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Sample records for evaluate pharmacokinetics safety

  1. Pharmacokinetics and preliminary safety evaluation of azithromycin in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Leclere, M; Magdesian, K G; Cole, C A; Szabo, N J; Ruby, R E; Rhodes, D M; Edman, J; Vale, A; Wilson, W D; Tell, L A

    2012-12-01

    Azithromycin is widely used in foals but has not been studied in adult horses. The goals of this study were to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and to make a preliminary assessment of the safety of azithromycin in adult horses. Azithromycin was administered intravenously (5 mg/kg) and intragastrically (10 mg/kg) to six healthy mares in a crossover design. Serial plasma samples, blood neutrophils, and pulmonary macrophages were collected for the measurement of azithromycin concentrations. Azithromycin was also administered orally (10 mg/kg) once a day for 5 days to five healthy mares for preliminary evaluation of safety in adult horses. The bioavailability of azithromycin following intragastric administration was 45 ± 12%. Concentrations within peripheral neutrophils and bronchoalveolar macrophages were several fold higher than that of plasma. Mild decreases in appetite (n = 3) and alterations in fecal consistency (n = 3) were noted following repeated oral administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of azithromycin in adult horses, especially the slow elimination rate and intraneutrophil and intrapulmonary macrophage accumulation, demonstrate that it is conducive to use in this age group. Because of the gastrointestinal alterations noted, further studies are warranted before azithromycin can be recommended for use in adult horses.

  2. FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS FOR USE IN SAFETY OR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Proposed applications of increasingly sophisticated biologically-based computational models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, raise the issue of how to evaluate whether the models are adequate for proposed uses including safety or risk ...

  3. The Sheep as a Model of Preclinical Safety and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of Candidate Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. PMID:25845860

  4. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  5. Pharmacokinetic study and evaluation of the safety of taurolidine for dogs with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma in dogs and humans share many similarities and the dog has been described as an excellent model to study this disease. The median survival in dogs has not improved in the last 25 years. Taurolidine has been shown to be cytotoxic to canine and human osteosarcoma in vitro. The goals of this study were to determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of taurolidine in healthy dogs and the safety of taurolidine in combination with doxorubicin or carboplatin in dogs with osteosarcoma. Methods Two percent taurolidine was infused into six healthy dogs (150 mg/kg) over a period of two hours and blood samples were taken periodically. One dog received taurolidine with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as its carrier and later received PVP-free taurolidine as did all other dogs in this study. Serum taurolidine concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) online coupled to ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Subsequently, the same dose of taurolidine was infused to seven dogs with osteosarcoma also treated with doxorubicin or carboplatin. Results Taurolidine infusion was safe in 6 healthy dogs and there were no significant side effects. Maximum taurolidine serum concentrations ranged between 229 to 646 μM. The dog that received taurolidine with PVP had an immediate allergic reaction but recovered fully after the infusion was stopped. Three additional dogs with osteosarcoma received doxorubicin and taurolidine without PVP. Toxicities included dilated cardiomyopathy, protein-losing nephropathy, renal insufficiency and vasculopathy at the injection site. One dog was switched to carboplatin instead of doxorubicin and an additional 4 dogs with osteosarcoma received taurolidine-carboplatin combination. One incidence of ototoxicity occurred with the taurolidine- carboplatin combination. Bone marrow and gastro-intestinal toxicity did not appear increased with taurolidine over doxorubicin or carboplatin alone

  6. Evaluation of Herbal Medicines: Value Addition to Traditional Medicines Through Metabolism, Pharmacokinetic and Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Thelingwani, Roslyn; Masimirembwa, Collen

    2014-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of herbal medicines remain major issues of concern especially in the developing world where the use is high. The World Health Organisation estimates up to 80% of the population in Africa relies on herbal medicines for treatment of many diseases. Minimum safety evaluations need to be done for both the herbal and conventional drugs, in particular when there is a high likelihood of co-administration. This is particularly important in Africa where there is increased access to antiretrovirals in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, which are being used in a population background characterized by rampant use of herbal medicines. Many techniques used in the discovery and evaluation of conventional drugs can be adapted to herbal medicines. Such evaluations will add value to herbal medicines as doctors and patients will be better informed on which drugs and herbal medicines to take or not take together. This can also lead to the adoption of guidelines by regulatory agents such as the European Medicines Agency (EMA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and governmental agencies controlling the use of medicines. Of current interest is the evaluation of drug-herb interactions (DHI) involving the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of medicines where there is a promising possibility to adopt the current FDA and EMA guidelines on the evaluation of herbal medicines for drug-drug interactions (DDI). In this review we demonstrate progress made so far in DHI and point to possible future developments that will contribute to the safe use of herbal medicines.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and safety evaluation of the use of ciprofloxacin on an isoniazid-rifampicin regimen in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Padilha, Elias Carvalho; Pires, Rodrigo Vieira; Filho, Marco Antonio Ferraz Nogueira; de Pontes Machado, Diego Vinicius; Baldan, Helen Mariana; Davanço, Marcelo Gomes; Campos, Michel Leandro; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    The combination of isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and pyrazinamide (PYR) is used in the treatment of tuberculosis. Although this treatment is effective in most clinical cases, the side-effects and the development of mycobacterium resistance have hindered its success. There is evidence that the combination of INH, RMP and ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) is useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. However, the influence of this drug combination on the hepatotoxicity of INH is unknown. In this study, the safety of combined INH, RMP and CIPRO was evaluated. Male albino rabbits (n = 20) were divided into four groups and subjected to multiple oral doses for 7 days according to the following treatments: water (group 1); 50 mg/kg INH (group 2); 50 mg/kg INH + 100 mg/kg RMP (group 3) and 50 mg/kg INH + 100 mg/kg RMP + 50 mg/kg CIPRO (group 4). Blood samples were taken before and after treatments for the determination of ALT, AST, ALP and bilirubin to assess hepatotoxicity. For pharmacokinetic analysis, serial blood samples were collected over 24 h on day 7 of treatment. Plasma concentrations of INH and acetylisoniazid (AcINH) were determined by HPLC. Biochemical parameters did not show any statistically significant differences between the groups that received the drug combinations. The pharmacokinetic profile of INH was also similar for both groups of combinations. These findings allow us to infer that the inclusion of CIPRO did not increase the risk of hepatotoxicity when compared with the classic combination of INH and RMP.

  8. Phase I Combination of Sorafenib and Erlotinib Therapy in Solid Tumors: Safety, Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation from an Expansion Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Quintela-Fandino, Miguel; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Duran, Ignacio; Chen, Eric X.; Wang, Lisa; Tsao, Ming; Bandarchi-Chamkhaleh, Bizhan; Pham, Nhu-Ann; Do, Trevor; MacLean, Martha; Nayyar, Rakesh; Tusche, Michael W.; Metser, Ur; Wright, John J.; Mak, Tak W.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to further define the safety of sorafenib and erlotinib, given at their full approved monotherapy doses, and to correlate pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) markers with clinical outcome. In addition, a novel PD marker based on the real-time measurement of RAF signal transduction capacity (STC) is described. Sorafenib was administered alone for a one-week run-in period, and then both drugs were given together continuously. RAF STC was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes prior to erlotinib initiation. EGFR expression and K-RAS mutations were measured in archival tumor samples. Changes in pERK and CD31 were determined in fresh tumor biopsies obtained pre-treatment, prior to erlotinib dosing and during the administration of both drugs. In addition, PET-CT scans and PK assessments were performed. Eleven patients received a total of 57 cycles (median: 5, range: 1–10). Only 4 patients received full doses of both drugs for the entire study course, with elevation of liver enzymes being the main reason for dose reductions and delays. Among 10 patients evaluable for response, 8 experienced tumor stabilization of 4 or more cycles. PK analysis revealed no significant interaction of erlotinib with sorafenib. Sorafenib-induced decrease in RAF-STC showed statistically significant correlation with time-to-progression in 7 patients. Other PD markers did not correlate with clinical outcome. This drug combination resulted in promising clinical activity in solid tumor patients although significant toxicity warrants close monitoring. RAF-STC deserves further study as a predictive marker for sorafenib. PMID:20197396

  9. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  10. Non-clinical safety and pharmacokinetic evaluations of propylene glycol aerosol in Sprague-Dawley rats and Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Werley, Michael S; McDonald, Paddy; Lilly, Patrick; Kirkpatrick, Daniel; Wallery, Jeffrey; Byron, Peter; Venitz, Jürgen

    2011-09-05

    Aerosolized propylene glycol (PG) was generated as log-normally distributed particulate clouds in different concentrations using a novel capillary aerosol generator (CAG) and evaluated in a battery of non-clinical studies intended to assess its potential inhalation and systemic toxicity in 2 species before ICH-compliant "first-time-in-man" studies. Exposures were nose-only in rats, and via face mask with oropharyngeal tube in dogs. The CAG-generated PG aerosol had a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 2.29μm, with a 1.56 geometric standard deviation (GSD) in the rat studies, and a MMAD of 1.34μm (1.45 GSD) in the dog studies, consistent with expected particle size exposures in man. International Congress on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines were followed, which recommend preliminary non-clinical safety studies using the vehicle and device (CAG-PG) prior to the first human exposure including safety pharmacology, pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, single dose toxicity studies, and repeated dose toxicity studies in two species. In the rat, the only biologically relevant findings included clinical signs of ocular and nasal irritation indicated by minor bleeding around the eyes and nose, and minimal laryngeal squamous metaplasia. This finding is commonly observed in inhalation studies in the rat, and likely related to the unique sensitivity of the tissue, as well as the circuitous airflow pathway through the larynx which increases particle deposition. In the female Beagle dog, treatment-related decreases in hemoglobin, red blood cells and hematocrit were observed in the two highest exposure groups, equivalent to approximately 18 and 60mg/kg/day. In male dogs from the high dose group, similar small decreases, albeit, non-statistically significant decreases were observed in these hematological markers as well. PK studies in rats and dogs showed that the absorption of PG following pulmonary inhalation exposure occurs rapidly, and equilibrium between lung tissue and plasma

  11. Pharmacokinetic and Safety Evaluation of BILR 355, a Second-Generation Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fenglei; Koenen-Bergmann, Michael; MacGregor, Thomas R.; Ring, Arne; Hattox, Susan; Robinson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    BILR 355 is a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) under clinical development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection, particularly in those who harbor virus resistant to the currently available NNRTIs. Two single-center, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel dose-escalation studies were conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral BILR 355 administration alone and after coadministration with ritonavir (RTV) at 100 mg. Following a single dose of BILR 355 in oral solution, the mean half life (t1/2) was 2 to 4 h, with peak concentrations occurring at 0.5 to 1 h postadministration. The mean apparent clearance (CL/F) ranged from 79.2 to 246 liters/h for administered doses of 12.5 mg to 100 mg. This observed nonlinearity in CL/F resulted from the increased bioavailability attributed to a saturated absorption and/or elimination process at higher doses. In contrast, after the coadministration of single doses of 5 mg to 87.5 mg of BILR 355 with RTV, the mean CL/F ranged from 5.88 to 8.47 liters/h. Over the dose range (5 to 87.5 mg) studied, systemic BILR 355 exposures were approximately proportional to the doses administered when they were coadministered with RTV. With RTV coadministration, the mean t1/2 increased to 10 to 16 h, and the mean time of the maximum concentration in plasma lengthened to 1.5 to 5 h. Compared to the values for BILR 355 given alone, the mean area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity, the maximum concentration in plasma, and the t1/2 of BILR 355 achieved after coadministration with RTV increased 15- to 30-fold, 2- to 5-fold, and 3- to 5-fold, respectively. In both studies, BILR 355 appeared to be safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers when the outcomes in the treated volunteers were compared with those in the placebo group. PMID:18824608

  12. A Randomized Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Trabodenoson in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Laties, Alan; Rich, Cadmus C.; Stoltz, Randall; Humbert, Vernon; Brickman, Chaim; McVicar, William

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of trabodenoson, a highly selective adenosine mimetic targeting the adenosine A1 receptor. Methods: In Part 1, 60 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to 14 days of twice-daily topical monocular application of placebo or trabodenoson (200, 400, 800, 1,600, 2,400, or 3,200 μg). In Part 2, 10 subjects were randomized to placebo or 8 escalating doses of bilateral trabodenoson (total daily doses: 1,800–6,400 μg). Results: The incidence of treatment-related adverse events in Part 1 was similar in the trabodenoson (27.8%) and placebo (25.0%) groups. Most were mild in intensity. The most common adverse events (AEs) for trabodenoson and placebo were headache (25.0% vs. 33%, respectively) and eye pain (11.1% vs. 4.2%, respectively). Ocular AEs were infrequent (16.7% and 17.9%, respectively), were self-limited, lasted <24 h, and were typically mild in intensity. The most common ocular AE was eye pain (9.5% and 3.6%, respectively), with a single observation of ocular hyperemia (200 μg trabodenoson). Trabodenoson was rapidly absorbed [median time to maximum concentration (tmax): ∼0.08 to 0.27 h] and eliminated (t½: 0.48–2.0 h), with no evidence of drug accumulation. Systemic exposure to topical trabodenoson was dose related but not dose proportional, with a plateau effect at doses ≥2,400 mg per eye. No clinically significant treatment-related systemic AEs were observed, and increasing systemic exposure had no effect on heart rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Ocular doses of trabodenoson up to 3,200 μg per eye were safe and well tolerated in the eye and resulted in no detectable systemic effects in healthy adult volunteers. PMID:27046445

  13. Development of safety profile evaluating pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity of a combination of pioglitazone and olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Nandi, Utpal; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), an antidiabetic drug and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), an antihypertensive drug were administered orally alone and in combination to Wistar albino rats for evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity of individual drugs and their combination. Pharmacokinetic study was performed by orally administering PIO and OLM at single dose of 3 and 2mg/kg, respectively alone and in combination analyzing the plasma samples using LC-MS/MS. Antidiabetic activity evaluation was done in type-2 diabetes mellitus induced animals at same dose level as in pharmacokinetic study daily for 30 days. PIO and/or OLM were administered orally to animals at daily doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days for toxicity study. There was no significant alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of either drug indicating absence of any pharmacokinetic interaction when co-administered. Positive pharmacodynamic interaction between PIO and OLM was established in this study. Two drugs in combination showed no evidence of potentiation of 28-day repeated dose toxicity in animals. Again, drugs, alone and in combination, caused only minor changes in clinical-laboratory tests and histopathological change was not found in the experiment performed. In conclusion, PIO and OLM combination can primarily be stated as safe in terms of present toxicity and pharmacokinetics findings.

  14. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16 h predose to 24 h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1–6. At 1 mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  15. Evaluation of the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction potential of a selective Lp-PLA2 inhibitor (GSK2647544) in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Fong, Regan; Yao, Xiaozhou; Xu, Yanmei; Guiney, William; Gray, Frank; Lockhart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Objective: To evaluate in healthy volunteers the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of GSK2647544, (a selective lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) inhibitor). Methods: Study 1 was a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study with healthy male volunteers randomized to receive single escalating oral doses (0.5 – 750 mg) of GSK2647544. Study 2 was a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with healthy volunteers randomized to receive repeat doses (80 mg) of GSK2647544. The drug-drug interaction of GSK2647544 with simvastatin was also evaluated in study 2. Results: Across both studies GSK2647544 doses were generally well tolerated with no GSK2647544-related clinically significant findings. GSK2647544 was readily absorbed and its plasma concentration declined bi-exponentially with a terminal half-life ranging from 8 to 16 hours. Plasma exposure of GSK2647544 increased approximately dose-proportionally. There was GSK2647544 dose-dependent inhibition of plasma Lp-PLA2 activity, with a trough inhibition (12 hours after dose) of 85.6% after 7-day twice daily dosing. The administration of simvastatin concomitantly with GSK2647544 increased the overall exposure (area under the plasma concentration-time curve and maximum plasma concentration) of simvastatin and simvastatin acid by 3.6- to 4.3-fold and 1.5- to 3.1-fold, respectively. Conclusions: GSK2647544 was generally well tolerated and had a reasonable PK-PD profile. The clinically significant drug-drug interaction led to an early termination of study 2. PMID:27719741

  16. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of bosentan in portopulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Savale, Laurent; Magnier, Romain; Le Pavec, Jérôme; Jaïs, Xavier; Montani, David; O'Callaghan, Dermot S; Humbert, Marc; Dingemanse, Jasper; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Data on treatment of patients with portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) are limited, as they are usually excluded from randomised controlled trials with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapies. This study investigated the short- and long-term efficacy/safety of bosentan in these patients, as well as its pharmacokinetics. All 34 consecutive patients with PoPH treated with first-line bosentan (December 2002 to July 2009) were retrospectively evaluated. Assessments included the New York Heart Association functional class (NYHA FC), blood tests, haemodynamics, 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and event-free status. The pharmacokinetics of bosentan in five patients with Child-Pugh (C-P) class B cirrhosis were compared with idiopathic PAH patients. Significant improvements from baseline were observed in NYHA FC, 6 MWD and haemodynamics, and were largely maintained during follow-up. Patients with C-P class B cirrhosis (n=9) had significantly larger haemodynamic improvement after mean ± SD 5 ± 2 months. Mean follow-up time was 43 ± 19 months; four patients died and seven patients had significant elevation of liver enzymes (annual rate 5.5%). Plasma concentrations of bosentan were higher in patients with C-P class B cirrhosis than those observed in idiopathic PAH. These data confirm the benefit of bosentan treatment for patients with PoPH. Haemodynamic improvements were particularly pronounced in patients with more severe cirrhosis. The safety profile of bosentan was consistent with previous studies.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and safety of intravitreal caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Cheng; Liang, Chiao-Ying; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Lin, Keng-Hung; Hsu, Min-Yen; Yuen, Hon-Leung; Wei, Li-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Caspofungin exhibits potent antifungal activities against Candida and Aspergillus species. The elimination rate and retinal toxicity of caspofungin were determined in this study to assess its pharmacokinetics and safety in the treatment of fungal endophthalmitis. Intravitreal injections of 50 μg/0.1 ml of caspofungin were administered to rabbits. Levels of caspofungin in the vitreous and aqueous humors were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at selected time intervals (10 min and 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 h), and the half-lives were calculated. Eyes were intravitreally injected with caspofungin to obtain concentrations of 10 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, and 200 μg/ml. Electroretinograms were recorded 4 weeks after injections, and the injected eyes were examined histologically. The concentrations of intravitreal caspofungin at various time points exhibited an exponential decay with a half-life of 6.28 h. The mean vitreous concentration was 6.06 ± 1.76 μg/ml 1 h after intravitreal injection, and this declined to 0.47 ± 0.15 μg/ml at 24 h. The mean aqueous concentration showed undetectable levels at all time points. There were no statistical differences in scotopic a-wave and b-wave responses between control eyes and caspofungin-injected eyes. No focal necrosis or other abnormality in retinal histology was observed. Intravitreal caspofungin injection may be considered to be an alternative treatment for fungal endophthalmitis based on its antifungal activity, lower retinal toxicity, and lower elimination rate in the vitreous. More clinical data are needed to determine its potential role as primary therapy for fungal endophthalmitis.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of eszopiclone in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Zhao, X L; Wei, M J; Wang, S M; Zhou, H; Guo, S J; Zhang, P

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic characters of eszopiclone (CAS: 138729-47-2) after single and multiple-dose oral administration in healthy adult Chinese volunteers.In single-dose study, 12 subjects were given oral administrations of 1.5, 3 and 6 mg eszopiclone in an open-label, randomized, crossover fashion. In multiple-dose study, 8 subjects were given 3 mg eszopiclone once daily consecutively for 7 days. Blood samples were collected over 24 h and plasma eszopiclone were determined using a validated liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay. The safety and tolerability of eszopiclone was evaluated by adverse events recording, physical examination, laboratory testing, vital signs, and 12-lead ECG findings.The main pharmacokinetic parameters of eszopiclone after single-dose administration were as follows: doses of 1.5, 3 and 6 mg; Cmax of 18.08±4.65, 38.29±15.41 and 76.38±23.34 ng/ml; Tmax of 0.94±0.39, 1.04±0.63 and 1.08±0.51 h; AUC0-24 of 110.90±23.06, 227.36±62.41 and 504.10±140.13 ng*h/ml; elimination half-lives of 5.84±1.03, 5.53±1.91 and 6.17±1.23 h. After multiple-dose administration, the steady-state levels of eszopiclone were achieved by the 4th day, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were Css_max at 33.43±5.63 ng/ml and AUCss (0-24) at 263.30±51.21 ng*h/ml. The most common adverse event was bitter or abnormal taste. All the adverse events were judged as mild to moderate and resolved without any medication.The pharmacokinetic character of eszopiclone is linear and dose-proportional over the range of 1.5-6 mg. The systemic exposure does not accumulate with once-daily administrations. Eszopiclone appears to have good safety and is well tolerated.

  19. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of an ibuprofen-pseudoephedrine cold suspension in children.

    PubMed

    Gelotte, Cathy K; Prior, Mary Jane; Pendley, Charles; Zimmerman, Brenda; Lavins, Bernard J

    2010-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to characterize multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and potential drug interactions of ibuprofen and pseudoephedrine combined in a suspension and to evaluate safety of this combination in children with common cold, flu, or sinusitis. In the pharmacokinetic study, 24 healthy children aged 4-11 years were administered ibuprofen -pseudoephedrine suspension at 7.5 and 1.125 mg/kg, respectively, every 6 hours for 5 doses. Serial blood samples were drawn over 6 hours after final dose for assessment of steady-state pharmacokinetics. In the open-label, multicenter safety study, more than 100 children aged 2-11 years experiencing symptomatic rhinitis were enrolled. Ibuprofen -pseudoephedrine suspension was administered as needed at similar mg/kg doses every 6-8 hours for up to 3 days. Subjects enrolled in the pharmacokinetic study showed no accumulation of either drug; their weight-adjusted clearances were independent of age, and results were comparable with those from previous single-ingredient studies. For ibuprofen, oral clearance (Cl/F) was 77.5 + or - 16.4 mL/kg/h and volume of distribution (Vd/F) was 0.147 + or - 0.037 L/kg. For pseudoephedrine, Cl/F was 12.3 + or - 2.2 mL/kg/min and Vd/F was 2.52 + or - 0.47 L/kg. In the safety study, adverse events were reported for 18.4% of subjects; most were mild to moderate intensity. There was little difference in incidence of adverse events among different age and weight groups. In conclusion, administration of combined ibuprofen and pseudoephedrine in children demonstrated similar pharmacokinetics when compared with reports of the pharmacokinetics for the single-ingredient products, consistent with no apparent drug interactions. The combination suspension was generally well tolerated.

  20. A randomized, open-label study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of human hepatitis C immune globulin (Civacir) in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gary L; Nelson, David R; Terrault, Norah; Pruett, Timothy L; Schiano, Thomas D; Fletcher, Courtney V; Sapan, Christine V; Riser, Laura N; Li, Yufeng; Whitley, Richard J; Gnann, John W

    2005-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is the most common indication for liver transplantation, but viral recurrence is universal and progressive graft injury occurs in most recipients. Our aim was to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and antiviral effects of high doses of a human hepatitis C antibody enriched immune globulin product (HCIG) in patients undergoing liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis C. This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled trial conducted at 4 transplant centers in the United States. A total of 18 patients with chronic hepatitis C, who underwent liver transplantation, were randomized to receive low-dose HCIG (75 mg/kg) or high-dose HCIG (200 mg/kg), or no treatment. A total of 17 infusions of HCIG were administered in each treated patient over 14 weeks using a time-dependent dosing strategy based on the PK of anti-hepatitis B immune globulin in liver transplant recipients. Hepatitis C virus levels, liver enzymes, and liver biopsies were obtained serially throughout the study period. PK profiles of HCV antibodies were determined on days 4, 10, and 98. HCIG infusions were safe and tolerated. The infusion rate could not be maximized because of symptoms for 18% to 30% of the doses. The half-life of HCIG was extremely short immediately after transplantation but was gradually prolonged. In the high-dose group, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels normalized in most subjects and no patient developed hepatic fibrosis. However, serum HCV RNA levels were not suppressed at either dose. In conclusion, HCIG, an anti-HCV enriched immune globulin product, appears to be safe in patients with chronic hepatitis C undergoing liver transplantation. Further studies are required to determine whether the drug has beneficial effects in this group of patients.

  1. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself.

  2. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics and safety following administration of escalating doses once daily to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dvorchik, Barry H; Brazier, David; DeBruin, Michael F; Arbeit, Robert D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the pharmacokinetics and safety of escalating, once-daily doses of daptomycin, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic active against gram-positive pathogens, including those resistant to methicillin and vancomycin. This phase 1, multiple-dose, double-blind study involved 24 healthy subjects in three dose cohorts (4, 6, and 8 mg/kg of body weight) who were randomized to receive daptomycin or the control at a 3:1 ratio and administered the study medication by a 30-min intravenous infusion every 24 h for 7 to 14 days. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics was assessed by blood and urine sampling. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by monitoring adverse events (AEs) and laboratory parameters. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics was linear through 6 mg/kg, with a slight ( approximately 20%) nonlinearity in the area under the curve and trough concentration at the highest dose studied (8 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameters measured on the median day of the study period, (day 7) were half-life ( approximately 9 h), volume of distribution ( approximately 0.1 liters/kg), systemic clearance ( approximately 8.2 ml/h/kg), and percentage of the drug excreted intact in urine from 0 to 24 h ( approximately 54%). Daptomycin protein binding (mean amount bound, 91.7%) was independent of the drug concentration. No gender effect was observed. All subjects who received daptomycin completed the study. The frequencies and distributions of treatment-emergent AEs were similar for the subjects who received daptomycin and the control subjects. There were no serious AEs and no pattern of dose-related events. The pharmacokinetics of once-daily administration of daptomycin was linear through 6 mg/kg. For all three doses, plasma daptomycin concentrations were consistent and predictable throughout the dosing interval. Daptomycin was well tolerated when it was administered once daily at a dose as high as 8 mg/kg for 14 days.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine delivered in lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Lin, Xia; Tang, Xing

    2010-01-04

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of cinnarizine loaded in lipid emulsion to modify the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine. The cinnarizine-loaded emulsion (CLE) which can remain stable over 18-month storage at 4+/-2 degrees C was prepared by high-pressure homogenization. Nicomp 380 particle sizing system and HPLC were used to evaluate CLE in vitro, while UPLC/MS/MS for pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distributions of CLE were assessed by comparing with the solution form after intravenous administration to rats at a dose of 2mg/kg. The CLE showed significant higher AUC and lower clearance and distribution volume than those of solution form. This helped cinnarizine to reach higher level in vessel, and circulate in the blood stream for a longer time resulting in better therapeutic effect. The tissue distribution exhibited significant lower uptake of CLE emulsion in lung and brain, indicating the advantage of CLE over the solution form in reducing drug precipitation in vivo and toxicity in CNS. Drug safety assessment studies including hemolysis test, intravenous stimulation and injection anaphylaxis revealed that the CLE was safe for intravenous injection.

  4. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Intraocular Celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stephen J.; Toma, Hassanain; Shah, Rohan; Kompella, Uday B.; Vooturi, Sunil K.; Sheng, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine safety, pharmacokinetics, and anti-inflammatory effects of intraocular celecoxib. Methods. The right eye of animals was injected with 1.5, 3, or 6 mg celecoxib prepared in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Left eyes served as controls and received 0.1 mL DMSO. Electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks, and eyes were enucleated afterward for histopathologic analysis. For pharmacokinetics, 3 mg celecoxib was injected, and vitreous and retina/choroid drug levels were then analyzed at specific time points. For efficacy, 1 μg lipopolysaccharide was injected to induce inflammation; the right eye was then injected with 3 mg celecoxib (six eyes) or 2 mg triamcinolone acetonide (six eyes) and the left eye with saline. Twenty-four hours later, aqueous fluid was removed, and total leukocyte concentration and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration were determined. Results. Histologic and ERG studies demonstrated no signs of retinal or optic nerve toxicity. After a single 3-mg injection, vitreous (0.06 μg/mL) and retina/choroid (132.31 μg/g) celecoxib concentrations at 8 weeks exceeded median inhibitory concentration. Treatment with celecoxib and triamcinolone significantly reduced total leukocyte count by 40% (P = 0.02) and 31% (P = 0.01), respectively. Reduction in PGE2 levels paralleled reduction in leukocyte counts (P < 0.05). There was no increase in intraocular pressure, but cataract formation was observed at higher concentrations. Conclusions. Intraocular injection of celecoxib appeared to be nontoxic and demonstrated excellent penetration into the retina/choroid and sustained drug levels out to 8 weeks. Celecoxib demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory effects, but there was an association with cataract formation at higher doses. PMID:24458149

  5. A phase I study in paediatric patients to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77, a liposome encapsulated formulation of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Veal, G J; Griffin, M J; Price, E; Parry, A; Dick, G S; Little, M A; Yule, S M; Morland, B; Estlin, E J; Hale, J P; Pearson, A D; Welbank, H; Boddy, A V

    2001-04-20

    Pre-clinical studies indicate that cisplatin encapsulated in STEALTH((R))liposomes (SPI-77) retains anti-tumour activity, but has a much reduced toxicity, compared to native cisplatin. A phase I study was conducted to determine the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77 administered to children with advanced cancer not amenable to other treatment. Paediatric patients were treated at doses ranging from 40 to 320 mg m(-2)by intravenous infusion every 4 weeks. Blood samples taken during, and up to 3 weeks after, administration and plasma and ultrafiltrate were prepared immediately. Urine was collected, when possible, for 3 days after administration. SPI-77 administration was well tolerated with the major toxicity being an infusion reaction which responded to modification of the initial infusion rate of SPI-77. Limited haematological toxicity and no nephrotoxicity were observed. No responses to treatment were seen during the course of this phase I study. Measurement of total plasma platinum showed that cisplatin was retained in the circulation with a half life of up to 134 h, with maximum plasma concentrations approximately 100-fold higher than those reported following comparable doses of cisplatin. Comparison of plasma and whole blood indicated that cisplatin was retained in the liposomes and there was no free platinum measurable in the ultrafiltrate. Urine recovery was less than 4% of the dose administered over 72 h. Results from this phase I study indicate that high doses of liposomal cisplatin can safely be given to patients, but further studies are required to address the issue of reformulation of liposomally bound cisplatin.

  6. A phase I study in paediatric patients to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77, a liposome encapsulated formulation of cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Veal, G J; Griffin, M J; Price, E; Parry, A; Dick, G S; Little, M A; Yule, S M; Morland, B; Estlin, E J; Hale, J P; Pearson, A D J; Welbank, H; Boddy, A V

    2001-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies indicate that cisplatin encapsulated in STEALTH®liposomes (SPI-77) retains anti-tumour activity, but has a much reduced toxicity, compared to native cisplatin. A phase I study was conducted to determine the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77 administered to children with advanced cancer not amenable to other treatment. Paediatric patients were treated at doses ranging from 40 to 320 mg m−2by intravenous infusion every 4 weeks. Blood samples taken during, and up to 3 weeks after, administration and plasma and ultrafiltrate were prepared immediately. Urine was collected, when possible, for 3 days after administration. SPI-77 administration was well tolerated with the major toxicity being an infusion reaction which responded to modification of the initial infusion rate of SPI-77. Limited haematological toxicity and no nephrotoxicity were observed. No responses to treatment were seen during the course of this phase I study. Measurement of total plasma platinum showed that cisplatin was retained in the circulation with a half life of up to 134 h, with maximum plasma concentrations approximately 100-fold higher than those reported following comparable doses of cisplatin. Comparison of plasma and whole blood indicated that cisplatin was retained in the liposomes and there was no free platinum measurable in the ultrafiltrate. Urine recovery was less than 4% of the dose administered over 72 h. Results from this phase I study indicate that high doses of liposomal cisplatin can safely be given to patients, but further studies are required to address the issue of reformulation of liposomally bound cisplatin. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11308249

  7. Clindamycin Pharmacokinetics and Safety in Preterm and Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Delmore, Paula; Bloom, Barry T.; Cotten, C. Michael; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth; Shattuck, Karen; Bradford, Kathleen K.; Smith, P. Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Morris, Maurine; Yin, Wanrong; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin may be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a common pathogen causing sepsis in infants, but optimal dosing in this population is unknown. We performed a multicenter, prospective pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety study of clindamycin in infants. We analyzed the data using a population PK analysis approach and included samples from two additional pediatric trials. Intravenous data were collected from 62 infants (135 plasma PK samples) with postnatal ages of <121 days (median [range] gestational age of 28 weeks [23 to 42] and postnatal age of 17 days [1 to 115]). In addition to body weight, postmenstrual age (PMA) and plasma protein concentrations (albumin and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein) were found to be significantly associated with clearance and volume of distribution, respectively. Clearance reached 50% of the adult value at PMA of 39.5 weeks. Simulated PMA-based intravenous dosing regimens administered every 8 h (≤32 weeks PMA, 5 mg/kg; 32 to 40 weeks PMA, 7 mg/kg; >40 to 60 weeks PMA, 9 mg/kg) resulted in an unbound, steady-state concentration at half the dosing interval greater than a MIC for S. aureus of 0.12 μg/ml in >90% of infants. There were no adverse events related to clindamycin use. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01728363.) PMID:26926644

  8. Evaluation of microdosing to assess pharmacokinetic linearity in rats using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balani, Suresh K; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Qian, Mark G; Costa, Arnaldo O; Daniels, J Scott; Yang, Hua; Shimoga, Prakash R; Wu, Jing-Tao; Gan, Liang-Shang; Lee, Frank W; Miwa, Gerald T

    2006-03-01

    The microdosing strategy allows for early assessment of human pharmacokinetics of new chemical entities using more limited safety assessment requirements than those requisite for a conventional phase I program. The current choice for evaluating microdosing is accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) due to its ultrasensitivity for detecting radiotracers. However, the AMS technique is still expensive to be used routinely and requires the preparation of radiolabeled compounds. This report describes a feasibility study with conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology for oral microdosing assessment in rats, a commonly used preclinical species. The nonlabeled drugs fluconazole and tolbutamide were studied because of their similar pharmacokinetics characteristics in rats and humans. We demonstrate that pharmacokinetics can be readily characterized by LC-MS/MS at a microdose of 1 microg/kg for these molecules in rats, and, hence, LC-MS/MS should be adequate in human microdosing studies. The studies also exhibit linearity in exposure between the microdose and >or=1000-fold higher doses in rats for these drugs, which are known to show a linear dose-exposure relationship in the clinic, further substantiating the potential utility of LC-MS/MS in defining pharmacokinetics from the microdose of drugs. These data should increase confidence in the use of LC-MS/MS in microdose pharmacokinetics studies of new chemical entities in humans. Application of this approach is also described for an investigational compound, MLNX, in which the pharmacokinetics in rats were determined to be nonlinear, suggesting that MLNX pharmacokinetics at microdoses in humans also might not reflect those at the therapeutic doses. These preclinical studies demonstrate the potential applicability of using traditional LC-MS/MS for microdose pharmacokinetic assessment in humans.

  9. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Famciclovir in Children with Herpes Simplex or Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Llorens, X.; Yogev, R.; Arguedas, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Spigarelli, M. G.; De León Castrejón, T.; Bomgaars, L.; Roberts, M.; Abrams, B.; Zhou, W.; Looby, M.; Kaiser, G.; Hamed, K.

    2009-01-01

    Two multicenter, open-label, single-arm, two-phase studies evaluated single-dose pharmacokinetics and single- and multiple-dose safety of a pediatric oral famciclovir formulation (prodrug of penciclovir) in children aged 1 to 12 years with suspicion or evidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. Pooled pharmacokinetic data were generated after single doses in 51 participants (∼12.5 mg/kg of body weight [BW] for children weighing <40 kg and 500 mg for children weighing ≥40 kg). The average systemic exposure to penciclovir was similar (6- to 12-year-olds) or slightly lower (1- to <6-year-olds) than that in adults receiving a 500-mg dose of famciclovir (historical data). The apparent clearance of penciclovir increased with BW in a nonlinear manner, proportional to BW0.696. An eight-step weight-based dosing regimen was developed to optimize exposure in smaller children and was used in the 7-day multiple-dose safety phases of both studies, which enrolled 100 patients with confirmed/suspected viral infections. Twenty-six of 47 (55.3%) HSV-infected patients who received famciclovir twice a day and 24 of 53 (45.3%) VZV-infected patients who received famciclovir three times a day experienced at least one adverse event. Most adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature. Exploratory analysis following 7-day famciclovir dosing regimen showed resolution of symptoms in most children with active HSV (19/21 [90.5%]) or VZV disease (49/53 [92.5%]). Famciclovir formulation (sprinkle capsules in OraSweet) was acceptable to participants/caregivers. In summary, we present a weight-adjusted dosing schedule for children that achieves systemic exposures similar to those for adults given the 500-mg dose. PMID:19273678

  12. A novel paclitaxel microemulsion containing a reduced amount of Cremophor EL: pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and in vivo antitumor efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wu, Ke-Chun; Zhao, Bing-Xiang; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Xin; Chen, Su; Nie, Shu-Fang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel paclitaxel (PTX) microemulsion containing a reduced amount of Cremophor EL (CrEL) which had similar pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy as the commercially available PTX injection, but a significantly reduced allergic effect due to the CrEL. The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, in vivo antitumor activity and safety of PTX microemulsion was evaluated. The results of pharmacokinetic and distribution properties of PTX in the microemulsion were similar to those of the PTX injection. The antitumor efficacy of the PTX microemulsion in OVCRA-3 and A 549 tumor-bearing animals was similar to that of PTX injection. The PTX microemulsion did not cause haemolysis, erythrocyte agglutination or simulative reaction. The incidence and degree of allergic reactions exhibited by the PTX microemulsion group, with or without premedication, were significantly lower than those in the PTX injection group (P < .01). In conclusion, the PTX microemulsion had similar pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor efficacy to the PTX injection, but a significantly reduced allergic effect due to CrEL, indicating that the PTX microemulsion overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional PTX injection and is one way of avoiding the limitations of current injection product while providing suitable therapeutic efficacy.

  13. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Ziprasidone in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Floyd R.; Miceli, Jeffrey J.; Tensfeldt, Thomas; Robarge, Lisa; Wilner, Keith; Patel, Nick C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to provide single-dose pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability data for ziprasidone in youths with tic disorder, for comparison to adult studies to discern whether ziprasidone pediatric dosing could be modeled from adult data. Method: A single-dose, open-label study of ziprasidone was conducted in youths…

  14. Study to Evaluate the Effect of Rifampicin, Ketoconazole, and Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Sativex

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Known Inducer of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Potent Inhibitor of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a CYP2C19 Inhibitor

  15. The efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and safety of a nevirapine to rilpivirine switch in virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rokx, Casper; Blonk, Maren; Verbon, Annelies; Burger, David; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2015-01-01

    : This prospective, open-label nonrandomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of substituting nevirapine/emtricitabine/tenofovir for rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir in 50 suppressed HIV-1 switchers. One hundred thirty-nine nonswitchers remained on nevirapine as controls. Week 12 HIV-1 RNA was <50 copies per milliliter in 92.0% of switchers and was <50 copies per milliliter at week 24 in 88.0% of switchers and 90.6% of nonswitchers (difference 2.6%, 95% confidence interval: -7.6% to 12.8%). Week 3 geometric mean nevirapine concentration was undetectable and week 1 geometric mean rilpivirine concentration (0.083 mg/L) was comparable with phase 3 trial (P = 0.747). Substituting nevirapine for rilpivirine resulted in ongoing virological suppression and did not have clinically relevant pharmacokinetic effects by cytochrome P450 interactions.

  16. Single-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of pegylated interferon-alpha2b in patients with chronic renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir K; Pittenger, Amy L; Swan, Suzanne K; Marbury, Thomas C; Tobillo, Emlyn; Batra, Vijay; Sack, Marshall; Glue, Paul; Jacobs, Sheila; Affrime, Melton

    2002-10-01

    This study evaluates the pharmacokinetics and safety of pegylated interferon-alpha2b (PEG-Intron) following a single-dose subcutaneous injection into subjects with normal renal function, subjects with chronic renal impairment, and patients on hemodialysis. In this open-label, single-dose, parallel group study, subjects were divided into five groups according to their degree of renal function: four groups as defined by measured creatinine clearance and a fifth hemodialysis dependent group. They received 1 microg/kg PEG-Intron subcutaneously after a 10-hour fast. Pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were performed up to 168 hours postdose. Hemodialysis patients had a second PEG-Intron dose 12 hours prior to a hemodialysis session. PEG-Intron pharmacokinetic parameters (AUCtf, Cmax, and t1/2) increased progressively as CL(CR) declined. All subjects reported at least one adverse event, which were typical of those reported after alpha-interferon administration (e.g., flu-like symptoms, headache). Single-dose PEG-Intron administration to volunteers with normal renal function and chronic renal impairment was safe and well tolerated. In patients with CL(CR) < 30 ml/min, AUCand Cmax values were increased 90% compared with controls, while half-life was increased by up to 40% over controls. Based on the relationship between PEG-Intron apparent clearance and CL(CR), renal clearance accountsfor less than half of its total clearance. Hemodialysis did not affect PEG-Intron apparent clearance.

  17. Safety and pharmacokinetics of higher doses of caspofungin in healthy adult participants.

    PubMed

    Migoya, Elizabeth M; Mistry, Goutam C; Stone, Julie A; Comisar, Wendy; Sun, Peng; Norcross, Alisha; Bi, Sheng; Winchell, Gregory A; Ghosh, Kalyan; Uemera, Naoto; Deutsch, Paul J; Wagner, John A

    2011-02-01

    Caspofungin was the first in a new class of antifungal agents (echinocandins) indicated for the treatment of primary and refractory fungal infections. Higher doses of caspofungin may provide another option for patients who have failed caspofungin or other antifungal therapy. This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single 150- and 210-mg doses of caspofungin in 16 healthy participants and 100 mg/d for 21 days in 20 healthy participants. Other than infusion site reactions and 1 reversible elevation in alanine aminotransferase (≥2× and <4× upper limit of normal), caspofungin was generally well tolerated. Geometric mean AUC(0-∞) after single 150- and 210-mg doses was 279.7 and 374.9 µg·h/mL, respectively; peak concentrations were 29.4 and 33.5 µg/mL, respectively; and 24-hour postdose concentrations were 2.8 and 4.2 µg/mL, respectively. Steady state was achieved in the third week of dosing. Following multiple 100-mg doses of caspofungin, day 21 geometric mean AUC(0-24) was 227.4 µg·h/mL, peak concentration was 20.9 µg/mL, and trough concentration was 4.7 µg/mL. Beta-phase t(1/2) was ~8 to ~13 hours. Caspofungin pharmacokinetics at these higher doses were dose proportional to and consistent with those observed at lower doses, suggesting a modest nonlinearity of increased accumulation with dose, which was considered not clinically meaningful.

  18. Concomitant administration of bevacizumab, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin: nonclinical safety and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Jacques; Shiu, Vanessa; Bricarello, Ann; Christian, Brian J; Zuch, Christina L; Mounho, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Bevacizumab (Avastin) is a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor approved for use in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The Saltz regimen (irinotecan/5-FU/leucovorin [LV]) is a first-line treatment for this indication. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of bevacizumab when administered concomitantly with the Saltz regimen to cynomolgus monkeys, and to determine if the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab, irinotecan, SN38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), or 5-FU were affected by combined administration. Male cynomolgus monkeys were intravenously administered the Saltz regimen (125 mg/m2 irinotecan, 500 mg/m2 5-FU, 20 mg/m2 LV) alone (n = 4) or concomitantly with 10 mg/kg bevacizumab (n = 5) on days 1 and 8. All animals survived to euthanasia on day 15. Adverse effects associated with the Saltz regimen included diarrhea and neutropenia. Macroscopically, two animals from each group had small thymus glands that correlated microscopically with lymphoid depletion. Myeloid hypoplasia and/or erythroid hyperplasia was observed in the sternal bone marrow of most animals. These effects were considered to be associated with the Saltz regimen; concomitant bevacizumab administration did not alter the severity of these findings. Irinotecan and 5-FU were observed to be rapidly eliminated (t1/2 = 1 h and 0.5 h, respectively). Although the number of animals in each group was small and no statistical comparison between groups was performed, bevacizumab did not affect the disposition of either agent. These results indicate that bevacizumab can be safely administered in combination with the Saltz regimen without pharmacokinetic interaction.

  19. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a single 1500-mg dose of famciclovir in adolescents with recurrent herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Block, Stan L; Yogev, Ram; Waldmeier, Felix; Hamed, Kamal

    2011-06-01

    An open-label study evaluated the safety (n = 53) and pharmacokinetics (n = 8) of single-dose therapy with 1500 mg famciclovir (prodrug of penciclovir) for recurrent herpes labialis in adolescents. Mean Cmax, mean AUC0-∞, and clearance for penciclovir were 9.37 μg/mL, 31.8 μg · h/mL, and 38.2 L/h, respectively, and within the range extrapolated from data in adults. Adverse events were generally mild and transient.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety study of posaconazole intravenous solution administered peripherally to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M; van Iersel, Thijs; Nassander, Ulla; O'Mara, Edward; Waskin, Hetty; Caceres, Maria; van Iersel, Marlou L P S

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a posaconazole i.v. (intravenous) solution. This was a single-center, 2-part, randomized, rising single- and multiple-dose study in healthy adults. In part 1, subjects received 0 (vehicle), 50, 100, 200, 250, or 300 mg posaconazole in a single dose i.v. by 30-min peripheral infusion (6 cohorts of 12 subjects each [9 active and 3 placebo], making a total of 72 subjects). Blood samples were collected until 168 h postdose. In part 2, subjects were to receive 2 peripheral infusions at a 12-h interval on day 1 followed by once-daily infusion for 9 days. However, part 2 was terminated early because of high rates of infusion site reactions with multiple dosing at the same infusion site. The pharmacokinetics results for part 1 (n=45 subjects) showed that the mean posaconazole exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞]) ranged from 4,890 to 46,400 ng · h/ml (range of coefficient of variation values, 26 to 50). The dose-proportionality slope estimate (90% confidence interval) for AUC0-∞ was 1.30 (1.19 to 1.41), indicating a greater-than-dose-proportional increase. The data for safety in part 1 show that 29/72 subjects had ≥1 adverse event. Infusion site reactions were reported in 2/9 vehicle subjects, 0/18 placebo subjects, and 7/45 i.v. posaconazole subjects. The data for safety in part 2 show that infusion site reactions were reported in 1/4 (25%) placebo subjects, 3/9 (33%) vehicle control subjects, and 4/5 (80%) i.v. posaconazole (100 mg) subjects (3 posaconazole recipients subsequently developed thrombophlebitis and were discontinued from treatment). In conclusion, the posaconazole i.v. solution showed a greater-than-dose-proportional increase in exposure, primarily at doses below 200 mg. When administered peripherally at the same infusion site, multiple dosing of i.v. posaconazole led to unacceptably high rates of infusion site reactions. Intravenous

  1. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, ABT-288, in healthy young adults and elderly volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Zhang, Jun; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this work was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288, a highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple dosing in a phase 1 setting. Methods Single doses (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 and 40 mg ABT-288) and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 14 days) were evaluated in young adults and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 5 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 12 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food on ABT-288 pharmacokinetics (5 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open label, randomized, crossover design. Results ABT-288 safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were comparable in young and elderly subjects. Single doses up to 40 mg and multiple doses up to 3 mg once-daily were generally safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were hot flush, headache, abnormal dreams, insomnia, nausea and dizziness. ABT-288 exposure (AUC) was dose-proportional over the evaluated dose ranges. The mean elimination half-life ranged from 40 to 61 h across dose groups. Steady state was achieved by day 10 of once-daily dosing with 3.4- to 4.2-fold accumulation. Food did not have a clinically meaningful effect on ABT-288 exposure. Conclusions Based on the above results, 1 and 3 mg once-daily doses of ABT-288 were advanced to phase 2 evaluation in Alzheimer's patients. PMID:23016924

  2. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of escalating high doses of ivermectin in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Cynthia A; Furtek, Christine I; Porras, Arturo G; Chen, Cong; Tipping, Robert; Clineschmidt, Coleen M; Sciberras, David G; Hsieh, John Y K; Lasseter, Kenneth C

    2002-10-01

    Safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the antiparasitic drug ivermectin, administered in higher and/or more frequent doses than currently approved for human use, were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study. Subjects (n = 68) were assigned to one of four panels (3:1, ivermectin/placebo): 30 or 60 mg (three times a week) or 90 or 120 mg (single dose). The 30 mg panel (range: 34 7-594 microg/kg) also received a single dose with food after a 1-week washout. Safety assessments addressed both known ivermectin CNS effects and general toxicity. The primary safety endpoint was mydriasis, accurately quantitated by pupillometry. Ivermectin was generally well tolerated, with no indication of associated CNS toxicity for doses up to 10 times the highest FDA-approved dose of 200 microg/kg. All dose regimens had a mydriatic effect similar to placebo. Adverse experiences were similar between ivermectin and placebo and did not increase with dose. Following single doses of 30 to 120 mg, AUC and Cmax were generally dose proportional, with t(max) approximately 4 hours and t1/2 approximately 18 hours. The geometric mean AUC of 30 mg ivermectin was 2.6 times higher when administered with food. Geometric mean AUC ratios (day 7/day 1) were 1.24 and 1.40 for the 30 and 60 mg doses, respectively, indicating that the accumulation of ivermectin given every fourth day is minimal. This study demonstrated that ivermectin is generally well tolerated at these higher doses and more frequent regimens.

  3. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy older subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amir I A; van den Elsen, Geke A H; Colbers, Angela; van der Marck, Marjolein A; Burger, David M; Feuth, Ton B; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Kramers, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    There is a great concern about the safety of THC-based drugs in older people (≥65 years), as most of THC-trials did not include such group. In this phase 1, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, we evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of three oral doses of Namisol(®), a novel THC in tablet form, in older subjects. Twelve healthy older subjects (6 male; mean age 72±5 years) randomly received a single oral dose of 3mg, 5mg, or 6.5mg of THC or matching placebo, in a crossover manner, on each intervention day. The data for 11 subjects were included in the analysis. The data of 1 subject were excluded due to non-compliance to study medication. THC was safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) were drowsiness (27%) and dry mouth (11%). Subjects reported more AEs with THC 6.5mg than with 3mg (p=0.048), 5mg (p=0.034) and placebo (p=0.013). There was a wide inter-individual variability in plasma concentrations of THC. Subjects for whom the Cmax fell within the sampling period (over 2h), Cmax was 1.42-4.57ng/mL and Tmax was 67-92min. The AUC0-2h (n=11) was 1.67-3.51ng/mL. Overall, the pharmacodynamic effects of THC were smaller than effects previously reported in young adults. In conclusion, THC appeared to be safe and well tolerated by healthy older individuals. Data on safety and effectiveness of THC in frail older persons are urgently required, as this population could benefit from the therapeutic applications of THC.

  4. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of KNS-760704 (dexpramipexole) in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Bozik, Michael E; Mather, James L; Kramer, William G; Gribkoff, Valentin K; Ingersoll, Evan W

    2011-08-01

    Dexpramipexole (KNS-760704; [6R]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-N6-propyl-2,6-benzothiazole-diamine) is a novel synthetic amino-benzothiazole in development for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Preclinical studies have shown that dexpramipexole is neuroprotective in vitro and in vivo, is highly orally bioavailable and water soluble, and rapidly achieves and maintains high central nervous system concentrations relative to plasma. Two phase 1 clinical studies were conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of single and multiple doses of dexpramipexole in 54 healthy male and female adults. The effect of food on the single-dose PK of dexpramipexole was also evaluated. Single doses (50 mg, 150 mg, or 300 mg) and multiple doses (50 mg twice daily, 100 mg twice daily, or 150 mg twice daily) of dexpramipexole over 4.5 days were safe and well tolerated. Dexpramipexole was rapidly absorbed, with time to maximum plasma concentration ranging from 1.8 to 2.6 hours and half-life ranging from 6.4 to 8.1 hours under fasted conditions, and was mostly eliminated in urine as unchanged parent drug (84%-90% of dose). Food had no effect on the single-dose PK of dexpramipexole. These findings support the ongoing development of dexpramipexole for the treatment of ALS and further evaluation of the compound's therapeutic potential in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of pain: pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Linda; Mattsson, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been suggested to have useful analgesic properties and to be devoid of unwanted effects. Here, we have examined critically this contention, and discussed available data concerning the pharmacokinetics of PEA and its formulation. Sixteen clinical trials, six case reports/pilot studies and a meta‐analysis of PEA as an analgesic have been published in the literature. For treatment times up to 49 days, the current clinical data argue against serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at an incidence of 1/200 or greater. For treatment lasting more than 60 days, the number of patients is insufficient to rule out a frequency of ADRs of less than 1/100. The six published randomized clinical trials are of variable quality. Presentation of data without information on data spread and nonreporting of data at times other than the final measurement were among issues that were identified. Further, there are no head‐to‐head clinical comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA, and so evidence for superiority of one formulation over the other is currently lacking. Nevertheless, the available clinical data support the contention that PEA has analgesic actions and motivate further study of this compound, particularly with respect to head‐to‐head comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA and comparisons with currently recommended treatments. PMID:27220803

  6. Palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of pain: pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Linda; Mattsson, Sofia; Fowler, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been suggested to have useful analgesic properties and to be devoid of unwanted effects. Here, we have examined critically this contention, and discussed available data concerning the pharmacokinetics of PEA and its formulation. Sixteen clinical trials, six case reports/pilot studies and a meta-analysis of PEA as an analgesic have been published in the literature. For treatment times up to 49 days, the current clinical data argue against serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at an incidence of 1/200 or greater. For treatment lasting more than 60 days, the number of patients is insufficient to rule out a frequency of ADRs of less than 1/100. The six published randomized clinical trials are of variable quality. Presentation of data without information on data spread and nonreporting of data at times other than the final measurement were among issues that were identified. Further, there are no head-to-head clinical comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA, and so evidence for superiority of one formulation over the other is currently lacking. Nevertheless, the available clinical data support the contention that PEA has analgesic actions and motivate further study of this compound, particularly with respect to head-to-head comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA and comparisons with currently recommended treatments.

  7. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard; Frymoyer, Adam; Lewandowski, Andrew; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Feig, Daniel I.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Warady, Bradley A.; Goebel, Jens W.; Schwartz, George J.; Lewis, Kenneth; Anand, Ravinder; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options—including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors—are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7–17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard non-compartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n=13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30–59 ml/min per 1.73m2), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in osteosarcoma patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gota, Vikram S; Maru, Girish B; Soni, Tejal G; Gandhi, Tejal R; Kochar, Nitin; Agarwal, Manish G

    2010-02-24

    Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant compound obtained from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and inflammatory pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, the clinical literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent due to its low bioavailability in humans. The purpose of this study was to quantify plasma levels of free curcumin after dosing of a solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulation versus unformulated curcumin in healthy volunteers and to determine its tolerability and dose-plasma concentration relationship in late-stage osteosarcoma patients. Doses of 2, 3, and 4 g of SLCP were evaluated in 11 patients with osteosarcoma. Plasma curcumin levels were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The limit of detection of the assay was 1 ng/mL of curcumin. In healthy subjects, the mean peak concentration of curcumin achieved from dosing 650 mg of SLCP was 22.43 ng/mL, whereas plasma curcumin from dosing an equal quantity of unformulated 95% curcuminoids extract was not detected. In both healthy individuals and osteosarcoma patients, high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and nonlinear dose dependency was observed, suggesting potentially complex absorption kinetics. Overall, good tolerability was noted in both healthy and osteosarcoma groups.

  9. Piperaquine population pharmacokinetics and cardiac safety in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Lon, Chanthap; Spring, Michele; Sok, Sommethy; Ta-Aksorn, Winita; Kodchakorn, Chanikarn; Pann, Sut-Thang; Chann, Soklyda; Ittiverakul, Mali; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Buathong, Nillawan; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; So, Mary; Youdaline, Theng; Milner, Erin; Wojnarski, Mariusz; Lanteri, Charlotte; Manning, Jessica; Prom, Satharath; Haigney, Mark; Cantilena, Louis; Saunders, David

    2017-02-13

    Despite rising resistance, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) remains a first line therapy for uncomplicated malaria in many parts of Cambodia. While generally well-tolerated as a 3-day regimen, compressed 2-day regimens were associated with treatment-limiting cardiac repolarization effects in a recent clinical trial. To better estimate the risks of piperaquine concentration on QT interval prolongation, we pooled data from 3 randomized clinical trials between 2010 and 2014 in northern Cambodia. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to compare exposure-response relationships between 2-day (2DP) and 3-day (3DP) regimens while accounting for differences in regimen and sample collection times between studies. A 2-compartment model with 1(st) order absorption and elimination without covariates was the best fit of the data. The linear slope-intercept model in this largely male population predicted 0.05 ms QT prolongation per ng/ml of piperaquine (5 milliseconds per 100 ng/ml). Though plasma half-life was similar in both regimens, peak and total piperaquine exposure were higher in those treated with 2DP. Furthermore, the correlation between plasma piperaquine and QT interval prolongation was stronger in the 2DP population. Neither time since last meal nor baseline serum magnesium or potassium levels had additive effects on QT prolongation. As electrocardiographic monitoring is often non-existent in malaria endemic areas, 2DP regimens should be avoided, and 3DP carefully considered in settings where viable alternative therapies exist. When DP is employed, the risk of cardiotoxicity can be mitigated by combining a 3-day regimen, enforcing a 3 hour fast before and after administration, and avoiding concomitant QT-prolonging medications.

  10. Assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of maraviroc, a novel CCR5 antagonist, in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; van der Ryst, Elna; Rosario, Maria C; Ridgway, Caroline E; Medhurst, Christine G; Taylor-Worth, Richard J; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of single and multiple oral doses of maraviroc in healthy volunteers. Methods Three double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation studies with either single or multiple doses of maraviroc were conducted in healthy volunteers. Plasma and urine samples were collected to investigate the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc and evaluate any changes with respect to dose and duration/frequency of dosing. Safety and toleration of maraviroc were also assessed. Results Maraviroc is rapidly absorbed following oral administration, and plasma Tmax is achieved within 0.5–4.0 h postdose. Steady-state plasma concentrations are achieved after 7 consecutive days of dosing. Although the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc is nonproportional over the dose range studied (3–1200 mg), the degree of nonproportionality is small at clinically relevant doses. Renal clearance is approximately 10–12 l h−1 and appears unaffected by increasing maraviroc doses. Maraviroc does not significantly modulate the activity of CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 at clinically relevant doses. There were no serious adverse events in any of these studies, and doses up to 900 mg were generally well tolerated, with postural hypotension being the dose-limiting event. There was no pattern or dose relationship observed with maraviroc with regard to laboratory abnormalities, including hepatic transaminases. No clinically significant increases in QTc were noted at clinically relevant doses. Conclusions Maraviroc is absorbed into the systemic circulation and reaches steady state by day 7 of multiple dosing. It does not significantly influence the activity of major drug-metabolizing enzymes and is well tolerated at clinically relevant doses, with most adverse events being mild or moderate. PMID:18333861

  11. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of an oral suspension of fexofenadine for children with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Segall, Nathan; Grubbe, Robert E; Levy, Arden L; Maloney, Michael J; Nayak, Anjuli S; Kittner, Barbara; Quesada, Javier T

    2008-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common chronic condition in children and may impact a child's quality of life. Increasing treatment compliance may improve quality of life. An oral suspension of fexofenadine hydrochloride (HCl) has been developed to ease administration to children and may, therefore, improve treatment compliance. The purpose of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic behavior, safety, and tolerability of a single dose of fexofenadine HCl oral suspension administered to children aged 2-5 years with allergic rhinitis. Children (aged 2-5 years) with AR were recruited in a multicenter, open-label, single-dose study. Fexofenadine HCl (30 mg) was administered as a 6-mg/mL suspension (5 mL). Plasma samples were collected up to 24 hours postdose. Adverse events (AEs); electrocardiograms (ECGs); vital signs; and clinical laboratory tests for hematology, blood chemistry, and urinalysis were analyzed to evaluate safety and tolerability. Fifty subjects completed the study. Mean maximum plasma concentration of fexofenadine was 224 ng/mL, and mean area under the plasma concentration curve was 898 ng . hour/mL. Treatment-emergent AEs were mild in intensity and reported in a total of seven subjects. No trends or clinically meaningful changes in mean ECG, vital sign, or clinical laboratory test data occurred during the study. In children aged 2-5 years, the exposure after a 30-mg dose of fexofenadine HCl suspension was similar to the exposures previously seen after a 30- and 60-mg dose of fexofenadine HCl in children aged 6-11 years and in adults, respectively. The suspension was also well tolerated.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and preliminary safety data of a single oral dose of bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in cats.

    PubMed

    Puza, N; Papich, M G; Reinero, C; Chang, C H; Yu, D-H; Sharp, C; DeClue, A

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and adverse effect profile of single-dose oral bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in healthy cats. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined following a single mean ± SD oral dose of 3.2 ± 0.6 mg/kg of bosentan in 6 adult cats. Blood was collected for quantification of bosentan via high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Blood and urine were evaluated for CBC, plasma biochemical profile, and urinalysis, and repeat physical examinations were performed to evaluate for adverse effects. The mean terminal half-life of bosentan was 20.4 ± 17.2 h. The mean peak plasma concentration was 0.49 ± 0.24 g/mL, and the mean time to maximum plasma concentration was 6.8 ± 8.6 h. The area under the curve was 5.14 ± 3.81 h·μg/mL. Oral bosentan tablets were absorbed in cats, and no clinically important adverse events were noted. Further evaluation of repeat dosing, investigation into the in vivo efficacy of decreasing endothelin-1 concentrations in cats, as well as safety in conjunction with other medications is warranted.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of 2 dapivirine vaginal microbicide gels and their safety vs. Hydroxyethyl cellulose-based universal placebo gel.

    PubMed

    Nel, Annalene M; Smythe, Shanique C; Habibi, Sepideh; Kaptur, Paulina E; Romano, Joseph W

    2010-10-01

    Dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is in development as a microbicide for the protection of women against HIV infection. A randomized, double-blind, phase 1 trial was conducted in 36 healthy HIV-negative women to compare the pharmacokinetics of 2 dapivirine vaginal gel formulations (0.05% each) and their safety with the hydroxyethyl cellulose-based universal placebo gel. Gel was self-administered once daily for a total of 11 days. Blood and vaginal fluid samples were collected sequentially over 24 days for pharmacokinetic analysis. Safety was evaluated by pelvic examination, colposcopy, adverse events, and clinical laboratory assessments. Adverse event profiles were similar for the 3 gels. Most events were mild and not related to study gel. Headache and vaginal hemorrhage (any vaginal bleeding) were most common. Plasma concentrations of dapivirine did not exceed 1.1 ng/mL. Steady-state conditions were reached within approximately 10 days. Dapivirine concentrations in vaginal fluids were slightly higher for Gel 4789, but Cmax values on days 1 and 14 were not significantly different. Terminal half-life was 72-73 hours in plasma and 15-17 hours in vaginal fluids. Both formulations of dapivirine gel were safe and well tolerated. Dapivirine was delivered to the lower genital tract at concentrations at least 5 logs greater than in vitro inhibitory concentrations.

  14. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and safety of the sesame lignans, sesamin and episesamin, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Tomimori, Namino; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Fujii, Wataru; Sakakibara, Yutaka; Shibata, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    A single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group and multiple oral dose study was conducted in 48 healthy subjects to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of multiple oral doses of sesame lignans (sesamin and episesamin). Subjects were randomly divided into two groups. Each subject was administered 50 mg of sesame lignans (sesamin/episesamin=1/1) or placebo once daily for 28 days. The pharmacokinetics of the sesame lignans were investigated using 10 of the 24 subjects in the sesame lignans group. No serious adverse events were observed in this study. Sesamin was absorbed with a peak plasma concentration at 5.0 h. The plasma concentration of the main metabolite, SC-1, reached a peak at 5.0 h and decreased rapidly with a terminal half-life of 2.4 h. Episesamin was also absorbed with a peak plasma concentration at 5.0 h and decreased with a terminal half-life of 7.1 h. The plasma concentration of the main metabolite, EC-1, reached a peak at 5.0 h and decreased rapidly with a terminal half-life of 3.4 h. The plasma concentrations of sesamin and episesamin reached a steady state by day 7. Sesame lignans were confirmed to be safe and tolerable in healthy subjects. The results of the pharmacokinetic study demonstrate that no accumulation was observed following multiple 50 mg doses of sesame lignans.

  16. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Nemonoxacin in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guo-ying; Zhang, Ying-yuan; Guo, Bei-ning; Yu, Ji-cheng; Wu, Xiao-jie; Chen, Yuan-cheng; Wu, Ju-Fang; Shi, Yao-guo

    2014-01-01

    Nemonoxacin (TG-873870) is a novel nonfluorinated quinolone with potent broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and atypical pathogens, including vancomycin-nonsusceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), quinolone-resistant MRSA, quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae. This first-in-human study was aimed at assessing the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers. The study comprised a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalating safety and tolerability study in 92 subjects and a randomized, single-dose, open-label, 3-period Latin-square crossover pharmacokinetic study in 12 subjects. The study revealed that nemonoxacin infusion was well tolerated up to the maximum dose of 1,250 mg, and the acceptable infusion rates ranged from 0.42 to 5.56 mg/min. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild, transient, and confined to local irritation at the injection site. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that after the administration of 250, 500, and 750 mg of intravenous nemonoxacin, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) values were 4.826 μg/ml, 7.152 μg/ml, and 11.029 μg/ml, respectively. The corresponding values for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 72 hours (AUC0–72 h) were 17.05 μg · h/ml, 39.30 μg · h/ml, and 61.98 μg · h/ml. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 11 h, and the mean cumulative drug excretion rate within 72 h ranged from 64.93% to 77.17%. Volunteers treated with 250 to 750 mg nemonoxacin exhibited a linear dose-response relationship between the AUC0–72 h and AUC0–∞. These findings provide further support for the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01944774.) PMID:25092690

  17. Solithromycin Pharmacokinetics in Plasma and Dried Blood Spots and Safety in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Palazzi, Debra L.; Bhattacharya-Mithal, Leena; Al-Uzri, Amira; James, Laura P.; Bradley, John; Neu, Natalie; Jasion, Theresa; Hornik, Christoph P.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Keedy, Kara; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of solithromycin, a fluoroketolide antibiotic, in a phase 1, open-label, multicenter study of 13 adolescents with suspected or confirmed bacterial infections. On days 3 to 5, the mean (standard deviation) maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration versus time curve from 0 to 24 h were 0.74 μg/ml (0.61 μg/ml) and 9.28 μg · h/ml (6.30 μg · h/ml), respectively. The exposure and safety in this small cohort of adolescents were comparable to those for adults. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01966055.) PMID:26883693

  18. A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of 2 and 4 Weeks of Twice-Daily Ocular Trabodenoson in Adults with Ocular Hypertension or Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Kenneth N.; DuBiner, Harvey; Slomowitz, Natanya; McVicar, William; Rich, Cadmus C.; Baumgartner, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the safety and ocular hypotensive efficacy of 4 trabodenoson doses administered twice daily over 14 or 28 days in subjects with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase 2 study, patients received unilateral topical twice-daily trabodenoson (50, 100, or 200 mcg) or placebo for 14 days, or 500 mcg trabodenoson or placebo for 28 days. Ocular and systemic safety and tolerability were assessed by examinations, clinical and laboratory studies. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was assessed using Goldmann tonometry. Results: Trabodenoson was well tolerated; no clinically meaningful ocular or systemic side effects were identified. Trabodenoson produced a dose-dependent IOP reduction. IOP reductions in the 500 mcg group were significantly greater than placebo at all time points at Day 28. Mean IOP reductions from diurnal baseline ranged from −3.5 to −5.0 mmHg with a mean change of −4.1 mmHg in the 500 mcg group compared −1.0 to −2.5 mmHg with a mean change of −1.6 mmHg for the placebo group, and the Day 28 drop was significantly greater than at Day 14 (P = 0.0163) indicating improvement in IOP lowering with longer treatment time. IOP remained significantly reduced 24 h after the final 500 mcg dose (P = 0.048). Conclusion: Twice-daily ocular doses of trabodenoson, from 50 to 500 mcg, were well tolerated and showed a dose-related decrease in IOP that was statistically significant and clinically relevant at 500 mcg in patients with ocular hypertension or POAG. PMID:27002298

  19. Carfilzomib in multiple myeloma patients with renal impairment: pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Badros, A Z; Vij, R; Martin, T; Zonder, J A; Kunkel, L; Wang, Z; Lee, S; Wong, A F; Niesvizky, R

    2013-08-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and efficacy of carfilzomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, in patients with multiple myeloma and varying degrees of renal impairment, including patients on chronic hemodialysis. Patients were grouped by creatinine clearance: >80 ml/min, 50-80 ml/min, 30-49 ml/min, <30 ml/min and chronic hemodialysis. Carfilzomib was administered on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16 in 28-day cycles: 15 mg/m(2) (Cycle 1), 20 mg/m(2) (Cycle 2) and 27 mg/m(2) (Cycles 3+). There were no differences in carfilzomib clearance or exposure among patients with normal renal function and any group with renal impairment. Grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) included anemia (28.0%), thrombocytopenia (20.0%), lymphopenia (18.0%) and fatigue (14.0%). AEs were similar among groups. At 15 mg/m(2), proteasome inhibition up to 85% was observed and did not differ among groups. Although nearly 50% of patients were refractory to both bortezomib and lenalidomide, end of study partial response or better (overall response rate) was 25.5% with 7.9 months median duration of response. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics and safety of carfilzomib were not influenced by the degree of baseline renal impairment, including in patients on dialysis, and carfilzomib was well tolerated and demonstrated promising efficacy.

  20. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Usach, Iris; Melis, Virginia; Peris, José-Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)/HIV infection. Discussion First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP), delavirdine (DLV) and efavirenz (EFV) are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research. PMID:24008177

  1. Dose comparison of conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia – efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F; Rock, Amy D; Woodward, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of 20 and 40 mg/day conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with hypervolemic or euvolemic hyponatremia. Methods Hyponatremic patients – serum sodium (sNa) ≤130 mEq/L – received either 20 or 40 mg/day of conivaptan for 4 days, following an initial 20 mg loading dose. Efficacy was evaluated by the magnitude and extent of change in sNa. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events, changes in vital signs and laboratory parameters, rate of sNa correction, and frequency of infusion-site reactions. Pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results A total of 37 patients received 20 mg/day and 214 patients received 40 mg/day conivaptan. Baseline-adjusted sNa-area under the concentration–time curve increased by an average of 753.8±499.9 mEq·hr/L (20 mg/day) and 689.2±417.3 mEq·hr/L (40 mg/day) over the course of the 4-day treatment period. The majority of patients in both treatment groups achieved a 4 mEq/L increase in sNa over baseline in ~24 hours (82.5%). Average increase in sNa after 4 days was ~10 mEq/L, varying with dosage level and baseline volume status. Treatment success (normal sNa or increase of ≥6 mEq/L) was attained by 70.3% of patients in the 20 mg/day group and 72.0% in the 40 mg/day group. Conclusion Both 20 and 40 mg/day doses of conivaptan are efficacious in increasing sNa over 4 days of treatment with no observed increase in the frequency of adverse events or specific infusion-site reactions using the higher dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both doses were similar to what has been reported previously, exhibiting greater-than-dose-proportional plasma concentrations. PMID:26848258

  2. A phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of ATX-101: injectable, synthetic deoxycholic acid for submental contouring.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia; Fellmann, Jere; Lizzul, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid [DCA] injection) is a proprietary formulation of pure synthetic DCA. When injected into subcutaneous fat, ATX-101 results in focal adipocytolysis, the targeted destruction of fat cells. ATX-101 is undergoing investigation as an injectable drug for contouring the submental area by reducing submental fat (SMF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the maximal therapeutic dose of ATX-101 (100 mg total dose). Following PK evaluation of endogenous DCA, subjects (N=24) received subcutaneous injections of ATX-101 (2 mg/cm2, with or without 0.9% benzyl alcohol) into SMF; PK evaluation was repeated periodically over 24 hours. Endogenous DCA plasma concentrations measured prior to injection were highly variable within and between subjects. Similarly, following ATX-101 injection, DCA plasma concentrations were highly variable, peaked rapidly, and returned to the range observed for endogenous values by 24 hours postdose. All subjects experienced at least 1 adverse event (AE). No death, serious AE, or AE-related discontinuations occurred. The majority of AEs were transient, associated with the area treated, and of mild or moderate severity. No clinically significant changes were reported for laboratory test results, vital signs, or Holter electrocardiograms postdosing. These data support the favorable safety and efficacy observations of ATX-101 as an injectable drug to reduce SMF.

  3. Hemostatic efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a recombinant von Willebrand factor in severe von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Joan C.; Castaman, Giancarlo; Windyga, Jerzy; Kouides, Peter; Ragni, Margaret; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Obermann-Slupetzky, Ortrun; Chapman, Miranda; Fritsch, Sandor; Pavlova, Borislava G.; Presch, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    This phase 3 trial evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) for treatment of bleeds in severe von Willebrand disease (VWD). rVWF was initially administered together with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) and subsequently alone, as long as hemostatic factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) levels were maintained. Pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated in a randomized cross-over design (rVWF vs rVWF:rFVIII at 50 IU VWF:ristocetin cofactor activity [RCo]/kg). Bleed control for all treated bleeds (N = 192 bleeds in 22 subjects) was rated good or excellent (96.9% excellent; 119 of 122 minor, 59 of 61 moderate, and 6 of 7 major bleeds) on a 4-point scale (4 = none to 1 = excellent). A single infusion was effective in 81.8% of bleeds. Treatment success, defined as the number of subjects with a mean efficacy rating of <2.5, was 100%. The PK profile of rVWF was not influenced by rFVIII (mean VWF:RCo terminal half-life: 21.9 hours for rVWF and 19.6 hours for rVWF:rFVIII). FVIII:C levels increased rapidly after rVWF alone, with hemostatic levels achieved within 6 hours and sustained through 72 hours after infusion. Eight adverse events (AEs; 6 nonserious AEs in 4 subjects and 2 serious AEs [chest discomfort and increased heart rate, without cardiac symptomatology] concurrently in 1 subject) were associated with rVWF. There were no thrombotic events or severe allergic reactions. No VWF or FVIII inhibitors, anti-VWF binding antibodies, or antibodies against host cell proteins were detected. These results show that rVWF was safe and effective in treating bleeds in VWD patients and stabilizes endogenous FVIII:C, which may eliminate the need for rFVIII after the first infusion. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01410227. PMID:26239086

  4. Hemostatic efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a recombinant von Willebrand factor in severe von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Gill, Joan C; Castaman, Giancarlo; Windyga, Jerzy; Kouides, Peter; Ragni, Margaret; Leebeek, Frank W G; Obermann-Slupetzky, Ortrun; Chapman, Miranda; Fritsch, Sandor; Pavlova, Borislava G; Presch, Isabella; Ewenstein, Bruce

    2015-10-22

    This phase 3 trial evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) for treatment of bleeds in severe von Willebrand disease (VWD). rVWF was initially administered together with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) and subsequently alone, as long as hemostatic factor VIII activity (FVIII : C) levels were maintained. Pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated in a randomized cross-over design (rVWF vs rVWF:rFVIII at 50 IU VWF:ristocetin cofactor activity [RCo]/kg). Bleed control for all treated bleeds (N = 192 bleeds in 22 subjects) was rated good or excellent (96.9% excellent; 119 of 122 minor, 59 of 61 moderate, and 6 of 7 major bleeds) on a 4-point scale (4 = none to 1 = excellent). A single infusion was effective in 81.8% of bleeds. Treatment success, defined as the number of subjects with a mean efficacy rating of <2.5, was 100%. The PK profile of rVWF was not influenced by rFVIII (mean VWF:RCo terminal half-life: 21.9 hours for rVWF and 19.6 hours for rVWF:rFVIII). FVIII : C levels increased rapidly after rVWF alone, with hemostatic levels achieved within 6 hours and sustained through 72 hours after infusion. Eight adverse events (AEs; 6 nonserious AEs in 4 subjects and 2 serious AEs [chest discomfort and increased heart rate, without cardiac symptomatology] concurrently in 1 subject) were associated with rVWF. There were no thrombotic events or severe allergic reactions. No VWF or FVIII inhibitors, anti-VWF binding antibodies, or antibodies against host cell proteins were detected. These results show that rVWF was safe and effective in treating bleeds in VWD patients and stabilizes endogenous FVIII : C, which may eliminate the need for rFVIII after the first infusion. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01410227.

  5. Pre-formulation characterization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Barnes, Keila Delores

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes has potential chemotherapy effects but very low oral bioavailability in humans. The objectives of this study are to quantitatively characterized and understand the physiochemical properties and the pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol. Solubility of resveratrol was measured in 10 common solvents at 25°C using HPLC. The solution state pH stability of resveratrol was assessed in various USP buffers ranging from pH 2-10 for 24 hours at 37 °C. Human plasma protein binding was determined using ultracentrifugation technique. Stability of resveratrol in human and rat plasma was also assessed at 37°C. Aliquots of blank plasma were spiked with a standard drug concentration to yield final plasma concentration of 50 mug/mL. Samples were analyzed for resveratrol concentration up to 96 hours. A group (n=8) of jugular vein-cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated and received intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg resveratrol. Serial blood samples were collected up to 8 hours after the dose. Plasma concentrations of resveratrol were measured by an established LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed using noncompartmental methods. Resveratrol is more soluble in alcohol and PEG-400, and stable in acidic pH. It binds highly to plasma proteins, and degrades slower in human then rat plasma. Resveratrol exhibits bioexponential disposition after intravenous administration and has a short elimination half-life. Resveratrol displays bioexponential disposition following intravenous administration. The estimated mean maximum concentration was 1045.5 ng/mL and rapidly dropped below 100 ng/mL within 30 minutes. The area under the concentration time curve (AUC) for resveratrol was 13888.7 min*ng/mL The mean terminal elimination half-life was 50.9 minutes. The mean total body clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution of trans-resveratrol were 1711.9mL/min/kg and 91087.8 mL/kg, respectively. Pre

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of phentermine in healthy participants receiving taranabant, a novel cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Addy, Carol; Jumes, Patricia; Rosko, Kimberly; Li, Susie; Li, Hankun; Maes, Andrea; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Chodakewitz, Jeffrey; Stoch, S Aubrey; Wagner, John A

    2009-10-01

    This study assessed the potential pharmacokinetic interaction and safety/tolerability of taranabant and phentermine coadministration. This was a randomized, double-blind, 3-panel, fixed-sequence study in healthy participants. Panels A, B, and C evaluated the safety/tolerability of phentermine 15 mg coadministered with taranabant 0.5, 1, and 2 mg for 7 days (panel A) and 28 days (panels B and C). In panels A and C, phentermine 15 mg was administered both with (7 days, panel A; 28 days, panel C) and without (7 days) taranabant 0.5 mg or 2 mg to evaluate pharmacokinetics. The primary endpoint was phentermine AUC(0-24 h) in panels A and C. Secondary endpoints were changes from baseline in blood pressure and heart rate for all panels. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals for phentermine AUC(0-24 h) in the presence/absence of taranabant 0.5 mg and 2 mg were 1.08 (0.99, 1.17) and 1.04 (0.98, 1.10), respectively. No significant differences in blood pressure and heart rate were observed with any treatment versus placebo. Coadministration of taranabant 0.5 mg, 1 mg, and 2 mg with phentermine was well tolerated with no pharmacokinetic interaction and did not result in meaningful changes in blood pressure or heart rate versus placebo.

  7. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of phenoprolamine hydrochloride floating sustained-release tablets in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Rong; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Shifen; Zhang, Li; Gong, Peili; Chen, Hui; Zeng, Fandian

    2009-07-30

    The present study was designed to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of phenoprolamine hydrochloride floating sustained tablets (PHFST) in healthy Chinese subjects. 116 volunteers were randomized into single- or multiple-dose groups for oral administration 30-240 mg of PHFST once or 60-120 mg twice daily. Safety and tolerability were appraised by monitoring adverse events and laboratory parameters. Pharmacokinetics was assessed by determining the plasma concentrations of phenoprolamine hydrochloride with a validated HPLC method. In single-dose studies, no severe adverse events were observed in volunteers, and all adverse events were mild; the percentages of treatment-emergent events judged to be possibly related to the drug were 3/6 in the 240 mg dose group, 1/6 in the 180-210 mg dose groups, and none in the 30-150 mg dose groups; system exposure (AUC, C(max)) increased with respect to dose at 30-120 mg, whereas AUC raised disproportionately with dose escalating from 120 to 240 mg; the absorption of phenoprolamine hydrochloride was unaffected by food. In multiple studies, no safety concerns were revealed up to 7 days; steady-state plasma concentration was achieved after approximately 4-5 days of repeated twice-daily dosing. PHFST is safe and well tolerated in healthy Chinese subjects. The mean C(max) of PHFST is proportional to dose, but not the AUC. Oral dosing regimen selected for subsequent Phase II/III clinical trials was 60 mg of PHFST, b.i.d., and dose up to 120 mg, b.i.d. - may be used to achieve better antihypertensive effect.

  8. Voriconazole Pharmacokinetics and Safety in Immunocompromised Children Compared to Adult Patients ▿

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Claudia; Bierbach, Uta; Frenzel, Katrin; Lange, Thoralf; Basara, Nadezda; Niederwieser, Dietger; Mauz-Körholz, Christine; Preiss, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of voriconazole after intravenous (i.v.) administration in immunocompromised children (2 to 11 years old) and adults (20 to 60 years old) who required treatment for the prevention or therapy of systemic fungal infections. Nine pediatric patients were treated with a dose of 7 mg/kg i.v. every 12 h for a period of 10 days. Three children and 12 adults received two loading doses of 6 mg/kg i.v. every 12 h, followed by a maintenance dose of 5 mg/kg (children) or 4 mg/kg (adults) twice a day during the entire study period. Trough voriconazole levels in blood over 10 days of therapy and regular voriconazole levels in blood for up to 12 h postdose on day 3 were examined. Wide intra- and interindividual variations in plasma voriconazole levels were noted in each dose group and were most pronounced in the children receiving the 7-mg/kg dose. Five (56%) of them frequently had trough voriconazole levels in plasma below 1 μg/ml or above 6 μg/ml. The recommended dose of 7 mg/kg i.v. in children provides exposure (area under the concentration-time curve) comparable to that observed in adults receiving 4 mg/kg i.v. The children had significantly higher Cmax values; other pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different from those of adults. Voriconazole exhibits nonlinear pharmacokinetics in the majority of children. Voriconazole therapy was safe and well tolerated in pediatric and adult patients. The European Medicines Agency-approved i.v. dose of 7 mg/kg can be recommended for children aged 2 to <12 years. PMID:20547816

  9. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  10. Safety climate and attitude as evaluation measures of organizational safety.

    PubMed

    Isla Díaz, R; Díaz Cabrera, D

    1997-09-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop a set of evaluation measures for safety attitudes and safety climate. Specifically it is intended: (a) to test the instruments; (b) to identify the essential dimensions of the safety climate in the airport ground handling companies; (c) to assess the quality of the differences in the safety climate for each company and its relation to the accident rate; (d) to analyse the relationship between attitudes and safety climate; and (e) to evaluate the influences of situational and personal factors on both safety climate and attitude. The study sample consisted of 166 subjects from three airport companies. Specifically, this research was centered on ground handling departments. The factor analysis of the safety climate instrument resulted in six factors which explained 69.8% of the total variance. We found significant differences in safety attitudes and climate in relation to type of enterprise.

  11. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and hydrolysis of oral pyrroloquinazolinediamines administered in single and multiple doses in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qigui; Kozar, Michael P; Shearer, Todd W; Xie, Lisa H; Lin, Ai J; Smith, Kirsten S; Si, Yuanzheng; Anova, Lalaine; Zhang, Jing; Milhous, Wilbur K; Skillman, Donald R

    2007-08-01

    Pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD) derivatives such as tetra-acetamide PQD (PQD-A4) and bis-ethylcarbamyl PQD (PQD-BE) were much safer (with therapeutic indices of 80 and 32, respectively) than their parent compound, PQD (therapeutic index, 10). Further evaluation of PQD-A4 and PQD-BE in single and multiple pharmacokinetic (PK) studies as well as corresponding toxicity studies was conducted with rats. PQD-A4 could be converted to two intermediate metabolites (monoacetamide PQD and bisacetamide PQD) first and then to the final metabolite, PQD, while PQD-BE was directly hydrolyzed to PQD without precursor and intermediate metabolites. Maximum tolerant doses showed that PQD-A4 and PQD-BE have only 1/12 and 1/6, respectively, of the toxicity of PQD after a single oral dose. Compared to the area under the concentration-time curve for PQD alone (2,965 ng.h/ml), values measured in animals treated with PQD-A4 and PQD-BE were one-third (1,047 ng.h/ml) and one-half (1,381 ng.h/ml) as high, respectively, after an equimolar dosage, suggesting that PQD was the only agent to induce the toxicity. Similar results were also shown in multiple treatments; PQD-A4 and PQD-BE generated two-fifths and three-fifths, respectively, of PQD concentrations, with 8.8-fold and 3.8-fold safety margins, respectively, over the parent drug. PK data indicated that the bioavailability of oral PQD-A4 was greatly limited at high dose levels, that PQD-A4 was slowly converted to PQD via a sequential three-step process of conversion, and that PQD-A4 was significantly less toxic than the one-step hydrolysis drug, PQD-BE. It was concluded that the slow and smaller release of PQD was the main reason for the reduction in toxicity and that the active intermediate metabolites can still maintain antimalarial potency. Therefore, the candidate with multiple-step hydrolysis of PQD could be developed as a safer potential agent for malaria treatment.

  12. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir K; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Wang, Zaiqi

    2007-10-01

    Desloratadine, a nonsedating histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist, is metabolized to 3-hydroxy (3-OH) desloratadine. Impaired hepatic function could result in increased exposure to desloratadine. This study assessed possible differences in the pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine in subjects (N = 21) with moderate hepatic dysfunction or normal liver function. Subjects were given desloratadine 5 mg once daily for 10 days and were assessed in several pharmacokinetic parameters. A similar degree of plasma protein binding to desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine was observed in healthy volunteers and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment. All subjects with hepatic impairment were normal metabolizers. Three subjects with normal liver function, all African American, were identified as poor metabolizers. Exposure to desloratadine in the poor metabolizers was 2.6- to 6.5-fold greater than in other subjects with normal liver function. Eleven treatment-related adverse events, all mild to moderate in severity, were reported. Results suggest that subjects with moderate hepatic impairment experienced a greater increase in desloratadine exposure than subjects with normal liver function. Poor metabolizers had more exposure to desloratadine than normal metabolizers with or without hepatic impairment. Desloratadine administered at a daily dose of 5 mg was well tolerated.

  13. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Repeat-Dose Micafungin in Young Infants

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian; Arrieta, Antonio; Castro, Lisa; Sánchez, Pablo J; Kaufman, David; Arnold, Leah J; Kovanda, Laura L; Sawamoto, Taiji; Buell, Donald N; Hope, William W; Walsh, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Due to the risk of central nervous system infection, relatively high weight-based echinocandin dosages may be required for successful treatment of invasive candidiasis and candidemia in young infants. This open-label study assessed safety and pharmacokinetics of micafungin in 13 young infants (> 48 hours of age and < 120 days of life) with suspected candidemia or invasive candidiasis. Infants weighing ≥ 1,000 g and < 1,000 g received 7 and 10 mg/kg/day, respectively, for a minimum of 4 to 5 days. Mean baseline weight and gestational age were 2101 g and 688 g, and 30 weeks and 25 weeks, in the 7 and 10 mg/kg/day groups, respectively. Median pharmacokinetic values for the 7 and 10 mg/kg/day groups, respectively, were: AUC0–24, 258.1 and 291.2 μg•h/ml; Clss/wt, 0.45 and 0.57 ml/min/kg; Cmax, 23.3 and 24.9 μg/ml; and Vdss/wt, 341.4 and 542.8 ml/kg. No deaths or discontinuations from treatment occurred. These data suggest that micafungin dosages of 7 and 10 mg/kg/day were well tolerated and provided exposure that was demonstrated in animal model to be adequate for central nervous system coverage. PMID:19890251

  14. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in subjects with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Tirucherai, Giridhar; Marbury, Thomas C; Wang, Jessie; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Donglu; Song, Yan; Pursley, Janice; Boyd, Rebecca A; Frost, Charles

    2016-05-01

    An open-label, parallel-group, single-dose study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in 8 subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis compared with 8 subjects with normal renal function. A single oral 5-mg dose of apixaban was administered once to healthy subjects and twice to subjects with ESRD, separated by ≥7 days: 2 hours before (on hemodialysis) and immediately after a 4-hour hemodialysis session (off hemodialysis). Blood samples were collected for determination of apixaban pharmacokinetic parameters, measures of clotting (prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time), and anti-factor Xa (FXa) activity. Compared with healthy subjects, apixaban Cmax and AUCinf were 10% lower and 36% higher, respectively, in subjects with ESRD off hemodialysis. Hemodialysis in subjects with ESRD was associated with reductions in apixaban Cmax and AUCinf of 13% and 14%, respectively. The percent change from baseline in clotting measures was similar in healthy subjects and subjects with ESRD, and differences in anti-FXa activity were similar to differences in apixaban concentration. A single 5-mg oral dose of apixaban was well tolerated in both groups. In conclusion, ESRD resulted in a modest increase (36%) in apixaban AUC and no increase in Cmax , and hemodialysis had a limited impact on apixaban clearance.

  15. Safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the anti‐hepcidin Spiegelmer lexaptepid pegol in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, M; Warrington, S; Cortezi, B; Zöllner, S; Vauléon, S; Swinkels, D W; Summo, L; Schwoebel, F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Anaemia of chronic disease is characterized by impaired erythropoiesis due to functional iron deficiency, often caused by excessive hepcidin. Lexaptepid pegol, a pegylated structured l‐oligoribonucleotide, binds and inactivates hepcidin. Experimental Approach We conducted a placebo‐controlled study on the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lexaptepid after single and repeated i.v. and s.c. administration to 64 healthy subjects at doses from 0.3 to 4.8 mg·kg−1. Key Results After treatment with lexaptepid, serum iron concentration and transferrin increased dose‐dependently. Iron increased from approximately 20 μmol·L−1 at baseline by 67% at 8 h after i.v. infusion of 1.2 mg·kg−1 lexaptepid. The pharmacokinetics showed dose‐proportional increases in peak plasma concentrations and moderately over‐proportional increases in systemic exposure. Lexaptepid had no effect on hepcidin production or anti‐drug antibodies. Treatment with lexaptepid was generally safe and well tolerated, with mild and transient transaminase increases at doses ≥2.4 mg·kg−1 and with local injection site reactions after s.c. but not after i.v. administration. Conclusions and Implications Lexaptepid pegol inhibited hepcidin and dose‐dependently raised serum iron and transferrin saturation. The compound is being further developed to treat anaemia of chronic disease. PMID:26773325

  16. Pharmacokinetic evaluation and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol nanosuspension.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuzhang; Zhu, Ling; Du, Bin; Shi, Xiufang; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) nanosuspension relative to 2-ME solution both in vitro and in vivo. The pharmacokinetics of 2-ME administered either as a nanosuspension or as a solution were compared after I.V. administration to rats. In plasma, 2-ME nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (p < 0.01) reduced C(max) (1022.8 ± 467.4 ng/mL versus 2559.2 ± 775.8 ng/mL) and AUC(0-240min) (41566.8 ± 965.5 ng/mL min versus 79557.7 ± 256.2 ng/mL min), and a significantly (p < 0.01) greater volume of distribution (3.18-fold), clearance (1.85-fold), and elimination half-life (156.6 ± 33.5 min versus 70.0 ± 22.6 min) compared to the 2-ME solution. Methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that nanosuspension could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of 2-ME on EC9706 cells in vitro. After 72 h exposure, the IC(50) value of 2-ME nanosuspension was much lower than that of 2-ME solution (1.81 ± 0.15 μmol/L versus 4.14 ± 0.30 μmol/L). Studies on BALB/c mice with EC9706 solid tumors demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with 2-ME nanosuspension than 2-ME solution at the same dosage. These results suggest that the delivery of 2-ME nanosuspension is a promising approach for the treatment of tumors.

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of linagliptin in African American patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Christian; Glund, Stephan; Lionetti, Dominick; Kissling, C James; Righetti, Julian; Patel, Sanjay; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Retlich, Silke; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Aim This was an open label, multicentre phase I trial to study the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin in African American patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Forty-one African American patients with T2DM were included in this study. Patients were admitted to a study clinic and administered 5 mg linagliptin once daily for 7 days, followed by 7 days of outpatient evaluation. Results Primary endpoints were area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and plasma DPP-4 trough inhibition at steady-state. Linagliptin geometric mean AUC was 194 nmol l−1 h (geometric coefficient of variation, 26%), with a Cmax of 16.4 nmol l−1 (41%). Urinary excretion was low (0.5% and 4.4% of the dose excreted over 24 h, days 1 and 7). The geometric mean DPP-4 inhibition at steady-state was 84.2% at trough and 91.9% at maximum. The exposure range and overall pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of linagliptin in this study of African Americans with T2DM was comparable with that in other populations. Laboratory data, vital signs and physical examinations did not show any relevant findings. No safety concerns were identified. Conclusions The results of this study in African American patients with T2DM support the use of the standard 5 mg dose recommended in all populations. PMID:23331248

  18. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Micafungin (FK463) in Febrile Neutropenic Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seibel, Nita L.; Schwartz, Cindy; Arrieta, Antonio; Flynn, Patricia; Shad, Aziza; Albano, Edith; Keirns, James; Lau, Wendi M.; Facklam, David P.; Buell, Donald N.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Micafungin (FK463) is a new parenteral echinocandin. A multicenter, phase I, open-label, sequential-group dose escalation study was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of micafungin in neutropenic pediatric patients. A total of 77 patients stratified by age (2 to 12 and 13 to 17 years) received micafungin. Therapy was initiated at 0.5 mg/kg per day and escalated to higher dose levels of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mg/kg per day. Micafungin was administered within 24 h of initiating broad-spectrum antibacterial antibiotics for the new onset of fever and neutropenia. The most common overall adverse events in the study population were diarrhea (19.5%), epistaxis (18.2%), abdominal pain (16.9%), and headache (16.9%). Nine patients (12%) experienced adverse events considered by the investigator to be possibly related to the study drug. The most common related events were diarrhea, vomiting, and headache, all occurring in two patients each. There was no evidence of a dose-limiting toxicity as defined within the prespecified criteria of this clinical protocol. There was one death during the study due to septic shock. The pharmacokinetic profiles for micafungin over the 0.5- to 4.0-mg/kg dose range demonstrated dose linearity. Clearance, volume of distribution, and half-life remained relatively constant over the dose range and did not change with repeated administration. The overall plasma pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that observed in adults. However, there was an inverse relation between age and clearance. For patients 2 to 8 years old, clearance was approximately 1.35 times that of patients ≥9 years of age. In summary, micafungin over a dosage range between 0.5 and 4.0 mg/kg/day in 77 febrile neutropenic pediatric patients displayed linear pharmacokinetics and increased clearance as a function of decreasing age. PMID:16048942

  19. Relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of the single-dose pharmacokinetics of omecamtiv mecarbil following administration of different modified-release formulations in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Palaparthy, Rameshraja; Banfield, Christopher; Alvarez, Paco; Yan, Lucy; Smith, Brian; Johnson, Jessica; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Malik, Fady

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Omecamtiv mecarbil is a novel small molecule that directly activates cardiac myosin and increases cardiac contractility without increasing cardiac myocyte intracellular calcium. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of several modified-release (MR) formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. Methods: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, 4-way crossover, incomplete block-design study evaluating 5 MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil vs. an immediate-release (IR) formulation. Materials: Healthy subjects were randomized to 1 of 30 possible sequences: within each sequence, subjects were assigned to receive a single 25-mg dose of 2 of the 6 possible formulations in the fasting and/or fed states. Results: 65 subjects were screened and enrolled; 5 were replacement subjects. Pharmacokinetic and safety data were analyzed from 62 and 63 subjects in the fasting and fed states, respectively. Compared with the IR formulation, median tmax was longer (0.5 vs. 2 – 10 hours), and mean Cmax was lower for all 5 MR formulations (262 vs. 34 – 78 ng/mL); t1/2,z was similar (18 – 21 hours). The relative bioavailability was high (> 75%) for three MR formulations but lower (< 65%) for the other two. Overall, the effect of food on omecamtiv mecarbil pharmacokinetics was minimal for four of the MR formulations. The pharmacokinetics of the inactive metabolites M3 and M4 were similar across all formulations. Conclusions: The relative bioavailability of omecamtiv mecarbil was high (> 75%) for 3 of the five MR formulations. Food had a marginal, nonclinically meaningful effect on the pharmacokinetics of the MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. PMID:26709596

  20. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  1. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Multiple Dose myo-Inositol in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Dale L.; Ward, Robert M.; Williams, Rick L.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Oh, William; Goedecke, Michael; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Fennell, Timothy; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Cotten, C. Michael; Hallman, Mikko; Frantz, Ivan D.; Faix, Roger G.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Das, Abhik; Ball, M. Bethany; Lacy, Conra Backstrom; Walsh, Michele C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bell, Edward F.; Shankaran, Seetha; Carlton, David P.; Chess, Patricia R.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Preterm infants with RDS given inositol had reduced BPD, death and severe ROP. We assessed the safety and pharmacokinetics(PK) of daily inositol to select a dose providing serum levels previously associated with benefit, and to learn if accumulation occurred when administered throughout the normal period of retinal vascularization. METHODS Infants ≤29wks GA (n=122, 14 centers) were randomized and treated with placebo or inositol at 10, 40 or 80mg/kg/day. Intravenous administration converted to enteral when feedings were established, and continued to the first of 10 weeks, 34weeks PMA or discharge. Serum collection employed a sparse sampling population PK design. Inositol urine losses and feeding intakes were measured. Safety was prospectively monitored. RESULTS At 80mg/kg/day mean serum levels reached 140mg/L, similar to Hallman’s findings. Levels declined after 2 weeks, converging in all groups by 6 wks. Analyses showed a mean volume of distribution 0.657 L/kg, clearance 0.058 L/kg/hr, and half-life 7.90 hr. Adverse events and co-morbidities were fewer in the inositol groups, but not significantly so. CONCLUSIONS Multiple dose inositol at 80mg/kg/day was not associated with increased adverse events, achieves previously effective serum levels, and is appropriate for investigation in a Phase 3 trial. PMID:27074126

  2. Raltegravir for HIV-1 infected children and adolescents: efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kajal B; King, Jennifer R; Acosta, Edward P

    2013-01-01

    Raltegravir was the first HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitor to be approved by the US FDA, in October 2007, for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Raltegravir can be used in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients, as well as for the treatment of multidrug-resistant infection. Raltegravir exists in two formulations: a film-coated tablet administered orally at 400 mg twice daily, and a chewable tablet administered orally at 300 mg twice daily. In 2011, raltegravir was also approved for the treatment of children and adolescents, ages 2–18 years. For adolescents (ages 12–18 years), the recommended dose is 400 mg twice daily (film-coated tablet). If children (ages 6–12 years) weigh at least 25 kg, the film-coated tablet is recommended at 400 mg twice daily. Otherwise, patients receive the chewable tablet according to weight-based dosing at approximately 6 mg/kg/dose. Studies are ongoing for children ages 4 weeks to 2 years, and preliminary efficacy and safety data are promising. This article reviews current studies on the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in the pediatric population and the challenges of treating HIV in children and adolescents. PMID:24600298

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and 48-Week Efficacy of Oral Raltegravir in HIV-1–Infected Children Aged 2 Through 18 Years

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Zheng, Nan; Acosta, Edward P.; Teppler, Hedy; Homony, Brenda; Graham, Bobbie; Fenton, Terence; Xu, Xia; Wenning, Larissa; Spector, Stephen A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Alvero, Carmelita; Worrell, Carol; Handelsman, Edward; Wiznia, Andrew; Moultrie, Harry; Kindra, Gurpreet; Sanders, Margaret Ann; Williams, Ruth; Jensen, Jennifer; Acevedo, Midnela; Fabregas, Lizbeth; Jurgrau, Andrea; Foca, Marc; Higgins, Alice; Deville, Jaime G.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Carter, Michele F.; Swetnam, John; Wilson, Joan; Donnelly, Margaret; Akleh, Siham; Rigaud, Mona; Kaul, Aditya; Patel, Nehali; Gaur, Aditya; Utech, L. Jill; Cardoso, Edmundo; Moreira, Ana Maria; Santos, Breno; Bobat, Raziya; Mngqibisa, Rosie; Burey, Marlene; Abadi, Jacob; Rosenberg, Michael; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Picard, Donna; Pagano-Therrien, Jessica; Dittmer, Sylvia; Ndiweni, Hilda Ntatule; Patel, Amisha; DelRey, Michelle; McMullen-Jackson, Chivon; Paul, Mary E.; Melvin, Ann; Venema-Weiss, Corry; Lane, Jenna; Beneri, Christy; Ferraro, Denise; Infanzon, Erin; McAuley, James B; Aziz, Mariam; McNichols, Maureen; Pelton, Stephen; McLaud, Deb; Clarke, Diana; Zeichner, Steven; Akar, Arezou; Thompson, Deidre; Douglas, Steven D.; Rutstein, Richard M.; Vincent, Carol A.; Vachon, Mary Elizabeth; Cavallo, Martha; Purswani, Murli Udharam; Masheto, Gaerolwe; Ogwu, Anthony; Kakhu, Tebogo; Viani, Rolando M.; Darcey, Anita,; Norris, Kimberly; Burchett, Sandra K.; Kneut, Catherine; Karthas, Nancy; Casey, Denise; Emmanuel, Patricia; Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge; Rana, Sohail; Houston, Patricia; Mengistab, Mulu; Rathore, Mobeen; Mirza, Ayesha; Gayton, Tabetha; Barr, Emily; Dunn, Jennifer; Hahn, Kerry; Eysallenne, Zulma; Howard, F. Sholar; Graham, Kathleen; Negra, Marinella Della; Queiroz, Wladimir; Lian, Yu Ching; Wara, Diane; Ruel, Ted; VanDyke, Russell; Reilly, Patricia; Bradford, Sheila; van Rensburg, Anita Janse; Dobbels, Els; Bester, Marietjie; Bamji, Mahrukh; Paul, Santa; Sarza, Mirala; Kovacs, Andrea; Homans, James; Spencer, LaShonda; Hofer, Cristna; Abreu, Thalita; Oliveira, Ricardo; Joao, Esau C.; Pinto, Jorge; Ferreira, Flavia; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Cervi, Maria Celia; Isaac, Marcia De Lima; Losso, Marcelo H.; Stankievich, Erica; Foradori, Irene; Tucker, Diane; Church, Joseph; Belzer, Marvin; Hopkins, Johns; Ellen, Jonathan; Agwu, Allison; Laurel, Borkovic

    2014-01-01

    Background. IMPAACT P1066 is a phase I/II open-label multicenter trial to evaluate pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of multiple raltegravir formulations in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected youth. Methods. Dose selection for each cohort (I: 12 to <19 years; II: 6 to <12 years; and III: 2 to <6 years) was based on review of short-term safety (4 weeks) and intensive pharmacokinetic evaluation. Safety data through weeks 24 and 48, and grade ≥3 or serious adverse events (AEs) were assessed. The primary virologic endpoint was achieving HIV RNA <400 copies/mL or ≥1 log10 reduction between baseline and week 24. Results. The targeted pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-12h and C12h) were achieved for each cohort, allowing dose selection for 2 formulations. Of 96 final dose subjects, there were 15 subjects with grade 3 or higher clinical AEs (1 subject with drug-related [DR] psychomotor hyperactivity and insomnia); 16 subjects with grade 3 or higher laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase elevation); 14 subjects with serious clinical AEs (1 with DR rash); and 1 subjects with serious laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase increased). There were no discontinuations due to AEs and no DR deaths. Favorable virologic responses at week 48 were observed in 79.1% of patients, with a mean CD4 increase of 156 cells/µL (4.6%). Conclusions. Raltegravir as a film-coated tablet 400 mg twice daily (6 to <19 years, and ≥25 kg) and chewable tablet 6 mg/kg (maximum dose 300 mg) twice daily (2 to <12 years) was well tolerated and showed favorable virologic and immunologic responses. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00485264. PMID:24145879

  4. An effect of moderate hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics and safety of darapladib

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Mindy He; Shearn, Shawn; Shaddinger, Bonnie; Fang, Zixing; Glaser, Ruchira

    2014-01-01

    Aim/Methods This was a phase 1, open label, non-randomized study designed to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety/tolerability of 10 consecutive once daily 40 mg oral doses of darapladib in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (n = 12) compared with matched healthy volunteers (n = 12). Results For total darapladib, a small increase in total and peak exposure was observed in the subjects with moderate hepatic impairment compared with the subjects with normal hepatic function. The area under the plasma concentration−time curve during a dosing interval of duration τ (AUC(0,τ), geometric mean 223 ng ml−1 h [90% CI 158, 316 ng ml−1 h], in moderate hepatic impaired subjects, vs. geometric mean 186 ng ml−1 h [90% CI 159, 217 ng ml−1 h], in healthy subjects) and maximum concentration (Cmax) were 20% and 7% higher, respectively, in the subjects with moderate hepatic impairment than in the healthy control subjects and there was no change in time to maximum concentration (tmax). Protein binding was performed to measure the amount of unbound drug vs. bound. Steady-state was achieved by day 10 for darapladib and its metabolites (M4, M3 and M10). Darapladib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events (AEs) reported by seven subjects in the hepatic impairment group and three subjects in the healthy matched group (five and one of which were drug-related AEs, respectively). The most common AEs were gastrointestinal. These AEs were mostly mild to moderate and there were no deaths, serious AEs or withdrawals due to AEs. Conclusions The results of this phase 1 study show that darapladib (40 mg) is well tolerated and its pharmacokinetics remain relatively unchanged in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. PMID:24938621

  5. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety profile of the new platelet-activating factor antagonist apafant in man.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H M; Adamus, W S; Heuer, H O; Birke, F W; Kempe, E R

    1991-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phospholipid mediator with multifunctional properties. Evidence generated in experimental studies suggests that PAF plays a pathogenetic role in anaphylactic, inflammatory and immunogenic reactions. Apafant (WEB 2086, CAS 105219-56-5), a novel synthetic PAF receptor antagonist, was administered to a total of 101 healthy volunteers within 5 studies to investigate its pharmacologic activity, pharmacokinetic behaviour and safety profile. Pharmacologic activity was monitored by inhibition of 5 x 10(-8) mol/l PAF-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo. The following treatment schedules were studied: oral single dose 1.25 to 400 mg; oral multiple dose 100 mg t.i.d. over 7 days; i.v. infusion 0.5 to 50 mg (over 30 min); inhalative administration up to 1.0 mg. PAF induced platelet aggregation was virtually completely inhibited by single oral doses of 20 mg upwards, throughout during the multiple oral dose study, at all dose levels tested in the i.v. study and (significantly but not completely) at 0.5 and 1.0 mg in the inhalative study. Following oral administrations (capsules) apafant is absorbed rapidly (tmax 1 to 2 h), there is linear pharmacokinetics for the mean plasma concentrations of apafant measured by RIA as well as for the areas under the curve (AUCs). Approximately 60% of apafant is bound to plasma protein, the mean volume of distribution is 28 l, about 44% of an oral dose is excreted in the urine, the mean renal clearance is 192 ml/min. No accumulation of the drug occurred in volunteers with normal kidney function. No clinically relevant drug related adverse events or changes in laboratory or vital parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and ECG were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and safety of AM211: a novel and potent antagonist of the prostaglandin D2 receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Bain, G; King, C D; Brittain, J; Hartung, J P; Dearmond, I; Stearns, B; Truong, Y P; Hutchinson, J H; Evans, J F; Holme, K

    2012-10-01

    The prostaglandin D(2) receptor type 2 (DP2) and its ligand, PGD(2), have been implicated in the development of asthma and other inflammatory diseases. The authors evaluated the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of [2'-(3-benzyl-1-ethyl-ureidomethyl)-6-methoxy-4'-trifluoromethyl-biphenyl-3-yl]-acetic acid sodium salt (AM211), a novel and potent DP2 antagonist, in healthy participants. Single and multiple doses of AM211 demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of eosinophil shape change in blood with near-complete inhibition observed at trough after dosing 200 mg once daily for 7 days. Maximum plasma concentrations and exposures of AM211 increased in a greater-than-dose-proportional manner after single and multiple dosing. After multiple dosing, the exposures on day 7 were higher than on day 1 with accumulation ratio values ranging from 1.4 to 1.5. Mean terminal half-life values ranged from 14 to 25 hours across the dose range of 100 to 600 mg. AM211 was well tolerated at all doses in both the single- and multiple-dose cohorts. These data support additional clinical studies to evaluate AM211 in asthma and other inflammatory diseases.

  7. Phase I Safety and Pharmacokinetics Study of Micronized Atovaquone in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Walter; Dorenbaum, Alejandro; Yogev, Ram; Beauchamp, Belinda; Xu, Jing; McNamara, James; Moye, John; Purdue, Lynette; van Dyke, Russell; Rogers, Michael; Sadler, Brian; Group, The Pediatric Aids Clinical Trials

    1998-01-01

    A phase I dose-escalating safety and pharmacokinetic study evaluated an oral suspension of micronized atovaquone (m-atovaquone) in infants and children stratified into age groups from 1 month to 12 years of age. Dosages of 10, 30, and 45 mg/kg of body weight/day were evaluated as single daily doses over a period of 12 days. Steady-state concentrations in plasma were determined on day 12, and single postdose concentrations were measured on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 18, 21, and 24. Prior studies with adults suggest that the average plasma atovaquone concentration of 15 μg/ml is associated with therapeutic success in more than 95% of patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis. The results showed m-atovaquone to be safe and well tolerated. Dosages of 30 mg/kg/day were adequate to achieve an average steady-state concentration of greater than 15 μg/ml in children ages 1 to 3 months and 2 to 12 years, but a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day was needed to reach this concentration in infants 3 to 24 months of age. The oral suspension of atovaquone is safe and well tolerated in children. A single daily dose of 30 mg/kg provides bioavailability considered adequate for therapy of P. carinii pneumonia, but infants between 3 and 24 months of age may require a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day. PMID:9624466

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  9. Practical considerations for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Carmel M; Hart, Bruce W

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a well established class of therapeutics as evidenced by a large number of FDA approved mAbs for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Monoclonal antibodies that are molecularly engineered for enhanced functions and pharmacokinetic properties are routinely being considered for development by many biotechnology companies. Safety evaluation of current generation of mAbs poses new challenges due to the highly complex nature of engineering aspects and variability induced by the diverse recombinant cell systems to generate them. This review provides a basic outline for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic antibodies. Important considerations for planning a preclinical program, the types of nonclinical safety studies, and a general timeline for their conduct in relation to clinical trials are described. A list of relevant regulatory documents issued by government agencies is also provided. Adoption of these principles will greatly enhance the quality and relevance of the nonclinical safety data generated and will facilitate future development of mAb therapeutics. PMID:20046568

  10. Evaluation of Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Sodium 2,2 Dimethylbutyrate, a Novel Short Chain Fatty Acid Derivative, in a Phase 1, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Single- and Repeat-Dose Studies in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Wargin, William A.; Boosalis, Michael S.; Wallis, Wayne J.; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R.; Faller, Douglas V.; Welch, William C.; Berenson, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel SCFA derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with one of four single dose levels (2, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9–15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable PK profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies. PMID:21422239

  11. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals. Trial Registration Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000004997 PMID:25978046

  12. The use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data in the assessment of drug safety in early drug development

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D K

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry continues to look for ways to reduce drug candidate attrition throughout the drug discovery and development process. A significant cause of attrition is due to safety issues arising either as a result of animal toxicity testing or in the clinical programme itself. A factor in the assessment of safety during early drug development is the pharmacokinetic profile of the compound. This allows safety data to be considered in the light of systemic drug exposure and therefore permits a quantitative assessment. This is particularly applicable when assessing the risk of a new chemical entity (NCE) in relation to safety parameters such as QT interval prolongation, where free plasma concentrations have been shown to be predictive of this property in relation to potency in preclinical testing. Prior to actual human exposure it is therefore important to be able to predict reliably the pharmacokinetic behaviour of an NCE in order to place such safety findings into a quantitative risk context. The emerging science of pharmacogenetics is likely to further our ability to assess the risk of NCEs to populations and individuals due to genetic variance. The drug metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 has been recognized as providing the potential to result in widely differing systemic drug exposure in the patient population due to polymorphic expression. Further knowledge is likely to add to our understanding of population differences in exposure and response and aid in the identification of risk factors. One potential strategy for improving the effectiveness of the drug discovery process is to obtain clinical pharmacokinetic data more rapidly in order to assess more accurately the potential for both efficacy and safety of an NCE. Whilst procedures and technologies are available that allow this on the microdose scale, it is important that we recognize potential limitations of these approaches in order that they can be applied beneficially. PMID:15563358

  13. Alfuzosin: overview of pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of a clinically uroselective alpha-blocker.

    PubMed

    Roehrborn, C G

    2001-12-01

    Efficacy and safety of alfuzosin administered as 3-times-daily and 2-times-daily formulations have been previously demonstrated in placebo-controlled studies, and these formulations have been commercially available in many countries. A once-daily formulation of alfuzosin administered through a novel prolonged-release system has been recently developed to improve the convenience of dosing and to provide optimal pharmacokinetic coverage over 24 hours. The results of 2 double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 studies in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia suggests that 10 mg of alfuzosin administered once daily without dose titration is superior to placebo in terms of symptom and urinary flow rate improvement. Orthostatic hypotension and first-dose phenomenon related to the alpha-blocking property were rare. The incidences of asthenia and fatigue were comparable to those seen with placebo. Ejaculatory disorders were very rare. The most frequently reported adverse event potentially related to alpha blockade was dizziness, which occurred in 5.0% of patients treated with 10 mg alfuzosin compared with 2.1% of patients given placebo.

  14. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of faldaprevir in patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglei; Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2015-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.).

  15. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of a novel subcutaneous immunoglobulin, Evogam®, in primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Empson, Marianne B; Tang, Mimi L K; Pearce, Lisa K C; Rozen, Leon; Gold, Michael S; Katelaris, Constance H; Langton, David; Smart, Joanne; Smith, William B; Steele, Richard H; Ziegler, John B; Maher, Darryl

    2012-10-01

    This phase III, open-label, multi-centre study investigated the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and quality of life impact of Evogam(®), a new chromatographically fractionated 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin, utilising a 1:1 dose transition ratio from previous immunoglobulin therapy. Thirty-five previously treated patients with primary immunodeficiency received weekly Evogam over 36 weeks. Primary endpoints were rate of serious bacterial infections (SBIs) and steady-state serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) trough concentrations. No SBIs were reported during the study. Evogam produced significantly higher mean trough IgG concentrations with 1:1 dose conversion compared to previous immunoglobulin treatment (8.94 versus 8.27 g/L, p = 0.0063). Evogam was efficacious in the prevention of infections and maintenance of trough levels using a 1:1 dose conversion. It was well tolerated with no withdrawals due to adverse events and was preferred to IVIg by the majority of patients.

  16. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of CKD-519, a CETP inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choon Ok; Oh, Eun Sil; Choi, Chungam; Kim, Yeonjoo; Lee, Sera; Kim, Semi; Park, Min Soo

    2016-01-01

    CKD-519 is a selective and potent cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single doses of CKD-519 in healthy adult subjects. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was performed. Eight healthy subjects were enrolled in each CKD-519 dose group (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) and randomized to CKD-519 (n=6) or matching placebo (n=2). CKD-519 reached the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) at 5–6 h post-dose, and had a long terminal half-life ranging between 40–70 h. The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) and Cmax increased with the dose, however, Cmax and AUC normalized by dose decreased with each incremental dose. CETP activity decreased with dose, and the maximum decrease (63%–83%) was observed at 6–8 h post-dose. A sigmoid Emax model best described the relationship between CKD-519 plasma concentrations and CETP activity with an EC50 of 17.3 ng/mL. Overall, 11 adverse events (AEs) were observed. All AEs were mild or moderate in intensity, and resolved without any complications. There were no clinically significant effects on blood pressure. In conclusion, single doses of CKD-519 up to 400 mg were well tolerated and showed potent inhibition of CETP activity. PMID:27895466

  17. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CD101 IV, a Novel Echinocandin, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Voon; Lee, Jonathan; Thye, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD101 IV is a novel echinocandin with distinctive pharmacokinetic properties that is being developed as a once-weekly treatment for candidemia and invasive candidiasis. CD101 has potent in vitro activity and in vivo efficacy against a broad range of Candida and Aspergillus species. The primary objective of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation studies in healthy adults was to determine the safety and tolerability of CD101 IV. Sequential cohorts of 8 subjects (n = 6, active; n = 2, placebo) were administered single (50, 100, 200, 400 mg) or multiple once-weekly (100 mg given once weekly for two weeks [×2], 200 mg ×2, 400 mg ×3) doses of CD101 IV infused over 1 h. There were no deaths, serious adverse events (SAEs), severe adverse events (AEs), or withdrawals from the study due to an AE. The majority of AEs were mild, and all completely resolved. There was a higher incidence of total AEs and mild transient infusion reactions in the 400-mg ×3 dose group. There were no clinically meaningful trends in postbaseline laboratory abnormalities and no safety issues related to electrocardiograms, vital signs, or physical exams. CD101 showed dose-proportional plasma exposures, minor accumulation (30% to 55%), low apparent clearance (<0.28 liter/h), long half-life (t1/2) (>80 h), and minimal urine excretion. CD101 IV was safe and well tolerated at single and multiple doses of up to 400 mg given once weekly for 3 weeks and exhibited a long t1/2, minimal accumulation over several weeks, negligible renal excretion, and high plasma exposures enabling once-weekly dosing. PMID:27919901

  18. Chitosan-Stearic Acid Based Polymeric Micelles for the Effective Delivery of Tamoxifen: Cytotoxic and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thotakura, Nagarani; Dadarwal, Mukesh; Kumar, Pramod; Sharma, Gajanand; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Raza, Kaisar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2017-04-01

    Chitosan is a widely employed polysaccharide with positive zeta-potential and better tissue/cell adhesion. Its hydrophilicity, high viscosity, and insolubility at physiological pH are major hurdles in proper utilization of this macromolecule. Therefore, it was conjugated with biocompatible stearic acid and the conjugate was employed to develop polymeric micelles for delivery of tamoxifen to breast cancer cells. The conjugate was characterized by FT-IR and NMR, and the nanocarrier was characterized for micromeritics, surface charge, drug loading, and morphological attributes. The efficacy was evaluated by in vitro MTT studies, safety by erythrocyte compatibility, and biodistribution by in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. Despite better drug loading and sustained drug release, cytotoxicity on MCF-7 breast cancer cells was substantially enhanced and the pharmacokinetic profile was significantly modified. The AUC was enhanced manifolds along with reduced clearance. The findings are unique and provide an alternative to the conventional lipid-based nanocarriers for better dose delivery, tissue adhesion, and desired pharmacokinetic modulation.

  19. Dose modifications in Asian cancer patients with hepatic dysfunction receiving weekly docetaxel: A prospective pharmacokinetic and safety study.

    PubMed

    Syn, Nicholas Li-Xun; Wang, Lingzhi; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Soe, Mu-Yar; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Tan, Sing-Huang; Soo, Ross Andrew; Lee, Soo-Chin; Goh, Boon-Cher; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic dysfunction may modify the safety profile and pharmacokinetics of docetaxel in cancer patients, but no validated guideline exists to guide dose modification necessitated by this uncommon comorbidity. We carried out the first prospective study of a personalized dosage regimen for cancer patients with liver dysfunction treated with docetaxel. Weekly dosages were stratified by hepatic dysfunction classification as such: Category 1, normal; Category 2, mild--alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and/or alanine aminotransferase ≤5× upper limit of normal (ULN), and total bilirubin within normal range; and Category 3, moderate--any alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase or alanine aminotransferase ≤5-10× ULN, and/or total bilirubin ≤1-1.5× ULN. Category 1, 2 and 3 patients received starting dosages of 40, 30, and 20 mg/m(2) docetaxel, respectively. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated on day 1 and 8 of the first treatment cycle, and entered into a multilevel model to delineate interindividual and interoccasion variability. Adverse event evaluation was carried out weekly for two treatment cycles. We found that docetaxel clearance was significantly different between patient categories (P < 0.001). Median clearance was 22.8, 16.4, and 11.3 L/h/m(2) in Categories 1, 2, and 3, respectively, representing 28% and 50% reduced clearance in mild and moderate liver dysfunction patients, respectively. However, docetaxel exposure (area under the concentration-time curve) and docetaxel-induced neutropenia (nadir and the maximum percentage decrease in neutrophil count) were not significantly different between categories. Median area under the concentration-time curve was 1.74, 1.83, and 1.77 mg·h/L in Categories 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The most common Grade 3/4 toxicity was neutropenia (30.0%). An unplanned comparison with the Child-Pugh and National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group grouping systems suggests that the proposed

  20. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  1. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of ceftriaxone in children].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Sakata, H; Murono, K; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N

    1984-12-01

    Twenty-eight pediatric patients were treated with ceftriaxone (Ro 13-9904, CTRX) in the doses ranging from 8.75 to 25 mg/kg every 12 hours for 3.5 to 11.5 days, and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. Among the 21 children with bacterial infections including pneumonia, acute bronchitis, otitis media, tonsillitis and urinary tract infections, the results were excellent in 9, good in 11, and fair in 1 patient. Out of the 28 patients, 2 patients had diarrhea, 3 patients had slightly elevated serum concentrations of transaminases, and 2 patients showed eosinophilia. The serum concentrations of CTRX in 5 children ranged from 50.0 to 93.8 micrograms/ml (mean 75.0 micrograms/ml) at 15 minutes and from 10.2 to 15.6 micrograms/ml (mean 13.4 micrograms/ml at 6 hours after 10 mg/kg intravenous bolus injection of CTRX. The serum half-lives were from 2.61 to 8.30 hours (mean 6.16 hours), and urinary recovery rates were from 43.3 to 58.0% (mean 48.5%) during 0-6 hours and from 52.0 to 66.1% (mean 59.4%) during 0-12 hours. After 20 mg/kg intravenous bolus injection of CTRX in 4 children, the serum concentrations of CTRX were from 118.8 to 162.5 micrograms/ml (mean 139.1 micrograms/ml) at 15 minutes and from 18.0 to 21.1 micrograms/ml (mean 19.2 micrograms/ml) at 6 hours. The serum half-lives were 4.07 to 6.34 hours (mean 5.13 hours), and urinary recovery rates were 38.6 to 51.1% (mean 45.4%) during 0-6 hours and from 54.8 to 64.0% (mean 59.0%) during 0-12 hours. Patients with impairment of renal function were excluded from this pharmacokinetic study.

  2. A Pharmacokinetic and Safety Study of Trebananib, a Fc-Fusion Peptibody, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors and Varying Degrees of Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Benjamin; Lewis, Lionel D; Harvey, R Donald; Rasmussen, Erik; Gamelin, Erick; Sun, Yu-Nien; Friberg, Gregory; Koyner, Jay L; Dowlati, Afshin; Maitland, Michael L

    2017-01-11

    Clearance of trebananib (AMG 386), a 64 kD anti-angiogenic peptibody, has been associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We prospectively evaluated trebananib pharmacokinetics and safety/tolerability in advanced solid tumor patients with varying degrees of renal function. Patients were assigned to normal renal function, mild, moderate, or severe renal dysfunction cohorts based on eGFR, received trebananib 15 mg/kg IV weekly, and underwent week 1 and week 5 pharmacokinetic and weekly safety assessments. For 28 patients, trebananib clearance decreased from normal renal function (1.52 mL/hr/kg), to mild (1.20 mL/hr/kg), moderate (0.79 mL/hr/kg), and severe (0.53 mL/hr/kg) renal dysfunction (P ≤ 0.001). Treatment-related adverse events showed no association with clearance. Trebananib clearance was proportional to eGFR and unrelated to pretreatment protein excretion. These data confirm a role for renal clearance of a recombinant peptibody with molecular weight < 69 kD and support a longer dosing interval for patients with severe renal dysfunction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety and pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoglobulin administered to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 185 Pharmacokinetic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Fletcher, C V; Moye, J; Stiehm, E R; Meyer, W A; Nemo, G J; Mathieson, B J; Hirsch, G; Sapan, C V; Cummins, L M; Jimenez, E; O'Neill, E; Kovacs, A; Stek, A

    1997-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were evaluated in the first 28 maternal-infant pairs enrolled in a randomized, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-controlled trial of HIVIG maternal-infant HIV transmission prophylaxis. Using 200 mg/kg, mean half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) in women were 15 days and 72 mL/kg, respectively, after one and 32 days and 154 mL/kg after three monthly infusions, with stable 4 mL/kg/day clearance. Transplacental passage occurred. Newborn single-dose half-life, Vd, and clearance were 30 days, 143 mL/kg, and 4 mL/kg/day, respectively. HIVIG rapidly cleared maternal serum immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were stable. Mild to moderate adverse clinical effects occurred in 2 of 103 maternal and 2 of 25 infant infusions. No adverse hematologic, blood chemistry, or immunologic effects were seen. HIVIG is well-tolerated in HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns, clears antigenemia, crosses the placenta, and exhibits pharmacokinetics similar to those of other immunoglobulin preparations.

  4. First-in-Human Trial of MIV-150 and Zinc Acetate Coformulated in a Carrageenan Gel: Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Acceptability, Adherence, and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hoesley, Craig J.; Plagianos, Marlena; Hoskin, Elena; Zhang, Shimin; Teleshova, Natalia; Alami, Mohcine; Novak, Lea; Kleinbeck, Kyle R.; Katzen, Lauren L.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Creasy, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of MIV-150 and zinc acetate in a carrageenan gel (PC-1005). Acceptability, adherence, and pharmacodynamics were also explored. Design: A 3-day open-label safety run-in (n = 5) preceded a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in healthy, HIV-negative, abstinent women randomized (4:1) to vaginally apply 4 mL of PC-1005 or placebo once daily for 14 days. Methods: Assessments included physical examinations, safety labs, colposcopy, biopsies, cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs), and behavioral questionnaires. MIV-150 (plasma, CVL, tissue), zinc (plasma, CVL), and carrageenan (CVL) concentrations were determined with LC-MS/MS, ICP-MS, and ELISA, respectively. CVL antiviral activity was measured using cell-based assays. Safety, acceptability, and adherence were analyzed descriptively. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental techniques and actual sampling times. CVL antiviral EC50 values were calculated using a dose–response inhibition analysis. Results: Participants (n = 20) ranged from 19–44 years old; 52% were black or African American. Among those completing the trial (13/17, PC-1005; 3/3, placebo), 11/17 reported liking the gel overall; 7 recommended reducing the volume. Adverse events, which were primarily mild and/or unrelated, were comparable between groups. Low systemic MIV-150 levels were observed, without accumulation. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged from baseline. Seven of seven CVLs collected 4-hour postdose demonstrated antiviral (HIV, human papillomavirus) activity. High baseline CVL anti–herpes-simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) activity precluded assessment of postdose activity. Conclusions: PC-1005 used vaginally for 14 days was well tolerated. Low systemic levels of MIV-150 were observed. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged. Postdose CVLs had anti-HIV and anti–human papillomavirus activity. These data warrant further development of PC-1005 for HIV and sexually transmitted

  5. Abuse potential, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of intranasally administered crushed oxycodone HCl abuse-deterrent controlled-release tablets in recreational opioid users.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen C; Perrino, Peter J; Smith, Ira; Shram, Megan J; Colucci, Salvatore V; Bartlett, Cynthia; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate abuse potential, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of intranasally administered, crushed reformulated OxyContin® (oxycodone HCl controlled-release) tablets (ORF), relative to crushed original OxyContin® (OC), oxycodone powder (Oxy API), and OC placebo. This randomized, double-blind, positive- and placebo-controlled crossover study enrolled healthy, adult, nonphysically dependent recreational opioid users with recent history of intranasal drug abuse (N = 27). Active treatments contained oxycodone (30 mg). Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (e.g., Overall Drug Liking [ODL], Take Drug Again [TDA], and High Visual Analog Scales [VAS]; Subjective Drug Value [SDV]; pupillometry; intranasal irritation), and safety (e.g., adverse events, vital signs, laboratory tests) were assessed to 24 hours postdose. Crushed ORF administration yielded reduced oxycodone Cmax and increased Tmax versus crushed OC and Oxy API. Peak effects for pharmacodynamic measures were delayed with ORF (1-2 hours) versus OC and Oxy API (0.5-1 hour). ODL, TDA, High VAS, and SDV Emax values were significantly lower (P ≤ .05) and some intranasal irritation ratings were greater for ORF versus OC and Oxy API. No significant or unexpected safety findings were observed. Compared with OC and Oxy API, intranasally administered ORF was associated with lower and delayed peak plasma concentrations, decreased drug-liking, and decreased intranasal tolerability. This suggests that ORF has a decreased potential for intranasal oxycodone abuse. There were no significant or unexpected safety findings. As is true for all abuse potential studies, epidemiological or other appropriate post-marketing studies are required to assess the impact of the reduction in intranasal oxycodone abuse potential observed in the present study on real-world patterns of ORF misuse, abuse, and diversion.

  6. Phase 1 Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Dapivirine and Maraviroc Vaginal Rings: a Double-Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Beatrice A.; Panther, Lori; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Hoesley, Craig J.; van der Straten, Ariane; Husnik, Marla J.; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Nel, Annalene; Johnson, Sherri; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Rabe, Lorna K.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Variable adherence limits effectiveness of daily oral and intravaginal tenofovir-containing pre-exposure prophylaxis. Monthly vaginal antiretroviral rings are one approach to improve adherence and drug delivery. Methods MTN-013/IPM 026, a multi-site, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 48 HIV-negative U.S. women, evaluated vaginal rings containing dapivirine (25 mg) and maraviroc (100 mg), dapivirine-only, maraviroc-only, and placebo used continuously for 28 days. Safety was assessed by adverse events. Drug concentrations were quantified in plasma, cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), and cervical tissue. Cervical biopsy explants were challenged with HIV ex vivo to evaluate pharmacodynamics. Results There was no difference in related genitourinary adverse events between treatment arms compared to placebo. Dapivirine and maraviroc concentrations rose higher initially before falling more rapidly with the combination ring compared to relatively stable concentrations with the single drug rings. Dapivirine concentrations in CVF were 1 and 5 log10 greater than cervical tissue and plasma for both rings. Maraviroc was consistently detected only in CVF. Dapivirine and maraviroc CVF and dapivirine tissue concentrations dropped rapidly after ring removal. Cervical tissue showed a significant inverse linear relationship between HIV replication and dapivirine levels. Conclusions In this first study of a combination microbicide vaginal ring, all four rings were safe and well tolerated. Tissue dapivirine concentrations were 1,000 times greater than plasma concentrations and single drug rings had more stable pharmacokinetics. Dapivirine, but not maraviroc, demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue. Since maraviroc concentrations were consistently detectable only in CVF and not in plasma, improved drug release of maraviroc rings is needed. PMID:26034880

  7. Antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics: systematic review, formulations, pharmacokinetics, safety, efficacy and implications for control.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer; Ingram, Katrin; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-10-01

    Drug development for paediatric applications entails a number of challenges, such as the wide age spectrum covered - from birth to adolescence - and developmental changes in physiology during biological maturation that influence the efficacy and toxicity of drugs. Safe and efficacious antiparasitic drugs for children are of pivotal importance given the large proportion of burden attributable to parasitic diseases in this age group, and growing efforts to administer, as widely as possible, antiparasitic drugs to at-risk populations, such as infants and school-aged children, often without prior diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether antiparasitic drugs have been adequately studied for use in paediatrics. We approached this issue through a systematic review using PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Trials covering a period of 10 years and 8 months until the end of August 2010 to identify trials that investigated efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics. Overall, 269 clinical drug trials and 17 PK studies met our inclusion criteria. Antimalarial drugs were the most commonly studied medicines (82·6%). Most trials were carried out in Africa and children aged 2-11 years were the age group most often investigated. Additionally, we critically examined available drug formulations for anthelminthics and identified a number of shortcomings that are discussed. Finally, we shed new light on current proposals to expand 'preventive chemotherapy' to preschool-aged children and emphasise that new research, including risk-benefit analyses, are needed before such a strategy can be adopted more widely.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of caspofungin in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Imaizumi, Masue; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Kaneko, Takashi; Goto, Hiroaki; Kato, Koji; Hara, Junichi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Naoko; Yoshinari, Tomoko; Kishino, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kenichi; Kawahara, Shizuko; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    The antifungal agents approved in Japan for pediatric use are limited and many unapproved drugs are actually used without clear instruction for dosage. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis in 20 Japanese pediatric patients using a pediatric-specific dosage based on body surface area. Caspofungin was administered intravenously over 60 min as 70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) per day. Five or 4 point blood sampling were done in 15 patients on Day 4-5 to calculate AUC0-24 h. The geometric means (95% confidence interval) of C24 h and AUC0-24 h in the pediatric patients were 3.3(2.5, 4.4) μg/mL and 175.1 (139.3, 220.1) μg hr/mL, respectively, which were comparable to those in Japanese adult patients [3.2 (2.8, 3.5) μg/mL and 144.9 (131.7, 159.3) μg hr/mL, respectively]. Among the 20 patients, 10 (50%) had at least 1 drug-related adverse event which was considered related to caspofungin therapy. No drug-related serious adverse event and no death occurred. The most common drug-related adverse events were events relating to hepatic function (mainly increases in ALT and AST). The overall success in efficacy was observed in 13 of 20 patients. In conclusion, once daily administration of caspofungin (70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) [maximum daily dose not to exceed 70 mg]), which is the same dosage being used in overseas, achieved sufficient drug exposure and a favorable efficacy and acceptable safety profile in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive fungal infections.

  9. Pharmacokinetic, partial pharmacodynamic and initial safety analysis of (−)-Epicatechin in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christopher F.; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Shiva, Sruti; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Taub, Pam R.; Su, Yongxuan; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dugar, Sundeep; Schreiner, George; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epicatechin ((−)-EPI), a naturally occurring flavanol has emerged as a likely candidate for cocoa-based product reported reductions in cardiometabolic risk. The present study aimed to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of purified (−)-EPI administered to healthy volunteers. In this phase I, open-label, two-part single- and multiple-dose study subjects received either a single dose (n=9) of 50, 100 or 200 mg or multiple doses (n=8) of 50 mg daily (q.d.) or twice daily (b.i.d) for 5 days. Blood was collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 hrs after (−)-EPI administration in the single and multiple dose groups (blood collection repeated in day 5). Samples were analyzed by HPLC-HR-ESI-MS for EPI and metabolites quantification. In the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, blood samples were analyzed for NO surrogates, follistatin, platelet mitochondrial complex I, V and citrate synthase level determinations. (−)-EPI was well tolerated and readily absorbed with further phase 2 metabolism. On day 5, in the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, there were significant increases in plasma nitrite of 30 % and 17 %, respectively. In the q.d. group on day 5 vs. day 1, platelet mitochondria complexes I, IV and citrate synthase activities demonstrated a significant increase of ~ 92, 62 and 8 %, respectively. Average day 5 follistatin AUC levels were ~2.5 fold higher vs. day 1 AUC levels in the b.i.d. group. (−)-EPI was safe with no observed adverse effects and our findings suggest that increases in NO metabolites, mitochondrial enzyme function and plasma follistatin levels may underlie some of the beneficial effects of cocoa products or (−)-EPI as reported in other studies. PMID:25598082

  10. No relevant cardiac, pharmacokinetic or safety interactions between roflumilast and inhaled formoterol in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomised, actively controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Roflumilast is an oral, selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor with anti-inflammatory effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The addition of roflumilast to long-acting bronchodilators improves lung function in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The present study investigated drug-drug interaction effects between inhaled formoterol and oral roflumilast. Methods This was a single-centre (investigational clinic), open, randomised, multiple-dose, parallel-group study. In Regimen A, healthy men were treated with roflumilast (500 μg tablet once daily; Day 2-18) and concomitant formoterol (24 μg twice daily; Day 12-18). In Regimen B, healthy men were treated with formoterol (24 μg twice daily; Day 2-18) and concomitant roflumilast (500 μg once daily; Day 9-18). Steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of roflumilast, roflumilast N-oxide and/or formoterol (Cmax and AUC0-τ) as well as pharmacodynamics - blood pressure, transthoracic impedance cardiography (ZCG), 12-lead digital electrocardiography, peripheral blood eosinophils, and serum glucose and potassium concentrations - were evaluated through Day 1 (baseline), Day 8 (Regimen B: formoterol alone) or Day 11 (Regimen A: roflumilast alone), and Day 18 (Regimen A and B: roflumilast plus formoterol). Blood and urine samples were taken for safety assessment at screening, pharmacokinetic profiling days and Day 19. Adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Results Of the 27 subjects enrolled, 24 were evaluable (12 in each regimen). No relevant pharmacokinetic interactions occurred. Neither roflumilast nor formoterol were associated with significant changes in cardiovascular parameters as measured by ZCG, and these parameters were not affected during concomitant administration. Formoterol was associated with a slight increase in heart rate and a corresponding shortening of the QT interval, without changes in the heart rate-corrected QTc interval. There were small effects on the other

  11. Safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of rVIII-SingleChain in children with severe hemophilia A: results of a multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stasyshyn, O; Djambas Khayat, C; Iosava, G; Ong, J; Abdul Karim, F; Fischer, K; Veldman, A; Blackman, N; St Ledger, K; Pabinger, I

    2017-04-01

    Essentials rVIII-SingleChain is a novel recombinant factor VIII with covalently bonded heavy and light chains. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics were studied in pediatric patients with severe hemophilia A. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00. rVIII-SingleChain showed excellent hemostatic efficacy and a favorable safety profile.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and preliminary safety study of pod-intravaginal rings delivering antiretroviral combinations for HIV prophylaxis in a macaque model.

    PubMed

    Moss, John A; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, Thomas J; Butkyavichene, Irina; Lopez, Gilbert; Brooks, Amanda A; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong T; Smith, James M; Baum, Marc M

    2014-09-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis using oral regimens involving the HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) demonstrated efficacy in three clinical trials. Adherence was determined to be a key parameter for success. Incorporation of the TDF-FTC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with those of oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described; this constitutes the first report of an IVR delivering TDF and FTC, as well as a triple-combination IVR delivering TDF, FTC, and the entry inhibitor maraviroc (MVC). The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety of the two combination pod-IVRs were evaluated in the pig-tailed macaque model. The devices exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study period. Median steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissues in the TDF-FTC group were 30 μg g(-1) (tenofovir [TFV], in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF) and 500 μg g(-1) (FTC) and in the TDF-FTC-MVC group were 10 μg g(-1) (TFV), 150 μg g(-1) (FTC), and 20 μg g(-1) (MVC). No adverse events were observed, and there were no toxicological findings. Mild-to-moderate increases in inflammatory infiltrates were observed in the vaginal tissues of some animals in both the presence and the absence of the IVRs. The IVRs did not disturb the vaginal microbiota, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines remained stable throughout the study. Pod-IVR candidates based on the TDF-FTC combination have potential for the prevention of vaginal HIV acquisition and merit clinical investigation.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Study of Pod-Intravaginal Rings Delivering Antiretroviral Combinations for HIV Prophylaxis in a Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John A.; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, Thomas J.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Lopez, Gilbert; Brooks, Amanda A.; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong T.; Smith, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis using oral regimens involving the HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) demonstrated efficacy in three clinical trials. Adherence was determined to be a key parameter for success. Incorporation of the TDF-FTC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with those of oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described; this constitutes the first report of an IVR delivering TDF and FTC, as well as a triple-combination IVR delivering TDF, FTC, and the entry inhibitor maraviroc (MVC). The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety of the two combination pod-IVRs were evaluated in the pig-tailed macaque model. The devices exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study period. Median steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissues in the TDF-FTC group were 30 μg g−1 (tenofovir [TFV], in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF) and 500 μg g−1 (FTC) and in the TDF-FTC-MVC group were 10 μg g−1 (TFV), 150 μg g−1 (FTC), and 20 μg g−1 (MVC). No adverse events were observed, and there were no toxicological findings. Mild-to-moderate increases in inflammatory infiltrates were observed in the vaginal tissues of some animals in both the presence and the absence of the IVRs. The IVRs did not disturb the vaginal microbiota, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines remained stable throughout the study. Pod-IVR candidates based on the TDF-FTC combination have potential for the prevention of vaginal HIV acquisition and merit clinical investigation. PMID:24936594

  14. Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sustained-release lanreotide (lanreotide Autogel) in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Akira; Teramoto, Akira; Hizuka, Naomi; Kitai, Kazuo; Ramis, Joaquim; Chihara, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The somatostatin analog lanreotide Autogel has proven to be efficacious for treating acromegaly in international studies and in clinical practices around the world. However, its efficacy in Japanese patients has not been extensively evaluated. We examined the dose-response relationship and long-term efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. In an open-label, parallel-group, dose-response study, 32 patients (29 with acromegaly, 3 with pituitary gigantism) received 5 injections of 60, 90, or 120 mg of lanreotide Autogel over 24 weeks. Four weeks after the first injection, 41% of patients achieved serum GH level of <2.5 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) level was normalized in 31%. Values at Week 24 were 53% for GH and 44% for IGF-I. Dose-dependent decreases in serum GH and IGF-I levels were observed with dose-related changes in pharmacokinetic parameters. In an open-label, long-term study, 32 patients (30 with acromegaly, 2 with pituitary gigantism) received lanreotide Autogel once every 4 weeks for a total of 13 injections. Dosing was initiated with 90 mg and adjusted according to clinical responses at Weeks 16 and/or 32. At Week 52, 47% of patients had serum GH levels of <2.5 ng/mL and 53% had normalized IGF-I level. In both studies, acromegaly symptoms improved and treatment was generally well tolerated although gastrointestinal symptoms and injection site induration were reported. In conclusion, lanreotide Autogel provided early and sustained control of elevated GH and IGF-I levels, improved acromegaly symptoms, and was well tolerated in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

  15. A Phase 1 Randomized Placebo-Controlled Safety and Pharmacokinetic Trial of a Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Vaginal Ring

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Marla J.; Mesquita, Pedro M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Teller, Ryan; Espinoza, Lilia; Atrio, Jessica M.; Lo, Yungtai; Frank, Bruce; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N.; Rabe, Lorna; Anderson, Peter L.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Kiser, Patrick F.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), a prodrug of tenofovir (TFV), may be ideal for topical HIV preexposure prophylaxis because it has higher tissue and cell permeability than TFV, is not adversely impacted by seminal proteins, and its active metabolite, TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP), has a long intracellular half-life. We engineered a TDF eluting polyurethane reservoir intravaginal ring (IVR) to provide near constant mucosal antiretroviral concentrations. Methods A first-in-human randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of the TDF IVR in healthy, sexually abstinent women (15 TDF and 15 placebo). Drug concentrations were measured in cervicovaginal fluid (CVF) obtained by swab, cervical tissue, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS) over 14 days of continuous ring use. Results There were 43 total, 23 reproductive tract, and 8 product-related Grade 1 adverse events. Steady state CVF TFV concentrations were achieved proximal (vagina, ectocervix) and distal (introitus) to the TDF IVR one day after ring insertion. Median tissue TFV-DP concentrations 14 days after TDF IVR placement were 120 fmol/mg (interquartile range 90, 550). CVF collected from the cervix one week and two weeks after TDF IVR insertion provided significant protection against ex vivo HIV challenge. Eleven of 14 (78%) participants had detectable TFV-DP DBS concentrations 14 days after TDF IVR placement, suggesting that DBS may provide a surrogate marker of adherence in future clinical trials. Conclusions A TDF IVR is safe, well tolerated, and results in mucosal TFV concentrations that exceed those associated with HIV protection. The findings support further clinical evaluation of this TDF IVR. PMID:26605514

  16. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary assessment of efficacy of mecasermin (recombinant human IGF-1) for the treatment of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Omar S.; Ho, Eugenia; Barnes, Katherine V.; O’Leary, Heather M.; Pereira, Luis M.; Finkelstein, Yaron; Nelson, Charles A.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; DeGregorio, Geneva; Holm, Ingrid A.; Khatwa, Umakanth; Kapur, Kush; Alexander, Mark E.; Finnegan, Deirdre M.; Cantwell, Nicole G.; Walco, Alexandra C.; Rappaport, Leonard; Gregas, Matt; Fichorova, Raina N.; Shannon, Michael W.; Sur, Mriganka; Kaufmann, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and is associated with mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2. Mouse models suggest that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (rhIGF1) (mecasermin) may improve many clinical features. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles of IGF-1 in 12 girls with MECP2 mutations (9 with RTT). In addition, we performed a preliminary assessment of efficacy using automated cardiorespiratory measures, EEG, a set of RTT-oriented clinical assessments, and two standardized behavioral questionnaires. This phase 1 trial included a 4-wk multiple ascending dose (MAD) (40–120 μg/kg twice daily) period and a 20-wk open-label extension (OLE) at the maximum dose. Twelve subjects completed the MAD and 10 the entire study, without evidence of hypoglycemia or serious adverse events. Mecasermin reached the CNS compartment as evidenced by the increase in cerebrospinal fluid IGF-1 levels at the end of the MAD. The drug followed nonlinear kinetics, with greater distribution in the peripheral compartment. Cardiorespiratory measures showed that apnea improved during the OLE. Some neurobehavioral parameters, specifically measures of anxiety and mood also improved during the OLE. These improvements in mood and anxiety scores were supported by reversal of right frontal alpha band asymmetry on EEG, an index of anxiety and depression. Our data indicate that IGF-1 is safe and well tolerated in girls with RTT and, as demonstrated in preclinical studies, ameliorates certain breathing and behavioral abnormalities. PMID:24623853

  17. [Undesirable pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions affecting the effectiveness and safety of anti-infectious pharmacotherapy].

    PubMed

    Dworacka, Marzena; Nowocień, Tamara

    2017-02-20

    The occurence of pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions is the serious clinical problem in the course of pharmacotherapy of infections. Its essential part is the influence of such interactions on the effectiveness and safety of antimicrobial therapy. The aim of study was to present, the most significant on clinical hand, examples of interactions and their mechanisms between antimicrobial agents and other drugs on stages of absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination, leading to the decreased antimicrobial activity and ineffective pharmacotherapy or to the increased antimicrobial activity and to the increased risk of adverse effects due to agents used for anti-infectious pharmacotherapy.

  18. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of formulated levodopa methyl ester nasal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon Hong; Kim, Kyung Hee; Yoon, In Kyung; Lee, Kyung Eun; Chun, In Koo; Rhie, Jeong Yeon; Gwak, Hye Sun

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of levodopa (L-dopa) from nasal powder formulations using highly water-soluble levodopa methyl ester hydrochloride (LDME). In vivo pharmacokinetic studies were carried out with formulated LDME nasal powders. After oral and intravenous administration of L-dopa and carbidopa and intranasal administration LDME to the rat, L-dopa concentrations were determined in plasma and the brain using high-performance liquid chromatography. The absolute bioavailabilities of nasal preparations with and without Carbopol were 82.4 and 66.7 %, respectively, which were much higher than that of oral delivery (16.2 %). The drug-targeting efficiencies [area under the curve (AUC) in brain/AUC in plasma] of L-dopa in the nasal formulations (0.98-1.08) were much higher than that of oral preparation (0.69). These results suggest that LDME nasal powder formulations would be useful delivery systems of L-dopa to the brain.

  19. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E L; Bento, A F; Cavalli, J; Oliveira, S K; Schwanke, R C; Siqueira, J M; Freitas, C S; Marcon, R; Calixto, J B

    2016-12-12

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  20. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, E.L.; Bento, A.F.; Cavalli, J.; Oliveira, S.K.; Schwanke, R.C.; Siqueira, J.M.; Freitas, C.S.; Marcon, R.; Calixto, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose. PMID:27982281

  1. Evaluation of food safety education for consumers.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, L; Hillers, V; Kendall, P; Mason, A

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, nutrition educators have used a fairly global approach to teach food safety by teaching a broad range of safe food handling behaviors in the expectation that this will lead to the avoidance of foodborne illness. This approach can be confusing and lead to evaluation data that are difficult to interpret. This article suggests that food safety education and evaluation in the future be organized around five behavioral constructs: practice personal hygiene, cook foods adequately, avoid cross-contamination, keep foods at safe temperatures, and avoid food from unsafe sources. These five constructs are derived from data on actual outbreaks and estimated incidences of foodborne illness. Research is needed to establish reliable and valid evaluation measures for these five behavioral constructs. Evaluation instruments can be tailored to fit specific education programs. If evaluation instruments focus on these five behavior areas, the result will be meaningful evaluation data that can be more easily summarized across food safety education programs for consumers.

  2. A new amoxicillin/clavulanate therapeutic system: preparation, in vitro and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kerc, Janez; Opara, Jerneja

    2007-04-20

    A new peroral amoxicillin/clavulanate therapeutic system composed of immediate release tablet and controlled release floating capsule was developed and evaluated by in vivo bioavailability study. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for amoxicillin and clavulanic acid of the new therapeutic systems: AUCt, AUCi, (AUCt/AUCi), Cmax, Tmax, kel, T(1/2) and additionally for amoxicillin T(4) and T(2) were calculated from the plasma levels. The study confirmed enhanced pharmacokinetic parameters of a newly developed therapeutic system containing 1500 mg of amoxicillin and 125 mg of clavulanic acid. Prolonged time over MIC of amoxicillin in relation to a regular immediate release amoxicillin/clavulanate formulation was confirmed.

  3. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Täubel, Jörg; Ferber, Georg; Fernandes, Sara; Lorch, Ulrike; Santamaría, Eva; Izquierdo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses. Methods In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP), reaction time (RT), spatial working memory (SWM) and visual analogue scales (VAS). Results Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10–40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs) or withdrawals due to treatment–emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests. Conclusions This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine. PMID:27632557

  5. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  6. Pharmacokinetics in patients with chronic liver disease and hepatic safety of incretin-based therapies for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2014-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of chronic liver disease (CLD) such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis, and about one-third of cirrhotic patients have diabetes. However, the use of several antidiabetic agents, such as metformin and sulphonylureas, may be a concern in case of hepatic impairment (HI). New glucose-lowering agents targeting the incretin system are increasingly used for the management of type 2 diabetes. Incretin-based therapies comprise oral inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) (gliptins) or injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. This narrative review summarises the available data regarding the use of both incretin-based therapies in patients with HI. In contrast to old glucose-lowering agents, they were evaluated in specifically designed acute pharmacokinetic studies in patients with various degrees of HI and their hepatic safety was carefully analysed in large clinical trials. Only mild changes in pharmacokinetic characteristics of DPP-4 inhibitors were observed in patients with different degrees of HI, presumably without major clinical relevance. GLP-1 receptor agonists have a renal excretion rather than liver metabolism. Specific pharmacokinetic data in patients with HI are only available for liraglutide. No significant changes in liver enzymes were reported with DPP-4 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists, alone or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, in clinical trials up to 2 years in length. On the contrary, preliminary data suggested that incretin-based therapies may be beneficial in patients with CLD, more particularly in the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Nevertheless, caution should be recommended, especially in patients with advanced cirrhosis, because of a lack of clinical experience with incretin-based therapies in these vulnerable patients.

  7. Pharmacokinetics, thrombogenicity and safety of a double viral inactivated factor IX concentrate compared with a prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, A; Hong, A; Arguello, A; Echenagucia, M; Boadas, A; Fabbrizzi, F; Minichilli, F; Bosch, N B

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic options for developing countries have to assure an optimum safety and efficacy and low-cost antihaemophilic concentrates. A single blind randomized crossover study was carried out in 12 previously treated HB patients, comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK), thrombogenicity (TG) and safety of two plasma-derived double-inactivated (solvent/detergent heating at 100 degrees C, 30 min) factor IX (FIX) concentrates, UMAN COMPLEX DI (product A) [plasma-derived prothrombin concentrates (PCC)] and a high purity FIX concentrate AIMAFIX DI (product B, HPFIX). In a non-bleeding state, they received one single intravenous dose 50 IU FIX kg(-1) of PCC or HPFIX, and after a wash-out period of 14 days, the other product. We evaluated acute tolerance and determined PK parameters based on FIX levels measured over a 50 h postinfusion period. We studied fibrinogen, platelets, antithrombin, F1 + 2, TAT, D-dimer, over a 360 min postinfusion period. Ten cases remained in on-demand treatment for 6 months, five with PCC and five with HPFIX. PK and anti-FIX inhibitors were repeated at 3 and 6 months. No inhibitors were detected. PK values (PCC vs. HPFIX): clearence (CL; mL h(-1) kg(-1)) 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 1.4; the volume of distribution at steady state (mL kg(-1)) 154.9 +/- 54.9 vs. 197.5 +/- 72.5; mean residence time (h) 29.7 +/- 8.1 vs. 30.7 +/- 9.2; T(1/2) (h) 22.3 +/- 7 vs. 23.5 +/- 12.3; incremental recovery (IR; U dL(-1) U(-1) kg(-1)) 0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.13. HPFIX showed significant lower IR and higher CL. There were no differences in PK at 3 and 6 months. In TG, significant increments in TAT and F1 + 2 at 30 min and 6 h were found with PCC. Product B PK results agrees with reported results for other HPFIX preparations. Use of PCC product A has to consider its thrombogenic activity.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Tenofovir Alafenamide in HIV-Uninfected Subjects with Severe Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, Marshall; Garner, William; Vimal, Mona; Ling, Kah Hiing J.; Kearney, Brian P.; Ramanathan, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) is an oral prodrug of tenofovir (TFV) that has greater stability in plasma than TFV disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and circulates as intact TAF, resulting in the direct and higher lymphatic loading of and exposure to TFV diphosphate, the active moiety. Unlike TFV, TAF is minimally eliminated in urine. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of TAF and TFV in HIV-uninfected subjects with severe renal impairment and matched healthy controls were evaluated. Subjects with severe renal impairment (RI; estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 15 to 29 ml/min) and controls (eGFR, ≥90 ml/min) matched for age, gender, and body mass index received a single dose of TAF at 25 mg. Blood and urine samples for TAF and TFV PK determinations were collected over 7 days postdosing, and subjects were followed up at 14 days. A total of 14 renally impaired subjects and 13 control subjects enrolled and completed the study. The TAF maximum observed concentration in plasma (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) extrapolated to infinite time (AUCinf) were 79% and 92% higher, respectively, in subjects with severe RI than the controls, primarily due to higher absorption. The TFV Cmax and AUCinf were 2.8-fold and 5.7-fold higher, respectively, in subjects with severe RI than the controls. In subjects with severe RI, TAF at 25 mg provided a TFV AUC 10 to 40% lower than that from historical TDF-based TFV exposures in subjects with normal renal function. There were no discontinuations due to adverse events. In subjects with severe RI receiving TAF at 25 mg, TAF exposures were higher than those for the controls; these differences are unlikely to be clinically meaningful. TFV exposures were higher than those for the controls but lower than the exposures in nonrenally impaired subjects on TDF-based regimens. PMID:27216057

  9. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of edoxaban in end-stage renal disease subjects undergoing haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Parasrampuria, Dolly A; Marbury, Thomas; Matsushima, Nobujo; Chen, Shuquan; Wickremasingha, Prachi K; He, Ling; Dishy, Victor; Brown, Karen S

    2015-04-01

    Edoxaban is an oral, direct, once-daily, factor Xa inhibitor developed for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and for the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent thromboembolism in patients with acute symptomatic venous thromboembolism. Among elderly patients who require anticoagulation therapies, some may have end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This open-label, phase 1, randomised, two-way crossover study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of edoxaban in 10 subjects on haemodialysis. Eligible subjects with ESRD on chronic haemodialysis received a single, oral dose of edoxaban 15 mg 2 hours (h) prior to (on-dialysis) or in between (off-dialysis) haemodialysis sessions. Haemodialysis resulted in a minor decrease in mean total exposure (AUC0-∞; 676.2 ng·h/ml) as compared with that observed in subjects off-dialysis (691.7 ng·h/ml). Mean maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax) values were comparable between on-dialysis and off-dialysis treatments (53.3 vs 56.3 ng/ml, respectively). Mean apparent total body clearance (CL/F) values were 24.1 and 22.5 l/h during the on-dialysis and off-dialysis treatment periods, respectively. Dialyser clearance was 5.7 l/h and haemodialysis clearance was 6.1 l/h. Haemodialysis clearance was only 6.1 l/h, suggesting that it only accounts for one-fourth of the total clearance in these subjects. A single, oral dose of 15 mg of edoxaban was well tolerated by subjects with ESRD. In conclusion, based on these single-dose PK data, a supplementary dose of edoxaban may not be required following a haemodialysis session. Importantly, haemodialysis is not an effective mechanism for removal of edoxaban from the blood.

  10. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues.

  11. Effectiveness, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Quetiapine in Aggressive Children with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Reed, Michael D.; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Demeter, Christine A.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; McNamara, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide an initial description of the effectiveness and pharmacokinetics (PK) of quetiapine in aggressive children with conduct disorder (CD). Method: This 8-week, open-label outpatient trial, enrolled patients ages 6 to 12 years with CD. Outcome measures included the Rating of Aggression Against People and/or Property Scale…

  12. Pharmacokinetic and Toxicological Evaluation of a Zinc Gluconate-Based Chemical Sterilant Using In Vitro and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Lima, Carlos F.; Nunes, Rafael J. M.; Carpes, Raphael M.

    2017-01-01

    Sclerosing agents as zinc gluconate-based chemical sterilants (Infertile®) are used for chemical castration. This solution is injected into the animal testis, but there are not enough evidences of its safety profiles for the receivers. The present work aimed to establish the pharmacokinetics and toxicological activity of Infertile, using in vitro and in silico approaches. The evaluation at the endpoint showed effects in a dose-dependent manner. Since necrosis is potentially carcinogenic, the possible cell death mechanism could be apoptosis. Our data suggested that Infertile at 60 mM presented risk for animal health. Even though Infertile is a licensed product by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply, it presented a high mutagenic potential. We suggest that the optimal dose must be less than 6 mM, once, at this concentration, no mutagenicity or genotoxicity was observed. PMID:28197414

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of phencyclidine and its decadeutero variant

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, A.K.; Hiramatsu, M.; Pechnick, R.N.; Di Stefano, E.

    1989-07-01

    The role of metabolism in the in vivo actions of phencyclidine (PCP) was examined by comparing deuterium-substituted drug with drug of normal isotopic abundance. PCP elicits two responses that differ in their time course, ataxia, which is observable immediately after dosage, and hypothermia, which peaks approximately 90 to 120 min after drug administration. The role of metabolism in these responses was determined by comparing bioavailabilities of deuterium enriched (d10) and normal (d0) PCP with the two responses. Plasma concentration was determined after the i.v. and i.p. administration of d10 and d0 drug and the bioavailability of the d10 was found to be 1.3 to 1.5 times the d0. The clearance of the d10 was also smaller than the d0. The d10, which is pharmacologically equivalent in vitro, is metabolized more slowly than the d0 in vitro. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic bioavailabilities exhibited comparable isotope effects, indicating that both responses are due to the actions of the parent drug.

  14. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Activity of Navitoclax, a Targeted High Affinity Inhibitor of BCL-2, in Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wyndham H.; O’Connor, Owen A.; Czuczman, Myron S.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Gerecitano, John F.; Leonard, John P.; Tulpule, Anil; Dunleavy, Kieron; Xiong, Hao; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Cui, Yue; Busman, Todd; Elmore, Steven W.; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Krivoshik, Andrew P.; Enschede, Sari H.; Humerickhouse, Rod A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Background BCL-2 family proteins play a central role in regulating clonal selection and survival of lymphocytes and are frequently over expressed in lymphomas. Navitoclax (ABT-263) is a targeted high-affinity small molecule that occupies the BH3 binding groove of BCL-2 and BCL-XL and inhibits their anti-apoptotic activity. Experimentally, navitoclax kills cells in a BAX/BAK-dependent manner and results in regression of lymphoid tumors in xenograft models. Methods This is a phase I dose-escalation study of navitoclax in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies. Study endpoints included safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetic profile and clinical activity. In addition, mechanism-based pharmacodynamic effects on platelets and lymphocytes were assessed. Navitoclax was orally administered and assessed on an intermittent schedule of once daily for 14 days followed by 7 days off (14/21 days) or on a continuous once daily schedule (21/21 days). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00406809. Findings Fifty-five patients were enrolled, (median age 59 years, IQR 51–67), of whom two did not complete the first cycle and were not evaluable for assessment of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Common toxicities included grade 1/2 diarrhea and fatigue in 31 and 21 patients, respectively. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia were the serious common toxicities with grade 3/4 observed in 29 and 17 patients, respectively. On the intermittent schedule (14/21), 5 DLT’s were observed; two due to hospitalizations for bronchitis and pleural effusion, and one each due to grade 3 transaminase elevation, grade 4 thrombocytopenia and grade 3 cardiac arrhythmia. Navitoclax caused a rapid and dose-dependent decline in peripheral platelets following initial drug exposure, followed by a rebound. To reduce the platelet nadir associated with intermittent dosing, a lead-in dose followed by continuous dosing (21/21 schedule) was examined. Three

  15. Data Analysis Protocol for the Development and Evaluation of Population Pharmacokinetic Models for Incorporation Into the Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo)

    PubMed Central

    McEneny-King, Alanna; Foster, Gary; Edginton, Andrea N

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in a specific clotting factor. This results in spontaneous bleeding episodes and eventual arthropathy. The mainstay of hemophilia treatment is prophylactic replacement of the missing factor, but an optimal regimen remains to be determined. Rather, individualized prophylaxis has been suggested to improve both patient safety and resource utilization. However, uptake of this approach has been hampered by the demanding sampling schedules and complex calculations required to obtain individual estimates of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. The use of population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) can alleviate this burden by reducing the number of plasma samples required for accurate estimation, but few tools incorporating this approach are readily available to clinicians. Objective The Web-accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to bridge this gap by providing a Web-accessible service for the reliable estimation of individual PK parameters from only a few patient samples. This service is predicated on the development of validated brand-specific PopPK models. Methods We describe the data analysis plan for the development and evaluation of each PopPK model to be incorporated into the WAPPS-Hemo platform. The data sources and structure of the dataset are discussed first, followed by the procedures for handling both data below limit of quantification (BLQ) and absence of such BLQ data. Next, we outline the strategies for building the appropriate structural and covariate models, including the possible need for a process algorithm when PK behavior varies between subjects or significant covariates are not provided. Prior to use in a prospective manner, the models will undergo extensive evaluation using a variety of techniques such as diagnostic plots, bootstrap analysis and cross-validation. Finally, we describe the incorporation of a validated PopPK model into the

  16. When Is It Important to Measure Unbound Drug in Evaluating Nanomedicine Pharmacokinetics?

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Martinez, Marilyn N; Stevens, David M

    2016-12-01

    Nanoformulations have become important tools for modifying drug disposition, be it from the perspective of enabling prolonged drug release, protecting the drug molecule from metabolism, or achieving targeted delivery. When examining the in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of these formulations, most investigations either focus on systemic concentrations of total (encapsulated plus unencapsulated) drug, or concentrations of encapsulated and unencapsulated drug. However, it is rare to find studies that differentiate between protein-bound and unbound (free) forms of the unencapsulated drug. In light of the unique attributes of these formulations, we cannot simply assume it appropriate to rely upon the protein-binding properties of the traditionally formulated or legacy drug when trying to define the pharmacokinetic or pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of these nanoformulations. Therefore, this commentary explores reasons why it is important to consider not only unencapsulated drug, but also the portion of unencapsulated drug that is not bound to plasma proteins. Specifically, we highlight those situations when it may be necessary to include measurement of unencapsulated, unbound drug concentrations as part of the nanoformulation pharmacokinetic evaluation.

  17. A randomized safety and pharmacokinetic trial of daily tenofovir 1% gel in term and near-term pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Richard H; Noguchi, Lisa M; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Biggio, Joseph; Hendrix, Craig W; Marzinke, Mark A; Dai, James Y; Pan, Jason; Na Ayudhya, Ratiya Kunjara; Schwartz, Jill L; Isaacs, Karen; Piper, Jeanna M; Watts, D Heather

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel may reduce incident HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Pregnancy may increase risk of HIV acquisition, and incident HIV in pregnancy potentiates perinatal HIV transmission. Our objective was to investigate the safety and pharmacokinetics of seven days of TFV 1% vaginal gel in term and near-term pregnancy. Methods Ninety-eight healthy pregnant women, stratified to a term cohort followed by a near-term cohort, were enrolled into a 2:1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Women received TFV or placebo gel for seven consecutive days with pharmacokinetic sampling on days 0 and 6. Maternal and cord blood were collected at delivery. Primary end points included laboratory and genital adverse events, adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, and maternal TFV levels. Results Most adverse events were grade 1 and none of the grade 3 or 4 adverse events were related to study product. There was no significant difference in safety end points between the two pregnancy cohorts (p=0.18); therefore, their data were combined. Primary safety end point rates were similar for mothers randomized to the TFV gel vs placebo arm (72.7 and 68.8%, p=0.81). The same was true for newborns in the TFV gel vs placebo arms (4.5% vs 6.3%, p=0.66). All women randomized to TFV had quantifiable serum levels within eight hours of dosing, with low overall median (interquartile range) day 0 and day 6 peak values (3.8 (2.0 to 7.0) and 5.8 (2.6 to 9.4) ng/mL, respectively). Conclusions Daily TFV 1% vaginal gel use in term and near-term pregnancy appears to be safe and produces low serum drug levels. PMID:27658440

  18. Safety evaluation of multilane arterials in Florida.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Devarasetty, Prem Chand; Pande, Anurag

    2009-07-01

    Resurfacing is one of the more common construction activities on highways. While its effect on riding quality on any type of roadway is obviously positive; its impact on safety as measured in terms of crashes is far from obvious. This study examines the safety effects of the resurfacing projects on multilane arterials with partially limited access. Empirical Bayes method, which is one of the most accepted approaches for conducting before-after evaluations, has been used to assess the safety effects of the resurfacing projects. Safety effects are estimated not only in terms of all crashes but also rear-end as well as severe crashes (crashes involving incapacitating and fatal injuries). The safety performance functions (SPFs) used in this study are negative binomial crash frequency estimation models that use the information on ADT, length of the segments, speed limit and number of lanes. These SPFs are segregated by crash groups (all, rear-end, and severe), length of the segments being evaluated, and land use (urban, suburban, and rural). The results of the analysis show that the resulting changes in safety following resurfacing projects vary widely. Evaluating additional improvements carried out with resurfacing activities showed that all (other than sidewalk improvements for total crashes) of them consistently led to improvements in safety of multilane arterial sections. It leads to the inference that it may be a good idea to take up additional improvements if it is cost effective to do them along with resurfacing. It was also found that the addition of turning lanes (left and/or right) and paving shoulders were two improvements associated with a project's relative performance in terms of reduction in rear-end crashes.

  19. Skin safety evaluation of laundry detergent products.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok; Holland, Daniela; Kern, Petra

    2009-01-01

    The conduct of a scientifically sound safety assessment of new ingredients and finished products is essential prior to their introduction into the marketplace. Such assessments are based on a risk assessment paradigm established by the National Academy of Science (NAS, 1983) that consists of a four-step process: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. This risk assessment paradigm has been (1) used as a framework for estimating an adverse health risk posed by environmental chemicals, and (2) applied to systemic toxicological endpoints. The general principles of risk assessment may be applied to skin safety evaluation of consumer products, considering that dermal toxicity is also a threshold phenomenon. This study describes a risk assessment-based approach for skin safety evaluation of laundry detergent products.

  20. Evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between verapamil and propranolol in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D L; Thomson, G D; Thompson, G G; Murray, G D; Brodie, M J; McInnes, G T

    1991-01-01

    1. Potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between verapamil and propranolol were evaluated in two double-blind, randomised, balanced, crossover studies employing the same six healthy males. 2. The first study examined the effect of repeated propranolol administration on the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of verapamil after single oral and intravenous doses. The second explored the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of verapamil and propranolol alone and in combination after single and repeated oral doses. 3. The magnitude of the prolongation of PR interval induced by oral and intravenous verapamil was not affected by pre-treatment with propranolol. When verapamil and propranolol were co-administered as single doses, effects on PR interval were additive but, following repeated doses, a trend towards greater than additive prolongation was seen. The arithmetic sum of the effects of the two drugs was 23% (95% C.I. 8-38%) but the measured increase after the combination was 40% (95% C.I. 26-54%). 4. The extent of reduction in heart rate and blood pressure at rest and after exercise following repeated doses of propranolol was not influenced by single oral or intravenous doses of verapamil. The heart rate and blood pressure responses to single and repeated oral doses of verapamil and propranolol in combination were significantly greater than those after either drug alone and approximated to the arithmetic sum of the individual responses. 5. Although repeated administration of propranolol reduced hepatic blood flow as assessed by indocyanine green clearance, there was no evidence of an interaction between the drugs at this level. 6. The pharmacokinetics of verapamil and norverapamil were not significantly affected by prior propranolol. After single doses of verapamil and propranolol in combination, the maximum plasma concentration of propranolol was increased and the oral clearance of verapamil reduced. No pharmacokinetic interaction was

  1. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamic Effects of a Selective TGR5 Agonist, SB-756050, in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Rebecca J; Lin, Jiang; Vasist Johnson, Lakshmi S; Gould, Elizabeth P; Bowers, Gary D; Nunez, Derek J

    2013-07-01

    TGR5 is a bile acid receptor and a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We report here the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects of a selective TGR5 agonist, SB-756050, in patients with T2D. Fifty-one subjects were randomized to receive either placebo or one of four doses of SB-756050 for 6 days. A single 100 mg dose of sitagliptin was co-administered on Day 6 to all subjects. SB-756050 was well-tolerated; it was readily absorbed, exhibited nonlinear pharmacokinetics with a less than dose-proportional increase in plasma exposure above 100 mg, and demonstrated no significant changes in exposure when co-administered with sitagliptin. SB-756050 demonstrated highly variable pharmacodynamic effects both within dose groups and between doses, with increases in glucose seen at the two lowest doses and no reduction in glucose seen at the two highest doses. The glucose effects of SB-756050 + sitagliptin were comparable to those of sitagliptin alone, even though gut hormone plasma profiles were different. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00733577).

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of the soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667) in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Mück, Wolfgang; Unger, Sigrun; Artmeier-Brandt, Ulrike; Weimann, Gerrit; Wensing, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Preclinical data indicate that the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667), which is a new drug in development for patients with heart failure, induces vasodilation preferentially in diseased vessels. This study aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of cinaciguat. Seventy-six healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, placebo-controlled study. Cinaciguat (50-250 microg/h) was administered intravenously for up to 4 hours in a maximum of 6 individuals per dose group. No serious adverse events were reported. Four-hour infusions (50-250 microg/h) decreased diastolic blood pressure and increased heart rate (all P values < .05) versus placebo, without significantly reducing systolic blood pressure (P between 0.07 and 0.56). At higher doses (150-250 microg/h), 4-hour infusions decreased mean arterial pressure and increased plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels (all P values < .05). Pharmacokinetics showed dose-proportionality with low interindividual variability. Plasma concentrations declined below 1.0 microg/L within 30 minutes of cessation of infusion. Cinaciguat had potent cardiovascular effects reducing preload and afterload, warranting further investigation in patients with heart failure.

  3. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, p<0.001; 24 ms, versus alcohol, p<0.05) and had additive negative effects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant.

  4. Safety evaluation of yeast glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Ohshita, K; Nakajima, Y; Yamakoshi, J; Kataoka, S; Kikuchi, M; Pariza, M W

    2000-08-01

    The consumption of soy and soy products (including soy sauce) has been increasing in Western countries due to purported health benefits of soy (cancer protective, estrogenic effects). In addition to providing soy proteins and isoflavones, soy sauce also functions as a flavor enhancer and is able to impart a "umami" taste. Glutaminases are used in the production of soy sauce and enzymatically hydrolyzed protein. The glutaminases described herein were produced from the cultured broth of Cryptococcus albidus (ATCC-20293) which is designated as CK, a mutant of C. albidus (ATCC-20293) which is designated as CK-D10 and the newly isolated Cryptococcus sp. NISL-3771 which is designated as TK. All three preparations (CK, CK-D10 and TK) were evaluated for pathogenicity and virulence in mice and were found to be non-pathogenic. The acute LD(50)s for CK in male mice was greater than 4.8 g/kg body weight and for female mice was greater than 6.5 g/kg body weight. Acute LD(50)s for CK and CK-D10 in male and female rats was greater than 7.5 g/kg body weight, and that for TK was greater than 10 g/kg body weight. Subchronic (90-day) feeding studies (wherein the glutaminases were presented as dietary admixtures) were conducted in mice and rats. The NOAEL for CK in mice was 7.5 g/kg body weight/day. The NOAELs in rats were as follows: for CK, 9 g/kg body weight/day; for CK-D10, 1.2 g/kg body weight/day, and for TK, 8 g/kg body weight/day. Mice received CK as a dietary admixture at levels of 0, 1.0 and 10.0% for 1 year. The NOAEL was 13 g/kg body weight/day. The glutaminases from C. albidus described herein demonstrate very low toxicity.

  5. Safety evaluation of superabsorbent baby diapers.

    PubMed

    Kosemund, Kirstin; Schlatter, Harald; Ochsenhirt, Jennifer L; Krause, Edburga L; Marsman, Daniel S; Erasala, Geetha N

    2009-03-01

    Superabsorbent disposable baby diapers are sophisticated, well-engineered products that provide many benefits including convenience, comfort, exceptional leakage protection, improved hygiene and skin care benefits compared with cloth diapers. Safety assurance is an integral part of the diaper development process at Procter & Gamble, with the goal of ensuring safety for both caregivers and babies. A systematic, stepwise approach to safety assessment starts with a thorough evaluation of new design features and materials, using the principles of general risk assessment including, as appropriate, controlled trials to assess clinical endpoints or independent scientific review of safety data. The majority of the diaper materials are polymers that are safe and do not have inherent toxicity issues. Trace amounts of non-polymeric materials, such as colorants, are assessed based on their skin contact potential. New materials or design features are introduced in marketed products only if they have been shown to be safe under the conditions of recommended or foreseeable use. The product safety continues to be confirmed after launch by means of in-market monitoring. This article provides a broad overview of human safety exposure-based risk assessment used at Procter & Gamble for absorbent hygiene products.

  6. Preliminary efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life study of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yau, Thomas; Cheng, Paul N; Chan, Pierre; Chen, Li; Yuen, Jimmy; Pang, Roberta; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wheatley, Denys N; Poon, Ronnie T

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety profile, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 (Peg-rhAgr1) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients were given weekly doses of Peg-rhAgr1 (1600 U/kg). Tumour response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST 1.1 and modified RECIST criteria. A total of 20 patients were recruited, of whom 15 were deemed evaluable for treatment efficacy. Eighteen patients (90%) were hepatitis B carriers. Median age was 61.5 (range 30-75). Overall disease control rate was 13%, with 2 of the 15 patients achieving stable disease for >8 weeks. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.67-1.73) months, with median overall survival (OS) of all 20 enrolled patients being 5.2 (95% CI: 3.3-12.0) months. PFS was significantly prolonged in patients with adequate arginine depletion (ADD) >2 months versus those who had ≤2 months of ADD (6.4 versus 1.7 months; p = 0.01). The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 non-hematological toxicities. Transient liver dysfunctions (25%) were the most commonly reported serious AEs and likely due to disease progression. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data showed that Peg-rhAgr1 induced rapid and sustained arginine depletion. The overall quality of life of the enrolled patients was well preserved. Peg-rhAgr1 is well tolerated with a good toxicity profile in patients with advanced HCC. A weekly dose of 1600 U/kg is sufficient to induce ADD. Significantly longer PFS times were recorded for patients who had ADD for >2 months.

  7. Safety, pharmacokinetics and neutralization of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01 in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, J E; Coates, E E; Yamshchikov, G; Saunders, J G; Holman, L; Enama, M E; DeZure, A; Lynch, R M; Gordon, I; Plummer, S; Hendel, C S; Pegu, A; Conan-Cibotti, M; Sitar, S; Bailer, R T; Narpala, S; McDermott, A; Louder, M; O'Dell, S; Mohan, S; Pandey, J P; Schwartz, R M; Hu, Z; Koup, R A; Capparelli, E; Mascola, J R; Graham, B S

    2015-12-01

    VRC-HIVMAB060-00-AB (VRC01) is a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolated from the B cells of an HIV-infected patient. It is directed against the HIV-1 CD4 binding site and is capable of potently neutralizing the majority of diverse HIV-1 strains. This Phase I dose-escalation study in healthy adults was conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD, USA). Primary objectives were the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VRC01 intravenous (i.v.) infusion at 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, given either once (20 mg/kg) or twice 28 days apart (all doses), and of subcutaneous (s.c.) delivery at 5 mg/kg compared to s.c. placebo given twice, 28 days apart. Cumulatively, 28 subjects received 43 VRC01 and nine received placebo administrations. There were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities. Mean 28-day serum trough concentrations after the first infusion were 35 and 57 μg/ml for groups infused with 20 mg/kg (n = 8) and 40 mg/kg (n = 5) doses, respectively. Mean 28-day trough concentrations after the second infusion were 56 and 89 μg/ml for the same two doses. Over the 5-40 mg/kg i.v. dose range (n = 18), the clearance was 0.016 l/h and terminal half-life was 15 days. After infusion VRC01 retained expected neutralizing activity in serum, and anti-VRC01 antibody responses were not detected. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) VRC01 was well tolerated when delivered i.v. or s.c. The mAb demonstrated expected half-life and pharmacokinetics for a human immunoglobulin G. The safety and PK results support and inform VRC01 dosing schedules for planning HIV-1 prevention efficacy studies.

  8. A Cell-Based Pharmacokinetics Assay for Evaluating Tubulin-Binding Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W.; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels. PMID:24688312

  9. Pharmacokinetics-Based Approaches for Bioequivalence Evaluation of Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Raney, Sam G; Franz, Thomas J; Lehman, Paul A; Lionberger, Robert; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic approach has accelerated the development of high-quality generic medicines with extraordinary cost savings, transforming the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system in the USA. While this is true for systemically absorbed drug products, the availability of generic versions of topical dermatological products remains constrained due to the limited methods accepted for bioequivalence evaluation of these products. The current review explores the possibility of developing appropriate bioequivalence approaches based on pharmacokinetic principles for topical dermatological products. This review focuses on the strengths and limitations of the three most promising pharmacokinetics-based methods to evaluate the performance and bioequivalence of topical dermatological products, which include in vivo skin stripping, in vivo microdialysis, and in vitro permeation testing (IVPT) with excised human skin. It is hoped that recent advances in pharmaceutical and regulatory science will facilitate the development of robust bioequivalence approaches for these dosage forms, enable more efficient methodologies to compare the performance of new drug products in certain pre-approval or post-approval change situations, and promote the availability of high-quality generic versions of topical dermatological products.

  10. A pharmacokinetic and safety study of a fixed oral dose of enzastaurin HCl in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Zhang, Weijing; Yang, Nong; Cui, Yimin; Huang, He; Cai, Ruiqing; Lin, Xiaoting; Fu, Xiaohong; Hong, Huangming; Lin, Tongyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of enzastaurin in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma. Methods Eligible patients received 500 mg of enzastaurin orally once daily. The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin and its metabolites were assessed on days 14 to 18. Patients were allowed to continue receiving the agent in a safety extension phase until disease progression or presentation with unacceptable toxicity. Results Twenty-five patients received at least 1 dose of enzastaurin, and twenty-one patients completed the pharmacokinetic phase. Fifteen patients entered the safety extension phase. Except for transient, asymptomatic grade 3 QT interval prolongation in one patient who had baseline grade 2 QT prolongation, other adverse events were of grade 1 to 2. The t1/2, Cav, ss, and AUCτ, ss for enzastaurin and its primary active metabolite LSN326020 were 14 and 42 h, 1,210 and 907 nmol/L, and 29,100 and 21,800 nmol•h/L, respectively. One patient with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma achieved a partial response that lasted for 8.1 months. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin in Chinese cancer patients were consistent with those observed in previous studies abroad. Enzastaurin 500 mg daily was well tolerated by Chinese patients. We recommend 500 mg daily as the phase II dose in this population. Its efficacy in lymphoma deserves further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01432951 PMID:26942463

  11. EVALUATION OF MULTIPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING STRUCTURES FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of PBPK models were developed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate biological processes that may affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of TCE and its metabolites.

  12. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Adams, T B; Cohen, S M; Doull, J; Feron, V J; Goodman, J I; Hall, R L; Marnett, L J; Portoghese, P S; Waddell, W J; Wagner, B M

    2004-04-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is not intended to be viewed as a rigid check list, begins with a description of the chemical composition of the commercial product, followed by a review of the data on the history of dietary use. Next, each constituent of an NFC is assigned to one of 33 congeneric groups of structurally related substances and to one of three classes of toxic potential, each with its own exposure threshold of toxicological concern. The group of substances of unknown structure is placed in the class of greatest toxic potential. In subsequent steps, for each congeneric group the procedure determines the per capita intake, considers metabolic pathways and explores the need and availability of toxicological data. Additional toxicological and analytical data may be required for a comprehensive safety evaluation. The procedure concludes with an evaluation of the NFC in its entirety, also considering combined exposure to congeneric groups. The first experiences with the use of this procedure are very promising. Future safety evaluations of larger numbers of NFCs will indicate the usefulness of the system, either in its present form or in a form modified on the basis of experience.

  13. The effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of naloxegol.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh; She, Fahua; Sostek, Mark

    2014-12-01

    The impact of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of a 25-mg oral dose of naloxegol was examined in patients with renal impairment classified as moderate, severe, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and compared with healthy subjects (n = 8/group). Geometric mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was increased in patients with moderate (1.7-fold) or severe (2.2-fold) impairment, and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were elevated in patients with moderate (1.1-fold) or severe (1.8-fold) impairment. These findings were driven by higher exposures in two patients in each of the moderate and severe impairment groups; exposures in all other patients were similar to the control group. Overall exposures in ESRD patients were similar and Cmax was 29% lower versus normal subjects. Renal impairment minimally affected other plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. As renal clearance was a minor component of total clearance, exposure to naloxegol was unaffected by the degree of renal impairment, with no correlation between either AUC or Cmax and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Hemodialysis was an ineffective means to remove naloxegol. Naloxegol was generally well tolerated in all groups. Renal impairment could adversely affect clearance by hepatic and gut metabolism, resulting in the increased exposures observed in outliers of the moderate and severe renal impairment groups.

  14. EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

  15. Preliminary safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of regorafenib, cisplatin, and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Matthew D; Sturm, Isrid; Trnkova, Zuzana Jirakova; Lettieri, John; Diefenbach, Konstanze; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Gettinger, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose The addition of bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis agent, to cytotoxic chemotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancers (nsNSCLCs). Regorafenib is an oral multi-targeted kinase inhibitor with potent anti-angiogenic activity that is approved for patients with advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This phase I trial evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of regorafenib with cisplatin and pemetrexed for patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced nsNSCLCs were treated with regorafenib 60mg/day continuously and cisplatin 75mg/m2 plus pemetrexed 500mg/m2 once every three weeks for up to six cycles. Thereafter, regorafenib with or without pemetrexed could be continued as maintenance. Results Nine patients enrolled prior to premature termination of the study due to slow recruitment and a change in the development strategy of regorafenib by the study sponsor, partially due to slow enrollment. Five patients experienced at least one treatment-related Grade 3 adverse event. No grade 4–5 toxicity occurred. 5 of 9 (56%) patients had a partial response and the median progression-free survival was 7 months (range 1.5–15.1). Minor pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between regorafenib and chemotherapy were observed. Conclusions Regorafenib had acceptable tolerability and minor PK interactions in combination with standard doses of cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. Encouraging activity was appreciated in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. However, the small number of patients treated limits conclusions that can be drawn from these results. PMID:26003007

  16. Intranasal Abuse Potential, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety of Once-Daily, Single-Entity, Extended-Release Hydrocodone (HYD) in Recreational Opioid Users

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Alessandra; Colucci, Salvatore V.; Kapil, Ram P.; Geoffroy, Pierre; Hopyan, Talar; Levy-Cooperman, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. A once-daily, extended-release hydrocodone bitartrate tablet with abuse-deterrent properties (Hysingla ER® [HYD]) is available for the treatment of chronic pain in appropriate patients. This study evaluated the intranasal abuse potential and pharmacokinetics of HYD coarse and fine particles vs hydrocodone powder or placebo. Design. Single-center, double-blind, positive- and placebo-controlled, randomized, four-treatment crossover study. Subjects. Healthy adult, nondependent, recreational opioid users with a history of intranasal abuse. Methods. During four treatment periods, subjects (N = 31) received hydrocodone powder 60 mg, HYD coarse particles 60 mg, HYD fine particles 60 mg, or placebo, with five-to-seven-day washouts between treatments. Measures over 36 hours postdose included drug-liking and willingness to take drug again, assessed using visual analog scales (VASs), pupillometry, intranasal irritation, and pharmacokinetics. Results. Insufflation of both HYD coarse and fine particles led to lower “At this Moment” Drug Liking VAS peak values compared with hydrocodone powder, but higher values compared with placebo (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Similar results were observed for Overall Drug Liking VAS, Take Drug Again VAS, and Subjective Drug Value. Compared with hydrocodone, insufflation of HYD particles led to reduced miosis and increased nasal irritation. Mean hydrocodone Cmax following insufflation of HYD coarse particles, HYD fine particles, and hydrocodone powder was 27.5, 36.5, and 105.8 ng/mL, respectively; median Tmax was ≥2-fold longer with either HYD particle size than hydrocodone powder; and (Cmax/Tmax) was 9.5, 13.4, and 82.0 ng/mL/h, respectively. Safety was consistent with that of opioid agonists. Conclusions. HYD demonstrated reduced intranasal abuse potential compared with hydrocodone powder. PMID:26814240

  17. Safety Evaluation and Imaging Properties of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Piraquive, Joao; Lamberton, Franck; Lux, François; Verset, Michael; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Contamin, Hugues; Tillement, Olivier; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report the safety evaluation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in nonhuman primates (NHP) in the context of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in atherosclerosis bearing animals and healthy controls. In healthy NHP, the pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles demonstrated the absence of dose, time, and sex-effects, as well as a suitable tolerance of intravenous administration of the nanoparticles. We investigated their imaging properties for arterial plaque imaging in a standard diet or a high cholesterol diet NHP, and compared their characteristics with clinically applied Gd-chelate. This preliminary investigation reports the efficient and safe imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27725693

  18. [Elements of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Piette, F; Soubrie, C

    1990-05-21

    A knowledge of pharmacokinetic data is particularly important with drugs that have a narrow margin of safety. Exhaustive pre-marketing pharmacokinetic investigations and pharmacokinetic studies in populations are the two principal means of acquiring such knowledge. Although popular, the concept of half-life which decreases with age for many drugs is insufficient to calculate dosage in elderly people. Measurements of creatinine clearance provide an almost mathematical approach to the dosage of drugs that are excreted exclusively by the kidneys. In contrast, changes in hepatic metabolism with age and pathology are difficult to evaluate, and their consequences are often vaguely perceived. Our knowledge of relationships between age and pharmacodynamics is still in infancy. Owing to the wide consumption of medicine by elderly people, drug interactions are frequent at all stages, including absorption, metabolization, transport and site of action.

  19. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy of a Busulfan Test Dose in Adult Patients Undergoing Myeloablative Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weil, Elizabeth; Zook, Felicia; Oxencis, Carolyn; Canadeo, Angela; Urmanski, Angela; Waggoner, Mindy; Eastwood, Daniel; Pasquini, Marcelo; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hari, Parameswaran

    2017-03-10

    Owing to interpatient variability in busulfan exposure, therapeutic monitoring of busulfan is often used in myeloablative allogeneic transplantation to ensure that patients are near the optimal steady-state goal of 900 ng/mL. One challenge in therapeutic monitoring of busulfan is the brief course of busulfan treatment, requiring prompt analysis and dose adjustments as needed. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a busulfan test dose before the start of the conditioning regimen would allow for all conditioning regimen doses to be given at the calculated optimized dose. An observational study was completed to evaluate the effects of a busulfan test dose of .9 mg/kg administered before the start of a myeloablative intravenous busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Sixty adult patients who received a busulfan conditioning regimen were reviewed, including 30 patients who had not yet received the busulfan test dose (pretest dose group) and 30 patients who had received the busulfan test dose (posttest dose group). The primary objective was a pharmacokinetic evaluation of the percentage of patients who achieved the desired steady-state goal using the test dose strategy. The safety and efficacy of the busulfan test dose were evaluated as well. The average busulfan steady-state level after the first dose of the conditioning regimen was significantly lower in the pre-test dose group compared with the post-test dose group (660 ng/mL versus 879.9 ng/mL; P < .001). Compared with the post-test dose group, significantly fewer patients in the pre-test dose group were within 10% of the busulfan steady-state goal (10% versus 73.3%; P < .001) or within 5% of the goal (0% versus 53%; P < .001). Requirements for parenteral nutrition and/or patient-controlled analgesia owing to mucositis and veno-occlusive disease rates were not significantly different between the pre-test dose group and the post-test dose group. The rates of disease relapse, mortality, and acute graft

  20. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of an Intramuscular Monoclonal Antibody (SB 209763) against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Infants and Young Children at Risk for Severe RSV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, H. Cody; Groothuis, Jessie R.; Rodriguez, William J.; Welliver, Robert C.; Hogg, Geoff; Gray, Peter H.; Loh, Richard; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Sly, Peter; Miller, Ann K.; Nichols, Alice I.; Jorkasky, Diane K.; Everitt, Daniel E.; Thompson, Kathleen A.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of a humanized monoclonal antibody against a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein (SB 209763) to evaluate its safety, pharmacokinetics, and fusion inhibition and neutralization titers. Forty-three infants who were either delivered prematurely (≤35 weeks’ gestation) or exhibited bronchopulmonary dysplasia were administered either single or repeat (two doses, 8 weeks apart) intramuscular injections of SB 209763 at a concentration of 0.25, 1.25, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg or of a placebo. Four of 229 adverse events were considered related to the study drug, including purpura (n = 3) and thrombocytosis (n = 1). No subject developed a detectable level of anti-SB 209763 antibody. Approximately 1 week after administration of the second dose of SB 209763 at 10 mg/kg, the mean plasma concentration (n = 9) was 68.5 μg/ml. The terminal half-life (T1/2) determined by noncompartmental analysis ranged from 22 to 50 days. The population pharmacokinetics for SB 209763 following intramuscular administration was appropriately described by a one-compartment model with first-order input and elimination. Higher values for clearance and volume of distribution at steady state were observed for younger patients, with values decreasing to 0.143 (ml/h)/kg and 161 mL/kg, respectively, by a mean age of 298 days (∼10 months). The mean T1/2 of SB 209763 for the study population was 32.5 days. No other factor (dose, weight, gender, race, premature birth, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia) was observed to alter the population pharmacokinetics of SB 209763 in this study of infants and young children. The mean neutralization titer on day 6 was 286, and the mean fusion inhibition titer was 36. At least 57% of subjects dosed at 1.25 to 10.0 mg of SB 209763 per kg of body weight who were seronegative at baseline experienced a fourfold or greater increase in fusion inhibition titer. Nine RSV infections were documented

  1. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Kragh Thomsen, Marianne; Petersen, Eskild; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-04-01

    When antimicrobials are used empirically, pathogen MICs equal to clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values must be considered. This is to ensure that the most resistant pathogen subpopulation is appropriately targeted to prevent emergence of resistance. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0-24) values predicted for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H. influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0-24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature of this population pharmacokinetic model to predict therapeutic success. (Clinical Trials Registration no. NCT01983839.).

  2. Improved Safety, Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine through Lactoferrin Nanoparticles during Oral Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lakshmi, Yeruva Samrajya; C, Bhaskar; Golla, Kishore; Kondapi, Anand K

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most referred antiretroviral drug. In spite of its higher bioavailability (50-75%) the most important reason of its cessation are bone marrow suppression, anemia, neutropenia and various organs related toxicities. This study aims at the improvement of oral delivery of AZT through its encapsulation in lactoferrin nanoparticles (AZT-lactonano). The nanoparticles (NPs) are of 50-60 nm in size and exhibit 67% encapsulation of the AZT. They are stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Anti-HIV-1 activity of AZT remains unaltered in nanoformulation in acute infection. The bioavailability and tissue distribution of AZT is higher in blood followed by liver and kidney. AZT-lactonano causes the improvement of pharmacokinetic profile as compared to soluble AZT; a more than 4 fold increase in AUC and AUMC in male and female rats. The serum Cmax for AZT-lactonano was increased by 30%. Similarly there was nearly 2-fold increase in Tmax and t1/2. Our in vitro study confirms that, the endosomal pH is ideal for drug release from NPs and shows constant release from up to 96h. Bone marrow micronucleus assay show that nanoformulation exhibits approximately 2fold lower toxicity than soluble form. Histopathological and biochemical analysis further confirms that less or no significant organ toxicities when nanoparticles were used. AZT-lactonano has shown its higher efficacy, low organs related toxicities, improved pharmacokinetics parameter while keeping the antiviral activity intact. Thus, the nanoformulation are safe for the target specific drug delivery.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Clinical Activity of Multiple Doses of RCT-18 in Chinese Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Xia; Hou, Yong; Jiang, Ji; Zhong, Wen; Yao, Xuejing; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Lin; Fang, Jianmin; Zhang, Fengchun; Hu, Pei

    2016-08-01

    RCT-18 is a novel recombinant fusion protein that blocks the activity of a B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand. This was a randomized, single-blind, and placebo-controlled phase 1 study in 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Eligible patients were randomized 3:1 to receive multiple subcutaneous doses of RCT-18 for 4 weeks (180 mg, once weekly) or placebo and monitored over an 84-day observation period for pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, safety, and clinical activity. After multiple-dose RCT-18, the maximal serum concentration (Cmax ) of total and free RCT-18 was reached within 1 to 2 days. Mean elimination half-life for total RCT-18 and free RCT-18 was 11.4 to 26.4 days and 2.4 to 26.5 days, respectively. Slight accumulation was found after multiple subcutaneous administrations. The average accumulation ratios of AUC and Cmax after the fourth administration of RCT-18 were 2.0 and 1.7 for total RCT-18, and 1.8 and 1.6 for free RCT-18. The formation and elimination of BLyS-RCT-18 complex were much slower, with a time to Cmax of 14 to 46 days. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of RCT-18 in SLE patients were similar to those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No positive reaction was detected in the immunogenicity assessments. RCT-18 was biologically active, according to serum immunoglobulin and B-cell levels. Treatment-related IgM and IgA reduction was found during this study. CD19(+) , IgD(+) , and CD27(+) B-cell counts were increased after administration and decreased subsequently. SLE patients treated with RCT-18 were more prone to infections, including moderate and severe infections. Lower dosages of RCT-18 should be considered in further clinical development.

  4. A randomised study in healthy volunteers to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of idarucizumab, a specific antidote to dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Glund, Stephan; Moschetti, Viktoria; Norris, Stephen; Stangier, Joachim; Schmohl, Michael; van Ryn, Joanne; Lang, Benjamin; Ramael, Steven; Reilly, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran with high affinity, is in development as a specific antidote for dabigatran. In this first-in-human, single-rising-dose study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of idarucizumab. Healthy male volunteers aged 18-45 years received between 20 mg and 8 g idarucizumab as a 1-hour intravenous infusion in 10 sequential dose groups, or 1, 2 or 4 g idarucizumab as a 5-minute infusion. Subjects within each dose group were randomised 3:1 to idarucizumab or placebo. A total of 110 randomised subjects received study drug (27 placebo, 83 idarucizumab). Peak and total exposure to idarucizumab increased proportionally with dose. Maximum plasma concentrations were achieved near the end of infusion, followed by a rapid decline, with an initial idarucizumab half-life of ~45 minutes. For the 5-minute infusions, this resulted in a reduction of plasma concentrations to less than 5 % of peak within 4 hours. Idarucizumab (in the absence of dabigatran) had no effect on coagulation parameters or endogenous thrombin potential. Overall adverse event (AE) frequency was similar for idarucizumab and placebo, and no relationship with idarucizumab dose was observed. Drug-related AEs (primary endpoint) were rare (occurring in 2 placebo and 3 idarucizumab subjects) and were mostly of mild intensity; none of them resulted in study discontinuation. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetic profile of idarucizumab meets the requirement for rapid peak exposure and rapid elimination, with no effect on pharmacodynamic parameters. Idarucizumab was safe and well tolerated in healthy males.

  5. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Plasma Lipoprotein Distribution of Eritoran (E5564) during Continuous Intravenous Infusion into Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Daniel P.; Wasan, Kishor M.; Choo, Eugene; Yau, Edwin; Wong, Nancy; Rose, Jeffrey; Moran, Jeffrey; Lynn, Melvyn

    2004-01-01

    Eritoran, a structural analogue of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is an antagonist of LPS in animal and human endotoxemia models. Previous studies have shown that low doses (350 to 3,500 μg) of eritoran have demonstrated a long pharmacokinetic half-life but a short pharmacodynamic half-life. The present study describes the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and lipid distribution profile of eritoran during and after a 72-h intravenous infusion of 500, 2,000, or 3,500 μg/h into healthy volunteers. Except for the occurrence of phlebitis, eritoran administration over 72 h was safe and well tolerated. Eritoran demonstrated a slow plasma clearance (0.679 to 0.930 ml/h/kg of body weight), a small volume of distribution (45.6 to 49.8 ml/kg), and a relatively long half-life (50.4 to 62.7 h). In plasma, the majority (∼55%) of eritoran was bound to high-density lipoproteins. During infusion and for up to 72 h thereafter, ex vivo response of blood to 1- or 10-ng/ml LPS was inhibited by ≥85%, even when the lowest dose of eritoran (500 μg/h) was infused. Inhibition of response was dependent on eritoran dose and the concentration of LPS used as an agonist. Finally, in vitro analysis with purified lipoprotein and protein fractions from plasma obtained from healthy volunteers indicated that eritoran is inactivated by high-density but not low-density lipoproteins, very-low-density lipoproteins, or albumin. From these results, we conclude that up to 252 mg of eritoran can be safely infused into normal volunteers over 72 h and even though it associates extensively with high-density lipoproteins, antagonistic activity is maintained, even after infusion ceases. PMID:15328078

  6. A probabilistic bridge safety evaluation against floods.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Wei; Muto, Yasunori; Chen, Wei-Lun; Wu, Bang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To further capture the influences of uncertain factors on river bridge safety evaluation, a probabilistic approach is adopted. Because this is a systematic and nonlinear problem, MPP-based reliability analyses are not suitable. A sampling approach such as a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) or importance sampling is often adopted. To enhance the efficiency of the sampling approach, this study utilizes Bayesian least squares support vector machines to construct a response surface followed by an MCS, providing a more precise safety index. Although there are several factors impacting the flood-resistant reliability of a bridge, previous experiences and studies show that the reliability of the bridge itself plays a key role. Thus, the goal of this study is to analyze the system reliability of a selected bridge that includes five limit states. The random variables considered here include the water surface elevation, water velocity, local scour depth, soil property and wind load. Because the first three variables are deeply affected by river hydraulics, a probabilistic HEC-RAS-based simulation is performed to capture the uncertainties in those random variables. The accuracy and variation of our solutions are confirmed by a direct MCS to ensure the applicability of the proposed approach. The results of a numerical example indicate that the proposed approach can efficiently provide an accurate bridge safety evaluation and maintain satisfactory variation.

  7. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of ceftazidime in children].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Sakata, H; Murono, K; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Takimoto, M

    1984-03-01

    Forty-two pediatric patients were treated with ceftazidime ( CAZ ) in the doses ranging from 45.6 to 120 mg/kg/day for 2 to 10 days, and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. Among the 37 children with bacterial infections including pneumonia, bronchitis, tonsillitis, croup, cervical lymphadenitis, abdominal abscess and urinary tract infections, the results were excellent in 22, good in 12, fair in 2, and poor in 1 patient with pneumonia. Out of the 42 patients, 5 cases showed eosinophilia, but no clinical sign such as rash, fever or diarrhea, attributable to CAZ was observed during the study. The serum concentrations of CAZ in 4 patients ranged from 60.8 to 71.0 micrograms/ml (mean 66.1 micrograms/ml) at 30 minutes and from 0.5 to 1.2 micrograms/ml (mean 0.8 micrograms/ml) at 8 hours after 20 mg/kg intravenous bolus injection of the antibiotic. The mean serum half-life was 1.42 hours (85 minutes). Patients with impairment of renal function were excluded from this study.

  8. Developing Methodologies for Evaluating the Earthquake Safety of Existing Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, B.; And Others

    This report contains four papers written during an investigation of methods for evaluating the safety of existing school buildings under Research Applied to National Needs (RANN) grants. In "Evaluation of Earthquake Safety of Existing Buildings," by B. Bresler, preliminary ideas on the evaluation of the earthquake safety of existing…

  9. Safety and Upper Respiratory Pharmacokinetics of the Hemagglutinin Stalk-Binding Antibody VIS410 Support Treatment and Prophylaxis Based on Population Modeling of Seasonal Influenza A Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Wollacott, Andrew M.; Boni, Maciej F.; Szretter, Kristy J.; Sloan, Susan E.; Yousofshahi, Mona; Viswanathan, Karthik; Bedard, Sylvain; Hay, Catherine A.; Smith, Patrick F.; Shriver, Zachary; Trevejo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza is a major public health concern in vulnerable populations. Here we investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (VIS410) against Influenza A in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Based on these results and preclinical data, we implemented a mathematical modeling approach to investigate whether VIS410 could be used prophylactically to lessen the burden of a seasonal influenza epidemic and to protect at-risk groups from associated complications. Methods Using a single-ascending dose study (n = 41) at dose levels from 2 mg/kg–50 mg/kg we evaluated the safety as well as the serum and upper respiratory pharmacokinetics of a broadly-neutralizing antibody (VIS410) against influenza A (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02045472). Our primary endpoints were safety and tolerability of VIS410 compared to placebo. We developed an epidemic microsimulation model testing the ability of VIS410 to mitigate attack rates and severe disease in at risk-populations. Findings VIS410 was found to be generally safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels, from 2–50 mg/kg. Overall, 27 of 41 subjects (65.9%) reported a total of 67 treatment emergent adverse events (TEAEs). TEAEs were reported by 20 of 30 subjects (66.7%) who received VIS410 and by 7 of 11 subjects (63.6%) who received placebo. 14 of 16 TEAEs related to study drug were considered mild (Grade 1) and 2 were moderate (Grade 2). Two subjects (1 subject who received 30 mg/kg VIS410 and 1 subject who received placebo) experienced serious AEs (Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs) that were not related to study drug. VIS410 exposure was approximately dose-proportional with a mean half-life of 12.9 days. Mean VIS410 Cmax levels in the upper respiratory tract were 20.0 and 25.3 μg/ml at the 30 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses, respectively, with corresponding serum Cmax levels of 980.5 and 1316 μg/mL. Using these pharmacokinetic data, a microsimulation model showed

  10. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of MEDI4893, an Investigational, Extended-Half-Life, Anti-Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Human Monoclonal Antibody, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang-Qing; Robbie, Gabriel J.; Wu, Yuling; Esser, Mark T.; Jensen, Kathryn; Schwartz, Howard I.; Bellamy, Terramika; Hernandez-Illas, Martha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEDI4893 is an investigational immunoglobulin G1(κ) monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to and neutralizes alpha-toxin, a key Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. A triple-amino-acid substitution, M252Y/S254T/T256E, was engineered into the MEDI4893 Fc region to extend its serum half-life. A phase 1, double-blind, dose escalation study was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, anti-alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity, and antidrug antibody (ADA) response of MEDI4893 following a single intravenous infusion in healthy adults 18 to 65 years of age. Thirty-three subjects were randomly assigned to receive MEDI4893 at 225 mg (n = 3), 750 mg (n = 3), 2,250 mg (n = 8), or 5,000 mg (n = 12) or placebo (n = 7) and were followed for 360 days. Adverse events were mild or moderate in severity; none were serious. The MEDI4893 peak serum concentration increased dose proportionally from 77.2 μg/ml (225-mg dose) to 1,784 μg/ml (5,000-mg dose). The area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 360 days also increased dose proportionally, from 4,840 μg · day/ml (225-mg dose) to 91,493 μg · day/ml (5,000-mg dose), indicating linear pharmacokinetics. MEDI4893's terminal half-life was estimated to be 80 to 112 days, which is approximately 4-fold longer than the half-lives of other human immunoglobulin G antibodies. The alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity in serum correlated highly with the MEDI4893 concentrations in serum. Three adults transiently tested positive for ADA on day 151, but this did not have an impact on MEDI4893 serum concentrations or the MEDI4893 safety profile; no subjects exhibited serum ADA at the study end. These data support the continued development of MEDI4893 for the prevention of S. aureus-mediated pneumonia. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02296320.) PMID:27795368

  11. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) SERF cask

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1997-10-24

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) documents the ability of the Special Environmental Radiometallurgy Facility (SERF) Cask to meet the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B quantities (up to highway route controlled quantities) of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This document shall be used to ensure that loading, tie down, transport, and unloading of the SERF Cask are performed in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  12. Safety and pharmacokinetics of escalating daily doses of the antituberculosis drug rifapentine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dooley, K E; Bliven-Sizemore, E E; Weiner, M; Lu, Y; Nuermberger, E L; Hubbard, W C; Fuchs, E J; Melia, M T; Burman, W J; Dorman, S E

    2012-05-01

    Rifapentine (RP T) is an antituberculosis drug that may shorten treatment duration when substituted for rifampin (RI F).The maximal tolerated daily dose of RP T and its potential for cytochrome 3A4 induction and autoinduction at clinically relevant doses are unknown. In this phase I, dose-escalation study among healthy volunteers, daily doses as high asa prespecified maximum of 20 mg/kg/day were well tolerated. Steady-state RP T concentrations increased with dose from 5 to 15 mg/kg, but area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AU C0–24) and maximum concentration (Cmax)were similar in the 15- and 20-mg/kg cohorts. Although RP T pharmacokinetics (PK) appeared to be time-dependent,accumulation occurred with daily dosing. The mean AU C0–12 of oral midazolam (MDZ), a cytochrome 3A (CYP 3A) probe drug, was reduced by 93% with the coadministration of RPT and by 74% with the coadministration of RIF (P < 0.01).Changes in the oral clearance of MDZ did not vary by RP T dose. In conclusion, RP T was tolerated at doses as high as20 mg/kg/day, its PK were less than dose-proportional, and its CYP 3A induction was robust.

  13. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Escalating Daily Doses of the Antituberculosis Drug Rifapentine in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, KE; Bliven-Sizemore, EE; Weiner, M; Lu, Y; Nuermberger, EL; Hubbard, WC; Fuchs, EJ; Melia, MT; Burman, WJ; Dorman, SE

    2013-01-01

    Rifapentine (RPT) is an antituberculosis drug that may shorten treatment duration when substituted for rifampin (RIF). The maximal tolerated daily dose of RPT and its potential for cytochrome 3A4 induction and autoinduction at clinically relevant doses are unknown. In this phase I, dose-escalation study among healthy volunteers, daily doses as high as a prespecified maximum of 20 mg/kg/day were well tolerated. Steady-state RPT concentrations increased with dose from 5 to 15 mg/kg, but area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC0–24) and maximum concentration (Cmax) were similar in the 15- and 20-mg/kg cohorts. Although RPT pharmacokinetics (PK) appeared to be time-dependent, accumulation occurred with daily dosing. The mean AUC0–12 of oral midazolam (MDZ), a cytochrome 3A (CYP3A) probe drug, was reduced by 93% with the coadministration of RPT and by 74% with the coadministration of RIF (P < 0.01). Changes in the oral clearance of MDZ did not vary by RPT dose. In conclusion, RPT was tolerated at doses as high as 20 mg/kg/day, its PK were less than dose-proportional, and its CYP3A induction was robust. PMID:22472995

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation according to absorption differences in three formulations of ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongseong; Lee, Sook Joung; Ha, Yu-Mi; Choi, Young-Sim; Kim, Jae-Won; Park, Se-Rin; Park, Min Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis is modulated by COX2. Changes in PGE2 could be used to quantify the COX2 inhibition after ibuprofen administration. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships for COX2 inhibition according to three formulations of ibuprofen in healthy male subjects. Materials and methods A randomized, open-label, single-dose, three-treatment, six-sequence crossover study was performed in 36 healthy South Korean male volunteers. Enrolled subjects received the following three 200 mg ibuprofen formulations: ibuprofen arginine, solubilized ibuprofen capsule, and standard ibuprofen. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic blood samples were collected for 16 hours following treatment. For pharmacodynamic evaluations, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PGE2 inhibition at each time point compared to predose was measured. Noncompartmental analysis was used for pharmacokinetic assessment, and time-weighted average inhibition (WAI) of PGE2 was applied to the pharmacodynamic evaluation. Results After a single oral dose of the ibuprofen formulations, the median times to maximum concentration were 0.42, 0.5, and 1.25 hours in ibuprofen arginine, solubilized ibuprofen capsule, and ibuprofen, respectively. The maximum observed plasma concentration was lower in ibuprofen, and the area under the plasma concentration–time curve was comparable among the three formulations. A significant difference was observed between fast-acting formulations and standard ibuprofen tablets for both maximum concentration and time taken to reach it. Individual formulations had an effect on PGE2 WAI during the 8 hours following treatment, resulting in significantly lower WAI in standard ibuprofen: ibuprofen arginine 18.4%, solubilized ibuprofen capsule 18.4%, and standard ibuprofen 11.6%. Conclusion Rapid absorption and higher peak concentration were observed in ibuprofen arginine and the solubilized ibuprofen capsule. Additionally, fast

  15. Safety and Biosimilarity of ior(®)LeukoCIM Compared to Neupogen(®) Based on Toxicity, Pharmacodynamic, and Pharmacokinetic Studies in the Sprague-Dawley Rat.

    PubMed

    Licollari, Albert; Riddle, Katherine; Taylor, Simon R; Ledon, Nuris; Bolger, Gordon T

    2017-02-24

    This study examined the safety, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic similarity of the human recombinant filgrastim products ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®) following a 28-day repeated subcutaneous dose administration in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats with a 14-day recovery period. Safety profiling was based on clinical observations, clinical pathology, and pathology findings for control rats dosed with vehicle and rats dosed either with 15, 75, and 150 μg/kg of ior(®)LeukoCIM or with 150 μg/kg of Neupogen(®). The major adverse treatment-related clinical finding was mild to severe swelling of the hock-joint (tarsal joint) and hind limb, alone or accompanied with lameness which was more prominent in males and which had a similar frequency of occurrence for both ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®). All adverse findings were fully reversible. As expected, ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®) both increased white blood cell and neutrophil levels in rats and to a similar extent for high-dose ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®). The pharmacokinetics of filgrastim following dosing with ior(®)LeukoCIM were well behaved and comparable for high-dose ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®). The results of this study imply that ior(®)LeukoCIM and Neupogen(®) had similar safety profiles, pharmacodynamic responses, and pharmacokinetic profiles that suggest they are biosimilar.

  16. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of 6-month daily dosing of an oral formulation of cyclosporine (ATOPICA for cats®) in cats

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E S; VanLare, K A; Strehlau, G; Peyrou, M; Roycroft, L M; King, S

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine was proven efficacious in the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. This target animal study was conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ATOPICA for Cats® (cyclosporine oral solution, USP) MODIFIED following 6-month daily dosing in cats. Forty healthy cats (four cats/sex/group) received 0, 8 (1×), 16 (2×), 24 (3×), or 40 (5×) mg/kg cyclosporine once daily for 6 months (183 days). Body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopic, physical examinations including neurological assessments, blood pressure, electrocardiography, clinical pathology (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis), organ weights, and macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed and assessed. In addition, blood concentrations of cyclosporine were measured at the pretreatment trough on Days 1, 2, 7, 14, 31, 91, 154, and 182, and post-treatment on Days 1, 31, and 182. Adverse effects possibly related to treatment included prolonged APTT and one report each of bone marrow hypocellularity and lymphoma; all occurred in cats treated with doses more than 16 mg/kg. There was no significant accumulation of cyclosporine beyond the first week of treatment. Results confirm that ATOPICA for Cats is safe and well tolerated in cats without unexpected accumulation beyond the first week of treatment when administered as directed. PMID:24134659

  17. A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label, Pharmacokinetics and Safety Study of Pantoprazole Tablets in Children and Adolescents Aged 6 Through 16 Years With GERD

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Robert M.; Kearns, Gregory L.; Tammara, Brinda; Bishop, Phyllis; O’Gorman, Molly A.; James, Laura P.; Katz, Mitchell H.; Maguire, Mary K.; Rath, Natalie; Meng, Xu; Comer, Gail M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Children with GERD may benefit from gastric acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors such as pantoprazole. Effective treatment with pantoprazole requires correct dosing and understanding of the drug’s kinetic profile in children. The aim of these studies was to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of single and multiple doses of pantoprazole delayed-release tablets in pediatric patients with GERD aged ≥6 through 11 years (study 1) and 12 through 16 years (study 2). Patients were randomly assigned to receive pantoprazole 20 or 40 mg once daily. Plasma pantoprazole concentrations were obtained at intervals through 12 hours after the single dose, and at 2 and 4 hours after multiple doses for PK evaluation. PK parameters were derived by standard noncompartmental methods and examined as a function of both drug dose and patient age. Safety was also monitored. Pantoprazole PK was dose independent (when dose normalized) and similar toPK reported from adult studies. There was no evidence of accumulation with multiple dosing or reports of serious drug-associated adverse events. In children aged 6 to 16 years with GERD, currently available pantoprazole delayed-release tablets can be used to provide systemic exposure similar to that in adults. PMID:20852004

  18. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of 6-month daily dosing of an oral formulation of cyclosporine (ATOPICA for cats®) in cats.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E S; Vanlare, K A; Strehlau, G; Peyrou, M; Roycroft, L M; King, S

    2014-04-01

    Cyclosporine was proven efficacious in the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. This target animal study was conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ATOPICA for Cats® (cyclosporine oral solution, USP) MODIFIED following 6-month daily dosing in cats. Forty healthy cats (four cats/sex/group) received 0, 8 (1×), 16 (2×), 24 (3×), or 40 (5×) mg/kg cyclosporine once daily for 6 months (183 days). Body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopic, physical examinations including neurological assessments, blood pressure, electrocardiography, clinical pathology (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis), organ weights, and macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed and assessed. In addition, blood concentrations of cyclosporine were measured at the pretreatment trough on Days 1, 2, 7, 14, 31, 91, 154, and 182, and post-treatment on Days 1, 31, and 182. Adverse effects possibly related to treatment included prolonged APTT and one report each of bone marrow hypocellularity and lymphoma; all occurred in cats treated with doses more than 16 mg/kg. There was no significant accumulation of cyclosporine beyond the first week of treatment. Results confirm that ATOPICA for Cats is safe and well tolerated in cats without unexpected accumulation beyond the first week of treatment when administered as directed.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed. PMID:26730212

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed.

  1. Efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and biomarkers of cediranib monotherapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andrew X.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Thomas A.; McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Bhargava, Pankaj; Muzikansky, Alona; Sheehan, Susan; Regan, Eileen; Vasudev, Eamala; Knowles, Michelle; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ryan, David P.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We performed a single-arm phase II study of cediranib, a pan-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed measurable advanced HCC and adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal functions received cediranib 30-mg orally once daily (4 weeks/cycle). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 3 months. Other endpoints included response rates, overall survival (OS), pharmacokinetics (PK) and biomarkers for cediranib. Results Cediranib treatment resulted in an estimated 3-month-PFS rate of 77% [60%, 99%]. Median PFS was 5.3 [3.5,9.7] months, stable disease was seen in 5/17 patients (29%), and median OS was 11.7 [7.5–13.6] months. Grade 3 toxicities included hypertension (29%), hyponatremia (29%) and hyperbilirubinemia (18%). Cediranib PK were comparable to those seen in cancer patients with normal hepatic function. Plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF increased and sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2 and Ang-2 decreased after cediranib treatment. PFS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of VEGF, sVEGFR2, and bFGF and with on-treatment levels of bFGF and IGF-1, and directly associated with on-treatment levels of IFN-γ. OS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of sVEGFR1, Ang-2, TNF-α, CAIX and CD34+CD133+CD45dim circulating progenitor cells and on-treatment levels of sVEGFR2. Conclusions Despite the limitations of primary endpoint selection, cediranib at 30-mg daily showed a high incidence of toxicity and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Hepatic dysfunction did not appear to affect the steady-state PK of cediranib. Exploratory studies suggested pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors as potential biomarkers of anti-VEGF therapy in HCC. PMID:23362324

  2. The Effect of Food and Formulation on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of GSK1322322 in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Naderer, Odin; Jones, Lori S; Zhu, John; Coffin, Mark D; Kurtinecz, Milena; Dumont, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    GSK1322322 is the first in a new class of antibiotics that inhibit peptide deformylase, necessary for bacterial protein maturation. Previously, low absolute bioavailability was observed for the 1500-mg oral tablet formulation, resulting in a less than dose-proportional increase from the 1000-mg dose. Furthermore, high variability of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters within cohorts was suggested to be associated with differences in body weight. This open-label, randomized, 4-period, crossover, single-dose phase I study in healthy individuals compared the PK, safety, and tolerability of free base oral tablets under fasted or fed conditions with intravenous and oral mesylate salt solution of GSK1322322 under fasted conditions. Absolute bioavailability of GSK1322322 1500-mg free base tablets under fasted conditions, fed conditions, and oral mesylate salt solution was 57%, 77%, and 92%, respectively. Moderate-fat/calorie food intake increased area under the concentration–time curve (AUC0−∞) by 36%, maintained maximum observed concentration (Cmax), and delayed time to Cmax. It appeared that AUC0−∞ decreased with body weight, whereas clearance increased. GSK1322322 administration resulted in only mild-to-moderate adverse events. These results support future clinical investigations of the free base oral tablet formulation of GSK1322322 1500 mg after intake of a moderate-fat/calorie meal, including further investigation of a potential weight-based dosage change. PMID:26097792

  3. Intra-articular administration of lidocaine in anaesthetized dogs: pharmacokinetic profile and safety on cardiovascular and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, A; Bufalari, A; De Monte, V; Cagnardi, P; Marenzoni, M L; Catanzaro, A; Vigorito, V; Della Rocca, G

    2015-08-01

    The intra-articular administration of lidocaine is a frequent practice in human orthopaedic surgical procedures, but an eventual absorption of the drug into the bloodstream can lead to toxicity, mainly concerning the central nervous system and the cardiovascular systems. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and the safety, in terms of cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, of lidocaine after intra-articular administration to anesthetized dogs undergoing arthroscopy. Lidocaine 2% was administered to eight dogs before surgery in differing amounts, depending on the volume of the joints involved, and blood samples were taken at predetermined time points. The maximum serum concentration of lidocaine ranged from 0.50 to 3.01 μg/mL (mean ± SD: 2.18 ± 0.91 μg/mL), and the time to reach it was 28.75 ± 15.74 min. No signs of cardiac toxicity were detected during the entire procedure, and possible signs of CNS toxicity were masked by the anaesthesia. However, concentrations reported in literature as responsible for neurotoxicity in dog were achieved in three of eight investigated subjects. Pending further studies, veterinarians should consider the possibility of side effects occurring following the intra-articular administration of local anaesthetics.

  4. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time. PMID:27595040

  5. Adult and paediatric poor metabolisers of desloratadine: an assessment of pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Bruce; Kim, Kenneth; Gupta, Samir; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; Lorber, Richard; Wang, Zaiqi; Lutsky, Barry

    2006-03-01

    Antihistamines are widely used to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in adults and children. Desloratadine is a once-daily oral antihistamine with a favourable sedation profile that is approved for the treatment of AR and CIU. Phenotypic polymorphism in the metabolism of desloratadine has been observed, such that some individuals have a decreased ability to form 3-hydroxydesloratadine, the major metabolite of desloratadine; such individuals are termed 'poor metabolisers of desloratadine'. This review describes the prevalence of poor metabolisers of desloratadine, quantifies the exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers and demonstrates that the increased exposure in poor metabolisers is independent of age when administered at age-appropriate doses. Furthermore, this review demonstrates that the increased exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers is not associated with any changes in the safety and tolerability profile of desloratadine, including cardiovascular safety.

  6. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T; Sykes, David A; Watson, Kenny J; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J; Kent, Toby C

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED50 values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1h; >200 fold at 6h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M2 muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M2 receptor blockade at ED50 doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium.

  7. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    SciTech Connect

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T.; Sykes, David A.; Watson, Kenny J.; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J.; Kent, Toby C.

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED{sub 50} values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M{sub 2} receptor blockade at ED{sub 50} doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED{sub 50} doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M{sub 2} receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M

  8. Phase 1B study of the pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole intravenous solution in patients at risk for invasive fungal disease.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Johan; Cornely, Oliver A; Ullmann, Andrew J; Heinz, Werner J; Krishna, Gopal; Patino, Hernando; Caceres, Maria; Kartsonis, Nicholas; Waskin, Hetty; Robertson, Michael N

    2014-07-01

    This was a phase 1B, dose-ranging, multicenter, pharmacokinetics, and safety study of cyclodextrin-based posaconazole intravenous (i.v.) solution administered through a central line to subjects at high risk for invasive fungal disease (part 1 of a 2-part study [phase 1B/3]). Initially, the safety and tolerability of single-dose posaconazole i.v. 200 mg (n = 10) were compared with those of a placebo (n = 11). Subsequently, 2 doses were evaluated, posaconazole i.v. 200 mg once daily (q.d.) (n = 21) and 300 mg q.d. (n = 24). The subjects received twice-daily (b.i.d.) posaconazole i.v. on day 1, followed by 13 days of posaconazole i.v. q.d., then 14 days of posaconazole oral suspension 400 mg b.i.d. The steady-state (day 14) exposure target (average concentration [areas under concentration-time curve {AUCs}/24 h, average concentrations at steady state {Cavgs}], of ≥ 500 to ≤ 2,500 ng/ml in ≥ 90% of the subjects) was achieved by 94% of the subjects for 200 mg posaconazole q.d. and by 95% of subjects for 300 mg posaconazole q.d. The desired exposure target (mean steady-state Cavg, ∼ 1,200 ng/ml) was 1,180 ng/ml in the 200-mg dosing cohort and was exceeded in the 300-mg dosing cohort (1,430 ng/ml). Posaconazole i.v. was well tolerated. Posaconazole i.v. 300 mg q.d. was selected for the phase 3 study segment. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01075984.).

  9. Safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers with activity against ebola virus and marburg virus: results of two single-ascending-dose studies.

    PubMed

    Heald, Alison E; Iversen, Patrick L; Saoud, Jay B; Sazani, Peter; Charleston, Jay S; Axtelle, Tim; Wong, Michael; Smith, William B; Vutikullird, Apinya; Kaye, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Two identical single-ascending-dose studies evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of AVI-6002 and AVI-6003, two experimental combinations of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers with positive charges (PMOplus) that target viral mRNA encoding Ebola virus and Marburg virus proteins, respectively. Both AVI-6002 and AVI-6003 were found to suppress disease in virus-infected nonhuman primates in previous studies. AVI-6002 (a combination of AVI-7537 and AVI-7539) or AVI-6003 (a combination of AVI-7287 and AVI-7288) were administered as sequential intravenous (i.v.) infusions of a 1:1 fixed dose ratio of the two subcomponents. In each study, 30 healthy male and female subjects between 18 and 50 years of age were enrolled in six-dose escalation cohorts of five subjects each and received a single i.v. infusion of active study drug (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1.5, 3, and 4.5 mg/kg per component) or placebo in a 4:1 ratio. Both AVI-6002 and AVI-6003 were safe and well tolerated at the doses studied. A maximum tolerated dose was not observed in either study. The four chemically similar PMOplus components exhibited generally similar PK profiles. The mean peak plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve values of the four components exhibited dose-proportional PK. The estimated plasma half-life of all four components was 2 to 5 h. The safety of the two combinations and the PK of the four components were similar, regardless of the target RNA sequence.

  10. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of 2-pyridylacetic acid, a major metabolite of betahistine, in a phase 1 dose escalation study in subjects with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ganesh; Sallee, Floyd; Gabbita, Prasad; Zemlan, Frank; Sallans, Larry; Desai, Pankaj B

    2015-10-01

    Betahistine, a potent histamine H3 receptor antagonist, is being developed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifests with symptoms such as hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. This study describes the pharmacokinetics of betahistine in ADHD subjects at doses higher than 50 mg. These assessments were made during a randomized, placebo-controlled, single blind, dose escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of once daily doses of 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg of betahistine in subjects with ADHD. Plasma levels of 2-pyridylacetic acid (2-PAA), a major metabolite of betahistine were quantified using a validated LC-MS/MS method and used for pharmacokinetic analysis and dose proportionality of betahistine. A linear relationship was observed in Cmax and AUC0-4 of 2-PAA with the betahistine dose (R2 0.9989 and 0.9978, respectively) and dose proportionality coefficients (β) for the power model were 0.8684 (Cmax) and 1.007 (AUC0-4). A population pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption of betahistine and metabolism to 2-PAA, followed by a first-order elimination of 2-PAA provides estimates of clearance that underscored the linear increase in systemic exposure with dose. There were no serious adverse events reported in the study, betahistine was safe and well tolerated at all the dose levels tested.

  11. Safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of high-dose liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) in patients infected with Aspergillus species and other filamentous fungi: maximum tolerated dose study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Goodman, J L; Pappas, P; Bekersky, I; Buell, D N; Roden, M; Barrett, J; Anaissie, E J

    2001-12-01

    We conducted a phase I-II study of the safety, tolerance, and plasma pharmacokinetics of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB; AmBisome) in order to determine its maximally tolerated dosage (MTD) in patients with infections due to Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi. Dosage cohorts consisted of 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 mg/kg of body weight/day; a total of 44 patients were enrolled, of which 21 had a proven or probable infection (13 aspergillosis, 5 zygomycosis, 3 fusariosis). The MTD of L-AMB was at least 15 mg/kg/day. Infusion-related reactions of fever occurred in 8 (19%) and chills and/or rigors occurred in 5 (12%) of 43 patients. Three patients developed a syndrome of substernal chest tightness, dyspnea, and flank pain, which was relieved by diphenhydramine. Serum creatinine increased two times above baseline in 32% of the patients, but this was not dose related. Hepatotoxicity developed in one patient. Steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics were achieved by day 7. The maximum concentration of drug in plasma (C(max)) of L-AMB in the dosage cohorts of 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 mg/kg/day changed to 76, 120, 116, and 105 microg/ml, respectively, and the mean area under the concentration-time curve at 24 h (AUC(24)) changed to 692, 1,062, 860, and 554 microg x h/ml, respectively, while mean CL changed to 23, 18, 16, and 25 ml/h/kg, respectively. These data indicate that L-AMB follows dose-related changes in disposition processing (e.g., clearance) at dosages of >or=7.5 mg/kg/day. Because several extremely ill patients had early death, success was determined for both the modified intent-to-treat and evaluable (7 days of therapy) populations. Response rates (defined as complete response and partial response) were similar for proven and probable infections. Response and stabilization, respectively, were achieved in 36 and 16% of the patients in the modified intent-to-treat population (n = 43) and in 52 and 13% of the patients in the 7-day evaluable population (n

  12. Safety, Tolerance, and Pharmacokinetics of High-Dose Liposomal Amphotericin B (AmBisome) in Patients Infected with Aspergillus Species and Other Filamentous Fungi: Maximum Tolerated Dose Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Thomas J.; Goodman, Jesse L.; Pappas, Peter; Bekersky, Ihor; Buell, Donald N.; Roden, Maureen; Barrett, John; Anaissie, Elias J.

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a phase I-II study of the safety, tolerance, and plasma pharmacokinetics of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB; AmBisome) in order to determine its maximally tolerated dosage (MTD) in patients with infections due to Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi. Dosage cohorts consisted of 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 mg/kg of body weight/day; a total of 44 patients were enrolled, of which 21 had a proven or probable infection (13 aspergillosis, 5 zygomycosis, 3 fusariosis). The MTD of L-AMB was at least 15 mg/kg/day. Infusion-related reactions of fever occurred in 8 (19%) and chills and/or rigors occurred in 5 (12%) of 43 patients. Three patients developed a syndrome of substernal chest tightness, dyspnea, and flank pain, which was relieved by diphenhydramine. Serum creatinine increased two times above baseline in 32% of the patients, but this was not dose related. Hepatotoxicity developed in one patient. Steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics were achieved by day 7. The maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of L-AMB in the dosage cohorts of 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 mg/kg/day changed to 76, 120, 116, and 105 μg/ml, respectively, and the mean area under the concentration-time curve at 24 h (AUC24) changed to 692, 1,062, 860, and 554 μg · h/ml, respectively, while mean CL changed to 23, 18, 16, and 25 ml/h/kg, respectively. These data indicate that L-AMB follows dose-related changes in disposition processing (e.g., clearance) at dosages of ≥7.5 mg/kg/day. Because several extremely ill patients had early death, success was determined for both the modified intent-to-treat and evaluable (7 days of therapy) populations. Response rates (defined as complete response and partial response) were similar for proven and probable infections. Response and stabilization, respectively, were achieved in 36 and 16% of the patients in the modified intent-to-treat population (n = 43) and in 52 and 13% of the patients in the 7-day evaluable population (n = 31). These

  13. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  14. A Phase 1 Study of 131I-CLR1404 in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors: Dosimetry, Biodistribution, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Titz, Benjamin; Kozak, Kevin; Clarke, William; Allen, Ernest; Trembath, LisaAnn; Stabin, Michael; Marshall, John; Cho, Steve Y.; Wong, Terence Z.; Mortimer, Joanne; Weichert, Jamey P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction 131I-CLR1404 is a small molecule that combines a tumor-targeting moiety with a therapeutic radioisotope. The primary aim of this phase 1 study was to determine the administered radioactivity expected to deliver 400 mSv to the bone marrow. The secondary aims were to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profiles of 131I-CLR1404. Methods Eight subjects with refractory or relapsed advanced solid tumors were treated with a single injection of 370 MBq of 131I-CLR1404. Whole body planar nuclear medicine scans were performed at 15–35 minutes, 4–6, 18–24, 48, 72, 144 hours, and 14 days post injection. Optional single photon emission computed tomography imaging was performed on two patients 6 days post injection. Clinical laboratory parameters were evaluated in blood and urine. Plasma PK was evaluated on 127I-CLR1404 mass measurements. To evaluate renal clearance of 131I-CLR1404, urine was collected for 14 days post injection. Absorbed dose estimates for target organs were determined using the RADAR method with OLINDA/EXM software. Results Single administrations of 370 MBq of 131I-CLR1404 were well tolerated by all subjects. No severe adverse events were reported and no adverse event was dose-limiting. Plasma 127I-CLR1404 concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner with a mean t½ value of 822 hours. Mean Cmax and AUC(0-t) values were 72.2 ng/mL and 15753 ng•hr/mL, respectively. An administered activity of approximately 740 MBq is predicted to deliver 400 mSv to marrow. Conclusions Preliminary data suggest that 131I-CLR1404 is well tolerated and may have unique potential as an anti-cancer agent. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00925275 PMID:25402488

  15. [Review of pharmacokinetic monitoring of 5-Fluorouracil as a tool to increase efficacy and safety].

    PubMed

    Matus-Santos, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Ponce, José Luis; Lara-Medina, Fernando Ulises; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel; Meneses-García, Abelardo; López-Gamboa, Mireya

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in medical knowledge has indicated that both clinical and biological markers will determine the response to different medical treatments: age, gender and genetics will determine the success of treatment. Genetic variability in this respect is fundamental and determines efficiency and safety of drugs, as well as susceptibility and illness' development. Fortunately, personalized medicine now offers individually tailored treatment strategies for each patient's needs. This is of outmost importance in oncology, since treatment is per se toxic and the commonly found low serum drug concentrations result in low treatment efficacy. Personalized medicine will allow a better approach to this, until now, a poorly managed disease. In this review we intent to raise awareness of personalized medicine and of clinical pharmacologic monitoring, with the aim to achieve adequate levels of efficacy and safety in the use of the cytotoxic drug 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Additionally, the importance of pharmacogenomics for the use of 5-FU is discussed. We designed this discussion towards medical practitioners challenged with treatment decisions every day, together with their patients.

  16. A validated bioanalytical HPLC method for pharmacokinetic evaluation of 2-deoxyglucose in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Murugesan K; Lin, Hongxia; Stein, Mark; Goodin, Susan; Bertino, Joseph R; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; DiPaola, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG), an analog of glucose, is widely used to interfere with glycolysis in tumor cells and studied as a therapeutic approach in clinical trials. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of 2-DG, we describe the development and validation of a sensitive HPLC fluorescent method for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. Plasma samples were deproteinized with methanol and the supernatant was dried at 45°C. The residues were dissolved in methanolic sodium acetate-boric acid solution. 2-DG and other monosaccharides were derivatized to 2-aminobenzoic acid derivatives in a single step in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride at 80°C for 45 min. The analytes were separated on a YMC ODS C₁₈ reversed-phase column using gradient elution. The excitation and emission wavelengths were set at 360 and 425 nm. The 2-DG calibration curves were linear over the range of 0.63-300 µg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.5 µg/mL. The assay provided satisfactory intra-day and inter-day precision with RSD less than 9.8%, and the accuracy ranged from 86.8 to 110.0%. The HPLC method is reproducible and suitable for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. The method was successfully applied to characterize the pharmacokinetics profile of 2-DG in patients with advanced solid tumors.

  17. Systematic safety evaluation on photoluminescent carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Gao, Zhongcai; Gao, Guo; Wo, Yan; Wang, Yuxia; Shen, Guangxia; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared using the improved nitric acid oxidation method. The C-dots were characterized by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The C-dots were subjected to systematic safety evaluation via acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, and genotoxicity experiments (including mouse bone marrow micronuclear test and Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test). The results showed that the C-dots were successfully prepared with good stability, high dispersibility, and water solubility. At all studied C-dot dosages, no significant toxic effect, i.e., no abnormality or lesion, was observed in the organs of the animals. Therefore, the C-dots are non-toxic to mice under any dose and have potential use in fluorescence imaging in vivo, tumor cell tracking, and others.

  18. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and 48-Week Safety and Efficacy of Raltegravir for Oral Suspension in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Infected Children 4 Weeks to 2 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Alvero, Carmelita; Acosta, Edward P.; Teppler, Hedy; Homony, Brenda; Graham, Bobbie; Fenton, Terence; Xu, Xia; Rizk, Matthew L.; Spector, Stephen A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Worrell, Carol; Handelsman, Edward; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background IMPAACT P1066 is a Phase I/II open-label multicenter trial to evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and efficacy of multiple raltegravir (RAL) formulations in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected youth. Methods Dose selection of the oral suspension formulation for each cohort (IV: 6 months to <2 years and V: 4 weeks to <6 months) was based on review of short-term safety (4 weeks) and intensive PK evaluation. Safety data through Weeks 24 and 48 and Grade ≥3 or serious adverse events (AEs) were assessed. The primary virologic endpoint was achieving HIV RNA <400 copies/mL or ≥1 log10 reduction from baseline at Week 24 (Success). For Cohort IV, optimized background therapy (OBT) could have been initiated with RAL either at study entry or after intensive PK sampling was completed at Day 5–12. An OBT was started when RAL was initiated for Cohort V subjects because they were not permitted to have received direct antiretroviral therapy before enrollment. Results Total accrual was 27 subjects in these 2 cohorts, including 1 subject who was enrolled but never started study drug (excluded from the analyses). The targeted PK parameters (area under the curve [AUC]0−12hr and C12hr) were achieved for each cohort allowing for dose selection. Through Week 48, there were 10 subjects with Grade 3+ AEs. Two were judged related to study drug. There was 1 discontinuation due to an AE of skin rash, 1 event of immune reconstitution syndrome, and no drug-related deaths. At Week 48, for Cohorts IV and V, 87.5% of subjects achieved virologic success and 45.5% had HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. At Week 48, gains in CD4 cells of 527.6 cells/mm3 and 7.3% were observed. Conclusions A total of 6 mg/kg per dose twice daily of RAL for oral suspension was well tolerated and showed favorable virologic and immunologic responses. PMID:26582887

  20. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics, safety, and immunogenicity of MSB11022, a biosimilar of adalimumab, with Humira® in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Tim; Vlachos, Pantelis; Attkins, Neil; Ullmann, Martin; Roy, Sanjeev; Wagner, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and tolerability of the proposed adalimumab biosimilar MSB11022 (Merck) with Humira® (AbbVie), sourced from both the US (US reference product [US‐RP]) and Europe (European reference medicinal product [EU‐RMP]). Methods In this phase 1 double‐blind, parallel group trial (EMR200588‐001), 213 healthy volunteers were randomized 1 : 1 : 1 to receive a single dose (40 mg) of MSB11022, US‐RP or EU‐RMP in order to achieve 80% power assuming a 5% difference among groups and a 10% dropout rate. Following a preplanned blinded sample size re‐assessment after more than 50% of the originally planned subjects had been observed, the sample size was increased to 237 (79 per arm) to ensure 213 completers. Primary PK endpoints analyzed by non‐compartmental methods, were area under the curve (AUC) from time 0 extrapolated to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum observed concentration (C max), and AUC from time 0 to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC(0,t last)). PK equivalence was declared if the 90% CI for the test : reference ratio lay within the 80–125% equivalence margin. Bioequivalence was demonstrated if all three PK parameters met the PK equivalence criteria. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. Results Mean serum concentration–time profiles for the three treatments were similar. MSB11022 demonstrated PK equivalence to US‐RP and EU‐RMP for all primary endpoints. The geometric means of AUC(0,∞), C max and AUC(0,t last) following a single dose of MSB11022 were 2276.05 μg ml–1 h, 3.44 μg ml–1  and 1983.90 μg ml–1 h, respectively. Adverse events (AEs) were similar across all groups, with treatment‐emergent AEs (TEAEs) reported by 62.8%, 56.3% and 62.0% of subjects within the MSB11022, US‐RP and EU‐RMP groups, respectively. Most of the TEAEs were considered mild and unrelated to study drug. No deaths or severe AEs related to the study drug were

  1. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = -33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = -33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 681750 ng/mL). Conclusion Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study.

  2. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, Julio S.G.; Schutz, Malte; Schwartz, Robert; Jayaweera, Dushyantha T.; Burnside, Alfred F.; Walmsley, Sharon; Saag, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = −33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = −33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 68-1750 ng/mL). Conclusions Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study. PMID:16926775

  3. Impact on abiraterone pharmacokinetics and safety: Open-label drug-drug interaction studies with ketoconazole and rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Apexa; Vaccaro, Nicole; Acharya, Milin; Jiao, James; Monbaliu, Johan; De Vries, Ronald; Stieltjes, Hans; Yu, Margaret; Tran, Namphuong; Chien, Caly

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole, and a strong inducer, rifampicin, on the pharmacokinetic (PK) exposure of abiraterone in two studies in healthy men. All subjects received 1,000 mg of abiraterone acetate on Days 1 and 14. Study A subjects (n = 20) received 400 mg ketoconazole on Days 11-16. Study B subjects (n = 19) received 600 mg rifampicin on Days 8-13. Serial PK sampling was done on Days 1 and 14. Study A: When given with ketoconazole, abiraterone exposure increased by 9% for maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) and 15% for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUClast ) and AUC from time 0 to infinity (AUC∞ ) compared to abiraterone acetate alone. Study B: When given with rifampicin, abiraterone exposure was reduced to 45% for Cmax and AUC∞ and to 42% for AUClast compared to abiraterone acetate alone. Ketoconazole had no clinically meaningful impact on abiraterone exposure. Rifampicin decreased abiraterone exposure by half. Hence, strong CYP3A4 inducers should be avoided or used with careful evaluation of clinical efficacy when administered with abiraterone acetate.

  4. Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, D P

    2006-06-26

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  5. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Kushwaha, H. N.; Mittal, N.; Chandurkar, N.; Bhalla, A.; Kaur, S.; Pandhi, P.; Puri, G. D.; Achuthan, S.; Pareek, A.; Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, J. S.; Gaur, S. P. S.; Malhotra, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T1/2, MRT, and AUC0−∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85 ± 1.94 h, 13.77 ± 2.05 h, and 878.74 ± 133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials. PMID:24800100

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy from randomized controlled trials of 1 and 2 mg nicotine bitartrate lozenges (Nicotinell®)

    PubMed Central

    Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Nides, Mitchell; Kienzler, Jean-Luc; Callens, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can almost double the chances of success for smokers to quit. Nevertheless, there is still a considerable number of cessation attempts that are made without any treatment. This novel oral formulation, (lozenge containing nicotine bitartrate dihydrate) has been developed to enlarge the offer for efficient smoking cessation drug therapies, assuming that increasing treatment options will bring more smokers to find the support they personally need to stop smoking. Methods Three pharmacokinetic (PK), one safety and two efficacy studies were carried out with Nicotinell lozenges. PK trials were: (1) a single-dose, three-way crossover study comparing 1 and 2 mg lozenges with 2 mg nicotine gum; (2) a multiple-dose, two-way crossover study comparing 1 mg lozenge with 2 mg gum; (3) a multiple-dose, three-way crossover study comparing 1 and 2 mg lozenges with 4 mg gum. Safety trial: (4) a single dose study to assess the safety of swallowing up to 12 lozenges containing 1 mg nicotine. Efficacy trials: two efficacy studies in (5) France and (6) the USA, including more than 900 smokers followed-up for up to one year, conducted with the 1 mg lozenge. Results The results of the individual PK trials showed that the 1 mg Nicotinell lozenge is bioequivalent to 2 mg polacrilex gum, as demonstrated by similar blood PK parameters (tmax, Cmax, AUC). The 2 mg lozenge was found to deliver quantities of nicotine that were intermediate between those delivered by 2 and 4 mg polacrilex gum. The short-term efficacy of the 1 mg lozenge in comparison with placebo was also demonstrated with significantly more subjects continuously abstinent from smoking with active lozenges on week 6 in two different populations: moderate to heavy smokers (FTND between 4 and 7) OR = 1.72 [95% CI: 1.05–2.80]; heavy to very heavy smokers (FTND 6 and over) OR = 2.87 [95% CI: 1.18–6.97]. Nicotinell lozenges were found to be safe with mainly mild and

  7. Evaluating the safety and dosing of drugs in patients with liver cirrhosis by literature review and expert opinion

    PubMed Central

    Weersink, Rianne A; Bouma, Margriet; Burger, David M; Drenth, Joost P H; Hunfeld, Nicole G M; Kranenborg, Minke; Monster-Simons, Margje H; van Putten, Sandra A W; Metselaar, Herold J; Taxis, Katja; Borgsteede, Sander D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver cirrhosis can have a major impact on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Patients with cirrhosis often suffer from potentially preventable adverse drug reactions. Guidelines on safe prescribing for these patients are lacking. The aim of this study is to develop a systematic method for evaluating the safety and optimal dosage of drugs in patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods and analysis For each drug, a six-step evaluation process will be followed. (1) Available evidence on the pharmacokinetics and safety of a drug in patients with liver cirrhosis will be collected from the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) and a systematic literature review will be performed. (2) Data regarding two outcomes, namely pharmacokinetics and safety, will be extracted and presented in a standardised assessment report. (3) A safety classification and dosage suggestion will be proposed for each drug. (4) An expert panel will discuss the validity and clinical relevance of this suggested advice. (5) Advices will be implemented in all relevant Clinical Decision Support Systems in the Netherlands and published on a website for patients and healthcare professionals. (6) The continuity of the advices will be guaranteed by a yearly check of new literature and comments on the advices. This protocol will be applied in the evaluation of a selection of drugs: (A) drugs used to treat (complications of) liver cirrhosis, and (B) drugs frequently prescribed to the general population. Ethics and dissemination Since this study does not directly involve human participants, it does not require ethical clearance. Besides implementation on a website and in clinical decision support systems, we aim to publish the generated advices of one or two drug classes in a peer-reviewed journal and at conference meetings. PMID:27733414

  8. Development of olmesartan medoxomil lipid-based nanoparticles and nanosuspension: preparation, characterization and comparative pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    B, Arun; D, Narendar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2017-03-14

    The aim was to enhance the oral bioavailability of olmesartan medoxomil (OM) by preparing solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and comparing with nanosuspension (OM-NS). OM-SLNs and OM-NS were prepared by known methods. Prepared SLNs were evaluated for physical characters and in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) performance in rats. OM-NS showed more than four-fold increase in the solubility. During DSC and XRD studies, drug incorporated in SLNs was found to be in amorphous form. The relative bioavailability of OM-SLN and OM-NS was 7.21- and 3.52-fold when compared with that of coarse suspension. Further, OM-SLNs also increased the oral bioavailability by two-fold over that of OM-NS.

  9. Deferasirox pharmacokinetics evaluation in a woman with hereditary haemochromatosis and heterozygous β-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Sarah; De Francia, Silvia; Longo, Filomena; Massano, Davide; Cusato, Jessica; Arduino, Arianna; Pirro, Elisa; Piga, Antonio; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    We present the deferasirox pharmacokinetics evaluation of a female patient on iron chelation, for the interesting findings from her genetic background (hereditary haemochromatosis and heterozygous β-thalassaemia) and clinical history (ileostomy; iron overload from transfusions). Drug plasma concentrations were measured by an HPLC-UV validated method, before and after ileum resection. Area under deferasirox concentration curve over 24h (AUC) values were determined by the mixed log-linear rule, using Kinetica software. AUC was low also with high deferasirox dose as well as tolerability. Non invasive tissue iron quantification by magnetic resonance imaging or superconducting quantum interference device were prevented by a metal hip replacement. Good efficacy and normalisation of iron markers was obtained on long term. Therapeutic drug monitoring in patient in critical conditions may help to understand reasons for non response and set individualised treatment.

  10. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of omeprazole suspension following oral administration in rats: effect of neutralization of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Matsuka, N; Furuno, K; Eto, K; Kawasaki, H; Gomita, Y

    1996-08-01

    In order to evaluate a clinical use of omeprazole suspension, we examined the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole after oral administration in rats. Although the administration of omeprazole suspension buffered by NaHCO3 solution did not produce a significant increase in the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) value compared with non-buffered group, the administration of NaHCO3 buffer immediately after dosing of omeprazole suspension buffered by NaHCO3 caused a significant increase in the AUC value. These results suggest that the NaHCO3 treatment following the administration of omeprazole buffered suspension effectively decreased the degradation of the compound by gastric acid. Therefore, the successive administration of NaHCO3 solution after the omeprazole dosing seems to be a simple and useful method for the administration to patients who cannot receive tablets.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Caspofungin in Neonates and Infants Less than 3 Months of Age▿

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Macias, Mercedes; Maiya, Padmanabha; Pineros, Juan; Jafri, Hasan S.; Chatterjee, Archana; Ruiz, Gloria; Raghavan, Janaki; Bradshaw, Susan K.; Kartsonis, Nicholas A.; Sun, Peng; Strohmaier, Kim M.; Fallon, Marissa; Bi, Sheng; Stone, Julie A.; Chow, Joseph W.

    2009-01-01

    Candida infections represent a major threat in neonatal intensive care units. This is the first prospective study to obtain caspofungin plasma levels and safety data for neonates and very young infants. Patients of <3 months of age receiving intravenous amphotericin B for documented or highly suspected candidiasis were enrolled in a single-dose (n = 6) or subsequent multiple-dose (n = 12) panel; all received caspofungin at 25 mg/m2 once daily as a 1-hour infusion. Caspofungin plasma levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and compared to historical data from adults. Patient chronological ages ranged from 1 to 11 weeks, and weights ranged from 0.68 to 3.8 kg. Gestational ages ranged from 24 to 41 weeks. Geometric mean (GM) peak (C1 h) and trough (C24 h) caspofungin levels were 8.2 and 1.8 μg/ml, respectively, on day 1, and 11.1 and 2.4 μg/ml, respectively, on day 4. GM ratios for C1 h and C24 h for neonates/infants relative to adults receiving caspofungin at 50 mg/day were 1.07 and 1.36, respectively, on day 1, and 1.18 and 1.21, respectively, on day 4. Clinical and laboratory adverse events occurred in 17 (94%) and 8 (44%) patients, respectively. Five patients (28%) had serious adverse events, none of which were considered drug related. Caspofungin at 25 mg/m2 once daily was well tolerated in this group of neonates/infants of <3 months of age and appears to provide relatively similar plasma exposure to that obtained in adults receiving 50 mg/day. However, the small number of patients studied precludes any definitive recommendations about caspofungin dosing for this group comprising a broad range of ages and weights. PMID:19075070

  12. A Safety Index and Method for Flightdeck Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    2000-01-01

    If our goal is to improve safety through machine, interface, and training design, then we must define a metric of flightdeck safety that is usable in the design process. Current measures associated with our notions of "good" pilot performance and ultimate safety of flightdeck performance fail to provide an adequate index of safe flightdeck performance for design evaluation purposes. The goal of this research effort is to devise a safety index and method that allows us to evaluate flightdeck performance holistically and in a naturalistic experiment. This paper uses Reason's model of accident causation (1990) as a basis for measuring safety, and proposes a relational database system and method for 1) defining a safety index of flightdeck performance, and 2) evaluating the "safety" afforded by flightdeck performance for the purpose of design iteration. Methodological considerations, limitations, and benefits are discussed as well as extensions to this work.

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single enantiomer (+)-mefloquine compared with racemic mefloquine in healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Tansley, Robert; Lotharius, Julie; Priestley, Anthony; Bull, Fiona; Duparc, Stephan; Möhrle, Jörg

    2010-12-01

    Racemic mefloquine is a highly effective antimalarial whose clinical utility has been compromised by its association with neuropsychiatric and gastrointestinal side effects. It is hypothesized that the cause of the side effects may reside in the (-) enantiomer. We sought to compare the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile of (+)-mefloquine with racemic mefloquine in a randomized, ascending-dose, double-blind, active and placebo-controlled, parallel cohort study in healthy male and female adult volunteers. Although differing in its manifestations, both study drugs displayed a substantially worse tolerability profile compared with placebo. The systemic clearance was slower for (-)-mefloquine than (+)-mefloquine. Thus, (+)-mefloquine has a different safety and tolerability profile compared with racemic mefloquine but its global safety profile is not superior and replacement of the currently used antimalarial drug with (+)-mefloquine is not warranted.

  14. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  15. Evaluation of the Transport, In Vitro Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a Potent Hallucinogen

    PubMed Central

    Teksin, Zeynep S.; Lee, Insong J.; Nemieboka, Noble N.; Othman, Ahmed A.; Upreti, Vijay V.; Hassan, Hazem E.; Syed, Shariq S.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Eddington, Natalie D.

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A is an unregulated potent hallucinogen isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum. It is the only known non-nitrogenous kappa-opioid selective agonist and rivals synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in potency. This objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro transport, in vitro metabolism, and pharmacokinetic properties of Salvinorin A. The transport characteristics of Salvinorin A were assessed using MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affinity status was assessed by the P-gp ATPase assay. In vitro metabolism studies were performed with various specific human CYP450 isoforms and UGT2B7 to assess the metabolic characteristics of Salvinorin A. Cohorts (n=3) of male Sprague Dawley rats were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of Salvinorin A (10 mg/kg, intraperitonal (i.p.) over a 240 min period. A validated UV-HPLC and LC/MS/MS method was used to quantify the hallucinogen concentrations obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. Salvinorin A displayed a high secretory transport in the MDCK-MDR1 cells (4.07±1.34 × 10-5 cm/s). Salvinorin A also stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration (5-10 μm) dependent manner, suggesting that it may be a substrate of P-gp. A significant decrease in Salvinorin A concentration ranging from 14.7±0.80 % to 31.1±1.20 % was observed after incubation with CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2C18, and CYP2E1, respectively. A significant decrease was also observed after incubation with UGT2B7. These results suggest that Salvinorin A may be a substrate of UGT2B7, CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1 and CYP2C18. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed a relatively fast elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 75 min and a clearance (Cl/F) of 26 L/h/kg. The distribution was extensive (Vd of 47.1 L/kg), however the brain to plasma ratio was 0.050. Accordingly, the brain half life was relatively short, 36 min. Salvinorin A is rapidly eliminated after i.p. dosing

  16. Evaluation of the transport, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a potent hallucinogen.

    PubMed

    Teksin, Zeynep S; Lee, Insong J; Nemieboka, Noble N; Othman, Ahmed A; Upreti, Vijay V; Hassan, Hazem E; Syed, Shariq S; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Eddington, Natalie D

    2009-06-01

    Salvinorin A is an unregulated potent hallucinogen isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum. It is the only known non-nitrogenous kappa-opioid selective agonist, and rivals synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in potency. The objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro transport, in vitro metabolism, and pharmacokinetic properties of Salvinorin A. The transport characteristics of Salvinorin A were assessed using MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affinity status was assessed by the P-gp ATPase assay. In vitro metabolism studies were performed with various specific human CYP450 isoforms and UGT2B7 to assess the metabolic characteristics of Salvinorin A. Cohorts (n = 3) of male Sprague Dawley rats were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of Salvinorin A (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) over a 240-min period. A validated UV-HPLC and LC/MS/MS method was used to quantify the hallucinogen concentrations obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. Salvinorin A displayed a high secretory transport in the MDCK-MDR1 cells (4.07 +/- 1.34 x 10(-)5 cm/s). Salvinorin A also stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration (5 and 10 microM)-dependent manner, suggesting that it may be a substrate of (P-gp). A significant decrease in Salvinorin A concentration ranging from 14.7 +/- 0.80% to 31.1 +/- 1.20% was observed after incubation with CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2C18, and CYP2E1, respectively. A significant decrease was also observed after incubation with UGT2B7. These results suggest that Salvinorin A maybe a substrate of UGT2B7, CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP2C18. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed a relatively fast elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 75 min and a clearance (Cl/F) of 26 L/h/kg. The distribution was extensive (Vd of 47.1 L/kg); however, the brain to plasma ratio was 0.050. Accordingly, the brain half-life was relatively short, 36 min. Salvinorin A is rapidly eliminated

  17. Combination Pod-Intravaginal Ring Delivers Antiretroviral Agents for HIV Prophylaxis: Pharmacokinetic Evaluation in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John A.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Churchman, Scott A.; Gunawardana, Manjula; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S.; Yang, Flora; Easley, Jeremiah T.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV using oral regimens based on the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been effective to various degrees in multiple clinical trials, and the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (MVC) holds potential for complementary efficacy. The effectiveness of HIV PrEP is highly dependent on adherence. Incorporation of the TDF-MVC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described. The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety characteristics of a novel pod-IVR delivering a combination of TDF and MVC were evaluated in the ovine model. The device exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study and maintained steady-state drug levels in cervicovaginal fluids (CVFs). Dilution of CVFs during lavage sample collection was measured by ion chromatography using an inert tracer, allowing corrected drug concentrations to be measured for the first time. Median, steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissue homogenate were as follows: for tenofovir (TFV; in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF), 7.3 × 102 ng g−1 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0 × 102, 4.0 × 103); for TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP; active metabolite of TFV), 1.8 × 104 fmol g−1 (IQR, 1.5 × 104, 4.8 × 104); and for MVC, 8.2 × 102 ng g−1 (IQR, 4.7 × 102, 2.0 × 103). No adverse events were observed. These findings, together with previous pod-IVR studies, have allowed several lead candidates to advance into clinical evaluation. PMID:27067321

  18. Grepafloxacin: an overview of antibacterial activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Geddes, A M

    1999-04-01

    chronic bronchitis (ABECB), 7-10 days treatment with o.d. grepafloxacin 400 mg or 600 mg has been shown to be equivalent to that with either t.i.d. amoxycillin 500 mg, or b.i.d. ciprofloxacin 500 mg. In patients with a documented bacterial pathogen, microbiological success with both grepafloxacin dosage regimens was superior to amoxycillin 500 mg t.i.d. In addition, short course treatment of ABECB with 400 mg of grepafloxacin given o.d. for five days has been shown to be as effective, clinically and microbiologically as a ten-day course of the same dose. The safety profile of grepafloxacin has been well-characterised from data from over 12,000 patients treated in Phase II/III and post-marketing studies, and over 400,000 patients treated worldwide in routine clinical practice. The most commonly reported adverse events are gastrointestinal, mainly nausea and unpleasant taste. The potential for photosensitivity and central nervous system effects is low, and there have been no reports of convulsions. No unique or unexpected.

  19. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  20. Efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of a novel human immune globulin subcutaneous, 20%: a Phase 2/3 study in Europe in patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Borte, M.; Kriván, G.; Derfalvi, B.; Maródi, L.; Harrer, T.; Jolles, S.; Bourgeois, C.; Engl, W.; Leibl, H.; McCoy, B.; Gelmont, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A highly concentrated (20%) immunoglobulin (Ig)G preparation for subcutaneous administration (IGSC 20%), would offer a new option for antibody replacement therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IGSC 20% were evaluated in a prospective trial in Europe in 49 patients with PIDD aged 2–67 years. Over a median of 358 days, patients received 2349 IGSC 20% infusions at monthly doses equivalent to those administered for previous intravenous or subcutaneous IgG treatment. The rate of validated acute bacterial infections (VASBIs) was significantly lower than 1 per year (0·022/patient‐year, P < 0·0001); the rate of all infections was 4·38/patient‐year. Median trough IgG concentrations were ≥ 8 g/l. There was no serious adverse event (AE) deemed related to IGSC 20% treatment; related non‐serious AEs occurred at a rate of 0·101 event/infusion. The incidence of local related AEs was 0·069 event/infusion (0·036 event/infusion, when excluding a 13‐year‐old patient who reported 79 of 162 total related local AEs). The incidence of related systemic AEs was 0·032 event/infusion. Most related AEs were mild, none were severe. For 64·6% of patients and in 94·8% of IGSC 20% infusions, no local related AE occurred. The median infusion duration was 0·95 (range = 0·3‐4·1) h using mainly one to two administration sites [median = 2 sites (range = 1–5)]. Almost all infusions (99·8%) were administered without interruption/stopping or rate reduction. These results demonstrate that IGSC 20% provides an effective and well‐tolerated therapy for patients previously on intravenous or subcutaneous treatment, without the need for dose adjustment. PMID:27613250

  1. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, following multiple ascending subcutaneous administrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau, Martin; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Shaw, Paula; Cyran, Jane; Kesavan, Jothi; Wallens, John; Zahir, Hamim; Wells, David; Caminis, John

    2008-11-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of short-bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide in healthy subjects (N = 64) were assessed following daily subcutaneous administrations for 8 days in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose study. Teduglutide treatments were administered as a 50-mg/mL (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, and 80 mg) or 20-mg/mL (20 mg) formulation. Blood samples were collected on days 1 and 8, and plasma concentrations of teduglutide were measured using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method. Mean systemic exposures to teduglutide were very similar on days 1 and 8, suggesting minimal, if any, accumulation following once-daily repeated administrations. The apparent clearance of teduglutide following administration of the 50-mg/mL formulation was constant over the dose range, with mean values in male and female subjects of 0.155 and 0.159 L/h/kg, respectively. Peak plasma concentrations and total exposure of teduglutide after subcutaneous injection of a 20-mg/mL formulation (1.0 mL) were approximately 15% and 78% higher than those observed with the 50-mg/mL formulation (0.4 mL), respectively. Teduglutide treatments were safe and well tolerated. All but 1 adverse event was assessed as mild or moderate in severity. No relationship between teduglutide treatments and frequency of adverse events was observed, with the exception of injection site pain, which increased as a function of dose and injected volume. Results from the current study will assist in the dose selection in future efficacy studies.

  2. Efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of a novel human immune globulin subcutaneous, 20%: a Phase 2/3 study in Europe in patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Borte, M; Kriván, G; Derfalvi, B; Maródi, L; Harrer, T; Jolles, S; Bourgeois, C; Engl, W; Leibl, H; McCoy, B; Gelmont, D; Yel, L

    2017-01-01

    A highly concentrated (20%) immunoglobulin (Ig)G preparation for subcutaneous administration (IGSC 20%), would offer a new option for antibody replacement therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IGSC 20% were evaluated in a prospective trial in Europe in 49 patients with PIDD aged 2-67 years. Over a median of 358 days, patients received 2349 IGSC 20% infusions at monthly doses equivalent to those administered for previous intravenous or subcutaneous IgG treatment. The rate of validated acute bacterial infections (VASBIs) was significantly lower than 1 per year (0·022/patient-year, P < 0·0001); the rate of all infections was 4·38/patient-year. Median trough IgG concentrations were ≥ 8 g/l. There was no serious adverse event (AE) deemed related to IGSC 20% treatment; related non-serious AEs occurred at a rate of 0·101 event/infusion. The incidence of local related AEs was 0·069 event/infusion (0·036 event/infusion, when excluding a 13-year-old patient who reported 79 of 162 total related local AEs). The incidence of related systemic AEs was 0·032 event/infusion. Most related AEs were mild, none were severe. For 64·6% of patients and in 94·8% of IGSC 20% infusions, no local related AE occurred. The median infusion duration was 0·95 (range = 0·3-4·1) h using mainly one to two administration sites [median = 2 sites (range = 1-5)]. Almost all infusions (99·8%) were administered without interruption/stopping or rate reduction. These results demonstrate that IGSC 20% provides an effective and well-tolerated therapy for patients previously on intravenous or subcutaneous treatment, without the need for dose adjustment.

  3. Nose-to-brain transport of imatinib mesylate: A pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hada, Nobuko; Netzer, William Joseph; Belhassan, Fanny; Wennogle, Lawrence Paul; Gizurarson, Sveinbjörn

    2017-02-24

    The delivery of drugs to the brain is a constant challenge due to limitations imposed by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Various methods of bypassing the BBB are under investigation. One approach is intranasal administration, where the olfactory region of the nasal cavity extends up to the cranial cavity and provides direct access to the brain. The pharmacokinetics of this transport and factors that determine transport rates and capacity is of vital importance for evaluating the clinical value of this route. Here, the pharmacokinetics of intranasally administered imatinib has been explored. Imatinib is distributed into the brain following intravenous administration, and then rapidly removed. Following intravenous administration, the brain/plasma ratio for imatinib was calculated to be 2% and remained at this ratio for 30min. The brain/plasma ratio following intranasal administration, however, was found to be 5.3% and remained at this ratio for up to 90min. Imatinib was found to be rapidly transported into the brain via the olfactory region, by shutting down the nose-to-blood-to-brain transport with epinephrine. The increased brain concentration of imatinib (0.33μg/g tissue) achieved by intranasal administration, compared with an IV injection, is likely to provide a model for developing a wide range of CNS active molecules that were previously removed from consideration as drug candidates due to their lack of CNS access. Furthermore, brain imatinib levels were increased by co-administration of the p-gp substrates, elacridar and pantoprazole, showing that both compounds were able to inhibit the elimination of imatinib from the brain.

  4. Candesartan cilexetil loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for oral delivery: characterization, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dudhipala, Narendar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Candesartan cilexetil (CC) is used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. It has poor aqueous solubility and low oral bioavailability. In this work, CC loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (CC-SLNs) were developed to improve the oral bioavailability. Components of the SLNs include either of trimyristin/tripalmitin/tristearin, and surfactants (Poloxamer 188 and egg lecithin E80). The CC loaded nanoparticles were prepared by hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication method. The physicochemical properties, morphology of CC-SLNs were characterized, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behaviour of CC-SLNs were evaluated in rats. Stable CC-SLNs having a mean particle size of 180-220 nm with entrapment efficiency varying in between 91-96% were developed. The physical stability of optimized formulation was studied at refrigerated and room temperature for 3 months. Further, freeze drying was tried for improving the physical stability. DSC and XRD analyses indicated that the drug incorporated into SLN was in amorphous form but not in crystalline state. The SLN-morphology was found to be nearly spherical by electron microscopic studies. Pharmacokinetic results indicated that the oral bioavailability of CC was improved over 2.75-fold after incorporation into SLNs. Pharmacodynamic study of SLNs in hypertensive rats showed a decrease in systolic blood pressure for 48 h, while suspension showed a decrease in systolic blood pressure for only 2 h. Taken together, these effects are due to enhanced bioavailability coupled with sustained action of CC in SLN formulation. Thus, the results conclusively demonstrated the role of CC-SLNs for a significant enhancement in oral bioavailability along with improved pharmacodynamic effect.

  5. Single-dose pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator BAY 63-2521: an ascending-dose study in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Mück, Wolfgang; Unger, Sigrun; Artmeier-Brandt, Ulrike; Weimann, Gerrit; Wensing, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of BAY 63-2521, a new drug in development for pulmonary hypertension. Fifty-eight healthy male volunteers received a single oral dose of BAY 63-2521 (0.25-5 mg) or placebo. No serious adverse events were reported; there were no life-threatening events. Heart rate over 1 minute, an indicator of the effect of a vasodilating agent on the cardiovascular system in healthy subjects, was increased dose dependently versus placebo at BAY 63-2521 doses of 1 to 5 mg (P < .01). Mean arterial and diastolic pressures were decreased versus placebo at doses of 1 mg (P < .05) and 5 mg (P < .01). Systolic pressure was not significantly affected. BAY 63-2521 was readily absorbed and exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of BAY 63-2521 suggest that it can offer a unique mode of action in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  6. 78 FR 47010 - Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Technical Specifications Task Force Traveler... requesting public comment on the proposed model safety evaluation (SE) for plant- specific adoption of... ADAMS Accession Number ML13053A075. The proposed model SE for plant-specific adoption of...

  7. Clinical impact of concomitant immunomodulators on biologic therapy: Pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenhua; Davis, Hugh M; Zhou, Honghui

    2015-03-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases encompass a variety of different clinical syndromes, manifesting as either common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and psoriasis, or rare diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. The therapy for these diseases often involves the use of a wide range of drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, immunomodulators, and biologic therapies. Due to the abundance of relevant clinical data, this article provides a general overview on the clinical impact of the concomitant use of immunomodulators and biologic therapies, with a focus on anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents (anti-TNFα), for the treatment of RA and Crohn's disease (CD). Compared to biologic monotherapy, concomitant use of immunomodulators (methotrexate, azathioprine, and 6-mercaptopurine) often increases the systemic exposure of the anti-TNFα agent and decreases the formation of antibodies to the anti-TNFα agent, consequently enhancing clinical efficacy. Nevertheless, long-term combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents may be associated with increased risks of serious infections and malignancies. Therefore, the determination whether combination therapy is suitable for a patient should always be based on an individualized benefit-risk evaluation. More research should be undertaken to identify and validate prognostic markers for predicting patients who would benefit the most and those who are at greater risk from combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents.

  8. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Intravaginal Rings Delivering Tenofovir in Pig-Tailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John A.; Malone, Amanda M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Cortez, Cassandra; Gilman, Joshua; Kennedy, Sean; Kopin, Etana; Nguyen, Cali; Sinha, Preetha; Hendry, R. Michael; Guenthner, Patricia; Holder, Angela; Martin, Amy; McNicholl, Janet; Mitchell, James; Pau, Chou-Pong; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral-based microbicides applied topically to the vagina may play an important role in protecting women from HIV infection. Incorporation of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir (TFV) into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery may lead to increased microbicide product adherence and efficacy compared with those of conventional vaginal formulations. Formulations of a novel “pod IVR” platform spanning a range of IVR drug loadings and daily release rates of TFV were evaluated in a pig-tailed macaque model. The rings were safe and exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over 28 days. Vaginal secretion TFV levels were independent of IVR drug loading and were able to be varied over 1.5 log units by changing the ring configuration. Mean TFV levels in vaginal secretions were 72.4 ± 109 μg ml−1 (slow releasing) and 1.84 ± 1.97 mg ml−1 (fast releasing). The mean TFV vaginal tissue concentration from the slow-releasing IVRs was 76.4 ± 54.8 μg g−1 and remained at steady state 7 days after IVR removal, consistent with the long intracellular half-life of TFV. Intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP), the active moiety in defining efficacy, was measured in vaginal lymphocytes collected in the study using the fast-releasing IVR formulation. Mean intracellular TFV-DP levels of 446 ± 150 fmol/106 cells fall within a range that may be protective of simian-human immunodeficiency virus strain SF162p3 (SHIVSF162p3) infection in nonhuman primates. These data suggest that TFV-releasing IVRs based on the pod design have potential for the prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and merit further clinical investigation. PMID:22964245

  9. Safety and pharmacokinetics of intravaginal rings delivering tenofovir in pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Moss, John A; Malone, Amanda M; Smith, Thomas J; Butkyavichene, Irina; Cortez, Cassandra; Gilman, Joshua; Kennedy, Sean; Kopin, Etana; Nguyen, Cali; Sinha, Preetha; Hendry, R Michael; Guenthner, Patricia; Holder, Angela; Martin, Amy; McNicholl, Janet; Mitchell, James; Pau, Chou-Pong; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James M; Baum, Marc M

    2012-11-01

    Antiretroviral-based microbicides applied topically to the vagina may play an important role in protecting women from HIV infection. Incorporation of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir (TFV) into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery may lead to increased microbicide product adherence and efficacy compared with those of conventional vaginal formulations. Formulations of a novel "pod IVR" platform spanning a range of IVR drug loadings and daily release rates of TFV were evaluated in a pig-tailed macaque model. The rings were safe and exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over 28 days. Vaginal secretion TFV levels were independent of IVR drug loading and were able to be varied over 1.5 log units by changing the ring configuration. Mean TFV levels in vaginal secretions were 72.4 ± 109 μg ml(-1) (slow releasing) and 1.84 ± 1.97 mg ml(-1) (fast releasing). The mean TFV vaginal tissue concentration from the slow-releasing IVRs was 76.4 ± 54.8 μg g(-1) and remained at steady state 7 days after IVR removal, consistent with the long intracellular half-life of TFV. Intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP), the active moiety in defining efficacy, was measured in vaginal lymphocytes collected in the study using the fast-releasing IVR formulation. Mean intracellular TFV-DP levels of 446 ± 150 fmol/10(6) cells fall within a range that may be protective of simian-human immunodeficiency virus strain SF162p3 (SHIV(SF162p3)) infection in nonhuman primates. These data suggest that TFV-releasing IVRs based on the pod design have potential for the prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and merit further clinical investigation.

  10. Preparation of codeine-resinate and chlorpheniramine-resinate sustained-release suspension and its pharmacokinetic evaluation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huan-Xiang; Cheng, Gang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhong, Guo-Ping; Huang, Min

    2007-06-01

    the release rate of both drugs. But the release of codeine from its resinate beads was much more rapid than chlorpheniramine released from its resinate beads in the same ionic strength release medium. The drug release specification of the CCSS, where release mediums were 0.05 M KCl solution for codeine and 0.5 M KCl solution for chlorpheniramine, was established to be in conformance with in vivo performance. Relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the CCSS, using commercial immediate-release tablets as the reference preparation, were performed following a randomized two-way crossover design in beagle dogs. The drug concentrations in plasma were measured by a validated LC-MS/MS method to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of CCSS. This LC-MS/MS method demonstrated high accuracy and precision for bioanalysis, and was proved quick and reliable for the pharmacokinetic studies. The results showed that the CCSS had the longer value of Tmax and the lower value of Cmax, which meant an obviously sustained release effect, and its relative bioavailability of codeine and chlorpheniramine were (103.6 +/- 14.6)% and (98.1 +/- 10.3)%, respectively, compared with the reference preparation. These findings indicated that a novel liquid sustained release suspension made by using IERs as carriers and subsequent fluidized bed coating might provide a constant plasma level of the active pharmaceutical ingredient being highly beneficial for various therapeutic reasons.

  11. Daptomycin versus Vancomycin in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Endophthalmitis Rabbit Model: Bactericidal Effect, Safety, and Ocular Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maher; Marcellin, Luc; Subilia, Audrey; Bourcier, Tristan; Prévost, Gilles; Jehl, François

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of acute endophthalmitis, and infection with this virulent bacterium is often associated with a poor visual outcome. In this study, we investigated the bactericidal efficacy and the safety of intravitreal daptomycin (DAP), a lipopeptide antibiotic with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive bacteria, compared with those of intravitreal vancomycin (VAN) in a methicillin-resistant S. aureus endophthalmitis rabbit model. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of daptomycin in the infected eyes were also studied. Rabbits were randomly divided into three treatment groups (n = 8) and one untreated group (n = 4), to compare the effect of single intravitreal injections of 0.2 mg and 1 mg of daptomycin (DAP 0.2 and DAP 1 groups, respectively) with that of 1 mg of intravitreal vancomycin (VAN 1 group). Vitreal aspirates were regularly collected and grading of ocular inflammation was regularly performed until euthanasia on day 7. In the DAP 0.2 group, 62.5% of the eyes were sterilized and the mean bacterial count presented a reduction of 1 log unit. In the DAP 1 and VAN 1 groups, the infection was eradicated (100% and 87.5% of eyes sterilized, respectively), with a 4-log-unit reduction of the mean bacterial count. The bactericidal efficacy in the DAP 1 group was not inferior to that in the VAN 1 group and was superior to that of the other regimens in limiting the ocular inflammation and preserving the architecture of the ocular structures (P < 0.05). The elimination half-life (t1/2β) of daptomycin was independent of the administered dose (38.8 ± 16.5 h and 40.9 ± 6.7 h, respectively, for the DAP 0.2 and DAP 1 groups) and was significantly longer than the t1/2β of vancomycin (20.5 ± 2.0 h for the VAN 1 group) (P < 0.05). This antibiotic could therefore be considered for the treatment of intraocular infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22371888

  12. [Post-marketing re-evaluation about usage and dosage of Chinese medicine based on human population pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junjie; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are determined by rigorous evaluation which include four clinical trail stages: I, II, III. But the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are lacked re-evaluation after marketing. And this lead to unchanging or fixed of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine instead of different quantity based on different situations in individual patients. The situation of Chinese patent medicine used in clinical application is far away from the idea of the "Treatment based on syndrome differentiation" in traditional Chinese medicine and personalized therapy. Human population pharmacokinetics provides data support to the personalized therapy in clinical application, and achieved the postmarking reevaluating of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine. This paper briefly introduced the present situation, significance and the application of human population pharmacokinetics about re-evaluation of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine after marketing.

  13. First‐in‐human study assessing safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of BI 409306, a selective phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitor, in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Katja; Feifel, Ulrich; Hoch, Anja; Zimdahl‐Gelling, Heike; Sand, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, dose proportionality and relative bioavailability of tablet and oral solution formulations of BI 409306 in healthy male subjects, and to compare the safety and pharmacokinetics in subjects who were extensive metabolizers (EMs) or poor metabolizers (PMs) of cytochrome P450 (CYP)‐2C19. Methods The present randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, single‐centre study evaluated single rising doses of BI 409306 (0.5–500 mg) administered as a tablet or oral solution to EMs or PMs. Results Of 80 enrolled subjects (mean age 36.7 years), 79 (CYP2C19 EMs, 71; CYP2C19 PMs, eight) received treatment and completed the study. Adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate in intensity. Overall, 17/71 (23.9%) EMs and 6/8 (75.0%) PMs experienced 28 and eight AEs, respectively, of which, 25 and seven AEs, respectively, were considered to be drug related. The most frequently reported AEs were nervous system and eye disorders; all occurred shortly (20–30 min) after administration and mostly resolved within 1–2 h. No serious AEs occurred. BI 409306 systemic absorption and elimination were rapid; peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached <1 h after drug administration, and the half‐life ranged from 0.99 h to 2.71 h. Both the tablet and oral solution resulted in similar exposures. In PMs, at dose levels of 10 mg and 100 mg, Cmax was 2.2–2.3‐fold higher, and the area under the plasma concentration–time curve over the time interval 0 extrapolated to infinity was 4.1–5.0‐fold higher compared with EMs. Conclusions In healthy male subjects, BI 409306 was generally safe and well tolerated, with rapid absorption and elimination. Systemic exposure was higher in CYP2C19 PMs than EMs at the same dose level. PMID:27378314

  14. [Safety evaluation of Chinese medicine on tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Hua, Bao-Jin; Li, Jie

    2013-12-01

    As a characteristic tumor therapy in China, Chinese medicine (CM) plays an important position in comprehensive treatment of tumor. It's a critical issue of objective realization, analysis and evaluation of CM safety for scientific decision-making in tumor safe medication and it also is a pivotal issue which affects the international communication. The safety evaluation of CM includes three phases: pre-clinical safety evaluation, clinical trials (micro-dose studies and traditional clinical trials) and post-marketing CM safety assessment. The key point of evaluation should be distinguished among different stages and various types of CM (such as classic formulas, Chinese herbal extracts, etc). Emphasis should be given to chronic toxicity when evaluating oral Chinese herbal , microdose studies and quality control must be underlined while injection is evaluated and more attention should be pay to the dose-effect relationship and time-effect relationship when turned to toxic Chinese medicine , and so as for the toxicity grading study. Moreover, we should constantly improve CM safety assessment method in various stages of tumor treatment, such as introducing the concept of syndrome classification theory, bringing in metabonomics and real-world research method which are similar to the CM therapeutic concept. Most importantly, we must keep its own feature of CM theory when we learn the concept of safety evaluation from abroad. Actively exploring the anti-tumor medicine safety evaluation methods and strategies is of great significance for clinical and experimental research, and it can provide supportability platform to CM's international communication.

  15. The evaluation of the safety benefits of combined passive and on-board active safety applications.

    PubMed

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006-2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectiveness of the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries.

  16. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectivenessof the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  17. Effect of severe renal impairment on umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol pharmacokinetics and safety: a single-blind, nonrandomized study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rashmi; Hardes, Kelly; Brealey, Noushin; Tombs, Lee; Preece, Andrew; Kelleher, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Background Umeclidinium and vilanterol, long-acting bronchodilators for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are primarily eliminated via the hepatic route; however, severe renal impairment may adversely affect some elimination pathways other than the kidney. Objectives To evaluate the effect of severe renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol. Methods Nine patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min) and nine matched healthy volunteers received a single dose of umeclidinium 125 μg; and after a 7- to 14-day washout, a single dose of umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg. Results No clinically relevant increases in plasma umeclidinium or vilanterol systemic exposure (area under the curve or maximum observed plasma concentration) were observed following umeclidinium 125 μg or umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration. On average, the amount of umeclidinium excreted in 24 hours in urine (90% confidence interval) was 88% (81%–93%) and 89% (81%–93%) lower in patients with severe renal impairment compared with healthy volunteers following umeclidinium 125 μg and umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration, respectively. Treatments were well tolerated in both populations. Conclusion Umeclidinium 125 μg or umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration to patients with severe renal impairment did not demonstrate clinically relevant increases in systemic exposure compared with healthy volunteers. No dose adjustment for umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol is warranted in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:25565796

  18. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a novel recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Negrier, Claude; Klamroth, Robert; Tiede, Andreas; Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Voigt, Christine; Jacobs, Iris; Morfini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX (FIX) with human albumin (rIX-FP) has been developed to facilitate hemophilia B treatment by less frequent FIX dosing. This first-in-human dose-escalation trial in 25 previously treated subjects with hemophilia B (FIX ≤ 2 IU/dL) examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of 25, 50, and 75 IU/kg rIX-FP. Patients in the 50-IU/kg cohort underwent a comparative pharmacokinetics assessment with their previous FIX product (plasma-derived or recombinant). No allergic reactions or inhibitors were observed. Four mild, possibly treatment-related adverse events were reported. In the 50-IU/kg cohort (13 subjects), the mean half-life of rIX-FP was 92 hours, more than 5 times longer than the subjects' previous FIX product. After 25 or 50 IU/kg rIX-FP administration, the baseline-corrected mean FIX activity remained elevated at day 7 (7.4 IU/dL and 13.4 IU/dL, respectively) and day 14 (2.5 IU/dL and 5.5 IU/dL, respectively). The incremental recovery of rIX-FP was higher than both recombinant and plasma-derived FIX (1.4 vs 0.95 and 1.1 IU/dL per IU/kg, respectively). These results demonstrated both the safety and improved pharmacokinetics of rIX-FP, thus indicating this new product with extended half-life as possibly able to control and prevent bleeding with less frequent injection. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01233440. PMID:22859609

  19. Methods and software tools for design evaluation in population pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Joakim; Bazzoli, Caroline; Ogungbenro, Kay; Aliev, Alexander; Leonov, Sergei; Duffull, Stephen; Hooker, Andrew C; Mentré, France

    2015-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models are increasingly used in drug development and in academic research; hence, designing efficient studies is an important task. Following the first theoretical work on optimal design for nonlinear mixed-effects models, this research theme has grown rapidly. There are now several different software tools that implement an evaluation of the Fisher information matrix for population PKPD. We compared and evaluated the following five software tools: PFIM, PkStaMp, PopDes, PopED and POPT. The comparisons were performed using two models, a simple-one compartment warfarin PK model and a more complex PKPD model for pegylated interferon, with data on both concentration and response of viral load of hepatitis C virus. The results of the software were compared in terms of the standard error (SE) values of the parameters predicted from the software and the empirical SE values obtained via replicated clinical trial simulation and estimation. For the warfarin PK model and the pegylated interferon PKPD model, all software gave similar results. Interestingly, it was seen, for all software, that the simpler approximation to the Fisher information matrix, using the block diagonal matrix, provided predicted SE values that were closer to the empirical SE values than when the more complicated approximation was used (the full matrix). For most PKPD models, using any of the available software tools will provide meaningful results, avoiding cumbersome simulation and allowing design optimization.

  20. Criticality safety benchmark evaluation project: Recovering the past

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, E.F.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of the Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company is provided in this paper. The purpose of the project is to provide a source of evaluated criticality safety experiments in an easily usable format. Another project goal is to search for any experiments that may have been lost or contain discrepancies, and to determine if they can be used. Results of evaluated experiments are being published as US DOE handbooks.

  1. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  2. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermal Generator, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  3. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  4. Evaluation of a Personal Safety Program with Latino Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Maureen C.; Wurtele, Sandy K.; Alonso, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a personal safety educational program designed for Latino families attending preschools in a large metropolis. Seventy-eight children who participated in the Kids Learning About Safety program were compared to 45 control children. Compared with controls, participating children demonstrated enhanced ability to recognize…

  5. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Quick-Dissolving Polymeric Vaginal Films Delivering the Antiretroviral IQP-0528 for Preexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Priya; Zhang, Jining; Martin, Amy; Kelley, Kristin; McNicholl, Janet M.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Smith, James M.

    2016-01-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, microbicides or drugs delivered as quick-dissolving films may be more acceptable to women than gels because of their compact size, minimal waste, lack of an applicator, and easier storage and transport. This has the potential to improve adherence to promising products for preexposure prophylaxis. Vaginal films containing IQP-0528, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, were evaluated for their pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Polymeric films (22 by 44 by 0.1 mm; providing 75% of a human dose) containing IQP-0528 (1.5%, wt/wt) with and without poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle encapsulation were inserted vaginally into pigtailed macaques in a crossover study design (n = 6). With unencapsulated drug, the median (range) vaginal fluid concentrations of IQP-0528 were 160.97 (2.73 to 2,104), 181.79 (1.86 to 15,800), and 484.50 (8.26 to 4,045) μg/ml at 1, 4, and 24 h after film application, respectively. Median vaginal tissue IQP-0528 concentrations at 24 h were 3.10 (0.03 to 222.58) μg/g. The values were similar at locations proximal, medial, and distal to the cervix. The IQP-0528 nanoparticle-formulated films delivered IQP-0528 in vaginal tissue and secretions at levels similar to those obtained with the unencapsulated formulation. A single application of either formulation did not disturb the vaginal microflora or the pH (7.24 ± 0.84 [mean ± standard deviation]). The high mucosal IQP-0528 levels delivered by both vaginal film formulations were between 1 and 5 log higher than the in vitro 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) of 0.146 μg/ml. The excellent coverage and high mucosal levels of IQP-0528, well above the IC90, suggest that the films may be protective and warrant further evaluation in a vaginal repeated low dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) transmission study in macaques and clinically in women. PMID:27139475

  6. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed ...

  7. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed t...

  8. Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  9. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a 1,3-dicyclohexylurea nanosuspension formulation to support early efficacy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlstrom, Jan L.; Chiang, Po-Chang; Ghosh, Sarbani; Warren, Chad J.; Wene, Steve P.; Albin, Lesley A.; Smith, Mark E.; Roberds, Steven L.

    2007-06-01

    Time and resource constraints necessitate increasingly early decisions to advance or halt pre-clinical drug discovery programs. Early discovery or “tool” compounds may be potent inhibitors of new targets, but all too often they exhibit poor pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties that make early assessment of in vivo efficacy difficult. 1,3-Dicyclohexylurea, a potent and selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), reduces blood pressure in hypertensive preclinical animal models when administered intraperitoneally using DMSO/corn oil as a delivery vehicle. However, the poor aqueous solubility of DCU poses a challenge for in vivo dosing in a multiple dose situation. Therefore, we developed a nanosuspension formulation of DCU to support oral, intravenous bolus and intravenous infusion dosing. Use of the nanosuspension formulation maintained DCU free plasma levels above the sEH IC50 and demonstrated that the application of formulation technology can accelerate in vivo evaluation of new targets by enabling pharmacodynamic studies of poorly soluble compounds.

  10. Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluations of novel ternary solid dispersion of rebamipide with poloxamer 407.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Tung, Nguyen-Thach; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Tack-Oon; Ha, Jung-Myung; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Park, Eun-Seok

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted primarily to improve the solubility of rebamipide, a poorly water-soluble anti-ulcer drug, using novel ternary solid dispersion (SD) systems and secondly to evaluate the effect of solubility enhancement on its pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profile. After dissolving the three components in aqueous medium, ternary SD containing the drug, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and PVP-VA 64 was achieved by spray drying method, which was used as primary SD. Poloxamer 407, a surfactant polymer, was incorporated in this primary SD by four different methods: co-grinding, physical mixing, melting or spray drying. SD was then characterized by dissolution test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The spray dried SD of poloxamer 407 together with primary SD displayed highest dissolution rate of the drug of about 70% after 2 h. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR characterized the amorphous state and molecular dispersion of the drug in the SD. PK and PD studies in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that the bioavailability of the drug using optimal SD was about twofold higher than that of reference product, and the irritation area of stomach was significantly reduced in the ulcer-induced rat model using optimal SD as compared to the reference product.

  11. Nonpolymeric nanoassemblies for ocular administration of acyclovir: pharmacokinetic evaluation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stella, Barbara; Arpicco, Silvia; Rocco, Flavio; Burgalassi, Susi; Nicosia, Nadia; Tampucci, Silvia; Chetoni, Patrizia; Cattel, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase bioavailability of the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) when administered by the ocular route. For this purpose, a new lipophilic derivative of acyclovir was synthesized, both possessing greater lipophilicity and providing the formation of a homogeneous water dispersion with higher amount of ACV than the aqueous solution of the parent drug. This was done by chemically linking acyclovir to the isoprenoid chain of squalene, obtaining 4'-trisnorsqualenoylacyclovir (SQACV), in which squalene is covalently coupled to the 4'-hydroxy group of acyclovir. This new prodrug was then formulated as nonpolymeric nanoassemblies through nanoprecipitation; the resulting particles were characterized in terms of mean diameter, zeta potential, and stability. The pharmacokinetic profile of the prodrug in the tear fluid and in the aqueous humor of rabbits was evaluated and compared to that of the parent drug. Data showed that SQACV nanoassemblies increased the amount of ACV in the aqueous humor of rabbits compared to free ACV solution. This new amphiphilic prodrug of acyclovir is a very promising tool to increase the ocular bioavailability of the parent drug.

  12. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of tobramycin DPI formulations in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; Goole, Jonathan; Van Gansbeke, Bernard; Blocklet, Didier; Knoop, Christiane; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2008-02-01

    Tobramycin dry powder formulations were evaluated by gamma scintigraphy and pharmacokinetic methods. In an open single-dose, three-treatment, three-period, cross-over study, nine cystic fibrosis patients received both the two test products and the reference product Tobi (nebulizer solution) in order to assess lung deposition and systemic comparative bioavailability of the two investigational inhaled products versus the marketed inhaled comparator product. The percentage of dose (mean+/-SD) in the whole lung was 53.0+/-10.0% for the tobramycin Form 1, 34.1+/-12.4% for the tobramycin Form 2 and 7.6+/-2.7% for the comparator product Tobi. Lung deposition expressed as a percentage of the nominal dose was thus estimated to be 7.0 and 4.5 times higher for the Tobra Form 1 and Tobra Form 2 than for the Tobi, respectively. Furthermore, the systemic bioavailability (adjusted to correspond to the same drug dose as that of the comparator product deposited in the lung) was found to be 1.6 times higher for the comparator product Tobi than for the two DPI formulations. The principal advantages of the DPI formulations include reduced systemic availability and thus, side effects, and higher dose levels of the drug at the site of drug action.

  13. Linear pharmacokinetic models for evaluating unusual work schedules, exposure limits and body burdens of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.E.

    1988-05-01

    The adverse effects of workplace exposures to pollutants relate more accurately to the concentrations of pollutants in the body than in the environment. In many cases pharmacokinetic models may represent the external to internal concentration relationships with useful accuracy. Simplified equations are presented for stepwise calculations on a series of time-averaged, external concentrations to give a corresponding series of internal concentrations. Accurate results were obtained for averaging times not exceeding one-fourth of the biological half-life of the pollutant. A convenient measure of internal concentration is the external concentration that would be at in vivo equilibrium with it (termed biologically effective concentration). Three measures of damage burden are proposed, each appropriate for different toxic mechanisms. The calculations readily may be carried out on a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Illustrative examples show how unusual work schedules may be compared with an 8 hr/day, 5 days/week schedule and how appropriate short- and long-term exposure limits may be determined. Other examples, illustrated for lead, relate absorbed mass rates to body concentrations and body burdens in a two-compartment kinetic model. These calculations should provide a more accurate evaluation of fluctuating concentrations, which can be handled easily.

  14. Influence Map Methodology for Evaluating Systemic Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    "Raising the bar" in safety performance is a critical challenge for many organizations, including Kennedy Space Center. Contributing-factor taxonomies organize information about the reasons accidents occur and therefore are essential elements of accident investigations and safety reporting systems. Organizations must balance efforts to identify causes of specific accidents with efforts to evaluate systemic safety issues in order to become more proactive about improving safety. This project successfully addressed the following two problems: (1) methods and metrics to support the design of effective taxonomies are limited and (2) influence relationships among contributing factors are not explicitly modeled within a taxonomy.

  15. Hyperspectral and multispectral imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral imaging technologies have been developed rapidly during the past decade. This paper presents hyperspectral and multispectral imaging technologies in the area of food safety and quality evaluation, with an introduction, demonstration, and summarization of the spectral imaging techniques avai...

  16. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wacheck, Volker; Lahn, Michael; Dickinson, Gemma; Füreder, Wolfgang; Meyer, Renata; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Füreder, Thorsten; Dorfner, Georg; Pillay, Sada; André, Valérie; Burkholder, Timothy P; Akunda, Jacqueline K; Flye-Blakemore, Leann; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Schlenk, Richard F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in chemotherapy-refractory patients. A first-in-human dose study was designed to investigate a safe and biologically effective dose range for LY2457546, a novel multikinase inhibitor, in patients with relapsed AML. Methods: In this nonrandomized, open-label, dose escalation Phase I study, LY2457546 was administered orally once a day. Safety, pharmacokinetics, changes in phosphorylation of target kinases in AML blasts, and risk of drug–drug interactions (DDI) were assessed. Results: Five patients were treated at the starting and predicted minimal biologically effective dose of 50 mg/day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81%) were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3), which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients. Conclusion: No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile. PMID:21625399

  17. Application of pharmacometric approaches to evaluate effect of weight and renal function on pharmacokinetics of alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Himanshu; Czerniak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of alogliptin in healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects using a population PK approach and to assess the influence of various covariates on alogliptin exposure. Methods Plasma concentration data collected from two phase 1 studies and one phase 3 study following administration of alogliptin (12.5–400 mg) were used for the PK model development. One‐ and two‐compartment models were evaluated as base structural PK models. The impact of selected covariates was assessed using stepwise forward selection and backward elimination procedures. The predictability and robustness of the final model was evaluated using visual predictive check and bootstrap analyses. The final model was used to perform simulations and guide appropriate dose adjustments. Results A two‐compartment model with first‐order absorption and elimination best described the alogliptin concentration vs. time profiles. Creatinine clearance and weight had a statistically significant effect on the oral clearance (CL/F) of alogliptin. The model predicted a lower CL/F (17%, 35%, 80%) and a higher systemic exposure (56%, 89%, 339%) for subjects with mild, moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively, compared with healthy subjects. Effect of weight on CL/F was not considered clinically relevant. Simulations at different doses of alogliptin support the approved doses of 12.5 mg and 6.25 mg for patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively. Conclusions The PK of alogliptin was well characterized by the model. The analysis suggested an alogliptin dose adjustment for subjects with moderate‐to‐severe renal impairment and no dose adjustments based on weight. PMID:26617339

  18. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  19. Metabolite Profiling and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Hydrocortisone in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M.; Hughes, David J.; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Dyer, Rachel L.; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte–Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase–ultra high-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time of flight–mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8–10% of the loss, and 45–52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour−1, 6.6 × 10−5 l⋅hour−1, and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  20. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of Shenfu Injection in beagle dogs after intravenous drip administration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiao; Tian, Dali; Huang, Yuyou; Li, Ling; Mao, Juan; Tian, Juan; Ding, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Shenfu Injection (SFI) is a well-defined Chinese herbal formulation that is obtained from red ginseng and processed aconite root. The main active constituents in SFI are ginsenosides and aconitum alkaloids. In this work, ginsenosides (ginsenoside Rg1, ginsenoside Rb1 and ginsenoside Rc) and aconitum alkaloids (benzoylmesaconine and fuziline) were used as the index components to explore the pharmacokinetic behavior of SFI. A selective and sensitive HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantification of ginsenosides and aconitum alkaloids in dog plasma and was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the five index components after intravenous drip of three different dosages of SFI in beagle dogs. The pharmacokinetic properties of the index components were linear over the dose range of 2-8 mL/kg.

  1. Evaluation of sex differences in the pharmacokinetics of ranitidine in humans.

    PubMed

    Abad-Santos, F; Carcas, A J; Guerra, P; Govantes, C; Montuenga, C; Gómez, E; Fernández, A; Frias, J

    1996-08-01

    A bioequivalence study of two oral formulations of 300 mg ranitidine was carried out in 16 healthy volunteers (8 men and 8 women), and the pharmacokinetics in both sexes were compared. There was bioequivalence of both formulations. The terminal half-life of ranitidine was 7% shorter and the oral apparent clearance 10.5% higher in women (1.44 L/h/kg) than in men (1.29 L/h/kg), although this difference did not reach statistical significance. No differences were observed in maximum concentration (Cmax) or the time of its occurrence (tmax). Sex, age, and weight did not correlate significantly with oral clearance. These results suggest that there are no sex differences in the pharmacokinetics of ranitidine, or that any differences would not be of clinical relevance. It also should be emphasized that bioequivalence trials also can be used to study other pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic characteristics of drugs without damaging the main endpoint of the study.

  2. Long-term pharmacokinetic efficacy and safety of low-dose ritonavir as a booster and atazanavir pharmaceutical formulation based on solid dispersion system in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Keizo; Haraya, Kenta; Terasaka, Shuichi; Ito, Yukako; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2008-06-01

    Atazanavir (ATV) is clinically coadministered with low-dose ritonavir (RTV), which boosts the oral bioavailability (BA) of ATV by inhibiting cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) via the same metabolic pathway; however, it is well known that in the chronic phase, the inhibition effect of RTV on Pgp and CYP3A becomes an induction effect. In this study, we investigated the long-term efficacy and safety of RTV-boosted ATV in rats with a clinical relevant dosage of ATV and RTV, 7 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg, respectively, and drew a direct comparison with RTV-boosted ATV and the previously reported ATV pharmaceutical formulation based on a solid dispersion system (ATV-SLS SD+G). Rats received RTV-boosted ATV or ATV-SLS SD+G for 14 d in the pharmacokinetic study. In addition, after 14-d repeated administration of each formulation, cyclosporine A (CyA) was administered to rats and Western blot analysis of Pgp and CYP3A was performed to investigate the impact on pharmacokinetic interaction of each ATV formulation. After repeated administration of both formulations, there was no significant difference between ATV pharmacokinetic parameters on day 1 and 14; therefore, it was considered that the long-term efficacy of both ATV formulations was maintained. However, after treatment with RTV-boosted ATV, the Cmax and AUC0-infinity of the following CyA significantly decreased to 49% and 47% in comparison to the control, respectively, and the Pgp expression in the small intestine by Western blot analysis was approximately 2-fold higher than the control, whereas after treatment with ATV pharmaceutical formulation, neither significant alteration of CyA nor notable change in the expression of intestinal Pgp and hepatic CYP3A was observed. Therefore, it was considered that the BA of CyA after treatment with RTV-boosted ATV would decrease by the induction effect of RTV in chronic phase as described above. The results of this study revealed that the chronic use of low-dose RTV as a

  3. Evaluation of Galleria mellonella larvae for measuring the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of antibiotic therapies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lucy; Veli, Neyme; Coote, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Galleria mellonella larvae can be used (i) as an in vivo infection model for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and (ii) for evaluating the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antipseudomonal antibiotics. Two strains of P. aeruginosa were employed, NCTC 10662 (antibiotic-susceptible) and NCTC 13437 (multidrug-resistant). Larvae were infected with increasing doses of either P. aeruginosa strain to investigate the effect of inoculum size on survival. Subsequently, infected larvae were treated with a range of antibiotics to examine whether these agents were effective against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo and whether the efficacy of these drugs matched the known susceptibilities of each bacterial strain. Larval burden of P. aeruginosa was also determined after infection and treatment with cefotaxime. Pharmacokinetic properties of the antibiotics tested were measured using a well diffusion assay to determine the concentration of antibiotics in larval haemolymph over time. Galleria mellonella larvae were sensitive to P. aeruginosa infection, and increasing inoculum doses of live cells resulted in greater larval mortality. Heat-killed bacteria had no detrimental effect on survival. Antibiotic efficacy against P. aeruginosa-infected G. mellonella correlated with the measured in vitro sensitivities of the two strains tested. The therapeutic benefit arising from administration of cefotaxime correlated with a reduced burden of bacteria present in the haemolymph. There was a clear correlation between measured antibiotic pharmacokinetics and the therapeutic effect. This study strongly supports future application of the G. mellonella infection model to initial studies of novel antipseudomonal treatments.

  4. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of ceftazidime in neonates and young infants].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Murono, K; Sakata, H; Kakehashi, H; Oka, T; Kaeriyama, M; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Inyaku, F

    1986-08-01

    Seventeen newborn and young infants including 6 premature infants were treated with ceftazidime (CAZ) and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. Ages of the patients ranged from zero to 55 days, and their body weights ranged from 1.35 to 3.87 kg. Doses of CAZ ranged 10-50 mg/kg every 6 to 12 hours for 3 to 14 days. Twelve infants with infections including meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia and urinary tract infections, were considered to have responded to the CAZ treatment. Among them, results were excellent in 2, good in 9 and fair in 1 patient. The drug was well tolerated, but 1 had diarrhea and 3 patients had eosinophilia among the 17 patients. The pharmacokinetics of CAZ was studied in 22 patients including 11 premature infants. Their ages ranged from 1 to 60 days, and body weights ranged from 0.85 to 3.96 kg. Serum concentrations in 7 patients ranged from 24.2-38.5 micrograms/ml at 30 minutes after single doses of 10 mg/kg intravenous bolus injections and 4.36-12.4 micrograms/ml at 6 hours. Mean elimination half-lives of the drug were 3.20 hours in 2 patients under 7 days of age and 2.31 hours in 5 patients from 7 days of age or older. In 8 patients, serum concentrations ranged 32.6-57.9 micrograms/ml at 30 minutes and 8.10-20.7 micrograms/ml at 6 hours after single doses of 20 mg/kg. Elimination half-lives were 3.53 hours in 4 patients under 7 days of age and 2.79 hours in 4 patients from 7 days of age or older.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of cefmenoxime in neonates and young infants].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Murono, K; Sakata, H; Kakehashi, H; Oka, T; Kaeriyama, M; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N

    1989-12-01

    Twenty-three newborn and young infants, including 13 low-birth-weight infants, were treated with cefmenoxime (CMX) and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. The ages of the patients ranged from 1 to 102 days, and their weights ranged from 0.83 to 4.19 kg. Doses given were 18-42 mg/kg every 6 to 12 hours for 2 to 16 days. Among 12 infants with bacterial meningitis and sepsis, the results were excellent in 2, good in 7 and fair in 3 patients. The drug was well tolerated and no adverse effects were observed in the 23 patients. Pharmacokinetic studies of CMX were done in 5 infants whose mean body weight was 3.03 kg (range 2.4 to 4.2 kg). Serum concentrations at 15 minutes after 10 mg/kg intravenous bolus injections were 35.6 and 55.7 micrograms/ml in two 12- and 18-day-old patients. In 3 patients with ages of 7, 7 and 24 days, serum concentrations were 54.6, 102 and 100 micrograms/ml, respectively, at 15 minutes after 20 mg/kg doses. Elimination half-lives of the drug were 1.3 to 1.5 (mean 1.4) hours in these patients. Excretion rates into urine in the first 8 hours were 30.3, 74.2, 77.6 and 85.6% in four patients given 10 or 20 mg/kg doses. The cerebrospinal fluid level at 3 hours after the dose was 0.4 micrograms/ml on 15th day of treatment in 1 patient with bacterial meningitis given 20 mg/kg every 6 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-yong; Wan, Li-li; Yang, Quan-jun; Han, Yong-long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5 mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40 mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72 h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC–MS–MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40 mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC{sub 0–t} and C{sub max} of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40 mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  7. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  8. [The main pharmacokinetic parameters of p-tyrosol upon intravenous injection in rats. II. Verification of the pharmacokinetics linearity and evaluation of the possible accumulation].

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, G A; Plotnikov, M B; Smol'iakova, V I; Cherkashina, I V; Tolstikova, T G; Krysin, A P; Sorokina, I V

    2006-01-01

    The main pharmacokinetic parameters of p-tyrosol after single (in 3 doses) and repeated intravenous injection were studied in rats. The content ofp-tyrosol in the blood plasma was determined by spectrofluorimetric method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of p-tyrosol are linear in the dose range from 50 to 200 mg/kg. Repeated administration leads to accelerated metabolic elimination of p-tyrosol.

  9. Investigation of Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Single and Multiple Doses of a Long-Acting α-MSH Analog in Healthy Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Royalty, Jane E; Konradsen, Gitte; Eskerod, Ole; Wulff, Birgitte S; Hansen, Birgit S

    2014-01-01

    MC4-NN2-0453 is a novel, long-acting, selective, melanocortin-4-receptor agonist developed for treatment of obesity. This first-human-dose, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single and multiple doses of MC4-NN2-0453 in overweight to obese but otherwise healthy subjects. The trial included a single-dose part of ascending subcutaneous 0.03–1.50 mg/kg doses in overweight to obese but otherwise healthy men, and a multiple-dose part of ascending subcutaneous 0.75–3.0 mg/day doses in obese but otherwise healthy men/women. The single-dose part included 7 cohorts of 8 subjects, randomized 6:2 to active drug/placebo; the multiple-dose part included 4 cohorts of 20 subjects, randomized 16:4 to active drug/placebo. MC4-NN2-0453 was well tolerated and raised no safety concerns except for nonserious skin-related adverse events, this along with lack of weight loss effect led to premature termination of the trial. Headache, sexual–arousal disturbance, and penile erection were also reported. Single-dose pharmacokinetics showed dose-linearity and dose-proportionality. Maximum plasma concentration was observed after 50–100 hours, which then declined with a of approximately 250 hours. Plasma concentration reached steady state after 4 weeks for 0.75 and 1.5 mg/day multiple-dose cohorts, and the was similar to single dose. There were no significant pharmacodynamic effects, including effect on body weight. PMID:24166760

  10. A Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Presurgical Trial of Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Springett, Gregory M.; Husain, Kazim; Neuger, Anthony; Centeno, Barbara; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Hutchinson, Tai Z.; Lush, Richard M.; Sebti, Saïd; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol (VEDT), a natural vitamin E from plants, has shown anti-neoplastic and chemoprevention activity in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigated VEDT in patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia in a window-of-opportunity preoperative clinical trial to assess its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and apoptotic activity. Methods Patients received oral VEDT at escalating doses (from 200 to 3200 mg) daily for 13 days before surgery and one dose on the day of surgery. Dose escalation followed a three-plus-three trial design. Our primary endpoints were safety, VEDT pharmacokinetics, and monitoring of VEDT-induced neoplastic cell apoptosis (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00985777). Findings In 25 treated patients, no dose-limiting toxicity was encountered; thus no maximum-tolerated dose was reached. One patient had a drug-related adverse event (diarrhea) at a 3200-mg daily dose level. The effective half-life of VEDT was ~ 4 h. VEDT concentrations in plasma and exposure profiles were quite variable but reached levels that are bioactive in preclinical models. Biological activity, defined as significant induction of apoptosis in neoplastic cells as measured by increased cleaved caspase-3 levels, was seen in the majority of patients at the 400-mg to 1600-mg daily dose levels. Interpretation VEDT from 200 to 1600 mg daily taken orally for 2 weeks before pancreatic surgery was well tolerated, reached bioactive levels in blood, and significantly induced apoptosis in the neoplastic cells of patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia. These promising results warrant further clinical investigation of VEDT for chemoprevention and/or therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26844278

  11. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme Ml; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge.

  12. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme ML; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge. PMID:27933307

  13. Safety of Disposable Diaper Materials: Extensive Evaluations Validate Use.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Helmes, C Tucker; White, Jeffrey C; Zhou, Shaoying

    2014-08-01

    Disposable diapers are primarily composed of polymers, such as cellulose, polypropylene, polyester, and polyethylene, which are biologically inert and not bioavailable. They are used in clothes, fabrics, personal hygiene products, and other materials that are commonly in contact with the skin. Each component used throughout the production process must undergo rigorous safety evaluations and assessments and are proven to be well tolerated and safe for their intended uses. No materials are incorporated into a diaper until their safety is confirmed through robust assessments, and additional factors are integrated into the process to compensate for the uncertainty associated with extrapolating toxicity data. After a thorough assessment of the materials and final product, extensive skin compatibility evaluations are conducted as appropriate. This rigorous safety process provides reassurance that consumers can rely on the safety of these diapers.

  14. An Evaluation Tool for Agricultural Health and Safety Mobile Applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Iris; Ellis, Tammy; Yoder, Aaron; Keifer, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    As the use of mobile devices and their software applications, or apps, becomes ubiquitous, use amongst agricultural working populations is expanding as well. The smart device paired with a well-designed app has potential for improving workplace health and safety in the hands of those who can act upon the information provided. Many apps designed to assess workplace hazards and implementation of worker protections already exist. However, the abundance and diversity of such applications also presents challenges regarding evaluation practices and assignation of value. This is particularly true in the agricultural workspace, as there is currently little information on the value of these apps for agricultural safety and health. This project proposes a framework for developing and evaluating apps that have potential usefulness in agricultural health and safety. The evaluation framework is easily transferable, with little modification for evaluation of apps in several agriculture-specific areas.

  15. Evaluation of a simulation-based surrogate safety metric.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Stamatiadis, Nikiforos

    2014-10-01

    The development of surrogate safety measures is essential due to the problems of availability and quality of historical crash data. The Aggregate Conflict Propensity Metric (ACPM) is a surrogate metric recently proposed and it is based on conflict studies and traffic simulations. ACPM is expected to be capable of assessing the relative safety levels of traffic facilities and/or treatments in order to help traffic engineers to select appropriate treatments based on traffic safety estimates. This paper presents three experimental tests conducted to evaluate the reliability of ACPM. In each test, ACPM is compared to a traditional conflict indicator in terms of identifying and ranking safety of traffic conditions under various traffic volumes based on traffic simulations. ACPM shows its strength and reliability in all three tests, as it provides results highly consistent with the Highway Safety Manual. The experimental tests indicate that ACPM is a promising surrogate safety measure that can appropriately identify relative safety among traffic treatments and/or facilities and provide traffic engineers with useful information on potential safety impact.

  16. Safety and Health Evaluation-Communication/Electronic Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-15

    DT. e. Schedule an initial examination of the test Item with the maintenance evaluator, human factors engineer , and safety engineer precent. Discuss...hazards associated with the test Item. Use the appropriate checklists appended to this TOP throughout all operations duri’.g the DT cycle . Direct...durirn Development and Acquisition of Materiel, 29 August 1975. 2. AR 385-16, System Safety Engineering and Management, I December 1980. 3. AR 40-5

  17. Phase 1 safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study of single ascending doses of XM17 (recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone) in downregulated healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Lammerich, Andreas; Bias, Peter; Gertz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background XM17 is a recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (follitropin alfa) for stimulation of multifollicular development in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation during assisted reproductive therapy and for treatment of anovulation. Manufactured using Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the human follicle-stimulating hormone gene, XM17 has an identical amino acid sequence to that of the human protein as well as to those of the other approved recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone products. Glycosylation patterns may differ slightly between products. The objectives of this first-in-human study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and dose-proportionality of single ascending subcutaneous doses of XM17 in healthy young female volunteers. Methods Endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone was downregulated by implanting a 1-month depot of goserelin acetate 3.6 mg on day 0 in eligible subjects. On day 14 of the experimental period, subjects received one of four ascending doses of XM17. Blood sampling to obtain the pharmacokinetic profile of XM17 was done at frequent intervals until 168 hours post-dose. Results Following downregulation of endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone to <4 IU/L, 40 subjects (of mean age 29±5.4 years) received single subcutaneous doses of 37.5 (n=4, pilot group), 75, 150, or 300 IU (n=12 each) of XM17. The mean serum concentration-time profiles of XM17 revealed dose-related increases in maximum concentration (Cmax) within 24 hours followed by monoexponential decay for the three higher dose levels. Slopes estimated by linear regression for Cmax and AUC0–168h were ~1.0 (0.9052 IU/L and 1.0964 IU·h/L, respectively). For each IU of XM17 administered, Cmax and AUC0–168h rose by 0.032 IU/L and 2.60 IU·h/L, respectively. Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 54 to 90 hours. No antibodies to XM17 were detected. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability (Study 1) with particular reference to ocular safety (Study 2) of tiotropium Respimat soft mist inhaler: findings from two dose-ranging studies in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Feifel, Ulrich; Wallenstein, Gudrun; Rominger, Karl-Ludwig; Trommeshauser, Dirk; Platz, Juliane

    2008-01-01

    Data are presented from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in which the tolerability of tiotropium Respimat Soft MistTM Inhaler (SMI), a new-generation, propellant-free device for use in COPD, and the ocular safety oftiotropium were examined. In Study 1, 36 healthy males received tiotropium 8, 16, or 32 microg (n = 9/dose) or placebo (n = 3/dose level), administered once daily via Respimat SMI for 14 days. Safety and pharmacokinetics were evaluated. In Study 2, 48 healthy males received tiotropium 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.28, or 0.40 microg (n = 6/dose) or placebo (n = 2/dose level), applied as two drops to one eye (the highest dose was a significant multiple of a percentage of the proposed Respimat SMI clinical dose that could be inadvertently deposited in the eye). Ocular parameters were measured over 24 hours. Tiotropium Respimat SMI at doses up to 32 microg was well tolerated in Study 1; typical dose-dependent anticholinergic adverse events of mild-to-moderate intensity were observed. In Study 2, ocular tiotropium administration did not affect pupil diameter, pupillary reflex, intraocular pressure, or accommodation. Tiotropium Respimat SMI was well tolerated. Inadvertent ocular exposure to tiotropium up to 0.40 g is unlikely to result in ocular adverse effects.

  19. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture ...

  20. Criticality safety evaluations - a {open_quotes}stalking horse{close_quotes} for integrated safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Columbia Fuel Fabrication Facility of the Westinghouse Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division manufactures low-enriched uranium fuel and associated components for use in commercial pressurized water power reactors. To support development of a comprehensive integrated safety assessment (ISA) for the facility, as well as to address increasing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expectations regarding such a facility`s criticality safety assessments, a project is under way to complete criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) of all plant systems used in processing nuclear materials. Each CSE is made up of seven sections, prepared by a multidisciplinary team of process engineers, systems engineers, safety engineers, maintenance representatives, and operators. This paper provides a cursory outline of the type of information presented in a CSE.

  1. Evaluation of Initial and Steady-State Gatifloxacin Pharmacokinetics and Dose in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients by Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, Wynand; Merle, Corinne S.; Rustomjee, Roxana; Gninafon, Martin; Lo, Mame Bocar; Bah-Sow, Oumou; Olliaro, Piero L.; Lienhardt, Christian; Horton, John; Smith, Peter; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month regimen of gatifloxacin with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide is being evaluated for the treatment of tuberculosis in a phase 3 randomized controlled trial (OFLOTUB). A prior single-dose study found that gatifloxacin exposure increased by 14% in the combination. The aims of the study are to evaluate the initial and steady-state pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin when daily doses are given to patients with newly diagnosed drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis as part of a combination regimen and to evaluate the gatifloxacin dose with respect to the probability of attaining a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target. We describe the population pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin from the first dose to a median of 28 days in 169 adults enrolled in the OFLOTUB trial in Benin, Guinea, Senegal, and South Africa. The probability of achieving a ratio of ≥125 for the area under the concentration time curve to infinity (AUC0–∞) for the free fraction of gatifloxacin over the MIC (fAUC/MIC) was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The median AUC0–∞ of 41.2 μg · h/ml decreased on average by 14.3% (90% confidence interval [CI], −90.5% to +61.5%) following multiple 400-mg daily doses. At steady state, 90% of patients achieved an fAUC/MIC of ≥125 only when the MIC was <0.125 μg/ml. We conclude that systemic exposure to gatifloxacin declines with repeated daily 400-mg doses when used together with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide, thus compensating for any initial increase in gatifloxacin levels due to a drug interaction. (The OFLOTUB study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00216385.) PMID:23774436

  2. Application of remote sensing image interpretation in seismic safety evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wei, Wen-xia; Wang, Gang

    2005-10-01

    As one of essential design gist in important engineering projects, the seismic safety evaluation on choosing engineering site has been applied widely. Using remote sensing images, the analysis to regional seismotectonic environment can bring macroscopic, integrative, dynamic and high efficiency information, so the application of remote sensing technology in seismic safety evaluation of engineering site has fine prospect and will bring great benefit. In this paper, based on remote sensing interpretation to Landsat7 ETM images, also using GIS and field geological investigations, as a case study in Qingdao City, we analyze the physiognomy environment, new tectonic movement, faults activities, and the distributing of deleterious geological objects around the site. Then we find this method can provide good basic geological information for seismic safety evaluation.

  3. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  4. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern.

  5. 71 FR 55515 - Safety Evaluation Report for the Proposed American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, OH, NUREG-1851...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-09-22

    ..., nuclear criticality safety, chemical process safety, fire safety, emergency management, environmental... COMMISSION Safety Evaluation Report for the Proposed American CentrifugePlant in Piketon, OH, NUREG-1851... Availability of Safety Evaluation Report. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Nuclear...

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  7. FFTF railroad tank car safety evaluation for packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1996-10-25

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer cif the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14.

  8. FFTF railroad tank car Safety Evaluation for Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1995-09-21

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations considered necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14

  9. Pharmacokinetic profile and first preliminary clinical evaluation of bendamustine in Taiwanese patients with heavily pretreated indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Kuo, Ching-Yuan; Wu, Jin-Hou; Hou, Hsin-An; Wang, Ming-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2015-12-01

    Prior studies found bendamustine is efficacious in patients with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). To date, no studies have reported the efficacy of bendamustine in a Chinese population. This multicentre phase II trial evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy of bendamustine monotherapy in Chinese patients in Taiwan with pretreated indolent B-cell NHL or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). For PK assessments, patients were randomized (n = 16; 11 with indolent B-cell NHL and five with MCL) to 90 or 120 mg/m(2) of bendamustine for the first cycle. Plasma levels of bendamustine and its two metabolites were analyzed. For efficacy and safety evaluations, bendamustine 120 mg/m(2) was given to all patients every 3 weeks starting at cycle 2 for a minimum of a total of six cycles. The median age of patients was 61.7 years, and the majority were men (75%). The median number of prior treatments was 4 (range, 1-9 regimens), and all patients were previously treated with rituximab. Bendamustine plasma concentration peaked near the end of infusion and was rapidly eliminated with a mean elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of 0.67-0.8 h. Of the evaluable patients (n = 14), the overall response rate was 78.6%, including 7.2% of patients having a complete response. Mean progression-free survival was 27.5 weeks. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were leucopenia (56.3%), neutropenia (56.3%) and thrombocytopenia (25%). In conclusion, bendamustine was efficacious and well tolerated in Taiwanese patients with indolent NHL and MCL with a similar PK profile to that of other populations.

  10. Intranasal microemulsion of sildenafil citrate: in vitro evaluation and in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Elshafeey, Ahmed H; Bendas, Ehab R; Mohamed, Osama H

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare intranasal delivery system of sildenafil citrate and estimate its relative bioavailability after nasal administration in rabbits to attain rapid onset of action with good efficacy at lower doses. Sildenafil citrate saturated solubility was determined in different solvents, cosolvents, and microemulsion systems. For nasal application, sildenafil citrate was formulated in two different systems: the first was a cosolvent system (S3) of benzyl alcohol/ethanol/water/Transcutol/taurodeoxy cholate/Tween 20 (0.5:16.8:47.7:15.9:1:18.1% w/w). The second was a microemulsion system (ME6) containing Oleic acid: Labrasol/Transcutol/water (8.33:33.3:16.66:41.66% w/w). The prepared systems were characterized in relation to their clarity, particle size, viscosity, pH, and nasal ciliotoxicity. In vivo pharmacokinetic performance of the selected system ME6 (with no nasal ciliotoxicity) was evaluated in a group of six rabbits in a randomized crossover study and compared to the marketed oral tablets. The targeted solubility (>20 mg/ml) of sildenafil citrate was achieved with cosolvent systems S1, S3, and S5 and with microemulsion systems ME3-ME6. The saturated solubility of sildenafil citrate in cosolvent system S3 and microemulsion system ME6 were 22.98 +/- 1.26 and 23.79 +/- 1.16 mg/ml, respectively. Microemulsion formulation ME6 showed shorter t (max) (0.75 h) and higher AUC((0-infinity)) (1,412.42 ng h/ml) compared to the oral tablets which showed t (max) equals 1.25 h and AUC((0-infinity)) of 1,251.14 ng h/ml after administration to rabbits at dose level of 5 mg/kg. The relative bioavailability was 112.89%. In conclusion, the nasal absorption of sildenafil citrate microemulsion was found to be fast, indicating the potential of nasal delivery instead of the conventional oral administration of such drug.

  11. Evaluation of the influence of chloroacetic acids on the pharmacokinetics of trihalomethanes in the rat.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Annie; Krishnan, Kannan; Tardif, Robert

    2003-12-12

    Chloroacetic acids (monochloroacetic acid [MCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroacetic acid [TCA]) and trihalomethanes (THMs: chloroform [CHCl(3)], bromodichloromethane [BDCM], dibromochloromethane [DBCM], and bromoform [TBM]) are common by-products of the chlorination of drinking water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of chloroacetic acids on the pharmacokinetics of trihalomethanes in the male Sprague-Dawley rat. In the first series of studies, groups of 5 animals were given, by intravenous injections, a single dose of 0.125 mmol/kg of one of the four THMs. Additional groups received a binary mixture containing 0.125 mmol/kg of a THM plus 0.125 mmol/kg of a chloroacetic acid. The venous blood concentrations of unchanged THMs were measured by headspace gas chromatography from 5 min to 6 h postadministration. The areas under the blood concentration versus time curves (AUCs) of CHCl(3), BDCM, and DBCM were increased by a factor of 3.5, 1.6, and 2, respectively, by coadministration of TCA. DCA coadministration resulted in an increase in the AUC of DBCM (x2.5) and TBM (x1.3), whereas MCA modified the Cmax (x1.5) and AUC (x1.8) of BDCM and the AUC of DBCM (x2.5). In the second series of experiments, animals received either a single dose of 0.03125 mmol/kg of one of the four THMs, a mixture containing 0.03125 mmol/kg of each of the four THMs (total dose = 0.125 mmol/kg), or a mixture containing 0.03125 mmol/kg of each of the four THMs plus 0.125 mmol/kg of either TCA or DCA. Results indicated that the AUCs of CHCl(3), BDCM, DBCM, and TBM were increased during coadministration compared to single administrations (+2.5-fold). Combined administration of the four THMs with TCA, and not DCA, resulted in an increase of the AUCs of THMs (CHCl(3): x11.7; BDCM, DBCM, and TBM: x3.9) and an increase in the Cmax of CHCl(3) (x1.9). Overall, these results indicate that, at the dose levels tested in this study, TCA alters the blood concentration profiles

  12. Strategies to evaluate the safety of bioengineered foods.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    A number of genetically modified (GM) crops bioengineered to express agronomic traits including herbicide resistance and insect tolerance have been commercialized. Safety studies conducted for the whole grains and food and feed fractions obtained from GM crops (i.e., bioengineered foods) bear similarities to and distinctive differences from those applied to substances intentionally added to foods (e.g., food ingredients). Similarities are apparent in common animal models, route of exposure, duration, and response variables typically assessed in toxicology studies. However, because of differences in the nutritional and physical properties of food ingredients and bioengineered foods and in the fundamental goals of the overall safety assessment strategies for these different classes of substances, there are recognizable differences in the individual components of the safety assessment process. The fundamental strategic difference is that the process for food ingredients is structured toward quantitative risk assessment whereas that for bioengineered foods is structured for the purpose of qualitative risk assessment. The strategy for safety assessment of bioengineered foods focuses on evaluating the safety of the transgenic proteins used to impart the desired trait or traits and to demonstrate compositional similarity between the grains of GM and non-GM comparator crops using analytical chemistry and, in some cases, feeding studies. Despite these differences, the similarities in the design of safety studies conducted with bioengineered foods should be recognized by toxicologists. The current paper reviews the basic principles of safety assessment for bioengineered foods and compares them with the testing strategies applied to typical food ingredients. From this comparison it can be seen that the strategies used to assess the safety of bioengineered foods are at least as robust as that used to assess the safety of typical food ingredients.

  13. An Extended Minimal Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model: Evaluation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy on Human IgG Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurkishan S; Morris, Marilyn E

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low molecular weight molecules, there is limited information regarding effects on monoclonal antibodies. Our previous studies have reported significant increases in total (2-4 fold) and renal (100-300 fold) clearance of human IgG, an antibody isotype, in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pioglitazone treatment incompletely reversed the disease-related PK changes. The objective of this study was to construct a mechanistic model for simultaneous fitting plasma and urine data, to yield physiologically relevant PK parameters. We propose an extended minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) model specifically for IgG by classifying organs as either leaky or tight vascular tissues, and adding a kidney compartment. The model incorporates convection as the primary mechanism of IgG movement from plasma into tissues, interstitial fluid (ISF) in extravascular distribution space, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sieving coefficient and fraction reabsorbed in the kidney. The model captured the plasma and urine PK profiles well, and simulated concentrations in ISF. The model estimated a 2-4 fold increase in nonrenal clearance from plasma and 30-120 fold increase in renal clearance with T2DM, consistent with the experimental findings, and these differences in renal clearance were related to changes in GFR, sieving coefficient, and proximal tubular reabsorption. In conclusion, the mPBPK model offers a more relevant approach for analyzing plasma and urine IgG concentration-time data than conventional models and provides insight regarding alterations in distributional and elimination parameters occurring with T2DM.

  14. Design and application of microfluidic systems for in vitro pharmacokinetic evaluation of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Maguire, T J; Novik, E; Chao, P; Barminko, J; Nahmias, Y; Yarmush, M L; Cheng, K-C

    2009-12-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the development of new chemical entities within the pharmaceutical industry is the extrapolation of key in vivo parameters from in vitro cell culture assays and animal studies. Development of microscale devices and screening assays incorporating primary human cells can potentially provide better, faster and more efficient prediction of in vivo toxicity and clinical drug performance. With this goal in mind, large strides have been made in the area of microfluidics to provide in vitro surrogates that are designed to mimic the physiological architecture and dynamics. More recent advancements have been made in the development of in vitro analogues to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models - a mathematical model that represents the body as interconnected compartments specific for a particular organ. In this review we highlight recent advancements in human hepatocyte microscale culture, and describe the next generation of integrated devices, whose potential allows for the high throughput assessment of drug metabolism, distribution and pharmacokinetics.

  15. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-05-20

    Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or changing between periods. We use the expected standard errors of treatment effect to compute the power for the Wald test of comparison or equivalence and the number of subjects needed for a given power. We perform various simulations mimicking crossover two-period trials to show the relevance of these developments. We then apply these developments to design a crossover pharmacokinetic study of amoxicillin in piglets and implement them in the new version 3.2 of the r function PFIM.

  16. Sequential Generalized Likelihood Ratio Tests for Vaccine Safety Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei-Chiung; Lai, Tze Leung; Heyse, Joseph F.; Chen, Jie

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The evaluation of vaccine safety involves pre-clinical animal studies, pre-licensure randomized clinical trials and post-licensure safety studies. Sequential design and analysis are of particular interest because they allow early termination of the trial or quick detection that the vaccine exceeds a prescribed bound on the adverse event rate. After a review of recent developments in this area, we propose a new class of sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests for evaluating adverse event rates in two-armed pre-licensure clinical trials and single-armed post-licensure studies. The proposed approach is illustrated using data from the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). Simulation studies of the performance of the proposed approach and other methods are also given. PMID:20799244

  17. Bovine growth hormone: human food safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Juskevich, J C; Guyer, C G

    1990-08-24

    Scientists in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), after reviewing the scientific literature and evaluating studies conducted by pharmaceutical companies, have concluded that the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) in dairy cattle presents no increased health risk to consumers. Bovine GH is not biologically active in humans, and oral toxicity studies have demonstrated that rbGH is not orally active in rats, a species responsive to parenterally administered bGH. Recombinant bGH treatment produces an increase in the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in cow's milk. However, oral toxicity studies have shown that bovine IGF-I lacks oral activity in rats. Additionally, the concentration of IGF-I in milk of rbGH-treated cows is within the normal physiological range found in human breast milk, and IGF-I is denatured under conditions used to process cow's milk for infant formula. On the basis of estimates of the amount of protein absorbed intact in humans and the concentration of IGF-I in cow's milk during rbGH treatment, biologically significant levels of intact IGF-I would not be absorbed.

  18. Safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of remogliflozin etabonate, a novel SGLT2 inhibitor, and metformin when co-administered in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) is expressed in absorptive epithelia of the renal tubules. Remogliflozin etabonate (RE) is the prodrug of remogliflozin, the active entity that inhibits SGLT2. An inhibitor of this pathway would enhance urinary glucose excretion (UGE), and potentially improve plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. RE is intended for use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as monotherapy and in combination with existing therapies. Metformin, a dimethylbiguanide, is an effective oral antihyperglycemic agent widely used for the treatment of T2DM. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, repeat-dose, two-sequence, cross-over study in 13 subjects with T2DM. Subjects were randomized to one of two treatment sequences in which they received either metformin alone, RE alone, or both over three, 3-day treatment periods separated by two non-treatment intervals of variable duration. On the evening before each treatment period, subjects were admitted and confined to the clinical site for the duration of the 3-day treatment period. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic (urine glucose and fasting plasma glucose), and safety (adverse events, vital signs, ECG, clinical laboratory parameters including lactic acid) assessments were performed at check-in and throughout the treatment periods. Pharmacokinetic sampling occurred on Day 3 of each treatment period. Results This study demonstrated the lack of effect of RE on steady state metformin pharmacokinetics. Metformin did not affect the AUC of RE, remogliflozin, or its active metabolite, GSK279782, although Cmax values were slightly lower for remogliflozin and its metabolite after co-administration with metformin compared with administration of RE alone. Metformin did not alter the pharmacodynamic effects (UGE) of RE. Concomitant administration of metformin and RE was well tolerated with minimal hypoglycemia, no serious adverse events, and no increase in lactic

  19. Population pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-piperaquine in pregnant and nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, John M; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Tawat, Somoyang; Yadi, Gumal; Lorry, Lina; Siba, Peter M; Batty, Kevin T; Robinson, Leanne J; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-07-01

    The tolerability, safety, and disposition of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and piperaquine (PQ) were assessed in 32 pregnant (second/third trimester) and 33 nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women randomized to adult treatment courses of DHA-PQ (three daily doses) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)-PQ (three daily PQ doses, single dose of SP). All dose adminstrations were observed, and subjects fasted for 2 h postdose. Plasma PQ was assayed by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and DHA was assessed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed using a population-based approach. Both regimens were well tolerated. There was an expected increase in the rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT interval which was independent of pregnancy and treatment. Two pregnant and two nonpregnant women had Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia which cleared within 48 h, and no other subject became slide positive for malaria during 42 days of follow-up. Of 30 pregnant women followed to delivery, 27 (90%) delivered healthy babies and 3 (10%) had stillbirths; these obstetric outcomes are consistent with those in the general population. The area under the plasma PQ concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was lower in the pregnant patients (median [interquartile range], 23,721 μg · h/liter [21,481 to 27,951 μg · h/liter] versus 35,644 μg · h/liter [29,546 to 39,541 μg · h/liter]; P < 0.001) in association with a greater clearance relative to bioavailability (73.5 liters/h [69.4 to 78.4] versus 53.8 liters/h [49.7 to 58.2]; P < 0.001), but pregnancy did not influence the pharmacokinetics of DHA. The apparent pharmacokinetic differences between the present study and results from other studies of women with uncomplicated malaria that showed no effect of pregnancy on the AUC0-∞ of PQ and greater bioavailability may reflect differences in postdose fat intake, proportions of women with malaria, and/or racial differences in drug

  20. Multiple-dose escalation study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and biologic activity of oral AMD070, a selective CXCR4 receptor inhibitor, in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Stone, Nimalie D; Dunaway, Shelia B; Flexner, Charles; Tierney, Camlin; Calandra, Gary B; Becker, Stephen; Cao, Ying-Jun; Wiggins, Ilene P; Conley, Jeanne; MacFarland, Ron T; Park, Jeong-Gun; Lalama, Christina; Snyder, Sally; Kallungal, Beatrice; Klingman, Karin L; Hendrix, Craig W

    2007-07-01

    AMD070 is an oral CXCR4 antagonist with in vitro activity against X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Thirty fasting healthy male volunteers received oral doses of AMD070 ranging from a single 50-mg dose to seven 400-mg doses given every 12 h (q12h). Nine subjects received a 200-mg dose during fasting and prior to a meal. Subjects were monitored for safety and pharmacokinetics. AMD070 was well tolerated, without serious adverse events. Transient headaches (13 subjects) and neurocognitive (8 subjects) and gastrointestinal (7 subjects) symptoms were the most common complaints. Seven subjects had sinus tachycardia, and two were symptomatic. AMD070 plasma concentrations peaked 1 to 2 h after patient dosing. The estimated terminal half-life ranged from 11.2 to 15.9 h among cohorts. Dose proportionality was not demonstrated. Less than 1% of the drug appeared unchanged in the urine. Food reduced the maximum concentration of drug in serum and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h by 70% and 56%, respectively (P < or = 0.01). A dose-dependent elevation of white blood cells (WBC) demonstrated a maximum twofold increase over baseline (95% confidence interval, 2.0- to 2.1-fold) in an E(max) model. In healthy volunteers, AMD070 was well tolerated and demonstrated mixed-order pharmacokinetics, and food reduced drug exposure. AMD070 induced a dose-related elevation of WBC which was attributed to CXCR4 blockade. Using leukocytosis as a surrogate marker for CXCR4 inhibition, this dose-response relationship suggests that the doses used in this study were active in vivo, though not maximal, throughout the dosing interval. Trough concentrations with the 400-mg dose q12h exceeded the antiviral in vitro 90% effective concentration of AMD070.

  1. Computational Opioid Prescribing: A Novel Application of Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist pre-scribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety. PMID:21657860

  2. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology.

  3. Evaluation of protein safety in the context of agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Bryan; Astwood, James D; Cunny, Helen; Conn, Robin Eichen; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Macintosh, Susan; Meyer, Linda S; Privalle, Laura; Gao, Yong; Mattsson, Joel; Levine, Marci

    2008-05-01

    One component of the safety assessment of agricultural products produced through biotechnology is evaluation of the safety of newly expressed proteins. The ILSI International Food Biotechnology Committee has developed a scientifically based two-tiered, weight-of-evidence strategy to assess the safety of novel proteins used in the context of agricultural biotechnology. Recommendations draw upon knowledge of the biological and chemical characteristics of proteins and testing methods for evaluating potential intrinsic hazards of chemicals. Tier I (potential hazard identification) includes an assessment of the biological function or mode of action and intended application of the protein, history of safe use, comparison of the amino acid sequence of the protein to other proteins, as well as the biochemical and physico-chemical properties of the proteins. Studies outlined in Tier II (hazard characterization) are conducted when the results from Tier I are not sufficient to allow a determination of safety (reasonable certainty of no harm) on a case-by-case basis. These studies may include acute and repeated dose toxicology studies and hypothesis-based testing. The application of these guidelines is presented using examples of transgenic proteins applied for agricultural input and output traits in genetically modified crops along with recommendations for future research considerations related to protein safety assessment.

  4. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    SciTech Connect

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  5. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of imipenem/cilastatin sodium in children].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Kakehashi, H; Murono, K; Sakata, H; Ohmi, H; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Inyaku, F

    1986-07-01

    Nineteen episodes of infection in 17 children (one had 3 episodes) were treated with imipenem/cilastatin sodium (MK-0787/MK-0791), and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. The ages of patients ranged from 1 month to 8 years 1 month and their body weights ranged from 3.9 to 25.2 kg. The MK-0787/MK-0791 was administered intravenously by a 30-60 minutes infusion, in doses ranging from 8-42 mg/8-42 mg/kg every 6 to 12 hours for 3 to 40.5 days. Among 18 episodes in 16 patients (one patient proved to have rubella meningoencephalitis and was excluded from evaluation of the clinical efficacy) with bacterial infections including sepsis, pneumonia, acute suppurative thyroiditis and urinary tract infections, the results were excellent in 10, good in 5, fair in 2, and poor in 1 episode. Some side effects were noted; among all 19 episodes in the 17 patients diarrhea was noted in 3, rash in 1, slightly elevated serum transaminases in 1 and thrombocytosis in 1 episode. Pharmacokinetic studies were done in 7 patients whose ages ranged from 3 years 2 months to 13 years 1 month. Plasma concentrations of MK-0787 in 2 children were 19.6 and 20.0 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes and 5.6 and 2.1 micrograms/ml at 2 hours after a 10 mg/10 mg/kg intravenous 30-minute drip infusion of MK-0787/MK-0791. Plasma half-lives of MK-0787 were 1.52 and 0.74 hour, and total urinary recoveries were 54.6 and 71.4% during 0-6 hours. After a 20 mg/20 mg/kg intravenous 30-minute drip infusion into 2 other children, plasma concentrations of MK-0787 were 46.8 and 44.0 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes and 7.8 and 7.4 micrograms/ml at 2 hours. Plasma half-lives were 0.82 and 0.83 hour, and total urinary recoveries were 110.2 and 80.5% during 0-6 hours. Plasma concentrations of MK-0787 were less than 0.2, 0.2 and 1.2 micrograms/ml just before the next doses in 3 patients given 11-20 mg/11-20 mg/kg of MK-0787/MK-0791 every 6-8 hours. The time course of the plasma levels and urinary excretion in these

  6. Phase I Study Assessing the Pharmacokinetic Profile, Safety, and Tolerability of a Single Dose of Ceftazidime-Avibactam in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jon; Arrieta, Antonio; Bishai, Raafat; Das, Shampa; Delair, Shirley; Edeki, Timi; Holmes, William C.; Li, Jianguo; Moffett, Kathryn S.; Mukundan, Deepa; Perez, Norma; Romero, José R.; Speicher, David; Sullivan, Janice E.; Zhou, Diansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a single dose of ceftazidime-avibactam in pediatric patients. A phase I, multicenter, open-label PK study was conducted in pediatric patients hospitalized with an infection and receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Patients were enrolled into four age cohorts (cohort 1, ≥12 to <18 years; cohort 2, ≥6 to <12 years; cohort 3, ≥2 to <6 years; cohort 4, ≥3 months to <2 years). Patients received a single 2-h intravenous infusion of ceftazidime-avibactam (cohort 1, 2,000 to 500 mg; cohort 2, 2,000 to 500 mg [≥40 kg] or 50 to 12.5 mg/kg [<40 kg]; cohorts 3 and 4, 50 to 12.5 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected to describe individual PK characteristics for ceftazidime and avibactam. Population PK modeling was used to describe characteristics of ceftazidime and avibactam PK across all age groups. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Thirty-two patients received study drug. Mean plasma concentration-time curves, geometric mean maximum concentration (Cmax), and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were similar across all cohorts for both drugs. Six patients (18.8%) reported an adverse event, all mild or moderate in intensity. No deaths or serious adverse events occurred. The single-dose PK of ceftazidime and avibactam were comparable between each of the 4 age cohorts investigated and were broadly similar to those previously observed in adults. No new safety concerns were identified. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01893346.) PMID:27503642

  7. Safety evaluation methodology for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods for coal extraction systems were developed. The analysis examines the soundness of the design, whether or not the major hazards have been eliminated or reduced, and how the reduction would be accomplished. The quantitative methodology establishes the approximate impact of hazards on injury levels. The results are weighted by peculiar geological elements, specialized safety training, peculiar mine environmental aspects, and reductions in labor force. The outcome is compared with injury level requirements based on similar, safer industries to get a measure of the new system's success in reducing injuries. This approach provides a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of hazards and their effects than existing safety analyses.

  8. Infliximab therapy for intestinal, neurological, and vascular involvement in Behcet disease: Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics in a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Toshifumi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Sato, Noriko; Ozaki, Kunihiko; Kondo, Kazuoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem disease associated with a poor prognosis in cases of gastrointestinal, neurological, or vascular involvement. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of infliximab (IFX) in BD patients with these serious complications who had displayed poor response or intolerance to conventional therapy.IFX at 5 mg/kg was administered to 18 patients (11 intestinal BD, 3 neurological BD [NBD], and 4 vascular BD [VBD]) at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46. In patients who showed inadequate responses to IFX after week 30, the dose was increased to 10 mg/kg. We then calculated the percentage of complete responders according to the predefined criteria depending on the symptoms and results of examinations (ileocolonoscopy, brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum inflammatory markers), exploring the percentage of complete responders at week 30 (primary endpoint).The percentage of complete responders was 61% (11/18) at both weeks 14 and 30 and remained the same until week 54. Intestinal BD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms along with decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after week 2. Consistently, scarring or healing of the principal ulcers was found in more than 80% of these patients after week 14. NBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms, imaging findings, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. VBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms after week 2 with reductions in CRP levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging findings showed reversal of inflammatory changes in 3 of the 4 VBD patients. Irrespective of the type of BD, all patients achieved improvement in quality of life, leading to the dose reduction or withdrawal of steroids. IFX dose was increased to 10 mg/kg in 3 intestinal BD

  9. Infliximab therapy for intestinal, neurological, and vascular involvement in Behcet disease: Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics in a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Toshifumi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Sato, Noriko; Ozaki, Kunihiko; Kondo, Kazuoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem disease associated with a poor prognosis in cases of gastrointestinal, neurological, or vascular involvement. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of infliximab (IFX) in BD patients with these serious complications who had displayed poor response or intolerance to conventional therapy. IFX at 5 mg/kg was administered to 18 patients (11 intestinal BD, 3 neurological BD [NBD], and 4 vascular BD [VBD]) at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46. In patients who showed inadequate responses to IFX after week 30, the dose was increased to 10 mg/kg. We then calculated the percentage of complete responders according to the predefined criteria depending on the symptoms and results of examinations (ileocolonoscopy, brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum inflammatory markers), exploring the percentage of complete responders at week 30 (primary endpoint). The percentage of complete responders was 61% (11/18) at both weeks 14 and 30 and remained the same until week 54. Intestinal BD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms along with decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after week 2. Consistently, scarring or healing of the principal ulcers was found in more than 80% of these patients after week 14. NBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms, imaging findings, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. VBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms after week 2 with reductions in CRP levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging findings showed reversal of inflammatory changes in 3 of the 4 VBD patients. Irrespective of the type of BD, all patients achieved improvement in quality of life, leading to the dose reduction or withdrawal of steroids. IFX dose was increased to 10 mg/kg in 3

  10. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  11. [Ceftriaxone in neonates and young infants; clinical efficacy, pharmacokinetic evaluation and effect on intestinal bacterial flora].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Murono, K; Sakata, H; Kakehashi, H; Oka, T; Kaeriyama, M; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Inyaku, F

    1988-02-01

    Twenty-two newborn and young infants, including 13 premature infants, were treated with ceftriaxone (CTRX) and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. Ages of the patients ranged from 0 to 106 days, and their body weights from 1.19 to 3.92 kg. Dose levels were 15 to 23 mg/kg every 12 to 24 hours for 2 to 13.5 days. Eighteen infants with sepsis and 1 infant with purulent coxitis were considered to have responded to the CTRX treatment. The results were excellent in 13 and good in 6 patients. The drug was well tolerated, although diarrhea occurred in 2 patients, eosinophilia in 6 patients, slightly elevated serum concentrations of transaminases in 2 patients and thrombocytosis in 1 among the 22 patients. The pharmacokinetic studies on CTRX were done in 8 patients including 3 premature infants. The ages ranged from 3 to 50 days, and body weight from 2.20 to 3.94 kg. Plasma concentrations 30 minutes after single 10 mg/kg intravenous bolus injection in two 4- to 5-day-old premature neonates were 48.4 and 50.0 micrograms/ml and those at 6 hours were 22.7 and 23.4 micrograms/ml, respectively. In 2 mature neonates, plasma levels were 42.2 and 39.1 micrograms/ml at 30 minutes and 23.4 and 26.6 micrograms/ml at 6 hours after single 20 mg/kg doses. In four 12- to 50-day-old patients, plasma concentrations ranged from 35.9 to 175.0 micrograms/ml at 30 minutes and from 21.9 to 32.8 micrograms/ml at 6 hours after multiple doses of 20 mg/kg intravenous bolus injection. The plasma half-lives of the drug ranged from 6.6 to 16.8 hours in these 8 patients. Excretion rates of this drug into urine within 12 hours were 21.4 to 63.4% in 7 patients. Urine concentrations of the drug in 34 samples collected at various times from the 7 patients ranged from 28.3 to 469.0 micrograms/ml. The cerebrospinal fluid level at 2 hours after a dose was 3.33 micrograms/ml on the 5th day of treatment in 1 patient with sepsis receiving 18 mg/kg of the drug every 12 hours. Its level at 3

  12. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Penetration of Antituberculosis Agents in Rabbit Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kjellsson, Maria C.; Via, Laura E.; Goh, Anne; Weiner, Danielle; Low, Kang Min; Kern, Steven; Pillai, Goonaseelan; Barry, Clifton E.

    2012-01-01

    Standard antituberculosis (anti-TB) therapy requires the use of multiple drugs for a minimum of 6 months, with variable outcomes that are influenced by a number of microbiological, pathological, and clinical factors. This is despite the availability of antibiotics that have good activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles in plasma. However, little is known about the distribution of widely used antituberculous agents in the pulmonary lesions where the pathogen resides. The rabbit model of TB infection was used to explore the hypothesis that standard drugs have various abilities to penetrate lung tissue and lesions and that adequate drug levels are not consistently reached at the site of infection. Using noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetic approaches, we modeled the rate and extent of distribution of isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and moxifloxacin in rabbit lung and lesions. Moxifloxacin reproducibly showed favorable partitioning into lung and granulomas, while the exposure of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide in lesions was markedly lower than in plasma. The extent of penetration in lung and lesions followed different trends for each drug. All four agents distributed rapidly from plasma to tissue with equilibration half-lives of less than 1 min to an hour. The models adequately described the plasma concentrations and reasonably captured actual lesion concentrations. Though further refinement is needed to accurately predict the behavior of these drugs in human subjects, our results enable the integration of lesion-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices in clinical trial simulations and in in vitro PK-PD studies with M. tuberculosis. PMID:21986820

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Tofacitinib on the Pharmacokinetics of Oral Contraceptive Steroids in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sujatha; Riese, Richard; Wang, Ronnie; Alvey, Christine W.; Shi, Haihong; Petit, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor. Tofacitinib metabolism is primarily mediated by cytochrome P450 3A4. This phase 1 randomized, open‐label, 2‐way crossover study (NCT01137708) evaluated the effect of tofacitinib 30 mg twice daily on the single‐dose pharmacokinetics of combination oral contraceptives ethinylestradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LN). EE and LN were administered as a single Microgynon 30® tablet (30 μg EE and 150 μg LN) to 19 healthy women. In the presence of tofacitinib, the area under the curve from time zero to infinity (AUC∞) increased by 6.6% and 0.9% for EE and LN, respectively. Maximal plasma concentrations decreased by 10.4% for EE and increased by 12.2% for LN when coadministered with tofacitinib. The 90% confidence intervals for the adjusted geometric mean ratios for AUC∞ fell within the 80%–125% region for both EE and LN. Mean half‐life was similar in the presence and absence of tofacitinib: 13.8 and 13.3 hours, respectively, for EE; 25.9 and 25.4 hours, respectively, for LN. Tofacitinib had no clinically relevant net inhibitory or inductive effect on the pharmacokinetics of EE and LN. Therefore, there is no evidence to suggest dose adjustments of oral contraceptive drugs containing EE or LN when coadministered with tofacitinib. PMID:27138968

  14. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of the Drug‐Drug Interaction Between Isavuconazole and Warfarin in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Amit; Yamazaki, Takao; Dietz, Albert J.; Kowalski, Donna; Lademacher, Christopher; Pearlman, Helene; Akhtar, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This phase 1 trial evaluated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between the novel triazole antifungal agent isavuconazole and warfarin in healthy adults. Multiple doses of isavuconazole were administered as the oral prodrug, isavuconazonium sulfate (372 mg 3 times a day for 2 days loading dose, then 372 mg once daily thereafter; equivalent to isavuconazole 200 mg), in the presence and absence of single doses of oral warfarin sodium 20 mg. Coadministration with isavuconazole increased the mean area under the plasma concentration‐time curves from time 0 to infinity of S‐ and R‐warfarin by 11% and 20%, respectively, but decreased the mean maximum plasma concentrations of S‐ and R‐warfarin by 12% and 7%, respectively, relative to warfarin alone. Mean area under the international normalized ratio curve and maximum international normalized ratio were 4% lower in the presence vs absence of isavuconazole. Mean warfarin area under the prothrombin time curve and maximum prothrombin time were 3% lower in the presence vs absence of isavuconazole. There were no serious treatment‐emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and no subjects discontinued the study due to TEAEs. All TEAEs were mild in intensity. These findings indicate that coadministration with isavuconazole has no clinically relevant effects on warfarin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. PMID:27278712

  15. Evaluating the Pharmacokinetics and in vivo Cancer Targeting Capability of Au Nanocages by Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Liu, Yongjian; Luehmann, Hannah; Xia, Xiaohu; Brown, Paige; Jarreau, Chad; Welch, Michael; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanocages have recently emerged as a novel class of photothermal transducers and drug carriers for cancer treatment. However, their pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting capability remain to be largely unexplored due to the lack of an imaging modality for quick and reliable mapping of their distributions in vivo. Herein, Au nanocages were prepared with controlled physicochemical properties and radiolabeled with 64Cu in high specific activities for in vivo evaluation using positron emission tomography (PET). Our pharmacokinetic studies with femtomolar administrations suggest that nanocages of 30 nm in size had a greatly improved biodistribution profile than nanocages of 55 nm in size, together with higher blood retention and lower hepatic and splenic uptakes. In a murine EMT-6 breast cancer model, the small cages also showed a significantly higher level of tumor uptake and a greater tumor-to-muscle ratio than the large cages. Quantitative PET imaging confirmed rapid accumulation and retention of Au nanocages inside the tumors. The ability to directly and quickly image the distribution of Au nanocages in vivo allows us to further optimize their physicochemical properties for a range of theranostic applications. PMID:22690722

  16. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  17. Pharmacokinetic and taste evaluation of ibuprofen (Motrin) 800 mg tablets in extemporaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Small, R E; Johnson, S M; Willis, H E

    1988-02-01

    A 4-way crossover study was done to determine the pharmacokinetic and palatability characteristics of ibuprofen 800 mg tablets when given as a solution in various beverages. When compared to the tablet itself, no significant difference was noted for any variable measured for an orange juice solution. A delay in time-to-peak concentration (Tmax) was noted for a dilute cherry syrup solution. Changes in Tmax, peak concentration achieved and area-under-the-curve were noted with a Coca-Cola solution. The authors conclude Coca-Cola to be clearly inappropriate for this method, a dilute cherry syrup solution slightly better and orange juice to be the preferred option.

  18. Road network safety evaluation using Bayesian hierarchical joint model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Huang, Helai

    2016-05-01

    Safety and efficiency are commonly regarded as two significant performance indicators of transportation systems. In practice, road network planning has focused on road capacity and transport efficiency whereas the safety level of a road network has received little attention in the planning stage. This study develops a Bayesian hierarchical joint model for road network safety evaluation to help planners take traffic safety into account when planning a road network. The proposed model establishes relationships between road network risk and micro-level variables related to road entities and traffic volume, as well as socioeconomic, trip generation and network density variables at macro level which are generally used for long term transportation plans. In addition, network spatial correlation between intersections and their connected road segments is also considered in the model. A road network is elaborately selected in order to compare the proposed hierarchical joint model with a previous joint model and a negative binomial model. According to the results of the model comparison, the hierarchical joint model outperforms the joint model and negative binomial model in terms of the goodness-of-fit and predictive performance, which indicates the reasonableness of considering the hierarchical data structure in crash prediction and analysis. Moreover, both random effects at the TAZ level and the spatial correlation between intersections and their adjacent segments are found to be significant, supporting the employment of the hierarchical joint model as an alternative in road-network-level safety modeling as well.

  19. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunbi; Oh, Cheol

    2017-03-01

    Advanced vehicle safety systems have been widely introduced in transportation systems and are expected to enhance traffic safety. However, these technologies mainly focus on assisting individual vehicles that are equipped with them, and less effort has been made to identify the effect of vehicular technologies on the traffic stream. This study proposed a methodology to assess the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems (AVSSs), which represent a promising technology to prevent traffic crashes and mitigate injury severity. The proposed AVSS consists of longitudinal and lateral vehicle control systems, which corresponds to the Level 2 vehicle automation presented by the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA). The effectiveness evaluation for the proposed technology was conducted in terms of crash potential reduction and congestion mitigation. A microscopic traffic simulator, VISSIM, was used to simulate freeway traffic stream and collect vehicle-maneuvering data. In addition, an external application program interface, VISSIM's COM-interface, was used to implement the AVSS. A surrogate safety assessment model (SSAM) was used to derive indirect safety measures to evaluate the effectiveness of the AVSS. A 16.7-km freeway stretch between the Nakdong and Seonsan interchanges on Korean freeway 45 was selected for the simulation experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of AVSS. A total of five simulation runs for each evaluation scenario were conducted. For the non-incident conditions, the rear-end and lane-change conflicts were reduced by 78.8% and 17.3%, respectively, under the level of service (LOS) D traffic conditions. In addition, the average delay was reduced by 55.5%. However, the system's effectiveness was weakened in the LOS A-C categories. Under incident traffic conditions, the number of rear-end conflicts was reduced by approximately 9.7%. Vehicle delays were reduced by approximately 43.9% with 100% of market penetration rate (MPR). These results

  1. Safety Evaluation of Transgenic Tilapia with Accelerated Growth.

    PubMed

    Guillén; Berlanga; Valenzuela; Morales; Toledo; Estrada; Puentes; Hayes; de la Fuente J

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in modern marine biotechnology have permitted the generation of new strains of economically important fish species through the transfer of growth hormone genes. These transgenic fish strains show improved growth performance and therefore constitute a better alternative for aquaculture programs. Recently, we have obtained a transgenic tilapia line with accelerated growth. However, before introducing this line into Cuban aquaculture, environmental and food safety assessment was required by national authorities. Experiments were performed to evaluate the behavior of transgenic tilapia in comparison to wild tilapia as a way to assess the environmental impact of introducing transgenic tilapia into Cuban aquaculture. Studies were also conducted to evaluate, according to the principle of substantial equivalence, the safety of consuming transgenic tilapia as food. Behavior studies showed that transgenic tilapia had a lower feeding motivation and dominance status than controls. Food safety assessment indicated that tilapia growth hormone has no biological activity when administered to nonhuman primates. Furthermore, no effects were detected in human healthy volunteers after the consumption of transgenic tilapia. These results showed, at least under the conditions found in Cuba, no environmental implications for the introduction of this transgenic tilapia line and the safety in the consumption of tiGH-transgenic tilapia as an alternative feeding source for humans. These results support the culture and consumption of these transgenic tilapia.

  2. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Supporting Cumulative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Clewell, Harvey; Campbell, Jerry; Andersen, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture by other chemical(s), resulting in a change in the toxicity from that predicted from the summation of the effects of the single chemicals using dose additivity. In such cases, conducting quantitative cumulative risk assessment for chemicals present as a mixture is difficult. The uncertainties that arise from PK interactions can be addressed by developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the disposition of chemical mixtures. Further, PK models can be developed to describe mechanisms of action and tissue responses. In this article, PBPK/PD modeling efforts conducted to investigate chemical interactions at the PK and PD levels are reviewed to demonstrate the use of this predictive modeling framework in assessing health risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures. PMID:21655141

  3. Efavirenz dissolution enhancement III: Colloid milling, pharmacokinetics and electronic tongue evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Cristiane R D; Fandaruff, Cinira; da Costa, Maíra A; Cabral, Lucio M; Pitta, Luciana R; Bilatto, Stanley E R; Prado, Livia D; Corrêa, Daniel S; Tasso, Leandro; Silva, Marcos Antônio S; Rocha, Helvécio V A

    2017-03-01

    Efavirenz (EFV), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), is part of first-line therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (HIV-1/AIDS). This drug shows relatively low oral absorption and bioavailability, as well as high intra- and inter-subject variability. Several studies have shown that treatment failure and adverse effects are associated with low and high EFV plasma concentrations, respectively. Some studies suggest different EFV formulations to minimize inter-patient variability and improve its solubility and dissolution; however, all of these formulations are complex, using for instance, cyclodextrins, dendrimers and polymeric nanoparticles, rendering them inviable industrially. The aim of this work was to prepare simple and low-cost suspensions of EFV for improvement of solubility and dissolution rate by using colloid mill, spray or freeze-drying, and characterization of the powders obtained. The results demonstrated an increase in the dissolution rate of EFV, using 0.2% of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and 0.2% of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) or hydroxypropylmetilcellulose (HPMC) in both freeze and spray dried powders. The pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated improved pharmacokinetic parameters for the formulation containing SLS and HPC. The powders obtained, which present enhanced dissolution properties, can be incorporated in a solid dosage form for treatment of AIDS in paediatric patients with promising results.

  4. Use of anatomical and kinetic models in the evaluation of human food additive safety.

    PubMed

    Roth, William L

    2005-09-22

    Toxicological testing in animals is relied upon as a surrogate for clinical testing of most food additives. Both animal and human clinical test results are generally available for direct additives when high levels of exposure are expected. Limited animal studies or in vitro test results may be the only sources of toxicological data available when low levels of exposure (microg/person/day) are expected and where no effects of the additive on the food itself are desired. Safety assessment of such materials for humans requires mathematical extrapolation from any effects observed in test animals to arrive at acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) for humans. Models of anatomy may be used to estimate tissue and organ weights where that information is missing and necessary for evaluation of a data set. The effect of growth on target tissue exposure during critical phases of organ development can be more accurately assessed when models of growth and known physiological changes are combined with pharmacokinetic results for test species. Kinetic models, when combined with limited chemical property, kinetic, and distribution data, can often be used to predict steady-state plasma and tissue levels of a test material over the range of doses employed in chronic studies to aid in interpretation of effects that are often nonlinear with respect to delivered dose. A better understanding of the reasons for nonlinearity of effects in animals improves our confidence in extrapolation to humans.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and safety of olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler in subjects with impaired hepatic or renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christina; Luedtke, Doreen; Unseld, Anna; Hamilton, Alan; Halabi, Atef; Wein, Martina; Formella, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In two trials, the influences of hepatic and renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of olodaterol, a novel long-acting inhaled β2-agonist for treatment of COPD, were investigated. Subjects and methods The first trial included eight subjects with mild hepatic function impairment (Child–Pugh A), eight subjects with moderate impairment (Child–Pugh B), and 16 matched healthy subjects with normal hepatic function. The second trial included eight subjects with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL·min−1) and 14 matched healthy subjects with normal renal function. Subjects received single doses of 20 or 30 μg olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler. Results Olodaterol was well tolerated in all subjects. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 4 hours (AUC0–4) for subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment compared to healthy subjects were 97% (75%–125%) and 105% (79%–140%), respectively. Corresponding values for dose-normalized maximum concentration (Cmax) were 112% (84%–151%) (mild impairment) and 99% (73%–135%) (moderate impairment). The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of AUC0–4 for subjects with severe renal impairment compared to healthy subjects was 135% (94%–195%), and for Cmax was 137% (84%–222%). There was no significant relationship between creatinine clearance and AUC0–4 or Cmax. Renal clearance of olodaterol was reduced to 20% of normal in severe renal impairment. Conclusion Mild to moderate hepatic function impairment or severe renal function impairment did not result in a clinically relevant increase of olodaterol systemic exposure after a single inhaled dose. PMID:27051282

  6. An open-label clinical trial of the effects of age and gender on the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of the ghrelin receptor agonist anamorelin

    PubMed Central

    Leese, Philip T; Trang, John M; Blum, Robert A; de Groot, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the ghrelin receptor agonist anamorelin. Methods Three demographic cohorts of healthy subjects were enrolled in this single-center, open-label study. Subjects received a single oral dose (25 mg) of anamorelin HCl. Serial blood samples were collected over 24 hours to assess anamorelin PK and circulating growth hormone (GH) levels. Data were compared with a reference cohort. Results Anamorelin was rapidly absorbed in all cohorts; peak concentrations were observed 30–45 minutes and 2–4 hours post-dose, which declined biexponentially with mean terminal half-lives of 6–7 hours. An age effect on Cmax and AUC∞ was not apparent; however, mean AUC∞ values were approximately 1.8–1.9-fold higher in the female cohorts than in the reference male cohort. GH increase was rapid and virtually identical in both sexes, though attenuated in elderly subjects. No clinically significant safety or tolerability findings were observed. Conclusions While PK parameters do suggest higher exposure in females, this effect is considered to be modest given the variability of the 6–8 subjects per cohort. Moreover, no such effect was observed in the pharmacodynamic responses, thus, dose adjustment for age and gender is considered unnecessary. PMID:26640742

  7. Phase I randomised double-blind pilot study of micronized resveratrol (SRT501) in patients with hepatic metastases - safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Howells, L. M.; Berry, D. P.; Elliott, P.J.; Jacobson, E. W.; Hoffmann, E.; Hegarty, B.; Brown, K.; Steward, W. P.; Gescher, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The phytochemical resveratrol has undergone extensive preclinical investigation for its putative cancer chemopreventive properties. Low systemic availability of the parent compound due to rapid and extensive metabolism, may confound its usefulness as a potential agent to prevent malignancies in organs remote from the site of absorption. Micronization allows increased drug absorption, thus increasing availability. Here we describe a pilot study of SRT501, micronized resveratrol, given at 5.0 g daily for 14 days, to patients with colorectal cancer and hepatic metastases scheduled to undergo hepatectomy. The purpose of the study was to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the formulation. SRT501 was found to be well tolerated. Mean plasma resveratrol levels following a single dose of SRT501 administration were 1942±1422 ng/mL, exceeding those published for equivalent doses of non-micronized resveratrol by 3.6-fold. Resveratrol was detectable in hepatic tissue following SRT501 administration (up to 2287 ng/g). Cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, was significantly increased by 39% in malignant hepatic tissue following SRT501 treatment, compared to tissue from the placebo-treated patients. SRT501 warrants further clinical exploration to assess its potential clinical utility. PMID:21680702

  8. Pharmacokinetics and safety of a novel recombinant human von Willebrand factor manufactured with a plasma-free method: a prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Kempton, Christine; Millar, Carolyn; Romond, Edward; Shapiro, Amy; Birschmann, Ingvild; Ragni, Margaret V.; Gill, Joan Cox; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Klamroth, Robert; Wong, Wing-Yen; Chapman, Miranda; Engl, Werner; Turecek, Peter L.; Suiter, Tobias M.

    2013-01-01

    Safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) combined at a fixed ratio with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) were investigated in 32 subjects with type 3 or severe type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) in a prospective phase 1, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. rVWF was well tolerated and no thrombotic events, inhibitors, or serious adverse events were observed. The PK of rVWF ristocetin cofactor activity, VWF antigen, and collagen-binding activity were similar to those of the comparator plasma-derived (pd) VWF-pdFVIII. In vivo cleavage of ultra-large molecular-weight rVWF multimers by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13; the endogenous VWF protease) and generation of characteristic satellite bands were demonstrated. In 2 subjects with specific nonneutralizing anti-VWF–binding antibodies already detectable before rVWF infusion, a reduction in VWF multimers and VWF activity was observed. Stabilization of endogenous FVIII was enhanced following post–rVWF-rFVIII infusion as shown by the difference in area under the plasma concentration curve compared with pdVWF-pdFVIII (AUC0-∞) (P < .01). These data support the concept of administering rVWF alone once a therapeutic level of endogenous FVIII is achieved. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00816660. PMID:23777763

  9. An Exploratory Dose-Escalating Study Investigating the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Intravenous Atacicept in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Rossi, C; Nasonov, E; Stanislav, M; Yakusevich, V; Ershova, O; Lomareva, N; Saunders, H; Hill, J; Nestorov, I

    2009-01-01

    Atacicept, a recombinant fusion protein containing the extracellular, ligand-binding portion of the transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin-ligand interactor receptor, and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin (Ig) G, is designed to block the activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand, and may have utility as a treatment for B-cellmediated diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This Phase Ib study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics of intravenous (i.v.) atacicept in patients with mild-to-moderate SLE. Patients (n = 24) were randomised (5:1) to receive atacicept (single dose: 3, 9 or 18 mg/kg; or multiple dose: 2 × 9 mg/kg) or matching placebo. Patients were followed for 6 weeks after dosing (9 weeks in the 2 × 9 mg/kg cohort). Local tolerability of atacicept was comparable with that of placebo, with only mild injection-site reactions reported with atacicept. Atacicept i.v. was generally well tolerated, both systemically and locally, in patients with mild-to-moderate SLE. Atacicept displayed non-linear PK, which was predictable across doses and between single and repeat doses. The biological activity of atacicept was demonstrated by its marked effect in reducing B-cells and Ig levels in patients with SLE. This supports the utility of this therapeutic approach in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as SLE. PMID:19395457

  10. An open-label, two-period comparative study on pharmacokinetics and safety of a combined ethinylestradiol/gestodene transdermal contraceptive patch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Haiyan; Xiong, Xin; Zhai, Suodi; Wei, Yudong; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Lin; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of a newly developed combined ethinylestradiol (EE)/gestodene (GSD) transdermal contraceptive patch after a single-dose administration and compared with the market available tablet formulation in healthy adult subjects. An open-label, two-period comparative study was conducted in 12 healthy women volunteers. A single dose of the study combined EE/GE transdermal contraceptive patch and oral tablet (Milunet(®)) were administered. Blood samples at different time points after dose were collected, and concentrations were analyzed. A reliable, highly sensitive and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) assay method was developed in this study to determine the plasma concentrations of EE and GSD. Compared to the tablet, the study patch had a significantly decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), extended time to reach the Cmax and half-life, as well as increased clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The half-lives of EE and GSD of the patch were 3.3 and 2.2 times, respectively, than the half-life of the tablet. The areas under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCs) of EE and GSD of the patch were 8.0 and 16.2 times, respectively, than the AUC of the tablet. No severe adverse event was observed during the whole study, and the general safety was acceptable. In conclusion, compared to the oral tablet Milunet, the study contraceptive patch was well tolerated and showed potent drug exposure, significant extended half-life and stable drug concentrations.

  11. An open-label, two-period comparative study on pharmacokinetics and safety of a combined ethinylestradiol/gestodene transdermal contraceptive patch

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Haiyan; Xiong, Xin; Zhai, Suodi; Wei, Yudong; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Lin; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of a newly developed combined ethinylestradiol (EE)/gestodene (GSD) transdermal contraceptive patch after a single-dose administration and compared with the market available tablet formulation in healthy adult subjects. An open-label, two-period comparative study was conducted in 12 healthy women volunteers. A single dose of the study combined EE/GE transdermal contraceptive patch and oral tablet (Milunet®) were administered. Blood samples at different time points after dose were collected, and concentrations were analyzed. A reliable, highly sensitive and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) assay method was developed in this study to determine the plasma concentrations of EE and GSD. Compared to the tablet, the study patch had a significantly decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), extended time to reach the Cmax and half-life, as well as increased clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The half-lives of EE and GSD of the patch were 3.3 and 2.2 times, respectively, than the half-life of the tablet. The areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUCs) of EE and GSD of the patch were 8.0 and 16.2 times, respectively, than the AUC of the tablet. No severe adverse event was observed during the whole study, and the general safety was acceptable. In conclusion, compared to the oral tablet Milunet, the study contraceptive patch was well tolerated and showed potent drug exposure, significant extended half-life and stable drug concentrations. PMID:28331292

  12. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-08-27

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

  13. Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Combined autophagy and HDAC inhibition: a phase I safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic analysis of hydroxychloroquine in combination with the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Devalingam; Mita, Monica; Sarantopoulos, John; Wood, Leslie; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Davis, Lisa E; Mita, Alain C; Curiel, Tyler J; Espitia, Claudia M; Nawrocki, Steffan T; Giles, Francis J; Carew, Jennifer S

    2014-08-01

    We previously reported that inhibition of autophagy significantly augmented the anticancer activity of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat (VOR) through a cathepsin D-mediated mechanism. We thus conducted a first-in-human study to investigate the safety, preliminary efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of the combination of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and VOR in patients with advanced solid tumors. Of 27 patients treated in the study, 24 were considered fully evaluable for study assessments and toxicity. Patients were treated orally with escalating doses of HCQ daily (QD) (d 2 to 21 of a 21-d cycle) in combination with 400 mg VOR QD (d one to 21). Treatment-related adverse events (AE) included grade 1 to 2 nausea, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, anemia, and elevated creatinine. Grade 3 fatigue and/or myelosuppression were observed in a minority of patients. Fatigue and gastrointestinal AE were dose-limiting toxicities. Six-hundred milligrams HCQ and 400 mg VOR was established as the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase II regimen. One patient with renal cell carcinoma had a confirmed durable partial response and 2 patients with colorectal cancer had prolonged stable disease. The addition of HCQ did not significantly impact the PK profile of VOR. Treatment-related increases in the expression of CDKN1A and CTSD were more pronounced in tumor biopsies than peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Based on the safety and preliminary efficacy of this combination, additional clinical studies are currently being planned to further investigate autophagy inhibition as a new approach to increase the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors.

  15. Virtual Clinical Trial Toward Polytherapy Safety Assessment: Combination of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Based Modeling and Simulation Approach With Drug-Drug Interactions Involving Terfenadine as an Example.

    PubMed

    Wiśniowska, Barbara; Polak, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    A Quantitative Systems Pharmacology approach was utilized to predict the cardiac consequences of drug-drug interaction (DDI) at the population level. The Simcyp in vitro-in vivo correlation and physiologically based pharmacokinetic platform was used to predict the pharmacokinetic profile of terfenadine following co-administration of the drug. Electrophysiological effects were simulated using the Cardiac Safety Simulator. The modulation of ion channel activity was dependent on the inhibitory potential of drugs on the main cardiac ion channels and a simulated free heart tissue concentration. ten Tusscher's human ventricular cardiomyocyte model was used to simulate the pseudo-ECG traces and further predict the pharmacodynamic consequences of DDI. Consistent with clinical observations, predicted plasma concentration profiles of terfenadine show considerable intra-subject variability with recorded Cmax values below 5 ng/mL for most virtual subjects. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of inhibitors were predicted with reasonable accuracy. In all cases, a combination of the physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiology-based pharmacodynamic models was able to differentiate between the terfenadine alone and terfenadine + inhibitor scenario. The range of QT prolongation was comparable in the clinical and virtual studies. The results indicate that mechanistic in vitro-in vivo correlation can be applied to predict the clinical effects of DDI even without comprehensive knowledge on all mechanisms contributing to the interaction.

  16. Plasma concentrations of pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine and evaluation of pharmaco-kinetic data by computerized curve fitting

    PubMed Central

    Weidekamm, E.; Plozza-Nottebrock, H.; Forgo, I.; Dubach, U. C.

    1982-01-01

    For the determination of the plasma concentration profiles of pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine after the administration of 1 tablet of Fansidar, highly specific analytical methods are needed as the pyrimethamine concentration is low (0.2 - 0.02 mg/litre) and the concentration ratio of the two components in the plasma is high (> 1: 500). The microbiological method described in this paper fulfils these requirements for high specificity and sensitivity (the sensitivity limit for sulfadoxine is 1 mg/litre and for pyrimethamine is 0.013 mg/litre). Pharmacokinetic data were evaluated for 14 volunteers after administration of 1 tablet of Fansidar, and a computer simulation of multiple dosing (1 tablet per week) was performed. PMID:6979415

  17. Effect of Coadministered Fat on the Tolerability, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Papua New Guinean Children with Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Moore, B. R.; Benjamin, J. M.; Salman, S.; Griffin, S.; Ginny, E.; Page-Sharp, M.; Robinson, L. J.; Siba, P.; Batty, K. T.; Mueller, I.

    2014-01-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/kg doses were given with water (n = 14, group A) or milk (n = 16, group B), with regular clinical/laboratory assessment and blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma PQ was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection, and DHA was assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models for PQ and DHA were developed using a population-based approach. DHA-PQ was generally well tolerated, and initial fever and parasite clearance were prompt. There were no differences in the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–∞) for PQ (median, 41,906 versus 36,752 μg · h/liter in groups A and B, respectively; P = 0.24) or DHA (4,047 versus 4,190 μg · h/liter; P = 0.67). There were also no significant between-group differences in prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc) initially during follow-up, but the QTc tended to be higher in group B children at 24 h (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 15 ± 10 versus 6 ± 15 ms0.5 in group A, P = 0.067) and 168 h (10 ± 18 versus 1 ± 23 ms0.5, P = 0.24) when plasma PQ concentrations were relatively low. A small amount of fat does not change the bioavailability of DHA-PQ in children, but a delayed persistent effect on ventricular repolarization cannot be excluded. PMID:25049242

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Nelfinavir When Used in Combination with Zidovudine and Lamivudine in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women: Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) Protocol 353

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Y.J.; Mirochnick, M.; Stek, A.; Mofenson, L.M.; Connor, J.; Capparelli, E.; Watts, D.H.; Huang, S.; Hughes, M.D.; Kaiser, K.; Purdue, L.; Asfaw, Y.; Keller, M.; Smith, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral regimens including nelfinavir (NFV) are commonly used in pregnancy. We studied the safety, antiviral effect, and pharmacokinetics of NFV and its M8 metabolite with two dosing regimens in combination with zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC) in HIV-infected pregnant women. Method HIV-infected pregnant women between 14 and 34 weeks gestation received NFV (Cohort 1: 750 mg tid, n = 10; Cohort 2: 1250 mg bid, n = 23) with ZDV and 3TC. Serial blood sampling for NFV concentrations was performed antepartum (AP) and 6 weeks postpartum (PP). Maternal and cord blood samples were also obtained at delivery. NFV and M8 levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The pharmacokinetic (PK) target was an extrapolated NFV AUC0–24 > 30 μg · h/mL. Mothers were followed frequently for potential clinical and laboratory toxicity. Results Overall, NFV in combination with ZDV and 3TC was well tolerated. The PK target was met in 3/8 AP and 5/7 PP in Cohort 1 and 17/21 AP and 16/17 PP in Cohort 2. When Cohort 2 NFV PK parameters AP and PP were compared, median Cmax (3.90 μg/mL vs. 5.01 μg/mL, p < .05) and AUC0–24 (56.6 vs. 86.8 μg · h/mL, p < .05) were increased PP and oral clearance (Cl/F; 44.2 vs. 28.8 L/h, p < .05) was decreased PP. The average M8/NFV ratio was increased PP compared to AP (0.085 vs. 0.29, p < .001). Placental transfer of NFV was low with a median cord blood:maternal plasma ratio at delivery of 0.05. Maternal mean CD4+ T cell counts increased significantly and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels decreased from entry to delivery and 6 to 12 weeks postpartum. Conclusion NFV used in combination with ZDV and 3TC was well tolerated in pregnant HIV-infected women and produced a significant improvement in HIV disease parameters. NFV drug exposure is inadequate in most pregnant women receiving 750 mg tid but is much improved with 1250 mg bid. NFV crosses the placenta poorly. The AP increase in NFV oral clearance and

  19. Phase 1, Open-Label, Dose Escalation, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics Study of ME-344 as a Single Agent in Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bendell, Johanna C; Patel, Manish R; Infante, Jeffrey R; Kurkjian, Carla D; Jones, Suzanne F; Pant, Shubham; Burris, Howard A; Moreno, Ofir; Esquibel, Vanessa; Levin, Wendy; Moore, Kathleen N

    2015-01-01

    Background The current phase 1, open-label, dose escalation study was conducted to establish the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic profile, and preliminary antitumor activity of the novel mitochondrial inhibitor ME-344 in patients with refractory solid tumors. Methods Patients with refractory solid tumors were treated in a 3 + 3 dose escalation design. ME-344 was administered via intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of the first 28-day cycle and weekly thereafter. Pharmacokinetics was assessed on days 1 and 15 of the first cycle. Results A total of 30 patients (median age, 65 years; 67% of whom were female) received ME-344. There were 5 dose-limiting toxicities reported. Four patients developed grade 3 neuropathy (2 patients each at doses of 15 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) and 1 patient treated at a dose of 10 mg/kg developed a grade 3 acute myocardial infarction (toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.03]). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as 10 mg/kg weekly. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and fatigue. At the MTD of 10 mg/kg, the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) was 25.8 µg/mL and the area under the concentration curve from time zero to infinity was 25.9 hour*µg/mL. One patient with small cell lung cancer achieved a partial response for ≥52 weeks. Four patients had prolonged stable disease (1 patient each with urothelial carcinoma [47 weeks], carcinoid tumor [≥40 weeks], cervical leiomyosarcoma [39 weeks], and cervical cancer [≥31 weeks]). Conclusions The once-weekly administration of ME-344 was generally well tolerated in the current study, a first-in-human study; dose-limiting neuropathy was noted, but not at the MTD. Exposures at the 10-mg/kg dose level suggest a sufficient therapeutic index. The preliminary clinical activity as a monotherapy supports the further clinical development of ME-344 in combination with chemotherapy. The

  20. Programmatic Environmental, Safety, and Health Evaluation (PESHE) Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Elements 1. System Safety & Health Explosive Safety Orbital Debris 2. NEPA 3. Env. Compliance 4. Hazardous Materials 5. Pollution Prevention STEP 4... orbital debris , collision avoidance, laser clearing-house functions, environmental hazards, and safety procedures. D. Explosive Safety: 1...System Safety and Health a. Explosive Safety b. Orbital Debris ii. Environmental compliance iii. NEPA iv. Hazardous Materials Management v. Pollution

  1. Pharmacokinetic study and clinical evaluation of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Quan; Yang, Jing Chun; Liang, Jie Xiong; Wang, Shi Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant as well as to evaluate the clinical drug activity of this preparation in pancreatic cancer patients. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant were evaluated by examining the half-life time (T1/2) and apparent volume of distribution (Vd) in pancreatic cancer patients; the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant was administered through interstitial chemotherapy (tumor interstitium implantation). In the drug activity study, 36 locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer patients were divided randomly into an experimental treatment group (n=18) and a standard treatment group (n=18). The experimental treatment group was treated with interstitial chemotherapy of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant combined with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine; the standard treatment group was treated with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine. An internal drainage procedure was used when biliary and/or gastrointestinal tract obstruction occurred in the two groups. Clinical benefit response, including pain (visual analogue scale), analgesic drug use, general conditions (Karnofsky performance score), weight changes, and survival status, was observed. T1/2 of the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant was 5475.8±136.4 min, whereas Vd was 45275.0±1028.6 l. Clinical benefit response in the experimental treatment group was better than that in the standard treatment group. The experimental treatment group had longer median survival time compared with the standard treatment group. The slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant could deliver drugs mainly in the regional area of the tumor and prolong the drug action time; interstitial chemotherapy of a 5-fluorouracil implant combined with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine could improve the quality of life and survival status of pancreatic cancer patients. The method was promising and worthy of

  2. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  3. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kai, Marc P; Keeler, Amanda W; Perry, Jillian L; Reuter, Kevin G; Luft, J Christopher; O'Neal, Sara K; Zamboni, William C; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-04-28

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limit its clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16wt.%). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2wt.%). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20wt.%), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10mg/kg versus 5mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies.

  4. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. PMID:26893559

  5. A Novel Microspheres Formulation of Puerarin: Pharmacokinetics Study and In Vivo Pharmacodynamics Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of puerarin loaded carboxymethyl chitosan microspheres (Pue-CCMs). The differences in pharmacokinetics parameters of rats after intragastric administration of Pue-CCMs and puerarin were investigated using HPLC. To assess the protective effect of Pue-CCMs on myocardial injury in rats, serum levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured, in addition to pathological examinations and immunohistochemical staining. Our present study has shown that the AUC0–t, Cmax, Tmax, MRT0–t of Pue-CCMs, and puerarin were 20.176 mg·h/L, 3.778 μg/mL, 1 h, 4.634 h and 9.474 mg·h/L, 2.618 μg/mL, 0.542 h, and 3.241 h, respectively. Pue-CCMs alleviated myocardial ischemic injury. Pretreatment with Pue-CCMs could significantly decrease CK, LDH, and MDA levels and increase T-SOD level in the serum. Pue-CCMs downregulated expression of the Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and upregulated B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) expression. Compared with puerarin group, the Pue-CCMs group could improve the oral bioavailability of puerarin. The protective effect of Pue-CCMs against myocardial injury was significantly greater than puerarin at the same dose. In summary, Pue-CCMs should be a qualified and promising candidate as a new oral preparation of puerarin. PMID:28119759

  6. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom-up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability.

  7. Electronic Clinical Safety Reporting System: A Benefits Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Desmond; Neville, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Background Eastern Health, a large health care organization in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), started a staged implementation of an electronic occurrence reporting system (used interchangeably with “clinical safety reporting system”) in 2008, completing Phase One in 2009. The electronic clinical safety reporting system (CSRS) was designed to replace a paper-based system. The CSRS involves reporting on occurrences such as falls, safety/security issues, medication errors, treatment and procedural mishaps, medical equipment malfunctions, and close calls. The electronic system was purchased from a vendor in the United Kingdom that had implemented the system in the United Kingdom and other places, such as British Columbia. The main objective of the new system was to improve the reporting process with the goal of improving clinical safety. The project was funded jointly by Eastern Health and Canada Health Infoway. Objective The objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) assess the CSRS on achieving its stated objectives (particularly, the benefits realized and lessons learned), and (2) identify contributions, if any, that can be made to the emerging field of electronic clinical safety reporting. Methods The evaluation involved mixed methods, including extensive stakeholder participation, pre/post comparative study design, and triangulation of data where possible. The data were collected from several sources, such as project documentation, occurrence reporting records, stakeholder workshops, surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. Results The findings provided evidence that frontline staff and managers support the CSRS, identifying both benefits and areas for improvement. Many benefits were realized, such as increases in the number of occurrences reported, in occurrences reported within 48 hours, in occurrences reported by staff other than registered nurses, in close calls reported, and improved timelines for notification. There was also user satisfaction

  8. A phase I, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic evaluation of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-fuoro-2′-deoxycytidine, administered with tetrahydrouridine

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert J.; Kummar, Shivaani; Beumer, Jan H.; Blanchard, M. Suzette; Ruel, Christopher; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Carroll, Mary I.; Hou, Jessie M.; Li, Chun; Lenz, Heinz J.; Eiseman, Julie L.; Doroshow, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (DNMT) are active antineoplastic agents. We conducted the first-in-human phase I trial of 5-fluoro-2′-deoxycytidine (FdCyd), a DNMT inhibitor stable in aqueous solution, in patients with advanced solid tumors. Objectives were to establish the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of FdCyd + tetrahydrouridine (THU). Methods FdCyd + THU were administered by 3 h IV infusion on days 1–5 every 3 weeks, or days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. FdCyd was administered IV with a fixed 350 mg/m2/day dose of THU to inhibit deamination of FdCyd. Pharmacokinetics of FdCyd, downstream metabolites and THU were assessed by LC–MS/MS. RBC γ-globin expression was evaluated as a pharmacodynamics biomarker. Results Patients were enrolled on the 3-week schedule at doses up to 80 mg/m2/day without dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) prior to transitioning to the 4-week schedule, which resulted in an MTD of 134 mg/m2/day; one of six patients had a first-cycle DLT (grade 3 colitis). FdCyd ≥40 mg/m2/day produced peak plasma concentrations >1 μM. Although there was inter-patient variability, γ-globin mRNA increased during the first two treatment cycles. One refractory breast cancer patient experienced a partial response (PR) of >90 % decrease in tumor size, lasting over a year. Conclusions The MTD was established at 134 mg/m2 FdCyd + 350 mg/m2 THU days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. Based on toxicities observed over multiple cycles, good plasma exposures, and the sustained PR observed at 67 mg/m2/day, the phase II dose for our ongoing multi-histology trial is 100 mg/m2/day FdCyd with 350 mg/m2/day THU. PMID:25567350

  9. 77 FR 27814 - Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force... Consolidated Line Item Improvement Process AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of... safety evaluation (SE) for plant-specific adoption of Technical Specifications (TSs) Task Force...

  10. Potent in vivo anti-malarial activity and representative snapshot pharmacokinetic evaluation of artemisinin-quinoline hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Because Plasmodium falciparum displays increase tolerance against the recommended artemisinin combination therapies (ACT), new classes of anti-malarial drugs are urgently required. Previously synthesized artemisinin-aminoquinoline hybrids were evaluated to ascertain whether the potent low nanomolar in vitro anti-plasmodial activity would carry over in vivo against Plasmodium vinckei. A snapshot pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out on one of the hybrids to obtain an indication of the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of anti-malarial drugs. Methods In vitro activity of hybrids 2 and 3 were determined against the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum. Plasmodium vinckei-infected mice were treated with hybrids 1 – 3 for four days at a dosage of 0.8 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, 7.5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), or orally (per os) with 2.7 mg/kg, 8.3 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg. Artesunate was used as reference drug. A snapshot oral and IV pharmacokinetic study was performed on hybrid 2. Results Hybrids 1 – 3 displayed potent in vivo anti-malarial activity with ED50 of 1.1, 1.4 and <0.8 mg/kg by the ip route and 12, 16 and 13 mg/kg per os, respectively. Long-term monitoring of parasitaemia showed a complete cure of mice (without recrudescence) at 15 mg/kg via ip route and at 50 mg/kg by oral route for hybrid 1 and 2, whereas artesunate was only able to provide a complete cure at 30 mg/kg ip and 80 mg/kg per os. Conclusions These compounds provide a new class of desperately needed anti-malarial drug. Despite a short half-life and moderate oral bioavailability, this class of compounds was able to cure malaria in mice at very low dosages. The optimum linker length for anti-malarial activity was found to be a diaminoalkyl chain consisting of two carbon atoms either methylated or unmethylated. PMID:23433124

  11. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey's manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum.

  12. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey’s manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:28367145

  13. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health... distribute to Federal agencies detailed information on the Department of Labor's evaluation program....

  14. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.79 Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. Agency heads shall develop...

  15. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health... distribute to Federal agencies detailed information on the Department of Labor's evaluation program....

  16. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.79 Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. Agency heads shall develop...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health... distribute to Federal agencies detailed information on the Department of Labor's evaluation program....

  18. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.79 Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. Agency heads shall develop...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.79 Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. Agency heads shall develop...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health... distribute to Federal agencies detailed information on the Department of Labor's evaluation program....

  1. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.79 Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. Agency heads shall develop...

  2. The role of quantitative safety evaluation in regulatory decision making of drugs.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Aloka G; Izem, Rima; Keeton, Stephine; Kim, Clara Y; Levenson, Mark S; Soukup, Mat

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of safety is a critical component of drug review at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Statisticians are playing an increasingly visible role in quantitative safety evaluation and regulatory decision-making. This article reviews the history and the recent events relating to quantitative drug safety evaluation at the FDA. The article then focuses on five active areas of quantitative drug safety evaluation and the role Division of Biometrics VII (DBVII) plays in these areas, namely meta-analysis for safety evaluation, large safety outcome trials, post-marketing requirements (PMRs), the Sentinel Initiative, and the evaluation of risk from extended/long-acting opioids. This article will focus chiefly on developments related to quantitative drug safety evaluation and not on the many additional developments in drug safety in general.

  3. 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety) based pyroprocessing facility safety evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, J.H.; Choung, W.M.; You, G.S.; Moon, S.I.; Park, S.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2013-07-01

    The big advantage of pyroprocessing for the management of spent fuels against the conventional reprocessing technologies lies in its proliferation resistance since the pure plutonium cannot be separated from the spent fuel. The extracted materials can be directly used as metal fuel in a fast reactor, and pyroprocessing reduces drastically the volume and heat load of the spent fuel. KAERI has implemented the SBD (Safeguards-By-Design) concept in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The goal of SBD is to integrate international safeguards into the entire facility design process since the very beginning of the design phase. This paper presents a safety evaluation plan using a conceptual design of a reference pyroprocessing facility, in which 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety)-By-Design (3SBD) concept is integrated from early conceptual design phase. The purpose of this paper is to establish an advanced pyroprocessing hot cell facility design concept based on 3SBD for the successful realization of pyroprocessing technology with enhanced safety and proliferation resistance.

  4. Phase I Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Combined Valproic Acid/Doxorubicin Treatment in Dogs with Spontaneous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittenburg, Luke A.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Thamm, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are targeted anti-cancer agents with a well-documented ability to act synergistically with cytotoxic agents. We recently demonstrated that the HDACi valproic acid (VPA) sensitizes osteosarcoma cells to doxorubicin (DOX) in vitro and in vivo. As there are no published reports on the clinical utility of HDACi in dogs with spontaneous cancers, we sought to determine a safe and biologically effective dose of VPA administered prior to a standard dose of DOX. Methods 21 dogs were enrolled into eight cohorts in an accelerated dose-escalation trial consisting of pre-treatment with oral VPA followed by DOX on a three-week cycle. Blood and tumor tissue were collected for determination of serum VPA concentration and evaluation of pharmcodynamic effects by immunofluorescence cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Serum and complete blood counts were obtained for determination of changes in DOX pharmacokinetics or hematologic effects. Results All doses of VPA were well tolerated. Serum VPA concentrations increased linearly with dose. DOX pharmacokinetics were comparable to those in dogs receiving DOX alone. A positive correlation was detected between VPA dose and histone hyperacetylation in PBMC. No potentiation of DOX-induced myelosuppression was observed. Histone hyperacetylation was documented in tumor and PBMC. Responses included 2/21 complete, 3/21 partial, 5/21 stable disease, and 11/21 progressive disease. Conclusions VPA can be administered to dogs at doses up to 240 mg/kg/day prior to a standard dose of DOX. In addition, we have developed the PK/PD tools necessary for future studies of novel HDACi in the clinical setting of canine cancer. PMID:20705615

  5. Evaluation of an integrated in vitro-in silico PBPK (physiologically based pharmacokinetic) model to provide estimates of human bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongliang; Stoner, Chad; Reddy, Anita; Freiwald, Sascha; Smith, Danielle; Winters, Roger; Stankovic, Charles; Surendran, Narayanan

    2006-02-03

    PK express module is a physiologically based model of first pass metabolism, which integrates in vitro data with an in silico physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human bioavailability (F(H)). There are three required inputs: FDp (Fraction dose absorbed, final parameter from iDEA absorption module), protein binding (fu) and disappearance kinetics in human hepatocytes. Caco-2 permeability, aqueous solubility (at multiple pH's), estimated dose and chemical structure are inputs required for the estimation of FDp (Norris et al., 2000; Stoner et al., 2004) and were determined for all compounds in our laboratory or obtained from literature. Protein binding data was collected from literature references and/or Pfizer database. Human hepatocyte data was generated in-house using an automated human hepatocyte method (using Tecan Genesis Workstation) as described previously (). Sixteen compounds (commercial and Pfizer compounds) were chosen to evaluate the PK express model and the bioavailability predicted from the module was compared with known clinical endpoints. For majority of the 16 compounds (approximately 80%), the PK express model F(H) values were comparable to the known human bioavailability (F(H)) (within 23.7 units of the known human (true) F, except for PF 3, PF 4, PF 6). In conclusion, the PK express model integrates a number of key readily available discovery parameters and provides estimates of human performance by integrating in silico and experimental variables built on a physiological based pharmacokinetic model. Information from this model in conjunction with other ADME data (e.g., P450 inhibition) will enable progression of most promising compounds for further in vivo PK and/or efficacy studies.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of sulbactam against Acinetobacter baumannii in in vitro and murine thigh and lung infection models.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ikawa, Kazuro; Watanabe, Erika; Shigemi, Akari; Umezaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Koyo; Ueno, Keiichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has become globally associated with nosocomial infections. Sulbactam, a potent inhibitor of β-lactamases, was previously shown to be active against A. baumannii strains in vitro and effective against A. baumannii infections. However, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of sulbactam against A. baumannii infections has not yet been performed. This is necessary because optimisation of dosing regimens should be based on PK/PD analysis. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo PK/PD analyses of sulbactam were performed using murine thigh and lung infection models of A. baumannii to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulbactam. Sulbactam showed time-dependent bactericidal activity in vitro against A. baumannii. The PK/PD index that best correlated with its in vivo effects was the time that the free drug concentration remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (fT>MIC) both in the thigh (R(2)=0.95) and lung (R(2)=0.96) infection models. Values of fT>MIC for a static effect and 1, 2 and 3log10 kill, respectively, were 21.0%, 32.9%, 43.6% and 57.3% in the thigh infection model and 20.4%, 24.5%, 29.3% and 37.3% in the lung infection model. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo time-dependent activities of sulbactam against A. baumannii infection and demonstrate that sulbactam was sufficiently bactericidal when an fT>MIC of >60% against A. baumannii thigh infection and >40% against A. baumannii lung infection was achieved.

  8. A phase I dose‐escalation study to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bendell, Johanna C.; Kelley, Robin K.; Shih, Kent C.; Grabowsky, Jennifer A.; Bergsland, Emily; Jones, Suzanne; Martin, Thomas; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Matsutani, Tomoo; Xu, Shuichan; Wong, Lilly; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xiaoling; Mortensen, Deborah S.; Chopra, Rajesh; Hege, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for tumor development, yet mTOR inhibitors have yielded modest results. This phase 1 study investigated the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS Patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma received an initial dose of 7.5‐60 mg of CC‐223, followed by oral daily dosing in 28‐day cycles until disease progression. The primary objective was to determine the safety, tolerability, nontolerated dosage, maximum tolerated dosage (MTD), and preliminary pharmacokinetic profile. Secondary objectives were to evaluate pharmacodynamic effects and to describe preliminary efficacy. RESULTS Twenty‐eight patients were enrolled and received ≥1 dose of CC‐223. The most common treatment‐related grade 3 adverse events were hyperglycemia, fatigue, and rash. Four patients had dose‐limiting toxicities, including hyperglycemia, rash, fatigue, and mucositis. Therefore, 45 mg/d was determined to be the MTD. The pharmacokinetics of CC‐223 demonstrated a mean terminal half‐life ranging from 4.86 to 5.64 hours and maximum observed plasma concentration ranging from 269 to 480 ng/mL in patients who received CC‐223 ≥45 mg/d. Phosphorylation of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway biomarkers in blood cells was inhibited by CC‐223 ≥30 mg/d with an exposure‐response relationship. Best responses included 1 partial response (breast cancer; response duration 220 days; 30‐mg/d cohort), stable disease (8 patients across ≥15 mg/d cohorts; response duration range, 36‐168 days), and progressive disease (12 patients). The disease control rate was 32%. CONCLUSIONS CC‐223 was tolerable, with manageable toxicities. Preliminary antitumor activity, including tumor regression, and evidence of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway inhibition were observed. Cancer 2015;121:3435–43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26177599

  9. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the anticancer prodrug simmitecan in different experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-yi; Li, Xiu-xue; Du, Fei-fei; Yang, Jun-ling; Niu, Wei; Xu, Fang; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetics and disposition of simmitecan (L-P) that was a water-soluble ester prodrug of chimmitecan (L-2-Z) with potent anti-tumor activities in different experimental animals, and to assess its drug-drug interaction potential. Methods: SD rats were injected with a single iv bolus doses of L-P (3.75, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion and metabolism of L-P and its active metabolite L-2-Z were studied through quantitative measurements and metabolite profiling with LC/MS. The binding of L-P and L-2-Z to rat plasma proteins was examined using an ultrafiltration method. Systemic exposures of beagle dogs to L-P as well as drug distribution in tumors of the nude mice xenograft model of human hepatic cancer SMMC-7721 cells were also examined. The metabolism of L-P by liver mcirosomal carboxylesterase in vitro was investigated in different species. The effects of L-P and L-2-Z on cytochrome P450 enzymes were examined using commercial screening kits. Results: The in vivo biotransformation of L-P to L-2-Z showed a significant species difference, with a mean elimination half-life t1/2 of approximately 1.4 h in rats and 1.9 h in dogs. The systemic exposure levels of L-P and L-2-Z were increased in a dose-dependent manner. In rats, approximately 66% of L-P and 79% of L-2-Z were bound to plasma proteins. In rats and the nude mice bearing human hepatic cancers, most organ tissues had significantly higher concentrations of L-P than the corresponding plasma levels. In the tumor tissues, the L-P levels were comparable to those of plasma, whereas the L-2-Z levels were lower than the L-P levels. In rats, L-P was eliminated mainly via biliary excretion, but metabolism played an important role in elimination of the intact L-P. Finally, L-P and L-2-Z exerted moderate inhibition on the activity of CYP3A4 in vitro. Conclusion: L-P and L-2-Z have relatively short elimination half-lives and L-P is mainly eliminated via

  10. Safety Report for Raman Spectroscopy: Safety Evaluation and Search Algorithm Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2002-07-05

    This study determines safety hazards associated with using a 300-mW 785-nm near-IR Raman laser for sample analysis. Most safety concerns are associated with excessive sample heating resulting from sample illumination. Thermography experiments were designed to quantitatively assess which visible surface colors heat most when exposed to the Raman laser. Temperatures achieved after illuminating 216 color patches with the unfocussed laser are presented. Figures contained in this report allow a field agent to rapidly determine the thermal hazards associated with Raman analysis of unknown colored samples. Dark colors tended to heat the most when exposed to the Raman laser. Studies were also conducted with a flammable organic solvent mixed with a near-IR absorbing dye to evaluate the magnitude of solution heating. Heating was minimal and Raman analysis was not considered a likely ignition hazard. The next series of experiments examined the tendency of propellants and military explosives, as well as mixtures of these explosives with IR-opaque dyes or matrix materials, to deflagrate upon illumination. All neat military explosives studied and most mixtures could be analyzed safely; however, an occasional mixture exhibited self-sustained deflagration, emphasizing safety hazards exist. Safety protocols include assessing the thermal consequences of sample analysis by referencing the thermography studies outlined above as well as minimizing the amount of sample analyzed. Several neat shock-sensitive explosives were also examined to test whether detonation could be induced by laser exposure. Black nitrogen triiodide consistently detonated, whereas colorless trinitroglycerin did not. Finally, a study was conducted to define the ignition sensitivity of various gunpowders (smokeless, black and Pyrodex powders) toward the Raman laser. All gunpowders deflagrated when illuminated. Smokeless powders were found to be the most sensitive toward laser-induced ignition.

  11. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TAK-683, an investigational metastin analogue in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Graham; Ahmad, Irfan; Howard, Katy; MacLean, David; Oliva, Cristina; Warrington, Steve; Wilbraham, Darren; Worthington, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aims Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were performed to characterize the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of the investigational metastin analogue, TAK-683, in healthy men. Methods We first investigated a single subcutaneous (s.c.) dose of TAK-683 (0.01–2.0 mg) in 60 subjects (TAK-683, n = 42; placebo, n = 18). We then assessed a single s.c. bolus of 0.03–1.0 mg TAK-683 on day 1, followed by a 0.01–2.0 mg day−1 continuous infusion on days 2–13, to simulate a depot formulation, in 30 subjects (TAK-683, n = 25; placebo, n = 5) for 14 days. Results TAK-683 was well tolerated up to a dose of 2.0 mg day−1 by continuous s.c. infusion for 14 days. Adverse events were similar between TAK-683 and placebo subjects at all dose levels. TAK-683 plasma concentrations generally increased in proportion to dose with single and continuous dosing, with steady-state concentrations achieved by day 2 of continuous dosing. TAK-683 at 2.0 mg day−1 suppressed testosterone below castration level (<50 ng dl−1) in four of five subjects by day 7 of continuous dosing. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone concentrations were suppressed with TAK-683 continuous dosing compared with placebo by up to 70 and 43%, respectively, but this was not consistently dose-dependent. Conclusions In healthy men, s.c. administration of TAK-683 was well tolerated at all dose levels. The PK profile of TAK-683 was favourable, and TAK-683 suppressed testosterone profoundly during continuous dosing. Further investigation of metastin analogues is warranted for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:22803642

  12. Phase I clinical studies of S-1108: safety and pharmacokinetics in a multiple-administration study with special emphasis on the influence on carnitine body stores.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, M; Uematsu, T; Oguma, T; Yoshida, T; Mizojiri, K; Matsuno, S; Yamamoto, S

    1992-01-01

    S-1108, the prodrug of S-1006, was given to healthy volunteers three times a day (TID) for 8 days in a dose of 200 mg in a crossover placebo-controlled study. The safety of S-1108 and the pharmacokinetics of S-1006 and pivalic acid liberated from pivaloyloxymethyl ester of S-1108 were investigated. There were no abnormal symptoms or signs, as observed by physical and laboratory tests. The half-life and area under the concentration-time curve of S-1006 was reduced from 1.11 +/- 0.17 h at the first dose to 0.87 +/- 0.18 h at the last dose and from 7.30 +/- 1.10 to 5.20 +/- 0.85 micrograms.h/ml, respectively. However, there was no significant difference in the peak concentration between the two doses. Pivalic acid was found to be completely detoxified by conjugation with carnitine. The total urinary recovery of pivalic acid as pivaloylcarnitine was 98.7 +/- 3.6%, resulting in an increase of daily carnitine urinary excretion two- to threefold the predose value. During the multiple administration of S-1108, the plasma carnitine concentration was reduced to and maintained at 50 to 70% of the control value, suggesting that there might be enough carnitine store in the body to detoxify the pivalic acid in a dose of 200 mg TID. Moreover, the reduced plasma carnitine was rapidly returned to the control value within a few days after the cessation of the administration of 200 mg TID. PMID:1503438

  13. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Antiviral Effects of Hypericin, a Derivative of St. John's Wort Plant, in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Feinman, Lawrence; Liebes, Leonard; Ostrow, Nancy; Koslowski, Victoria; Tobia, Alfonso; Cabana, Bernard E.; Lee, Dong-Hun; Spritzler, John; Prince, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    Hypericin is a natural derivative of the common St. Johns wort plant, Hypericum perforatum. It has in vitro activity against several viruses, including bovine diarrhea virus, a pestivirus with structural similarities to hepatitis C virus (HCV). We conducted a phase I dose escalation study to determine the safety and antiviral activity of hypericin in patients with chronic HCV infection. The first 12 patients received an 8-week course of 0.05 mg of hypericin per kg of body weight orally once a day; 7 patients received an 8-week course of 0.10 mg/kg orally once a day. At the end of the 8-week period of treatment, no subject had a change of plasma HCV RNA level of more than 1.0 log10. Five of 12 subjects receiving the 0.05-mg/kg/day dosing schedule and 6 of 7 subjects receiving the 0.10-mg/kg/day dosing schedule developed phototoxic reactions. No other serious adverse events associated with hypericin use occurred. The pharmacokinetic data revealed a long elimination half-life (mean values of 36.1 and 33.8 h, respectively, for the doses of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and mean area under the curve determinations of 1.5 and 3.1 μg/ml × hr, respectively. In sum, hypericin given orally in doses of 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg/d caused considerable phototoxicity and had no detectable anti-HCV activity in patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:11158749

  14. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and antiviral effects of hypericin, a derivative of St. John's wort plant, in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J M; Feinman, L; Liebes, L; Ostrow, N; Koslowski, V; Tobia, A; Cabana, B E; Lee, D; Spritzler, J; Prince, A M

    2001-02-01

    Hypericin is a natural derivative of the common St. Johns wort plant, Hypericum perforatum. It has in vitro activity against several viruses, including bovine diarrhea virus, a pestivirus with structural similarities to hepatitis C virus (HCV). We conducted a phase I dose escalation study to determine the safety and antiviral activity of hypericin in patients with chronic HCV infection. The first 12 patients received an 8-week course of 0.05 mg of hypericin per kg of body weight orally once a day; 7 patients received an 8-week course of 0.10 mg/kg orally once a day. At the end of the 8-week period of treatment, no subject had a change of plasma HCV RNA level of more than 1.0 log(10). Five of 12 subjects receiving the 0.05-mg/kg/day dosing schedule and 6 of 7 subjects receiving the 0.10-mg/kg/day dosing schedule developed phototoxic reactions. No other serious adverse events associated with hypericin use occurred. The pharmacokinetic data revealed a long elimination half-life (mean values of 36.1 and 33.8 h, respectively, for the doses of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and mean area under the curve determinations of 1.5 and 3.1 microg/ml x hr, respectively. In sum, hypericin given orally in doses of 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg/d caused considerable phototoxicity and had no detectable anti-HCV activity in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  15. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of multiple doses of ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355), an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody, in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Godofsky, Eliot; DeJesus, Edwin; Larson, Jeffrey A; Weinheimer, Steven P; Lewis, Stanley T

    2009-02-01

    Ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and inhibits the viral entry process. A phase lb multidose study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of ibalizumab was conducted with 22 HIV-1-infected patients. Nineteen patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg/kg of body weight weekly (arm A) or a 10-mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks (arm B) intravenously for 9 weeks. Three patients were assigned to receive 25 mg/kg every 2 weeks for five doses (arm C). During the study, the patients remained off other antiretrovirals or continued a stable failing regimen. Treatment with ibalizumab resulted in substantial reductions in HIV-1 RNA levels (0.5 to 1.7 log(10)) in 20 of 22 subjects. In most patients, HIV-1 RNA fell to nadir levels after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment and then returned to baseline despite continued treatment. Baseline viral isolates were susceptible to ibalizumab in vitro, regardless of coreceptor tropism. Emerging resistance to ibalizumab was manifested by reduced maximal percent inhibition in a single-cycle HIV infectivity assay. Resistant isolates remained CD4 dependent and were susceptible to enfuvirtide in vitro. Complete coating of CD4(+) T-cell receptors was correlated with serum ibalizumab concentrations. There was no evidence of CD4(+) T-cell depletion in ibalizumab-treated patients. Ibalizumab was not immunogenic, and no serious drug-related adverse effects occurred. In conclusion, ibalizumab administered either weekly or biweekly was safe and well tolerated and demonstrated antiviral activity. Further studies with ibalizumab in combination with standard antiretroviral treatments are warranted.

  16. In Vitro, Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic, and Safety Comparisons of Single and Combined Administration of Tiotropium and Salmeterol in COPD Patients Using Different Dry Powder Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Horhota, Stephen T; van Noord, Jan A; Verkleij, Cynthia B; Bour, Loek J; Sharma, Ashish; Trunk, Michael; Cornelissen, Piet J G

    2015-07-01

    In vitro Andersen cascade impactor-sized mass (ISM) and aerodynamic fine particle mass (FPM) <5 μm for tiotropium and salmeterol combined in a novel inhalation powder formulation containing 7.5 μg tiotropium/25 μg salmeterol (TSHH) were similar (within ±15%) to reference products containing 18 μg of tiotropium (Spiriva® HandiHaler®) (TioHH) and 50 μg of salmeterol (Serevent® Diskus®) (SalD). The pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of the novel fixed-dose TSHH formulation administered once daily was compared with the single-agent therapies TioHH (once daily [qd]) and SalD (twice daily [bid]) and with the jointly administered combination of TioHH (qd) plus SalD (bid) in a randomized, 22-week, open-label, four-way crossover study in 50 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For tiotropium, TSHH and TioHH were bioequivalent based on mean steady-state plasma area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC), while the urinary excretion amount was higher for TSHH and not bioequivalent to TioHH. Tiotropium peak plasma concentrations at steady state (C max,ss) were 40% higher with TSHH. For salmeterol, substantial differences were observed in plasma AUCs and Cmax,ss. No significant differences in 8-h forced expiratory volume in 1 s or forced vital capacity were detected for the TSHH (qd) against the combination of TioHH (qd) with SalD (bid). Maintenance therapy with tiotropium plus salmeterol as TSHH or as the jointly administered reference products is superior to either agent alone, safe, and well tolerated in COPD patients. In vitro results were not predictive of clinical PK findings for both tiotropium and salmeterol for the TSHH dry powder inhaler product.

  17. Evaluation of the safety of epinephrine in digital nerve blockade

    PubMed Central

    Chapeskie, Henry; Juliao, Alexis; Payne, Sonja; Koichopolos, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the safety profile of lidocaine containing 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine with concurrent tourniquet use in patients undergoing toe surgery. Design A retrospective case series analysis of toe procedures performed under digital blockade with adjuvant vasopressor from January 25, 2009, to May 31, 2014, was conducted. Exclusion criteria were limited to procedures performed without adjuvant vasopressor use. Setting A single clinic in Ontario. Participants A total of 1334 toe procedures performed in 937 patients. Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was the incidence of postoperative digital necrosis. Secondary outcomes included other postoperative complications including infection, reperfusion injury, persistent granulation, and damage to the nail matrix. Results In total, 1334 toe procedures were included in this study, of which 45 involved patients with a pre-existing diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of postoperative complications was low (4.6%). No cases of digital ischemia or gangrenous necrosis were observed. Subgroup analysis of patients with and without diabetes showed no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. Conclusion This study demonstrates the safety of adjuvant vasopressor use in digital nerve blockade of the toes within a large, diverse population. This study adds to a growing base of evidence on the safety of lidocaine with 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine for digital anesthesia.

  18. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a novel fast dissolving film formulation of flupentixol dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdelbary, Ahmed; Bendas, Ehab R; Ramadan, Afaf A; Mostafa, Dalia A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop fast dissolving oral film of the antipsychotic drug, flupentixol dihydrochloride, to enhance its bioavailability, optimize its therapeutic effect when used to treat depression with anxiety, and increase the convenience and compliance by the mentally ill, developmentally disable, elderly, and pediatric patients. Six formulae were prepared with different concentrations of water-soluble polymers vis. hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E5) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by solvent casting technique. The prepared films were subjected to characterization for folding endurance, weight variations, thickness, disintegration time, drug release pattern, and drug content. Physical compatibility between the drug and excipients was guaranteed in the selected formulation (2% HPMC) by means of differential scanning calorimetry analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. This formulation revealed high stability after testing according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. In vivo studies based on single phase parallel design were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers. The concentration of flupentixol dihydrochloride in plasma samples was analyzed by a developed validated LC-MS/MS assay method and the pharmacokinetic parameters of the established formulation were compared with the commercially available oral tablets. Faster rate of absorption of flupentixol could be obtained from the oral film formulation and the relative bioavailability was found to be 151.06% compared to the marketed product.

  19. [Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of respiratory fluoroquinolones. Guideline to selection of the most appropriate fluoroquinolone].

    PubMed

    Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Hernández-Quero, José

    2012-12-01

    Since its approval, fluoroquinolones have become one of the most prescribed antibacterial agents. Because of its widespread use, serious concerns about the emergence of resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp, and entrobacteriaceae, has arisen, especially because of cross-resistance between fluoroquinolones. Huge efforts has been done to identify pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters like maximum serum concentration (Cmax), area under the curve of serum concentrations (AUC) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters like the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), to optimize the use of the new fluoroquinolones, especially against these difficult to treat microorganisms. The new fluoroquinolones commercially available in Spain, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, have significant differences in their PK (Cmax, half-life, volume of distribution, etc), PD (MIC, MPC,) and in their PK/PD parameters (AUC/MIC; AUC/MPC) that allow clinicians to establish clear preference for the utilization of one of them. Proper use of these new fluoroquinolones according to these PK/PD parameters will result in better management of respiratory infections with a reduction in the emergence of resistance. Based on data reviewed in this paper moxifloxacin use, with best PK/PD characteristics, should be preferred over levofloxacin. Should levofloxacin be used, alternative dosing strategies would be recommended to avoid selection of resistant variants.

  20. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice.

  1. Synthesis and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Siderophore Biosynthesis Inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kathryn M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Dawadi, Surendra; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed biosynthetic step of the mycobactins, which are important virulence factors associated with iron acquisition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MbtA is a validated therapeutic target for antitubercular drug development. 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1) is a bisubstrate inhibitor of MbtA and exhibits exceptionally potent biochemical and antitubercular activity. However, 1 suffers from sub-optimal drug disposition properties resulting in a short half-life (t1/2), low exposure (AUC), and low bioavailability (F). Four strategies were pursued to address these liabilities including the synthesis of prodrugs, increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl moiety, modulation of the lipophilicity, and strategic introduction of fluorine into 1. Complete pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of all compounds was performed. The most successful modifications involved fluorination of the nucleoside that provided substantial improvements in t1/2 and AUC. Increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl linker yielded incremental enhancements while modulation of the lipophilicity and prodrug approaches led to substantially poorer PK parameters. PMID:26110337

  2. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiation Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a site

  3. A simple pharmacokinetic method to evaluate the pulmonary dose in clinical practice--analyses of inhaled sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Maria; Svensson, Jan Olof; Meurling, Lennart; Svartengren, Katharina; Anderson, Martin; Svartengren, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    When the expected effect of an inhaled drug is not achieved, the cause could be poor inhalation technique and consequently a low pulmonary dose. A simple in vivo test to evaluate the pulmonary dose would be a benefit. This study evaluates the relative and systemic bioavailability following inhalation of nebulized sodium cromoglycate (SCG) in healthy subjects. Blood samples were collected during 240 min and urine was collected in two portions, up to 6 h post-inhalation. Two exposures were performed and comparisons based on the quantification of drug in plasma and urine by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure were done. In one of the exposures, a pulmonary function test was performed to study if an expected effect of increased absorption could be detected. There was a good correlation between the two exposures shown in the plasma concentrations, but not in the urine analyses. The forced exhaled volume manoeuvres were associated with a higher Cmax and plasma concentrations up to 60 min post-inhalation (P<0.01). This effect was not detected in the urine analyses. We conclude that this pharmacokinetic method with inhaled SCG and plasma analyses could be used to evaluate individual inhalation technique. The HPLC method used was rapid and had adequate sensitivity.

  4. Treatment of acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria with artemether-lumefantrine in nonimmune populations: a safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Christoph; Soto, Jaime; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Zoller, Thomas; Weitzel, Thomas; Loutan, Louis; Bricaire, Francois; Gay, Frederick; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Andriano, Kim; Lefèvre, Gilbert; De Palacios, Patricia Ibarra; Genton, Blaise

    2008-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of malaria in nonimmune populations are not well defined. In this study, 165 nonimmune patients from Europe and non-malarious areas of Colombia with acute, uncomplicated falciparum malaria or mixed infection including P. falciparum were treated with the six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine. The parasitologic cure rate at 28 days was 96.0% for the per protocol population (119/124 patients). Median times to parasite clearance and fever clearance were 41.5 and 36.8 hours, respectively. No patient had gametocytes after Day 7. Treatment was well tolerated; most adverse events were mild to moderate and seemed to be related to malaria. There were few serious adverse events, none of which were considered to be drug-related. No significant effects on ECG or laboratory parameters were observed. In conclusion, the six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine was effective and well tolerated in the treatment of acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in nonimmune patients.

  5. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Nervous System Effects of Two Natural Sources of Caffeine in Healthy Adult Males.

    PubMed

    Krieger, D R; Kalman, D S; Feldman, S; Arnillas, L; Goldberg, D; Gisbert, O; Nader, S

    2016-06-20

    This double-blind crossover clinical trial randomized 12 adult males to receive 200 mg of caffeine from a green coffee extract, a guayusa leaf extract, and a synthetic control to compare their safety, absorption, and effect on neurotransmitters. The results showed no statistically significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate from baseline to 120 min postdose of each natural source compared with changes from baseline in the control (0.094 < = P < = 0.910). The ratios of Cmax , AUC0-4 , and AUC0-∞ of each natural source to the control were bioequivalent by US Food and Drug Administration standards (90% CI within 80-125%). The guayusa leaf extract stimulated a significantly lower increase in epinephrine compared with the control (+0.5 vs. +2.78 μg/gCr, P = 0.04), while the green coffee extract provoked an increase in epinephrine similar to the control (+3.21 vs. +2.78 μg/gCr, P = 0.569). Implications for future clinical research are discussed.

  6. Curriculum and Evaluation Guide for Safety Education Programs. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 40.00.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Carlee S.

    Designed to assist Bureau of Indian Affairs school officials in the identification of safety education program needs, this evaluation guide focuses upon the basic operational components in a safety education program. The means for establishing an evaluation design for safety education are presented via a flexible model appropriate for most…

  7. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Functional Effects of the Nogo-A Monoclonal Antibody in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, First-In-Human Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Vincent; Pradat, Pierre-François; Corse, Andrea; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rix Brooks, Benjamin; Caress, James B.; Cudkowicz, Merit; Kolb, Stephen J.; Lange, Dale; Leigh, P. Nigel; Meyer, Thomas; Milleri, Stefano; Morrison, Karen E.; Orrell, Richard W.; Peters, Gary; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Shefner, Jeremy; Lavrov, Arseniy; Williams, Nicola; Overend, Phil; Price, Jeffrey; Bates, Stewart; Bullman, Jonathan; Krull, David; Berges, Alienor; Abila, Bams; Meno-Tetang, Guy; Wurthner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG), and clinical laboratory tests). Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological), and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01–15 mg/kg) was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab) showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated co

  8. Transport of recombinant human CD4-immunoglobulin G across the human placenta: pharmacokinetics and safety in six mother-infant pairs in AIDS clinical trial group protocol 146.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, W T; Duliege, A M; Kline, M W; Hammill, H; Minkoff, H; Ammann, A J; Chen, S; Izu, A; Mordenti, J

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant CD4-immunoglobulin G (rCD4-IgG) is a 98-kDa human immunoglobulin-like protein that is produced by fusing the gp120 binding domain of CD4 to the Fc portion of the human IgG1 heavy chain. This hybrid molecule was given to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women at the onset of labor by intravenous bolus at 1 mg/kg of body weight (group A; n = 3) and 1 week prior to and at the onset of labor by the same route and at the same dose (group B; n = 3). In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, safety in the mothers and infants was determined through routine chemistries, hematology, and urinalysis; immunologic and HIV infection statuses in the infants were assessed through lymphocyte cultures, p24 antigen level determination, culture of HIV from plasma, PCR, lymphocyte subset enumeration, quantitative immunoglobulin analysis, and lymphocyte proliferation. Thirty minutes after the rCD4-IgG injection, concentrations in maternal serum were 12 to 23 micrograms/ml. These concentrations declined slowly, with initial and terminal half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) of 9.95 +/- 3.23 and 47.6 +/- 22.3 h, respectively. Infants were born 2.6 to 46.5 h after rCD4-IgG administration; concentrations of rCD4-IgG in cord blood ranged from 28 to 107 ng/ml. The half-life of rCD4-IgG in infants ranged from 5 to 29 h. These data demonstrate that the transfer of rCD4-IgG from the mother to the fetus is rapid and that newborns do not appear to have any difficulty eliminating rCD4-IgG. No safety concerns in mothers or infants were encountered. Although the study did not address the question of efficacy, none of the infants was HIV type 1 infected 36 months later. In summary, these findings document that bifunctional immune molecules can be transported across the placenta, and this general approach may be used in the future to block vertical transmission of HIV type 1. PMID:7664172

  9. Synthesis and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Degradable Shell Crosslinked Polymer Nanoparticles with Poly(carboxybetaine) vs. Poly(ethylene glycol) Surface-grafted Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Sun, Guorong; Samarajeewa, Sandani; Zou, Jiong; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Welch, Michael J.; Liu, Yongjian; Wooley, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles with tunable pharmacokinetics are desirable for various biomedical applications. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is well known to create “stealth” effects to stabilize and extend the blood circulation of nanoparticles. In this work, poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB), a new non-fouling polymer material, was incorporated as surface-grafted coatings, conjugated onto degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (dSCKs) composed of poly(acrylic acid)- based shells and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) cores, to compare the in vivo pharmacokinetics to their PEG-functionalized analogs. A series of five dSCKs was prepared from amphiphilic block copolymers, having different numbers and lengths of either PEG or PCB grafts, by supramolecular assembly in water followed by shell crosslinking, and then studied by a lactate assay to confirm their core hydrolytic degradabilities. Each dSCK was also conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocyclic chelators and tyramine moieties to provide for 64Cu and/or radiohalogen labeling. The high specific activity of 64Cu radiolabeling ensured nanogram administration of dSCKs for in vivo evaluation of their pharmacokinetics. Biodistribution studies demonstrated comparable in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of PCB-grafted dSCKs to their PEG-conjugated counterparts. These results indicated that PCB-functionalized dSCKs have great potential as a theranostic platform for translational research. PMID:23043240

  10. Evaluation of Margins of Safety in Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Len; Powell, Mollie M.; Soffa, Matthew A.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential steps in assuring reliable performance of high cost critical brazed structures is the assessment of the Margin of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints. In many cases the experimental determination of the failure loads by destructive testing of the brazed assembly is not practical and cost prohibitive. In such cases the evaluation of the MS is performed analytically by comparing the maximum design loads with the allowable ones and incorporating various safety or knock down factors imposed by the customer. Unfortunately, an industry standard methodology for the design and analysis of brazed joints has not been developed. This paper provides an example of an approach that was used to analyze an AlBeMet 162 (38%Be-62%Al) structure brazed with the AWS BAlSi-4 (Al-12%Si) filler metal. A practical and conservative interaction equation combining shear and tensile allowables was developed and validated to evaluate an acceptable (safe) combination of tensile and shear stresses acting in the brazed joint. These allowables are obtained from testing of standard tensile and lap shear brazed specimens. The proposed equation enables the assessment of the load carrying capability of complex brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading.

  11. Alternatives to animal testing in the safety evaluation of products.

    PubMed

    Knight, Derek J; Breheny, Damien

    2002-01-01

    The conventional method for assessing the safety of products, ranging from pharmaceuticals to agrochemicals, biocides and industrial and household chemicals - including cosmetics - involves determining their toxicological properties by using experimental animals. The aim is to identify any possible adverse effects in humans by using these animal models. Providing safe products is undoubtedly of the utmost importance but, over the last decade or so, this aim has come into conflict with strong public opinion, especially in Europe, against animal testing. Industry, academia and the regulators have worked in partnership to find other ways of evaluating the safety of products, by non-animal testing, or at least by reducing the numbers of animals required and the severity of the tests in which they are used. There is a long way to go before products can be evaluated without any animal studies, and it may be that this laudable aim is an impossible dream. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made by using a combination of in vitro tests and the prediction of properties based on chemical structure. The aim of this review is to describe these important and worthwhile developments in various areas of toxicological testing, with a focus on the European regulatory framework for general industrial and household chemicals.

  12. Formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a paclitaxel nanosuspension for intravenous delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming; Wang, Liyao; Xu, Yuanlong; Cheng, Xiaodan; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a diterpenoid isolated from Taxus brevifolia. It is effective for various cancers, especially ovarian and breast cancer. Due to its aqueous insolubility, it is administered dissolved in ethanol and Cremophor EL (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany), which can cause serious allergic reactions. In order to eliminate Cremophor EL, paclitaxel was formulated as a nanosuspension by high-pressure homogenization. The nanosuspension was lyophilized to obtain the dry paclitaxel nanoparticles (average size, 214.4 ± 15.03 nm), which enhanced both the physical and chemical stability of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Paclitaxel dissolution was also enhanced by the nanosuspension. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the crystallinity of paclitaxel was preserved during the high-pressure homogenization process. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of paclitaxel were compared after intravenous administration of paclitaxel nanosuspension and paclitaxel injection. In rat plasma, paclitaxel nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (P < 0.01) reduced area under the concentration curve (AUC)(0-∞) (20.343 ± 9.119 μg · h · mL(-1) vs 5.196 ± 1.426 μg · h · mL(-1)), greater clearance (2.050 ± 0.616 L · kg(-1) · h(-1) vs 0.556 ± 0.190 L · kg(-1) · h(-1)), and shorter elimination half-life (5.646 ± 2.941 vs 3.774 ± 1.352 hours) compared with the paclitaxel solution. In contrast, the paclitaxel nanosuspension resulted in a significantly greater AUC(0-∞) in liver, lung, and spleen (all P < 0.01), but not in heart or kidney.

  13. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  14. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; ...

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  15. Bioadhesive microspheres for bioavailability enhancement of raloxifene hydrochloride: formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ram K; Tiwari, Sanjay; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2011-06-01

    Raloxifene hydrochloride (R-HCl), a BCS class II drug, remains a mainstay in the prevention and pharmacologic therapy of osteoporosis. Its absolute bioavailability, however, is 2% due to poor solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The present study describes two simultaneous approaches to improve its bioavailability, complexation of R-HCl with cyclodextrin(s), and formulation of mucoadhesive microspheres of the complex using different proportions of carbopol and HPMC. Microspheres were pale yellow in color, free-flowing, spherical, and porous in outline. The particle size ranged between 3 and 15 μm, and entrapment efficiency was found to be within 81.63% to 87.73%. A significant improvement in the solubility of R-HCl was observed, and it differed with the combination of excipients used. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed that enhancement in drug solubility was resulted due to a change in its crystallinity within the formulation. Microspheres possessed remarkable mucoadhesion and offered controlled drug release, lasting up to 24 h. They produced a sharp plasma concentration-time profile of R-HCl within 30 min post-administration to Wistar rats. [AUC](0-24 h) was found to be 1,722.34 ng h/ml, and it differed significantly to that of pure drug powder (318.28 ng h/ml). More than fivefold increase in AUC and more than twofold increase in MRT were observed. FT-IR studies evidenced no interaction among drug and excipients. The results of this study showed that mucoadhesive microspheres could be a viable approach to improve the pharmacokinetic profile of R-HCl.

  16. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa.

  17. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24.

  18. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety...

  19. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus.

  20. Phase 1 Study of Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTC299, an Inhibitor of Stress-Regulated Protein Translation.

    PubMed

    Weetall, Marla; Davis, Thomas; Elfring, Gary; Northcutt, Valerie; Cao, Liangxian; Moon, Young-Choon; Riebling, Peter; Dali, Mandar; Hirawat, Samit; Babiak, John; Colacino, Joseph; Almstead, Neil; Spiegel, Robert; Peltz, Stuart W

    2016-07-01

    PTC299 is a novel small molecule that specifically blocks the production of protein from selected mRNAs that under certain conditions use noncanonical ribosomal translational pathways. Hypoxia, oncogenic transformation, and viral infections limit normal translation and turn on these noncanonical translation pathways that are sensitive to PTC299. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) is an example of a transcript that is posttranscriptionally regulated. Single doses of PTC299 (0.03 to 3 mg/kg) were administered orally to healthy volunteers in a phase 1 single ascending-dose study. In a subsequent multiple ascending-dose study in healthy volunteers, multiple-dose regimens (0.3 to 1.2 mg/kg twice a day or 1.6 mg/kg 3 times a day for 7 days) were evaluated. PTC299 was well tolerated in these studies. As expected in healthy volunteers, mean plasma VEGF levels did not change. Increases in Cmax and AUC of PTC299 were dose-proportional. The target trough plasma concentration associated with preclinical efficacy was achieved within 7 days at doses of 0.6 mg/kg twice daily and above. These data demonstrate that PTC299 is orally bioavailable and well tolerated and support clinical evaluation of PTC299 in cancer, certain viral infections, or other diseases in which deregulation of translational control is a causal factor.

  1. Facile synthesis, pharmacokinetic and systemic clearance evaluation, and positron emission tomography cancer imaging of 64Cu-Au alloy nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Luehmann, Hannah; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal biodistribution and significant renal and hepatobiliary excretion. PET imaging showed low non-specific tumor uptake, indicating its potential for active targeting of clinically relevant biomarkers in tumor and metastatic organs.Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal

  2. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) LY2181308 as a single-agent or in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Erba, Harry P; Sayar, Hamid; Juckett, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Andre, Valerie; Callies, Sophie; Schmidt, Shelly; Kadam, Sunil; Brandt, John T; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Andreeff, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Survivin is expressed in tumor cells, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), regulates mitosis, and prevents tumor cell death. The antisense oligonucleotide sodium LY2181308 (LY2181308) inhibits survivin expression and may cause cell cycle arrest and restore apoptosis in AML. In this study, the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics/efficacy of LY2181308 was examined in AML patients, first in a cohort with monotherapy (n = 8) and then post-amendment in a cohort with the combination of cytarabine and idarubicin treatment (n = 16). LY2181308 was administered with a loading dosage of three consecutive daily infusions of 750 mg followed by weekly intravenous (IV) maintenance doses of 750 mg. Cytarabine 1.5 g/m(2) was administered as a 4-hour IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1, and idarubicin 12 mg/m(2) was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1. Cytarabine and idarubicin were administered on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each subsequent 28-day cycle. Reduction of survivin was evaluated in peripheral blasts and bone marrow. Single-agent LY2181308 was well tolerated and survivin was reduced only in patients with a high survivin expression. In combination with chemotherapy, 4/16 patients had complete responses, 1/16 patients had incomplete responses, and 4/16 patients had cytoreduction. Nine patients died on study: 6 (monotherapy), 3 (combination). LY2181308 alone is well tolerated in patients with AML. In combination with cytarabine and idarubicin, LY2181308 does not appear to cause additional toxicity, and has shown some clinical benefit needing confirmation in future clinical trials.

  3. Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Vilanterol, a Novel Inhaled Long-Acting β-Agonist, in Children Aged 5–11 Years with Persistent Asthma: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Amanda; VanBuren, Sandi; Allen, Ann; Hamilton, Melanie; Tombs, Lee; Kempsford, Rodger; Qaqundah, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study was designed to characterize the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profile of single and once-daily repeat doses of vilanterol 25 µg in children aged 5–11 years. Twenty-eight children with persistent asthma received a single inhaled dose of vilanterol 25 µg or placebo via the ELLIPTA™ dry powder inhaler (DPI) on Day 1, followed 7 days later by once-daily treatment for 7 days. Nine (33%) subjects reported adverse events (AEs) with vilanterol 25 µg and 6 (23%) with placebo. No serious or drug-related AEs were reported; 3 subjects experienced upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) with vilanterol 25 µg versus none with placebo. Similar pharmacokinetic profiles of vilanterol 25 µg were observed irrespective of age or gender. No clinically relevant changes in heart rate, Fridericia's correction (QTcF), maximum glucose or minimum potassium parameters were observed during treatment with vilanterol 25 µg compared with placebo treatment. Vilanterol was well-tolerated and no long-acting ß2-agonist (LABA)-mediated AEs were observed. The pharmacokinetic profile of vilanterol 25 µg suggests exposure is similar regardless of age or gender in a pediatric population aged 5–11 years. PMID:26097789

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Humira(®) Biosimilar ONS-3010 in Healthy Volunteers: Focus on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Dillingh, Marlous R; Reijers, Joannes A A; Malone, Karen E; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Bahrt, Kenneth; Yamashita, Liz; Rehrig, Claudia; Moerland, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    ONS-3010 is being developed by Oncobiologics Inc. (Cranbury, NJ, USA) as a biosimilar of Humira(®). This randomized, double blind, single-center phase I study (EudraCT registration # 2013-003551-38) was performed to demonstrate pharmacokinetic (PK) biosimilarity between two reference products (Humira(®) EU and US) and ONS-3010 in healthy volunteers, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity profiles. In addition, the intended pharmacological activity was assessed and compared by application of a whole blood challenge. Hundred ninety-eight healthy volunteers received a single 40 mg subcutaneous dose of ONS-3010, Humira(®) EU, or US. The pharmacodynamic effects were assessed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/aluminum hydroxide whole blood challenges (n = 36; n = 12 per treatment arm; male:female, 1:1). Equivalence was demonstrated on the PK endpoints (AUC0-inf, Cmax, and AUC0-last) based on bounds of 80-125% for the ratio of the geometric means (ONS-3010/Humira(®)). The immunogenicity profiles were comparable between treatment groups, and there were no indications for differences in routine safety parameters. Administration of adalimumab resulted in the observation of dramatically reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) levels upon stimulation with LPS/aluminum hydroxide (>99%), with no differences between the three treatment groups in terms of magnitude or duration. Adalimumab also resulted in a reduction of LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced interleukin (IL)-8 release (maximally 30%), suggested to have a causal relationship with the anti-TNFα treatment. LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced release of IL-1β and IL-6 was not inhibited by anti-TNFα treatment. Taken together, these data are promising for the further clinical development of ONS-3010, demonstrate the relevance of the LPS/aluminum challenge to monitor Humira(®) effects, and emphasize the value of whole blood challenges for monitoring of proximal drug effects in healthy volunteers, and potentially in

  5. Clinical Evaluation of Humira® Biosimilar ONS-3010 in Healthy Volunteers: Focus on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dillingh, Marlous R.; Reijers, Joannes A. A.; Malone, Karen E.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Bahrt, Kenneth; Yamashita, Liz; Rehrig, Claudia; Moerland, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    ONS-3010 is being developed by Oncobiologics Inc. (Cranbury, NJ, USA) as a biosimilar of Humira®. This randomized, double blind, single-center phase I study (EudraCT registration # 2013-003551-38) was performed to demonstrate pharmacokinetic (PK) biosimilarity between two reference products (Humira® EU and US) and ONS-3010 in healthy volunteers, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity profiles. In addition, the intended pharmacological activity was assessed and compared by application of a whole blood challenge. Hundred ninety-eight healthy volunteers received a single 40 mg subcutaneous dose of ONS-3010, Humira® EU, or US. The pharmacodynamic effects were assessed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/aluminum hydroxide whole blood challenges (n = 36; n = 12 per treatment arm; male:female, 1:1). Equivalence was demonstrated on the PK endpoints (AUC0–inf, Cmax, and AUC0–last) based on bounds of 80–125% for the ratio of the geometric means (ONS-3010/Humira®). The immunogenicity profiles were comparable between treatment groups, and there were no indications for differences in routine safety parameters. Administration of adalimumab resulted in the observation of dramatically reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) levels upon stimulation with LPS/aluminum hydroxide (>99%), with no differences between the three treatment groups in terms of magnitude or duration. Adalimumab also resulted in a reduction of LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced interleukin (IL)-8 release (maximally 30%), suggested to have a causal relationship with the anti-TNFα treatment. LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced release of IL-1β and IL-6 was not inhibited by anti-TNFα treatment. Taken together, these data are promising for the further clinical development of ONS-3010, demonstrate the relevance of the LPS/aluminum challenge to monitor Humira® effects, and emphasize the value of whole blood challenges for monitoring of proximal drug effects in healthy volunteers, and potentially in the

  6. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-09-20

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

  7. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  8. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jui-Wen; Huang, Bin-Syuan; Hsu, Chu-Wei; Peng, Chun-Wei; Cheng, Ming-Long; Kao, Jung-Yie; Way, Tzong-Der; Yin, Hao-Chang; Wang, Shan-Shue

    2017-03-22

    In this study, a chlorine dioxide solution (UC-1) composed of chlorine dioxide was produced using an electrolytic method and subsequently purified using a membrane. UC-1 was determined to contain 2000 ppm of gaseous chlorine dioxide in water. The efficacy and safety of UC-1 were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was more than 98.2% reduction when UC-1 concentrations were 5 and 20 ppm for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of H1N1, influenza virus B/TW/71718/04, and EV71 were 84.65 ± 0.64, 95.91 ± 11.61, and 46.39 ± 1.97 ppm, respectively. A 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test revealed that the cell viability of mouse lung fibroblast L929 cells was 93.7% at a 200 ppm UC-1 concentration that is over that anticipated in routine use. Moreover, 50 ppm UC-1 showed no significant symptoms in a rabbit ocular irritation test. In an inhalation toxicity test, treatment with 20 ppm UC-1 for 24 h showed no abnormality and no mortality in clinical symptoms and normal functioning of the lung and other organs. A ClO₂ concentration of up to 40 ppm in drinking water did not show any toxicity in a subchronic oral toxicity test. Herein, UC-1 showed favorable disinfection activity and a higher safety profile tendency than in previous reports.

  9. Safety evaluation of eleven insecticides to Trichogramma nubilale (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Song, Min; Qi, Suzhen; Wang, Chengju

    2013-02-01

    The safety of 11 pesticides (indoxacarb, chlorfluazuron, azadirachtin, methoxyfenozide, rotenone, spinosad, acetamiprid, imidacloprid, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, and triazophos) to Trichogramma nubilale (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) was evaluated in this study. The acute toxicity to the adults was investigated using dry-film method. The influences of the pesticides on both parasitic ability and different developmental stages were studied using corn leaves residual method, rice moth egg card dipping method, and T. nubilale parasitized rice moth egg dipping method. Results showed that methoxyfenozide, azadirachtin, and indoxacarb were safe for the whole life cycle of T. nubilale. Chlorfluazuron, rotenone, and acetamiprid had different levels of impacts on different developmental stages, and they should be chosen to be used according to their safety time with reduced exposure levels. Rotenone was safe for the adults but it was harmful to the other stages, whose dosage should be reduced when it was used. Acetamiprid could be applied during the pupae stage. Finally, to avoid large kill, spinosad, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, triazophos, and imidacloprid should not be used as they were not safe for any development stage of T. nubilale.

  10. Preparation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of oral self-emulsifying system for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Song, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yingxin; Zhao, Qianqian; Zhang, Xuemei; Pan, Weisan; Yang, Xinggang

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed aiming to develop a new solid self-emulsifying system (SMEDDS) for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam and evaluate the bioavailability in Wister rats by oral gavage. Liquid SMEDDS of Lornoxicam was formulated with Labrafil M 1944 CS as oil phase, Kolliphor HS 15 as a surfactant and Transcutol HP as a cosurfactant after screening various vehicles. The microemulsion system selected from the phase diagram and optimized by central composite design (CCD) response surface method was transformed into solid-SMEDDS (S-SMEDDS) by lyophilization using sucrose as cryoprotectant. The formulations were further characterized by the particle size, poly dispersity index (PDI), self-emulsifying time, zeta potential, transmission electron microscope (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics. Results of DSC studies confirmed that the drug was incorporated in the S-SMEDDS. The in vitro drug release from Lornoxicam SMEDDS was found to be greatly higher in comparison with that from the commercial tablets. It was indicated that SMEDDS might be effective in reducing the effect of pH variability of Lornoxicam and improving the release performance of Lornoxicam. HPLC system was applied to study the concentration of Lornoxicam in the plasma of the Wister rats after oral administration of Lornoxicam SMEDDS and Lornoxicam commercial tablets. The pharmacokinetics parameters of the rats were C(max) 1065.91 ± 224.90 and 1855.22 ± 748.25 ngmL(-1), T(max) were 2.5 ± 0.4 h and 1.8 ± 0.5 h, and AUC(0∼t) were 5316.35 ± 323.62 and 7758.07 ± 241.57 ngmL(-1) h, respectively. Calculated by AUC(0∼∞), the relative bioavailability of Lornoxicam S-SMEDDS was 151.69 ± 15.32%. It suggested that this S-SMEDDS could be used as a successful oral solid dosage form to improve the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam as well.

  11. Parenteral nanoemulsions as promising carriers for brain delivery of risperidone: Design, characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Sanela M; Cekić, Nebojša D; Savić, Miroslav M; Isailović, Tanja M; Ranđelović, Danijela V; Marković, Bojan D; Savić, Saša R; Timić Stamenić, Tamara; Daniels, Rolf; Savić, Snežana D

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes design and evaluation of parenteral lecithin-based nanoemulsions intended for brain delivery of risperidone, a poorly water-soluble psychopharmacological drug. The nanoemulsions were prepared through cold/hot high pressure homogenization and characterized regarding droplet size, polydispersity, surface charge, morphology, drug-vehicle interactions, and physical stability. To estimate the simultaneous influence of nanoemulsion formulation and preparation parameters--co-emulsifier type, aqueous phase type, homogenization temperature--on the critical quality attributes of developed nanoemulsions, a general factorial experimental design was applied. From the established design space and stability data, promising risperidone-loaded nanoemulsions (mean size about 160 nm, size distribution <0.15, zeta potential around -50 mV), containing sodium oleate in the aqueous phase and polysorbate 80, poloxamer 188 or Solutol(®) HS15 as co-emulsifier, were produced by hot homogenization and their ability to improve risperidone delivery to the brain was assessed in rats. Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated erratic brain profiles of risperidone following intraperitoneal administration in selected nanoemulsions, most probably due to their different droplet surface properties (different composition of the stabilizing layer). Namely, polysorbate 80-costabilized nanoemulsion showed increased (1.4-7.4-fold higher) risperidone brain availability compared to other nanoemulsions and drug solution, suggesting this nanoemulsion as a promising carrier worth exploring further for brain targeting.

  12. Development of drug-in-adhesive transdermal patch for α-asarone and in vivo pharmacokinetics and efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Wu, Yao-Yao; Xia, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Zheng; Liang, Wen-Quan; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2011-01-01

    A transdermal drug delivery system has been reported that can increase the bioavailability, reduce the administration duration, and maintain the concentration of drug in blood. In the present study, drug-in-adhesive transdermal patches of α-asarone using Eudragit E100 as pressure-sensitive adhesives and oleic acid plus isopropyl myristate as penetration co-enhancers were developed. In vitro permeation, in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits, and efficacy in asthmatic rats were evaluated. The results showed that co-enhancers could induce a synergistic effect on α-asarone permeability. In vivo study suggested that the patch can keep a relatively certain blood level of drug within 10-30 h in rabbits. Furthermore, the patch with the size of 4 cm² containing drug 3 mg/cm² showed a noticeable treating effect on asthmatic rats which is equivalent to the effect of dexamethasone, while avoiding the side-effect induced by the corticorsteroid. This suggests that the drug-in-adhesive transdermal patch is a promising delivery system containing α-asarone to be used for asthma treatment.

  13. Food safety evaluation of broccoli and radish sprouts.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Frías, Juana; Gulewicz, Piotr; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Vidal-Valverde, Concepción

    2008-05-01

    Three cultivars of broccoli seeds (Brassica oleracea var. italica), cv. Tiburon, cv. Belstar and cv. Lucky, and two cultivars of radish seeds (Raphanus sativus), cv. Rebel and cv. Bolide, were germinated for three and five days and safety aspects such as microbiological counts and biogenic amines were investigated. Cytotoxicity evaluation was also carried out. Broccoli and radish sprouts contained numbers of mesophilic, psychrotrophic, total and faecal coliform bacteria which are the usual counts for minimally processed germinated seeds. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine increased during sprout production although these levels were below those permitted by legislation (5 mg/100 g of edible food). Broccoli and radish sprouts demonstrated no toxic effects on proliferation and viability of HL-60 cells and should be included in our diets as healthy and safe fresh foods.

  14. Safety Evaluation for Hull Waste Treatment Process in JNC

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, H.; Kurakata, K.

    2002-02-26

    Hull wastes and some scrapped equipment are typical radioactive wastes generated from reprocessing process in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). Because hulls are the wastes remained in the fuel shearing and dissolution, they contain high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started the project of Hull Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF) to treat these solid wastes using compaction and incineration methods since 1993. It is said that Zircaloy fines generated from compaction process might burn and explode intensely. Therefore explosive conditions of the fines generated in compaction process were measured. As these results, it was concluded that the fines generated from the compaction process were not hazardous material. This paper describes the outline of the treatment process of hulls and results of safety evaluation.

  15. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  16. Long-Term Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Drisapersen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Results from an Open-Label Extension Study

    PubMed Central

    Goemans, Nathalie M.; Tulinius, Már; van den Hauwe, Marleen; Kroksmark, Anna-Karin; Buyse, Gunnar; Wilson, Rosamund J.; van Deutekom, Judith C.; de Kimpe, Sjef J.; Lourbakos, Afrodite; Campion, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Background Drisapersen induces exon 51 skipping during dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing and allows synthesis of partially functional dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with amenable mutations. Methods This 188-week open-label extension of the dose-escalation study assessed the long-term efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of drisapersen (PRO051/GSK2402968), 6 mg/kg subcutaneously, in 12 DMD subjects. Dosing was once weekly for 72 weeks. All subjects had a planned treatment interruption (weeks 73–80), followed by intermittent dosing (weeks 81–188). Results Subjects received a median (range) total dose of 5.93 (5.10 to 6.02) mg/kg drisapersen. After 177 weeks (last efficacy assessment), median (mean [SD]) six-minute walk distance (6MWD) improved by 8 (-24.5 [161]) meters for the 10 subjects able to complete the 6MWD at baseline (mean age [SD]: 9.5 [1.9] years). These statistics include 2 subjects unable to complete the test at later visits and who scored “zero”. When only the 8 ambulant subjects at week 177 were taken into account, a median (mean [SD]) increase of 64 (33 [121]) meters in 6MWD was observed. Of 7 subjects walking ≥330 m at extension baseline, 5 walked farther at week 177. Of 3 subjects walking <330 m, 2 lost ambulation, while 1 declined overall but walked farther at some visits. Over the 188 weeks, the most common adverse events were injection-site reactions, raised urinary α1-microglobulin and proteinuria. Dystrophin expression was detected in all muscle biopsies obtained at week 68 or 72. Conclusion Drisapersen was generally well tolerated over 188 weeks. Possible renal effects, thrombocytopenia and injection-site reactions warrant continued monitoring. Improvements in the 6MWD at 12 weeks were sustained after 3.4 years of dosing for most patients. For a small, uncontrolled study, the outcomes are encouraging, as natural history studies would anticipate a decline of over 100 meters over a 3-year period in a comparable

  17. A Multi-centric Bioequivalence Trial in Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients to Assess Bioequivalence and Safety Evaluation of Generic Imatinib Mesylate 400 mg Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rachna; Sharma, Manju; Monif, Tausif; Iyer, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetic profile and to assess bioequivalence of the sponsor’s test formulation (imatinib mesylate 400 mg tablets) with an innovator product (Gleevec 400 mg tablets, Novartis Pharmaceuticals) under fed conditions, in adult patients of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph+ CML) stabilized on imatinib mesylate 400 mg. In addition, the aim of this study was to monitor the safety profile of investigational medicinal products (IMPs). Materials and Methods A multicenter, randomized, open label, two-period, crossover, single dose bioequivalence study was designed for conduct under fed conditions in 42 adult Ph+ CML patients already stabilized on imatinib 400 mg tablets. Pharmacokinetic parameters Tmax, Cmax, and AUC0-24 were calculated using a non-compartmental model on validated WinNonlin software. Validated SAS software was used for statistical evaluation of data. The safety profile of investigational products was monitored during the course of study by applying a clinical process for recording observed untoward effects postadministration of investigational products. Results The 90% confidence intervals for the test/reference mean ratios of the ln-transformed PK variables Cmax (99.0%) and AUC0-24 (99.2%) were within an acceptable range of 80%-125%, as per bioequivalence assumptions. Both formulations were well tolerated after oral administration of IMPs. Conclusion The test product was found to be bioequivalent and safe, and thus can be used interchangeably in clinical practice. PMID:26875198

  18. MRI Evaluation and Safety in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5T and 3T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, sedation considerations and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI-conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  19. Preclinical Study of Single-Dose Moxidectin, a New Oral Treatment for Scabies: Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics Compared to Two-Dose Ivermectin in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bernigaud, Charlotte; Aho, Ludwig Serge; Dreau, Dominique; Kelly, Andrew; Sutra, Jean-François; Moreau, Francis; Lilin, Thomas; Botterel, Françoise; Guillot, Jacques; Chosidow, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Scabies is one of the commonest dermatological conditions globally; however it is a largely underexplored and truly neglected infectious disease. Foremost, improvement in the management of this public health burden is imperative. Current treatments with topical agents and/or oral ivermectin (IVM) are insufficient and drug resistance is emerging. Moxidectin (MOX), with more advantageous pharmacological profiles may be a promising alternative. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a porcine scabies model, 12 pigs were randomly assigned to receive orally either MOX (0.3 mg/kg once), IVM (0.2 mg/kg twice) or no treatment. We evaluated treatment efficacies by assessing mite count, clinical lesions, pruritus and ELISA-determined anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies reductions. Plasma and skin pharmacokinetic profiles were determined. At day 14 post-treatment, all four MOX-treated but only two IVM-treated pigs were mite-free. MOX efficacy was 100% and remained unchanged until study-end (D47), compared to 62% (range 26–100%) for IVM, with one IVM-treated pig remaining infected until D47. Clinical scabies lesions, pruritus and anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies had completely disappeared in all MOX-treated but only 75% of IVM-treated pigs. MOX persisted ~9 times longer than IVM in plasma and skin, thereby covering the mite’s entire life cycle and enabling long-lasting efficacy. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that oral single-dose MOX was more effective than two consecutive IVM-doses, supporting MOX as potential therapeutic approach for scabies. PMID:27732588

  20. A new goldfish model to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used for motion sickness in different gravity loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Smith, Cedric M.; Schraeder, Paul L.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a new goldfish model to predict pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic effects of drugs used to treat motion sickness administered in differing gravity loads. The assumption of these experiments is that the vestibular system is dominant in producing motion sickness and that the visual system is secondary or of small import in the production of motion sickness. Studies will evaluate the parameter of gravity and the contribution of vision to the role of the neurovestibular system in the initiation of motion sickness with and without pharmacologic agents. Promethazine will be studied first. A comparison of data obtained in different groups of goldfish will be done (normal vs. acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded vs. sham operated). Some fish will be bilaterally blinded 10 months prior to initiation of the experiment (designated the chronically bilaterally blinded group of goldfish) to evaluate the neuroplasticity of the nervous system and the associated return of neurovestibular function. Data will be obtained under differing gravity loads with and without a pharmacological agent for motion sickness. Experiments will differentiate pharmacological effects on vision vs. neurovestibular input to motion sickness. Comparison of data obtained in the normal fish and in acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded fish with those obtained in fish with intact and denervated otoliths will differentiate if the visual or neurovestibular system is dominant in response to altered gravity and/or drugs. Experiments will contribute to validation of the goldfish as a model for humans since plasticity of the central nervous system allows astronauts to adapt to the altered visual stimulus conditions of 0-g. Space motion sickness may occur until such an adaptation is achieved.

  1. Evaluating the Use of Antibody Variable Region (Fv) Charge as a Risk Assessment Tool for Predicting Typical Cynomolgus Monkey Pharmacokinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Bumbaca Yadav, Daniela; Sharma, Vikas K.; Boswell, Charles Andrew; Hotzel, Isidro; Tesar, Devin; Shang, Yonglei; Ying, Yong; Fischer, Saloumeh K.; Grogan, Jane L.; Chiang, Eugene Y.; Urban, Konnie; Ulufatu, Sheila; Khawli, Leslie A.; Prabhu, Saileta; Joseph, Sean; Kelley, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) behavior of monoclonal antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys (cynos) is generally translatable to that in humans. Unfortunately, about 39% of the antibodies evaluated for PKs in cynos have fast nonspecific (or non-target-mediated) clearance (in-house data). An empirical model relating variable region (Fv) charge and hydrophobicity to cyno nonspecific clearance was developed to gauge the risk an antibody would have for fast nonspecific clearance in the monkey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictability of this empirical model on cyno nonspecific clearance with antibodies specifically engineered to have either high or low Fv charge. These amino acid changes were made in the Fv region of two test antibodies, humAb4D5-8 and anti-lymphotoxin α. The humAb4D5-8 has a typical nonspecific clearance in cynos, and by making it more positively charged, the antibody acquires fast nonspecific clearance, and making it less positively charged did not impact its clearance. Anti-lymphotoxin α has fast nonspecific clearance in cynos, and making it more positively charged caused it to clear even faster, whereas making it less positively charged caused it to clear slower and within the typical range. These trends in clearance were also observed in two other preclinical species, mice and rats. The effect of modifying Fv charge on subcutaneous bioavailability was also examined, and in general bioavailability was inversely related to the direction of the Fv charge change. Thus, modifying Fv charge appears to impact antibody PKs, and the changes tended to correlate with those predicted by the empirical model. PMID:26491012

  2. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distribute to Federal agencies detailed information on the Department of Labor's evaluation program. The... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  3. 70 FR 35461 - Safety Evaluation Report for the Proposed National Enrichment Facility in Lea County, NM, NUREG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-06-20

    ... ISA Summary, radiation protection, nuclear criticality safety, chemical process safety, fire safety... Doc No: E5-3174] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-3103] Safety Evaluation Report for the... States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of availability of Safety Evaluation Report....

  4. Extended Evaluation of Virological, Immunological and Pharmacokinetic Endpoints of CELADEN: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Celgosivir in Dengue Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Cynthia; Wei, Yuan; Watanabe, Satoru; Lee, How Sung; Khoo, Yok Moi; Fan, Lu; Rathore, Abhay P. S.; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Choy, Milly M.; Kamaraj, Uma S.; Sessions, October M.; Aw, Pauline; de Sessions, Paola F.; Lee, Bernett; Connolly, John E.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Wijaya, Limin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny Guek-Hong

    2016-01-01

    CELADEN was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with confirmed dengue fever to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celgosivir (A study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01619969). Celgosivir was given as a 400 mg loading dose and 200 mg bid (twice a day) over 5 days. Replication competent virus was measured by plaque assay and compared to reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) of viral RNA. Pharmacokinetics (PK) correlations with viremia, immunological profiling, next generation sequence (NGS) analysis and hematological data were evaluated as exploratory endpoints here to identify possible signals of pharmacological activity. Viremia by plaque assay strongly correlated with qPCR during the first four days. Immunological profiling demonstrated a qualitative shift in T helper cell profile during the course of infection. NGS analysis did not reveal any prominent signature that could be associated with drug treatment; however the phylogenetic spread of patients’ isolates underlines the importance of strain variability that may potentially confound interpretation of dengue drug trials conducted during different outbreaks and in different countries. Celgosivir rapidly converted to castanospermine (Cast) with mean peak and trough concentrations of 5727 ng/mL (30.2 μM) and 430 ng/mL (2.3 μM), respectively and cleared with a half-life of 2.5 (± 0.6) hr. Mean viral log reduction between day 2 and 4 (VLR2-4) was significantly greater in secondary dengue than primary dengue (p = 0.002). VLR2-4 did not correlate with drug AUC but showed a trend of greater response with increasing Cmin. PK modeling identified dosing regimens predicted to achieve 2.4 to 4.5 times higher Cmin. than in the CELADEN trial for only 13% to 33% increase in overall dose. A small, non-statistical trend towards better outcome on platelet nadir and difference between maximum and minimum hematocrit was observed in celgosivir-treated patients with secondary dengue

  5. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria A Appendix A to Part 385 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Pt. 385, App. A Appendix A to Part 385—Explanation of Safety...

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation for the spent nuclear fuel project`s cold vacuum drying system

    SciTech Connect

    Garvin, L.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) considers only the Cold Vacuum Drying System (CVDS) facility and its mission as it relates to the integrated process strategy (WHC 1995). The purpose of the PSE is to identify those CBDS design functions that may require safety- class and safety-significant accident prevention and mitigation features.

  7. pkCSM: Predicting Small-Molecule Pharmacokinetic and Toxicity Properties Using Graph-Based Signatures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug development has a high attrition rate, with poor pharmacokinetic and safety properties a significant hurdle. Computational approaches may help minimize these risks. We have developed a novel approach (pkCSM) which uses graph-based signatures to develop predictive models of central ADMET properties for drug development. pkCSM performs as well or better than current methods. A freely accessible web server (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/pkcsm), which retains no information submitted to it, provides an integrated platform to rapidly evaluate pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties. PMID:25860834

  8. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jui-Wen; Huang, Bin-Syuan; Hsu, Chu-Wei; Peng, Chun-Wei; Cheng, Ming-Long; Kao, Jung-Yie; Way, Tzong-Der; Yin, Hao-Chang; Wang, Shan-Shue

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a chlorine dioxide solution (UC-1) composed of chlorine dioxide was produced using an electrolytic method and subsequently purified using a membrane. UC-1 was determined to contain 2000 ppm of gaseous chlorine dioxide in water. The efficacy and safety of UC-1 were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was more than 98.2% reduction when UC-1 concentrations were 5 and 20 ppm for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of H1N1, influenza virus B/TW/71718/04, and EV71 were 84.65 ± 0.64, 95.91 ± 11.61, and 46.39 ± 1.97 ppm, respectively. A 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test revealed that the cell viability of mouse lung fibroblast L929 cells was 93.7% at a 200 ppm UC-1 concentration that is over that anticipated in routine use. Moreover, 50 ppm UC-1 showed no significant symptoms in a rabbit ocular irritation test. In an inhalation toxicity test, treatment with 20 ppm UC-1 for 24 h showed no abnormality and no mortality in clinical symptoms and normal functioning of the lung and other organs. A ClO2 concentration of up to 40 ppm in drinking water did not show any toxicity in a subchronic oral toxicity test. Herein, UC-1 showed favorable disinfection activity and a higher safety profile tendency than in previous reports. PMID:28327506

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of the Effect on System Safety Engineer Training Course for the Aerospace Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekita, Ryuichi; Yamada, Shu

    The system safety has been being applied in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ‧s launch vehicle and satellite development projects. The engineering state of system safety has some room for improvement. Therefore, JAXA is continuously working for system safety improvement. The system safety engineer training course is the top priority for the improvement. This paper represents the practical training evaluation way using Kirkpatrick‧s 4-level approach and the actual results in JAXA system safety engineer training course. Also this paper represents the importance of the engineer training evaluation as a part of PDCA cycle in the industry field.

  10. Preparation, In Vitro Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Respirable Porous Microparticles Containing Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Kundawala, Aliasgar; Patel, Vishnu; Patel, Harsha; Choudhary, Dhaglaram

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to prepare and evaluate rifampicin microparticles for the lung delivery of rifampicin as respirable powder. The microparticles were prepared using chitosan by the spray-drying method and evaluated for aerodynamic properties and pulmonary drug absorption. To control the drug release, tripoly-phosphate in different concentrations 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 was employed to get a sustained drug release profile. The microparticles were evaluated for drug loading, % entrapment efficiency, tapped density, morphological characteristics, and in vitro drug release studies. Aerosol properties were determined using the Andersen cascade impactor. Porous microparticles with particle sizes (d0.5) less than 10 μm were obtained. The entrapment of rifampicin in microparticles was up to 72%. In vitro drug release suggested that the crosslinked microparticles showed sustained release for more than 12 hrs. The drug release rate was found to be decreased as the TPP concentration was increased. The microparticles showed a fine particle fraction in the range of 55–63% with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) values below 3 μm. The in vivo pulmonary absorption of the chitosan microparticles suggested a sustained drug release profile up to 72 hrs with an elimination rate of 0.010 per hr. The studies revealed that the spray-dried porous microparticles have suitable properties to be used as respirable powder in rifampicin delivery to the lungs. PMID:25853075

  11. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoxia Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  12. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolic acid in Nagase analbuminemic rats: Evaluation of protein binding effects using the modeling and simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuaki; Yano, Ikuko; Kawanishi, Misaki; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in Nagase analbuminemic rats (NARs) to evaluate the effect of protein binding on the associated inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. Free fractions of MPA in the control rats and NARs were 2.09 and 24.8%, respectively. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters simultaneously obtained by the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM explained reasonably well the concentrations of MPA and MPA glucuronide as well as IMPDH activity in both rats. NARs showed a higher clearance and a smaller volume of distribution based on the free MPA concentration than the controls did, besides the increase in free fraction. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration based on free MPA was estimated as 163 ng/mL for both rats. Simulations based on the obtained pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters showed that the area under the IMPDH activity-time curve decreased non-linearly according to the increase in free fraction of MPA. In conclusion, the experimental data obtained from NARs followed by the modeling and simulation approach quantitatively clarified that the free MPA concentration was suitable for the biomarker of immunosuppressive effect of MPA. Dose adjustments based on the total MPA may cause unnecessary overexposure to MPA in patients with hypoalbuminemia.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluations of a 10 mg/kg enrofloxacin intramuscular administration in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps): a preliminary assessment.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, M; Vercelli, C; De Vito, V; Dezzutto, D; Bergagna, S; Re, G; Giorgi, M

    2017-01-01

    Enrofloxacin (E) is commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is necessary to perform pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies to minimize the selection of resistant mutants of bacteria and extend the efficacy of antimicrobial agents. Eight healthy adult Pogona vitticeps were assigned into two groups of equal size and treated with a single intramuscular injection of E at 10 mg/kg. Blood samples were withdrawn at different scheduled times for each group, and rectal swabs were collected. E and ciprofloxacin (active metabolite) blood concentrations were quantified by an HPLC validated method, while the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion susceptibility test. The pharmacokinetic profiles of E gave similar pharmacokinetic parameters irrespective of the collection time schedule. Bacteria isolation showed the presence of both E. coli, Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica and subspecies 3a, Proteus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. The majority of isolated colonies were sensitive to E, but the treatment did not reduce the number of bacteria in faeces. Results suggest that E is able to reach blood concentrations high enough to kill susceptible bacteria (MIC < 0.9 μg/mL), but at the same time does not significantly affect intestinal bacteria.

  15. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  16. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles for nose to brain delivery of haloperidol: in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Mohd; Sara, Udai Vir Singh

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, haloperidol (HP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared to enhance the uptake of HP to brain via intranasal (i.n.) delivery. SLNs were prepared by a modified emulsification-diffusion technique and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and stability. All parameters were found to be in an acceptable range. In vitro drug release was found to be 94.16±4.78% after 24 h and was fitted to the Higuchi model with a very high correlation coefficient (R (2)=0.9941). Pharmacokinetics studies were performed on albino Wistar rats and the concentration of HP in brain and blood was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The brain/blood ratio at 0.5 h for HP-SLNs i.n., HP sol. i.n. and HP sol. i.v. was 1.61, 0.17 and 0.031, respectively, indicating direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. The maximum concentration (C max) in brain achieved from i.n. administration of HP-SLNs (329.17±20.89 ng/mL, T max 2 h) was significantly higher than that achieved after i.v. (76.95±7.62 ng/mL, T max 1 h), and i.n. (90.13±6.28 ng/mL, T max 2 h) administration of HP sol. The highest drug-targeting efficiency (2362.43%) and direct transport percentage (95.77%) was found with HP-SLNs as compared to the other formulations. Higher DTE (%) and DTP (%) suggest that HP-SLNs have better brain targeting efficiency as compared to other formulations.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of a Single Intramuscular High Dose versus an Oral Long-Term Supplementation of Cholecalciferol

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, Alexander; Heine, Guido; Dölle, Sabine; Worm, Margitta

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Vitamin D deficiency is frequent during the winter and occurs throughout the year in the elderly or patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of oral supplementation versus a single intramuscular injection of cholecalciferol in healthy individuals. Research design and methods Up to 8,000 I.U. oral cholecalciferol was administered daily for 84 days in a 4 week dose-escalation setting to vitamin D deficient individuals. In another cohort, a single intramuscular injection of 100,000 I.U. cholecalciferol was given. In both cohorts, individuals without vitamin D intake served as the comparison group. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were measured in all individuals at defined time points throughout the studies. Results The mean 25(OH)D serum concentration increased significantly after oral cholecalciferol intake compared to the control group (day 28: 83.4 nmol/l and 42.5 nmol/l; day 56: 127.4 nmol/l and 37.3 nmol/l; day 84: 159.7 nmol/l and 30.0 nmol/l). In individuals receiving 100,000 I.U. cholecalciferol intramuscular, the mean 25(OH)D serum concentration peaked after 4 weeks measuring 70.9 nmol/l compared to 32.7 nmol/l in the placebo group (p = 0.002). The increase of 25(OH)D serum concentrations after 28 days was comparable between both routes of administration (p = 0.264). Conclusions Oral and intramuscular cholecalciferol supplementation effectively increased serum 25(OH)D concentrations. PMID:28114352

  19. Solid lipid nanoparticles for nose to brain delivery of haloperidol: in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Mohd; Sara, Udai Vir Singh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, haloperidol (HP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared to enhance the uptake of HP to brain via intranasal (i.n.) delivery. SLNs were prepared by a modified emulsification–diffusion technique and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and stability. All parameters were found to be in an acceptable range. In vitro drug release was found to be 94.16±4.78% after 24 h and was fitted to the Higuchi model with a very high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9941). Pharmacokinetics studies were performed on albino Wistar rats and the concentration of HP in brain and blood was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The brain/blood ratio at 0.5 h for HP-SLNs i.n., HP sol. i.n. and HP sol. i.v. was 1.61, 0.17 and 0.031, respectively, indicating direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood–brain barrier. The maximum concentration (Cmax) in brain achieved from i.n. administration of HP-SLNs (329.17±20.89 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) was significantly higher than that achieved after i.v. (76.95±7.62 ng/mL, Tmax 1 h), and i.n. (90.13±6.28 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) administration of HP sol. The highest drug-targeting efficiency (2362.43%) and direct transport percentage (95.77%) was found with HP-SLNs as compared to the other formulations. Higher DTE (%) and DTP (%) suggest that HP-SLNs have better brain targeting efficiency as compared to other formulations. PMID:26579417

  20. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia.

  1. Evaluating amikacin dosage regimens in intensive care unit patients: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Zazo, Hinojal; Martín-Suárez, Ana; Lanao, José M

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to conduct a comparative pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) evaluation using Monte Carlo simulation of conventional versus high-dose extended-interval dosage (HDED) regimens of amikacin (AMK) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for an Acinetobacter baumannii infection model. The simulation was performed in five populations (a control population and four subpopulations of ICU patients). Using a specific AMK PK/PD model and Monte Carlo simulation, the following were generated: simulated AMK steady-state plasma level curves; PK/PD efficacy indexes [time during which the serum drug concentration remains above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for a dosing period (%T>MIC) and ratio of peak serum concentration to MIC (Cmax/MIC)]; evolution of bacterial growth curves; and adaptive resistance to treatment. A higher probability of bacterial resistance was observed with the HDED regimen compared with the conventional dosage regimen. A statistically significant increase in Cmax/MIC and a statistically significant reduction in %T>MIC with the HDED regimen were obtained. A multiple linear relationship between CFU values at 24h with Cmax/MIC and %T>MIC was obtained. In conclusion, with the infection model tested, the likelihood of resistance to treatment may be higher against pathogens with a high MIC with the HDED regimen, considering that in many ICU patients the %T>MIC may be limited. If a sufficient value of %T>MIC (≥60%) is not reached, even though the Cmax/MIC is high, the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment may not be guaranteed. This study indicates that different AMK dosing strategies could directly influence the efficacy results in ICU patients.

  2. Warfarin is an effective modifier of multiple UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes: evaluation of its potential to alter the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Zhufeng; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the modulatory effects of warfarin (an extensively used anticoagulant drug) and its metabolites on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity and to assess the potential of warfarin to alter the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (AZT). The effects of warfarin and its metabolites on glucuronidation were determined using human and rat liver microsomes (HLM and RLM) as well as expressed UGTs. The mechanisms of warfarin-UGT interactions were explored through kinetic characterization and modeling. Pharmacokinetic studies with rats were performed to evaluate the potential of warfarin to alter the pharmacokinetics of AZT. We found that warfarin was an effective modifier of a panel of UGT enzymes. The effects of warfarin on glucuronidation were inhibitory for UGT1A1, 2B7, and 2B17, but activating for UGT1A3. Mixed effects were observed for UGT1A7 and 1A9. Consistent with its inhibitory effects on UGT2B7 activity, warfarin inhibited AZT glucuronidation in HLM (Ki = 74.9-96.3 μM) and RLM (Ki = 190-230 μM). Inhibition of AZT glucuronidation by UGT2B7, HLM, and RLM was also observed with several hydroxylated metabolites of warfarin. Moreover, the systemic exposure (AUC) of AZT in rats was increased by a 1.5- to 2.1-fold upon warfarin coadministration. The elevated AUC was associated with suppressed glucuronidation that was probably attained through a combined action of warfarin and its hydroxylated metabolites. In conclusion, the activities of multiple UGT enzymes can be modulated by warfarin and the nature of modulation was isoform dependent. Also, pharmacokinetic interactions of zidovudine with warfarin were highly possible through inhibition of UGT metabolism.

  3. A pharmacokinetic evaluation and metabolite identification of the GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 in mouse informs novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of GHB intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Garrett R; Gibson, K Michael; Vogel, Kara R

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous inhibitory neurotransmitter and precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzo-cyclohept-6-ylideneacetic acid), a known GHB receptor antagonist, has shown significant efficacy in a murine model of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (SSADHD), a heritable neurological disorder featuring chronic elevation of GHB that blocks the final step of GABA degradation. NCS-382 exposures and elimination pathways remain unknown; therefore, the goal of the present work was to obtain in vivo pharmacokinetic data in a murine model and to identify the NCS-382 metabolites formed by mouse and human. NCS-382 single-dose mouse pharmacokinetics were established following an intraperitoneal injection (100, 300, and 500 mg/kg body weight) and metabolite identification was conducted using HPLC-MS/MS. Kinetic enzyme assays employed mouse and human liver microsomes. Upon gaining an understanding of the NCS-382 clearance mechanisms, a chemical inhibitor was used to increase NCS-382 brain exposure in a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study. Two major metabolic pathways of NCS-382 were identified as dehydrogenation and glucuronidation. The Km for the dehydrogenation pathway was determined in mouse (Km = 29.5 ± 10.0 μmol/L) and human (Km = 12.7 ± 4.8 μmol/L) liver microsomes. Comparable parameters for glucuronidation were >100 μmol/L in both species. Inhibition of NCS-382 glucuronidation, in vivo, by diclofenac resulted in increased NCS-382 brain concentrations and protective effects in gamma-butyrolactone-treated mice. These initial evaluations of NCS-382 pharmacokinetics and metabolism inform the development of NCS-382 as a potential therapy for conditions of GHB elevation (including acute intoxication & SSADHD).

  4. Mixed nanomicelles as potential carriers for systemic delivery of Z-GP-Dox, an FAPα-based doxorubicin prodrug: formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Hongming; Cai, Shaohui; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    Z-GP-Dox, the FAPα (fibroblast activation protein-α)-based doxorubicin prodrug, demonstrates excellent tumor targeting effects and a favorable toxicokinetic profile. However, the insoluble nature of Z-GP-Dox becomes a significant barrier to drug administration, particularly when it comes to the clinical stage. Here we developed a nanomicelle system to facilitate the systemic delivery of Z-GP-Dox, and evaluated its disposition in rats following administration of the micelles using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model. Z-GP-Dox-loaded mixed nanomicelles (ZGD-MNs) were prepared by dispersion of an ethanol solution of Z-GP-Dox, lecithin, and sodium oleate in water. The obtained ZGD-MNs were 86.6 nm in size with a drug loading of 14.03%. ZGD-MNs were fairly stable in phosphate-buffered saline and showed satisfactory physical and chemical stability over a 2-week observation period. Accumulative drug release was more than 56% within 24 hours. Further, the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic rat model consisting of various organs (ie, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and intestine) was fitted to the experimental data following administration of ZGD-loaded cosolvent (control) or micelles. Derived partition coefficient values revealed that the nanomicelles significantly altered the biodistribution of Z-GP-Dox. Of note, drug distribution to the lung, liver, and spleen was greatly enhanced and the fold change ranged from 2.4 to 33. In conclusion, this is the first report of a mixed micelle system being a viable carrier for delivery of Z-GP-Dox. Also, the pharmacokinetic behavior of Z-GP-Dox was satisfactorily described by the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model. PMID:25759584

  5. Pharmacokinetics Evaluation of Carbon Nanotubes Using FTIR Analysis and Histological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Claudia; Tudor, Matea Cristian; Constantin, Bele; Flaviu, Tabaran; Stefan, Razvan; Maria, Bindea; Chira, Sergiu; Braicu, Cornelia; Pop, Laura; Petric, Roxana Cojocneanu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are biologically non-toxic and long-circulating nanostructures that have special physical properties. This study was focused on developing alternative methods that track carbon nanotubes, like FR-IR to classical tissue histological procedure. FT-IR absorption spectra were used to confirm the carboxylation of carbon nanotubes and to evaluate the presence of carbon nanotubes from bulk spleen samples and histologically prepared samples (control spleen and spleen with SWCNT-COOH). FT-IR spectrum of spleen sample from animals injected with CNTs shows major spectral differences consisting in infrared bands located at ~1173 cm(-1), ~ 1410 cm(-1); ~1658 cm(-1), ~1737 cm(-1) and around 1720 cm(-1) respectively. In terms of localization of carbon nanotubes, selective accumulation of marginal zone macrophages and splenic red pulp is observed for all treated groups, indicating the presence of carbon nanotubes even at 3, 4 and 7 days after treatment. In summary, we believe that histological evaluation and FT-IR can provide more characteristic information about the pharmacokinetcis and the clearance of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Safety evaluation of saffron (Crocus sativus) tablets in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Shahabian, Masoud; Esmaeili, Habib-Allah; Rajbai, Omid; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2008-12-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) stigma tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of a 1 week treatment of saffron tablets. Volunteers were divided into 3 groups of 10 each (5 males and 5 females). Group I received placebo; groups 2 and 3 received 200 and 400mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical and electrocardiographic parameters done in pre- and post-treatment periods. Clinical examination showed no gross changes in all volunteers after intervention. Saffron with higher dose (400mg) decreased standing systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures significantly. Saffron decreased slightly some hematological parameters such as red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets. Saffron increased sodium, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. This study showed that saffron tablets may change some hematological and biochemical parameters. However, these alterations were in normal ranges and they were not important clinically.

  7. Tackling children's road safety through edutainment: an evaluation of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Zeedyk, M S; Wallace, L

    2003-08-01

    The burgeoning market in electronic media has encouraged a trend toward 'edutainment', where entertaining, media-based materials are used to facilitate educational outcomes. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a video that has recently been released by a popular children's entertainment group to help tackle Britain's poor record on children's road safety. We wished to determine whether the video had an impact on either children's knowledge or parents' awareness of pedestrian skills, when used in a standard home-based fashion. A total of 120 families participated, all of whom had children 5 years of age. Half the families received videos at the beginning of the study, while the other half served as a control group against which to measure change in the treatment group. Data were gathered at baseline and again 1 month later, using a series of tailored questionnaire items. A robust pattern of null findings indicated that the video, when used in this casual fashion, had no educational impact on either parents or children. Crucially, however, parents strongly believed that it had. The discussion explores the implications of such a mismatch and highlights similarities with outcomes of other health education interventions.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency and safety in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Uckaya, Meryem; Uckaya, Fatih; Demir, Nazan; Demir, Yasar

    2016-02-29

    Chemicals used in cosmetics have to interact with enzymes for beneficial or destroy purpose after they enter in our body. Active sections of enzymes that catalyze reactions have three dimensions and they are active optically. When these limitations of catalytic sections are considered, it may be considered that defining geometric specifications of chemical materials and functional groups they contain may contribute on safety evaluations of cosmetic products. In this study, defining similarities and differences of geometric structures of chemicals that are prohibited to be used in cosmetic products and chemical that are allowed to be used by using group theory and analyze of functional groups that are often encountered in these chemicals are aimed. Molecule formulas related to chemical material of, 276 pieces chemicals that are prohibited to be used in cosmetic products and 65 pieces chemicals that are allowed, are used as the material. Two and three-dimension structures of these formulas are drawn and types and quantity of functional groups they contain are defined. And as a method, freeware (Free Trial) version of "Chem-BioOffice Ultra 13.0 Suite" chemical drawing program to draw two and three-dimension of formulas, "Campus-Licensed" version that are provided for use by our university of "Autodesk 3DS Max" for three-dimension drawings are used. In order to analyze geometric specifications of drawn molecules according to Group Theory and define type and quantity of available functional groups, Excel applications developed by Prof. Dr. Yaşar Demir are used.

  9. Safety evaluation of Algal Oil from Schizochytrium sp.

    PubMed

    Fedorova-Dahms, I; Marone, P A; Bailey-Hall, E; Ryan, A S

    2011-01-01

    The safety of Algal Oil from Schizochytrium sp. was evaluated by testing for gene mutations, clastogenicity and aneugenicity, and in a subchronic 90-day Sprague-Dawley rat dietary study. The results of all genotoxicity tests were negative. The 90-day study involved dietary exposure to 0.5, 1.5, and 5 wt.% of Algal Oil and two control diets: a standard low-fat basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with 5 wt.% menhaden oil (the fish oil control). There were no treatment-related effects of Algal Oil on clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, behavior, hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, or urinalysis parameters. Increased mean liver weights and alveolar histiocytosis were observed in both the fish oil control and the high-dose Algal Oil-treated animals and were not considered to be adverse. Algal Oil was bioavailable as demonstrated by the dose-related increase of DHA and EPA levels in tissues and plasma. The no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) for Algal Oil under the conditions of this study was 5 wt.% in the diet, equivalent to an overall average Algal Oil intake of 3250 mg/kg bw/day for male and female rats. Based on the body surface area, the human equivalent dose is about 30 g Algal Oil/day for a 60 kg adult.

  10. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Dorota; Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material.

  11. Krypton-85 hydrofracture engineering feasibility and safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.; Muller, M.E.; Pan, P.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Engineering studies have been made to determine the hazards associated with the disposal of /sup 85/Kr using the hydrofracture process. To assess the hazards, an effort has been made to identify the equipment required to entrain and dissolve the noble gas into the grout stream at hydrofracture pressure (up to 350 bar). Off-the-shelf or slightly modified equipment has been identified for safe and effective compression and gas-grout mixing. Each monthly injection disposes of 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ Ci of /sup 85/Kr. By connecting only one gas cylinder to the injection system at a time, the maximum amount of krypton likely to be released as a result of equipment failure is limited to 128,000 Ci. An evaluation by Los Alamos Technical Associates shows that releasing this amount of gas in less than one hour under worst-case meteorological conditions through a 30-m stack would result in a whole-body dose of 170 millirem at a distance of 1 km from the facility. A krypton collection and recovery system can further reduce this dose to 17 millirem; increasing the distance to the site boundary to 3 km can also reduce the dose by a factor of ten. Lung and skin dose estimates are 1.6 and 120 times the whole-body dose, respectively. These are all worst-case values; releases under more typical conditions would result in a significantly lower dose. No insurmountable safety or engineering problems have been identified.

  12. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of doxorubicin plasma levels in normal and overweight patients with breast cancer and simulation of dose adjustment by different indexes of body mass.

    PubMed

    Barpe, Deise Raquel; Rosa, Daniela Dornelles; Froehlich, Pedro Eduardo

    2010-11-20<