIV-1 can infect CD4 negative epithelial cells of different origin including normal human oral keratinocytes, but whether this infection of mucosal epithelial cells occurs in vivo is still unclear. In this report, the presence and cell types infected by HIV-1 in paraffin embedded oral mucosa biopsies from 17 anti-HIV-1 positive patients have been examined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. As controls, oral mucosa biopsies from eight patients without HIV-1 infection markers were also analyzed. The results showed that 8 out of the 17 anti-HIV-1 positive patients had HIV-1 RNA detectable in plasma. Positive hybridization signals were observed in the mucosa biopsies from 14 of the 17 anti-HIV-1 patients (82.3%). The mean percentage of cells showing HIV-1 RNA was 2.64% +/- 1.77% (range: 1% to 5.5%). No differences in the mean percentage of HIV-1 infected cells were found between patients with and without HIV-1 RNA in plasma (3.01% +/- 1.57% vs. 3.4% +/- 1.27% respectively), or between untreated patients and patients under antiretroviral therapy (2.83% +/- 1.63% vs. 3.42% +/- 1.29% respectively). Immunohistochemical detection of S-100 antigen, cytokeratin and CD4 showed that hybridization signals appeared in cytokeratin positive cells and CD4 positive cells but not in S-100 positive cells. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that HIV-1 infects and replicates in oral mucosa epithelial cells in vivo and that these cells could represent a reservoir of the virus that may escape to the currently used antiretroviral therapy. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5)% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3)%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice or 6% vinegar induced

  3. Aspernigrins with anti-HIV-1 activities from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Fang, Wei; Tan, Suiyi; Lin, Xiuping; Xun, Tianrong; Yang, Bingjie; Liu, Shuwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-15

    Two new 2-benzylpyridin-4-one containing metabolites, aspernigrins C (3) and D (4), together with six known compounds (1, 2, and 5-8), were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30. The structures of the new compounds were determined by NMR, MS, and optical rotation analyses. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities against infection with HIV-1 SF162 in TZM-bl cells. Malformin C (5) showed the strongest anti-HIV-1 activity with IC50 of 1.4±0.06μM (selectivity index, 11.4), meanwhile aspernigrin C (3) also exhibited potent activity with IC50 of 4.7±0.4μM (selectivity index, 7.5).

  4. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rai, Diwakar; Chen, Wenmin; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Hong; Tian, Ye; Liang, Xin; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-10-01

    A series of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives (Ia-Im and IIa-IIe) designed as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was synthesized via an expeditious route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activities in MT-4 cell cultures. All the synthesized compounds were structurally confirmed by spectral analyses. Biological results showed that three analogues displayed moderate inhibitory activity against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 replication with EC(50) values ranging from 16 to 22 μm. Molecular docking of compound Ih with wt HIV-1 RT was performed to understand the binding mode between these inhibitors and the wt HIV-1 RT and to rationalize some SARs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Plant-derived triterpenoids and analogues as antitumor and anti-HIV agents†

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Reen-Yen; Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the antitumor and anti-HIV activities of naturally occurring triterpenoids, including the lupane, ursane, oleanane, lanostane, dammarane, and miscellaneous scaffolds. Structure–activity relationships of selected natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives are also discussed. PMID:19779642

  6. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  7. Gene therapy strategies for HIV/AIDS: preclinical modeling in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael S; Akkina, Ramesh

    2013-12-12

    In the absence of an effective vaccine and lack of a complete cure, gene therapy approaches to control HIV infection offer feasible alternatives. Due to the chronic nature of infection, a wide window of opportunity exists to gene modify the HIV susceptible cells that continuously arise from the bone marrow source. To evaluate promising gene therapy approaches that employ various anti-HIV therapeutic molecules, an ideal animal model is necessary to generate important efficacy and preclinical data. In this regard, the humanized mouse models that harbor human hematopoietic cells susceptible to HIV infection provide a suitable in vivo system. This review summarizes the currently used humanized mouse models and different anti-HIV molecules utilized for conferring HIV resistance. Humanized mouse models are compared for their utility in this context and provide perspectives for new directions.

  8. Broad anti-HIV activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue lectin family

    PubMed Central

    Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Noppen, Sam; Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. The founding member OAA and a designed hybrid OAAH (OPA) recognize similar but unique carbohydrate structures of Man-9, compared with other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs). These two newly described CBAs were evaluated for their inactivating properties on HIV replication and transmission and for their potential as microbicides. Methods Various cellular assays were used to determine antiviral activity against wild-type and certain CBA-resistant HIV-1 strains: (i) free HIV virion infection in human T lymphoma cell lines and PBMCs; (ii) syncytium formation assay using persistently HIV-infected T cells and non-infected CD4+ T cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-mediated viral capture; and (iv) transmission to uninfected CD4+ T cells. OAA and OPA were also evaluated for their mitogenic properties and potential synergistic effects using other CBAs. Results OAA and OPA inhibit HIV replication, syncytium formation between HIV-1-infected and uninfected T cells, DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 capture and transmission to CD4+ target T cells, thereby rendering a variety of HIV-1 and HIV-2 clinical isolates non-infectious, independent of their coreceptor use. Both CBAs competitively inhibit the binding of the Manα(1-2)Man-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. The HIV-1 NL4.32G12res, NL4.3MVNres and IIIBGRFTres strains were equally inhibited as the wild-type HIV-1 strains by these CBAs. Combination studies indicate that OAA and OPA act synergistically with Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, 2G12 mAb and griffithsin (GRFT), with the exception of OPA/GRFT. Conclusions OAA and OPA are unique CBAs with broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity; however, further optimization will be necessary for microbicidal application. PMID:24970741

  9. A nanoparticle-encapsulated non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor with enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity and prolonged circulation time in plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Qian; Li, Yuan; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Qin, Bingjie; Xie, Lan; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), major components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), are effective in suppressing viral replication and preventing the progress of HIV-1 infection to AIDS. However, rapid blood clearance in vivo could significantly impair the efficiency of the anti-HIV-1 activity and result in multiple daily doses which might lead to poor patient compliance. Here we attempted to employ biodegradable organic nanoparticles (NPs) to encapsulate DAAN15h, a derivative of 4-substituted 1, 5-diarylaniline with potent anti-HIV activities. Nanoparticles encapsulating DAAN15h (NP-DAAN15h) displayed a spherical shape with a size of 97.01 ± 3.64 nm and zeta potential of -19.1 ± 3.78 mV, and they exhibited a sustained controlled release behavior in vitro. The cellular uptake of NPs on TZM-b1 cells, MT-2 cells and M7 cells, possibly through lipid raft-mediated and energydependent active transport processes, was significantly enhanced. NP-DAAN15h, which possessed no significant in vitro cytotoxicity, showed improved antiviral activity against laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes and tropisms, including RT-resistant variants. NP-DAAN15h exhibited a significantly prolonged blood circulation time, decreased plasma elimination rate, and enhanced AUC(0-t). NP-DAAN15h, a nanoparticle-encapsulated NNRTI, exhibits enhanced cellular uptake, improved anti-HIV-1 efficacy and prolonged in vivo circulation time, suggesting good potential for further development as a new NNRTI formulation for clinical use.

  10. Antiviral interactions of combinations of highly potent 2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione congeners and other anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Tracy L; Yang, Lu; Buckheit, Robert W

    2011-12-01

    Structure-activity relationship evaluation of seventy-four 2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione derivatives identified seven lead compounds based on anti-HIV-1 potency, extended range of action to include HIV-2, virus entry inhibition, reverse transcriptase inhibition, and lack of cytotoxicity to human cells. The selected pyrimidinedione congeners are highly active inhibitors of HIV-1 with EC(50) values ranging from 0.6 to 2 nM in CEM-SS cells infected with laboratory derived viruses, 11-20 nM in fresh human PBMCs infected with subtype B (HT/92/599) virus, and 2-7 nM in PBMCs infected with the clinical subtype C (ZA/97/003) virus. Combination antiviral assays were performed using the laboratory adapted RF strain of HIV-1 in CEM-SS cells and with a clade B and C low passage clinical isolate in fresh human peripheral mononuclear cells and the compound interactions were analyzed using MacSynergy II. The seven pyrimidinedione compounds resulted in additive to synergistic interactions in combination with entry and fusion inhibitors, nonnucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and the protease inhibitors. No evidence of antagonistic antiviral activity or synergistic cytotoxicity was detected with the combinations of compounds tested. The dual mechanism of action of the pyrimidinediones resulting in inhibition of both virus entry and reverse transcription suggests excellent potential of these lead pyrimidinediones as candidates for combination therapy with other approved HIV inhibitors of varying mechanism of action. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Antibacterial, anti-HIV-1 protease and cytotoxic activities of aqueous ethanolic extracts from Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Records have shown that Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) is used in traditional medicine systems of several tribes in Tanzania. This study focused on the investigation of antibacterial activity, anti-HIV-1 protease activity, toxicity properties and classes of phytochemicals in extracts from C. adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) to evaluate potential of these extracts for development as herbal remedies. Methods Dried plant material were ground to fine powder and extracted using 80% aqueous ethanol to afford root, leaf and stem bark extracts. The extracts were assayed for anti-HIV-1 protease activities, antibacterial activities using microdilution methods and cytotoxicity using brine shrimps lethality assay. Screening for major phytochemical classes was carried out using standard chemical tests. Results All extracts exhibited antibacterial activity to at least one of the test bacteria with MIC-values ranging from 0.31-5.0 mg/ml. Two extracts, namely, root and stem bark exhibited anti-HIV-1 PR activity with IC50 values of 24.7 and 26.5 μg/ml, respectively. Stem bark and leaf extracts showed mild toxicity with LC50 values of 65.768 μg/ml and 76.965 μg/ml, respectively, whereas roots were relatively non-toxic (LC50 = 110.042 μg/ml). Phytochemical screening of the extracts indicated presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, tannins, glycosides and saponins. Conclusion These results provide promising baseline information for the potential development of C. adenogonium extracts in treatment of bacterial and HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections. PMID:23013240

  12. Anti-HIV-1 activity of elafin is more potent than its precursor's, trappin-2, in genital epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Drannik, Anna G; Nag, Kakon; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Henrick, Bethany M; Jain, Sumiti; Ball, T Blake; Plummer, Francis A; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2012-04-01

    Cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) is a natural source of anti-HIV-1 factors; however, molecular characterization of the anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that CVLs from HIV-1-resistant (HIV-R) compared to HIV-1-susceptible (HIV-S) commercial sex workers (CSWs) contain significantly larger amounts of serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr) and its processed form, elafin (E). We assessed anti-HIV-1 activity of CVLs of CSWs and recombinant E and Tr on genital epithelial cells (ECs) that possess (TZM-bl) or lack (HEC-1A) canonical HIV-1 receptors. Our results showed that immunodepletion of 30% of Tr/E from CVL accounted for up to 60% of total anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL. Knockdown of endogenous Tr/E in HEC-1A cells resulted in significantly increased shedding of infectious R5 and X4 HIV-1. Pretreatment of R5, but not X4 HIV-1, with either Tr or E led to inhibition of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. Interestingly, when either HIV-1 or cells lacking canonical HIV-1 receptors were pretreated with Tr or E, HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis were significantly reduced, and decreased attachment was not associated with altered expression of syndecan-1 or CXCR4. Determination of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of Tr and E anti-HIV-1 activity indicated that E is ∼130 times more potent than its precursor, Tr, despite their equipotent antiprotease activities. This study provides the first experimental evidence that (i) Tr and E are among the principal anti-HIV-1 molecules of CVL; (ii) Tr and E affect cell attachment and transcytosis of HIV-1; (iii) E is more efficient than Tr regarding anti-HIV-1 activity; and (iv) the anti-HIV-1 effect of Tr and E is contextual.

  13. [Anti-HIV chemical constituents of aerial parts of Caragana rosea].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-xun; Qi, Jian-bin; Cheng, Ke-jun; Hu, Chang-qi

    2007-02-01

    This study was intended to look for anti-HIV chemical constituents of aerial parts of Caragana rosea Turcz. Column chromatographic technique was used for the isolation and purification of constituents of Caragana rosea under the guide of anti-HIV assay. The structures were established on the basis of physical and chemical properties and spectroscopic data. Five compounds were obtained from the EtOAc fraction of aerial parts of Caragana rosea and identified as myricetin (1), mearnsetin (2), p-hydroxy cinnamic acid (3), cararosinol A (4) and cararosinol B (5). At the same time, one possible transformation route between cararosinol B and kobophenol A, another resveratrol tetramer isolated from this plant previously, was proposed. Compounds 4, 5 are new resveratrol tetramers, compounds 1 -3 were isolated from this plant for the first time. All compounds showed no activities in an in vitro assay against HIV-1.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  15. Effects of alpha interferon treatment on intrinsic anti-HIV-1 immunity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Deng, Xutao; Liegler, Teri; Guatelli, John C; Salama, Mohamed S; Ghanem, Hussam El-din A; Rauch, Andri; Ledergerber, Bruno; Deeks, Steven G; Günthard, Huldrych F; Wong, Joseph K; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-α) suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro by inducing cell-intrinsic retroviral restriction mechanisms. We investigated the effects of IFN-α/ribavirin (IFN-α/riba) treatment on 34 anti-HIV-1 restriction factors in vivo. Expression of several anti-HIV-1 restriction factors was significantly induced by IFN-α/riba in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected individuals. Fold induction of cumulative restriction factor expression in CD4(+) T cells was significantly correlated with viral load reduction during IFN-α/riba treatment (r(2) = 0.649; P < 0.016). Exogenous IFN-α induces supraphysiologic restriction factor expression associated with a pronounced decrease in HIV-1 viremia.

  16. Potent dual anti-HIV and spermicidal activities of novel oxovanadium(V) complexes with thiourea non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Dong, Yanhong; Uckun, Fatih M

    2003-03-07

    We have previously demonstrated that tetrahedral bis(cyclopentadienyl)vanadium(IV) complexes and square pyramidal oxovanadium(IV) complexes of vanadium are rapid and selective spermicidal agents at low micromolar concentrations. This study investigated the potential utility of oxovanadium in combination with thiourea non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) for the development of an effective dual-function anti-HIV spermicide. Two rationally designed substituted phenyl-ring containing pyridyl thiourea NNIs, N-[2-(2-chlorophenethyl)]-N(')-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)-thiourea) [1] and N-[2-(2-methoxyphenethyl)]-N(')-[2-(pyridyl)-thiourea [2] that exhibited subnanomolar IC(50) values against the drug-sensitive, drug-resistant, and multidrug-resistant strains of HIV-1, were complexed with oxovanadium. The oxovanadium-thiourea [OVT] NNIs, C(29)H(27)Br(2)Cl(2)N(6)O(2)S(2)V [3], and C(31)H(35)N(6)O(4)S(2)V [4], were synthesized by reacting VOSO(4), a V(IV) compound, with the corresponding deprotonated thiourea NNI compounds as ligands. Elemental analysis showed that each OVT-NNI used two thiourea molecules as ligands. The existence of the Vz.dbnd6;O bond (968cm(-1)) was confirmed by IR spectroscopy. No d-d bands were observed in the visible spectra of OVT-NNIs and their EPR spectra were featureless, indicating that the vanadium centers were oxidized to V(V). The new OVT-NNIs as well as their thiourea NNI ligands were evaluated for (i) anti-HIV activity using the cell-free recombinant RT inhibition assays, (ii) cellular HIV replication assays, (iii) spermicidal activity against human sperm by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA), and (iv) cytotoxicity against normal human female genital tract epithelial cell using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) dye-reduction assays. Similar to thiourea NNIs 1 and 2, the OVT-NNIs 3 and 4, exhibited potent anti-HIV activity with submicromolar IC(50[p24]) values (0.08 and 0.128 micro

  17. A combination of molecular dynamics and docking calculations to explore the binding mode of ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound endowed with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Tintori, Cristina; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Massa, Silvio; Ragno, Rino; Esté, José A; Botta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    The HIV-1 entry process is an important target for the design of new pharmaceuticals for the multidrug therapy of AIDS. A lot of polyanionic compounds, such as polysulfonated and polysulfated, are reported in the literature for their ability to block early stages of HIV-1 replication. Several studies have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the anti-HIV-1 activity of sulfated polysaccharides and polyanions in general, including binding to cell surface CD4 and interfering with the gp120-coreceptor interaction. Here, we show molecular modeling investigations on ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound with anti-HIV activity that is able to interfere with gp120-coreceptor interactions. Agreeing with experimental data, computer simulations suggested that the V3 loop of gp120 was the preferential binding site for ADS-J1 onto HIV-1. Moreover, mutations induced by the inhibitor significantly changed the stereoelectronic properties of the gp120 surface, justifying a marked drop in the affinity of ADS-J1 toward an ADS-J1-resistant HIV-1 strain.

  18. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of a New Scorpion Venom Peptide Derivative Kn2-7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoqing; Cao, Luyang; Zhong, Maohua; Zhang, Yan; Han, Chen; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Jingyi; Zhou, Dihan; Shi, Wei; He, Benxia; Liu, Fang; Yu, Jie; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Li, Wenxin; Guo, Deying; Cao, Zhijian; Yan, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years, HIV/AIDS has wreaked havoc in the world. In the absence of an effective vaccine for HIV, development of new anti-HIV agents is urgently needed. We previously identified the antiviral activities of the scorpion-venom-peptide-derived mucroporin-M1 for three RNA viruses (measles viruses, SARS-CoV, and H5N1). In this investigation, a panel of scorpion venom peptides and their derivatives were designed and chosen for assessment of their anti-HIV activities. A new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7 was identified as the most potent anti-HIV-1 peptide by screening assays with an EC50 value of 2.76 µg/ml (1.65 µM) and showed low cytotoxicity to host cells with a selective index (SI) of 13.93. Kn2-7 could inhibit all members of a standard reference panel of HIV-1 subtype B pseudotyped virus (PV) with CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 PV strain. Furthermore, it also inhibited a CXCR4-tropic replication-competent strain of HIV-1 subtype B virus. Binding assay of Kn2-7 to HIV-1 PV by Octet Red system suggested the anti-HIV-1 activity was correlated with a direct interaction between Kn2-7 and HIV-1 envelope. These results demonstrated that peptide Kn2-7 could inhibit HIV-1 by direct interaction with viral particle and may become a promising candidate compound for further development of microbicide against HIV-1. PMID:22536342

  19. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds

    PubMed Central

    Forthal, Donald N.; Phan, Tran B.; Slepenkin, Anatoly V.; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. We determined the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides. Methods Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZMbl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Anti-viral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the anti-bacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe2+, we determined whether Fe2+ and other cations could reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds. We also employed real-time PCR to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results We identified four compounds with 50% HIV-1 inhibitory concentrations of 1 to 7 μM. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether targets for virus replication were TZMbl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe2+, but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. Conclusions We identified salicylidene acylhydrazides with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the μM range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  20. Synthesis and anti-HIV activities of symmetrical dicarboxylate esters of dinucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Hitesh K; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Parang, Keykavous

    2012-09-01

    Three nucleoside analogues, 3'-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (FLT), 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT), and 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC) were conjugated with three different dicarboxylic acids to afford the long chain dicarboxylate esters of nucleosides. In general, dinucleoside ester conjugates of FLT and 3TC with long chain dicarboxylic acids exhibited higher anti-HIV activity than their parent nucleosides. Dodecanoate and tetradecanoate dinucleoside ester derivatives of FLT were found to be the most potent compounds with EC(50) values of 0.8-1.0 nM and 3-4 nM against HIV-1(US/92/727) and HIV-1(IIIB) cells, respectively. The anti-HIV activity of the 3TC conjugates containing long chain dicarboxylate diester (EC(50)=3-60 nM) was improved by 1.5-66 fold when compared to 3TC (EC(50)=90-200 nM). This study reveals that the symmetrical ester conjugation of dicarboxylic acids with a number of nucleosides results in conjugates with improved anti-HIV profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  2. CD8+ cell anti-HIV activity correlates with the clinical state of the infected individual.

    PubMed

    Mackewicz, C E; Ortega, H W; Levy, J A

    1991-04-01

    The extent of antiviral activity exhibited in vitro by CD8+lymphocytes from individuals infected by HIV-1 correlates significantly with their clinical status. CD8+ lymphocytes from asymptomatic subjects were found to inhibit HIV-1 replication by 90% or greater at effector/target (E/T) ratios ranging from as low as 0.05 to 0.25. CD8+ cells from 17 of 19 (89%) of these subjects suppressed replication at an E/T ratio of 0.10 or less. CD8+ lymphocytes from symptomatic patients (non-AIDS) inhibited HIV-1 replication at E/T ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.0, and CD8+ cells from 8 of 13 (62%) required ratios greater than 0.10. As a group, patients with AIDS exhibited the lowest degree of anti-HIV activity with their CD8+ lymphocytes. The effective range of E/T ratios from AIDS patients was 0.10-2.0, and 9 of 10 (90%) required E/T ratios greater than 0.25. This anti-HIV activity exhibited by CD8+ cells also correlated significantly with the subject's peripheral blood CD4+ cell count. The relative extent of CD8+ cell anti-HIV-1 activity was not found dependent on variations in the CD4+ target cells and viruses used. These findings suggest that the decreased CD8+ cell antiviral activity is related to progression to disease in HIV-infected individuals.

  3. Methamphetamine Inhibits Toll-Like Receptor 9-Mediated Anti-HIV Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Ping; Ye, Li; Su, Qi-Jian; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Lin, Xin-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is one of the key sensors that recognize viral infection/replication in the host cells. Studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) dysregulated host cell innate immunity and facilitated HIV infection of macrophages. In this study, we present new evidence that METH suppressed TLR9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. Activation of TLR9 by its agonist CpG-ODN 2216 inhibits HIV replication, which was demonstrated by increased expression of TLR9, interferon (IFN)-α, IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) in macrophages. However, METH treatment of macrophages greatly compromised the TLR9 signaling-mediated anti-HIV effect and inhibited the expression of TLR9 downstream signaling factors. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists (SCH23390) could block METH-mediated inhibition of anti-HIV activity of TLR9 signaling. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the METH action showed that METH treatment selectively down-regulated the expression of TLR9 on macrophages, whereas it had little effect on the expression of other TLRs. Collectively, our results provide further evidence that METH suppresses host cell innate immunity against HIV infection by down-regulating TLR9 expression and its signaling-mediated antiviral effect in macrophages. PMID:23751096

  4. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a tripodal receptor that recognizes mannose oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Carrero, Paula; Casanova, Elena; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Madrona, Andrés; Quesada, Ernesto; Peréz-Pérez, María Jesús; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María José; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp120 of the HIV-1 viral envelope has a high content in mannose residues, particularly α-1,2-mannose oligomers. Compounds that interact with these high-mannose type glycans may disturb the interaction between gp120 and its (co)receptors and are considered potential anti-HIV agents. Previously, we demonstrated that a tripodal receptor (1), with a central scaffold of 1,3,5-triethylbenzene substituted with three 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoyl groups, selectively recognizes α-1,2-mannose polysaccharides. Here we present additional studies to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity and the mechanism of antiviral activity of this compound. Our studies indicate that 1 shows anti-HIV-1 activity in the low micromolar range and has pronounced gp120 binding and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory capacity. However, gp120 binding rather than integrase inhibition seems to be the primary mechanism of antiviral activity of 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Conformational studies of anti-HIV nucleosides: A rationale for the activity of {alpha}-nucleosides

    SciTech Connect

    Jalluri, R.K.; Yuh, Y.H.; Taylor, E.W.

    1993-12-31

    In the authors` computational studies of nucleosides, it has been found that the O-C-N anomeric effect is a major factor underlying the eastern barrier to pseudorotation, which has been measured by experimental methods (NMR). By adding torsional parameters for the O-C-N anomeric effect to the Kollman force field (SYBYL 5.5 implementation), the eastern barrier and compute realistic pseudorotational energy profiles for various nucleoside analogs can be reproduced. Although the contribution of the anomeric effect is partially neutralized in {beta}-nucleosides (since it is most favorable in the sterically hindered western conformations), in {alpha}-nucleosides it produces a distinct conformational minimum that is not sterically hindered, in which the 5`-CH{sub 2}OH is equatorial. This permits an {alpha}-nucleoside to mimic a {beta}-nucleoside only if the latter has an ap conformation of the 5`-CH{sub 2}OH, if one considers the relative orientations of O5` and the base, and the distance between O5` and the base nitrogen bonded to C1` (N1 or N9). This could account for the unexpected anti-HIV activity possessed by some {alpha}-nucleoside analogs (dioxolanes and oxathiolanes). The authors have also calculated pseudorotational energy profiles for various anti-HIV {beta}-nucleosides (like AZT, 3`-FDT, DDT, BCH-189, etc.), as well as inactive analogs, in order to quantitatively assess the role of conformational factors in anti-HIV activity.

  6. Dose-response curve slope sets class-specific limits on inhibitory potential of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Peterson, Susan; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; McMahon, Moira A; Callender, Marc; Zhang, Haili; Zhou, Yan; Pitt, Eleanor; Anderson, Karen S; Acosta, Edward P; Siliciano, Robert F

    2008-07-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can control HIV-1 replication, but suboptimal treatment allows for the evolution of resistance and rebound viremia. A comparative measure of antiviral activity under clinically relevant conditions would guide drug development and the selection of regimens that maximally suppress replication. Here we show that current measures of antiviral activity, including IC(50) and inhibitory quotient, neglect a key dimension, the dose-response curve slope. Using infectivity assays with wide dynamic range, we show that this slope has noteworthy effects on antiviral activity. Slope values are class specific for antiviral drugs and define intrinsic limitations on antiviral activity for some classes. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and integrase inhibitors have slopes of approximately 1, characteristic of noncooperative reactions, whereas non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and fusion inhibitors unexpectedly show slopes >1. Instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP), the log reduction in single-round infectivity at clinical drug concentrations, is strongly influenced by slope and varies by >8 logs for anti-HIV drugs. IIP provides a more accurate measure of antiviral activity and in general correlates with clinical outcomes. Only agents with slopes >1 achieve high-level inhibition of single-round infectivity, a finding with profound implications for drug and vaccine development.

  7. Improved specificity of in vitro anti-HIV antibody production: implications for diagnosis and timing of transmission in infants born to HIV-seropositive mothers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X P; Paul, M; Tetali, S; Abrams, E; Bamji, M; Gulick, L; Chirmule, N; Oyaizu, N; Bakshi, S; Pahwa, S

    1994-06-01

    In vitro anti-HIV antibody production (IVAP), initially introduced as a method for diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants, has been limited in its application because of poor specificity and sensitivity early in life. The aims of this study were to improve the specificity of the IVAP assay and to evaluate its sensitivity in conjunction with assays of HIV culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and p24 antigen. To prevent false-positive reactions resulting from maternal serum-derived cytophilic anti-HIV IgG, additional preculture and washing steps for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were introduced that resulted in dramatic improvement in specificity of IVAP. The sensitivity of the revised IVAP at age < 3 months in 20 infected infants was, however, only 25%; of 15 infected infants initially negative in IVAP, 13 became positive at a mean estimated age of 4.4 +/- 1.8 months. When correlated with virological assays, a failure to respond in IVAP at age < 1 month was often associated with negative virological identification, whereas a positive IVAP response at age < 3 months was always associated with positive results in all virological assays. Moreover, conversion from negative IVAP to positive responses occurred subsequent to, and not concurrently with, a positive virological identification of infected infants. The revised IVAP methodology renders this assay potentially useful as an additional tool not only for the diagnosis of HIV infection, but for estimating timing of maternal-infant HIV transmission as well.

  8. Latino Families in Therapy: Engagement and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Flores-Ortiz, Yvette

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that a therapist's involvement of Latinos in therapy requires both skills in family therapy and sensitivity to cultural issues. Presents factors found to be useful in the family assessment. Discusses issues in the engagement and evaluation phases of family therapy with Latino families. (Author)

  9. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of novel 4'-trifluoromethylated 5'-deoxyapiosyl nucleoside phosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyeon; Kim, Eunae; Lee, Wonjae; Hee Hong, Joon

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the discovery that the threosyl nucleoside phosphonate PMDTA is a potent anti-HIV compound, we synthesized several 4'-trifluoromethyl-5'-deoxyapiosyl nucleoside phosphonic acids and evaluated their anti-HIV activity. An efficient synthetic route was optimized, starting from an α-trifluoromethyl-α,β-unsaturated ester. Glycosylation of the purine nucleosidic bases with a glycosyl donor yielded modified nucleoside intermediates, which were then phosphonated and hydrolyzed to provide the targeted nucleoside analogs. Once synthesized, the anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities of each analog were evaluated. None of the analogs showed significant anti-HIV activity at concentrations up to 100 μM.

  10. A novel family of diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs) featuring a diatomic linker: Design, synthesis and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuang-Xi; Qiao, Heng; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Shu, Qi-Chao; Liu, Hui; Ju, Xiu-Lian; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    To improve the conformational flexibility and positional adaptability of the traditional diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs), a family of diarylpyrimidines featuring a C-N diatomic linker between the left wing benzene ring and the central pyrimidine was firstly designed, synthesized, and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity. Most of target molecules showed excellent activities against wild-type (WT) HIV-1. Among them the most potent two compounds 12h and 12r displayed extremely potent WT HIV-1 inhibitory activities with an EC50 of 2.6 nM and 3.0 nM, respectively, while their selective index (CC50/EC50) values were both over 1000. Another compound 12b (EC50 14.9 nM) was also noteworthy due to its high SI of 18,614. Moreover, all of compounds were evaluated for their WT HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities, which shown that the newly synthesized CH2NH-DAPYs bind to HIV-1 RT and belong to the genuine NNRTIs. However, the synthesized compounds lack the activities against HIV-1 double mutant (RES056) and HIV-2 (ROD). Thus it is an upcoming objective to improve the activities against HIV-1 double mutants.

  11. Immunity in the Vagina (Part II): Anti-HIV Activity and Antiviral Content of Human Vaginal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mickey V.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Rossoll, Richard M.; Wira, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Whether the concentrations of antiviral proteins, and anti-HIV activity, within human vaginal secretions changes across the menstrual cycle is unknown. Method of Study Using a menstrual cup, vaginal secretions from premenopausal women were recovered at the proliferative (d6–8), mid-cycle (d13–15) and secretory (d21–23) stages of the menstrual cycle. Antiviral protein concentration was determined by ELISA, and anti-HIV activity assessed using the TZM-bl reporter cell line. Results CCL20, RANTES, elafin, HBD2, SDF-1α and IL-8 levels were detectable in the secretions. Vaginal secretions had anti-HIV activity against specific clade B strains of HIV, with significant inhibition of IIIB and increased infectivity of transmitted/founder CH077.t. No significant differences in either antiviral protein concentration or anti-HIV activity with respect to menstrual cycle stage were measured, but marked differences were observed in both parameters over the course of the cycle between different women, and in consecutive cycles from the same woman. Conclusion The vagina contains a complement of antiviral proteins. The variation in anti-HIV activity demonstrates that immune protection in the vagina is not constant. Intra- and inter-individual variations suggest that factors in addition to sex hormones influence antiviral protection. Lastly, the menstrual cup is a new model for recovering undiluted vaginal secretions from women throughout their reproductive life. PMID:24806967

  12. Recent advances on anti-HIV vaginal delivery systems development.

    PubMed

    Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Mourtas, Spyridon

    2015-09-15

    A review of the recent outcomes regarding technologies to prevent vaginal transmission of HIV, mainly by using antiretroviral (ARV) drugs formulated as microbicides. An introduction about the HIV transmission mechanisms by the vaginal route is included, together with the recent challenges faced for development of successful microbicide products. The outcomes of clinical evaluations are mentioned, and the different formulation strategies studied to-date, with the requirements, advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each dosage-form type, are presented. Finally, the recent attempts to apply various types of nanotechnologies in order to develop advanced microbicide-products and overcome existing limitations, are discussed.

  13. Novel [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]- 3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2" -dioxide) derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and anti-human-cytomegalovirus activity.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Sonia; Lobatón, Esther; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; San-Félix, Ana; Cordeiro, Alessandra; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2005-02-24

    New [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-d-ribofuranosyl]-3'-spiro-5' '-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide) (TSAO) derivatives substituted at the 4' '-amino group of the spiro moiety with different carbonyl functionalities have been designed and synthesized. Various synthetic procedures, on the scarcely studied reactivity of the 3'-spiroaminooxathioledioxide moiety, have been explored. The compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on both wild-type and TSAO-resistant HIV-1 strains, in cell culture. The presence of a methyl ester (10) or amide groups (12) at the 4''-position conferred the highest anti-HIV-1 activity, while the free oxalyl acid derivative (11) was 10- to 20-fold less active against the virus. In contrast, the presence at this position of (un)substituted ureido or acyl groups markedly diminished or annihilated the anti-HIV-1 activity. Surprisingly, some of the target compounds also showed inhibition of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication at subtoxic concentrations. This has never been observed previously for TSAO derivatives. In particular, compound 26 represents the first TSAO derivative with dual anti-HIV-1 and -HCMV activity.

  14. Anti-AIDS agents 79. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and structure-activity relationships of novel dicamphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyranochromone (DCP) analogs as potent anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Zhu, Hao; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    In a continued study, 23 3′R,4′R-di-O-(−)-camphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) derivatives (5–27) were synthesized, and screened for anti-HIV activity against both a non-drug-resistant NL4-3 strain and multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR-1) strain, using 2-EDCP (4) and 2-MDCP (35) as controls. New DCP analogs 5, 9, 14, and 22 exhibited potent anti-HIV activity against HIVNL4-3 with EC50 and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 0.036 μM to 0.14 μM and from 110 to 420, respectively. Compounds 5 and 9 also exhibited good activity against RTMDR-1 (EC50 0.049 and 0.054 μM; TI 310 and 200, respectively), and were two-fold more potent than the leads 4 and 35 (EC50 0.11 and 0.19 μM; TI 60 and 58, respectively). Evaluation of water solubility showed that 5 and 22 were 5–10 times more water soluble than 4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling results were first performed on this compound type, and the models should aid in design of future anti-HIV DCP analogs and potential clinical drug candidates. PMID:20728367

  15. Bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite--possible role in the onset of toxicity induced by the anti-HIV drug abacavir.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Nádia M; Charneira, Catarina; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Marques, M Matilde; Antunes, Alexandra M M

    2014-01-30

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules, which can be generated during numerous physiological processes, including the biotransformation of drugs. Several non-P450 enzymes participate in their metabolism albeit alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase are the ones most frequently involved in this process. Endogenous and exogenous aldehydes have been strongly implicated in multiple human pathologies. Their ability to react with biomacromolecules (e.g. proteins) yielding covalent adducts is suggested to be the common primary mechanism underlying the toxicity of these reactive species. Abacavir is one of the options for combined anti-HIV therapy. Although individual susceptibilities to adverse effects differ among patients, abacavir is associated with idiosyncratic hypersensitivity drug reactions and an increased risk of cardiac dysfunction. This review highlights the current knowledge on abacavir metabolism and discusses the potential role of bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite, capable of forming protein adducts, in the onset of abacavir-induced toxic outcomes.

  16. Potentiation of anti-HIV activity of anti-inflammatory drugs, dexamethasone and indomethacin, by MAP30, the antiviral agent from bitter melon.

    PubMed

    Bourinbaiar, A S; Lee-Huang, S

    1995-03-17

    MAP30 is an antiviral protein from bitter melon (Momordica charantia). The enhancement of weak HIV antagonists, dexamethasone and indomethacin, by MAP30 has been examined by measuring the reduction in p24 expression in acutely infected MT-4 lymphocytes. In the presence of 1.5 nM MAP30 the IC50 dose of dexamethasone and indomethacin has been lowered, without concurrent cytotoxicity, at least a thousand-fold to 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M, respectively. This observation indicates that MAP30, a multifunctional antiviral plant protein capable of topological inactivation of viral DNA and specific cleavage of 28 S ribosomal RNA, may regulate HIV replication in concert with steroid and non-steroidal inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis. The results suggest that use of MAP30 in combination with low pharmacological doses of dexamethasone and indomethacin may improve the efficacy of anti-HIV therapy.

  17. A potent novel anti-HIV protein from the cultured cyanobacterium Scytonema varium.

    PubMed

    Bokesch, Heidi R; O'Keefe, Barry R; McKee, Tawnya C; Pannell, Lewis K; Patterson, Gregory M L; Gardella, Roberta S; Sowder, Raymond C; Turpin, Jim; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W; Boyd, Michael R

    2003-03-11

    A new anti-HIV protein, scytovirin, was isolated from aqueous extracts of the cultured cyanobacterium Scytonema varium. The protein displayed potent anticytopathic activity against laboratory strains and primary isolates of HIV-1 with EC50 values ranging from 0.3 to 22 nM. Scytovirin binds to viral coat proteins gp120, gp160, and gp41 but not to cellular receptor CD4 or other tested proteins. This unique protein consists of a single 95-amino acid chain with significant internal sequence duplication and 10 cysteines forming five intrachain disulfide bonds.

  18. QSAR study and VolSurf characterization of anti-HIV quinolone library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipponi, Enrica; Cruciani, Gabriele; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2001-03-01

    Antiviral quinolones are promising compounds in the search for new therapeutically effective agents for the treatment of AIDS. To rationalize the SAR for this new interesting class of anti-HIV derivatives, we performed a 3D-QSAR study on a library of 101 6-fluoro and 6-desfluoroquinolones, taken either from the literature or synthesized by us. The chemometric procedure involved a fully semiempirical minimization of the molecular structures by the AMSOL program, which takes into account the solvatation effect, and their 3D characterization by the VolSurf/GRID program. The QSAR analysis, based on PCA and PLS methods, shows the key structural features responsible for the antiviral activity.

  19. HIV Integrase Inhibitors with Nucleobase Scaffolds: Discovery of a Highly Potent anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Ptak, Roger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    HIV integrase is essential for HIV replication. However, there are currently no integrase inhibitors in clinical use for AIDS. We have discovered a conceptually new β-diketo acid that is a powerful inhibitor of both the 3′-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 integrase. The in vitro anti-HIV data of this inhibitor were remarkable as exemplified by its highly potent antiviral therapeutic efficacy against HIVTEKI and HIV-1NL4-3 replication in PBMC (TI >4,000 and >10,000, respectively). PMID:16420027

  20. False negative results in anti-HIV ELISA due to insufficient antigen coating of microtitre plates.

    PubMed

    Rosenkvist, J; Dybkjaer, E

    1990-10-01

    Since routine ELISA screening of blood donors for anti-HIV antibodies was introduced, much attention has been given to the specificity and the sensitivity of this assay. Most papers deal with false positive reactions while only a few have taken account of false negative results. We have found that insufficient HIV-antigen coating of the microtitre plates can lead to false negative results. It is essential that the producers of the ELISA test kits use control systems which guarantee sufficient antigen coating.

  1. Ethnopharmacology in overdrive: the remarkable anti-HIV activity of Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Lubbe, Andrea; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; van der Kooy, Frank

    2012-06-14

    Artemisia annua contains the well-known antimalarial compound artemisinin, which forms the backbone of the global malaria treatment regime. In African countries a tea infusion prepared from Artemisia annua has been used for the treatment of malaria only for the past 10-20 years. Several informal claims in Africa exist that the Artemisia annua tea infusions are also able to inhibit HIV. Since HIV is a relatively newly emerged disease, the claims, if substantiated, could provide a very good example of "ethnopharmacology in overdrive". The objective of this study was to provide quantitative scientific evidence that the Artemisia annua tea infusion exhibits anti-HIV activity through in vitro studies. A second objective was to determine if artemisinin plays a direct or indirect (synergistic) role in any observed activity. This was done by the inclusion of a chemically closely related species, Artemisia afra, known not to contain any artemisinin in our studies. Validated cellular systems were used to test Artemisia annua tea samples for anti-HIV activity. Two independent tests with different formats (an infection format and a co-cultivation format) were used. Samples were also tested for cellular toxicity against the human cells used in the assays. The Artemisia annua tea infusion was found to be highly active with IC(50) values as low as 2.0 μg/mL. Moreover we found that artemisinin was inactive at 25 μg/mL and that a chemically related species Artemisia afra (not containing artemisinin) showed a similar level of activity. This indicates that the role of artemisinin, directly or indirectly (synergism), in the observed activity is rather limited. Additionally, no cellular toxicity was seen for the tea infusion at the highest concentrations tested. This study provides the first in vitro evidence of anti-HIV activity of the Artemisia annua tea infusion. We also report for the first time on the anti-HIV activity of Artemisia afra although this was not an objective of this

  2. Synthesis of optically pure dioxolane nucleosides and their anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Siddigui, M.A.; Evans, C.; Jin, H.L.; Tse, A.; Brown, W.; Nguyen-Ba, N.; Mansour, T.S.; Cameron, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The clinical candidate 3TC, 1, possessing non-natural absolute stereochemistry is a potent and non-toxic inhibitor of a key enzyme, reverse transcriptase, involved in the replicative cycle of the HIV. Selective inhibition of both HIV and HBV is seen. In view of the authors` interest in finding correlation between stereochemistry and antiviral activity, several enantiomerically pure dioxolane nucleosides, 2, were synthesized and assayed. The discussion will focus on (a) the synthesis of optically pure dioxolane sugars from L-ascorbic acid, (b) enzymatic resolution of purine dioxolane nucleosides, (c) anti HIV-1 activity in MT-4 cells.

  3. Development and characterization of a solid dispersion film for the vaginal application of the anti-HIV microbicide UAMC01398.

    PubMed

    Grammen, Carolien; Van den Mooter, Guy; Appeltans, Bernard; Michiels, Johan; Crucitti, Tania; Ariën, Kevin K; Augustyns, Koen; Augustijns, Patrick; Brouwers, Joachim

    2014-11-20

    The purpose of this work was to design and evaluate a vaginal film delivery system for UAMC01398, a novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor currently under investigation for use as an anti-HIV microbicide. UAMC01398 (1mg) films consisting of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) in different ratios were prepared by solvent evaporation. Based on its flexibility, softness and translucent appearance, the 30% PEG400 and 70% HPMC containing film was selected for further assessment. The vaginal film formulation was fast-dissolving (<10 min in 1 mL of vaginal fluid simulant), stable up to at least one month and safe toward epithelial cells and lactobacilli. Furthermore, formulating UAMC01398 into the film dosage form did not influence its antiviral activity. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed the amorphous nature of the UAMC01398 film, resulting in enhanced compound permeation across the epithelial HEC-1A cell layer, presumably owing to the induction of supersaturation. The in vivo vaginal tissue uptake of UAMC01398 in rabbits, as measured by systemic concentrations, was increased compared to the previously established non-solubilizing gel (significant difference) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (5%) containing gel. To conclude, we identified a film formulation suitable for the vaginal delivery of UAMC01398.

  4. Notable Difference in anti-HIV Activity of Integrase Inhibitors as a Consequence of Geometric and Enantiomeric Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Nishonov, Malik; Nair, Vasu

    2013-01-01

    While some examples are known of integrase inhibitors that exhibit potent anti-HIV activity, there are very few cases reported of integrase inhibitors that show significant differences in anti-HIV activity that result from distinctions in cis-and trans-configurations as well as enantiomeric stereostructure. We describe here the design and synthesis of two enantiomeric trans-hydroxycyclopentyl carboxamides which exhibit notable difference in anti-HIV activity. This difference is explained through their binding interactions within the active site of the HIV-1 integrase intasome. The more active enantiomer 3 (EC50 25 nM) was relatively stable in human liver microsomes. Kinetic data revealed that its impact on key cytochrome P450 isozymes, as either an inhibitor or an activator, was minor, suggesting a favorable CYP profile. PMID:23746474

  5. [Prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies in patients at the Service of Human Reproduction Biology of the "20th November" National Medical Center].

    PubMed

    Sauceda, L F; Gutiérrez, R; Franco, M; Beltrán, A

    1999-10-01

    At the service of Human Reproduction of the Centro Médico Nacional "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE from January 94 to August 98, at the first visit, were performed routine screening for antibodies anti-HIV for both partners. Of 672 samples 3 (0.44%) were positive for antibodies anti-HIV with ELISA and two confirmed by Western blot analysis.

  6. Core-structure-inspired asymmetric addition reactions: enantioselective synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Ma, Jun-An

    2015-11-07

    Dihydrobenzoxazinones and dihydroquinazolinones are the core units present in many anti-HIV agents, such as Efavirenz, DPC 961, DPC 963, and DPC 083. All these molecules contain a trifluoromethyl moiety at the quaternary stereogenic carbon center with S configuration. The enantioselective addition of carbon nucleophiles to ketones or cyclic ketimines could serve as a key step to access these molecules. This tutorial review provides an overview of significant advances in the synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents and relative analogues, with an emphasis on asymmetric addition reactions for the establishment of the CF3-containing quaternary carbon centers.

  7. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant cyanovirin-N for vaginal anti-HIV microbicide development.

    PubMed

    Colleluori, Diana M; Tien, Deborah; Kang, Feirong; Pagliei, Tara; Kuss, Ryan; McCormick, Timothy; Watson, Karen; McFadden, Karyn; Chaiken, Irwin; Buckheit, Robert W; Romano, Joseph W

    2005-02-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is a prokaryotic protein under development as a topical anti-HIV microbicide, an urgent and necessary approach to prevent HIV transmission in at-risk populations worldwide. We have expressed recombinant CV-N as inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. A purification scheme has been developed that exploits the physicochemical properties of this protein, in particular its stability in a harsh inclusion body purification scheme. Under the conditions developed, this system yields 140 mg of highly purified CV-N per liter of high-density cell culture, which represents a 14-fold increase over the best recombinant CV-N yield reported to date. This purification scheme results in monomeric CV-N as analyzed by SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing, and reverse phase- and size exclusion-HPLC. This recombinantly expressed and refolded CV-N binds to gp120 with nanomolar affinity and retains its potent anti-HIV activities in cell-based assays. The expression and purification system described herein provides a better means for the mass production of CV-N for further microbicide development.

  8. Double Variational Binding—(SMILES) Conformational Analysis by Docking Mechanisms for Anti-HIV Pyrimidine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Dudaș, Nicoleta A.; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Variational quantitative binding–conformational analysis for a series of anti-HIV pyrimidine-based ligands is advanced at the individual molecular level. This was achieved by employing ligand-receptor docking algorithms for each molecule in the 1,3-disubstituted uracil derivative series that was studied. Such computational algorithms were employed for analyzing both genuine molecular cases and their simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) transformations, which were created via the controlled breaking of chemical bonds, so as to generate the longest SMILES molecular chain (LoSMoC) and Branching SMILES (BraS) conformations. The study identified the most active anti-HIV molecules, and analyzed their special and relevant bonding fragments (chemical alerts), and the recorded energetic and geometric docking results (i.e., binding and affinity energies, and the surface area and volume of bonding, respectively). Clear computational evidence was also produced concerning the ligand-receptor pocket binding efficacies of the LoSMoc and BraS conformation types, thus confirming their earlier presence (as suggested by variational quantitative structure-activity relationship, variational-QSAR) as active intermediates for the molecule-to-cell transduction process. PMID:26295229

  9. From Docking False-Positive to Active Anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T.; Guimarães, Cristiano R. W.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70,000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and MM-GB/SA post-processing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Though known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential “near-miss” with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to evolve efficiently a false positive into a true active. In addition, the need for adequate structure validation was confirmed by the apparent misrepresentation of a purchased compound elsewhere as the present oxadiazole core compound, 16. PMID:17918923

  10. Anti-HIV activity in vitro of MGN-3, an activated arabinoxylane from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, M

    1998-02-04

    MGN-3 an arabinoxylane from rice bran that has been enzymatically modified with extract from Hyphomycetes mycelia, was tested for anti-HIV activity in vitro. MGN-3 activity against HIV-1 (SF strain) was examined in primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MGN-3 inhibited HIV-1 replication by: (1) inhibition of HIV-1 p24 antigen production in a dose dependent manner--MGN-3 concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 micrograms/ml showed 18.3, 42.8, 59, and 75% reduction in p24 antigen, respectively; and (2) inhibition of syncytia formation maximized (75%) at concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml. Further studies showed that ingestion of MGN-3 at concentration of 15 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant increase in T and B cell mitogen response at 2 months after treatment: 146% for PHA, 140% for Con A, and 136.6% for PWM mitogen. We conclude that MGN-3 possesses potent anti-HIV activity and in the absence of any notable side effects, MGN-3 shows promise as an agent for treating patients with AIDS.

  11. Novel multi-component nanopharmaceuticals derived from poly(ethylene) glycol, retro-inverso-Tat nonapeptide and saquinavir demonstrate combined anti-HIV effects.

    PubMed

    Wan, Li; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gunaseelan, Simi; Pooyan, Shahriar; Debrah, Olivia; Leibowitz, Michael J; Rabson, Arnold B; Stein, Stanley; Sinko, Patrick J

    2006-04-24

    Current anti-AIDS therapeutic agents and treatment regimens can provide a dramatically improved quality of life for HIV-positive people, many of whom have no detectable viral load for prolonged periods of time. Despite this, curing AIDS remains an elusive goal, partially due to the occurrence of drug resistance. Since the development of resistance is linked to, among other things, fluctuating drug levels, our long-term goal has been to develop nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems that can improve therapy by more precisely controlling drug concentrations in target cells. The theme of the current study is to investigate the value of combining AIDS drugs and modifiers of cellular uptake into macromolecular conjugates having novel pharmacological properties. Bioconjugates were prepared from different combinations of the approved drug, saquinavir, the antiviral agent, R.I.CK-Tat9, the polymeric carrier, poly(ethylene) glycol and the cell uptake enhancer, biotin. Anti-HIV activities were measured in MT-2 cells, an HTLV-1-transformed human lymphoid cell line, infected with HIV-1 strain Vbu 3, while parallel studies were performed in uninfected cells to determine cellular toxicity. For example, R.I.CK-Tat9 was 60 times more potent than L-Tat9 while the addition of biotin resulted in a prodrug that was 2850 times more potent than L-Tat9. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies suggest that variations in intracellular uptake and intracellular localization, as well as synergistic inhibitory effects of SQV and Tat peptides, contributed to the unexpected and substantial differences in antiviral activity. Our results demonstrate that highly potent nanoscale multi-drug conjugates with low non-specific toxicity can be produced by combining moieties with anti-HIV agents for different targets onto macromolecules having improved delivery properties.

  12. In Vitro Drug Combination Studies of Letermovir (AIC246, MK-8228) with Approved Anti-Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Anti-HIV Compounds in Inhibition of HCMV and HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wildum, Steffen; Zimmermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Despite modern prevention and treatment strategies, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a common opportunistic pathogen associated with serious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, such as transplant recipients and AIDS patients. All drugs currently licensed for the treatment of HCMV infection target the viral DNA polymerase and are associated with severe toxicity issues and the emergence of drug resistance. Letermovir (AIC246, MK-8228) is a new anti-HCMV agent in clinical development that acts via a novel mode of action and has demonstrated anti-HCMV activity in vitro and in vivo. For the future, drug combination therapies, including letermovir, might be indicated under special medical conditions, such as the emergence of multidrug-resistant virus strains in transplant recipients or in HCMV-HIV-coinfected patients. Accordingly, knowledge of the compatibility of letermovir with other HCMV or HIV antivirals is of medical importance. Here, we evaluated the inhibition of HCMV replication by letermovir in combination with all currently approved HCMV antivirals using cell culture checkerboard assays. In addition, the effects of letermovir on the antiviral activities of selected HIV drugs, and vice versa, were analyzed. Using two different mathematical techniques to analyze the experimental data, (i) additive effects were observed for the combination of letermovir with anti-HCMV drugs and (ii) no interaction was found between letermovir and anti-HIV drugs. Since none of the tested drug combinations significantly antagonized letermovir efficacy (or vice versa), our findings suggest that letermovir may offer the potential for combination therapy with the tested HCMV and HIV drugs. PMID:25779572

  13. MIA-QSAR modelling of anti-HIV-1 activities of some 2-amino-6-arylsulfonylbenzonitriles and their thio and sulfinyl congeners.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Matheus P

    2006-03-21

    A QSAR method based on MIA (multivariate image analysis) descriptors is applied to a series of 2-amino-6-arylsulfonylbenzonitriles and their thio and sulfinyl congeners, compounds with anti-HIV-1 activity. Two models were built in order to appraise the modelling capability when different drawing programs are used to create the set of molecules. Both models showed good predictive ability, with cross-validated Q2 of 0.712 and 0.624, and Q2 for an external validation set of 0.823 and 0.747. An ADME evaluation, by calculating the topological polar surface area (TPSA) and parameters derived from the rule of five, was also performed to proposed compounds in order to suggest absorption profiles for potential new drugs.

  14. Economic evaluation of dialysis therapies.

    PubMed

    Klarenbach, Scott W; Tonelli, Marcello; Chui, Betty; Manns, Braden J

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis therapy continues to increase worldwide, and despite technological advances, treatment remains resource intensive. Thus, the increasing burden of dialysis therapy on finite health-care budgets is an important consideration. The principles of allocative efficiency and the concept of 'opportunity cost' can be used to assess whether dialysis is economically justified; if dialysis is to be provided, cost-minimization and cost-utility analyses can be used to identify the most efficient dialysis modality. Existing studies have examined the cost, and where relevant the effectiveness, of the various currently available peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis modalities. In this Review, we discuss variations in the intrinsic costs of the available dialysis modalities as well as other factors, such as variation by country, available health-care infrastructures, the timing of dialysis initiation and renal transplantation. We draw on data from robust micro-costing studies of the various dialysis modalities in Canada to highlight key issues.

  15. Identification of anti-HIV active dicaffeoylquinic- and tricaffeoylquinic acids in Helichrysum populifolium by NMR-based metabolomic guided fractionation.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Heino Martin; Senejoux, François; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; Maharaj, Vinesh Jaichand; Meyer, Jacobus Johannes Marion

    2015-06-01

    South Africa being home to more than 35% of the world's Helichrysum species (c.a. 244) of which many are used in traditional medicine, is seen potentially as a significant resource in the search of new anti-HIV chemical entities. It was established that five of the 30 Helichrysum species selected for this study had significant anti-HIV activity ranging between 12 and 21 μg/mL (IC50) by using an in-house developed DeCIPhR method on a full virus model. Subsequent toxicity tests also revealed little or no toxicity for these active extracts. With the use of NMR-based metabolomics, the search for common chemical characteristics within the plant extract was conducted, which resulted in specific chemical shift areas identified that could be linked to the anti-HIV activity of the extracts. The NMR chemical shifts associated with the activity were identified to be 2.56-3.08 ppm, 5.24-6.28 ppm, 6.44-7.04 ppm and 7.24-8.04 ppm. This activity profile was then used to guide the fractionation process by narrowing down and focusing the fractionation and purification processes to speed up the putative identification of five compounds with anti-HIV activity in the most active species, Helichrysum populifolium. The anti-HIV compounds identified for the first time from H. populifolium were three dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, i.e. 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid as well as two tricaffeoylquinic acid derivatives i.e. 1,3,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and either 5-malonyl-1,3,4-tricaffeoylquinic or 3-malonyl-1,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid, with the latter being identified for the first time in the genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemoenzymatic Syntheses and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Glucose-Nucleoside Conjugates as Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Tatiana; Fernández, Susana; Sanghvi, Yogesh S.; Detorio, Mervi; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Gotor, Vicente; Ferrero, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiester linked conjugates of various nucleosides such as d4U, d4T, IdUrd, ddI, ddA, virazole, ara-A and ara-C containing a glucosyl moiety have been described. These compounds were designed to act as prodrugs, where the corresponding 5′-monophosphates may be generated intracellularly. The synthesis of the glycoconjugates was achieved in good yields by condensation of a glucosyl phosphoramidite 7 with nucleosides in the presence of an activating agent. It was demonstrated that the glucose-conjugates improve water solubility of the nucleoside analogues, for example up to 31-fold for ara-A conjugate compared to ara-A alone. The new conjugates were tested for their anti-HIV-1 activity in human lymphocytes. These derivatives offer a convenient design for potential prodrug candidates with the possibility to improve the physicochemical properties and therapeutic activity of nucleoside analogues. PMID:21077659

  17. Electrochemical impediometric detection of anti-HIV drug taking gold nanorods as a sensing interface.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singh, Gajendra; Pundir, C S

    2015-04-15

    In present work, gold nanorods were used for amplification of electrochemical sensing of anti-HIV replication drug i.e. deferiprone. Gold nanorods (nano Au) deposited onto pencil graphite electrode (PGE) has been utilized for covalent immobilization of horse radish peroxidase (HRP), via glutaraldehyde (Glu), for deferiprone detection using impedimetric technique. Gold nanorods (nano Au) prepared were characterized by TEM and XRD. The resulting nano Au sensor exhibited a good response to deferiprone with a wide linear range (0.005-1000µM) and a low detection limit 0.005µM. The biosensor also showed a short response time (within 15s). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high reproducibility, good storage stability and anti-interference ability. The applicability of the nano Au sensor is to determine deferiprone level in spiked urine and serum samples.

  18. [Asymmetry in international relations, industrial property rights and anti-HIV medication].

    PubMed

    Costa-Couto, Maria Helena; Nascimento, Alvaro César

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the asymmetry in the international relations as refers to the recognition of industrial property rights in the pharmaceutical industry. It focuses on the impact of such relations upon the access to ARV medication, an issue of worldwide interest due to its connection with the development of the nations. Clashing interests and the position taken by some countries in their patent laws point to a scenario less favorable for the access of peripheral countries to anti-HIV/AIDS medication. On the other hand, it seems that the success of the Brazilian STD/AIDS program in negotiating ARV prices will open new possibilities. The solution may be the internal strengthening of the National States and the active role played by the Agencies of the United Nations System in defense of the collective human interests.

  19. A SINGLE INJECTION OF ANTI-HIV-1 ANTIBODIES PROTECTS AGAINST REPEATED SHIV CHALLENGES

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C.; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Mascola, John R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling HIV-1 infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 bNAbs can protect mice or macaques against a single high dose challenge with HIV or SIV/HIV chimeric viruses respectively1-8, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Based on the relatively long term protection conferred by Hepatitis A immune globulin, we tested the efficacy of a single injection (20mg/kg) of four anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-10749-12) in blocking repeated weekly low dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared to control animals, which required 2 to 6 challenges (median=3 weeks) for infection, a single bNAb infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weeks. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma neutralizing activity and correspondingly, the longest protection, were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies, 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median=13 and 12.5 weeks respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median=8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the Fc domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered in to populations at high risk for HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  20. Nanoparticles-in-film for the combined vaginal delivery of anti-HIV microbicide drugs.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Reis, Cassilda; Machado, Alexandra; Barreiros, Luísa; Araújo, Francisca; Nunes, Rute; Seabra, Vítor; Ferreira, Domingos; Segundo, Marcela A; Sarmento, Bruno; das Neves, José

    2016-12-10

    Combining two or more antiretroviral drugs in one medical product is an interesting but challenging strategy for developing topical anti-HIV microbicides. We developed a new vaginal delivery system comprising the incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into a polymeric film base - NPs-in-film - and tested its ability to deliver tenofovir (TFV) and efavirenz (EFV). EFV-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs were incorporated alongside free TFV into fast dissolving films during film manufacturing. The delivery system was characterized for physicochemical properties, as well as genital distribution, local and systemic 24h pharmacokinetics (PK), and safety upon intravaginal administration to mice. NPs-in-film presented suitable technological, mechanical and cytotoxicity features for vaginal use. Retention of NPs in vivo was enhanced both in vaginal lavages and tissue when associated to film. PK data evidenced that vaginal drug levels rapidly decreased after administration but NPs-in-film were still able to enhance drug concentrations of EFV. Obtained values for area-under-the-curve for EFV were around one log10 higher than those for the free drugs in aqueous vehicle (phosphate buffered saline). Film alone also contributed to higher and more prolonged local drug levels as compared to the administration of TFV and EFV in aqueous vehicle. Systemic exposure to both drugs was low. NPs-in-film was found to be safe upon once daily vaginal administration to mice, with no significant genital histological changes or major alterations in cytokine/chemokine profiles being observed. Overall, the proposed NPs-in-film system seems to be an interesting delivery platform for developing combination vaginal anti-HIV microbicides.

  1. The in vitro ejection of zinc from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 nucleocapsid protein by disulfide benzamides with cellular anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tummino, P J; Scholten, J D; Harvey, P J; Holler, T P; Maloney, L; Gogliotti, R; Domagala, J; Hupe, D

    1996-01-01

    Several disulfide benzamides have been shown to possess wide-spectrum antiretroviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar to submicromolar concentrations, inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) clinical and drug-resistant strains along with HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus [Rice, W. G., Supko, J. G., Malspeis, L., Buckheit, R. W., Jr., Clanton, D., Bu, M., Graham, L., Schaeffer, C. A., Turpin, J. A., Domagala, J., Gogliotti, R., Bader, J. P., Halliday, S. M., Coren, L., Sowder, R. C., II, Arthur, L. O. & Henderson, L. E. (1995) Science 270, 1194-1197]. Rice and coworkers have proposed that the compounds act by "attacking" the two zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein. Shown here is evidence that low micromolar concentrations of the anti-HIV disulfide benzamides eject zinc from HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) in vitro, as monitored by the zinc-specific fluorescent probe N-(6-methoxy-8-quinoyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ). Structurally similar disulfide benzamides that do not inhibit HIV-1 in culture do not eject zinc, nor do analogs of the antiviral compounds with the disulfide replaced with a methylene sulfide. The kinetics of NCp7 zinc ejection by disulfide benzamides were found to be nonsaturable and biexponential, with the rate of ejection from the C-terminal zinc finger 7-fold faster than that from the N-terminal. The antiviral compounds were found to inhibit the zinc-dependent binding of NCp7 to HIV psi RNA, as studied by gel-shift assays, and the data correlated well with the zinc ejection data. Anti-HIV disulfide benzamides specifically eject NCp7 zinc and abolish the protein's ability to bind psi RNA in vitro, providing evidence for a possible antiretroviral mechanism of action of these compounds. Congeners of this class are under advanced preclinical evaluation as a potential chemotherapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8577770

  2. Expressing anti-HIV VRC01 antibody using the murine IgG1 secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Aw, Rochelle; McKay, Paul F; Shattock, Robin J; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    The use of the recombinant expression platform Pichia pastoris to produce pharmaceutically important proteins has been investigated over the past 30 years. Compared to mammalian cultures, expression in P. pastoris is cheaper and faster, potentially leading to decreased costs and process development times. Product yields depend on a number of factors including the secretion signal chosen for expression, which can influence the host cell response to recombinant protein production. VRC01, a broadly neutralising anti-HIV antibody, was expressed in P. pastoris, using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter for both the heavy and light chains. Titre reached up to 3.05 μg mL(-1) in small scale expression. VRC01 was expressed using both the α-mating factor signal peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the murine IgG1 signal peptide. Surprisingly, using the murine IgG1 signal peptide resulted in higher yield of antibody capable of binding gp140 antigen. Furthermore, we evaluated levels of secretory stress compared to the untransformed wild-type strain and show a reduced level of secretory stress in the murine IgG1 signal peptide strains versus those containing the α-MF signal peptide. As bottlenecks in the secretory pathway are often the limiting factor in protein secretion, reduced levels of secretory stress and the higher yield of functional antibody suggest the murine IgG1 signal peptide may lead to better protein folding and secretion. This work indicates the possibilities for utilising the murine IgG1 signal peptide for a range of antibodies, resulting in high yields and reduced cellular stress.

  3. Stem cell-based therapies for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-08-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and, ultimately, a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute the patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theory, anti-HIV gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells can continuously provide HIV-resistant immune cells throughout the life of a patient. Therefore, hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy has a great potential to provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS by a single treatment. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of developing anti-HIV genes, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells, engraftment and reconstitution of anti-HIV gene-modified immune cells, HIV inhibition in in vitro and in vivo animal models, and in human clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Density functional theory study of the local molecular properties of acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, M.; Mahani, N. Madadi; Hamadanian, M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on the series of 2-(4-(naphthalen-2-yl)-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylthio)-N-acetamide (TTA) derivatives. The local reactivity of the acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs were studied in terms of Fukui functions in the framework of DFT. The results based on the basis set superposition error (BSSE) corrections showed that the mechanism of bond formation between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine as a biological molecule occurs mainly through nitrogen atoms. The intramolecular interaction energies between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine were calculated and the nature of the intermolecular interaction was revealed by natural bond orbital charge (NBO) analysis. The results suggest that acetamide derivatives with bromophenyl and nitrophenyl substitutions are the most potent as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:24082898

  5. Anti-HIV seropositivity was related to HBsAg seropositivity among injecting drug users in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Wang, Shu-Chi; Yang, Jeng-Fu; Chang, Ko; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Huang, Jee-Fu; Dai, Chia-Yen; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chuang, Wan-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-02-01

    In Taiwan, the number of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection via drug injection has been increasing since 2003. Due to HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) having similar transmission routes, HBV and HIV infections among injecting drug users (IDUs) has become an important public health issue. The aim of this study was explore the prevalence of HBV infection among IDUs with and without HIV infection, and examine whether HIV infection is associated with HBV infection among IDUs in Southern Taiwan. We enrolled 566 IDUs, including 87 anti-HBV positive IDUs and 479 anti-HBV negative IDUs, and also analyzed the results of liver function tests, HBV DNA, anti-HIV, HIV RNA, and CD4 cell count. The results showed that the prevalence of HBV infection among IDUs was 15.4%. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher among individuals born before 1985 (15.9% vs. 4.0%), but this was not significant. Anti-HIV seropositivity was related to HBsAg seropositivity [odds ratio (OR) = 2.47, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-4.82, p = 0.008). Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were risk factors for abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT; OR = 2.11, 95% confidence interval = 1.005-4.42, p = 0.048 and OR = 1.47, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-2.10, p = 0.04, respectively), and HBsAg was not a factor related to abnormal ALT. In conclusion, the prevalence of HBV infection was similar in the general population and in IDUs, and due to anti-HIV seropositivity being significantly related to HBsAg seropositivity, HBV infection among IDUs is still important. We suggest that for IDUs, HBsAg should be monitored closely.

  6. High titer anti-HIV antibody reactivity associated with a paraprotein spike in a homosexual male with AIDS related complex.

    PubMed

    Ng, V L; Hwang, K M; Reyes, G R; Kaplan, L D; Khayam-Bashi, H; Hadley, W K; McGrath, M S

    1988-05-01

    We observed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual male with AIDS related complex (ARC) who had a serum globulin level of 80 g/L. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed a gamma globulin fraction of 40 g/L, of which 50% (20 g/L) was contained within a paraprotein spike, comprised predominantly of IgG kappa. This patient also had high titer anti-HIV antibodies in his serum, which were Western blot reactive at a final dilution of 1:500,000, and recognized gp120env, p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. Because paraproteins in the past have been shown to be directed against specific antigens, we purified this patient's paraprotein using a modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-hydroxylapatite procedure and tested the purified paraprotein for anti-HIV antibody activity. The purified paraprotein retained anti-HIV antibody activity to a final dilution of 1:100,000, and recognized p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. The recognition of both "gag" and "pol" gene products suggested that the purified paraprotein might not be monoclonal in origin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that the purified paraprotein contained at least two immunoglobulin light chain species (Mol wt 30 to 33 Kd). Affinity chromatography of the purified paraprotein using a p24-Sepharose 4B matrix separated the "gag" and "pol" antibody activities. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis of a bone marrow aspirate (which contained 15% plasma cells) failed to reveal a clonal population of immunoglobulin producing cells. We conclude that this patient's paraprotein accounted for most of the anti-HIV activity present in whole serum, and that this paraprotein was not monoclonal in origin.

  7. Structure and conformational analysis of the anti-HIV AZT 5‧-aminocarbonylphosphonate prodrug using DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamara Molina, A.; Alcolea Palafox, M.

    2011-08-01

    A comprehensive theoretical conformational analysis of the anti-HIV AZT 5'-aminocarbonylphosphonate prodrug was carried out, due to this prodrug has noticeable advantage over approved drugs AZT and Nikavir. The whole conformational parameters ( χ, γ, β, α, δ, ɛ, τ, P, νmax) were analysed as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out by means of B3LYP/6-31G ∗∗ and B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,pd) DFT levels of theory with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 86 stable structures, 6 of which are within a 1 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum and 11 conformers are within a 1 kcal/mol Gibbs energy range. The global minimum with the 6-311++G(3df,pd) basis set corresponds to the calculated values of the exocyclic torsional angles χ = -121.6°, β = 153.0°, γ = -152.0° and α = -74.1°. The results obtained are in accordance to those found in related anti-HIV nucleoside Analogs. Comparisons of the conformers with those determined in the common anti-HIV drug AZT were carried out. Several correlations and general conclusions were emphasized.

  8. Transient swelling behavior and drug delivery from a dissolving film deploying anti-HIV microbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Despite more than two decades of HIV vaccine research, there is still no efficacious HIV vaccine. Very recently, a research group has shown that a microbicide gel formulation of antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, significantly inhibits HIV transmission to women [1]. However, there is a widespread agreement that more effective and diverse drug delivery vehicles must be developed. In this setting, there is now great interest in developing different delivery vehicles such as vaginal rings, gels, and films. Here, we develop a model for transient fluid uptake and swelling behavior, and subsequent dissolution and drug deployment from a film containing anti-HIV microbicide. In the model, the polymer structural relaxation via water uptake is assumed to follow first order kinetics. In the case of a film loaded with an osmotically active solute, the kinetic equation is modified to account for the osmotic effect. The transport rate of solvent and solute within the matrix is characterized by a diffusion equation. After the matrix is relaxed to a specified concentration of solvent, lubrication theory and convective-diffusive transport are employed for flow of the liquefied matrix and drug dispersion respectively. [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.

  9. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  10. Mucosal and systemic anti-HIV immunity controlled by A20 in mouse dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bangxing; Song, Xiao-Tong; Rollins, Lisa; Berry, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2011-02-01

    Both mucosal and systemic immune responses are required for preventing or containing HIV transmission and chronic infection. However, currently described vaccination approaches are largely ineffective in inducing both mucosal and systemic responses. In this study, we found that the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20--an inducible feedback inhibitor of the TNFR, RIG-I, and TLR signaling pathways that broadly controls the maturation, cytokine production, and immunostimulatory potency of DCs--restricted systemically immunized DCs to induce both robust mucosal and systemic HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that A20 regulated DC production of retinoic acid and proinflammatory cytokines, inhibiting the expression of gut-homing receptors on T and B cells. Furthermore, A20-silenced, hyperactivated DCs exhibited an enhanced homing capacity to draining and gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) after systemic administration. Thus, this study provides insights into the role of A20 in innate immunity. This work may allow the development of an efficient HIV vaccination strategy that is capable of inducing both robust systemic and mucosal anti-HIV cellular and humoral responses.

  11. Mucosal and systemic anti-HIV immunity controlled by A20 in mouse dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bangxing; Song, Xiao-Tong; Rollins, Lisa; Berry, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F.; Chen, Si-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Both mucosal and systemic immune responses are required for preventing or containing HIV transmission and chronic infection. However, currently described vaccination approaches are largely ineffective in inducing both mucosal and systemic responses. In this study, we found that the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 — an inducible feedback inhibitor of the TNFR, RIG-I, and TLR signaling pathways that broadly controls the maturation, cytokine production, and immunostimulatory potency of DCs — restricted systemically immunized DCs to induce both robust mucosal and systemic HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that A20 regulated DC production of retinoic acid and proinflammatory cytokines, inhibiting the expression of gut-homing receptors on T and B cells. Furthermore, A20-silenced, hyperactivated DCs exhibited an enhanced homing capacity to draining and gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) after systemic administration. Thus, this study provides insights into the role of A20 in innate immunity. This work may allow the development of an efficient HIV vaccination strategy that is capable of inducing both robust systemic and mucosal anti-HIV cellular and humoral responses. PMID:21206085

  12. Role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in anti-HIV innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller-Trutwin, Michaela; Hosmalin, Anne

    2005-10-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in anti-HIV immunity is mostly represented by the production of type I IFN in response to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. This production is decreased in HIV-1 infected patients at the time of primary infection and during chronic disease in association with progression of disease. Circulating pDC counts are decreased concomitantly with type I IFN, and both factors correlate inversely overall with viral loads and positively with CD4+ T-cell counts. These parameters might be used in clinical immunology to monitor treatment and as predictive factors of immune control of HIV-1 replication to help decide whether to interrupt antiretroviral treatment. They may be related to control of HIV replication as well as to pathogenesis of infection, perhaps in setting the balance between immunity or tolerance to the virus. A better understanding of these parameters is required while attempts to use IFN-alpha or ligands of Toll-like receptors found on pDC are being made.

  13. Coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide gel: boundary dilution and yield stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Tasoglu, Savas; Park, Su Chan; Katz, David F.

    2010-11-01

    A recent study has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when topically applied, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [1]. However, the gel for this drug, and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general, have not been designed using an understanding of how gel spreading govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model spreading of microbicide gels [2]. Here, we extend our initial analysis: we incorporate a yield stress, and we model the effects of gel dilution due to contact with vaginal fluid produced at the gel-tissue interface. Our model developed in [2] is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to characterize dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain. The association between local dilution of gel and rheological properties is obtained experimentally. To model the common yield stress property of gels, we proceed by scaling analysis first. This establishes the conditions for validity of lubrication theory of a shear thinning yield stress fluid. This involves further development of the model in [2], incorporating a biviscosity model.[4pt] [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.[0pt] [2] Szeri, et al., Phy. of Fluids, 2008.

  14. Transgenic Production of an Anti HIV Antibody in the Barley Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Goetz; Floss, Doreen M.; Arcalis, Elsa; Sack, Markus; Melnik, Stanislav; Altmann, Friedrich; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen; Stoger, Eva; Conrad, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Barley is an attractive vehicle for producing recombinant protein, since it is a readily transformable diploid crop species in which doubled haploids can be routinely generated. High amounts of protein are naturally accumulated in the grain, but optimal endosperm-specific promoters have yet to be perfected. Here, the oat GLOBULIN1 promoter was combined with the legumin B4 (LeB4) signal peptide and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SE)KDEL. Transgenic barley grain accumulated up to 1.2 g/kg dry weight of recombinant protein (GFP), deposited in small roundish compartments assumed to be ER-derived protein bodies. The molecular farming potential of the system was tested by generating doubled haploid transgenic lines engineered to synthesize the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody 2G12 with up to 160 μg recombinant protein per g grain. The recombinant protein was deposited at the periphery of protein bodies in the form of a mixture of various N-glycans (notably those lacking terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues), consistent with their vacuolar localization. Inspection of protein-A purified antibodies using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that their equilibrium and kinetic rate constants were comparable to those associated with recombinant 2G12 synthesized in Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:26461955

  15. Glycosylated enfuvirtide: a long-lasting glycopeptide with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuihong; Chang, Xuesong; Wang, Yan; Gao, George F; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying; Li, Xuebing

    2015-02-12

    Many peptide-based therapeutics have short circulatory half-lives. We report here that the pharmacokinetics of an anti-HIV peptide drug enfuvirtide (ENF) can be dramatically improved by a chemical glycosylation approach. A set of glycosylated ENFs with varying glycosylation sites and glycan structures were synthesized. Among these, a sialic acid-introduced peptide (SL-ENF) demonstrated a 15-fold extended half-life in rats relative to ENF (T1/2: 23.1 vs 1.5 h), and its antiviral potency was comparable to that of ENF (EC50: 2 vs 3 nM). SL-ENF bound to a functional fragment of the HIV fusogenic protein gp41 and formed complexes with high affinity and α-helicity, revealing the mechanism behind its potent antiviral activity. Because it is widely accepted in biology that glycosylation protects proteins from denaturation and proteases, our approach may be useful for the development of novel protein and peptide drugs with enhanced pharmaceutical properties.

  16. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ∼66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to α3,α6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  17. Novel Fold and Carbohydrate Specificity of the Potent Anti-HIV Cyanobacterial Lectin from Oscillatoria agardhii*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Furey, William; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA) is a recently discovered cyanobacterial lectin that exhibits potent anti-HIV activity. Up to now, only its primary structure and carbohydrate binding data have been available. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAA, we determined the structure of this lectin by x-ray crystallography at 1.2 Å resolution and mapped the specific carbohydrate recognition sites of OAA by NMR spectroscopy. The overall architecture of OAA comprises 10 β-strands that fold into a single, compact, β-barrel-like domain, creating a unique topology compared with all known protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. OAA sugar binding was tested against Man-9 and various disaccharide components of Man-9. Two symmetric carbohydrate-binding sites were located on the protein, and a preference for Manα(1–6)Man-linked sugars was found. Altogether, our structural results explain the antiviral activity OAA and add to the growing body of knowledge about antiviral lectins. PMID:20961847

  18. Effects of dilution on elastohydrodynamic coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew; Park, Su Chan; Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.

    2009-11-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates characterizes the drug delivery of anti-HIV topical microbicides carried in gel vehicles. These gels are under development to prevent HIV transmission into vulnerable vaginal mucosa during intercourse. Their effectiveness depends on completeness and durability of coating, as well as on the active ingredients. Here we investigate the influence of dilution by vaginal fluid on the coating flows that serve to protect the user. The effects of dilution by vaginal fluid simulant are assessed through rheological experiments at variable dilution of the gel vehicle. This involves determination of the way parameters in a Carreau model of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. The changes in coating are determined from a computational model, based on dilution rheology measured in the laboratory. The elastohydrodynamic lubrication model of Szeri, et al. Physics of Fluids (2008) is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to handle dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain.

  19. The anti-HIV activity of ADS-J1 targets the HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Botta, Maurizio; Esté, José A

    2005-12-05

    Recent data suggest that heparin sulfates may bind to a CD4 induced epitope in the HIV-1 gp120 that constitutes the coreceptor binding site. We have studied the mechanism of action of ADS-J1, a non-peptidic compound selected by docking analysis to interact with gp41 and to interfere with the formation of N-36/C-34 complexes in sandwich ELISA experiments. We show that ADS-J1 blocked the binding of wild-type HIV-1 NL4-3 strain to MT-4 cells but not virus-cell binding of a polyanion-resistant virus. However, ADS-J1 blocked the replication of polyanion-resistant, T-20- and C34-resistant HIV-1, suggesting a second mechanism of action. Development of resistance to ADS-J1 on the polyanion-resistant HIV-1 led to mutations in gp120 coreceptor binding site and not in gp41. Time of addition experiments confirmed that ADS-J1, but not polyanions such as dextran sulfate or AR177, worked at a step that mimics the activity of an HIV coreceptor antagonist but prior to gp41-dependent fusion. We conclude that ADS-J1 may bind to the HIV coreceptor binding site as its mechanism of anti-HIV activity.

  20. Functional In Vivo Delivery of Multiplexed Anti-HIV-1 siRNAs via a Chemically Synthesized Aptamer With a Sticky Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Neff, C Preston; Swiderski, Piotr; Li, Haitang; Smith, David D; Aboellail, Tawfik; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Akkina, Ramesh; Rossi, John J

    2013-01-01

    One of the most formidable impediments to clinical translation of RNA interference (RNAi) is safe and effective delivery of the siRNAs to the desired target tissue at therapeutic doses. We previously described in vivo cell type-specific delivery of anti-HIV small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) through covalent conjugation to an anti-gp120 aptamer. In order to improve the utility of aptamers as siRNA delivery vehicles, we chemically synthesized the gp120 aptamer with a 3′ 7-carbon linker (7C3), which in turn is attached to a 16-nucleotide 2′ OMe/2′ Fl GC-rich bridge sequence. This bridge facilitates the noncovalent binding and interchange of various siRNAs with the same aptamer. We show here that this aptamer-bridge-construct complexed with three different Dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) results in effective delivery of the cocktail of DsiRNAs in vivo, resulting in knockdown of target mRNAs and potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Following cessation of the aptamer-siRNA cocktail treatment, HIV levels rebounded facilitating a follow-up treatment with the aptamer cocktail of DsiRNAs. This follow-up injection resulted in complete suppression of HIV-1 viral loads that extended several weeks beyond the final injection. Collectively, these data demonstrate a facile, targeted approach for combinatorial delivery of antiviral and host DsiRNAs for HIV-1 therapy in vivo. PMID:23164935

  1. Anti-HIV activity of southern African plants: Current developments, phytochemistry and future research.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Gerhard; Marokane, Cynthia K; Street, Renée A

    2017-08-12

    The African continent is home to a large number of higher plant species used over centuries for many applications, which include treating and managing diseases such as HIV. Due to the overwhelming prevalence and incidence rates of HIV, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, it is necessary to develop new and affordable treatments. The article provides an extensive overview of the status on investigation of plants from the southern African region with ethnobotanical use for treating HIV or HIV-related symptoms, or the management of HIV. The review also provide an account of the in vitro assays, anti-viral activity and phytochemistry of these plants. Peer-reviewed articles investigating plants with ethnobotanical information for the treatment or management of HIV or HIV-related symptoms from the southern African region were acquired from Science Direct, PubMed central and Google Scholar. The selection criteria was that (1) plants should have a record of traditional/popular use for infectious or viral diseases, HIV treatment or symptoms similar to HIV infection, (2) if not traditionally/popularly used, plants should be closely related to plants with popular use and HIV activity identified by means of in vitro assays, (3) plants should have been identified scientifically, (4) should be native to southern African region and (5) anti-HIV activity should be within acceptable ranges. Many plants in Africa and specifically the southern African region have been used for the treatment of HIV or HIV related symptoms and have been investigated suing various in vitro techniques. In vitro assays using HIV enzymes such as reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN) and protease (PR), proteins or cell-based assays have been employed to validate the use of these plants with occasional indication of the selectivity index (SI) or therapeutic index (TI), with only one study, that progressed to in vivo testing. The compounds identified from plants from southern Africa is similar to compounds

  2. Precise engineering of dapivirine-loaded nanoparticles for the development of anti-HIV vaginal microbicides.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to provide effective and safe delivery of antiretroviral drugs in the context of prophylactic anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. Dapivirine-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs were produced by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method, optimized for colloidal properties using a 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken experimental design, and characterized for drug loading, production yield, morphology, thermal behavior, drug release, in vitro cellular uptake, cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory potential. Also, drug permeability/membrane retention in well-established HEC-1-A and CaSki cell monolayer models as mediated by NPs was assessed in the absence or presence of mucin. Box-Behnken design allowed optimizing monodisperse 170nm drug-loaded NPs. Drug release experiments showed an initial burst effect up to 4h, followed by sustained 24h release at pH 4.2 and 7.4. NPs were readily taken up by different genital and macrophage cell lines as assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Drug-loaded NPs presented lower or at least similar cytotoxicity as compared to the free drug, with up to around one-log increase in half-maximal cytotoxic concentration values. In all cases, no relevant changes in cell pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production were observed. Dapivirine transport across cell monolayers was significantly decreased when mucin was present at the donor side with either NPs or the free drug, thus evidencing the influence of this natural glycoprotein in membrane permeability. Moreover, drug retention in cell monolayers was significantly higher for NPs in comparison with the free drug. Overall, obtained dapivirine-loaded PLGA NPs possess interesting technological and biological features that may contribute to their use as novel safe and effective vaginal microbicides.

  3. Mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles bearing an anti-HIV drug didanosine for site-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanjay K; Gupta, Yashwant; Jain, Anekant; Saxena, Asheesh R; Khare, Piush; Jain, Aviral

    2008-03-01

    The present investigation was aimed at developing and exploring the use of mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles for the selective delivery of an anti-HIV drug, didanosine, to the target organs. The mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles (MN-G-NPs) were prepared using a two-step desolvation technique and coupled with mannose using the amino group of gelatin present on the surface of nanoparticles. The mannosylation was confirmed using infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MN-G-NPs were characterized for shape, particle size, zeta potential, and percentage drug entrapment. The size of nanoparticles was found to be in range of 248-325 nm, and maximum drug payload was found to be 40.2% to 48.5%. Average size was found to be more, but drug payload was less in the case of MN-G-NPs as compared with unconjugated nanoparticles (G-NPs). The results of the in vitro release profile demonstrated that G-NPs release a comparatively higher percentage of drug than MN-G-NPs. Cellular uptake by MN-G-NPs was 2.7 times more as compared with G-NPs. Fluorescence studies revealed the enhanced uptake of MN-G-NPs in the macrophage tissues when compared with unmodified G-NPs. Intravenous administration of free-drug solution resulted in a high concentration of drug in serum, whereas it was much less in the case of G-NPs. Coupling of the nanoparticles with mannose significantly enhanced the lung, liver, and lymph nodes uptake of drug, which is reflected in the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from these organs following administration of MN-G-NPs in comparison to noncoupled G-NPs or free drug.

  4. Anti-HIV and immunomodulation activities of cacao mass lignin-carbohydrate complex.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kawano, Michiyo; Thet, May Maw; Hashimoto, Ken; Satoh, Kazue; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Haishima, Yuji; Maeda, Yuuichi; Sakurai, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a prominent antiviral and macrophage stimulatory activity of cacao lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) has been reported. However, the solubility and sterility of LCC have not been considered yet. In the present study, complete solubilisation and sterilisation was achieved by autoclaving under mild alkaline conditions and the previously reported biological activities were re-examined. LCCs were obtained by 1% NaOH extraction and acid precipitation, and a repeated extraction-precipitation cycle. Nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine productions were assayed by the Griess method and ELISA, respectively. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide radical-scavenging activity was determined by ESR spectroscopy. Cacao mass LCC showed reproducibly higher anti-HIV activity than cacao husk LCC. Cacao mass LCC, up to 62.5 μg/ml, did not stimulate mouse macrophage-like cells (RAW264.7 and J774.1) to produce NO, nor did it induce iNOS protein, in contrast to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cacao mass LCC and LPS synergistically stimulated iNOS protein expression, suggesting a different point of action. Cacao mass LCC induced tumour necrosis factor-α production markedly less than LPS, and did not induce interleukin-1β, interferon-α or interferon-γ. ESR spectroscopy showed that cacao mass LCC, but not LPS, scavenged NO produced from NOC-7. This study demonstrated several new biological activities of LCCs distinct from LPS and further confirmed the promising antiviral and immunomodulating activities of LCCs.

  5. Anti-staphylococcal, anti-HIV and cytotoxicity studies of four South African medicinal plants and isolation of bioactive compounds from Cassine transvaalensis (Burtt. Davy) codd.

    PubMed

    Mthethwa, Ningy S; Oyedeji, Bola A O; Obi, Larry C; Aiyegoro, Olayinka A

    2014-12-18

    Medicinal plants represent an important opportunity to rural communities in Africa, as a source of affordable medicine and as a source of income. Increased patient awareness about safe usage is important as well as more training with regards to traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ethnomedicinal prowess of some indigenous South African plants commonly used in Eastern Cape Province of South Africa for the treatment of skin and respiratory tract infections, HIV and their toxicity potential. Cassine transvaalensis, Vangueria infausta, Croton gratissimus and Vitex ferruginea were tested for antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and minimum inhibition concentration (MIC). Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 activities of plants were tested using MTT Assay (3- (Dimethylthiozole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide)) and anti- HIV-1iib assay. In search of bioactive lead compounds, Cassine transvaalensis which was found to be the most active plant extract against the two Staphylocoous bacteria was subjected to various chromatographic. Thin layer chromatography, Column chromatography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), (1H-1H, 13C-13C, in DMSO_d6, Bruker 600 MHz) were used to isolate and characterize 3-Oxo-28-hydroxylbetuli-20(29)-ene and 3,28-dihydroxylbetuli-20(29)-ene bioactive compounds from C. transvaalensis. The four plants studied exhibited bioactive properties against the test isolates. The zones of inhibition ranged between 16 mm to 31 mm for multi-drug resistant staphylococci species. MIC values varied between 0.6 and 0.02 μg/ml. C. gratissimus and C. transvaalensis exhibited the abilities to inhibit HIV-1iib. Two bioactive compounds were isolated from C. transvaalensis. Data from this study reveals the use of these plant by traditional healers in the Eastern Cape. Furthermore, C. transvaalensis and C. gratissimus were found to be more active as against HIV-1iib

  6. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N.; Abrams, William R.; Montagna, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. Methods We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. Results The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. Conclusion The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for

  7. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N; Abrams, William R; Montagna, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for the "Test and Treat" and "Treatment

  8. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  9. Evaluation and therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loy, R; Seibel, M M

    1988-12-01

    The amenorrhea associated with bilateral polycystic ovaries, described by Stein and Leventhal, actually represents a syndrome involving various organs and systems. Clinically, this symptom complex commonly presents as menstrual disturbances, infertility, excessive body weight, and hirsutism. An understanding of the pathophysiology that underlies these symptoms provides a logical basis for evaluation and treatment of the syndrome. The diagnostic approach may involve biochemical determinations (baseline, stimulated, and suppressed) and radiologic testing. Therapy is directed at chronic anovulation, the hyperandrogenism responsible for hirsutism and acne, and the prophylaxis against endometrial and breast carcinomas. Ovulation can be induced with various agents, many of which have a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation in the PCOD patient. The use of GnRH agonists with HMG or FSH for ovulation induction will probably increase in the future. Although classic wedge resection has little place in modern management of PCOD, the recent laparoscopic ovarian cautery remains largely unstudied with respect to long-term postoperative plasma androgen levels and pelvic adhesions. It is too premature to evaluate this new surgical therapy. Hirsutism is effectively treated with estrogen-progestin combinations, medroxyprogesterone acetate, androgen receptor blockers (spironolactone, cimetidine, cyproterone acetate, and cyproheptadine), and glucocorticoids. To date, the available GnRH agonists have not been found selective enough to be used in the treatment of hirsutism, owing to possible long-term complications. Most medical approaches should include electrolysis for permanent hair removal. At present, gynecologic surgery seems to have little place in the management of hirsutism.

  10. [Synthesis, properties and anti-HIV activity of novel lipophilic 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine conjugates containing functional phosphoric linkages].

    PubMed

    Shastina, N S; Mal'tseva, T Iu; D'iakova, L N; Lobach, O A; Chataeva, M S; Nosik, D N; Shvetz, V I

    2013-01-01

    One of the approaches to enhance bioavailability of nucleoside reverse transcriptase HIV inhibitors consists in design of their prodrugs based on 1,3-diacylglycerols, which may simulate nature lipids metabolic pathways promoting the improvement of drug delivery to the target cells. Glycerolipidic AZT conjugates with different functional phosphoric centers were synthesized by H-phosphonate technique in the present work. Study of prepared prodrugs sensibility to the chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis (in buffer solution and under the influence of pancreatic lipase) and also study of their anti-HIV activity on the T-lymphoid human MT-4 cells in regarding to virus HIV-1(899A) strain were carried out.

  11. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses.

  12. Anti-AIDS agents 87. New bio-isosteric dicamphanoyl-dihydropyranochromone (DCP) and dicamphanoyl-khellactone (DCK) analogues with potent anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongshan; Xu, Shiqing; Cheng, Ming; Chen, Ying; Xia, Peng; Qian, Keduo; Xia, Yi; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Chen, Chin-Ho; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Six 3′R,4′R-di-O-(S)-camphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) and two 3′R,4′R-di-O-(S)-camphanoyl-(+)-cis-khellactone (DCK) derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for inhibition of HIV-1NL4-3 replication in TZM-bl cells. 2-Ethyl-2′-monomethyl-1′-oxa- and -1′-thia-DCP (5a, 6a), as well as 2-ethyl-1′-thia-DCP (7a) exhibited potent anti-HIV activity with EC50 values of 30, 38 and 54 nM and therapeutic indexes of 152.6, 48.0 and 100.0, respectively, which were better than or comparable to those of the lead compound 2-ethyl-DCP in the same assay. 4-Methyl-1′-thia-DCK (8a) also showed significant inhibitory activity with an EC50 of 128 nM and TI of 237.9. PMID:21871800

  13. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments.

  14. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  15. Discovery of a Potent HIV Integrase Inhibitor That Leads to a Prodrug with Significant anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide research efforts in drug discovery involving HIV integrase have produced only one compound, raltegravir, that has been approved for clinical use in HIV/AIDS. As resistance, toxicity, and drug–drug interactions are recurring issues with all classes of anti-HIV drugs, the discovery of novel integrase inhibitors remains a significant scientific challenge. We have designed a lead HIV-1 strand transfer (ST) inhibitor (IC50 70 nM), strategically assembled on a pyridinone scaffold. A focused structure–activity investigation of this parent compound led to a significantly more potent ST inhibitor, 2 (IC50 6 ± 3 nM). Compound 2 exhibits good stability in pooled human liver microsomes. It also displays a notably favorable profile with respect to key human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes and human UDP glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs). The prodrug of inhibitor 2, i.e., compound 10, was found to possess remarkable anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture (EC50 9 ± 4 nM, CC50 135 ± 7 μM, therapeutic index = 15 000). PMID:22328963

  16. Application of 3D-QSAR techniques in anti-HIV-1 drug design--an overview.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Asim Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Despite the availability of several classes of drugs against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1), this deadly disease showing very little sign of containment, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. More than 20 million people died since the first diagnosis of AIDS more than twenty years ago and almost 40 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS. Structure-based drug design effort was immensely successful in identifying several drugs that are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1. Many applications have been reported on the use of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies to understand the drug-receptor interactions and help in the design of more effective analogs. Extensive application was also reported on the application of 3D-QSAR techniques, such as, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), Comparative Molecular Similarity Analysis (CoMSIA), pharmacophore generation using Catalyst/HypoGen, free-energy binding analysis, GRID/GOLPE, HINT-based techniques, etc. in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery programs in academia and industry. We have attempted to put together a comprehensive overview on the 3D-QSAR applications in anti-HIV-1 drug design reported in the literature during the last decade.

  17. Sampling of Glycan-Bound Conformers by the Anti-HIV Lectin Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin in the Absence of Sugar.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Marta G; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Trigo-Mourino, Pablo; Mazur, Adam; Griesinger, Christian; Gronenborn, Angela M; Lee, Donghan

    2015-05-26

    Lectins from different sources have been shown to interfere with HIV infection by binding to the sugars of viral-envelope glycoproteins. Three-dimensional atomic structures of a number of HIV-inactivating lectins have been determined, both as free proteins and in glycan-bound forms. However, details on the mechanism of recognition and binding to sugars are elusive. Herein we focus on the anti-HIV lectin OAA from Oscillatoria agardhii: We show that in the absence of sugars in solution, both the sugar-free and sugar-bound protein conformations that were observed in the X-ray crystal structures exist as conformational substates. Our results suggest that glycan recognition occurs by conformational selection within the ground state; this model differs from the popular "excited-state" model. Our findings provide further insight into molecular recognition of the major receptor on the HIV virus by OAA. These details can potentially be used for the optimization and/or development of preventive anti-HIV therapeutics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. An Improved Protocol for Efficient Engraftment in NOD/LTSZ-SCIDIL-2RγNULL Mice Allows HIV Replication and Development of Anti-HIV Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Gaudray, Gilles; Musumeci, Lucia; Thielen, Caroline; Vaira, Dolores; Vandergeeten, Claire; Delacroix, Laurence; Van Gulck, Ellen; Vanham, Guido; de Leval, Laurence; Rahmouni, Souad; Moutschen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rγnull (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 replication studies. Total body irradiation (TBI) is a classical myeloablation regimen used to improve engraftment levels of human cells in these humanized mice. Some recent reports suggest the use of busulfan as a myeloablation regimen to transplant HPCs in neonatal and adult NSG mice. In the present study, we further ameliorated the busulfan myeloablation regimen with fresh CB-CD34+cell transplantation in 3–4 week old NSG mice. In this CB-CD34+transplanted NSG mice engraftment efficiency of human CD45+cell is over 90% in peripheral blood. Optimal engraftment promoted early and increased CD3+T cell levels, with better lymphoid tissue development and prolonged human cell chimerism over 300 days. These humanized NSG mice have shown long-lasting viremia after HIV-1JRCSF and HIV-1Bal inoculation through intravenous and rectal routes. We also saw a gradual decline of the CD4+T cell count, widespread immune activation, up-regulation of inflammation marker and microbial translocation after HIV-1 infection. Humanized NSG mice reconstituted according to our new protocol produced, moderate cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1 postinfection. We believe that NSG mice reconstituted according to our easy to use protocol will provide a better in vivo model for HIV-1 replication and anti-HIV-1 therapy trials. PMID:22675567

  19. Discovery of novel anti-HIV agents via Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry-based approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Sun, Lin; Zhou, Junsu; Li, Xiao; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, a variety of new synthetic methodologies and concepts have been proposed in the search for new pharmaceutical lead structures and optimization. Notably, the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry approach has drawn great attention and has become a powerful tool for the generation of privileged medicinal skeletons in the discovery of anti-HIV agents. This is due to the high degree of reliability, complete specificity (chemoselectivity and regioselectivity), mild conditions, and the biocompatibility of the reactants. Herein, the authors describe the progress thus far on the discovery of novel anti-HIV agents via the CuAAC click chemistry-based approach. CuAAC click chemistry is a proven protocol for synthesizing triazole products which could serve as basic pharmacophores, act as replacements of traditional scaffold or substituent modification, be a linker of dual-target or dual-site inhibitors and more for the discovery of novel anti-HIV agents. What's more, it also provides convenience and feasibility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry and in situ screening. It is envisioned that click chemistry will draw more attention and make more contributions in anti-HIV drug discovery in the future.

  20. Conformational analysis of the anti-HIV Nikavir prodrug: comparisons with AZT and Thymidine, and establishment of structure-activity relationships/tendencies in other 6'-derivatives.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ahmed A; Tamara Molina, A; Álvarez-Ros, M C; Alcolea Palafox, M

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical conformational analysis of the anti-HIV Nikavir prodrug was carried out; this prodrug has noticeable advantage over the approved drug AZT. The whole conformational parameters (χ, α, β, γ, δ, ϕ, P and νmax) were analysed as well as the NBO natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out by means of DFT/B3LYP and ab initio MP2 methods with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 67 stable structures, 4 of which were within a 1 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum. By MP2 it corresponds to the calculated values of the exocyclic torsional angles χ=-108.0°, β=14.5°, γ=76.7° and ε=71.5°. The results obtained are in accordance to those found in related anti-HIV nucleoside analogues. Comparisons of the conformers with those determined in the common anti-HIV drug AZT were carried out. A detailed analysis of the lowest vibrations (<200 cm(-1)) in the best conformer of Nikavir was carried out. The most stable hydrated cluster of this conformer with 20 explicit water molecules was determined. Calculations in five of its 6'-derivatives were performed to identify structural trends that might correlate with the anti-HIV activity of these compounds. Ten structure-activity relationships/tendencies were established that can help for the design of new drugs. Several recommendations for this design were expressed.

  1. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  2. 5,6-Dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine potentiates the anti-HIV-1 activity of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M; Heineman, Richard H; Beach, Lauren B; Martin, Jessica L; Schnettler, Erica K; Dapp, Michael J; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-11-15

    The nucleoside analog 5,6-dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (KP-1212) has been investigated as a first-in-class lethal mutagen of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Since a prodrug monotherapy did not reduce viral loads in Phase II clinical trials, we tested if ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (RNRIs) combined with KP-1212 would improve antiviral activity. KP-1212 potentiated the activity of gemcitabine and resveratrol and simultaneously increased the viral mutant frequency. G-to-C mutations predominated with the KP-1212-resveratrol combination. These observations represent the first demonstration of a mild anti-HIV-1 mutagen potentiating the antiretroviral activity of RNRIs and encourage the clinical translation of enhanced viral mutagenesis in treating HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Passive transfer of modest titers of potent and broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies block SHIV infection in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Shingai, Masashi; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Nason, Martha C.; Montefiori, David; Moldt, Brian; Poignard, Pascal; Diskin, Ron; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Cetrulo Lorenzi, Julio Cesar; Gazumyan, Anna; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that effective human vaccines directed against viral pathogens elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The passive transfer of anti–HIV-1 NAbs conferring sterilizing immunity to macaques has been used to determine the plasma neutralization titers, which must be present at the time of exposure, to prevent acquisition of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infections. We administered five recently isolated potent and broadly acting anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus macaques and challenged them intrarectally 24 h later with either of two different R5-tropic SHIVs. By combining the results obtained from 60 challenged animals, we determined that the protective neutralization titer in plasma preventing virus infection in 50% of the exposed monkeys was relatively modest (∼1:100) and potentially achievable by vaccination. PMID:25155019

  4. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of novel 2',2'-difluoro 5'-norcarbocyclic phosphonic acid nucleosides as antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guang Huan; Hong, Joon Hee

    2014-01-01

    A very efficient synthetic route to novel 2',2'-difluoro 5'-norcarbocyclic phosphonic acid nucleosides from but-3-en-1-ol 5 is described. The discovery of 2'-fluorinated furanose nucleoside 1 as a potent anti-HIV-1 agent has led to the synthesis and biological evaluation of 2'-modified 5'-norversions of the carbocyclic phosphonate nucleosides. The synthesized nucleoside analogues 18, 19, 23a, 23b, and 24 were tested for anti-HIV activity as well as cytotoxicity. Adenine analogue 19 shows significant anti-HIV-1 activity (EC(50) = 13 μM).

  5. CCL20/MIP3a is a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Molecule of the Human Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mimi; Shen, Zheng; Schaefer, Todd M.; Fahey, John V.; Gupta, Phalguni; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Problem CCL20/MIP3α is a chemokine for immature dendritic cells as well as an antibacterial against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The role of CCL20/MIP3α as an antiviral is unknown. In this study, we have examined the production of CCL20/MIP3α by epithelial cells from the upper female reproductive tract as well as its activity as an antiviral molecule. Method of study Primary uterine and Fallopian tube epithelial cells were treated with Poly(I:C) and CCL20/MIP3α mRNA and protein was measured by Real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Anti-HIV activity was determined using an indicator cell line TZM-bl and quantified by using a luminometer. Results Primary uterine and Fallopian tube epithelial cells produce CCL20/MIP3α constitutively and the production is enhanced following stimulation with viral double-stranded RNA mimic Poly(I:C). Recombinant CCL20/MIP3α was able to inhibit both T-cell-tropic X4/IIIB and macrophage-tropic R5/BaL HIV-1 when virus was directly incubated with CCL20/MIP3α but not when CCL20/MIP3α was added to cells either prior to infection or post-infection. This suggests that the mechanism of inhibition is likely to be a direct interaction between HIV-1 and CCL20/MIP3α. Conclusion This study demonstrates that CCL20/MIP3α is an important endogenous anti-HIV-1 microbicide of the female reproductive tract. PMID:19527233

  6. Anti-Leu3a induces combining site-related anti-idiotypic antibody without inducing anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J P; Buck, D; Berkower, I; Murphy, D; Epstein, S L

    1991-01-01

    Development of a vaccine for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has proven difficult, and so alternative approaches such as idiotypic manipulation have been suggested. As applied to AIDS, this approach could involve immunizing with an anti-CD4 antibody resembling gp120, to induce anti-idiotypic antibodies which would bind to gp120. The CD4 binding site on gp120 is conserved, and so, such an immune response should protect against all variants. Induction of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity has been reported using anti-Leu3a, and this result has led to testing in humans. Negative results obtained by others have been attributed to differences in immunization protocols. Because of the importance of this question, we reinvestigated the potential of anti-Leu3a to induce anti-HIV antibodies, compared with control immunizations with OKT4A (another anti-CD4 antibody) and the irrelevant Ig MOPC-21. Responses to anti-Leu3a showed induction of high-titer anti-idiotypic activity, and included combining-site-related activity. Yet sera showed no binding to gp160 above controls and no detectable neutralizing activity in a sensitive HIV plaque assay, so the anti-idiotypes induced were not internal images of CD4. We conclude that the pronounced anti-HIV responses reported with anti-Leu3a cannot be generalized, and thus that anti-Leu3a does not offer promise as an HIV vaccine. However, these results do not negate the promise of the idiotypic approach, and a vaccine for AIDS based on idiotype manipulation remains a possibility.

  7. Phenotypic characterization of CD8+ T cell populations in HIV disease and in anti-HIV immunity.

    PubMed

    Watret, K C; Whitelaw, J A; Froebel, K S; Bird, A G

    1993-04-01

    The CD8+ T cell population is believed to play an important role in the control of viral infection, both for suppression of viral replication and for cytotoxic activity against viral infected cells. Elevated numbers of CD8+ T cells have been demonstrated in HIV infection, and CD8+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) activity is associated with the early, asymptomatic stage of disease. We investigated the phenotypic characteristics of the CD8 population, in whole blood, in HIV disease and determined the predominant CD8+ subpopulation involved in anti-HIV CTL activity. We found that CD8+ T cells co-expressing markers of activation (HLA-DR), memory (CD45RO, CD29), and cytotoxic activity (S6F1) were significantly elevated in the early stages of disease, while the numbers of naive (CD45RA) cells remained unchanged. Progression to AIDS resulted in an overall loss of absolute CD8+ T cells, though the percentages of CD8+ HLA-DR+ and CD8+ S6F1+ remained elevated. In contrast to patients in the late stages of disease, anti-HIVgag CTL activity, following in vitro stimulation, was present in most HIV+ asymptomatic subjects and was associated with an expansion of CD8+ HLA-DR+ and CD8+ CD45RO+ cells. The absence of CTL activity was associated with a reduced ability of these populations to expand in vitro and with a significant loss of peripheral CD4+ T cells, independent of clinical stage. We suggest that CD8+ expressing HLA-DR+ CD45RO+ and S6F1+ play an important role in anti-HIV cytotoxicity.

  8. Methamphetamine inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells by modulating anti-HIV-1 miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Mantri, Jyoti V; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4(+) T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4(+) T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti-HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4(+) T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  9. Mapping the Vif-A3G interaction using peptide arrays: a basis for anti-HIV lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Viard, Mathias; Jacobs, Amy; Miller, Abigail; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeeseong; Blumenthal, Robert; Kotler, Moshe; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-06-15

    Human apolipoprotein-B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts retroviruses, endogenous retro-elements and DNA viruses. A3G plays a key role in the anti-HIV-1 innate cellular immunity. The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G mainly by leading A3G towards the proteosomal machinery and by direct inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Both activities involve direct interaction between Vif and A3G. Disrupting the interaction between A3G and Vif may rescue A3G antiviral activity and inhibit HIV-1 propagation. Here, mapping the interaction sites between A3G and Vif by peptide array screening revealed distinct regions in Vif important for A3G binding, including the N-terminal domain (NTD), C-terminal domain (CTD) and residues 83-99. The Vif-binding sites in A3G included 12 different peptides that showed strong binding to either full-length Vif, Vif CTD or both. Sequence similarity was found between Vif-binding peptides from the A3G CTD and NTD. A3G peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to counteract Vif action. A3G 211-225 inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell culture and impaired Vif dependent A3G degradation. In vivo co-localization of full-length Vif with A3G 211-225 was demonstrated by use of FRET. This peptide has the potential to serve as an anti-HIV-1 lead compound. Our results suggest a complex interaction between Vif and A3G that is mediated by discontinuous binding regions with different affinities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A model of transluminal flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle: Combined elastic squeezing and gravitational sliding

    PubMed Central

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Park, Su Chan; Verguet, Stéphane; Weiss, Aaron; Katz, David F.

    2008-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates is of importance in a number of biomedical problems: From lubrication of the eye surface by the tear film, to lubrication of joints by synovial fluid, to lubrication between the pleural surfaces that protect the lungs and other organs. Such flows are also important for the drug delivery functions of vehicles for anti-HIV topical microbicides. These are intended to inhibit transmission into vulnerable mucosa, e.g., in the vagina. First generation prototype microbicides have gel vehicles, which spread after insertion and coat luminal surfaces. Effectiveness derives from potency of the active ingredients and completeness and durability of coating. Delivery vehicle rheology, luminal biomechanical properties, and the force due to gravity influence the coating mechanics. We develop a framework for understanding the relative importance of boundary squeezing and body forces on the extent and speed of the coating that results. A single dimensionless number, independent of viscosity, characterizes the relative influences of squeezing and gravitational acceleration on the shape of spreading in the Newtonian case. A second scale, involving viscosity, determines the spreading rate. In the case of a shear-thinning fluid, the Carreau number also plays a role. Numerical solutions were developed for a range of the dimensionless parameter and compared well with asymptotic theory in the limited case where such results can be obtained. Results were interpreted with respect to trade-offs between wall elasticity, longitudinal forces, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume. These provide initial insights of practical value for formulators of gel delivery vehicles for anti-HIV microbicidal formulations. PMID:19547722

  11. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  13. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  14. Concerns of occupational HIV infection among surgical Staff in the light of anti-HIV sero-status and the distribution of Δ32 allele of the CCR5 gene: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gańczak, Maria; Korzeń, Marcin; Owsianka, Barbara; Szych, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Surgical staff might be considered at most risk of accidental viral infection due to their higher exposure to blood. To evaluate surgical staff concerns about occupational HIV infection, to determine contributing factors, to assess their sero-status regarding this pathogen, and the frequency of the Δ32 allele of the CCR5 gene. With the use of a self-administered anonymous questionnaire a cross-sectional sero-survey was conducted from February 2009-January 2010 among doctors/nurses from the surgical/ gynaecological wards of 16 randomly selected hospitals in Western Pomerania, Poland. Fear level was measured by the use of the VAS scale (range 0-10). Serum samples were tested by ELISA. Genotyping was performed using a PCR-AFLP assay. Response rate 84.9%; 427 participants, 88.3% females; 84.8% nurses, 15.2% doctors (median age 42 years, range 22-61 years). More than two thirds of respondents (67.2%) overestimated HIV single exposure risk. The median level of occupational HIV fear was 6.67. The prevalence of anti-HIV was 0.0% (95%CI: 0-0.9%); 1.2% (95%CI: 0.5%-2.9%) of participants were homozygotes Δ32/Δ32. The stepwise regression model revealed that job category (nurse) was associated with HIV fear (p<0.001). The risk of contracting occupational HIV infection remains low; no anti-HIV positive individuals were found among surgical staff, one in one hundred were resistant to HIV infection. Staff members, especially nurses, were much concerned with acquiring an occupational HIV infection, possibly due to the lack of knowledge on single exposure risk. Educational actions and better access to specialists which would help surgical staff in managing anxiety at the workplace is urgently needed.

  15. Indinavir-loaded pH-sensitive microparticles for taste masking: toward extemporaneous pediatric anti-HIV/AIDS liquid formulations with improved patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Diego A; Carcaboso, Angel M; Bregni, Carlos; Rubio, Modesto; Bramuglia, Guillermo; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop indinavir pediatric anti-HIV/AIDS formulations enabling convenient dose adjustment, ease of oral administration, and improved organoleptic properties by means of the generation of drug-loaded microparticles made of a polymer that is insoluble under intake conditions and dissolves fast in the stomach in order to completely release the active agent. Indinavir-loaded microparticles made of a pH-dependent polymeric excipient soluble at pH < 5, Eudragit E100, were prepared using a double emulsion solvent diffusion technique and the in vitro release profiles characterized. Finally, taste masking properties were evaluated in blind randomized sensory experiments by ten healthy human volunteers. The use of a w/o/o emulsion system resulted in indinavir loads around 90%. Thermal analysis of the microparticles by differential scanning calorimetry revealed that indinavir appeared mainly dispersed at the molecular level. Concentrations of residual organic solvents as determined by gas chromatography were below the upper limits specified by the European Pharmacopeia for pharmaceutical oral formulations. Then, the behavior of drug-containing microparticles in aqueous media at different pH values was assessed. While they selectively dissolved in gastric-like medium, in tap water (intake conditions), the matrix remained almost unchanged and efficiently prevented drug dissolution. Finally, sensoring taste tests performed by volunteers indicated that systems with indinavir loads approximately 15% displayed acceptable taste. This work explored the production of indinavir-containing microparticles based on a common pharmaceutical excipient as a means for the improvement of medicines of drugs involved in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. For systems containing about 15% drug, taste studies confirmed the acceptability of the formulation. In pediatric regimes, this composition would require an acceptable amount of formulation (0.7-1.5 g).

  16. Evaluating College Student Interest in Pet Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamle, Kathleen N.; Riley, Tracy A.; Carlson, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    The first year of college can be extremely stressful, especially for students residing on campus. Objective: The authors obtained information from college freshmen about their relationships with pets and investigated interest in a pet therapy program as social support for transient stressful periods. Participants: As part of a university…

  17. Evaluating College Student Interest in Pet Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamle, Kathleen N.; Riley, Tracy A.; Carlson, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    The first year of college can be extremely stressful, especially for students residing on campus. Objective: The authors obtained information from college freshmen about their relationships with pets and investigated interest in a pet therapy program as social support for transient stressful periods. Participants: As part of a university…

  18. Evaluating Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Stage-Based Therapies in a Population-Based Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Friedman, Robert H.; Fava, Joseph L.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Keller, Stefan; Sun, Xiaowu; Ramelson, Harley; Prochaska, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation are typically evaluated using volunteer samples (efficacy trials) but should also be evaluated in population-based trials (effectiveness trials). Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone and in combination with behavioral interventions was evaluated on a population of smokers from a New England…

  19. Evaluating Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Stage-Based Therapies in a Population-Based Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Friedman, Robert H.; Fava, Joseph L.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Keller, Stefan; Sun, Xiaowu; Ramelson, Harley; Prochaska, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation are typically evaluated using volunteer samples (efficacy trials) but should also be evaluated in population-based trials (effectiveness trials). Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone and in combination with behavioral interventions was evaluated on a population of smokers from a New England…

  20. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  1. ANN multiscale model of anti-HIV drugs activity vs AIDS prevalence in the US at county level based on information indices of molecular graphs and social networks.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Herrera-Ibatá, Diana María; Duardo-Sánchez, Aliuska; Munteanu, Cristian R; Orbegozo-Medina, Ricardo Alfredo; Pazos, Alejandro

    2014-03-24

    This work is aimed at describing the workflow for a methodology that combines chemoinformatics and pharmacoepidemiology methods and at reporting the first predictive model developed with this methodology. The new model is able to predict complex networks of AIDS prevalence in the US counties, taking into consideration the social determinants and activity/structure of anti-HIV drugs in preclinical assays. We trained different Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) using as input information indices of social networks and molecular graphs. We used a Shannon information index based on the Gini coefficient to quantify the effect of income inequality in the social network. We obtained the data on AIDS prevalence and the Gini coefficient from the AIDSVu database of Emory University. We also used the Balaban information indices to quantify changes in the chemical structure of anti-HIV drugs. We obtained the data on anti-HIV drug activity and structure (SMILE codes) from the ChEMBL database. Last, we used Box-Jenkins moving average operators to quantify information about the deviations of drugs with respect to data subsets of reference (targets, organisms, experimental parameters, protocols). The best model found was a Linear Neural Network (LNN) with values of Accuracy, Specificity, and Sensitivity above 0.76 and AUROC > 0.80 in training and external validation series. This model generates a complex network of AIDS prevalence in the US at county level with respect to the preclinical activity of anti-HIV drugs in preclinical assays. To train/validate the model and predict the complex network we needed to analyze 43,249 data points including values of AIDS prevalence in 2,310 counties in the US vs ChEMBL results for 21,582 unique drugs, 9 viral or human protein targets, 4,856 protocols, and 10 possible experimental measures.

  2. [Evaluation and improvement of therapy adherence of hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Gascón Cánovas, J J; Saturno Hernández, P J; Llor Esteban, B

    2001-11-30

    First, to assess whether it is useful for a patient to take part in the analysis of the causes of non-compliance with therapy for hypertension. Second, to design a questionnaire to evaluate the causes and the degree of adherence to therapy and to construct indicators on the basis of this. Lastly, to determine the effectiveness of the feedback of the evaluation of these indicators to health professionals, as a method of improving hypertense patients' adherence to therapy. Qualitative study through the focus group technique; b) quasi-experimental design of independent samples between evaluation and re-evaluation with two study groups: experimental (3 PC health centres) and control (3 PC health centres). PC health centres. Patients over 18 on medical hypertension treatment. First phase: analysis of the reasons for non-compliance with therapy through the group focus technique and design of the questionnaire to evaluate factors associated with non-compliance. Second phase: evaluation and pilot study of the questionnaire. For this, a questionnaire to assess therapy adherence and to determine the weight of related factors will be sent to a random sample of hypertense patients at each Health Centre. Third phase: intervention. A report with the results of the first assessment will be sent to the health professionals of the experimental group. Fourth phase: re-evaluation of the indicators of adherence, and analysis of the improvement achieved.

  3. Structure-activity relationship study of pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imine derivatives for potent anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Oishi, Shinya; Ohno, Hiroaki; Shimura, Kazuya; Matsuoka, Masao; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2012-11-01

    3,4-Dihydro-2H,6H-pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imine (PD 404182) is an antiretroviral agent with submicromolar inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 infection. In the current study, the structure-activity relationships of accessory groups at the 3- and 9-positions of pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imine were investigated for the development of more potent anti-HIV agents. Several different derivatives containing a 9-aryl group were designed and synthesized using Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and Ullmann coupling reactions. Modification of the m-methoxyphenyl or benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl group resulted in improved anti-HIV activity. In addition, the 2,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undec-2-ene-fused benzo[e][1,3]thiazine derivatives were designed and tested for their anti-HIV activities. The most potent 9-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl) derivative was two-threefold more effective against several strains of HIV-1 and HIV-2 than the parent compound, PD 404182.

  4. Decision-Theoretic Evaluation of Therapy Plans

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Brad R.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Medical decision-support systems that make recommendations for action require a mechanism for comparing the available alternatives. In developing a computer-based system to provide ventilator-setting recommendations, the decision-theoretic concept of a multiattribute value model was used to rank potential plans. The possible treatment plans represent a continuum of choice rather than several discrete options. Physician preferences are obtained by using an automated assessment tool that uses a physiologic model to simulate patient responses to therapy. The decision-theoretic approach described here is able to differentiate among continuous options, is efficient enough to be used in a real time setting, and makes explicit the criteria for selecting plans.

  5. Synthesis and molecular docking studies of oxochromenyl xanthenone and indolyl xanthenone derivatives as anti-HIV-1 RT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kasralikar, Hanmant M; Jadhavar, Suresh C; Bhusare, Sudhakar R

    2015-09-15

    A series of novel oxochromenyl xanthenone and indolyl xanthenone derivatives were obtained by one-pot reaction of substituted salicylaldehyde, 4-hydroxy coumarin/indole and dimedone at ambient temperature condition using eco-friendly reusable ionic liquid [Hmim]HSO4 in ethanol solvent. Excellent yields, mild reaction condition, and simple experimental work-up procedure are some of the advantages of this method. The obtained derivatives were studied for their molecular docking as an anti-HIV-1 RT. All synthesized compounds from indolyl xanthenone and chromenyl xanthenone series were be docked into the non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) of HIV-1 RT. Compounds 4r, 4j and 4k was found to be good around -12.487, -12.457, -12.256, respectively, with respective to native ligand TMC278, was found to be -13.413 which confirms that these compounds might have potent RT inhibition activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient Discovery of Potent Anti-HIV Agents Targeting the Tyr181Cys Variant of HIV Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, William L.; Bollini, Mariela; Thakur, Vinay V.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) are being pursued with guidance from molecular modeling including free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations for protein-inhibitor binding affinities. The previously reported pyrimidinylphenylamine 1 and its chloro analog 2 are potent anti-HIV agents; they inhibit replication of wild-type HIV-1 in infected human T-cells with EC50 values of 2 and 10 nM. However, they show no activity against viral strains containing the Tyr181Cys (Y181C) mutation in HIV-RT. Modeling indicates that the problem is likely associated with extensive interaction between the dimethylallyloxy substituent and Tyr181. As an alternative, a phenoxy group is computed to be oriented in a manner diminishing the contact with Tyr181. However, this replacement leads to a roughly 1000-fold loss of activity for 3 (2.5 μM). The present report details the efficient, computationally-driven evolution of 3 to novel NNRTIs with sub-10 nM potency towards both wild-type HIV-1 and Y181C-containing variants. The critical contributors were FEP substituent scans for the phenoxy and pyrimidine rings and recognition of potential benefits of addition of a cyanovinyl group to the phenoxy ring. PMID:21853995

  7. Functional mechanisms of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) associated anti-HIV-1 properties.

    PubMed

    Alais, Sandrine; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Balter, Vincent; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne; Schaeffer, Laurent; Darlix, Jean Luc; Cimarelli, Andrea; Raposo, Graça; Ohlmann, Théophile; Leblanc, Pascal

    2012-04-01

    The cellular prion protein PrP(C)/CD230 is a GPI-anchor protein highly expressed in cells from the nervous and immune systems and well conserved among vertebrates. In the last decade, several studies suggested that PrP(C) displays antiviral properties by restricting the replication of different viruses, and in particular retroviruses such as murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this context, we previously showed that PrP(C) displays important similarities with the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and found that PrP(C) expression in a human cell line strongly reduced HIV-1 expression and virus production. Using different PrP(C) mutants, we report here that the anti-HIV-1 properties are mostly associated with the amino-terminal 24-KRPKP-28 basic domain. In agreement with its reported RNA chaperone activity, we found that PrP(C) binds to the viral genomic RNA of HIV-1 and negatively affects its translation. Using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging strategies, we found that PrP(C) colocalizes with the virus assembly machinery at the plasma membrane and at the virological synapse in infected T cells. Depletion of PrP(C) in infected T cells and microglial cells favors HIV-1 replication, confirming its negative impact on the HIV-1 life cycle.

  8. Bicyclams, a class of potent anti-HIV agents, are targeted at the HIV coreceptor fusin/CXCR-4.

    PubMed

    Schols, D; Esté, J A; Henson, G; De Clercq, E

    1997-08-01

    Bicyclams are a novel class of antiviral compounds which are highly potent and selective inhibitors of the replication of HIV-1 and HIV-2. The prototype compound, AMD3100, has an IC50 of 1-10 ng/ml, which is a least 100,000 fold lower than the cytotoxic concentration. AMD3100 does not inhibit virus binding to the CD4 receptor and based on time-of-addition experiments, has been assumed to interact with the HIV fusion-uncoating process. Resistance of HIV-1 strains to AMD3100 is associated with the accumulation of several mutations in the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Here, we demonstrate that AMD3100 interacts with fusin (CXCR-4), the coreceptor used by T-tropic viruses to infect the target cells. The replication of NL4-3 wild type virus and NL4-3 dextran sulfate-resistant virus was inhibited by the CXC-chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), the natural ligand for CXCR-4. In contrast, the replication of the HIV-1 NL4-3 AMD3100-resistant virus was no longer inhibited by SDF-1. The bicyclams are the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agents shown to interact with the coreceptor for T-tropic viruses.

  9. [Anti-HIV effects of IFN-tau in human macrophages: role of cellular antiviral factors and interleukin-6].

    PubMed

    Maneglier, B; Rogez-Kreuz, C; Dereuddre-Bosquet, N; Martal, J; Devillier, P; Dormont, D; Clayette, P

    2008-01-01

    Tau interferon (IFN-tau) was shown to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in vitro more strongly than human IFN-alpha, particularly in human macrophages. IFN-tau efficiently inhibited the early steps of HIV biological cycle, decreasing intracellular HIV RNA and inhibiting the initiation of the reverse transcription of viral RNA into proviral DNA. In this study, the in vitro immunomodulatory effects of IFN-tau were explored in human macrophages. We found that IFN-tau increased the synthesis of the cellular antiviral factors, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L and MxA protein. These results suggested that IFN-tau induces the same antiviral pathways in macrophages as other type I IFNs. We found that IFN-tau increased the production of interleukins (IL)-10 and IL-6, but not of IL-1ss or TNF-alpha, in not infected and in in vitro HIV-1/Ba-L-infected macrophages. We also found that the neutralization of IL-6 biological activity in the cell culture supernatants of IFN-tau-treated macrophages led to a decrease in the antiretroviral effects of IFN-tau towards HIV RNA. In conclusion, anti-HIV effects of IFN-tau are mediated by several modes of action, mediated either directly by IFN-tau or via other cytokines, such as IL-6, also known to be induced by IFN-alpha.

  10. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    PubMed

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  11. The consequences of yield stress on deployment of a non-Newtonian anti-HIV microbicide gel

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Park, Su Chan; Peters, Jennifer J.; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A recent study in South Africa has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when applied topically, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [10]. However the gel for this drug, and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general, have not been designed using full understanding of how gel spreading and retention in the vagina govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model such spreading of microbicide gels, which are inherently non-Newtonian [13,15]. A yield stress is emerging as one of the important properties of microbicide gel vehicle deployment, as this may improve retention within the vaginal canal. On the other hand, a yield stress may decrease the initial extent of the coating flow. Here, we first explain a certain yield stress paradox observed generally in many lubrication flows. Four conditions are determined, via scaling analysis, which mitigate the inconsistency in the use of lubrication theory to analyze the specific problem of elastic wall squeezing flow of yield stress fluid. Parameters characterizing these conditions are obtained experimentally for a test gel. Using them, it is shown that the lubrication approximation may be applied to the elastic wall-squeezing problem for this gel. PMID:22563138

  12. Phenylspirodrimanes with anti-HIV activity from the sponge-derived fungus Stachybotrys chartarum MXH-X73.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinhua; Li, Letao; Zhu, Tianjiao; Ba, Mingyu; Li, Guoqiang; Gu, Qianqun; Guo, Ying; Li, Dehai

    2013-12-27

    Seven new phenylspirodrimanes, named stachybotrins D-F (1, 3, 4), stachybocins E and F (5, 6), and stachybosides A and B (7, 8), and four known compounds (2, 9-11), were isolated from the sponge-derived fungus Stachybotrys chartarum MXH-X73. Their structures were determined by detailed analysis of spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations of 1-8 were determined by chemical hydrolysis and modified Mosher's and Marfey's methods. All compounds were tested in an anti-HIV activity assay, and compound 1 showed an inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication by targeting reverse transcriptase. Further study exhibited that 1 could block NNRTIs-resistant strains (HIV-1RT-K103N, HIV-1RT-L100I,K103N, HIV-1RT-K103N,V108I, HIV-1RT-K103N,G190A, and HIV-1RT-K103N,P225H) as well as wild-type HIV-1 (HIV-1wt) with EC50 values of 7.0, 23.8, 13.3, 14.2, 6.2, and 8.4 μM, respectively.

  13. Activation of the human nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR by the reverse transcriptase-targeted anti-HIV drug PNU-142721

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yuan; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2012-10-09

    The human pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. PXR responds to a structurally diverse variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, and coordinates the expression of genes central to the metabolism and excretion of potentially harmful chemicals, including human therapeutics. The reverse transcriptase inhibitor PNU-142721 has been designed to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although this compound has anti-HIV activity, it was established using cell-based assays that PNU-142721 is an efficacious PXR agonist. We present here the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the human PXR ligand-binding domain in complex with PNU-142721. PXR employs one hydrogen bond and fourteen van der Waals contacts to interact with the ligand, but allows two loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket to remain disordered in the structure. These observations highlight the role structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous responses to xenobiotics. The crystal structure also explains why PNU-173575, a thiomethyl metabolite of PNU-142721, exhibits enhanced PXR activation relative to the unmodified compound and why PNU-142721 can also activate rat PXR. Taken together, the results presented here elucidate the structural basis for PXR activation by PNU-142721 and related chemicals.

  14. Exosomes contribute to the transmission of anti-HIV activity from TLR3-activated brain microvascular endothelial cells to macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Run-Hong; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), the major cell type in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), play a key role in maintaining brain homeostasis. However, their role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be determined. Our early work showed that TLR3 signaling of HBMECs could produce the antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. The present study examined whether exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs mediate the intercellular transfer of antiviral factors to macrophages. Primary human macrophages could take up exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs. HBMECs-derived exosomes contained multiple antiviral factors, including several key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs; ISG15, ISG56, and Mx2) at mRNA and protein levels. The depletion of exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs culture supernatant diminished HBMECs-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrate that exosomes shed by HBMECs are able to transport the antiviral molecules to macrophages. This finding suggests the possibility that HIV nonpermissive BBB cells (HBMECs) can help to restore the antiviral state in HIV-infected macrophages, which may be a defense mechanism against HIV neuroinvasion. PMID:27496004

  15. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) seeks to improve the lives of cancer patients by finding better treatments, control mechanisms, and cures for cancer. CTEP funds a national program of cancer research, sponsoring clinical trials to evaluate new anti-cancer agents.

  16. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation of novel peptide fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianjun; Su, Min; Zeng, Yi; Wang, Cunxin

    2016-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes about 2 million people to death every year. Fusion inhibitors targeted the envelope protein (gp41) represent a novel and alternative approach for anti-AIDS therapy, which terminates the HIV-1 life cycle at an early stage. Using CP621-652 as a template, a series of peptides were designed, synthesized and evaluated in vitro assays. An interesting phenomenon was found that the substitution of hydrophobic residues at solvent accessible sites could increase the anti-HIV activity when the C-terminal sequence was extended with an enough numbers of amino acids. After the active peptides was synthesized and evaluated, peptide 8 showed the best anti-HIV-1 IIIB whole cell activity (MAGI IC50=53.02 nM). Further study indicated that peptide 8 bound with the gp41 NHR helix, and then blocked the conformation of 6-helix, thus inhibited virus-cell membrane fusion. The results would be helpful for the design of peptide fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 infection.

  17. Phosphorylation of anti-HIV nucleoside analogs by nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Xu, Y; Sellam, O; Sarfati, R; Janin, J; Véron, M; Deville-Bonne, D

    1999-01-01

    The reaction of NDP kinase with antiviral nucleoside triphosphates used in antiviral therapies was studied at the presteady state by fluorescence stopped-flow and compared with the steady-state parameters. The affinity of the analogs was determined by fluorescence titration of a mutated enzyme with an inserted Trp in the binding site. The lack of the 3' hydroxyl in analogs is shown to decrease the kcat more than the KD.

  18. WHI-05, a novel bromo-methoxy substituted phenyl phosphate derivative of zidovudine, is a dual-action spermicide with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, O J; Zhu, Z; Yiv, S H; Chen, C L; Waurzyniak, B; Uckun, F M

    1999-05-01

    Heterosexual transmission of HIV to women is the fastest-growing mode of transmission. In a systematic effort to develop a microbicide capable of preventing HIV transmission as well as providing fertility control, novel phenyl phosphate derivatives of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, ZDV) have been identified that exhibit potent anti-HIV and spermicidal activities. This study reports the synthesis, characterization, and preclinical formulation of compound WHI-05, 5-bromo-6-methoxy-5,6-dihydro-3'-azidothymidine-5'-(p-methoxyphenyl) methoxyalaninyl phosphate. The anti-HIV activities of WHI-05 and ZDV were compared by measuring p24 antigen production and reverse transcriptase activity as markers of viral replication using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with both ZDV-sensitive and ZDV-resistant strains of HIV. The sperm immobilizing activity (SIA) of WHI-05 was compared with that of ZDV and nonoxynol-9 (N-9) by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). The effect of WHI-05 on sperm membrane integrity was examined by high resolution, low voltage scanning electron microscopy (HR-LVSEM). The in vitro cytotoxicity profile of WHI-05 versus N-9 were compared using normal human vaginal, ectocervical, and endocervical epithelial cells. The in vivo vaginal tolerance, absorption, and toxicity of a 2% WHI-05 gel-microemulsion was tested in the rabbit. Whereas ZDV displayed potent anti-HIV activity but lacked SIA, WHI-05 elicited both potent anti-HIV activity and SIA. WHI-05 inhibited the replication of ZDV-sensitive as well as ZDV-resistant strains of HIV in PBMC. CASA combined with HR-LVSEM demonstrated that WHI-05-induced SIA was not associated with membrane damage. Unlike, N-9, the spermicidal activity of WHI-05 was not associated with cytotoxicity to reproductive tract epithelial cells. Repetitive intravaginal application of a 2% WHI-05 gel-microemulsion did not damage the vaginal epithelium or cause local inflammation in the rabbit model. As a

  19. Assault on resistance: the use of computational chemistry in the development of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marilyn B Kroeger; Smith, Richard H; Jorgensen, William L

    2006-01-01

    While many inhibitors of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the causative agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), have been developed, the problem of drug resistance has continued to plague the fight against the disease. The ability of computers to aid in the drug discovery process, and by default the resistance problem, has increased dramatically as the speed of computers and sophistication of associated calculation programs has grown. In particular, the capability of predicting a compound's ability to combat resistance prior to synthesis of drug candidates has proven particularly desirable. Since resistance can develop against a specific drug designed to inhibit only one stage of the viral cycle, combinations of drugs directed at more than one step have proven to be more effective than a single drug given alone. While the introduction of this combination therapy (termed highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)) has significantly decreased the death rate from HIV infections, resistance problems still arise. This paper will review previous approaches and address current and future computational strategies used in the design of second-generation and beyond drugs.

  20. Evaluating Art Therapy to Heal the Effects of Trauma Among Refugee Youth: The Burma Art Therapy Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cassandra; Watson-Ormond, Rose; English, Lacey; Rubesin, Hillary; Marshall, Ashley; Linton, Kristin; Amolegbe, Andrew; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    Art therapy uses the creative process to encourage personal growth and alleviate symptoms of mental illness. The Art Therapy Institute provides programs for refugee adolescents from Burma to decrease their trauma-related symptoms. This article describes and discusses the methods and findings from an evaluation of this program. The challenges of assessing art therapy with this population and assessment tool gaps are explored and suggestions for future evaluations discussed. Four validated clinical assessment tools were administered to 30 participants at baseline and follow-up to measure symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavioral problems. Focus group discussions with clinicians were used to assess the evaluation. Nearly all participants had experienced one or more traumatic events. At baseline, results showed a higher prevalence of depression than national rates among adolescents. Follow-up results showed improvements in anxiety and self-concept. Qualitative findings suggest that specific benefits of art therapy were not adequately captured with the tools used. This evaluation showed some effects of art therapy; however, symptom-focused assessment tools are not adequate to capture clients' growth resulting from the traumatic experience and this unique intervention. Future evaluations will benefit by using an art-based assessment and measuring posttraumatic growth. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  1. Anti-HIV Drug Discovery and Development: Current Innovations and Future Trends.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-04-14

    The early effectiveness of combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the treatment of HIV infection has been compromised to some extent by rapid development of multidrug-resistant HIV strains, poor bioavailability, and cumulative toxicities, and so there is a need for alternative strategies of antiretroviral drug discovery and additional therapeutic agents with novel action modes or targets. From this perspective, we first review current strategies of antiretroviral drug discovery and optimization, with the aid of selected examples from the recent literature. We highlight the development of phosphate ester-based prodrugs as a means to improve the aqueous solubility of HIV inhibitors, and the introduction of the substrate envelope hypothesis as a new approach for overcoming HIV drug resistance. Finally, we discuss future directions for research, including opportunities for exploitation of novel antiretroviral targets, and the strategy of activation of latent HIV reservoirs as a means to eradicate the virus.

  2. Metrics for Performance Evaluation of Patient Exercises during Physical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vakanski, Aleksandar; Ferguson, Jake M; Lee, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The article proposes a set of metrics for evaluation of patient performance in physical therapy exercises. Taxonomy is employed that classifies the metrics into quantitative and qualitative categories, based on the level of abstraction of the captured motion sequences. Further, the quantitative metrics are classified into model-less and model-based metrics, in reference to whether the evaluation employs the raw measurements of patient performed motions, or whether the evaluation is based on a mathematical model of the motions. The reviewed metrics include root-mean square distance, Kullback Leibler divergence, log-likelihood, heuristic consistency, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and similar. The metrics are evaluated for a set of five human motions captured with a Kinect sensor. The metrics can potentially be integrated into a system that employs machine learning for modelling and assessment of the consistency of patient performance in home-based therapy setting. Automated performance evaluation can overcome the inherent subjectivity in human performed therapy assessment, and it can increase the adherence to prescribed therapy plans, and reduce healthcare costs.

  3. Nuclear factor kappa B: a potential target for anti-HIV chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pande, V; Ramos, M J

    2003-08-01

    The Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a lymphoid-specific transcription factor, which is sequestered in the cytoplasm by the protein IkappaB. NF-kappaB plays a major role in the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression. Upon activation, NF-kappaB is released from IkappaB, moves to the nucleus, and binds to its sites on the HIV long terminal repeat to start transcription of integrated HIV genome. The present review focuses on the NF-kappaB as a potential target for the development of chemotherapy against HIV-1. Beginning from the viral-binding to reverse transcription, integration, and gene expression, to the virion maturation, the life cycle of HIV presents drug-targets at all the stages. As a result, many drugs have been developed and have entered clinical trials. Some of the most important of these are reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors, which have been used mostly in clinical studies in the form of combined therapy. But, this combined therapy has presented the problem of resistance, due to mutations in the virus. However, targeting NF-kappaB for the suppression of virus does not present the problem of resistance, as NF-kappaB is a normal part of the human T-4 cell, and is not subject to mutations, as is the virus. An overview of the NF-kappaB system and its role in HIV-1 is presented, followed by a critical review of its current and potential synthetic inhibitors. The drugs studied against NF-kappaB fall mainly into three categories: (1) Antioxidants, against oxidative stress conditions, which aid in NF-kappaB activation, (2) IkappaB phosphorylation and degradation inhibitors (the phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB is necessary to make NF-kappaB free and move to the nucleus), and (3) NF-kappaB DNA binding inhibitors. The antioxidants include N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), alpha-Lipoic acid, glutathione monoester, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and tepoxalin, of which NAC is the best studied. The IkappaB phosphorylation and degradation inhibitors

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol) enclatherated pectin-mucin submicron matrices for intravaginal anti-HIV-1 drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mashingaidze, Felix; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Maharaj, Vinesh; Buchmann, Eckhart; Pillay, Viness

    2016-04-30

    This paper explores the potential of polyethylene glycol enclatherated pectin-mucin (PEG-encl-PEC:MUC) submicron matrices (SMMs) as an intravaginal drug delivery system capable of delivering an anti-HIV-1 agent (zidovudine; AZT) over a prolonged duration. A three factor and three level (3(3)) Box-Behnken statistical design was employed to optimize the SMMs. Optimized PEG-encl-PEC:MUC SMMs prepared as a stable W/O emulsion (determined by the degree of reversible colloidal phenomena) were spherical with a mean particle size of 270.6 ± 5.533 nm and mean zeta potential of -34.4 ± 0.539 mV. The microencapsulation of AZT and the hydrogen bonding mediated shielding of AZT by SMMs was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis. The thermochemical (differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis) data proposed that Ca(2+)-based macromolecular ionic crosslinking as well as the intermolecular interactions may be responsible for the thermal stability of the delivery system. The partially amorphous nature of drug-loaded SMMs, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns, further strengthened the matricization of AZT into the pectin-mucin matrix. In vitro drug release studies from the SMMs showed approximately 91% zidovudine release in simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) and 94% in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in 24h. The mean dissolution time (MDT) of zidovudine from the SMMs was 5.974 h. The attainment of required dimensional structure and drug release profiles from SMMs highlights the potential of their inclusion into a secondary carrier system for extended and controlled intravaginal stay.

  5. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S.; Fitzgerald, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection. PMID:26126533

  6. Promise and problems associated with the use of recombinant AAV for the delivery of anti-HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to elicit antibodies with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates have so far proven unsuccessful. Long-term delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with such activity is a creative alternative that circumvents the need for an immune response and has the potential for creating a long-lasting sterilizing barrier against HIV. This approach is made possible by an incredible array of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that have been identified over the last several years. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are ideally suited for long-term delivery for a variety of reasons. The only products made from rAAV are derived from the transgenes that are put into it; as long as those products are not viewed as foreign, expression from muscle tissue may continue for decades. Thus, use of rAAV to achieve long-term delivery of anti-HIV mAbs with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of HIV-1 isolates is emerging as a promising concept for the prevention or treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. Experiments in mice and monkeys that have demonstrated protective efficacy against AIDS virus infection have raised hopes for the promise of this approach. However, all published experiments in monkeys have encountered unwanted immune responses to the AAV-delivered antibody, and these immune responses appear to limit the levels of delivered antibody that can be achieved. In this review, we highlight the promise of rAAV-mediated antibody delivery for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection in humans, but we also discuss the obstacles that will need to be understood and solved in order for the promise of this approach to be realized. PMID:28197421

  7. The effects of inhomogeneous boundary dilution on the coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Peters, Jennifer J.; Park, Su Chan; Verguet, Stéphane; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2011-09-01

    A recent study in South Africa has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when topically applied, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [Karim et al., Science 329, 1168 (2010)]. However, the gel for this drug and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general have not been designed using an understanding of how gel spreading and retention in the vagina govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model spreading of microbicide gels [Szeri et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 083101 (2008)]. This should incorporate the full rheological behavior of a gel, including how rheological properties change due to contact with, and dilution by, ambient vaginal fluids. Here, we extend our initial analysis, incorporating the effects of gel dilution due to contact with vaginal fluid produced at the gel-tissue interface. Our original model is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to characterize water transport into the gel and, thus, local gel dilution. The problem is solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain. The association between local dilution of gel and rheological properties is obtained experimentally, delineating the way constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. Results show that dilution accelerates the coating flow by creating a slippery region near the vaginal wall akin to a dilution boundary layer, especially if the boundary flux exceeds a certain value. On the other hand, if the diffusion coefficient of boundary fluid is increased, the slippery region diminishes in extent and the overall rate of gel spreading decreases.

  8. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  9. Correlation between microstructure and bioequivalence in anti-HIV drug efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Fandaruff, Cinira; Segatto Silva, Marcos Antônio; Galindo Bedor, Danilo Cesar; de Santana, Davi Pereira; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes; Rebuffi, Luca; Azanza Ricardo, Cristy Leonor; Scardi, Paolo; Cuffini, Silvia Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Polymorphism and particle size distribution can impact the dissolution behaviour and, as a consequence, bioavailability and bioequivalence of poorly soluble drugs, such as Efavirenz (EFV). Nevertheless, these characteristics do not explain some failures occurring in in vitro assays and in in vivo studies. EFV belongs to Class II and the High Activity Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is considered the best choice in the treatment of adults and children. EFV is a drug that needs bioequivalence studies for generic compounds. In this work, six raw materials were analyzed and two of them were utilized with human volunteers (in vivo assays or bioequivalence). All the routine pharmaceutical controls of raw materials were approved; however, the reasons for the failure of the bioequivalence assay could not be explained with current knowledge. The aim of this work was to study microstructure, a solid-state property of current interest in the pharmaceutical area, in order to find an explanation for the dissolution and bioequivalence behaviour. The microstructure of EFV raw materials was studied by Whole Powder Pattern Modelling (WPPM) of X-ray powder diffraction data. Results for different EFV batches showed the biorelevance of the crystalline domain size, and a clear correlation with in vitro (dissolution tests) and in vivo assays (bioequivalence).

  10. Foamy Virus Vectors for HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Olszko, Miles E.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has vastly improved outcomes for patients infected with HIV, yet it is a lifelong regimen that is expensive and has significant side effects. Retroviral gene therapy is a promising alternative treatment for HIV/AIDS; however, inefficient gene delivery to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has so far limited the efficacy of this approach. Foamy virus (FV) vectors are derived from non-pathogenic viruses that are not endemic to the human population. FV vectors have been used to deliver HIV-inhibiting transgenes to human HSCs, and they have several advantages relative to other retroviral vectors. These include an attractive safety profile, broad tropism, a large transgene capacity, and the ability to persist in quiescent cells. In addition, the titers of FV vectors are not reduced by anti-HIV transgenes that affect the production of lentivirus (LV) vectors. Thus FV vectors are very promising for anti-HIV gene therapy. This review covers the advantages of FV vectors and describes their preclinical development for anti-HIV gene therapy. PMID:24153061

  11. A mixed-methods evaluation of complementary therapy services in palliative care: yoga and dance therapy.

    PubMed

    Selman, L E; Williams, J; Simms, V

    2012-01-01

    To inform service provision and future research, we evaluated two complementary therapy services: yoga classes and dance therapy [The Lebed Method (TLM)]. Both were run as 6-week group courses. Patients completed the Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing questionnaire pre- and post-course. Mean change over time was calculated for patient-nominated concern and well-being scores. Qualitative data regarding factors affecting health other than the therapy and benefits of the service were analysed using content analysis. Eighteen patients participated (mean age 63.8 years; 16 female; 14 cancer diagnoses); 10 were doing yoga, five TLM, and three both yoga and TLM; 14 completed more than one assessed course. Patients' most prevalent concerns were: mobility/fitness (n= 20), breathing problems (n= 20), arm, shoulder and neck problems (n= 18), difficulty relaxing (n= 8), back/postural problems (n= 8), fear/anxiety (n= 5). Factors affecting patients' health other than the therapy were prevalent and predominantly negative (e.g. treatment side effects). Patients reported psycho-spiritual, physical and social benefits. Concern scores improved significantly (P < 0.001) for both therapies; improved well-being was clinically significant for yoga. Evaluations of group complementary therapy services are feasible, can be conducted effectively and have implications for future research. Yoga and TLM may be of benefit in this population.

  12. A Critical Evaluation of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for Teenage Smokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Christi A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the appropriateness and feasibility of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in teenage smokers. Available forms of NRT, theoretical rationale and efficacy of NRT, ethical considerations, and the feasibility of NRT in teenage smokers are addressed. Several characteristics similar to adult nicotine dependent smokers have been found in teen…

  13. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita; Boll, Mette; Matzen, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Evidence-based practice creates practice that integrates research-driven evidence with clinical expertise and patients' preferences in clinical decision-making. The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate the quality and applicability of scientific research in occupational therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were appraised and the quality evaluated using an evidence taxonomy and an evidence hierarchy. Evidence arose providing support for a client-centred approach, entailing outcome related to better ability to recall goals, the patients feeling more involved and able to manage more everyday life occupations after rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL) and participation. As research of relevance for the profession to a large extent includes qualitative research it gives rise to reflection on including more tools than the evidence hierarchy while evaluating evidence within occupational therapy.

  14. Migration of CD8+ T cells into the CNS gives rise to highly potent anti-HIV CD4dimCD8bright T cells in a Wnt signaling -dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Maureen H.; Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Seaton, Melanie S.; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The role of CD8+ T cells in HIV control in the brain and the consequences of such control are unclear. Approximately 3% of peripheral CD8+ T cells dimly express CD4 on their surface. This population is known as CD4dimCD8bright T cells. We evaluated the role of CD4dimCD8bright and CD8 single positive T cells in HIV infected brain using NOD/SCID/IL-2rcγ−/− mice reconstituted with human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) (NSG-huPBMC). All three T cell populations (CD4 single positive, CD8 single positive, and CD4dimCD8bright) were found in NSG-huPBMC mice brain within 2 weeks of-infection. Wnts secreted from astrocytes induced CD4dimCD8bright T cells by 2-fold in vitro. Injection of highly purified CD8 single positive T cells into mouse brain induced CD4dimCD8bright T cells by 10-fold, which were proliferative and exhibited a terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype. Brain CD4dimCD8bright T cells from HIV infected mice exhibited anti-HIV specific responses, as demonstrated by induction of CD107ab post exposure to HIV-peptide loaded targets. Further, higher frequency of CD4dimCD8bright T cells (R= −0.62;p≤0.001), but not CD8 single positive T cells (R= −0.24;p≤0.27), negatively correlated with HIV-gag mRNA transcripts in HIV infected NSG-huPBMC brain. Together, these studies indicate that single positive CD8+ T cells entering the CNS during HIV infection can give rise to CD4dimCD8bright T cells, likely through a Wnt signaling-dependent manner, and that these cells are associated with potent anti-HIV control in the CNS. Thus, CD4dimCD8bright T cells are capable of HIV control in the CNS and may offer protection against HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders. PMID:26582945

  15. Computational investigation of the anti-HIV activity of Chinese medicinal formula Three-Huang Powder.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jack Z; Bai, Li; Chen, Da-Gang; Xu, Qi-Tai; Southerland, William M

    2010-06-01

    An essential step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is integration of the double-stranded retroviral DNA into the genome of the host cell. HIV-1 integrase, the enzyme that inserts the vital DNA into the host chromosome, is an attractive and rational target for anti-AIDS drug design because it is essential for HIV replication and there are no known counterparts in the host cell. Inhibitors of this enzyme have the great potential to complement the therapeutic use of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Natural products have provided a source of new drug candidates for anti-AIDS therapy. Baicalein and baicalin, identified components of a Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, have been shown to inhibit infectivity and replication of HIV. They are therefore promising lead compounds for developing new anti-AIDS drugs. To understand how the inhibitors work and therefore design more potent and specific inhibitors, we have used molecular modeling techniques to investigate the binding modes of these inhibitors. The three-dimensional structures of these inhibitors were first built. Then, computational binding studies of these inhibitors, based on the crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, were performed to study the complex structure. The preliminary results of our computational modeling study demonstrated that Baicalein binds to the active site region of the HIV-1 integrase. Our study will be of help to identify the pharmacophores of inhibitors binding to HIV-1 integrase and design new pharmaceuticals for the treatment of AIDS.

  16. Computational Investigation of the Anti-HIV Activity of Chinese Medicinal Formula Three-Huang Powder

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jack Z.; Bai, Li; Chen, Da-Gang; Xu, Qi-Tai; Southerland, William M.

    2011-01-01

    An essential step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is integration of the double-stranded retroviral DNA into the genome of the host cell. HIV-1 integrase, the enzyme that inserts the vital DNA into the host chromosome, is an attractive and rational target for anti-AIDS drug design because it is essential for HIV replication and there are no known counterparts in the host cell. Inhibitors of this enzyme have the great potential to complement the therapeutic use of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Natural products have provided a source of new drug candidates for anti-AIDS therapy. Baicalein and baicalin, identified components of a Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, have been shown to inhibit infectivity and replication of HIV. They are therefore promising lead compounds for developing new anti-AIDS drugs. To understand how the inhibitors work and therefore design more potent and specific inhibitors, we have used molecular modeling techniques to investigate the binding modes of these inhibitors. The three-dimensional structures of these inhibitors were first built. Then, computational binding studies of these inhibitors, based on the crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, were performed to study the complex structure. The preliminary results of our computational modeling study demonstrated that Baicalein binds to the active site region of the HIV-1 integrase. Our study will be of help to identify the pharmacophores of inhibitors binding to HIV-1 integrase and design new pharmaceuticals for the treatment of AIDS. PMID:20640783

  17. Trimethyl chitosan improves Anti-HIV effects of Atripla as a new nano-formulated drug.

    PubMed

    Shohani, Sepideh; Abdoli, Asghar; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Salimi-Asl, Mohammad; Ghanbari, Maryam; Haj, Mehrdad Sadeghi; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh

    2016-12-16

    Background; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been commonly used for HIV treatment. Its main drawbacks like drug resistance and side effects raised researcher's interest to find new approaches for its treatment. Trimethyl chitosan is one of the drug carriers which was introduced recently. Materials and Methods; the conjugated atripla-trimethyl chitosan was designed and characterized by zetasizer, AFM and FTIR techniques. The drug conjugation with trimethyl chitosan and cellular uptake of nano-conjugate were determined by spectrophotometry. XTT test was used to measure the cytotoxicity. Anti-retroviral efficiency was studied by ELISA test. Results; Zetasizer Results proved that the average size of nano-conjugate particles agglomeration was 493.4±24.6 nm but the size of the majority of the particles was 177.2±7.8 nm with the intensity of 87.9%. AFM technique revealed that the size of nano-conjugate and trimethyl chitosan were 129 nm and 59.78 nm, respectively. Zeta potential was -1.35±0.04 mv for nano-conjugate and -7.69±0.3 mv for drug. Conjugation efficiency of atripla with trimethyl chitosan was 5.27%. Measured cellular uptake with spectrophotometry for nano-conjugate was about twice of the free drug in examined concentrations (P=0.007). Compared to atripla, the nano-conjugate showed a higher inhibitory effect on HIV replication (P=0.0001). Conclusion; The result showed that atripla-TMC conjugate does not have a significant cytotoxicity effect. Due to the higher inhibitory effect of nano-conjugate on viral replication, it can be used in lower concentration for antiviral treatment, which resulted in reduction of drug resistance and other side effects.

  18. Development of dual-acting pyrimidinediones as novel and highly potent topical anti-HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    Watson Buckheit, Karen; Yang, Lu; Buckheit, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), topical microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV represent an important strategy to prevent the continued spread of infection. The recent trend in the development of new microbicide candidates includes the utilization of FDA-approved therapeutic drugs that target the early stages of the HIV life cycle, including entry inhibitors and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. We have investigated 12 pyrimidinedione compounds with potent HIV activities and their abilities to inhibit both virus entry and reverse transcription, in an effort to determine a lead microbicide for product development. The candidate compounds were evaluated for efficacy against subtype B, C, and E clinical virus strains in fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and against CCR5-tropic virus strains in both monocyte-macrophages and dendritic cells. Microbicide-specific biological assays and toxicity evaluations were also performed in a variety of established and fresh human cells as well as against Lactobacillus strains common to the vaginal environment. These evaluations resulted in the identification of congeners with cyclopropyl and cyclobutyl substituents at the N-1 of the pyrimidinedione as the most active molecules in the structure-activity relationship series. The pyrimidinediones represent excellent microbicide candidates in light of their significantly high efficacies against HIV-1 (subnanomolar concentration range), potencies (therapeutic index, >1 million), solubility profiles, and dual mechanism of antiviral action that includes two early steps of virus replication prior to the integration of the virus that are considered most important for microbicidal activity.

  19. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with physical therapy following primary THA.

    PubMed

    Issa, Kimona; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Memon, Talha; Dattilo, Jonathan; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is intended to maximize a patient's range of motion and function and improve the quality of life. No universally accepted standard of care exists for physical therapy among physicians or therapists. However, it may be crucial to enhance efforts to more fully elucidate contributing parameters that affect patient experiences. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various factors contributing to patient satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. One hundred consecutive patients (110 hips) who underwent THA were prospectively surveyed for satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. All surveys were filled out anonymously by the patients, and investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes and who was surveyed. Seventy-six percent of patients reported being satisfied with their rehabilitation experiences. Factors, including patient age and sex, duration of therapy, number of patients per session, continuity of care with the same therapist, amount of hands-on time spent with the therapist, number of patients per session, and total number of sessions completed, were significantly correlated with patient satisfaction. Co-pay amount did not significantly affect patient satisfaction. These factors may be underappreciated by physicians and physical therapists. To maximize patient satisfaction with physical therapy, physicians should identify institutions whose therapists are willing to spend adequate hands-on time during one-on-one or small-group sessions while maintaining the greatest possible continuity of care with a single provider.

  20. Evaluation of vancomycin for therapy of adult pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Viladrich, P F; Gudiol, F; Liñares, J; Pallarés, R; Sabaté, I; Rufí, G; Ariza, J

    1991-01-01

    The emergence of pneumococci resistant to penicillin and other agents prompted us to evaluate intravenous vancomycin for the therapy of pneumococcal meningitis, which has an overall mortality of 30%. Eleven consecutive adult patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-culture-proven pneumococcal meningitis and positive initial CSF Gram stain were given intravenous vancomycin (usual dosage, 7.5 mg/kg every 6 h for 10 days). The MBCs of vancomycin ranged from 0.25 to 0.5 micrograms/ml. Early adjunctive therapy with intravenous dexamethasone, mannitol, and sodium phenytoin was also instituted. After 48 h of therapy, all 11 patients showed a satisfactory clinical response, although the CSF culture remained positive in one case; median trough CSF and serum vancomycin levels were 2 and 5.1 micrograms/ml, respectively, and trough CSF bactericidal titers ranged from less than 1:2 to 1:16. On day 3, one patient died of acute heart failure. Four patients had clinical failure at on days 4 (two patients), 7 (one), and 8 (one) of therapy; they all immediately responded to a change in antibiotic therapy. The remaining six patients were cured after 10 days of vancomycin therapy. At this point, median peak CSF and serum vancomycin levels were 1.9 and 18.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. A transient alteration of renal function occurred in two patients, and persistent slight hypoacusia occurred in three patients. In summary, 11 adults with pneumococcal meningitis were treated with vancomycin and early adjunctive therapy including dexamethasone. All patients initially improved, and 10 were ultimately cured of the infection. However, four patients experienced a therapeutic failure, which led to a change in vancomycin therapy. PMID:1810180

  1. PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hallor, Magnus; Singer, Rachel; Tharinger, Hugo; Kenney, Jessica; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Robbiani, Melissa; Derby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239ΔNef (SIVΔNef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of α4β7 and CD169, and induced type I IFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro- and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIVΔNef-infected animals, SIVΔNef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIVΔNef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity. PMID:27603520

  2. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  3. Latex bead immobilisation in PDMS matrix for the detection of p53 gene point mutation and anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Degiuli, Agnès; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-03-01

    Two diagnostic chemiluminescent biochips were developed for either the detection of p53 gene point mutation or the serological detection of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein. Both biochips were composed of 24 microarrays of latex beads spots (4x4) (150 microm in diameter, 800 microm spacing) entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMS). The latex beads, bearing oligonucleotide sequences or capsid protein, were spotted with a conventional piezoelectric spotter and subsequently transferred at the PDMS interface. The electron microscopy observation of the biochips showed how homogeneous and well distributed the spots could be. Point mutation detection on the codon 273 of the p53 gene was performed on the basis of the melting temperature difference between the perfect match sequence and the one base pair mismatch sequence. The hybridisation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide form the codon 273 including a one base pair mutation in its sequence on a biochip arrayed with non-muted and the muted complementary sequences, enabled a clear discrimination at 56 degrees C between muted and wild sequences. Moreover, the quantitative measurement of the amount of muted sequence in a sample was possible in the range 0.4-4 pmol. Serological measurement of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein on the biochip, prepared with 1-microm-diameter latex beads, enabled the detection of monoclonal antibodies in the range 1.55-775 ng mL(-1). Such a range could be lowered to 0.775 ng mL(-1) when using 50-nm-diameter beads, which generated a higher specific surface. The validation of the biochip for the detection of anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies was performed in human sera from seropositive and seronegative patients. The positivity of the sera was easily discriminated at serum dilutions below 1:1,000.

  4. PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Frank, Ines; Hallor, Magnus; Singer, Rachel; Tharinger, Hugo; Kenney, Jessica; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Salazar, Andres; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Robbiani, Melissa; Derby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239ΔNef (SIVΔNef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of α4β7 and CD169, and induced type I IFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro- and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIVΔNef-infected animals, SIVΔNef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIVΔNef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity.

  5. Formulation Development of Retrocyclin 1 Analog RC-101 as an Anti-HIV Vaginal Microbicide Product▿

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, A. B.; Cost, M. R.; Cole, A. L.; Cole, A. M.; Patton, D. L.; Gupta, P.; Rohan, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    RC-101 is a synthetic microbicide analog of retrocyclin, which has shown in vitro activity against X4 and R5 HIV-1. In an effort to develop a safe and effective RC-101 vaginal microbicide product, we assessed safety in ex vivo macaque and human models and efficacy using in vitro and ex vivo models. A polyvinyl-alcohol vaginal film containing RC-101 (100 μg/film) was developed. Formulation assessment was conducted by evaluating disintegration, drug content, mechanical properties, and stability. Efficacy was evaluated by in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) assay and ex vivo human ectocervical tissue explant model. Ex vivo safety studies were conducted by exposing RC-101 to an excised monkey reproductive tract and excised human ectocervical tissue. RC-101 100 μg films were shown to be safe to human and monkey tissue and effective against HIV-1 in vitro and ex vivo in human ectocervical tissue. The 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) for RC-101 films at 2,000 μg (IC90 = 57.5 μM) using an ex vivo model was 10-fold higher than the IC90 observed using an in vitro model (IC90 = 5.0 μM). RC-101 films were stable for 1 month at 25°C, with in vitro bioactivity maintained for up to 6 months. RC-101 was developed in a quick-dissolve film formulation that was shown to be safe in an ex vivo model and effective in in vitro and ex vivo models. RC-101 film formulations were shown to maintain bioactivity for a period of 6 months. Findings from the present study contribute to the development of a safe and effective topical microbicide product. PMID:21321138

  6. Inhibition of the integrase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 by anti-HIV plant proteins MAP30 and GAP31.

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Huang, S; Huang, P L; Huang, P L; Bourinbaiar, A S; Chen, H C; Kung, H F

    1995-01-01

    MAP30 (Momordica anti-HIV protein of 30 kDa) and GAP31 (Gelonium anti-HIV protein of 31 kDa) are anti-HIV plant proteins that we have identified, purified, and cloned from the medicinal plants Momordica charantia and Gelonium multiflorum. These antiviral agents are capable of inhibiting infection of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) in T lymphocytes and monocytes as well as replication of the virus in already-infected cells. They are not toxic to normal uninfected cells because they are unable to enter healthy cells. MAP30 and GAP31 also possess an N-glycosidase activity on 28S ribosomal RNA and a topological activity on plasmid and viral DNAs including HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTRs). LTRs are essential sites for integration of viral DNA into the host genome by viral integrase. We therefore investigated the effect of MAP30 and GAP31 on HIV-1 integrase. We report that both of these antiviral agents exhibit dose-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 integrase. Inhibition was observed in all of the three specific reactions catalyzed by the integrase, namely, 3' processing (specific cleavage of the dinucleotide GT from the viral substrate), strand transfer (integration), and "disintegration" (the reversal of strand transfer). Inhibition was studied by using oligonucleotide substrates with sequences corresponding to the U3 and U5 regions of HIV LTR. In the presence of 20 ng of viral substrate, 50 ng of target substrate, and 4 microM integrase, total inhibition was achieved at equimolar concentrations of the integrase and the antiviral proteins, with EC50 values of about 1 microM. Integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome is a vital step in the replicative cycle of retroviruses, including the AIDS virus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by MAP30 and GAP31 suggests that impediment of viral DNA integration may play a key role in the anti-HIV activity of these plant proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568024

  7. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of lupane and olean-18-ene derivatives. Absolute configuration of 19,20-epoxylupanes by VCD.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Nicolás, Fátima; Gordillo-Román, Bárbara; Oberti, Juan C; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2012-04-27

    Lupane triterpenoids 2 and 5-12 and oleanene derivatives 13 and 14 were prepared from lupeol (1), betulin (3), and germanicol (4). They were tested for anti-HIV activity, and some structure-activity relationships were outlined. The 20-(S) absolute configuration of epoxylupenone (8) was assessed by comparison of the observed and DFT-calculated vibrational circular dichroism spectra. The CompareVOA algorithm was employed to support the C-20 configuration assignment. The 20,29 double bond in lupenone (2) and 3-epilupeol (15) was stereoselectively epoxidized to produce 20-(S)-8 and 20-(S)-16, respectively, an assignment in agreement with their X-ray diffraction structures.

  8. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a cornucopia of health: a review of its credited antidiabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Fang, E F; Ng, T B

    2011-07-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia, BG) is both a nutritious and healthy food with a distinctive bitter flavor, and it is also widely exploited in folklore medicine. This review focuses on the efficacies and molecular mechanisms of BG-induced anti-diabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor activities contributed by over twenty active components. The intent of this review is to provide comprehensive and valuable information for medicinal researchers, drug investigators, clinicians, and even patients with an interest in BG. In conclusion, BG is a cornucopia of health and it deserves in-depth investigations for clinical application in the future.

  9. Ultrasound Evaluation of Morton Neuroma Before and After Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gimber, Lana H; Melville, David M; Bocian, Darin A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Guidice, Matthew P Del; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2017-02-01

    The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess for differences in imaging appearances of Morton neuromas before and after laser therapy using diagnostic ultrasound (US). A retrospective review was performed to identify patients who underwent US imaging to evaluate for Morton neuroma during the study period (June 1, 2013-July 1, 2014); of the 42 patients identified, 21 underwent US evaluations before and after laser therapy. US reports and images were reviewed and correlated with clinical history. The final study group consisted of 21 patients who had a total of 31 Morton neuromas evaluated using US after treatment. A retrospective review was then performed to characterize the appearances of these lesions before and after therapy followed by an analysis of variables. Retrospective US review of 31 pretreatment Morton neuromas showed fusiform, heterogeneously hypoechoic masses with well-defined borders in most cases and that pain was reported when transducer pressure was applied in 97% (30/31) of cases. After treatment, lesions showed ill-defined borders (23/31), and pain with application of transducer pressure was either significantly decreased or absent (29/31); these findings were concordant with the clinical findings. Both of these characteristics were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). In addition, more Morton neuromas occurred in the second intermetatarsal space than in the third intermetatarsal space (p < 0.0001). US may be used to identify posttreatment changes after laser therapy of Morton neuromas. Posttreatment changes include ill-defined borders and less pain or the absence of pain with the application of transducer pressure. These criteria may be applied in future clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of laser therapy for Morton neuroma.

  10. Formulation, In Vitro and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Anti-HIV Vaginal Bioadhesive Gel

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, A; Bhowmik, B B; Thakur, Y S

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive and female-controlled pre-exposure prophylaxis strategies to prevent mucosal transmission of the virus, is urgently needed with the rising prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV2) infections in women. Zidovudine-loaded bioadhesive vaginal gel may become one of the very useful strategies, as it can be used not only for controlled release but also for enhancing bioavailability. Drug delivery through vaginal gel is a promising area for continued research with the aim of achieving controlled release with enhanced bioavailability over longer periods of time. The aim of the study was to develop a newer prolong releasing Zidovudine (AZT) bioadhesive vaginal gel to treat HIV infections with increased patient convenience. AZT-loaded bioadhesive vaginal gel was prepared successfully by using cold mechanical method. F3 formulation containing carbopol–HPMC (1:3) was selected and evaluated in order to achieve objectives of this study. In vitro drug release study of F3 showed in 24 h drug released following case I Fickian (n ≤ 0.5) transport mechanism, and in vivo drug release was found much better (Tmax), (Cmax), and bioavailability (F) comparison with oral pour drug solution. It was also showed good extrudability, spreadability, and bioadhesive strength. A generalized protocol, for the further research, in this area will surely expected to yield significant outcome with improved drug delivery system. PMID:21731351

  11. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Scott, Yanille M; Park, Seo Young; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2016-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection.

  12. Surface Modifications of Nanocarriers for Effective Intracellular Delivery of Anti-HIV Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gunaseelan, Simi; Gunaseelan, Krishnan; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Zhang, Xiaoping; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of nanocarriers such as bioconjugates, dendrimers, liposomes, and nanoparticles have been widely evaluated as potential targeted drug delivery systems. Passive targeting of nanoscale carriers is based on a size-flow-filtration phenomenon that is usually limited to tumors, the reticular endothelial system, and possibly lymph nodes (LN). In fact, targeting the delivery of drugs to pivotal physiological sites such as the lymph nodes has emerged as a promising strategy in treating HIV disease. Ligands for specific cell surface receptors can be displayed on nanocarriers in order to achieve active targeting. The approach has been extensively used preclinically in cancer where certain receptors are over-expressed at various stages of the disease. Unfortunately, markers of HIV infection are lacking and latently infected cells do not show any signs of infection on their surface. However, the disease naturally targets only a few cell types. The HIV receptor CD4, coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4), and some receptors relatively specific for macrophages provide potentially valuable surface targets for drug delivery to all susceptible cells in patients infected by HIV. This review focuses on nanoscale targeting with an emphasis on surface modifications of drug delivery nanocarriers for active targeting. A number of related issues, including HIV biology, targets, pharmacokinetics, and intracellular fate as well as literature-cited examples of emerging surface-modified targeted carrier systems are discussed. PMID:19941919

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille M.; Park, Seo Young

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection. PMID:26596954

  14. Cerebral vascular accident: some characteristics of occupational therapy evaluation forms.

    PubMed

    Ottenbacher, K

    1980-04-01

    To determine areas most commonly evaluated by occupational therapists and to ascertain methods in which evaluative information is gathered, 35 evaluation forms currently employed by occupational therapists to assess dysfunction in patients with cerebral vascular accident were collected. Five general areas including motor function, sensory deficit, hadn function, activities of daily living, and visual perception were found to be most frequently listed on the forms. These areas were divided into sub areas to operationally define the information collected. Analysis revealed that the level of measurement most frequently employed by therapists to record evaluate findings was the descriptive level. There was a tendency to collect data at "higher" or more sophisticated levels of measurement in those areas evaluated most frequently. The findings are discussed in relation to professional competency concerns and the need to develop unique occupational therapy evaluative instruments for areas of practice such as cerebral vascular accident.

  15. Transient swelling, spreading, and drug delivery by a dissolved anti-HIV microbicide-bearing film.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Rohan, Lisa C; Katz, David F; Szeri, Andrew J

    2013-03-01

    There is a widespread agreement that more effective drug delivery vehicles with more alternatives, as well as better active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), must be developed to improve the efficacy of microbicide products. For instance, in tropical regions, films are more appropriate than gels due to better stability of drugs at extremes of moisture and temperature. Here, we apply fundamental fluid mechanical and physicochemical transport theory to help better understand how successful microbicide API delivery depends upon properties of a film and the human reproductive tract environment. Several critical components of successful drug delivery are addressed. Among these are: elastohydrodynamic flow of a dissolved non-Newtonian film; mass transfer due to inhomogeneous dilution of the film by vaginal fluid contacting it along a moving boundary (the locally deforming vaginal epithelial surface); and drug absorption by the epithelium. Local rheological properties of the film are dependent on local volume fraction of the vaginal fluid. We evaluated this experimentally, delineating the way that constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning dissolved film are modified by dilution. To develop the mathematical model, we integrate the Reynolds lubrication equation with a mass conservation equation to model diluting fluid movement across the moving vaginal epithelial surface and into the film. This is a complex physicochemical phenomenon that is not well understood. We explore time- and space-varying boundary flux model based upon osmotic gradients. Results show that the model produces fluxes that are comparable to experimental data. Further experimental characterization of the vaginal wall is required for a more precise set of parameters and a more sophisticated theoretical treatment of epithelium.

  16. Anti-HIV B Cell Lines As Candidate Vaccine Biosensors1

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B.; Huber, Michael; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katherine J.; Hangartner, Lars; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph; Lifson, Jeffrey; Wu, Xueling; Mascola, John R.; Poignard, Pascal; Binley, James M.; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Schief, William R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Burton, Dennis R.; Nemazee, David

    2012-01-01

    Challenge studies following passive immunization with neutralizing antibodies suggest that an HIV vaccine could be efficacious were it able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs4). To better understand the requirements for activation of B cells producing bNAbs, we generated cell lines expressing bNAbs or their germline-reverted versions (gl-bNAbs) as BCRs. We then tested the abilities of the bNAb-expressing cells to recognize HIV pseudovirions and vaccine candidate proteins by binding and activation assays. The results suggest that HIV Env antigen-expressing, infection-competent virions are poorly recognized by high affinity bNAb-expressing cells, as measured by the inability of antigens to induce rapid increases in intracellular calcium levels. Other antigen forms appear to be highly stimulatory: in particular, soluble gp140 trimers and a multimerized, scaffolded epitope protein. Virions failed to efficiently activate bNAb-expressing B cells owing to delayed or inefficient BCR recognition, most likely caused by the low density of Env spikes. Importantly, B cells carrying gl-bNAb BCRs were not stimulated by any of the tested vaccine candidates. These data provide insight into why many HIV immunogens, and natural HIV infections, fail to rapidly stimulate bNAb responses and suggest that bNAb-expressing cell lines might be useful tools in evaluation of vaccine antigens for infectious diseases. As soluble Env trimers or multimerized scaffolded epitopes are best at activating B cell expressing bNAbs, these antigenic forms should be considered as preferred vaccine components, though they should be modified to better target naïve gl-bNAb B cells. PMID:23066156

  17. Transient swelling, spreading, and drug delivery by a dissolved anti-HIV microbicide-bearing film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Rohan, Lisa C.; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2013-03-01

    There is a widespread agreement that more effective drug delivery vehicles with more alternatives, as well as better active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), must be developed to improve the efficacy of microbicide products. For instance, in tropical regions, films are more appropriate than gels due to better stability of drugs at extremes of moisture and temperature. Here, we apply fundamental fluid mechanical and physicochemical transport theory to help better understand how successful microbicide API delivery depends upon properties of a film and the human reproductive tract environment. Several critical components of successful drug delivery are addressed. Among these are: elastohydrodynamic flow of a dissolved non-Newtonian film; mass transfer due to inhomogeneous dilution of the film by vaginal fluid contacting it along a moving boundary (the locally deforming vaginal epithelial surface); and drug absorption by the epithelium. Local rheological properties of the film are dependent on local volume fraction of the vaginal fluid. We evaluated this experimentally, delineating the way that constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning dissolved film are modified by dilution. To develop the mathematical model, we integrate the Reynolds lubrication equation with a mass conservation equation to model diluting fluid movement across the moving vaginal epithelial surface and into the film. This is a complex physicochemical phenomenon that is not well understood. We explore time- and space-varying boundary flux model based upon osmotic gradients. Results show that the model produces fluxes that are comparable to experimental data. Further experimental characterization of the vaginal wall is required for a more precise set of parameters and a more sophisticated theoretical treatment of epithelium.

  18. Transient spreading and swelling behavior of a gel deploying an anti-HIV topical microbicide.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F; Szeri, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Drug delivery of topical microbicidal molecules against HIV offers promise as a modality to prevent sexual transmission of the virus. Success of any microbicide product depends, in an interactive way, upon its drug (the microbicide active pharmaceutical ingredient, API) and its delivery system (e.g. a gel, film or intravaginal ring). There is a widespread agreement that more effective drug delivery vehicles, as well as better APIs, must be developed to improve the efficacy of microbicide products. Non-Newtonian gels are primary microbicide vehicles, but those to date have been created with limited understanding of how their properties govern their spreading and retention in the vagina, which, in turn, govern successful drug delivery. Here, we apply fundamental fluid mechanical and physicochemical transport theory to help better understand how successful microbicide API delivery depends upon properties of a gel and the vaginal environment. We address several critical components of this complex process, including: elastohydrodynamic flow of the bolus of a non-Newtonian fluid; and mass transfer due to inhomogeneous dilution of the gel by vaginal fluid contacting it along a moving boundary (the locally deforming vaginal epithelial surface). Local dilution of gel alters local rheological properties. We evaluated this experimentally, delin-eating the way that constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. We supplement the Reynolds lubrication equation with a mass conservation equation to model diluting fluid movement across the moving vaginal epithelial surface and into the gel bolus. This is a physicochemically complex phenomenon that is not well understood. We implement a boundary flux model based upon the elevated hydrodynamic pressures in the cells. Results show that this model produces fluxes that lie within the range of mean values that have been reported. Further experimental characterization of the vaginal wall is required for a more

  19. Anti-HIV, anti-poxvirus, and anti-SARS activity of a nontoxic, acidic plant extract from the Trifollium species Secomet-V/anti-vac suggests that it contains a novel broad-spectrum antiviral.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Girish J; Kaczmarek, Jennifer N; Leivers, Steven; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Kulkarni, Amod P; Bauer, Gabriele; De Beer, Corena; Preiser, Wolfgang; Mohamed, Abdu Rahman

    2005-11-01

    Enveloped animal viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus, Marburg, and influenza are major public health concerns around the world. The prohibitive cost of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for most HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa and the serious side effects in those who have access to ARV drugs make a compelling case for the study of complementary and alternative therapies. Such therapies should have scientifically proved antiviral activity and minimal toxic effects. A plant extract, Secomet-V, with an anecdotal indication in humans for promise as an anti-HIV treatment, was investigated. Using a previously described attenuated vaccinia virus vGK5, we established the antiviral activity of Secomet-V. Chemical analysis showed that it has an acidic pH, nontoxic traces of iron (<10 ppm), and almost undetectable levels of arsenic (<1.0 ppm). The color varies from colorless to pale yellow to dark brown. The active agent is heat stable at least up to sterilizing temperature of 121 degrees C. The crude plant extract is a mixture of several small molecules separable by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The HIV viral loads were significantly reduced over several months in a few patients monitored after treatment with Secomet-V. Secomet-V was also found to have antiviral activity against the SARS virus but not against the West Nile virus. Secomet-V, therefore, is a broad-spectrum antiviral, which possibly works by neutralizing viral infectivity, resulting in the prevention of viral attachment.

  20. The impact of pregnancy on anti-HIV activity of cervicovaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Brenna L; Dutt, Riana; Raker, Christina; Barthelemy, Melody; Rossoll, Richard M; Ramratnam, Bharat; Wira, Charles R; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2016-12-01

    Mucosal immunity of the female genital tract plays a critical role in defense against sexually transmitted infections like HIV. Pregnancy is associated with both structural and immunologic alterations in the genital mucosa, but the impact of these changes on its ability to suppress HIV infection is unknown. Current epidemiologic data are conflicting as to whether pregnancy increases the risk of HIV acquisition. The purpose of this study was to define the association between antimicrobial peptides and chemokines in cervicovaginal secretions and in vitro HIV infectivity among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Forty pregnant and 37 nonpregnant women were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal cohort study at a single tertiary care women's hospital in Providence, RI. Cervicovaginal lavage was performed at each study visit. For pregnant women, study visits occurred once per trimester, and there was an optional postpartum visit. For nonpregnant women, study visits occurred across a single cycle that was timed to occur in the proliferative, ovulatory, and secretory phases based on the presumption of a regular menstrual cycle. The impact of cervicovaginal lavage on HIV infectivity was evaluated using a TZM-bl assay and compared between pregnant and nonpregnant women for each visit. The previously validated TZM-bl assay, which uses a luciferase reporting gene to indicate HIV infection of TZM-bl cells, was measured with a luminometer with higher relative light units that indicate greater levels of in vitro HIV infection. Immune mediators were measured with a multiplex bead assay. HIV infectivity and median concentration of each mediator were compared between pregnant and nonpregnant groups with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Cervicovaginal fluid from pregnant and nonpregnant women significantly decreased HIV infectivity in both groups compared with positive control (virus only; P<.01), but infectivity was not different between groups (P≥.44). During the second and third

  1. Autoreactivity and Exceptional CDR Plasticity (but Not Unusual Polyspecificity) Hinder Elicitation of the Anti-HIV Antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Finton, Kathryn A. K.; Larimore, Kevin; Larman, H. Benjamin; Friend, Della; Correnti, Colin; Rupert, Peter B.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Strong, Roland K.

    2013-01-01

    The broadly-neutralizing anti-HIV antibody 4E10 recognizes an epitope in the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV envelope protein gp41. Previous attempts to elicit 4E10 by vaccination with envelope-derived or reverse-engineered immunogens have failed. It was presumed that the ontogeny of 4E10-equivalent responses was blocked by inherent autoreactivity and exceptional polyreactivity. We generated 4E10 heavy-chain knock-in mice, which displayed significant B cell dysregulation, consistent with recognition of autoantigen/s by 4E10 and the presumption that tolerance mechanisms may hinder the elicitation of 4E10 or 4E10-equivalent responses. Previously proposed candidate 4E10 autoantigens include the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and a nuclear splicing factor, 3B3. However, using carefully-controlled assays, 4E10 bound only weakly to cardiolipin-containing liposomes, but also bound negatively-charged, non-cardiolipin-containing liposomes comparably poorly. 4E10/liposome binding was predominantly mediated by electrostatic interactions rather than presumed hydrophobic interactions. The crystal structure of 4E10 free of bound ligands showed a dramatic restructuring of the combining site, occluding the HIV epitope binding site and revealing profound flexibility, but creating an electropositive pocket consistent with non-specific binding of phospholipid headgroups. These results strongly suggested that antigens other than cardiolipin mediate 4E10 autoreactivity. Using a synthetic peptide library spanning the human proteome, we determined that 4E10 displays limited and focused, but unexceptional, polyspecificity. We also identified a novel autoepitope shared by three ER-resident inositol trisphosphate receptors, validated through binding studies and immunohistochemistry. Tissue staining with 4E10 demonstrated reactivity consistent with the type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor as the most likely candidate autoantigen, but is inconsistent with splicing factor 3B3

  2. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  3. Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of Immunoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Ryan B.; Summa, Christopher M.; Corti, Miriam; Pincus, Seth H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous studies have identified the two target epitopes most effective for the delivery of cytotoxic immunoconjugates the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the hairpin loop of gp41. Here we construct and test tetravalent double variable domain immunoglobulin molecules (DVD-Igs) that bind to both epitopes. Methods Synthetic genes that encode DVD-Igs utilizing V-domains derived from human anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 Abs were designed and expressed in 293F cells. A series of constructs tested different inter-V-linker domains and orientations of the two V domains. Antibodies were tested for binding to recombinant Ag and native Env expressed on infected cells, for neutralization of infectious HIV, and for their ability to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates to infected cells. Findings The outer V-domain was the major determinant of binding and functional activity of the DVD-Ig. Function of the inner V-domain and bifunctional binding required at least 15 AA in the inter-V-domain linker. A molecular model showing the spatial orientation of the two epitopes is consistent with this observation. Linkers that incorporated helical domains (A[EAAAK]nA) resulted in more effective DVD-Igs than those based solely on flexible domains ([GGGGS]n). In general, the DVD-Igs outperformed the less effective parental antibody and equaled the activity of the more effective. The ability of the DVD-Igs to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates in the absence of soluble CD4 was improved over that of either parent. Conclusions DVD-Igs can be designed that bind to both gp120 and gp41 on the HIV envelope. DVD-Igs are effective in delivering cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The optimal design of these DVD-Igs, in which both domains are fully functional, has not yet been achieved. PMID:23056448

  4. Evaluating an Educational Module on Home Inotrope Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockman-Samkowiak, Jodie; Brenner, Phyllis S; Dunn, Deborah S; Qureshi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Educating home health nurses presents significant challenges for nurse educators because of the vast geographical areas served and the types of patient cared for. The integration of technology into the home health care arena offers new and innovative opportunities to address the ongoing educational needs of nurses as required by accrediting bodies. This exploratory study evaluated a Web-based educational module on home inotrope therapy in regard to nurses' perceived knowledge and confidence.

  5. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy in TMD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Simel; Emir, Faruk; Sahin, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is one of the most recent treatment modalities in dentistry. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is suggested to have biostimulating and analgesic effects through direct irradiation without causing thermal response. There are few studies that have investigated the efficacy of laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD), especially in reduced mouth opening. The case report here evaluates performance of LLLT with a diode laser for temporomandibular clicking and postoperative findings were evaluated in two cases of TMD patients. First patient had a history of limited mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region since nine months. Second patient's main complaint was his restricted mouth opening, which was progressed in one year. LLLT was performed with a 685 nm red probed diode laser that has an energy density of 6.2 J/cm2, three times a week for one month, and application time was 30 seconds (685 nm, 25 mW, 30 s, 0.02 Hz, and 6.2 J/cm2) (BTL-2000, Portative Laser Therapy Device). The treatment protocol was decided according to the literature. One year later patients were evaluated and there were no changes. This application suggested that LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMD related pain and limited mouth opening and should be considered as an alternative to other methods. PMID:26587294

  6. Zirconium phosphatidylcholine-based nanocapsules as an in vivo degradable drug delivery system of MAP30, a momordica anti-HIV protein.

    PubMed

    Caizhen, Guo; Yan, Gao; Ronron, Chang; Lirong, Yang; Panpan, Chu; Xuemei, Hu; Yuanbiao, Qiao; Qingshan, Li

    2015-04-10

    An essential in vivo drug delivery system of a momordica anti-HIV protein, MAP30, was developed through encapsulating in chemically synthesized matrices of zirconium egg- and soy-phosphatidylcholines, abbreviated to Zr/EPC and Zr/SPC, respectively. Matrices were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry studies. Zr/EPC granule at an approximate diameter of 69.43±7.78 nm was a less efficient encapsulator than the granule of Zr/SPC. Interlayer spacing of the matrices encapsulating MAP30 increased from 8.8 and 9.7 Å to 7.4 and 7.9 nm, respectively. In vivo kinetics on degradation and protein release was performed by analyzing the serum sampling of intravenously injected SPF chickens. The first order and biphasic variations were obtained for in vivo kinetics using equilibrium dialysis. Antimicrobial and anti-HIV assays yielded greatly decreased MIC50 and EC50 values of nanoformulated MAP30. An acute toxicity of MAP30 encapsulated in Zr/EPC occurred at a single intravenous dose above 14.24 mg/kg bw in NIH/KM/ICR mice. The folding of MAP30 from Zr/EPC sustained in vivo chickens for more than 8 days in high performance liquid chromatography assays. These matrices could protect MAP30 efficiently with strong structure retention, lowered toxicity and prolonged in vivo life.

  7. Medicinal attributes of Solanum xanthocarpum fruit consumed by several tribal communities as food: an in vitro antioxidant, anticancer and anti HIV perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Solanum xanthocarpum (Solanaceae) has been used for treatment of many infectious and degenerative diseases in traditional medicine. Present study reports the medicinal efficacy of S. xanthocarpum fruit as antioxidant, anticancer and anti HIV agents. Methods Extracts were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus and partially characterized by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Total flavonoid content was determined spectrophotometrically. Reducing power, DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays were used for measurement of antioxidant potential. Cytotoxic (SRB assay) and anti-HIV RT inhibition (RT assay kit, Roche) activities were determined using ELISA. Results TLC revealed the diversity of phytoconstituents in various sequential extracts of S. xanthocarpum fruit. Total flavonoid contents in extracts ranged between 10.22–162.49 μg quercetin equivalent/mg. Spectroscopic scanning of water soluble phenolics showed maximum absorbance at 250 and 280 nm. Polar extracts displayed potent radical scavenging activity (>80%). Several sub-fractions (spots) of extracts separated on TLC plates also exhibited powerful radical scavenging activity. Considerable reducing power was observed in extracts. Hexane fraction provided 55% lipoprotection in rat kidney homogenate. Non-polar extracts exhibited appreciable cytotoxic activity (70-91%) against leukemia (THP-1) and lung cancer (HOP-62) cell lines. Lower inhibitory activity was observed in extracts against HIV Reverse Transcriptase enzyme. Conclusion The study demonstrated considerable antioxidant and anticancer activities in S. xanthocarpum fruit. PMID:24678980

  8. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  9. Anti-HIV antibody in saliva: an assessment of the role of the components of saliva, testing methodologies and collection systems.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Nolan, A; Follett, E A; Coote, I; MacFarlane, T W; Kennedy, D H; Connell, A; Parry, J V

    1996-03-01

    The various components of saliva, namely mixed saliva, parotid saliva, submandibular saliva, crevicular fluid and minor (labial) gland secretions, were collected from 63 known HIV antibody seropositive patients. A commercial test system, Wellcozyme HIV 1+2, and an antibody capture ELISA (GACELISA), were compared for sensitivity against all components. Sensitivity of the GACELISA system was 100% in 123 mixed saliva, 121 parotid saliva and 127 labial fluid samples, and 98% in 99 submandibular samples and 127 crevicular fluid samples. Respective figures for Wellcozyme 1+2 were 92%, 55%, 73%, 66% and 63%. Mixed saliva was most easily, conveniently and effectively collected using a plain Salivette. In 241 Salivette samples examined from the 63 patients, GACELISA proved 100% sensitive, and Wellcozyme 95% sensitive. Another form of Salivette impregnated with citric acid was unsuitable for GACELISA and gave a false negative value of 45%. In 197 samples from the gingival margin taken by a dry swab, GACELISA showed a sensitivity of 98% and Wellcozyme 81%. The most sensitive method for demonstrating anti-HIV antibody in saliva is to collect mixed saliva with the plain Salivette system and assay anti-HIV antibody levels by GACELISA.

  10. An Effective Vaccination Approach Augments anti-HIV Systemic and Vaginal Immunity in Mice with Decreased HIV-1 Susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Shi, Guoping; Tang, Haijun; Lewis, Dorothy E; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 preferentially infects activated CD4+ T cells expressing α4β7 integrin and conventional vaccination approaches non-selectively induce immune responses including α4β7high CD4+ T cells, suggesting that current candidate AIDS vaccines may produce more target cells for HIV-1 and paradoxically enhance HIV-1 infection. Thus it remains a challenge to selectively induce robust anti-HIV immunity without the unwanted HIV-1 susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T cells. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that targets ALDH1a2, a retinoic acid producing enzyme in dendritic cells (DCs). Silencing ALDH1a2 in DCs enhanced the maturation and production of proinflammatory cytokines of DCs and promoted Th1/Th2 differentiation while suppressing Treg. ALDH1a2-silenced DCs effectively downregulated the expression of guthoming receptors α4β7 and CCR9 on activated T and B lymphocytes. Consequently, intranasal immunization of a lentiviral vaccine encoding ALDH1a2 shRNA and HIV-1 gp140 redirected gp140-specific mucosal T cell and antibody responses from the gut to the vaginal tract, while dramatically enhancing systemic gp140-specific immune responses. We further demonstrated that silencing ALDH1a2 in human DCs resulted in downregulation of β7 expression on activated autologous CD4+ T cells. Hence this study provides a unique and effective strategy to induce α4β7low anti-HIV immune responses. PMID:23157585

  11. An effective vaccination approach augments anti-HIV systemic and vaginal immunity in mice with decreased HIV-1 susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Shi, Guoping; Tang, Haijun; Lewis, Dorothy E; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 preferentially infects activated CD4(+) T cells expressing α4β7 integrin and conventional vaccination approaches non-selectively induce immune responses including α4β7(high) CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that current candidate AIDS vaccines may produce more target cells for HIV-1 and paradoxically enhance HIV-1 infection. Thus it remains a challenge to selectively induce robust anti-HIV immunity without the unwanted HIV-1 susceptible α4β77(high) CD4(+)+ T cells. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that targets ALDH1a2, a retinoic acid producing enzyme in dendritic cells (DCs). Silencing ALDH1a2 in DCs enhanced the maturation and production of proinflammatory cytokines of DCs and promoted Th1/Th2 differentiation while suppressing Treg. ALDH1a2-silenced DCs effectively downregulated the expression of guthoming receptors α4β77 and CCR9 on activated T and B lymphocytes. Consequently, intranasal immunization of a lentiviral vaccine encoding ALDH1a2 shRNA and HIV-1 gp140 redirected gp140-specific mucosal T cell and antibody responses from the gut to the vaginal tract, while dramatically enhancing systemic gp140-specific immune responses. We further demonstrated that silencing ALDH1a2 in human DCs resulted in downregulation of β7 expression on activated autologous CD4(+) T cells. Hence this study provides a unique and effective strategy to induce α4β7(low) anti-HIV immune responses.

  12. Synthesis of new 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-4′-azido nucleoside analogues as potent anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Weidong; Wang, Shuyang; Pan, Zhenliang; Tao, Le; Guo, Xiaohe; Qian, Keduo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Junbiao

    2011-01-01

    We prepared 1-(4′-azido-2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-β -D-arabinofuranosyl)cytosine (10) and its hydrochloride salt (11) as potential antiviral agents based on the favorable antiviral profiles of 4′-substituted nucleosides. Compounds 10 and 11 were synthesized from 1,3,5-O-tribenzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranoside in multiple steps, and their structures were unequivocally established by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and 19F NMR spectroscopy, HRMS, and X-ray crystallography. Compounds 10 and 11 exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50: 0.3 and 0.13 nM, respectively) without significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 100 μM. Compound 11 exhibited extremely potent anti-HIV activity against NL4-3 (wild-type), NL4-3 (K101E), and RTMDR viral strains, with EC50 values of 0.086, 0.15, and 0.11 nM, respectively. Due to the high potency of 11, it was also screened against an NIH Reagent Program NRTI-resistant virus panel containing eleven mutated viral strains and for cytotoxicity against six different human cell lines. The results of this screening indicated that 11 is a novel NRTI that could be developed as an anti-AIDS clinical trial candidate to overcome drug-resistance issues. PMID:21745701

  13. From the Chemistry of Epoxy-Sugar Nucleosides to the Discovery of Anti-HIV Agent 4′-ethynylstavudine-Festinavir

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Shingo; Kubota, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiromichi; Hamasaki, Takayuki; Baba, Masanori; Paintsil, Elijah; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Branched sugar nucleosides have attracted much attention due to their biological activities. We have demonstrated that epoxy-sugar nucleosides serve as versatile precursor for the stereo-defined synthesis of these nucleoside derivatives on the basis of its ring opening with organoaluminum or organosilicon reagents. In this review article, novel methods for the synthesis of nucleoside analogues branched at the 1′ and 4′-position will be described. During this study, we could discover an anti-HIV agent, 4′-ethynylstavudine (Festinavir). Festinavir showed more potent anti-HIV activity than the parent compound stavudine (d4T). Other significant properties of Festinavir are as follows: 1) much less toxic to various cells and also to mitochondorial DNA synthesis than d4T, 2) better substrate for human thymidine kinase than d4T, 3) resistant not only to chemical glycosidic bond cleavage but also to catabolism by thymidine phosphorylase, 4) the activity improves in the presence of a major mutation, K103N, associated with resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Detailed profile of the antiviral activities, biology and pharmacology of Festinavir are also described. PMID:23092278

  14. Concise synthesis and anti-HIV activity of pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imines and related tricyclic heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Oishi, Shinya; Ohno, Hiroaki; Shimura, Kazuya; Matsuoka, Masao; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2012-09-07

    3,4-Dihydro-2H,6H-pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imine (PD 404182) is a virucidal heterocyclic compound active against various viruses, including HCV, HIV, and simian immunodeficiency virus. Using facile synthetic approaches that we developed for the synthesis of pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imines and related tricyclic derivatives, the parallel structural optimizations of the central 1,3-thiazin-2-imine core, the benzene part, and the cyclic amidine part of PD 404182 were investigated. Replacement of the 6-6-6 pyrimido[1,2-c][1,3]benzothiazin-6-imine framework with 5-6-6 or 6-6-5 derivatives led to a significant loss of anti-HIV activity, and introduction of a hydrophobic group at the 9- or 10-positions improved the potency. In addition, we demonstrated that the PD 404182 derivative exerts anti-HIV effects at an early stage of viral infection.

  15. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions.

  16. Culture and its influence on occupational therapy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paul, S

    1995-08-01

    In the increasingly multicultural society of north America, occupational therapists have a responsibility to develop awareness and knowledge concerning different cultural groups. By accepting and understanding clients' customs, values and beliefs, clinicians have a better chance of assessing and producing more effective outcomes. Since occupational therapy has incorporated western middle-class values into its theory and practice, many evaluation tools used are based on norms developed for a white middle-class population. Using these evaluations with minority groups brings the danger of improper interpretation of test results. Consequently, increasing emphasis is being placed on the importance of culture fairness and the development of culture-fair evaluation tools for usage across different cultural groups. This paper will present a discussion concerning the importance, advantages and disadvantages of both culture-fair and culture-specific tests and evaluation tools.

  17. [Safety evaluation of Chinese medicine on tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Hua, Bao-Jin; Li, Jie

    2013-12-01

    As a characteristic tumor therapy in China, Chinese medicine (CM) plays an important position in comprehensive treatment of tumor. It's a critical issue of objective realization, analysis and evaluation of CM safety for scientific decision-making in tumor safe medication and it also is a pivotal issue which affects the international communication. The safety evaluation of CM includes three phases: pre-clinical safety evaluation, clinical trials (micro-dose studies and traditional clinical trials) and post-marketing CM safety assessment. The key point of evaluation should be distinguished among different stages and various types of CM (such as classic formulas, Chinese herbal extracts, etc). Emphasis should be given to chronic toxicity when evaluating oral Chinese herbal , microdose studies and quality control must be underlined while injection is evaluated and more attention should be pay to the dose-effect relationship and time-effect relationship when turned to toxic Chinese medicine , and so as for the toxicity grading study. Moreover, we should constantly improve CM safety assessment method in various stages of tumor treatment, such as introducing the concept of syndrome classification theory, bringing in metabonomics and real-world research method which are similar to the CM therapeutic concept. Most importantly, we must keep its own feature of CM theory when we learn the concept of safety evaluation from abroad. Actively exploring the anti-tumor medicine safety evaluation methods and strategies is of great significance for clinical and experimental research, and it can provide supportability platform to CM's international communication.

  18. Evaluation of intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    LaBone, T.R.

    1994-02-01

    Once an intake of transuranics occurs, there are only three therapeutic procedures available to the physician for reducing the intake and mitigating the dose: excision of material from wounds, removal of material from the lungs with lavage, and chelation therapy. The only chelation agents approved in the United States for the treatment of occupational intakes of transuranics are the zinc and calcium salts of diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, better known as Zn-DTPA and Ca-DTPA. In the past 35 years, approximately 3000 doses of DTPA have been administrated to over 500 individuals who had intakes of transuranics. The drug is considered to be quiet safe and has few side effects. For the internal dosimetrist, perhaps the most important aspects of chelation therapy is that if enhances the excretion rate of a transuranic and perturbs the shape of the urinary excretion curve. These perturbations last for months and are so great that standard urinary excretion models cannot be used to evaluate the intake. We review here a method for evaluating intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy that has been used with some degree of success at the Savannah River Site for over 20 years.

  19. Synthesis, anti-HIV activity, and metabolic stability of new alkenyldiarylmethane HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo-Liang; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Fanwick, Phillip E; Cushman, Mark

    2005-09-22

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) are part of the combination therapy currently used to treat HIV infection. Based on analogy with known HIV-1 NNRT inhibitors, 18 novel alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) containing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl, 3-cyanophenyl, or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups were synthesized and evaluated as HIV inhibitors. Their stabilities in rat plasma have also been investigated. Although introducing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups into alkenyldiarylmethanes does not maintain the antiviral potency, the structural modification of alkenyldiarylmethanes with a 3-cyanophenyl substituent can be made without a large decrease in activity. The oxazolidinonyl group was introduced into the alkenyldiarylmethane framework and found to confer enhanced metabolic stability in rat plasma.

  20. A systematic review of economic evaluations of therapy in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Katayoun; Quon, Bradley S; Doyle-Waters, Mary M; Marra, Carlo; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background: Asthma’s cost-effectiveness is a major consideration in the evaluation of its treatment options. Our objective was to perform a systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of asthma medications. Methods: We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, OHE-HEED, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Health Technology Assessments Database, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, and Web of Science and reviewed references from key articles between 1990 and Jan 2008. Results: A total of 49 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Maintenance therapy with inhaled corticosteroids was found to be very cost-effective and in uncontrolled asthmatics patients currently being treated with ICS, the combination of an ICS/LABA represents a safe, cost-effective treatment. The simplified strategy using budesonide and formoterol for maintenance and reliever therapy was also found to be as cost-effective as salmeterol/fluticasone plus salbutamol. Omalizumab was found to be cost-effective. An important caveat with regard to the published literature is the relatively high proportion of economic evaluations which are funded by the manufacturers of specific drug treatments. Conclusion: Future studies should be completed independent of industry support and ensure that the comparator arms within studies should include dosages of drugs that are equivalent. PMID:21437038

  1. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. Objective: To evaluate the participants’ appreciation for the various activities of the program. Methods: Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants’ satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Results: Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. Discussion: There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. Conclusion: The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness. PMID:27829859

  2. Non-professionals' evaluations of gene therapy ethics.

    PubMed

    Scully, Jackie Leach; Rippberger, Christine; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph

    2004-04-01

    Although the moral responsibilities of clinicians and researchers in the new genetics are exhaustively reflected upon, much less attention has been paid to the factors affecting the moral reasoning of non-professionals when they reflect on genetic issues. In this paper, we compare the moral evaluations of somatic gene therapy (SGT) made by some of its potential consumers (patients) and its providers (medical professionals). The results highlight significant differences between professional opinion and non-professional evaluations. Medical professionals shared a moral evaluation of SGT that (a) based its acceptability on a strong therapeutic imperative, (b) grounded this in an unproblematic separation of identity and disability/illness, and (c) generally did not see SGT as ethically different from other medical interventions. Prospective patients (a) often questioned the effectiveness of "therapeutic" interventions, (b) could derive a strong sense of identity from disability/illness, and (c) sometimes saw genetic interventions as changing a person's identity, either directly (through the genes) or indirectly (through altered life experience). We discuss the implications of these differences for the professional and public debate on the ethics of gene therapy. Our results highlight the need to take into account non-professionals' views of SGT.

  3. Effects of combined alcohol and anti-HIV drugs on cellular stress responses in primary hepatocytes and hepatic stellate and kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Lau, Mo Yin; Lee, Harrison; MacVeigh-Aloni, Michelle; Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Certain anti-HIV drugs alone or in combination are often associated with liver damages, which are frequently worsened by alcohol consumption. We previously found an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mechanism for the drug- and alcohol-induced hepatic injuries in animal models and in vitro hepatocytes. However, it is unknown whether anti-HIV drugs and alcohol induce similar cellular stress responses and injuries in liver nonparenchymal cells. Primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH), kupffer cells (KC), and hepatocellular stellate cells (HSC) were freshly isolated from mouse liver and treated with DMSO, stress-inducing pharmaceutical agents, alcohol alone, or in combination with antiviral ritonavir (RIT), lopinavir (LOP), or efavirenz (EFV). Expression of cellular stress markers, protein colocalization, and cell death were analyzed with immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and positive double staining with Sytox green and Hoechst blue, respectively. Expression of the ER stress markers of BiP, CHOP, and SERCA and the autophagy marker LC3 was significantly changed in PMH in response to combined alcohol, RIT, and LOP, which was companied by increased cell death compared with control. In contrast, although pharmaceutical agents induced ER stress and cell death, no significant ER stress or cell death was found in KC treated with alcohol, RIT, LOP, and EFV singly or in combination. In HSC, alcohol, RIT, LOP, or EFV induced BiP, but not CHOP, SERCA, or cell death compared with vehicle control. Further in PMH, RIT and LOP or in combination with alcohol-induced dose-dependent inhibition of β-actin. Inhibition of β-actin by RIT and LOP was companied with an inhibited nuclear expression of the antioxidant response regulator Nrf2 and reduced GST downstream of Nrf2. Ascorbic acid treatment reduced the alcohol-, RIT-, and LOP-induced cell death. The data suggest for the first time that sensitivities of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to alcohol and anti-HIV drugs in vitro are

  4. Convergence of voices: assimilation in linguistic therapy of evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gabalda, Isabel Caro

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows the convergence of voices in psychotherapy in the context of the assimilation model. Convergence is the link between patients' voices within the community of voices. The main aim of the paper was to explore (a) how convergence (and divergence) is shown during sessions and the usefulness of convergence for the process of assimilation; (b) if a well-structured patient is able to track the sociohistorical antecedents of his/her main voices; and (c) if, at the end of the therapy, the self becomes richer and with more resources.For this aim to be realized, a case study of a patient, María, treated with linguistic therapy of evaluation for 14 sessions, was analysed by using the Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Scale (APES). Three main problematic experiences or non-dominant voices were identified with the APES: inability to do things, dizziness and tiredness. María's main dominant voices were to cure, solve and overcome problems, to be always doing things and to cope.Results showed a convergence but no divergence of voices as early as session 3. Results also showed how continuity-benevolence assumptions were broken and that, at the end of therapy, the patient's self became richer due to assimilation through the dialogue between non-dominant and dominant voices.Discussion emphasized these results, which are especially representative of a well-integrated patient who showed a healthy multiplicity.

  5. Technology evaluation: VEGF165 gene therapy, Valentis Inc.

    PubMed

    Morse, M A

    2001-02-01

    Valentis Inc, formerly GeneMedicine, is developing a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) non-viral gene therapy using its proprietary PINC polymer for plasmid condensation. Two physician-initiated phase II angioplasty trials are ongoing, one for treating peripheral vascular disease and one for treating coronary artery disease [281714], [347153]. In February 2000, the trials were expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2000 [356225]; however, in October 2000, it was reported that the trial for peripheral vascular disease would be completed in the first quarter of 2001 [385232]. In March 2000, Valentis initiated a trial incorporating Valentis's DOTMA-based cationic lipid gene delivery system and the VEGF165 gene with Eurogene's local collar-reservoir delivery device. The trial is designed to demonstrate that the VEGF165 gene, delivered locally to the outside surface of a blood vessel, will transfect and express in the smooth muscle cells of the vessel wall [360683]. In March 1999, Valentis was awarded with a Phase II SBIR grant of $686,260. The aim of grant was to advance the development of non-viral gene therapies for ischemia. Specifically, Valentis intended to select an optimal promoter to be used with the VEGF expression plasmid. Valentis also intended to evaluate the gene therapy system in a rabbit ischemia model and complete the necessary preclinical studies for submission of an IND [318137].

  6. Uterine serous carcinoma: a historic evaluation of therapy.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, F a; Rijcken, F e m; Trum, J w; van der Noort, V; Tjon-Kon-Fat, R i; Bleeker, M c g; Kenter, G g

    2016-01-01

    Summary Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is an aggressive, histological subtype of endometrial cancer with a poor prognosis. This study evaluates the additional effect of staging surgery above total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH+BSO) on the use of adjuvant therapy and subsequent survival outcomes in clinical early-stage USC patients. This retrospective cohort study includes 75 women treated for clinical early-stage USC. In 33 (44%) clinical early-stage patients surgical staging was performed and 15 patients (45%) proved to have lymphatic or abdominal metastasis. Use of adjuvant therapy was similar in patients, both staged with no metastasis (n = 18) and patients who underwent TAH and BSO only (n = 42, p = 0.17). No significant survival difference was found between surgically staged and TAH+BSO patients. Surgical staging proved to be important to determine stage of disease and hence prognosis. Surgical staging did not lead to selective avoidance of adjuvant therapy in patients with no metastasis.

  7. Laser therapies for onychomycosis - critical evaluation of methods and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Francuzik, W; Fritz, K; Salavastru, C

    2016-06-01

    The number of medical devices designed specifically to treat onychomycosis has recently increased, although their mechanism of action is not clear. We evaluated available laser therapies for onychomycosis by reviewing the existing literature. Twenty-two reports, published in peer-reviewed journals and as white papers out of 926 initial search results conveyed enough details to be included in this study. In most cases, the methodology of the trials described in the papers we reviewed was not comprehensive and the reporting of outcomes was not unified. We therefore found it hard to compare different clinical trials to one another. The majority of studies (81.82%) reported using an Nd:YAG laser device to treat onychomycosis. A total of 47.37% of the studies which used a 1064 device (and 47.83% of all studies we reviewed) reported that all treated patients responded positively to laser therapy. A total of 60% of studies reported achieving a complete cure (no clinical symptoms, nor negative mycology) in at least 50% of the treated patients. A low number of adverse events and their mild intensity were consistently reported across all studies, which makes this form of therapy particularly attractive to patients with contraindications for receiving systemic antifungal medication. In order to achieve more unified, comparable studies in the future, we suggest that researchers report a minimum set of outcome measurements: the calculation of the infected nail area pre- and posttreatment, as well as the number of patients achieving mycological, clinical and complete cures.

  8. CT evaluation of effects of cranial radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C. Jr.; Pearl, G.S.; Braun, I.F.

    1986-09-01

    A retrospective evaluation was completed of 49 children who received conventional cranial radiation therapy for primary central nervous system and/or skull-base neoplasia and who had follow-up CT studies. In these children, abnormalities in normal parenchyma away from the tumor itself were surprisingly frequent, with or without chemotherapy. Generalized volume loss or atrophy was the most frequent abnormality (51%), but in this population it may have resulted from a variety of causes. Calcification in nontumorous parenchyma was common (28%) with or without chemotherapy. The most frequent site of calcification was subcortical at the gray-white junction. Calcification was progressive over 1-2 years and correlated pathologically with mineralizing microangiopathy and dystrophic calcification with demyelination. White-matter abnormalities other than those associated with shunt malfunction and tumor edema occurred in 26% of the patients. Both white-matter abnormalities and calcification occurred predominantly in younger children, particularly those under 3 years old at the time of radiation therapy. Of the 21 children who received chemotherapy in this series, only two received methotrexate. White-matter abnormalities and calcifications occurred with similar frequency in children with and without chemotherapy; thus, radiation therapy is the most likely cause of these findings.

  9. Evaluation of group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

    2009-03-01

    A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group treatment. Participants in the study formed a CBT treatment group that attended six workshops and a waiting list control group. The intervention was evaluated with measures assessing knowledge about ADHD, psychological symptoms, and support received. The groups were compared using repeated measures ANOVAs. The CBT group had significantly greater improvement on measures of knowledge about ADHD, self-efficacy, and self-esteem than the control group. Participants' evaluations of the sessions suggested that sharing personal experiences with other adults with ADHD was an important aspect of the intervention. Brief CBT group treatments may be an acceptable and cost-effective intervention for adults with ADHD.

  10. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo release kinetics, and anti-HIV activity of a sustained-release prodrug (mPEG-AZT) of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, Zidovudine).

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Chang, Yu; Zhan, Peng; Zhang, Na; Liu, Xinyong; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik

    2010-11-08

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugate of 3'-azido-3'- deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) was designed and synthesized as a novel sustained-release prodrug. In the synthetic process, a succinate diester spacer was used to covalently couple AZT with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG; MW=2000). The conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and NMR spectroscopies and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The in vitro release was determined in hydrochloride (HCl) solution (pH 1.2) and phosphate-buffered solution (PBS; pH 6.8), which showed the release rate of AZT from the conjugate was slower than that from the free drug, suggesting its possible increased retention in gastrointestinal conditions. Pharmacokinetic properties were evaluated experimentally by oral administration in mice. Compared to free AZT, the absorption half-life (t1/2ka) and elimination half life (t1/2ß) of AZT released from the conjugate were both extended to 0.51±0.03 h (p <0.01) and 2.94±0.24 h (p <0.01), respectively. Evaluation of the in vitro anti-HIV activities showed mPEG-AZT exhibited good inhibition of HIV-1, with an EC(50) value of 0.0634 μM, but it is lower than that of free AZT. These results show that the conjugate is capable of releasing the parent drug in a sustained profile, potentially providing a feasible alternative to oral administration of AZT in a clinical setting.

  11. Structural characterization and anti-HIV-1 activities of arginine/glutamate-rich polypeptide Luffin P1 from the seeds of sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrica).

    PubMed

    Ng, Yiu-Ming; Yang, Yinhua; Sze, Kong-Hung; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2011-04-01

    Luffin P1, the smallest ribosome-inactivating peptide from the seeds of Luffa cylindrica was found to have anti-HIV-1 activity in HIV-1 infected C8166 T-cell lines and be able to bind with HIV Rev Response Element. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the Luffin P1 comprises a helix-loop-helix motif, with the two alpha helices tightly associated by two disulfide bonds. Based on our findings, we conclude that unlike the well-studied ribosome-inactivating proteins, which exert their action through N-glycosidase activities, Luffin P1 demonstrates a novel inactivation mechanism probably through the charge complementation with viral or cellular proteins. Our work also provides a new scaffold for the design of novel inhibitors from a simple helical motif. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Note on the formulation of thermosensitive and mucoadhesive vaginal hydrogels containing the miniCD4 M48U1 as anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

    PubMed

    Bouchemal, Kawthar; Frelichowska, Justyna; Martin, Loïc; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Djabourov, Madeleine; Aka-Any-Grah, Armelle; Koffi, Armand; Ponchel, Gilles

    2013-10-01

    The miniCD4 M48U1 was formulated into thermosensitive and mucoadhesive pluronic(®) hydrogels as anti-HIV-1 microbicide. The release kinetics of M48U1 from F127/HPMC (20/1 wt%) and F127/F68/HPMC (22.5/2.5/1 wt%) studied during 24h by using Franz diffusion cells showed that HEC hydrogel (1.5 wt%) used as control released 93% of the peptide, while about 25% of M48U1 remained in pluronic(®) hydrogels. The formulation of M48U1 in pluronic(®) hydrogels ensures a local delivery because no diffusion of the peptide was detected through vaginal Cynomolgus macaque mucosa using Ussing chamber. Finally, toxicological studies showed no significant difference in the HeLa cell viability of the pluronic(®) hydrogels in comparison with HEC and phosphate buffer saline.

  13. LC-MS/MS structural characterization of stress degradation products including the development of a stability indicating assay of Darunavir: An anti-HIV drug.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Ramachandra, B; Sravan, B; Khalid, Sara

    2014-02-01

    Darunavir, an anti-HIV drug was subjected to forced degradation under acid, base, thermal and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation and photolysis as prescribed by ICH guidelines. Four major degradation products were formed under acid and base hydrolysis, while stable under neutral and thermal hydrolysis, oxidative and photolysis. The drug and its degradation products were separated on Hiber, LiChrospher® 60, RP-select B, C8 column (250mm×4.6mm i.d., 5μm) using 10mM ammonium acetate: acetonitrile (52:48, v/v) as mobile phase in an isocratic elution mode by LC. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and fragmentation pathways were proposed. The proposed structures of degradation products were confirmed by HRMS and the LC method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, recovery, LOD and LOQ.

  14. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Miyamoto, Fusako; Kawaji, Kumi; Hattori, Toshio; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  15. [Cell adhesion molecules in evaluation of Crohn's disease therapy].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Boldyreva, O N; Parfenov, A I; Trubitsyna, I E; Shcherbakov, P L; Khomeriki, S G; Kniazev, O V; Sagynbaeva, V É

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is one of actual problems of modern gastroenterology and coloproctology. In recent years a great attention is paid to the molecules of adhesion. Adhesion proteins play a significant role in the development of inflammation in patients with IBD. They cause the migration of cells from the capillaries into the center of inflammation, i.e. do much to increase the inflammatory infiltration of the mucosa and homing of lymphocytes. Changes in the levels of adhesion factors under the influence of biological therapy have been insufficiently studied. So the aim of our study was to determine the diagnostic value of adhesion molecules--integrin-sVCAM-1 and selectins P-, E-, L- for the assessment of the effectiveness of therapy in patients with UC and CD and prognosis of the disease. 15 patients with IBD were examined (15 patients with Crohn's disease (CD)). 9 patients were treated using infliximab 5 mg/kg according to the standard scheme (0-2-6 and then every 8 weeks). 3 patients with IBD received anti-inflammatory therapy with the introduction of the culture of MSC in the number of 150 x 108 cells suspended in 200 ml of physiological solution with the addition of heparin (10 IU/ml). 3 patients received azathioprine (2 mg/kg) and glucocorticosteroids (GCS) 1 mg/kg. The clinical symptoms, the level of leukocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and also were analyzed before and after the treatment with infliximab and transplantation of MSC. The status of the colonic mucosa was evaluated using colonoscopy with biopsy. The concentration of adhesion molecules L-selectin, E-selectin, P-selectin, integrin-sVCAM-1 in blood serum was analyzed using immunoenzyme method twice before the beginning of treatment and after 2 months. It is established that after the standard therapy with the use of corticosteroids and azathioprine clinical and laboratory signs

  16. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui-Guang; Huang, Philip L.; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao; Chen, Hao-Chia; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul L.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Lee-Huang, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  17. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  18. Autoimmune anti-HIV-1gp120 antibody with antiidiotype-like activity in sera and immune complexes of HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmune antiidiotype-like antibody (Ab2) directed against anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) was found in high titer in the sera of 10 consecutive homosexual and 11 narcotic addict HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia (HIV-1-ITP) patients, was barely detectable in 10 nonthrombocytopenic HIV-1 sero-positive individuals, and was not detectable in 5 normal subjects by use of a solid-phase RIA. Reactivity of autologous Ab2 for Ab1 was 4-120-fold greater than Ab2 for homologous Ab1. Affinity-purified Ab2 did not block the binding of affinity-purified Ab1 to its HIV-1gp120 epitopes on immunoblot, indicating the absence of "internal image" antiidiotype. Both Ab1 and Ab2 are precipitable from sera with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and present in a macromolecular complex that is excluded by gel filtration on G200 and contains IgG, IgM, C3, and the anti-F(ab')2 antiidiotype-like complex. PEG-precipitable complexes bind to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner. Neither affinity-purified Ab1 nor Ab2 binds to platelets. However, the combination of Ab1 and Ab2 (preincubated for 2 h at 22 degrees C) binds to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner at an optimum ratio range of 10-20:1. Ab2 reactivity correlates with serum PEG-precipitable immune complex level (r = 0.91; P less than 0.001) and with thrombocytopenia (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001). We suggest that the anti-HIV-1gp120 antiidiotype-like complex contributes to the markedly elevated platelet Ig and C3 level of HIV-1-ITP patients and propose that this may contribute to their thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1737832

  19. Potent Synergistic Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Effects Using Combinations of the CCR5 Inhibitor Aplaviroc with Other Anti-HIV Drugs▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Hirotomo; Steinberg, Seth M.; Koh, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Kenji; Takaoka, Yoshikazu; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Nobutaka; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Aplaviroc (AVC), an experimental CCR5 inhibitor, potently blocks in vitro the infection of R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (R5-HIV-1) at subnanomolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Although maraviroc is presently clinically available, further studies are required to determine the role of CCR5 inhibitors in combinations with other drugs. Here we determined anti-HIV-1 activity using combinations of AVC with various anti-HIV-1 agents, including four U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, two CCR5 inhibitors (TAK779 and SCH-C) and two CXCR4 inhibitors (AMD3100 and TE14011). Combination effects were defined as synergistic or antagonistic when the activity of drug A combined with B was statistically greater or less, respectively, than the additive effects of drugs A and A combined and drugs B and B combined by using the Combo method, described in this paper, which provides (i) a flexible choice of interaction models and (ii) the use of nonparametric statistical methods. Synergistic effects against R5-HIV-1Ba-L and a 50:50 mixture of R5-HIV-1Ba-L and X4-HIV-1ERS104pre (HIV-1Ba-L/104pre) were seen when AVC was combined with zidovudine, nevirapine, indinavir, or enfuvirtide. Mild synergism and additivity were observed when AVC was combined with TAK779 and SCH-C, respectively. We also observed more potent synergism against HIV-1Ba-L/104pre when AVC was combined with AMD3100 or TE14011. The data demonstrate a tendency toward greater synergism with AVC plus either of the two CXCR4 inhibitors compared to the synergism obtained with combinations of AVC and other drugs, suggesting that the development of effective CXCR4 inhibitors may be important for increasing the efficacies of CCR5 inhibitors. PMID:18378711

  20. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Zárate, Rafael; Ravelo, Ángel G.; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The existence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viruses in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment urgently requires the characterization and development of new antiretroviral drugs designed to inhibit resistant viruses and to complement the existing antiretroviral strategies against AIDS. We assayed several natural or semi-synthetic lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in permissive cells. We observed that the 30-oxo-calenduladiol triterpene, compound 1, specifically impaired R5-tropic HIV-1 envelope-mediated viral infection and cell fusion in permissive cells, without affecting X4-tropic virus. This lupane derivative competed for the binding of a specific anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody or the natural CCL5 chemokine to the CCR5 viral coreceptor with high affinity. 30-Oxo-calenduladiol seems not to interact with the CD4 antigen, the main HIV receptor, or the CXCR4 viral coreceptor. Our results suggest that compound 1 is a specific CCR5 antagonist, because it binds to the CCR5 receptor without triggering cell signaling or receptor internalization, and inhibits RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)-mediated CCR5 internalization, intracellular calcium mobilization, and cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, compound 1 appeared not to interact with β-chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, or CCR4. Thereby, the 30-oxo-calenduladiol-associated anti-HIV-1 activity against R5-tropic virus appears to rely on the selective occupancy of the CCR5 receptor to inhibit CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection. Therefore, it is plausible that the chemical structure of 30-oxo-calenduladiol or other related dihydroxylated lupane-type triterpenes could represent a good model to develop more potent anti-HIV-1 molecules to inhibit viral infection by interfering with early fusion and entry steps in the HIV life cycle. PMID:19386595

  1. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  2. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  3. Evaluating cost benefits of combination therapies for advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ivar S.; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jie; Yin, Wes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a number of monoimmunotherapies and targeted therapies are available to treat BRAF+ advanced melanoma, response rates remain relatively low in the range of 22–53% with progression-free survival (PFS) in the range of 4.8–8.8 months. Recently, combination targeted therapies have improved response rates to about 66–69%, PFS to 11.0–12.6 months and overall survival (OS) to 25.1–25.6 months. While combination immunotherapies have improved response rates of 67 compared with 19–29% with monotherapies and improved PFS of 11.7 compared with 4.4–5.8 months with monotherapies, the OS benefit is yet to be established in phase 3 trials. As healthcare costs continue to rise, US payers have a predominant interest in assessing the value of available treatments. Therefore, a cost-benefit model was developed to evaluate the value of treating BRAF+ advanced melanoma with two combination therapies: nivolumab + ipilimumab (N+I) and dabrafenib + trametinib (D+T). Scope: The model was used to estimate total costs, total costs by expenditure category, cost per month of PFS and cost per responder for the payer, and societal perspectives of treating advanced melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation using combination targeted therapy (D+T) or combination immunotherapy (N+I). The model followed patients from initiation of treatment to the point of progression or death. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the results and to understand the dispersion of simulated results. Findings: Based on a hypothetical payer with one million covered lives, it was expected that fourteen metastatic melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation would be treated each year. Cost-benefit with N+I and D+T was simulated from the payer perspective. The cost per month of PFS for N+I was $22,162, while that for D+T was $17,716 (−$4,446 cost difference); the cost per responder for N+I was $388,746 and that for D+T was

  4. Evaluating UK research in speech and language therapy.

    PubMed

    Lewison, Grant; Carding, Paul

    2003-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in recent years in British higher-degree training in speech and language therapy. But what is the standing of UK research in the subject and its component areas which should underpin and inform such training? How can such research be evaluated? The intention was to compare UK publications relevant to speech and language therapy with those of other countries, both quantitatively and qualitatively. We sought then to examine the UK papers in more detail to analyse their sources of funding, their geographical distribution and the ways in which they could appropriately be evaluated. Papers were selectively retrieved from the Science Citation Index and the Social Sciences Citation Index for 1991-2000 by means of a filter based on journal names and paper title words. They were subsequently checked to remove many false positives. The papers were classified into one of seven subject areas and by their research level (from clinical to basic). Their importance was estimated through their potential impact on other researchers, as determined by the citation score of their journals, by the numbers of citations they actually received and by the subjective esteem in which the various journals were held by UK speech and language researchers. World output of speech and language therapy papers has averaged 1000 papers per year during the 1990s, and has grown by half over the period. UK output has been about 12% of the total, compared with 10% in biomedicine, and is published in high impact journals relative to the norm for the field, which is quite a low rate compared with biomedicine overall. Almost half the UK papers had no funding acknowledgements, with the private-non-profit and industrial sectors playing less of a role than in other biomedical areas. Papers in seven subject areas showed substantial differences in their performance on the four criteria selected. The state of British speech and language research appears to be satisfactory, with an

  5. Evaluating quality indicators for physical therapy in primary care.

    PubMed

    Scholte, Marijn; Neeleman-van der Steen, Catharina W M; Hendriks, Erik J M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Braspenning, Jozé

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate measurement properties of a set of public quality indicators on physical therapy. An observational study with web-based collected survey data (2009 and 2010). Dutch primary care physical therapy practices. In 3743 physical therapy practices, 11 274 physical therapists reporting on 30 patients each. Eight quality indicators were constructed: screening and diagnostics (n= 2), setting target aim and subsequent of intervention (n = 2), administrating results (n = 1), global outcome measures (n = 2) and patient's treatment agreement (n = 1). Measurement properties on content and construct validity, reproducibility, floor and ceiling effects and interpretability of the indicators were assessed using comparative statistics and multilevel modeling. Content validity was acceptable. Construct validity (using known group techniques) of two outcome indicators was acceptable; hypotheses on age, gender and chronic vs. acute care were confirmed. For the whole set of indicators reproducibility was approximated by correlation of 2009 and 2010 data and rated moderately positive (Spearman's ρ between 0.3 and 0.42 at practice level) and interpretability as acceptable, as distinguishing between patient groups was possible. Ceiling effects were assessed negative as they were high to extremely high (30% for outcome indicator 6-95% for administrating results). Weaknesses in data collection should be dealt with to reduce bias and to reduce ceiling effects by randomly extracting data from electronic medical records. More specificity of the indicators seems to be needed, and can be reached by focusing on most prevalent conditions, thus increasing usability of the indicators to improve quality of care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  6. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dunda, Sebastian E.; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Pallua, Norbert; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma. Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment. Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases. PMID:26734539

  7. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  8. Evaluating current trends in psychiatric music therapy: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 21% of music therapists report working in the mental health field, more so than another other specific client population category (AMTA, 2005). The purpose of this study was to descriptively evaluate psychiatric music therapists and their institutions, philosophies, interventions, and clinical objectives. A survey was designed and posted online or mailed to music therapists who did not have email addresses in the 2005 Member Sourcebook (AMTA, 2005). A total of 176 psychiatric music therapists completed various parts of the survey for an overall response rate of 42.9%. Respondents reported working a mean of 11.3 years in the psychiatric setting, being Board-Certified Music Therapists for 13.3 years, and working at their institution for 8.4 years. Most respondents (90.6%) indicated they did not have a music therapist as a supervisor. Group music therapy was the dominant modality in psychiatric institutions for music therapists. Respondents indicated they read music therapy journals (80%) and other types of psychiatric periodicals (57.1%), presented educational sessions at conferences (44.6%), conducted in-services for hospital staff (64.8%), worked with an interdisciplinary treatment team (77.9%), and trained practica students (43.5%) and interns (37.4%). Respondents also indicated that although most were not bilingual (85.7%), they still worked with non-English speaking consumers (58.2%). Participants noted that they enjoyed working with the psychiatric population and felt they had a positive influence on treatment as indicated by Likert-type scales. Respondents reported using primarily behavioral or psychodynamic approaches but considered their primary psychological philosophy as eclectic. Participants predominantly indicated they addressed goal areas such as socialization, communication, self-esteem, coping skills, and stress reduction/management. Participants noted they employed a variety of music therapy techniques such as music assisted relaxation

  9. Evaluating clinical practice: using play-based techniques to elicit children's views of therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Jessica; Ryan, Virginia

    2007-07-01

    Children's services' drive towards accountability, and children's rights advocates' desire to truthfully represent children's views, are leading to more evaluation of child therapy services. The challenge is to find methods that accurately reflect children's views of their therapy. In this article we argue that play therapy skills have an important place in evaluating child therapy practice. We discuss four different directive play therapy techniques three of which have been piloted in the first author's practice to help children express their views of therapy at the end of their interventions. These are: 'The expert show', the miniature playroom technique and puppet and large doll evaluations. Explanations and examples are given from pilot research with 12 children. The issues and challenges inherent in play-based evaluations also are explored. We argue that expressive therapists are in a prime position to evaluate children's services and that children appear well able to express their views of therapy with these child-centred techniques.

  10. Prospects for the therapeutic application of lentivirus-based gene therapy to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2008-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is not sufficient to fully control HIV replication and problems of side effects and escape mutation have emerged. Current prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine strategies appear to be unable to confer full protection. However, given the rapid recent progress made in RNA interference and lentivirus technologies, it may soon be possible to develop effective gene therapies against HIV infection. We describe here the recent progress made in the lentivirus-based HIV-1-targeting RNAi system and the possibility that this system can be used to generate an anti-HIV-1 gene therapy. We speculate that this system would be most useful if it would be used in a coordinated manner with vaccines that can initiate and maintain potent anti-HIV immunity.

  11. Novel targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, Warner C; Debyser, Zeger; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Freed, Eric O; Stephens, Edward; Yonemoto, Wes; Buckheit, Robert W; Esté, José A; Cihlar, Tomas

    2008-12-01

    There are currently 25 drugs belonging to 6 different inhibitor classes approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, new anti-HIV agents are still needed to confront the emergence of drug resistance and various adverse effects associated with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy. The 21st International Conference on Antiviral Research, held in April 2008 in Montreal, Canada, therefore featured a special session focused on novel targets for HIV therapy. The session included presentations by world-renowned experts in HIV virology and covered a diverse array of potential targets for the development of new classes of HIV therapies. This review contains concise summaries of discussed topics that included Vif-APOBEC3G, LEDGF/p75, TRIM 5alpha, virus assembly and maturation, and Vpu. The described viral and host factors represent some of the most noted examples of recent scientific breakthroughs that are opening unexplored avenues to novel anti-HIV target discovery and validation, and should feed the antiretroviral drug development pipeline in the near future.

  12. Evaluation of Oxidative Status in Patients Treated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Şenyurt, Mahmut; Aybek, Hulya; Herken, Hasan; Kaptanoglu, Bunyamin; Korkmaz, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used in the treatment of many psychiatric diseases and this therapy may be effective on antioxidant defence system. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of ECT on oxidative stress. Methods Fourteen major depression, 11 schizophrenia and 8 bipolar affective disorder patients diagnosed and received ECT treatment, and 37 healthy volunteers enrolled in the study. ECT was applied to all patients. Before ECT, after the first and last ECTs, serum samples were obtained. Serum total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and calculated oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured in patients before and after ECTs. Results TOS values before ECT were higher in major depression (p=0.005) and schizophrenia (p=0.001) groups compared to the control group. TAS values were lower in major depression (p=0.0001), schizophrenia (p=0.004), bipolar affective disorder (p=0.004) groups compared to the controls. Also OSI values were higher in major depression (p=0.0001), schizophrenia (p=0.001), bipolar affective disorder (p=0.009) groups compared to healthy group. After the last ECT, TOS values were significantly lower compared to TOS values before ECT in major depression (p=0.004) and schizophrenia patients (p=0.004). TAS values after the first ECT were higher compared to values before ECT in major depression patients (p=0.004). After last ECT, OSI values were significantly lower compared to before ECT in schizophrenia patients (p=0.006). Conclusion As a result, it can be said that ECT did not increase oxidative stress. However, further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:28138109

  13. A novel PET tracer for evaluation of gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.; Monclus, M.; Cool, V.

    1996-05-01

    A promising approach of gene therapy for cancer consist in the transduction of neoplastic cells with the herpes virus thymidine-kinase gene (HSV-tk) which renders transduced cells sensitive to the lethal effect of anti-viral agent such as ganciclovir (GCV). Pet with adapted radiotracers represents an adequate tool to determine in vivo the level of HSV-tk expression and to establish the optimal protocol of gene and GCV administrations in human. We have developed a new potential PET tracer, 9-((1-[F-18]fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl)guanine [F-18]FHPG should theoretically accumulate in cells expressing HSV-tk. [F-18]FHPG was obtained by nucleophilic substitution on a ditosylate precursor followed by hydrolysis. To determine the biological behavior of this compound, we synthetized the corresponding non radioactive fluorinated analog (FHPG) and tested its inhibitory activity on HSV-tk transduced 9L gliosarcoma cells maintained in culture. FHPG at 100 {mu}M suppress cell growth by 50% while GCV and acyclovir induced 100% suppression at 10 and 100 {mu}M, respectively. We then tested the in vitro uptake of n.c.a. [F-18]FHPG in cultured cells transduced with HSV-tk or a control gene (neomycin). Ratio of [F-18]FHPG uptake in HSV-tk versus control cells was 240 after 6 hours of incubation. In vivo uptake of [F-18]FHPG was tested in experimental tumors obtained by stereotactical implantion of transduced 9L cells in the brain of male Fischer 344 rats. Ratio of [F-18]FHPG uptake in HSV-tk versus control tumors was 2.5, 3 hours after intravenous tracer injection. Uptake in HSV-tk tumor was 19-fold higher than in the cortex. We concluded that [F-18]FHPG is a promising PET tracer for the evaluation of gene therapy involving viral thymidine kinase genes.

  14. Evaluation of Specialized Medication Packaging Combined With Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Zillich, Alan J.; Jaynes, Heather A. W.; Snyder, Margie E.; Harrison, Jeff; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; de Moor, Carl; French, Dustin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the effect of a program combing specialized medication packaging and telephonic medication therapy management on medication adherence, health care utilization, and costs among Medicaid patients. Research Design A retrospective cohort design compared Medicaid participants who voluntarily enrolled in the program (n = 1007) compared with those who did not (n = 13,614). Main outcome measures were medication adherence at 12 months, hospital admissions and emergency department visits at 6 and 12 months, and total paid claim costs at 6 and 12 months. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for the effect of age, sex, race, comorbidities, and 12-month preenrollment health care utilization. Results Measures of medication adherence were significantly improved in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort. At 6 months, adjusted all-cause hospitalization was marginally less in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort [odds ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54–1.0, P = 0.05]. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 cohorts for any of the other adjusted utilization endpoints at 6 or 12 months. Adjusted total cost at 6 and 12 months were higher in the program cohort (6-month cost ratio = 1.76, 95% CI, 1.65–1.89; 12-month cost ratio = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.72–1.97), primarily because of an increase in prescription costs. Emergency department visits and hospitalization costs did not differ between groups. Conclusions The program improved measures of medication adherence, but the effect on health care utilization and nonpharmacy costs at 6 and 12 months was not different from the usual care group. Reasons for these findings may reflect differences in the delivery of the specialized packaging and the medication therapy management program, health care behaviors in this Medicaid cohort, unadjusted confounding, or time required for the benefit of the intervention to manifest

  15. Gene therapy for osteoporosis: evaluation in a murine ovariectomy model.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, A W; Whalen, J D; Wooley, P; Latterman, C; Truchan, L M; Robbins, P D; Evans, C H

    2001-12-01

    Various cytokines and cytokine antagonists hold promise as new therapeutic agents for osteoporosis, but their application is hindered by delivery problems. Gene transfer offers an attractive technology with which to obviate these restrictions. Its utility was evaluated in an animal model of osteoporosis. Disease was induced by surgical ovariectomy and monitored by measuring bone weight after 12 days, and by histomorphometry after 5 weeks. Genes were transferred to the mice by intramedullary injection of adenoviral vectors. LacZ and luciferase marker genes were used to identify the bone marrow cells transduced by this procedure, and to track the possible spread of transgenes to other organs. The effect on bone loss of transferring a cDNA encoding the human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) was then evaluated. The intramedullary injection of adenoviral vectors transduced lining osteoblasts, osteocytes and cells within the bone marrow. Luciferase activity persisted within the injected femora and adjacent musculature for at least 3 weeks, and in the draining lymph nodes for 2 weeks. Transient, low level expression was present in the liver, but no luciferase was detected at any time in the lung or spleen. Intramedullary introduction of the IL-1Ra gene resulted in circulation of the corresponding protein at concentrations that peaked on day 3, and returned to baseline by day 12. Transfer of the IL-1Ra gene strongly reduced the early loss of bone mass occurring in response to ovariectomy. Furthermore, it completely inhibited the loss of matrix detected by histomorphometry at 5 weeks. The protective effect of this gene was not restricted to bones receiving intramedullary injection of the vector, but occurred in all bones that were evaluated. This proof of concept encourages further development of gene therapy approaches to the treatment of osteoporosis.

  16. Differences in the mannose oligomer specificities of the closely related lectins from Galanthus nivalis and Zea mays strongly determine their eventual anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a recent report, the carbohydrate-binding specificities of the plant lectins Galanthus nivalis (GNA) and the closely related lectin from Zea mays (GNAmaize) were determined by glycan array analysis and indicated that GNAmaize recognizes complex-type N-glycans whereas GNA has specificity towards high-mannose-type glycans. Both lectins are tetrameric proteins sharing 64% sequence similarity. Results GNAmaize appeared to be ~20- to 100-fold less inhibitory than GNA against HIV infection, syncytia formation between persistently HIV-1-infected HuT-78 cells and uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte SupT1 cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and subsequent transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virions to uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte cells. In contrast to GNA, which preferentially selects for virus strains with deleted high-mannose-type glycans on gp120, prolonged exposure of HIV-1 to dose-escalating concentrations of GNAmaize selected for mutant virus strains in which one complex-type glycan of gp120 was deleted. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that GNA and GNAmaize interact with HIV IIIB gp120 with affinity constants (KD) of 0.33 nM and 34 nM, respectively. Whereas immobilized GNA specifically binds mannose oligomers, GNAmaize selectively binds complex-type GlcNAcβ1,2Man oligomers. Also, epitope mapping experiments revealed that GNA and the mannose-specific mAb 2G12 can independently bind from GNAmaize to gp120, whereas GNAmaize cannot efficiently bind to gp120 that contained prebound PHA-E (GlcNAcβ1,2man specific) or SNA (NeuAcα2,6X specific). Conclusion The markedly reduced anti-HIV activity of GNAmaize compared to GNA can be explained by the profound shift in glycan recognition and the disappearance of carbohydrate-binding sites in GNAmaize that have high affinity for mannose oligomers. These findings underscore the need for mannose oligomer recognition of therapeutics to be endowed with anti-HIV activity and that mannose, but not complex-type glycan

  17. Structural insights into the specific anti-HIV property of actinohivin: structure of its complex with the α(1–2)mannobiose moiety of gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Hoque, M. Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Tsunoda, Masaru; Jiang, Jiandong; Zhang, Fang; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Tanaka, Haruo; Ōmura, Satoshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    X-ray analysis of anti-HIV actinohivin in complex with the target α(1-2)mannobiose moiety of high-mannose type glycans attached to HIV-1 gp120 reveals that the three rotamers generated with 120 rotations around the molecular pseudo-rotation axis are packed randomly in the unit cell according to the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} symmetry to exhibit an apparent space group P2{sub 1}3 as the statistical structure. However, the high-resolution X-ray structure shows the detailed interaction geometry for specific binding. Actinohivin (AH) is an actinomycete lectin with a potent specific anti-HIV activity. In order to clarify the structural evidence for its specific binding to the α(1–2)mannobiose (MB) moiety of the D1 chains of high-mannose-type glycans (HMTGs) attached to HIV-1 gp120, the crystal structure of AH in complex with MB has been determined. The AH molecule is composed of three identical structural modules, each of which has a pocket in which an MB molecule is bound adopting a bracket-shaped conformation. This conformation is stabilized through two weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds facilitated by the α(1–2) linkage. The binding features in the three pockets are quite similar to each other, in accordance with the molecular pseudo-threefold symmetry generated from the three tandem repeats in the amino-acid sequence. The shape of the pocket can accept two neighbouring hydroxyl groups of the O{sup 3} and O{sup 4} atoms of the equatorial configuration of the second mannose residue. To recognize these atoms through hydrogen bonds, an Asp residue is located at the bottom of each pocket. Tyr and Leu residues seem to block the movement of the MB molecules. Furthermore, the O{sup 1} atom of the axial configuration of the second mannose residue protrudes from each pocket into an open space surrounded by the conserved hydrophobic residues, suggesting an additional binding site for the third mannose residue of the branched D1 chain of HMTGs. These structural features

  18. Theoretical dosimetric evaluation of carbon and oxygen minibeam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    González, Wilfredo; Peucelle, Cécile; Prezado, Yolanda

    2017-05-01

    Charged particles have several advantages over x-ray radiations, both in terms of physics and radiobiology. The combination of these advantages with those of minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) could help enhancing the therapeutic index for some cancers with poor prognosis. Among the different ions explored for therapy, carbon ions are considered to provide the optimum physical and biological characteristics. Oxygen could be advantageous due to a reduced oxygen enhancement ratio along with a still moderate biological entrance dose. The aforementioned reasons justified an in-depth evaluation of the dosimetric features of carbon and oxygen minibeam radiation therapy to establish the interest of further explorations of this avenue. The GATE/Geant4 6.2 Monte Carlo simulation platform was employed to simulate arrays of rectangular carbon and oxygen minibeams (600 μm × 2 cm) at a water phantom entrance. They were assumed to be generated by means of a magnetic focusing. The irradiations were performed with a 2-cm-long spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) centered at 7-cm-depth. Several center-to-center (c-t-c) distances were considered. Peak and valley doses, as well as peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) and the relative contribution of nuclear fragments and electromagnetic processes were assessed. In addition, the type and proportion of the secondary nuclear fragments were evaluated in both peak and valley regions. Carbon and oxygen MBRT lead to very similar dose distributions. No significant advantage of oxygen over carbon ions was observed from physical point of view. Favorable dosimetric features were observed for both ions. Thanks to the reduced lateral scattering, the standard shape of the depth dose curves (in the peaks) is maintained even for submillimetric beam sizes. When a narrow c-t-c is considered (910-980 μm), a (quasi) homogenization of the dose can be obtained at the target, while a spatial fractionation of the dose is maintained in the proximal normal tissues with

  19. Evaluating older patients with diabetes for insulin pump therapy.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Elizabeth A; Heffner, John

    2010-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes among elderly patients underscores the importance of matching the most effective therapy for diabetes self-management with patients' cognitive and motor skills, as these diminish with advancing age. Although many geriatric patients state interest in insulin pump therapy for tight glycemic control, few studies have examined the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of insulin pumps compared to traditional injected insulin therapy in older age groups. It is important, therefore, for physicians to recognize the indications and the age-related barriers to insulin pump therapy in geriatric patients. Indications include glucose variability, hypoglycemia, and poor glycemic control with traditional insulin regimens. Common barriers include poor vision, dexterity, and cognitive status. Successful implementation of insulin pump therapy for older patients requires an experienced diabetes management team that can assess patient needs and tailor therapy in the context of age-related disabilities.

  20. Evaluation of selection criteria for graduate students in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2006-12-01

    Selection of suitable students into graduate medical and specialist health professional courses can be difficult. Historically, selection of students was primarily based on prior academic performance. Recently, however, more emphasis has been placed on considering broader academic backgrounds and personal characteristics and attitudes of students, but no reliable measurement tool is available to predict student success and satisfaction with their choice of profession. The aim of this study was to survey practising radiation therapists in Australia to seek their opinions regarding suitable selection criteria for graduate entry radiation therapy (RT) students in order to optimize selection procedures for future applicants. Four hundred questionnaires were sent to nine RT centres in three states within Australia. All nine clinics participated in the survey and 189 questionnaires were returned. Results show that the majority of radiation therapists place a high level of importance upon a sound knowledge of physics and mathematics, as well as life experience, and agree that a visit to an RT clinic plus an interview comprise important components of the selection process. Humanities, psychology and a psychometric test were not viewed as essential entry requirements. Experienced radiation therapists placed less value on academic performance in the primary degree and were more likely to include an interview as a selection criterion than junior practitioners. Empathy for patients was identified as the most important personal attribute. It is thus recommended that not only cognitive but also personal skills be evaluated during the selection of prospective radiation therapists.

  1. Evaluation of an electroconvulsive therapy service in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Barclay, Christopher; Wijeratne, Chanaka

    2011-06-01

    There has been much recent literature on the technical parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with regard to improving efficacy and minimizing adverse effects, but relatively little on ECT service delivery. This paper will discuss the development and characteristics of an ECT service at a teaching hospital in metropolitan Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods, including a selective literature review and audit of ECT use were used. The results of the audit were compared with the 2007 revision of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' clinical memorandum on ECT. We discuss issues, such as the optimal site for ECT delivery, ECT mental health nurse coordinator role, credentialing of psychiatrists, registrar supervision, and the development of an ECT committee. A significant finding of the audit was that the majority of patients were treated under the New South Wales Mental Health Act, and voluntary patients were more likely to have a diagnosis of a depressive disorder, whereas involuntary patients were more likely to have a non-mood disorder diagnosis. This study has shown that auditing of ECT practices and services by mental health nurses is essential for quality improvement processes. The audit highlighted areas of service delivery that should be subject to review and evaluation against professional standards. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Fluorescence guided evaluation of photodynamic therapy as acne treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Marica B.; Horfelt, Camilla; Cheng, Elaine; Larsson, Frida; Larko, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive alternative treatment for patients with acne because of its efficiency and few side effects. Propionibacterium acnes (P.acnes) are bacteria present in the skin, which produce endogenous porphyrins that act as photosensitisers. In addition, application of aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester (mALA) results in increased accumulation of porphyrins in the pilosebaceous units. This makes it possible to treat acne with PDT. This initial study investigates the possibility of fluorescence imaging as assessment tool in adjunct to PDT of patients with acne. Twenty-four patients with acne on the cheeks have been treated with PDT with and without mALA. Fluorescence images have been obtained before and after treatment. The clinical acne score was assessed as base line before PDT, and at every follow up visit. Additionally the amount of P.acnes was determined. The clinical evaluation showed a general improvement of acne, even though no difference between treatment with and without mALA was observed. By performing texture analysis and multivariate data analsysis on the fluorescence images, the extracted texture features were found to correlate with the corresponding clinical assessment (67%) and amount of P.acnes (72%). The analysis showed that features describing the highly fluorescent pores could be related to the clinical assessment. This result suggests that fluorescence imaging can be used as an objective assessment of acne, but further improvement of the technique is possible, for example by including colour images.

  3. Porcine Neonatal Coccidiosis: Evaluation of Monensin as Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Monique; Morin, Michel

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of monensin as a preventive therapy for porcine neonatal coccidiosis. Fifteen three-day-old piglets were given 50,000 sporulated oocysts of Isospora suis and eight of them received 15 mg/kg of monensin orally every other day. Seven piglets served as normal controls. Fecal samples were collected and checked for oocyst shedding. At 18 days of age, piglets were euthanized and necropsied. The onset of clinical signs was delayed in the treated group, but all inoculated piglets displayed anorexia, soft stool, or diarrheic feces. Treated piglets shed large numbers of oocysts in their feces (up to 201,200 oocysts per gram of feces). All infected piglets had lesions of villous atrophy in the jejunum and most of them were in the late atrophic or villous regrowth stages. The results of this study suggest that monensin does not prevent clinical signs, oocyst shedding, and intestinal lesions caused by I. suis in neonatal piglets. PMID:17422909

  4. Cephalometric evaluation in different phases of Jasper jumper therapy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Francyle Simões; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; Janson, Guilherme; Francisconi, Manoela Favaro; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentoskeletal and soft-tissue effects of Class II malocclusion treatment with the Jasper jumper followed by Class II elastics at the different stages of therapy. The sample comprised 24 patients of both sexes (11 boys, 13 girls) with an initial age of 12.58 years, treated for a mean period of 2.15 years. Four lateral cephalograms were obtained of each patient in these stages of orthodontic treatment: at pretreatment (T1), after leveling and alignment (T2), after the use of the Jasper jumper appliance and before the use of Class II intermaxillary elastics (T3), and at posttreatment (T4). Thus, 3 treatment phases could be evaluated: leveling and alignment (T1-T2), use of the Jasper jumper (T2-T3), and use of Class II elastics (T3-T4). Dependent analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to compare the durations of the 3 treatment phases and for intragroup comparisons of the 4 treatment stages. The alignment phase showed correction of the anteroposterior relationship, protrusion and labial inclination of the maxillary incisors, and reduction of overbite. The Jasper jumper phase demonstrated labial inclination, protrusion and intrusion of the mandibular incisors, mesialization and extrusion of the mandibular molars, reduction of overjet and overbite, molar relationship improvement, and reduction in facial convexity. The Class II elastics phase showed labial inclination of the maxillary incisors; retrusion, uprighting, and extrusion of the mandibular incisors; and overjet and overbite increases. The greatest amount of the Class II malocclusion anteroposterior discrepancy was corrected with the Jasper jumper appliance. Part of the correction was lost during Class II intermaxillary elastics use after use of the Jasper jumper appliance. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study.

    PubMed

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A; Ledergerber, Bruno; Ryom, Lene; Reiss, Peter; Law, Matthew; Pradier, Christian; Dabis, Francois; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smith, Colette; de Wit, Stephane; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens D; Weber, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods.  Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without chronic viral hepatitis were observed to the earliest of cLEE (elevated aminotransferase ≥6 months), death, last follow-up, or January 2, 2014. Antiretroviral treatment exposure was categorized as follows: no exposure and ongoing short- and long-term exposure (<2 or ≥2 years) after initiation. Association between development of cLEE and ART exposure was investigated using Poisson regression. Results.  Among 21 485 participants observed for 105 413 person-years (PY), 6368 developed cLEE (incidence 6.04/100 PY; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.89-6.19). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was associated with short-and long-term exposure to didanosine (<2 years rate ratio [RR] = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.11-1.49; >2 years RR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.13-1.41); stavudine (<2 years RR = 1.51, 95% CI, 1.26-1.81; >2 years RR = 1.17, 95% CI, 1.03-1.32), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (<2 years RR = 1.55, 95% CI, 1.40-1.72; >2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.05-1.32), but only short-term exposure to nevirapine (<2 years RR = 1.44, 95% CI, 1.29-1.61), efavirenz (<2 years RR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.03-1.26), emtricitabine (<2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.04-1.33), and atazanavir (<2 years RR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.04-1.38). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was not associated with use of lamivudine, abacavir, and other protease inhibitors. Mortality did not differ between participants with and without cLEE. Conclusions.  Although didanosine, stavudine, nevirapine, and efavirenz have been described to be hepatotoxic, we additionally observed a consistent association between tenofovir and cLEE emerging within the first 2 years after drug initiation. This novel tenofovir-cLEE signal should be further investigated.

  6. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study

    PubMed Central

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Ryom, Lene; Reiss, Peter; Law, Matthew; Pradier, Christian; Dabis, Francois; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smith, Colette; de Wit, Stephane; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens D.; Weber, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods. Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without chronic viral hepatitis were observed to the earliest of cLEE (elevated aminotransferase ≥6 months), death, last follow-up, or January 2, 2014. Antiretroviral treatment exposure was categorized as follows: no exposure and ongoing short- and long-term exposure (<2 or ≥2 years) after initiation. Association between development of cLEE and ART exposure was investigated using Poisson regression. Results. Among 21 485 participants observed for 105 413 person-years (PY), 6368 developed cLEE (incidence 6.04/100 PY; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.89–6.19). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was associated with short-and long-term exposure to didanosine (<2 years rate ratio [RR] = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.11–1.49; >2 years RR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.13–1.41); stavudine (<2 years RR = 1.51, 95% CI, 1.26–1.81; >2 years RR = 1.17, 95% CI, 1.03–1.32), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (<2 years RR = 1.55, 95% CI, 1.40–1.72; >2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.05–1.32), but only short-term exposure to nevirapine (<2 years RR = 1.44, 95% CI, 1.29–1.61), efavirenz (<2 years RR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.03–1.26), emtricitabine (<2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.04–1.33), and atazanavir (<2 years RR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.04–1.38). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was not associated with use of lamivudine, abacavir, and other protease inhibitors. Mortality did not differ between participants with and without cLEE. Conclusions. Although didanosine, stavudine, nevirapine, and efavirenz have been described to be hepatotoxic, we additionally observed a consistent association between tenofovir and cLEE emerging within the first 2 years after drug initiation. This novel tenofovir-cLEE signal should be

  7. Stem-Cell-Based Gene Therapy for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells. PMID:24368413

  8. Stem-cell-based gene therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-12-24

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells.

  9. Process and Outcome Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Matthew B.; Betts, Donna J.; Blausey, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Program evaluation offers an opportunity for improving the implementation and impact of art therapy. This article describes a process and outcomes evaluation of an art therapy program within the mental health services unit of a community-based organization for people living with HIV/AIDS. The aims were to assess utilization patterns and program…

  10. Process and Outcome Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Matthew B.; Betts, Donna J.; Blausey, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Program evaluation offers an opportunity for improving the implementation and impact of art therapy. This article describes a process and outcomes evaluation of an art therapy program within the mental health services unit of a community-based organization for people living with HIV/AIDS. The aims were to assess utilization patterns and program…

  11. Broadening the use of antiretroviral therapy: the case for feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have saved and extended the lives of millions of individuals infected with HIV. The major classes of anti-HIV drugs include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and entry/fusion inhibitors. While antiretroviral drug regimens are not commonly used to treat other types of retroviral infections, there are instances where there is a perceived need for re-evaluation of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. One case in point is that of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), an infection of companion felines. While vaccines exist to prevent FeLV infection and spread, they have not eliminated FeLV infection. For FeLV-infected felines and their human companions, antiretroviral therapy would be desirable and of practical importance if good options were available. Here, we discuss FeLV biology and current treatment options, and propose that there is a need for antiretroviral treatment options for FeLV infection. The comparative use and analysis of antiretroviral therapy can provide new insights into the mechanism of antiretroviral drug action. PMID:21479142

  12. High throughput virtual screening and in silico ADMET analysis for rapid and efficient identification of potential PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as anti-HIV agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ruchi; Bunkar, Devendra; Choudhary, Bhanwar Singh; Srivastava, Shubham; Mehta, Pakhuri; Sharma, Manish

    2016-10-01

    Human semen is principal vehicle for transmission of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. Several endogenous peptides present in semen, including a 39-amino acid fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286) assemble into amyloid fibrils named as semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) that promote virion attachment to target cells which dramatically enhance HIV virus infection by up to 105-fold. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound, is the major catechin found in green tea which disaggregates existing SEVI fibers, and inhibits the formation of SEVI fibers. The aim of this study was to screen a number of relevant polyphenols to develop a rational approach for designing PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as potential anti-HIV agents. The molecular docking based virtual screening results showed that polyphenolic compounds 2-6 possessed good docking score and interacted well with the active site residues of PAP248-286. Amino acid residues of binding site namely; Lys255, Ser256, Leu258 and Asn265 are involved in binding of these compounds. In silico ADMET prediction studies on these hits were also found to be promising. Polyphenolic compounds 2-6 identified as hits may act as novel leads for inhibiting aggregation of PAP248-286 into SEVI.

  13. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of new alkenyldiarylmethane (ADAM) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) incorporating benzoxazolone and benzisoxazole rings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo-Liang; Cullen, Matthew D; Zhou, Zhigang; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Fanwick, Phillip E; Cushman, Mark

    2006-04-01

    The HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) constitute a large and structurally diverse set of compounds, several of which are currently used in the treatment of AIDS. A series of novel alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) were designed and synthesized as part of an ongoing investigation to replace the metabolically labile methyl ester moieties found in the ADAM pharmacophore with stable modifications that retain the potent anti-HIV activity of the parent compounds. Unsurprisingly, the rat plasma half-lives of the new ADAMs were not improved when compared to the parent compounds, but all of the synthesized ADAMs inhibited the cytopathic effect of HIV-1 in cell culture. The most potent compound identified was (E)-5-[1-(3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-benzoxazol-5-yl)-5-methoxycarbonyl-pent-1-enyl]-2-methoxy-3-methylbenzoic acid methyl ester (7), which inhibited the cytopathic effects of both HIV-1(RF) and HIV-1(IIIB) strains in cell cultures with EC50 values of 30 and 90 nM, respectively, and inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 20 nM.

  14. Expression of a Recombinant Anti-HIV and Anti-Tumor Protein, MAP30, in Nicotiana tobacum Hairy Roots: A pH-Stable and Thermophilic Antimicrobial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Afsharifar, Alireza; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which microorganisms can readily evade, it is nearly impossible for a microbial strain that is sensitive to antimicrobial proteins to convert to a resistant strain. Therefore, antimicrobial proteins and peptides that are promising alternative candidates for the control of bacterial infections are under investigation. The MAP30 protein of Momordica charantia is a valuable type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with anti-HIV and anti-tumor activities. Whereas the antimicrobial activity of some type I RIPs has been confirmed, less attention has been paid to the antimicrobial activity of MAP30 produced in a stable, easily handled, and extremely cost-effective protein-expression system. rMAP30-KDEL was expressed in Nicotiana tobacum hairy roots, and its effect on different microorganisms was investigated. Analysis of the extracted total proteins of transgenic hairy roots showed that rMAP30-KDEL was expressed effectively and that this protein exhibited significant antibacterial activity in a dose-dependent manner. rMAP30-KDEL also possessed thermal and pH stability. Bioinformatic analysis of MAP30 and other RIPs regarding their conserved motifs, amino-acid contents, charge, aliphatic index, GRAVY value, and secondary structures demonstrated that these factors accounted for their thermophilicity. Therefore, RIPs such as MAP30 and its derived peptides might have promising applications as food preservatives, and their analysis might provide useful insights into designing clinically applicable antibiotic agents. PMID:27459300

  15. C21 steroid derivatives from the Dai herbal medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, the dried roots of Marsdenia tenacissima, and their screening for anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xu; Kang, Li-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Mei; Yu, He-Shui; Han, Li-Feng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Li-Xia; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2017-09-15

    Twenty-three new C21 steroidal glycosides, marstenacissides C1-C10 (1-10), D1-D7 (11-17) and E1-E6 (18-23), and four new C21 steroids, 11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-tenacigenin C (24), 11α-O-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C (25), 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C (26) and 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin (27), were isolated from the Dai herbal medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, derived from the roots of Marsdenia tenacissima. The chemical structures of all compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques, including high-resolution mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, as well as by comparison with reported spectral data. The anti-HIV activities of these compounds were screened, and the compounds obtained displayed inhibitory effects against HIV-1 with inhibition rates of 36.4-81.3% at 30 μM.

  16. The potential toxicological insights about the anti-HIV drug azidothymidine-derived monoselenides in human leukocytes: Toxicological insights of new selenium-azidothymidine analogs.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Doc; de Souza, D; Meinerz, D F; Allebrandt, J; de Bem, A F; Hassan, W; Rodrigues, Oed; da Rocha, Jbt

    2017-09-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a worldwide disease characterized by impairments of immune function. AIDS can be associated with oxidative stress (OS) that can be linked to selenium (Se) deficiency. Se is fundamental for the synthesis of selenoproteins, such as glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. These enzymes catalyze the decomposition of reactive oxygen species and contribute to maintain equilibrium in cell redox status. Literature data indicate that organoselenium compounds, such as ebselen and diphenyl diselenide, have antioxidant properties in vitro and in vivo models associated with OS. Nevertheless, selenocompounds can also react and oxidize thiols groups, inducing toxicity in mammals. Here, we tested the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic properties of six analogs of the prototypal anti-HIV drug azidothymidine (AZT) containing Se (5'-Se-(phenyl)zidovudine; 5'-Se-(1,3,5-trimethylphenyl)zidovudine; 5'-Se-(1-naphtyl)zidovudine; 5'-Se-(4-chlorophenyl)zidovudine) (C4); 5'-Se-(4-methylphenyl)zidovudine (C5); and 5'-(4-methylbenzoselenoate)zidovudine). C5 increased the rate of dithiothreitol oxidation (thiol oxidase activity) and C2-C4 and C6 (at 100 µM) increased DNA damage index (DI) in human leukocytes. Moreover, C5 (200 µM) decreased human leukocyte viability to about 50%. Taken together, these results indicated the low in vitro toxicity in human leukocytes of some Se-containing analogs of AZT.

  17. In Vivo Anti-HIV Activity of the Heparin-Activated Serine Protease Inhibitor Antithrombin III Encapsulated in Lymph-Targeting Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Whitney, James B.; Luedemann, Corinne; Carville, Angela; Steen, Robert; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are anti-inflammatory mediators with multiple biologic functions. Several serpins have been reported to modulate HIV pathogenesis, or exhibit potent anti-HIV activity in vitro, but the efficacy of serpins as therapeutic agents for HIV in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we show that heparin-activated antithrombin III (hep-ATIII), a member of the serpin family, significantly inhibits lentiviral replication in a non-human primate model. We further demonstrate greater than one log10 reduction in plasma viremia in the nonhuman primate system by loading of hep-ATIII into anti-HLA-DR immunoliposomes, which target tissue reservoirs of viral replication. We also demonstrate the utility of hep-ATIIII as a potential salvage agent for HIV strains resistant to standard anti-retroviral treatment. Finally, we applied gene-expression arrays to analyze hep-ATIII-induced host cell interactomes and found that downstream of hep-ATIII, two independent gene networks were modulated by host factors prostaglandin synthetase-2, ERK1/2 and NFκB. Ultimately, understanding how serpins, such as hep-ATIII, regulate host responses during HIV infection may reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23133620

  18. [Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2): friends or foes? Are they actors in antibacterial and anti-HIV resistance?].

    PubMed

    Villarrubia, Vicente G; Costa, Luis A; Díez, Roberto A

    2004-11-27

    In this paper the authors update on the deletereous or beneficial roles of human and animal secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2). Although human sPLA2-IIA (inflammatory) was initially thought as a foe because its pathogenic implication in sepsis, multiorganic failure or other related syndromes, recent data indicates its role in in the antiinfectious host resistance. Thus, sPLA2-IIA exhibits potent bactericidal activities against gram-negative and gram-positive (in this case, together with other endogenous inflammatory factors) bacteria. Surprisingly, human sPLA-IIA does not show in vitro anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity, whilst several sPLA2-IA isolated from bee and serpent venons do it: this is the case for crotoxin, a sPLA2-IA isolated from the venon of Crotalus durissus terrificus (sPLA2-Cdt). The mechanism for the in vitro anti-HIV activity of sPLA2-Cdt (inhibition of Gag p24) appears to be related to the ability of the drug to desestabilize ancorage (heparans) and fusion (cholesterol) receptors on HIV target cells.

  19. Medicinal chemistry discoveries among 1,3,5-triazines: recent advances (2000-2013) as antimicrobial, anti-TB, anti-HIV and antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry and an extensive spectrum of biological activities of s-triazines have been examined since several decades and this heterocyclic core has received emerging consensus. This article aims to summarize recent advances (2000-2013) made towards the discovery of antimicrobial, antituberculosis, anti-HIV and antimalarial agents holding 1,3,5-triazine ring as a nucleus with the substitution of several types of nucleophiles. Molecular patterns associated with particular potency have been identified targeting several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and some fungal species, mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, HIV type I and HIV type II, particularly, HIV-1I IIB and HIV- 1ROD strains as well as a variety of P. falciparum malarial strains as chloroquine-resistant K1, chloroquine-susceptible NF54, chloroquine-sensitive 3D7, P. falciparum (D6 clone), P. falciparum (W2 clone), cycloguanil-resistant FCR-3, chloroquine sensitive RKL2. The report will be of considerable interest to gain useful information for the furtherance of drug discovery with extended 1,3,5-triazine designs.

  20. Differential antiviral activity of two TIBO derivatives against the human immunodeficiency and murine leukemia viruses alone and in combination with other anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, R W; Germany-Decker, J; Hollingshead, M G; Allen, L B; Shannon, W M; Janssen, P A; Chirigos, M A

    1993-11-01

    R82913 and R86183, two derivatives of tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione (TIBO), were found to potently and selectively inhibit the replication and cell killing effects of a panel of biologically diverse laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-1. The two compounds exhibited significant activity in all human cell lines tested, as well as in fresh human peripheral blood lymphocytes and macrophages. One of these two compounds (R82913) was found to significantly inhibit the replication of a murine retrovirus (Rauscher murine leukemia virus) in both UV-XC plaque formation and virus yield reduction assays. R86183, despite differing from R82913 only in the positioning of a single chlorine molecule, was not active against the murine retrovirus but was 10-fold more potent in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Combination antiviral assays with other reverse transcriptase inhibitors, including AZT, ddC, and carbovir, yielded synergistic anti-HIV activity with both TIBO derivatives. Additive to slightly synergistic results were obtained in combinations with ddI and phosphonoformic acid whereas additive to antagonistic activity was detected in combination with dextran sulfate.

  1. Correlation between digestion of the lipid phase of smedds and release of the anti-HIV drug UC 781 and the anti-mycotic drug enilconazole from smedds.

    PubMed

    Goddeeris, C; Coacci, J; Van den Mooter, G

    2007-05-01

    The present studies were conducted primarily to compare the drug release process of the anti-HIV drug UC781 from three different smedds to the smedds digestion profile. The influence of every formulation component on the digestion process, measured as the release of fatty acids, was determined. In addition, the release of the antimycotic drug enilconazole from a smedds was investigated as well in order to study the influence of the type of incorporated drug on oil digestion. Simulsol 1292, Tween 80, Cremophor RH40, ethanol and both drugs reduced the fatty acid release. C8, C10 and C12 fatty acids, originating from oil hydrolysis, were able to reverse the inhibitory effect of phospholipids present in the release medium. Similarly Cremophor RH40 lost its inhibitory capacities in combination with Captex 200P hydrolysis. In addition, UC781 did not decrease fatty acid release in combination with a Captex 200P-Tween 80-ethanol mixture. The release of UC781 from smedds significantly increased compared to the dissolution of the pure drug. The drug release profiles were characterized by rapid and complete release followed by precipitation. In order to detect possible correlations between drug release and oil digestion, release results were compared to those of vehicle digestion experiments. Contrary to what one would assume, a higher extent of fatty acid liberation did not enhance drug release. In other words, drug release does not seem to be driven by the extent of lipid digestion.

  2. Superiority of the S,S conformation in diverse pharmacological processes: Intestinal transport and entry inhibition activity of novel anti-HIV drug lead.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Joseph; Swed, Avi; Joubran, Salim; Hurevich, Mattan; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon

    2015-11-30

    Chirality is an important aspect in many pharmacological processes including drug transport and metabolism. The current investigation examined the stereospecific transport and entry inhibitory activity of four diastereomers derived from a small (macrocyclic) molecule that has two chiral centers. These molecules were designed to mimic the interaction between CD4 and gp120 site of HIV-1 and thereby to function as entry inhibitor(s). Intestinal permeability was assessed by ex-vivo model using excised rat intestine mounted in side-by-side diffusion chambers. The entry inhibitory activity was monitored using indicator HeLa-CD4-LTR-beta-gal cells (MAGI assay). The (S/S) diastereomer, named CG-1, exhibited superiority in both unrelated tested biological processes: (I) high transport through the intestine and (II) entry inhibition activity (in the low μM range). The permeability screening revealed a unique transporter-mediated absorption pathway of CG-1, suggesting a significant role of the molecule's conformation on the mechanism of intestinal absorption. Here we highlight that only the S,S enantiomer (CG-1) has both (I) promising anti HIV-1 entry inhibitory properties and (II) high transporter mediated intestinal permeability. Hence we suggest preference in pharmacological processes to the S,S conformation. This report augments the knowledge regarding stereoselectivity in receptor mediated and protein-protein interaction processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. QSAR based on multiple linear regression and PLS methods for the anti-HIV activity of a large group of HEPT derivatives.

    PubMed

    Luco, J M; Ferretti, F H

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships have been developed for a set of 107 inhibitors of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, derivatives of a recently reported HIV-1 specific lead: 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT). The activity of these compounds was investigated by means of multiple linear regression (MLR) and PLS regression techniques and topological indexes as well as several tabulated physicochemical substituent constants were used as predictor variables. The results obtained indicate that the anti-HIV activity of the HEPT derivatives is strongly dependent on hydrophobic factors as expressed by the Hansch constant (sigma pi (R1+R2)), and especially dependent on the geometric factors mainly accounted for by the 1 chi N (R2) and 4 chi pN molecular connectivity indexes and also for the molecular volume (Vx), the Taft steric constant (Es(2R1)), and the Verloop parameter for the smallest width value (B1(3R1)). Besides, for this data set, comparison of the quality of MLR and PLS models show that PLS is a better approach to MLR for improving the interpretability of the data and also to exhibit models with a better predictive quality.

  4. Novel recombinant engineered gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat trimers and their potential as anti-HIV-1 therapeutics or microbicides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Lu, Lu; Qi, Zhi; Lu, Hong; Wang, Ji; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yinghua; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-08-13

    Peptides derived from N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of the HIV-1 gp41 are generally poor inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, because they tend to aggregate and do not form a trimeric coiled-coil. In this study, we have fused portions of gp41 NHR, e.g. N36 or N28, to the T4 fibritin trimerization domain, Foldon (Fd), thus constructing novel NHR trimers, designated N36Fd or N28Fd, which could be expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The purified N36Fd and N28Fd exhibited SDS-resistant trimeric coiled-coil conformation with improved alpha-helicity compared with the corresponding N-peptides. They could interact with a C-peptide (e.g. C34) to form stable six-helix bundle and possessed potent anti-HIV-1 activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains. N28Fd was effective against T20-resistant HIV-1 variants and more resistant to proteinase K compared with T20 (enfuvirtide), a C-peptide-based HIV fusion inhibitor. Therefore, N28Fd trimer has great potentials for further development as an affordable therapeutic or microbicide for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  5. A novel vaginal microbicide containing the rationally designed anti-HIV compound HI-443 (N'-[2-(2-thiophene)ethyl]-N'-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)] thiourea]).

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Qazi, Sanjive; Yiv, Seang; Uckun, Fatih M

    2012-03-01

    A focal point in contemporary research aimed at preventing the heterosexual spread of AIDS has been the development of intravaginal anti-HIV microbicides to curb the mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. This article reviews the preclinical activity and safety profile of the thiophene thiourea PETT derivative, HI-443 (N'-[2-(2-thiophene)ethyl]-N'-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)] thiourea]). HI-443 is a rationally designed non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with unprecedented activity against primary clinical HIV-1 isolates with NRTI or NNRTI resistance, multidrug resistance as well as non-B envelope subtypes of HIV-1. HI-443 exhibited a favorable toxicity and pharmacokinetics profile following oral, intraperitoneal or intravenous administration in rodents and a favorable safety profile after repeated intravaginal dosing via a gel formulation in rabbits and pigs. HI-443 did not induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by three-dimensional reconstituted human vaginal epithelia integrating Langerhans cells ex vivo or in the in vivo porcine model at therapeutic dose levels. Intravaginally administered HI-443 prevented vaginal transmission of a drug-resistant clinical HIV-1 isolate in the surrogate Hu-PBL-SCID mouse model of AIDS. The discovery of HI-443 as a non-spermicidal broad-spectrum antiretroviral agent represents a significant step forward in the development of a prophylactic microbicide without contraceptive activity for curbing heterosexual HIV transmission.

  6. Tunable release of multiclass anti-HIV drugs that are water-soluble and loaded at high drug content in polyester blended electrospun fibers

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Daniel; Jiang, Yonghou; Woodrow, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sustained release of small molecule hydrophilic drugs at high doses remains difficult to achieve from electrospun fibers and limits their use in clinical applications. Here we investigate tunable release of several water-soluble anti-HIV drugs from electrospun fibers fabricated with blends of two biodegradable polyesters. Methods Drug-loaded fibers were fabricated by electrospinning using ratios of PCL and PLGA. Fiber morphology was imaged using SEM, and DSC was used to measure thermal properties. HPLC was used to measure drug loading and release from fibers. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of drug-loaded fibers were measured in an in vitro cell culture assay. Results We show programmable release of hydrophilic antiretroviral drugs loaded up to 40 wt%. Incremental tuning of highly-loaded drug fibers within 24 hours or >30 days was achieved by controlling the ratio of PCL and PLGA. Fiber compositions containing higher PCL content yielded greater burst release whereas fibers with higher PLGA content resulted in greater sustained release kinetics. We also demonstrated that our drug-loaded fibers are safe and can sustain inhibition of HIV in vitro. Conclusions These data suggest that we were able to overcome current limitations associated with sustained release of small hydrophilic drugs at clinically relevant doses. We expect that our system represents an effective strategy to sustain delivery of water-soluble molecules that will benefit a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:26286184

  7. 3D-QSAR analysis of a series of S-DABO derivatives as anti-HIV agents by CoMFA and CoMSIA.

    PubMed

    Xu, H R; Fu, L; Zhan, P; Liu, X Y

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we retrieved a series of 59 dihydroalkylthio-benzyloxopyrimidine (S-DABO) derivatives, which is a class of highly potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) reported from published articles, and analysed them with comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). Statistically significant three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models by CoMFA and CoMSIA were derived from a training set of 46 compounds on the basis of the rigid body alignment. Further, the predictive ability of the QSAR models was validated by a test set of 13 compounds. Based on the information derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps, we have identified some steric and electrostatic features for improving the activities of these inhibitors, and we validated the 3D-QSAR results by a molecular docking method. On the basis of the obtained results, we designed a new series of S-DABO derivatives with high activities. Therefore, this study could be utilized to design more potent S-DABO analogues as anti-HIV agents.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of novel 6',6'-difluoro 5'-deoxycarbocyclic phosphonic acid nucleosides as antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunae; Shen, Guang Huan; Kang, Lien; Hong, Joon Hee

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe highly efficient synthetic routes for the preparation of novel 6',6'-difluoro 5'-deoxycarbocyclic phosphonic acid nucleosides from 1,4-dihydroxy-2-butene. The discovery that the 6'-fluorinated carbocyclic nucleoside (2, EC₅₀ = 0.16 μM) is a potent anti-HSV-1 agent led to the syntheses and biological evaluations of 6'-modified 5'-deoxyversions of carbocyclic phosphonate nucleosides. The synthesized nucleoside analogues 15, 18, 22, and 25 were tested for anti-HIV activity and for cytotoxicity. However, none of them showed significant anti-HIV-1 activity or cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 100 μM.

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV-eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm{sup 3} (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm{sup 3}). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 92% (V{sub 92%} {sub PD}) and 95% (V{sub 95%} {sub PD}) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 105% (V{sub 105%} {sub PD}) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the

  10. Carbon and oxygen minibeam radiation therapy: An experimental dosimetric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada; González, Wilfredo; Brons, Stephan; Prezado, Yolanda

    2017-08-01

    To perform dosimetric characterization of a minibeam collimator in both carbon and oxygen ion beams to guide optimal setup geometry and irradiation for future radiobiological studies. Carbon and oxygen minibeams were generated using a prototype tungsten multislit collimator presenting line apertures 700 μm wide, which are spaced 3500 μm centre-to-centre distance apart. Several radiation beam spots generated the desired field size of 15 × 15 mm(2) and production of a 50 mm long spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) centered at 80 mm depth in water. Dose evaluations were performed with two different detectors: a PTW microDiamond® single crystal diamond detector and radiochromic films (EBT3). Peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) values, output factors (OF), penumbras, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were measured. Measured lateral dose profiles exhibited spatial fractionation of dose at depth in a water phantom in the expected form of peaks and valleys for both carbon and oxygen radiation fields. The diamond detector and radiochromic film provided measurements of PVDR in good agreement. PVDR values at shallow depth were about 60 and decreased to about 10 at 80 mm depth in water. OF in the center of the SOBP was about 0.4; this value is larger than the corresponding one in proton minibeam radiation therapy measured using a comparable collimator due to a reduced lateral scattering for carbon and oxygen minibeams. Carbon and oxygen minibeams may be produced by a mechanical collimator. PVDR values and output factors measured in this first study of these minibeam radiation types indicate there is potential for their therapeutic use. Optimization of minibeam collimator design and the number and size of focal spots for irradiation are advocated to improve PDVR values and dose distributions for each specific applied use. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. [Contract focused short-term group therapy--results of an evaluation].

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, Rainer; Meyer, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    A short description outlines the development of commission focused short-term therapy (AFoG) for children and adolescents. Subsequently the generic principles of psychotherapy are applied to AFoG in order to underline the basic assumptions of this variation of systemic group therapy. Behavioural changes arising in different contexts (school, family, group therapy) show the need for an appropriate flexibility of group therapy techniques. The evaluation was accomplished using the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL 4-18) at the beginning and 3 month after the end of the group therapy. The results show positive effects which finally are discussed critically.

  12. [Evaluation of the animal-assisted therapy in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Quibel, Clémence; Bonin, Marie; Bonnet, Magalie; Gaimard, Maryse; Mourey, France; Moesch, Isabelle; Ancet, Pierre

    Animal-assisted therapy sessions have been set up in a protected unit for patients with a dementia-related syndrome. The aim is to measure the effects of animal-assisted therapy on behavioural disorders in daily life and care. The results obtained provided some interesting areas to explore and recommendations with a view to optimising the implementation of such a system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A Model Plan for the Supervision and Evaluation of Therapy Services in Educational Settings. TIES: Therapy in Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Penny; And Others

    The manual serves as a model for school districts developing procedures for supervising and evaluating their therapy services. The narrative is addressed to therapists rather than supervisors so that school districts can photocopy or adapt sections of the manual and assemble customized manuals for therapists in their programs. The first chapter,…

  14. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega, P G; Torres-Espallardo, I; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-03-07

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  15. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gillam, J. E.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Oliver, J. F.; Sala, P. R.; Solevi, P.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-02-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  16. Evaluation of outcomes: the effects of continuous lateral rotational therapy.

    PubMed

    Washington, Georgita Tolbert; Macnee, Carol Leslie

    2005-01-01

    Research on continuous lateral rotational therapy (CLRT) has demonstrated mixed results, but there have been definite benefits described in its use for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial and ventilator-acquired pneumonia. Several studies have shown decreased hospital and intensive care unit costs and lengths of stay, and ventilator days when used appropriately. The intent of this study was to develop a protocol for initiating and discontinuing CLRT and to determine if the protocol would result in more effective and efficient use of this therapy.

  17. Controlling drug efficiency by encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: A theoretical study of the antitumor Cisplatin and the anti-HIV TIBO molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessrour, R.; Belmiloud, Y.; Hosni, Z.; Tangour, B.

    2012-06-01

    From the beginning of last century, Paul Ehrlich, a specialist in the immune system and the Nobel Prize (1908) had raised the possibility of "magic bullets" can directly address, in an organism, drugs in a particular area of the body, sparing all other parts of side effects. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have particular property to cross cell membranes easily. In an effort to optimize the use of CNT as drug nanocarriers, we divided our study into two parts. In the first, our concern was to find the minimum diameter of a single wall CNT can encapsulate an anticancer drug that iscisplatin without altering its geometry in order conserve its therapeutic power. Behavior of one and two Cisplatin(Cp) molecules confined in capped and opened single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is studied by means of ab-initio calculations. Single molecule binding energies clearly exhibit encapsulation dependence on tube diameters that range from 6.26 Å to 12.04 Å. A weak stabilization energy of the Cp@(11,0) equal to -70 kcal.mol-1 has been obtained corresponding to a CNT's diameter of 8.5Å. We noticed that Cisplatin molecule changes shape when encapsulated into CNTs' whose diameters are less than 7.6 Å. In the presence of a second Cisplatin molecule in the (10,0) CNT, preferred position stays parallel to CNT's axis leading to a linear density of roughly 1588 molecules/μm of CNT's length corresponding to a linear density of 7.9 10-19 g/μm. The 195Pt chemical shift tensors are calculated using GIAO method. NMR calculations reveal that Platinum chemical shift is sensitive to CNT's diameter and is linearly correlated to confinement energy. 195Pt chemical shift measurement may be a direct method to access to the diameter of the encapsulating CNT's and to control the amount of drug molecule transported by this CNT. In the second part, the opposite has been sought is to say how the use of nanotubes with different diameters can control the change in a geometry of an anti-HIV drug that is TIBO

  18. Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

  19. Avatar-Based Therapy within Prison Settings: Pilot Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijn, Biljana; Cooper, Mick; Jackson, Andrew; Wild, Ciara

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an introduction of a newly developed, avatar-based virtual reality therapy, as an addition to the therapeutic programme, within a therapeutic community prison in the UK. The participants had six group sessions facilitated by a counsellor. The aim of the project was to investigate whether this approach would improve mental health…

  20. Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Group Therapy for Underserved Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltman, Scott H.; Hetrick, Holly; Tasker, Tamara E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the case of a mindfulness-based group therapy that was implemented in a residential treatment facility. The case presented comprised a group of adolescent males with disruptive behavior disorders. The group was designed to be appropriate for the unique demographics of the clients, with the intent to help the clients enhance…

  1. Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Group Therapy for Underserved Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltman, Scott H.; Hetrick, Holly; Tasker, Tamara E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the case of a mindfulness-based group therapy that was implemented in a residential treatment facility. The case presented comprised a group of adolescent males with disruptive behavior disorders. The group was designed to be appropriate for the unique demographics of the clients, with the intent to help the clients enhance…

  2. Physical and hormonal evaluation of transsexual patients during hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W J; Finkelstein, J W; Stuart, C A; Webb, A; Smith, E R; Payer, A F; Walker, P A

    1981-08-01

    The optimal hormonal therapy for transsexual patients is not known. The physical and hormonal characteristics of 38 noncastrate male-to-female transsexuals and 14 noncastrate female-to-male transsexuals have been measured before and/or during therapy with various forms and dosages of hormonal therapy. All patients were hormonally and physically normal prior to therapy. Ethinyl estradiol was superior to conjugated estrogen in suppression of testosterone and gonadotropins but equal in effecting breast growth. The changes in physical and hormonal characteristics were the same for 0.1 mg/d and 0.5 mg/d of ethinyl estradiol. The female-to-male transsexuals were well managed with a dose of intramuscular testosterone cypionate of 400 mg/month, usually given 200 mg every two weeks. The maximal clitoral length reached was usually 4 cm. Higher doses of testosterone did not further increase clitoral length or suppression of gonadotropins; lower doses did not suppress the gonadotropins. Based on the information found in this study, we recommend 0.1 mg/d of ethinyl estradiol for the noncastrate male-to-female transsexual and 200 mg of intramuscular testosterone cypionate every two weeks for the noncastrate female-to-male transsexual.

  3. Cancer risks from diabetes therapies: evaluating the evidence.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified positive associations between diabetes, obesity and cancer. Insulin, metformin and thiazolidinediones (TDZs) are among the major diabetes therapies that improve glycaemic control by acting via molecular targets including the insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor pathways, adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. It is well-established that clinical application of insulin and TDZs is associated with weight gain, but the potential of these therapies to promote tumourigenesis is less well-studied. In addition, although anti-tumour properties of metformin have been proposed, recently published data do not support a protective effect of metformin against cancer in diabetic patients. Given that diabetes and cancer each account for 8% and 13% of global deaths and there is a substantial financial burden incurred by both disorders, developing diabetes therapies that are safe, efficacious and cost-effective has never been more desirable. This timely review examines recent progress in delineating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-diabetic actions of insulin, metformin and TZDs and considers evidence implicating these therapies in cell transformation and tumourigenesis. In addition, since the endocannabinoid signalling system (ECS) is now considered a therapeutic target and biomarker candidate for hyperglycaemia, obesity and cell growth, a brief section covering recent scientific advances regarding the ECS, particularly its functions in regulating glucose metabolism and cell survival, is also included in this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alleviating Communication Apprehension through Rational Emotive Therapy: A Comparative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.; Dodd, Carley H.

    Albert Ellis's Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), which assumes that a person can change an emotional disturbance by discovering and disputing the irrational ideas giving rise to that emotion, has been used effectively in treating public speaking anxiety. To compare RET with other treatments for communication apprehension, 52 high communication…

  5. Evaluation of Push-In/Integrated Therapy in a Collaborative Preschool for Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    With support found in the literature for the utilization of push-in, or integrated therapy when providing speech language pathology, the use of a set of criteria for determining how therapy would be provided was evaluated in a preschool for children with special needs. Using a 5-item Likert scale, teachers and speech pathologists were surveyed…

  6. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  7. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  8. Combinatorial de novo design and application of a biomimetic affinity ligand for the purification of human anti-HIV mAb 4E10 from transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Platis, Dimitris; Maltezos, Anastasios; Ma, Julian K-C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-HIV antibody 4E10 (mAb 4E10) is one of the most broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV, directed against a specific epitope on envelope protein gp41. In the present study, a combinatorial de novo design approach was used for the development of a biomimetic ligand for the affinity purification of mAb 4E10 from tobacco transgenic extract in a single chromatographic step. The biomimetic ligand (4E10lig) was based on a L-Phe/beta-Ala bi-substituted 1,3,5-triazine (Trz) scaffold (beta-Ala-Trz-L-Phe, 4E10lig) which potentially mimics the more pronounced electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of mAb 4E10-binding sequence determined by screening of a random peptide library. This library was comprised of Escherichia coli cells harboring a plasmid (pFlitrx) engineered to express a fusion protein containing random dodecapeptides that were inserted into the active loop of thioredoxin, which itself was inserted into the dispensable region of the flagellin gene. Adsorption equilibrium studies with this biomimetic ligand and mAb 4E10 determined a dissociation constant (K(D)) of 0.41 +/- 0.05 microM. Molecular modeling studies of the biomimetic ligand revealed that it can potentially occupy the same binding site as the natural binding core peptide epitope. The biomimetic affinity adsorbent was exploited in the development of a facile mAb 4E10 purification protocol, affording mAb 4E10 of high purity (approximately 95%) with good overall yield (60-80%). Analysis of the antibody preparation by SDS-PAGE, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and western blot showed that the mAb 4E10 was fully active and free of degraded variants, polyphenols, and alkaloids.

  9. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell. PMID:20463063

  10. Epitope mapping of ibalizumab, a humanized anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody with anti-HIV-1 activity in infected patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D

    2010-07-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell.

  11. Anti-HIV-1 Activity Prediction of Novel Gp41 Inhibitors Using Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Saghi; Saghaie, Lotfollah; Fassihi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    The fusion of viral and host cell membranes is mediated using gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein. As the HIV-1 enters the host cells, the two helical regions (HR1 and HR2) in the ectodomain of gp41 form a six-helix bundle, which carries the target and viral cell membranes to close proximity. Steps of this process serve as attractive targets for developing HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Identification of some novel HIV fusion inhibitors with the goal of blocking the formation of the six-helix bundle was accomplished by computer-aided drug design techniques. A virtual screening strategy was employed to recognize small molecules presumably able to bind the gp41 at the internal interface of the NHR helices at the core native viral six-helix. This study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a library of more than seven thousand compounds was collected from ZINC, PubChem and BindingDB databases and protein data bank. Key contacts of known inhibitors with gp41 binding site residues were considered as the collecting criteria. In the second stage series of filtering processes were performed on this library in subsequent steps to find the potential gp41 inhibitors. The filtering criteria included pharmacokinetic and ADMET properties as well as in silico anti-HIV-1 prediction. Molecular docking simulation was carried out to identify interactions of the filtered molecules with the key residues in the gp41 binding site. Finally, molecular dynamics simulation indicates the superior inhibitory ability of three selected compounds over the known gp41inhibitor, NB-64.

  12. The mechanism of phosphorylation of natural nucleosides and anti-HIV analogues by nucleoside diphosphate kinase is independent of their sugar substituents.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Michael C; Helms, Volkhard

    2002-07-02

    The reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by dinucleoside diphosphate kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum is investigated by semiempirical AM1 molecular orbital computation of an active site model system on the basis of various X-ray crystallographic structures. The computational results suggest that the phosphoryl transfer from adenosine triphosphate to the His122 residue is accompanied by the simultaneous shift of a proton from the histidine residue to one of the oxygen atoms of the gamma phosphate group. This involves a doubly protonated His122 residue whilst this residue is neutral in its ternary complex with ADP and the transition state analogue AlF(3). The proposed mechanism is thus analogous to that of phosphoryl transfer by cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent protein kinase and uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase as found in our earlier work and clarifies the role of the ribose 3'-OH group. Furthermore, the energetics of phosphoryl transfer onto other nucleoside analogues such as 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-diphosphate and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydro-thymidine-diphosphate are investigated. The calculated reaction barriers for the phosphorylation of the diphosphates by the enzyme are all within a range of 13.1 kJ mol(-1), which suggests that variations in the activation energies alone cannot account for the experimentally observed differences in enzymatic activity. Consequences for the design of new anti-HIV nucleoside analogues are discussed. Supporting information for this article is available on the WWW under http://www.wiley-vch.de/contents/jc_2268/2002/f360_s.pdf or from the author.

  13. A candidate anti-HIV reservoir compound, auranofin, exerts a selective 'anti-memory' effect by exploiting the baseline oxidative status of lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chirullo, B; Sgarbanti, R; Limongi, D; Shytaj, I L; Alvarez, D; Das, B; Boe, A; DaFonseca, S; Chomont, N; Liotta, L; Petricoin, E Iii; Norelli, S; Pelosi, E; Garaci, E; Savarino, A; Palamara, A T

    2013-12-05

    Central memory (T(CM)) and transitional memory (T(TM)) CD4(+) T cells are known to be the major cellular reservoirs for HIV, as these cells can harbor a transcriptionally silent form of viral DNA that is not targeted by either the immune system or current antiretroviral drug regimens. In the present study, we explored the molecular bases of the anti-HIV reservoir effects of auranofin (AF), a pro-oxidant gold-based drug and a candidate compound for a cure of AIDS. We here show that T(CM) and T(TM) lymphocytes have lower baseline antioxidant defenses as compared with their naive counterpart. These differences are mirrored by the effects exerted by AF on T-lymphocytes: AF was able to exert a pro-differentiating and pro-apoptotic effect, which was more pronounced in the memory subsets. AF induced an early activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) followed by mitochondrial depolarization and a final burst in intracellular peroxides. The pro-differentiating effect was characterized by a downregulation of the CD27 marker expression. Interestingly, AF-induced apoptosis was inhibited by pyruvate, a well-known peroxide scavenger, but pyruvate did not inhibit the pro-differentiating effect of AF, indicating that the pro-apoptotic and pro-differentiating effects involve different pathways. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that AF selectively targets the T(CM)/T(TM) lymphocyte subsets, which encompass the HIV reservoir, by affecting redox-sensitive cell death pathways.

  14. Developing a community-level anti-HIV/AIDS stigma and homophobia intervention in new York city: The project CHHANGE model.

    PubMed

    Frye, Victoria; Paige, Mark Q; Gordon, Steven; Matthews, David; Musgrave, Geneva; Kornegay, Mark; Greene, Emily; Phelan, Jo C; Koblin, Beryl A; Taylor-Akutagawa, Vaughn

    2017-08-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma and homophobia are associated with significant negative health and social outcomes among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and those at risk of infection. Interventions to decrease HIV stigma have focused on providing information and education, changing attitudes and values, and increasing contact with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), activities that act to reduce stereotyped beliefs and prejudice, as well as acts of discrimination. Most anti-homophobia interventions have focused on bullying reduction and have been implemented at the secondary and post-secondary education levels. Few interventions address HIV stigma and homophobia and operate at the community level. Project CHHANGE, Challenge HIV Stigma and Homophobia and Gain Empowerment, was a community-level, multi-component anti-HIV/AIDS stigma and homophobia intervention designed to reduce HIV stigma and homophobia thus increasing access to HIV prevention and treatment access. The theory-based intervention included three primary components: workshops and trainings with local residents, businesses and community-based organizations (CBO); space-based events at a CBO-partner drop-in storefront and "pop-up" street-based events and outreach; and a bus shelter ad campaign. This paper describes the intervention design process, resultant intervention and the study team's experiences working with the community. We conclude that CHHANGE was feasible and acceptable to the community. Promoting the labeling of gay and/or HIV-related "space" as a non-stigmatized, community resource, as well as providing opportunities for residents to have contact with targeted groups and to understand how HIV stigma and homophobia relate to HIV/AIDS prevalence in their neighborhood may be crucial components of successful anti-stigma and discrimination programming. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Binary and ternary combinations of anti-HIV protease inhibitors: effect on gene expression and functional activity of CYP3A4 and efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Khurana, Varun; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify the effect of binary and ternary combinations of anti-HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) on the expression of metabolizing enzyme (CYP3A4) and efflux transporters [multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP)] in a model intestinal cell line (LS-180). Methods LS-180 cells were treated with various combinations of PIs (amprenavir, indinavir, saquinavir and lopinavir), and the mRNA expression levels of metabolizing enzyme and efflux transporters were measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The alteration of gene expression was further correlated to the expression of nuclear hormone receptor PXR. Uptake of fluorescent and radioactive substrates was carried out to study the functional activity of these proteins. Cytotoxicity and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assays were carried out to measure stress responses. Results Binary and ternary combinations of PIs appeared to modulate the expression of CYP3A4, MRP2, P-gp and BCRP in a considerable manner. Unlike the individual PIs, their binary combinations showed much greater induction of metabolizing enzyme and efflux proteins. However, such pronounced induction was not observed in the presence of ternary combinations. The observed trend of altered mRNA expression was found to correlate well with the change in expression levels of PXR. The gene expression was found to correlate with activity assays. Lack of cytotoxicity and ATP activity was observed in the treatment samples, suggesting that these alterations in expression levels were probably not stress responses. Conclusions In the present study, we demonstrated that combinations of drugs can have serious consequences toward the treatment of HIV infection by altering their bioavailability and disposition. PMID:24399676

  16. Expression of deoxynucleotide carrier is not associated with the mitochondrial DNA depletion caused by anti-HIV dideoxynucleoside analogs and mitochondrial dNTP uptake.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wing; Chen, ChinShing; Ruan, Shuolun; Leung, Chung-Hang; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies suggested that the dNTP/dNDP transporter systems that exist in mitochondria for transporting dNTP/dNDP from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) synthesis play a critical role in delayed cytotoxicity of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dideoxynucleoside analogs in mitochondria. A protein, termed mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC), based on its ability to transport dNTPs in reconstituted proteoliposomes, was recently isolated. Lacking cellular information to substantiate DNC's involvement in the delayed cytotoxicity of dideoxynucleoside analogs, we expressed DNC and reconstituted it into proteoliposomes. The K(m) values for dNTPs uptake by reconstituted DNC were in the millimolar range, which is a thousandfold higher than that of the physiological level. Furthermore, we found that overexpressing DNC (wt and G177A-mutated DNC) in RKO cells did not sensitize the cells to the mtDNA depletion caused by beta-d-2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine, and 2',3'-dideoxyinosine or affect the mtDNA recovery rate after ddC treatment. Mitochondria isolated from DNC-overexpressing cells did not significantly differ from that isolated from RKO cells in terms of the rate of uptake or the incorporation of dTTP into mitochondria DNA. Down-regulation of DNC expression by small interfering RNA was also ineffective in changing the action of dideoxynucleoside analogs on the mtDNA depletion and the rate of dTTP uptake into isolated mitochondria. Down-regulation of both DNC and thymidine kinase-2 also did not cause mtDNA depletion. We conclude that DNC does not play an important role in the delayed cytotoxicity (mtDNA depletion) of anti-HIV dideoxynucleoside analogs and dNTPs uptake into mitochondria.

  17. Identification of Effective Subdominant Anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T Cells Within Entire Post-infection and Post-vaccination Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Gemma; Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Wainwright, Emma; Bourne, Victoria; Frisbee, Alyse; Payne, Tamika L.; Berrong, Mark; Ferrari, Guido; Chopera, Denis; Hanke, Tomas; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; McElrath, M. Juliana; McMichael, Andrew; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Frahm, Nicole; Dorrell, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Defining the components of an HIV immunogen that could induce effective CD8+ T cell responses is critical to vaccine development. We addressed this question by investigating the viral targets of CD8+ T cells that potently inhibit HIV replication in vitro, as this is highly predictive of virus control in vivo. We observed broad and potent ex vivo CD8+ T cell-mediated viral inhibitory activity against a panel of HIV isolates among viremic controllers (VC, viral loads <5000 copies/ml), in contrast to unselected HIV-infected HIV Vaccine trials Network (HVTN) participants. Viral inhibition of clade-matched HIV isolates was strongly correlated with the frequency of CD8+ T cells targeting vulnerable regions within Gag, Pol, Nef and Vif that had been identified in an independent study of nearly 1000 chronically infected individuals. These vulnerable and so-called “beneficial” regions were of low entropy overall, yet several were not predicted by stringent conservation algorithms. Consistent with this, stronger inhibition of clade-matched than mismatched viruses was observed in the majority of subjects, indicating better targeting of clade-specific than conserved epitopes. The magnitude of CD8+ T cell responses to beneficial regions, together with viral entropy and HLA class I genotype, explained up to 59% of the variation in viral inhibitory activity, with magnitude of the T cell response making the strongest unique contribution. However, beneficial regions were infrequently targeted by CD8+ T cells elicited by vaccines encoding full-length HIV proteins, when the latter were administered to healthy volunteers and HIV-positive ART-treated subjects, suggesting that immunodominance hierarchies undermine effective anti-HIV CD8+ T cell responses. Taken together, our data support HIV immunogen design that is based on systematic selection of empirically defined vulnerable regions within the viral proteome, with exclusion of immunodominant decoy epitopes that are irrelevant

  18. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development.

  19. Long-acting combination anti-HIV drug suspension enhances and sustains higher drug levels in lymph node cells than in blood cells and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, John C.; McConnachie, Lisa A.; Koehn, Josefin; Kinman, Loren; Collins, Carol; Shen, Danny D.; Collier, Ann C.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine whether a combination of anti-HIV drugs – tenofovir (TFV), lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV) – in a lipid-stabilized nanosuspension (called TLC-ART101) could enhance and sustain intracellular drug levels and exposures in lymph node and blood cells above those in plasma. Design: Four macaques were given a single dose of TLC-ART101 subcutaneously. Drug concentrations in plasma and mononuclear cells of the blood (PBMCs) and lymph nodes (LNMCs) were analysed using a validated combination LC-MS/MS assay. Results: For the two active drugs (TFV, LPV), plasma and PBMC intracellular drug levels persisted for over 2 weeks; PBMC drug exposures were three- to four-fold higher than those in plasma. Apparent terminal half-lives (t1/2) of TFV and LPV were 65.3 and 476.9 h in plasma, and 169.1 and 151.2 h in PBMCs. At 24 and 192 h, TFV and LPV drug levels in LNMCs were up to 79-fold higher than those in PBMCs. Analysis of PBMC intracellular TFV and its active metabolite TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) indicated that intracellular exposures of total TFV and TFV-DP were markedly higher and persisted longer than in humans and macaques dosed with oral TFV prodrugs, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) or tenofovir alafenamide (TAF). Conclusions: A simple, scalable three-drug combination, lipid-stabilized nanosuspension exhibited persistent drug levels in cells of lymph nodes and the blood (HIV host cells) and in plasma. With appropriate dose adjustment, TLC-ART101 may be a useful HIV treatment with a potential to impact residual virus in lymph nodes. PMID:28099191

  20. Purification and characterization of a novel antifungal protein with antiproliferation and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities from Peganum harmala seeds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojin; Liu, Dongliang; Tang, Haishu; Wang, Yan; Wu, Ting; Li, Yang; Yang, Jie; Yang, Jianhua; Sun, Surong; Zhang, Fuchun

    2013-02-01

    A novel antifungal protein, designated as PHP, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala, by cationic exchange chromatography on Resource S column and gel filtration on Sephadex 75 10/300 GL column. PHP was found to form a homodimer of about 16 kDa. Isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the isoelectric point of PHP was ∼8.4. The N-terminal 20-amino acid sequence of PHP, ITCPQVTQSLAPCVPYLISG, resembles the non-specific lipid transfer proteins in certain plants. PHP exhibited lipid-binding activity. Furthermore, PHP exerted antifungal activity against Alternaria alternate, Penicillium degitatum, Rhizopus stuolonifer, and Magnaporthe grisea, and its antifungal activity was stable in the temperature range 4-60°C, and in the pH range 4-10. It inhibited the mycelial growth in A. alternate, P. degitatum, R. stuolonifer, and M. grisea with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 1.5, 37.5, 8.44, and 12.19 μM, respectively. PHP was also able to inhibit the proliferation of esophagus carcinoma (Eca-109), cervical carcinoma (HeLa), gastric carcinoma (MGC-7), and melanoma (B16) cells with IC(50) of 0.7, 2.74, 3.13, and 1.47 μM, respectively. Moreover, PHP significantly inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC(50) of 1.26 μM. It did not have hemagglutinating and antibacterial activities. In conclusion, a novel antifungal protein with antiproliferation and anti-HIV-1 RT activities was obtained from P. harmala seeds.

  1. Synergistic neutralization of a chimeric SIV/HIV type 1 virus with combinations of human anti-HIV type 1 envelope monoclonal antibodies or hyperimmune globulins.

    PubMed

    Li, A; Baba, T W; Sodroski, J; Zolla-Pazner, S; Gorny, M K; Robinson, J; Posner, M R; Katinger, H; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Chou, T C; Ruprecht, R M

    1997-05-20

    A panel of 14 human IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for envelope antigens of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), 2 high-titer human anti-HIV-1 immunoglobulin (HIVIG) preparations, and 15 combinations of MAbs or MAb/HIVIG were tested for their ability to neutralize infection of cultured human T cells (MT-2) with a chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-vpu+), which expressed HIV-1 IIIB envelope antigens. Eleven MAbs and both HIVIGs were neutralizing. When used alone, the anti-CD4-binding site MAb b12, the anti-gp41 MAb 2F5, and the anti-gp120 MAb 2G12 were the most potent. When combination regimens involving two MAbs targeting different epitopes were tested, synergy was seen in all paired MAbs, except for one combination that revealed additive effects. The lowest effective antibody concentration for 50% viral neutralization (EC50) and EC90 were achieved with combinations of MAbs b12, 2F5, 2G12, and the anti-V3 MAb 694/98D. Depending on the combination regimen, the concentration of MAbs required to reach 90% virus neutralization was reduced approximately 2- to 25-fold as compared to the dose requirement of individual MAbs to produce the same effect. Synergy of the combination regimens implies that combinations of antibodies may have a role in passive immunoprophylaxis against HIV-1. The ability of SHIV to replicate in rhesus macaques will allow us to test such approaches in vivo.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and Metabolic Characteristics of Herb-Derived Khellactone Derivatives, A Class of Anti-HIV and Anti-Hypertensive: A Review.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wanghui; Liu, Ruilin; Du, Wei; Luo, Zhimin; Guo, Pengqi; Zhang, Ting; Zeng, Aiguo; Chang, Chun; Fu, Qiang

    2016-03-08

    A vast number of structural modifications have been performed for khellactone derivatives (KDs) that have been widely concerned owing to their diverse biological properties, including anti-hypertension, anti-HIV, reversing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multidrug resistance, and anti-inflammation effects, to find the most active entity. However, extensive metabolism of KDs results in poor oral bioavailability, thus hindering the clinical trial performance of those components. The primary metabolic pathways have been revealed as hydrolysis, oxidation, acyl migration, and glucuronidation, while carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450 3A (CPY3A), as well as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) primarily mediate these metabolic pathways. Attention was mainly paid to the pharmacological features, therapeutic mechanisms and structure-activity relationships of KDs in previous reviews, whereas their pharmacokinetic and metabolic characteristics have seldom been discussed. In the present review, KDs' metabolism and their pharmacokinetic properties are summarized. In addition, the structure-metabolism relationships of KDs and the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) induced by KDs were also extensively discussed. The polarity, the acyl groups substituted at C-3' and C-4' positions, the configuration of C-3' and C-4', and the moieties substituted at C-3 and C-4 positions play the determinant roles for the metabolic profiles of KDs. Contributions from CYP3A4, UGT1A1, P-gp, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 have been disclosed to be primary for the potential DDIs. The review is expected to provide meaningful information and helpful guidelines for the further development of KDs.

  3. Acrolein enhances epigenetic modifications, FasL expression and hepatocyte toxicity induced by anti-HIV drug Zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Ghare, Smita S; Donde, Hridgandh; Chen, Wei-Yang; Barker, David F; Gobejishvilli, Leila; McClain, Craig J; Barve, Shirish S; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) remains the mainstay of antiretroviral therapy against HIV in resource-poor countries; however, its use is frequently associated with hepatotoxicity. Not all HIV patients on AZT develop hepatotoxicity, and the determining factors are unclear. Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are known risk factors for HIV hepatotoxicity, and both are significant sources of acrolein, a highly reactive and toxic aldehyde. This study examines the potential hepatotoxic interactions between acrolein and AZT. Our data demonstrate that acrolein markedly enhanced AZT-induced transcriptionally permissive histone modifications (H3K9Ac and H3K9Me3) allowing the recruitment of transcription factor NF-kB and RNA polymerase II at the FasL gene promoter, resulting in FasL upregulation and apoptosis in hepatocytes. Notably, the acrolein scavenger, hydralazine prevented these promoter-associated epigenetic changes and inhibited FasL upregulation and apoptosis induced by the combination of AZT and acrolein, as well as AZT alone. Our data strongly suggest that acrolein enhancement of promoter histone modifications and FasL upregulation are major pathogenic mechanisms driving AZT-induced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, these data also indicate the therapeutic potential of hydralazine in mitigating AZT hepatotoxicity.

  4. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a review of evaluation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Polackwich, A S; Shoskes, D A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), also known as NIH Category III Prostatitis is a highly prevalent syndrome with significant impact on quality of life. As a heterogeneous syndrome, there exists no 'one size fits all' therapy with level 1 evidence to guide therapy. This often leads to a nihilistic approach to patients and clinical outcomes are poor. In this review, we examine the evidence for CP/CPPS therapies and discuss our technique of clinical phenotyping combined with multimodal therapy. Review of Medline articles with terms 'non-bacterial prostatitis', 'abacterial prostatitis' and 'chronic pelvic pain syndrome'. Many individual therapies have been evaluated in the treatment of CP/CPPS; antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications (including bioflavonoids), neuromodulators, alpha blockers, pelvic floor physical therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. Each of these has been found to have varying success in alleviating symptoms. UPOINT is a system of clinical phenotyping for CP/CPPS patients that has 6 defined domains, which guide multimodal therapy. It has been validated to correlate with symptom burden and therapy guided by UPOINT leads to significant symptom improvement in 75-84% of patients based on three independent studies. CP/CPPS is a heterogeneous condition and, much like with prostate cancer, optimal therapy can only be achieved by classifying patients into clinically meaningful phenotypic groups (much like TNM) and letting the phenotype drive therapy.

  5. Objective evaluation of hand function in scleroderma patients to assess effectiveness of physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Askew, L J; Beckett, V L; An, K N; Chao, E Y

    1983-11-01

    A system was developed to evaluate the hand function of patients with scleroderma objectively in terms of joint contracture, range of movement, dexterity, strength, and skin compliance. Twelve patients with progressive systemic sclerosis were evaluated using this technique to determine the effectiveness of classic physical therapy methods. A statistically significant improvement in hand function was found after a single physical therapy treatment. This conservative mode of treatment may contribute to improved hand function in patients with scleroderma.

  6. Radionuclide methods for evaluating the results of thrombolytic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaret, B.L.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-08-01

    In summary, a variety of nuclear techniques may be used to investigate the effects of thrombolytic therapy and myocardial reperfusion. Assessments of global and regional ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and metabolic integrity are available and appear to add substantially to conventional assessment. Timing of studies appears to be critical. Complementary data can be obtained in both the acute and convalescent phase of myocardial infarction. 49 references.

  7. Breathing evaluation and retraining as an adjunct to manual therapy.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Laurie; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Coleman, Kimberly

    2011-02-01

    Back and neck pain are extremely common reasons for patients seeking manual therapy treatment. Epidemiological evidence supports a link between breathing difficulties and back pain. Since trunk muscles perform both postural and breathing functions, it is theorized that disruption in one function can negatively impact the other. Altered breathing mechanics can change respiratory chemistry and therefore pH causing smooth muscle constriction, altered electrolyte balance and decreased tissue oxygenation. These changes can profoundly impact any body system. Increased excitability in the muscular and nervous systems may be most relevant to a manual therapist. Respiratory function can be tested via capnography which measures CO₂ at the end of exhale known as End Tidal CO₂ (ETCO₂). ETCO₂ closely reflects arterial CO₂ in people with normal cardiopulmonary function. A case series of twenty nine outpatients with neck or back pain who had plateaued with manual therapy and exercise were identified all of whom were found to have low ETCO₂. Breathing retraining improved ETCO₂, pain and function in all patients with 93% achieving at least a clinically important change in either pain or function. Screening for breathing dysfunction using capnography may improve patient outcomes in those patients where manual therapy, exercise and education do not provide full resolution of symptoms.

  8. MRP (ABCC) transporters-mediated efflux of anti-HIV drugs, saquinavir and zidovudine, from human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Mark; Roy, Upal; Mondal, Debasis

    2008-01-01

    The constituents of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) include HIV-1 protease inhibitors (HPIs) and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Endothelial cell (EC) barriers, especially the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) suppresses the entry of HAART drugs to subendothelial HIV-1 reservoirs. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family members, multidrug resistant-1 (MDR-1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) can efflux both HPIs and NRTIs from intracellular compartments. Using brain derived ECs from non-human sources, previous studies suggested a dominant role for MDR-1 in HAART efflux from the BBB. However, due to species variations in ABC-transporter expression, drug-efflux functions using human brain ECs need to be investigated. Furthermore, role of ABC-transporters in drug-efflux from systemic EC barriers need to be studied. We monitored the expression of ABC-transporters in primary human ECs obtained from brain (HBMVECs), aorta (HAECs), pulmonary-artery (HPAECs), dermal-microvessel (HDMVECs) and umbilical vein (HUVECs). Gene expression for MDR-1 and MRPs (MRP-1 to MRP-5) were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Drug efflux functions were determined by calcein retention assays. Intracellular accumulation of both 3H-saquinavir (an HPI) and 3H-zidovudine (an NRTI) were also monitored in HAECs and HBMVECs. Both assays were carried out in presence of verapamil (20–60 µM) or MK-571 (12.5–50 µM) inhibitors of MDR-1 and MRPs, respectively in presence of verapamil or MK-571. The HBMVECs expressed higher levels of MRPs than MDR-1 and only MK-571 significantly (p<0.01) suppressed calcein efflux from these cells. However, both HAECs and HPAECs showed MDR-1 and MRP expression and calcein efflux was inhibited by both verapamil and MK-571. Both inhibitors suppressed 3H-saquinavir efflux from HAECs, but only MK-571 suppressed saquinavir efflux from HBMVECs. In both ECs, 3H-zidovudine efflux was only

  9. Effect of Methamphetamine on Spectral Binding, Ligand Docking and Metabolism of Anti-HIV Drugs with CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Nookala, Anantha R; Li, Junhao; Ande, Anusha; Wang, Lei; Vaidya, Naveen K; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    -boosted antiretroviral therapy, in HIV-1-infected individuals who abuse methamphetamine.

  10. Effect of Methamphetamine on Spectral Binding, Ligand Docking and Metabolism of Anti-HIV Drugs with CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Ande, Anusha; Wang, Lei; Vaidya, Naveen K.; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    -boosted antiretroviral therapy, in HIV-1-infected individuals who abuse methamphetamine. PMID:26741368

  11. A new combined HIV p24 antigen and anti-HIV-1/2/O screening assay.

    PubMed

    Polywka, Susanne; Duttmann, Hedwig; Lübben, Frank; Laufs, Rainer; Feldner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    It is important to shorten the window period after acute HIV infection in which infected individuals are still antibody-negative, especially in blood donors. Newly developed fourth-generation assays detect antibodies to HIV-1, including subtype O, and to HIV-2 and, simultaneously, p24 antigen of HIV-1. To evaluate this assay for daily routine work we compared it with different third-generation assays using sera from uninfected patients and patients with known HIV infection. The most interesting sera are those drawn during seroconversion from freshly infected patients. Whenever we encounter such a patient with acute HIV infection we store the serum in aliquots at -20 degrees C. Thus, we were able to establish our own seroconversion panel and use it in our laboratory for evaluation of new assays. The new test was shown to be able to detect all chronically HIV-infected individuals and four of six patients during seroconversion although in two of these patients conventional assays for HIV antibodies were still negative. The rate of unspecific reactivities was slightly higher as compared with third-generation assays.

  12. Animal-assisted therapy: evaluation and implementation of a complementary therapy to improve the psychological and physiological health of critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeCourcey, Mary; Russell, Anne C; Keister, Kathy J

    2010-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy has gained widespread support in a variety of health care settings, including critical care units. This article seeks to review some of the current animal-assisted therapy, define a structured program, and evaluate the potential ability of the therapy to enhance the progress and health of our patients.

  13. A Method for Evaluating Quality Assurance Needs in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M. Saiful Fraass, Benedick A.; Dunscombe, Peter B.; Gibbons, John P.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Medin, Paul M.; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2008-05-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed.

  14. A method for evaluating quality assurance needs in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huq, M Saiful; Fraass, Benedick A; Dunscombe, Peter B; Gibbons, John P; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Medin, Paul M; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Yorke, Ellen D

    2008-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed.

  15. Behavioral and endocrinological evaluation of music therapy for elderly patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mizue; Kanamori, Masao; Watanabe, Motoko; Nagasawa, Shingo; Kojima, Emi; Ooshiro, Hajime; Nakahara, Daiichirou

    2004-03-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia patients using endocrinological and behavioral evaluations. The study comprised 10 patients with senile dementia who received music therapy; six had Alzheimer's dementia and four had vascular dementia. Music therapy was performed twice a week for 8 consecutive weeks (16 sessions). As a result, total scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) did not significantly change, but the scores of a subscale, "language", improved significantly. According to the Multidimensional Observation Scale For Elderly Subjects (MOSES), scores for "irritability" decreased significantly. Regarding changes in salivary chromogranin A (CgA) levels, the average was significantly decreased before session 16 compared to after this. These results suggest that the combination of endocrinological measurements, behavioral evaluations and functional assessment methods are useful in evaluating the effects of music therapy in persons with senile dementia.

  16. Spectroscopic evaluation of photodynamic therapy of the intraperitoneal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Sandell, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lewis, Robert; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence before and after photodynamic therapy of healthy canine peritoneal cavity. Animals were treated intra-operatively after iv injection of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). The small bowel was treated using a uniform light field projected by a microlens-tipped fiber. The cavity was then filled with scattering medium and the remaining organs were treated using a moving diffuser. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements were made using a multi-fiber optical probe positioned on the surface of various tissues within the cavity before and after illumination. The measured data were analyzed to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation and sensitizer concentration.

  17. Evaluation of the Therac 6 linear accelerator for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Grant, W; Ames, J; Almond, P R

    1978-01-01

    The Therac 6 is new generation of low-energy linear accelerator. It incorporates a PDP-11/05 computer for beam control, treatment-factor input, and beam shutdown in the event of failure of the system. The performance of the unit has not been hindered by computer or software malfunction, and the computer has provided an excellent means for preventive maintenance and repair. Dosimetry parameters are similar to other 6 MV x-ray beams, and comparison to 60Co therapy beams shows that this unit may be more like 60Co units in penumbra and absence of off-axis peaking than other low-energy accelerators.

  18. Spectroscopic evaluation of photodynamic therapy of the intraperitoneal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Sandell, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lewis, Robert; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence before and after photodynamic therapy of healthy canine peritoneal cavity. Animals were treated intra-operatively after iv injection of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). The small bowel was treated using a uniform light field projected by a microlenstipped fiber. The cavity was then filled with scattering medium and the remaining organs were treated using a moving diffuser. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements were made using a multi-fiber optical probe positioned on the surface of various tissues within the cavity before and after illumination. The measured data were analyzed to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation and sensitizer concentration. PMID:26028798

  19. Prediction and Early Evaluation of Anticancer Therapy Response: From Imaging of Drug Efflux Pumps to Targeted Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng; Li, Shaoshun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy and has been ascribed to the overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Molecular imaging of drug efflux pumps is helpful to identify the patients who may be resistant to the chemotherapy and thus will avoid the unnecessary treatment and increase the therapeutic effectiveness. Imaging probes targeting drug efflux pumps can non-invasively evaluate the Pgp function and play an important role in identification of MDR, prediction of response, and monitoring MDR modulation. On the other hand, new anticancer agents based on molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and angiogenic factor receptor may potentially be combined with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the MDR. Imaging of molecular targets visualize treatment response of patients at molecular level vividly and help to select right patients for certain targeted anticancer therapy. Among all the imaging modalities, nuclear imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has the greatest promise for rapid translation to the clinic and can realize quantitative visualization of biochemical processes in vivo. In this review, we will summarize the nuclear imaging probes utilized for predicting and evaluating the early anticancer therapy response.99mTc labeled agents and PET based radiopharmaceuticals like 18F-Paclitaxel, 11C-Verapamil for drug efflux pumps imaging will be discussed here. Moreover, molecular imaging probes used for targeted therapy response evaluation like 18F-Tamoxifen,89Zr-Trastuzumab will also be introduced in this review.

  20. Economic evaluation of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Psaltikidis, Eliane Molina; Silva, Everton Nunes da; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim Murray; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Resende, Mariângela Ribeiro

    2017-08-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) consists of providing antimicrobial therapy by parenteral infusion without hospitalization. A systematic review was performed to compare OPAT and hospitalization as health care modalities from an economic perspective. Areas covered: We identified 1455 articles using 13 electronic databases and manual searches. Two independent reviewers identified 35 studies conducted between 1978 and 2016. We observed high heterogeneity in the following: countries, infection site, OPAT strategies and outcomes analyzed. Of these, 88% had a retrospective observational design and one was a randomized trial. With respect to economic analyses, 71% of the studies considered the cost-consequences, 11% cost minimization, 6% cost-benefit, 6% cost-utility analyses and 6% cost effectiveness. Considering all 35 studies, the general OPAT cost saving was 57.19% (from -13.03% to 95.47%). Taking into consideration only high-quality studies (6 comparative studies), the cost saving declined by 16.54% (from -13.03% to 46.86%). Expert commentary: Although most studies demonstrate that OPAT is cost-effective, the magnitude of this effect is compromised by poor methodological quality and heterogeneity. Economic assessments of the issue are needed using more rigorous methodologies that include a broad range of perspectives to identify the real magnitude of economic savings in different settings and OPAT modalities.

  1. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy. Images FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. PMID:1731649

  2. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy.

  3. Evaluation of social marketing of oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Koul, P B; Murali, M V; Gupta, P; Sharma, P P

    1991-09-01

    Attempts, at social marketing of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) through television, in changing the knowledge and practice of mothers with regard to its use was assessed. One hundred and eighty seven consecutive mothers (38 excluded due to non use of ORT) were administered a preplanned questionnaire to assess their socio-economic profile, educational status, concept of diarrhea and correct use of ORT. Fifty nine mothers who watched these programmes on TV regularly formed the study group. These were compared with 90 mothers who had gained such knowledge from non-television sources. The correct application of knowledge of ORT was significantly better in study group compared with control group. The educational status of mothers had a positive impact on motivation to use ORT at home in the study group. Mass media campaigns through "TV spots" is an effective way of improving knowledge of mothers on ORT in a developing country.

  4. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  5. Evaluation of hearing impairment in leprosy patients taking multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rawlani, S; Patil, C Y; Bhowte, R; Degwekar, S; Rawlani, S; Chandak, R; Rawlani, S

    2013-01-01

    Present descriptive study was carried out for the assessment of hearing capability in leprosy patients. After getting approval from Institutional ethical committee, the present descriptive study was carried out on 60 subjects. All the patients were indoor-patients at the Leprosy Rehabilitation Center Maharogi Sewa Samiti Anandvan Warora, and were on multidrug therapy described by World Health Organization from an average period of 6 months. Study Group I consisted of 30 diagnosed Leprosy patients taking multidrug therapy from an average period of 6 months. Group II (Control group) consisted of 30 normal healthy individuals of same age. Patients suffering from acute or chronic ear discharge, Presence of wax in external auditory canal, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, impaired renal function and patients having history of trauma were excluded from the study. All the subjects underwent Pure tone audiometry, Tuning Fork test to check the level of hearing loss and type of hearing loss and detailed clinical examination for cranial nerve function was done in all the patients of study group and control group. Audiometry findings in study group patients showed that 23 patients (76.66%; 45 ears) of the leprosy patients had sensory neural hearing impairment and 7 patients (23.33%) showed normal hearing. Out of these affected patients, 10 patients (43.47%; 19 ears) had mild sensory neural hearing impairment, 10 patients (43.47%; 20 ears) had moderate sensory neural hearing impairment. 2 patients (8.69%; 04 ears) had moderate to severe hearing impairment, 1 patient (4.34%; 02 ears) showed severe sensory neural hearing impairment. In the absence of any local or systemic disease or drugs likely to have side effects on the cochleovestibular function, leprosy affects the cochleovestibular system, and effect on cochlear function is seen more often than effect on the vestibular system. Thus hearing loss which is seen in patients suffering from Hansen's disease is of cochlear origin.

  6. First Phase I human clinical trial of a killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine: demonstration of its safety and enhancement of anti-HIV antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsil; Michalski, Chad J; Choo, Seung Ho; Kim, Gyoung Nyoun; Banasikowska, Elizabeth; Lee, Sangkyun; Wu, Kunyu; An, Hwa-Yong; Mills, Anthony; Schneider, Stefan; Bredeek, U Fritz; Coulston, Daniel R; Ding, Shilei; Finzi, Andrés; Tian, Meijuan; Klein, Katja; Arts, Eric J; Mann, Jamie F S; Gao, Yong; Kang, C Yong

    2016-11-28

    Vaccination with inactivated (killed) whole-virus particles has been used to prevent a wide range of viral diseases. However, for an HIV vaccine this approach has been largely negated due to inherent safety concerns, despite the ability of killed whole-virus vaccines to generate a strong, predominantly antibody-mediated immune response in vivo. HIV-1 Clade B NL4-3 was genetically modified by deleting the nef and vpu genes and substituting the coding sequence for the Env signal peptide with that of honeybee melittin signal peptide to produce a less virulent and more replication efficient virus. This genetically modified virus (gmHIV-1NL4-3) was inactivated and formulated as a killed whole-HIV vaccine, and then used for a Phase I human clinical trial (Trial Registration: Clinical Trials NCT01546818). The gmHIV-1NL4-3 was propagated in the A3.01 human T cell line followed by virus purification and inactivation with aldrithiol-2 and γ-irradiation. Thirty-three HIV-1 positive volunteers receiving cART were recruited for this observer-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity. Genetically modified and killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine, SAV001, was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. HIV-1NL4-3-specific PCR showed neither evidence of vaccine virus replication in the vaccine virus-infected human T lymphocytes in vitro nor in the participating volunteers receiving SAV001 vaccine. Furthermore, SAV001 with adjuvant significantly increased the pre-existing antibody response to HIV-1 proteins. Antibodies in the plasma of vaccinees were also found to recognize HIV-1 envelope protein on the surface of infected cells as well as showing an enhancement of broadly neutralizing antibodies inhibiting tier I and II of HIV-1 B, D, and A subtypes. The killed whole-HIV vaccine, SAV001, is safe and triggers anti-HIV immune responses. It remains to be determined through an appropriate trial whether this immune response prevents HIV

  7. Formative Evaluation Research of Art-Based Supervision in Art Therapy Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    Image making is a common component of art therapy supervision but its use has not yet been formally evaluated. This article describes formative evaluation research used to investigate student responses to art-based supervision in which response art was used as a primary method to contain, explore, or express clinical work. Art-based supervision,…

  8. Impact Evaluation of a Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Model in Brazilian Sexually Abused Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habigzang, Luisa Fernanda; Damasio, Bruno Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral group therapy model in Brazilian girls who had experienced sexual abuse. The effect of the waiting period before treatment and the enduring effectiveness of the treatment after six and 12 months were also evaluated. Forty-nine female sexual abuse victims between the ages of 9 and 16…

  9. Evaluation of National Institute for Learning Development and Discovery Educational Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimpong, Prince Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In Maryland, some Christian schools have enrolled students with learning disabilities (LDs) but do not have any interventional programs at the school to help them succeed academically. The purpose of this qualitative program evaluation was to evaluate the National Institute for Learning Development (NILD) and Discovery Therapy Educational Program…

  10. Impact Evaluation of a Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Model in Brazilian Sexually Abused Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habigzang, Luisa Fernanda; Damasio, Bruno Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral group therapy model in Brazilian girls who had experienced sexual abuse. The effect of the waiting period before treatment and the enduring effectiveness of the treatment after six and 12 months were also evaluated. Forty-nine female sexual abuse victims between the ages of 9 and 16…

  11. Evaluating treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder with cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure therapy in a VHA specialty clinic.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, Matthew D; Reinfeld, Courtney; Nair, Prakash V; Garcia, Hector A; Mata-Galan, Emma; Rentz, Timothy O

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluates the effectiveness of manualized cognitive processing therapy (CPT) protocols (individual CPT, CPT group only, and CPT group and individual combined) and manualized prolonged exposure (PE) therapy on veterans' posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in one Veterans Health Administration (VHA) specialty clinic. A total of 517 charts were reviewed, and analyses included 178 charts for CPT and 85 charts for PE. Results demonstrated CPT and PE to significantly reduce PTSD Checklist (PCL) scores. However, PE was significantly more effective than CPT after controlling for variables of age, service era, and ethnicity. Additional findings included different outcomes among CPT formats, decreased treatment dropouts for older veterans, and no significant differences in outcome between Hispanic and White veterans. Study limitations and future research directions are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: A Model for Evaluating and Delivering Stem Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Natalie D.; Feigal, Ellen G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies. PMID:23197634

  13. Evaluation of a fuzzy logic controller for laser thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Vanessa; Sadeghian, Alireza; Sherar, Michael D.; Whelan, William M.

    2002-06-01

    Laser thermal therapy (LTT) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to destroy solid tumors while minimizing damage to adjacent normal tissues. Optical energy, delivered through fibers implanted into the target volume, raises tissue temperatures above 60 degree(s)C resulting in coagulative necrosis (thermal damage). Thermal damage volumes, however, can be irregular and unpredictable, resulting from dynamic changes in the tissue properties during treatment. A closed-loop feedback fuzzy logic controller for LTT was developed with the tissue treated as a black-box system. Preliminary testing was conducted for simulated LTT with a single spherically emitting source fiber at the center of 5 mm and 10 mm diameter target tissues. Dynamic changes in blood perfusion and tissue optical properties due to heating were incorporated into the LTT simulator. Input laser power was modulated to control the temperature field in an attempt to reach target temperatures at the source (90 degree(s)C to avoid tissue charring) and at the target boundary (55 degree(s)C). In all simulations, thermal damage based on Arrhenius formulation ((Omega) equals 1) was reached at the target boundary. The controller also responded efficiently to unexpected, rapid temperature changes.

  14. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  15. Hematopoietic bone marrow recovery after radiation therapy: MRI evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, F.; Ruggiero, C.; Caramella, D.; Tinacci, E.; Villari, N.; Ruggiero, M. )

    1989-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to detect the increase of adipocytes in the hematopoietic bone marrow that occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy and is indicative of the loss of myeloid tissue. By monitoring this process, it is also possible to determine the recovery of the bone marrow. The amount of viable hematopoietic tissue plays a fundamental role in determining whether the patient is able to undergo further antineoplastic therapy, particularly chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients who had been treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (12), uterine cervix carcinoma (nine), ovarian dysgerminoma (six), testicular seminoma (four), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (four). We observed that radiation-induced modifications of the MRI pattern in the bone marrow are tightly linked to two parameters; the administered radiation dose and the length of time passed after the treatment. Bone marrow recovery was observed only when patients were treated with doses lower than 50 Gy. The earlier radiation-induced modifications of the bone marrow MRI pattern occurred 6 to 12 months after irradiation, and they were most evident 5 to 6 years after the treatment. From 2 to 9 years after radiotherapy, we observed partial recovery. Complete recovery, when it occurred, was observed only 10 to 23 years after the treatment. Our results indicate that MRI studies are likely to be useful in the assessment of radiation-induced injuries.

  16. 1,4-Bis(5-(naphthalen-1-yl)thiophen-2-yl)naphthalene, a small molecule, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular Lens epithelium-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wan-gang; Ip, Denis Tsz-Ming; Liu, Si-jie; Chan, Joseph H; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Yong-tang; Wan, David Chi-Cheong

    2014-04-25

    Translocation of viral integrase (IN) into the nucleus is a critical precondition of integration during the life cycle of HIV, a causative agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes (AIDS). As the first discovered cellular factor to interact with IN, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) plays an important role in the process of integration. Disruption of the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction has provided a great interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that one small molecular compound, 1,4-bis(5-(naphthalen-1-yl)thiophen-2-yl)naphthalene(Compound 15), potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution at 1 μM. The putative binding mode of Compound 15 was constructed by a molecular docking simulation to provide structural insights into the ligand-binding mechanism. Compound 15 suppressed viral replication by measuring p24 antigen production in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 cells with EC50 value of 11.19 μM. Compound 15 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Spontaneous secretion of immunoglobulins and anti-HIV-1 antibodies by in vivo activated B lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected subjects: monocyte and natural killer cell requirement for in vitro terminal differentiation into plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anne Marie; Fondere, Jean-Michel; Alix-Panabieres, Catherine; Merle, Corinne; Baillat, Vincent; Huguet, Marie-France; Taïb, Jacques; Ohayon, Viviane; Zembala, Marek; Reynes, Jacques; Vendrell, Jean Pierre

    2002-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1-infected subjects secrete spontaneously in vitro immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies (Ab). Purified B lymphocytes secrete only minute amounts of Ig and anti-HIV-1 Ab compared with unfractionated cells. Monocytes and natural killer cells enhanced both secretions by cell-to-cell contacts, involving adhesion and CD27, CD80 costimulatory molecules and IL-6. Cell interactions prolonged the survival and allowed the terminal maturation of in vivo activated B cells. The secreting cell precursors were highly differentiated B cells expressing a broad diversity of maturation markers (CD27(+), CD38(+), CD20(+/-), CD37(+/-), CD71(+/-), HLA-DQ(+/-), sIg(+/-)) but not sIgD, CD28, or CD40. This phenotype and the cytologic aspect of purified B cells suggest that these cells are early plasma cells originated from germinal center. Ex vivo secreting peripheral B cells had probably gone beyond the CD40/CD40 ligand interaction; then following CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD27 ligand (CD70) interactions in the presence of IL-6, they achieved in vitro their differentiation into plasma cells.

  18. Assembling different antennas of the gp120 high mannose-type glycans on gold nanoparticles provides superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 than the individual antennas.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2015-03-20

    In order to re-build Man9GlcNAc2 clusters of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein, ∼2 nm gold glyconanoparticles (GNPs) were coated with the synthetic partial structures of Man9, the tetramannoside Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3Manα1- and the pentamannoside Manα1-2Manα1-3[Manα1-2Manα1-6]Manα1-. Their interactions with the anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors and saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR spectroscopy. A synergistic effect of the tetra- and pentamannosides multimerized on a same GNP was observed. The assembly of these antennas of the gp120 high-mannose type glycan on GNPs provided superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 with respect to GNPs carrying only the individual oligomannosides. The results presented in this work provide new molecular information on the interactions between clusters of oligomannosides and 2G12 that could help in the design of a carbohydrate-based vaccine against HIV.

  19. Evaluation of Helicobacter Pylori eradication in pediatric patients by triple therapy plus lactoferrin and probiotics compared to triple therapy alone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the addition of a probiotic could improve Helicobacter pylori (H.P.) eradication rates and reduce the side effects of treatment in children. Methods Between July 2008 and July 2011 all patients with a clinical, laboratory and endoscopic diagnosis of H.P. positive gastritis referred to our Unit were included in the study. Patients suffering from allergy to any of drugs used in the study, with previous attempts to eradicate H.P. and those who received antibiotics, PPIs or probiotics within 4 weeks were excluded from the present study. Patients were randomized into two therapy regimens (group A and B): both groups received standard triple treatment (omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin) while only group B patients were also given a probiotic (Probinul - Cadigroup). Patients compliance was evaluated at the end of the treatment. Successful eradication was defined as a negative 13 C-urea breath test (C13-ubt) result four weeks after therapy discontinuation. Results A total of 68 histopathologically proven H.P.-infection children (32 male and 36 females) were included in the study. All of the patients in both groups used more than 90% of the therapies and no patients were lost at follow up. All side effects were selflimiting and disappeared once the therapy was terminated. Epigastric pain was observed in 6 (17.6%) group A vs 2 (5.8%) group B patients (P<0.05), nausea in 3 (8.8%) group A vs 1 (2.9%) group B patients (P<0.05); vomiting and diarrhea were observed in 2(5.8%) and 8 (23.5%) group A patients, respectively and never in group B (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of constipation (5.8% in group A and B). Four weeks after the completion of therapy, 56/68 patients (82.3%) tested negative for H.P. on C13-ubt. H.P. was eradicated in 26 patients (76.4%) in group A and in 30 patients (88.2%) in group B. There was no significantly difference in the rate of H.P. eradication between group A and

  20. Impact of region contouring variability on image-based focal therapy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Eli; Donaldson, Ian A.; Shah, Taimur T.; Hu, Yipeng; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Barratt, Dean C.

    2016-03-01

    Motivation: Focal therapy is an emerging low-morbidity treatment option for low-intermediate risk prostate cancer; however, challenges remain in accurately delivering treatment to specified targets and determining treatment success. Registered multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) acquired before and after treatment can support focal therapy evaluation and optimization; however, contouring variability, when defining the prostate, the clinical target volume (CTV) and the ablation region in images, reduces the precision of quantitative image-based focal therapy evaluation metrics. To inform the interpretation and clarify the limitations of such metrics, we investigated inter-observer contouring variability and its impact on four metrics. Methods: Pre-therapy and 2-week-post-therapy standard-of-care MPMRI were acquired from 5 focal cryotherapy patients. Two clinicians independently contoured, on each slice, the prostate (pre- and post-treatment) and the dominant index lesion CTV (pre-treatment) in the T2-weighted MRI, and the ablated region (post-treatment) in the dynamic-contrast- enhanced MRI. For each combination of clinician contours, post-treatment images were registered to pre-treatment images using a 3D biomechanical-model-based registration of prostate surfaces, and four metrics were computed: the proportion of the target tissue region that was ablated and the target:ablated region volume ratio for each of two targets (the CTV and an expanded planning target volume). Variance components analysis was used to measure the contribution of each type of contour to the variance in the therapy evaluation metrics. Conclusions: 14-23% of evaluation metric variance was attributable to contouring variability (including 6-12% from ablation region contouring); reducing this variability could improve the precision of focal therapy evaluation metrics.

  1. In vitro evaluation of ruthenium complexes for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenna; Xie, Qiang; Lai, Linglin; Mo, Zhentao; Peng, Xiaofang; Leng, Ennian; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hongxia; Li, Yiqi; Mei, Wenjie; Gao, Shuying

    2017-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising anti-tumor treatment strategy. Photosensitizer is one of the most important components of PDT. In this work, the anticancer activities of PDT mediated by six new ruthenium porphyrin complexes were screened. The mechanisms of the most efficacious candidate were investigated. Photocytotoxicity of the six porphyrins was tested. The most promising complex, Rup-03, was further investigated using Geimsa staining, which indirectly detects reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subcellular localization. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, c-Myc gene expression, and telomerase activities were also assayed. Rup-03 and Rup-04 had the lowest IC50 values. Rup-03 had an IC50 value of 29.5±2.3μM in HepG2 cells and 59.0±6.1μM in RAW264.7 cells, while Rup-04 had an IC50 value of 40.0±3.8μM in SGC-7901 cells. The complexes also induced cellular morphological changes and impaired cellular ability to scavenge ROS, and accumulated preferentially in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Rup-03 reduced MMP levels, induced apoptosis, and repressed both c-Myc mRNA expression and telomerase activity in HepG2 cells. Among six candidates, Rup-03-mediated PDT is most effective against HepG2 and RAW264.7, with a similar efficacy as that of Rup-04-mediated PDT against SGC-7901 cells. Repression of ROS scavenging activities and c-Myc expression, which mediated DNA damage-induced cell apoptosis and repression of telomerase activity, respectively, were found to be involved in the anticancer mechanisms of Rup-03. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  3. Predialysis versus postdialysis hematocrit evaluation during erythropoietin therapy.

    PubMed

    Movilli, Ezio; Pertica, Nicoletta; Camerini, Corrado; Cancarini, Giovanni C; Brunori, Giuliano; Scolari, Francesco; Maiorca, Rosario

    2002-04-01

    American guidelines for the management of renal anemia by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) recommend collecting a predialysis blood sample to evaluate hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) levels in hemodialysis patients. Although a predialysis blood sample is appropriate for evaluating when to start rHuEPO treatment, the same sample would not be appropriate for evaluating the target Hb/Hct to be maintained, particularly when normal or near-normal values are pursued. We measured the degree of intradialytic and extradialytic variation of Hb, Hct, and body weight in 68 stable hemodialysis patients on maintenance subcutaneous rHuEPO treatment. Hb and Hct concentrations were determined before and after dialysis. In 16 patients, Hb and Hct concentrations also were assessed 24 hours after the end of dialysis. Predialysis versus postdialysis Hb and Hct concentrations for all patients were 10.5 +/- 1.3 g/dL versus 11.5 +/- 1.3 g/dL (P < 0.0001) and 32 +/- 4% versus 35 +/- 4% (P < 0.0001). The intradialytic percent variation (%Delta) of Hct and body weight were 10 +/- 6% and -6.3 +/- 3.5%. There was a close inverse correlation between %Delta of Hct and Hb and %Delta of body weight (P < 0.0001). In patients with body weight losses 2.5 kg or more per session, the mean %Delta of Hct was 12 +/- 7%. In the 16 patients studied 24 hours after the end of the dialysis session, Hct and Hb values remained significantly higher compared with the predialysis levels (P < 0.001), suggesting a slow reequilibration of the intravascular volume in the first 24 hours after hemodialysis. For these reasons, predialysis samples for monitoring the target Hb and Hct levels in patients treated by rHuEPO should be considered with caution.

  4. Evaluation of dog owners' perceptions concerning radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Denneberg, Nanna Åkerlund; Egenvall, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Background External radiation therapy (RT) has been available for small animals in Sweden since 2006. This study was designed to obtain information on owner experiences and perceptions related to RT of cancer in their dogs. Another survey was used to determine the attitudes about use of RT in a group of Swedish veterinarians. Their responses were analyzed and compared to their level of knowledge of oncology and RT. Methods Owners of all dogs (n = 23) who had undergone RT for malignancy at Jönköping Small Animal Hospital between March 2006 to September 2007 were interviewed. A questionnaire was given to a selected group of veterinarians. Results All 23 owners responded. All owners thought that their dog did well during RT and most that their dog was also fine during the following phase when acute RT-related skin reactions occur and heal. Three owners stated that their dog had pain that negatively impacted quality of life because of radiation dermatitis. Five owners reported that RT positively impacted quality of life of the dog during the first weeks after RT because palliation was achieved. The owners were not disturbed by the efforts required of them. All but one owner (22 of 23) stated that they would make the same decision about RT again if a similar situation occurred. The most important factor for this decision was the chance to delay occurrence of tumour-related discomfort. The chance for cure was of less importance but still essential, followed by expected side effects. Time commitments, travel, number of treatments required and financial cost; all had low impact. The veterinarian survey showed that less background knowledge of small animal oncology/RT was associated with more negative expectations of RT for small animals. Conclusion The results show that for these owners, RT was a worthwhile treatment modality and that the discomfort for the dog was manageable and acceptable relative to the benefits. Improved continuing education about small animal RT in

  5. Evaluation of lung tumor response to therapy: Current and emerging techniques.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2016-10-01

    Lung tumor response to therapy may be evaluated in most instances by morphological criteria such as RECIST 1.1 on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, those criteria are limited because they are based on tumoral dimensional changes and do not take into account other morphologic criteria such as density evaluation, functional or metabolic changes that may occur following conventional or targeted chemotherapy. New techniques such as dual-energy CT, PET-CT, MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI has to be considered into the new technical armamentarium for tumor response evaluation. Integration of all informations provided by the different imaging modalities has to be integrated and represents probably the future goal of tumor response evaluation. The aim of the present paper is to review the current and emerging imaging criteria used to evaluate the response of therapy in the field of lung cancer.

  6. Evaluating the cost of therapy for restenosis: considerations for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, W S

    1996-11-01

    Costs have become increasingly important in medicine in recent years as demand for services has outstripped readily available resources. Clinical microeconomics offers an approach to understanding cost and outcomes in an environment of economic scarcity. In this article the types of costs and methods for determining cost are presented. In addition, methods for assessing outcome and outcome in relation to cost are developed. Restenosis after coronary angioplasty is a prime example of a clinical problem requiring economic evaluation. This is because it results in little serious morbidity except for recurrent chest pain, but it has serious economic consequences which occur some time after the original angioplasty. This makes the economic assessment of restenosis complicated. The application of health care microeconomic principles to brachytherapy for restenosis in the coronary arteries is presented.

  7. Evaluation of current trends and recent development in insulin therapy for management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Rehman, Asim Ur; Rashid, Haroon Ur; Mahmood, Sajid; Khan, Shahzeb; Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid

    2017-07-08

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem in developing countries. There are various insulin therapies to manage diabetes mellitus. This systematic review evaluates various insulin therapies for management of diabetes mellitus worldwide. This review also focuses on recent developments being explored for better management of diabetes mellitus. We reviewed a number of published articles from 2002 to 2016 to find out the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus. The paramount parameters of the selected studies include the insulin type & its dose, type of diabetes, duration and comparison of different insulin protocols. In addition, various newly developed approaches for insulin delivery with potential output have also been evaluated. A great variability was observed in managing diabetes mellitus through insulin therapy and the important controlling factors found for this therapy include; dose titration, duration of insulin use, type of insulin used and combination therapy of different insulin. A range of research articles on current trends and recent advances in insulin has been summarized, which led us to the conclusion that multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump) is the best method to manage diabetes mellitus. In future perspectives, development of the oral and inhalant insulin would be a tremendous breakthrough in Insulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychological therapies including dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder: a systematic review and preliminary economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J; Tumur, I; Holmes, M; Ferriter, M; Parry, G; Dent-Brown, K; Paisley, S

    2006-09-01

    To summarise the available evidence on the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychological therapies including dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Electronic databases were searched up to March 2005. Relevant studies were assessed using standard checklists and data were abstracted by two reviewers using standardised forms. Separate economic evaluations were undertaken for six selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Cost-effectiveness was assessed in terms of cost per parasuicide event avoided in all six trials and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) in four of them. All results are at 2003-4 prices and for 12 months follow-up. Nine RCTs and one non-RCT of moderate to poor quality were identified in the clinical effectiveness review. They provided some evidence that DBT is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) for the treatment of chronically parasuicidal and drug-dependent borderline women; that DBT-orientated therapy is more effective than client-centred therapy (CCT) for the treatment of BPD; and that DBT is as effective as comprehensive validation therapy plus 12-Step for the treatment of opioid-dependent borderline women. There was also some evidence that partial hospitalisation is more effective than TAU in the treatment of BPD, good evidence that manual-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy (MACT) is no more effective than TAU in the treatment of BPD and some evidence that interpersonal group therapy is no more effective than individual mentalisation-based partial hospitalisation (MBT) for the treatment of BPD. However, these results should be interpreted with caution as not all studies were primarily targeted to borderline symptoms and there were considerable differences between the studies. The assessment of cost-effectiveness found a mix of results in the four trials of DBT, along with the high levels of uncertainty and the limitations in the analyses. The findings do not

  9. Evaluation of ifosfamide salvage therapy for metastatic canine osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Batschinski, K; Dervisis, N G; Kitchell, B E

    2014-12-01

    A retrospective study was performed to assess toxicity and response rate of ifosfamide salvage treatment for dogs diagnosed with metastatic osteosarcoma (OSA). Dogs diagnosed with OSA and previously treated with standard chemotherapy were included in the study. Nineteen dogs met the inclusion criteria, and 17 dogs were evaluable for response. Ifosfamide doses ranged from 375 to 425 mg m(-2) (median dose 375 mg m(-2)), with a median of two doses administered per dog (range 1-7 doses). The overall response to ifosfamide was 11.8% [complete response (CR) = 1/17, partial response (PR) = 1/17, stable disease (SD) = 2/17, progressive disease (PD) = 13/17]. Two dogs were hospitalized due to ifosfamide toxicosis. The median survival duration from the first dose of ifosfamide to death was 95 days. Ifosfamide was well tolerated, but minor anti-tumour activity was observed.

  10. Synthesis, Anti-HIV Activity, and Metabolic Stability of New Alkenyldiarylmethane (ADAM) HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bo-Liang; Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Cushman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) are part of the combination therapy currently used to treat HIV infection. Based on analogy with known HIV-1 NNRT inhibitors, eighteen novel alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) containing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl, 3-cyanophenyl or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups were synthesized and evaluated as HIV inhibitors. Their stabilities in rat plasma have also been investigated. Although introducing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl, or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups into alkenyldiarylmethanes does not maintain the antiviral potency, the structural modification of alkenyldiarylmethanes with a 3-cyanophenyl substituent can be made without a large decrease in activity. The oxazolidinonyl group was introduced into the alkenyldiarylmethane framework and found to confer enhanced metabolic stability in rat plasma. PMID:16162014

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of hypericin for photodynamic therapy of equine sarcoids.

    PubMed

    Martens, A; de Moor, A; Waelkens, E; Merlevede, W; De Witte, P

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of the photodynamic compound, hypericin, in the treatment of equine sarcoids was evaluated. The in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed using three equine cell lines and the observed phototoxic effect was comparable to that on different highly sensitive human cell lines and significantly influenced by the energy density used although independent of the cell type. The in vivo antitumoural action of photodynamic therapy using hypericin was evaluated on three equine sarcoids in a donkey. Four intratumoural injections were given and the tumours were illuminated daily during 25 days. An 81% reduction in tumour volume was obtained at the end of therapy and 2 months later, a 90% reduction was observed. Further experimental work should be performed, but these results suggest that photodynamic therapy using hypericin has a potential for the non-invasive treatment of equine sarcoids.

  12. Quality and Reporting of Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Occupational Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokolahi, Ema; Hocking, Clare; Kersten, Paula; Vandal, Alain C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cluster randomized control trials (RCTs) in health care research requires careful attention to study designs, with implications for the development of an evidence base for practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the characteristics, quality, and reporting of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy interventions to inform future research design. An extensive search of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy was conducted in several databases. Fourteen studies met our inclusion criteria; four were protocols. Eleven (79%) justified the use of a cluster RCT and accounted for clustering in the sample size and analysis. All full studies reported the number of clusters randomized, and five reported intercluster correlation coefficients (50%): Protocols had higher compliance. Risk of bias was most evident in unblinding of participants. Statistician involvement was associated with improved trial quality and reporting. Quality of cluster RCTs of occupational therapy interventions is comparable with those from other areas of health research and needs improvement. PMID:27504689

  13. Prospective phase I evaluation of radiation therapy, 5-fluorouracil, and levamisole in locally advanced gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Martenson, J A; Schutt, A J; Grado, G L; Maples, W J; Marschke, R F

    1994-01-15

    A recent clinical trial in patients with resected node-positive colon cancer demonstrated a clear survival advantage for patients treated with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil and levamisole. This finding led to interest in development of a Phase III trial comparing 5-fluorouracil and levamisole with 5-fluorouracil, levamisole, and radiation therapy in colon cancer patients at high risk for local recurrence. A prospective evaluation of 5-fluorouracil, levamisole, and radiation therapy was undertaken with the goal of establishing a satisfactorily tolerated regimen. Fifteen patients were studied who had locally advanced or locally recurrent upper abdominal gastrointestinal cancer (11 patients) or large bowel cancer confined to the pelvis (4 patients). The tumor and regional lymph nodes received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients with pelvic tumors subsequently were treated with a radiation boost of 5.4-9 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Systemic therapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil, 450 mg/m2, given intravenously for 3 consecutive days during the first and last weeks of radiation therapy. Levamisole, 50 mg, given orally 3 times daily was used for 3 consecutive days concurrent with initiation of radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil, at the beginning of the third week of radiation therapy, and concurrent with the final 3-day course of 5-fluorouracil. Therapy was generally well tolerated. In two patients, > or = grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity developed and consisted of transient small bowel obstruction in one and severe nausea and vomiting related to levamisole administration in another. One patient experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity with a leukocyte count nadir of 1,600 cells/microL. These results are similar to the toxicity profile reported elsewhere for radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil. The addition of levamisole to radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil does not appear to increase toxicity significantly.

  14. 75 FR 17412 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property... Treatment and Diagnosis, is seeking comments on a proposed revision to its policy on intellectual property...) INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OPTION. The proposed policy, if finalized, would establish that potential applicants for...

  15. Music Therapy Evaluation Study for Department of Health and Welfare Demonstration Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Carolyn, Ed.

    Reported are the findings of a project to evaluate the effectiveness of music therapy with disturbed or otherwise handicapped individuals in a number of different clinical settings. Following an introduction which outlines the project's objectives, a brief section discusses research methodology. The remainder of the document includes a larger…

  16. Evaluation of an Occupational Therapy Mentorship Program: Effects on Therapists' Skills and Family-Centered Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Tam, Cynthia; Fay, Linda; Pilkington, Martha; Servais, Michelle; Petrosian, Hasmik

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the usefulness of mentorship programs for children's rehabilitation service providers. This evaluation study examined the effects of an occupational therapy mentorship program on the skills and behaviors of 8 new and 17 experienced occupational therapists practicing at a regional children's rehabilitation…

  17. A Field Training Model for Creative Arts Therapies: Report from a 3-Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkibi, Hod

    2012-01-01

    Clinical field training is an essential component of educating future therapists. This article discusses a creative arts therapies field training model in Israel as designed and modified from 3 years of program evaluation in a changing regulatory context. A clinical seminar structure puts beginning students in the role of participant-observer in…

  18. 76 FR 13404 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, is announcing the final revision of the NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation... Register of April 6, 2010 (FR Vol. 65, No. 65), the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment... Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD...

  19. Evaluation of DIABNET, a decision support system for therapy planning in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M E; Gómez, E J; Corcoy, R; del Pozo, F

    2000-07-01

    DIABNET is a knowledge-based system designed to aid doctors with therapy planning in gestational diabetes. The system core is a qualitative model, implemented by a Causal Probabilistic Network, that is able to detect the insulin effectiveness on a daily basis. DIABNET analyses monitoring data and proposes quantitative changes in insulin therapy and qualitative diet modifications. This paper proposes an evaluation methodology to assess the system performance when working in a real scenario. The methodology manages the absence of a gold standard and includes: a subjective analysis based on questionnaires and an objective analysis based on a quantitative comparison of the system's and experts' proposals. The paper also shows the results of two experiments in whi