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Sample records for evaluate pharmacokinetics safety

  1. FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS FOR USE IN SAFETY OR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Proposed applications of increasingly sophisticated biologically-based computational models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, raise the issue of how to evaluate whether the models are adequate for proposed uses including safety or risk ...

  2. The Sheep as a Model of Preclinical Safety and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of Candidate Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. PMID:25845860

  3. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  4. Impact of inter-individual differences in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics on safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dorne, J L C M

    2004-12-01

    Safety evaluation aims to assess the dose-response relationship to determine a dose/level of exposure for food contaminants below which no deleterious effect is measurable that is 'without appreciable health risk' when consumed daily over a lifetime. These safe levels, such as the acceptable daily intake (ADI) have been derived from animal studies using surrogates for the threshold such as the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL). The extrapolation from the NOAEL to the human safe intake uses a 100-fold uncertainty factor, defined as the product of two 10-fold factors allowing for human variability and interspecies differences. The 10-fold factor for human variability has been further subdivided into two factors of 10(0.5) (3.16) to cover toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and this subdivsion allows for the replacement of an uncertainty factor with a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) when compound-specific data are available. Recently, an analysis of human variability in pharmacokinetics for phase I metabolism (CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, hydrolysis, alcohol dehydrogenase), phase II metabolism (N-acetyltransferase, glucuronidation, glycine conjugation, sulphation) and renal excretion was used to derive pathway-related uncertainty factors in subgroups of the human population (healthy adults, effects of ethnicity and age). Overall, the pathway-related uncertainty factors (99th centile) were above the toxicokinetic uncertainty factor for healthy adults exposed to xenobiotics handled by polymorphic metabolic pathways (and assuming the parent compound was the proximate toxicant) such as CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (26), CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (52) and NAT-2 slow acetylators (5.2). Neonates were the most susceptible subgroup of the population for pathways with available data [CYP1A2 and glucuronidation (12), CYP3A4 (14), glycine conjugation (28)]. Data for polymorphic pathways were not available in neonates but uncertainty factors

  5. Impact of inter-individual differences in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics on safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dorne, J L C M

    2004-12-01

    Safety evaluation aims to assess the dose-response relationship to determine a dose/level of exposure for food contaminants below which no deleterious effect is measurable that is 'without appreciable health risk' when consumed daily over a lifetime. These safe levels, such as the acceptable daily intake (ADI) have been derived from animal studies using surrogates for the threshold such as the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL). The extrapolation from the NOAEL to the human safe intake uses a 100-fold uncertainty factor, defined as the product of two 10-fold factors allowing for human variability and interspecies differences. The 10-fold factor for human variability has been further subdivided into two factors of 10(0.5) (3.16) to cover toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and this subdivsion allows for the replacement of an uncertainty factor with a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) when compound-specific data are available. Recently, an analysis of human variability in pharmacokinetics for phase I metabolism (CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, hydrolysis, alcohol dehydrogenase), phase II metabolism (N-acetyltransferase, glucuronidation, glycine conjugation, sulphation) and renal excretion was used to derive pathway-related uncertainty factors in subgroups of the human population (healthy adults, effects of ethnicity and age). Overall, the pathway-related uncertainty factors (99th centile) were above the toxicokinetic uncertainty factor for healthy adults exposed to xenobiotics handled by polymorphic metabolic pathways (and assuming the parent compound was the proximate toxicant) such as CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (26), CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (52) and NAT-2 slow acetylators (5.2). Neonates were the most susceptible subgroup of the population for pathways with available data [CYP1A2 and glucuronidation (12), CYP3A4 (14), glycine conjugation (28)]. Data for polymorphic pathways were not available in neonates but uncertainty factors

  6. Evaluation of Herbal Medicines: Value Addition to Traditional Medicines Through Metabolism, Pharmacokinetic and Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Thelingwani, Roslyn; Masimirembwa, Collen

    2014-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of herbal medicines remain major issues of concern especially in the developing world where the use is high. The World Health Organisation estimates up to 80% of the population in Africa relies on herbal medicines for treatment of many diseases. Minimum safety evaluations need to be done for both the herbal and conventional drugs, in particular when there is a high likelihood of co-administration. This is particularly important in Africa where there is increased access to antiretrovirals in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, which are being used in a population background characterized by rampant use of herbal medicines. Many techniques used in the discovery and evaluation of conventional drugs can be adapted to herbal medicines. Such evaluations will add value to herbal medicines as doctors and patients will be better informed on which drugs and herbal medicines to take or not take together. This can also lead to the adoption of guidelines by regulatory agents such as the European Medicines Agency (EMA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and governmental agencies controlling the use of medicines. Of current interest is the evaluation of drug-herb interactions (DHI) involving the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of medicines where there is a promising possibility to adopt the current FDA and EMA guidelines on the evaluation of herbal medicines for drug-drug interactions (DDI). In this review we demonstrate progress made so far in DHI and point to possible future developments that will contribute to the safe use of herbal medicines.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of multiple doses of rifampin on the pharmacokinetics and safety of ponatinib in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Davis, Jeffrey; Turner, Christopher D; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2015-09-01

    Ponatinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in heavily pretreated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, is a CYP3A4 substrate. This open-label, nonrandomized, fixed-order crossover study evaluated the effect of multiple oral doses of rifampin, a strong CYP3A4 inducer, on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib (45 mg, single dose). Twenty healthy adults received ponatinib on day 1, rifampin 600 mg alone on days 8-13, 15, and 16, and rifampin 600 mg with ponatinib on day 14. Rifampin decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time zero to time of last measurable concentration (AUC0-t ) and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞ ) of ponatinib by 42%, 59%, and 63%, respectively, with no effect on time to Cmax . The limits of the 90% confidence intervals of the estimated geometric mean ratios of ponatinib Cmax , AUC0-t , and AUC0-∞ did not fall within the 80-125% margins for equivalence, suggesting a statistically significant interaction. Coadministration of ponatinib with strong CYP3A4 inducers should be avoided unless the benefit outweighs the possible risk of ponatinib underexposure, because the safety of ponatinib dose increases has not been studied in this context. PMID:27137144

  8. Pharmacokinetic and Safety Evaluation of BILR 355, a Second-Generation Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fenglei; Koenen-Bergmann, Michael; MacGregor, Thomas R.; Ring, Arne; Hattox, Susan; Robinson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    BILR 355 is a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) under clinical development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection, particularly in those who harbor virus resistant to the currently available NNRTIs. Two single-center, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel dose-escalation studies were conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral BILR 355 administration alone and after coadministration with ritonavir (RTV) at 100 mg. Following a single dose of BILR 355 in oral solution, the mean half life (t1/2) was 2 to 4 h, with peak concentrations occurring at 0.5 to 1 h postadministration. The mean apparent clearance (CL/F) ranged from 79.2 to 246 liters/h for administered doses of 12.5 mg to 100 mg. This observed nonlinearity in CL/F resulted from the increased bioavailability attributed to a saturated absorption and/or elimination process at higher doses. In contrast, after the coadministration of single doses of 5 mg to 87.5 mg of BILR 355 with RTV, the mean CL/F ranged from 5.88 to 8.47 liters/h. Over the dose range (5 to 87.5 mg) studied, systemic BILR 355 exposures were approximately proportional to the doses administered when they were coadministered with RTV. With RTV coadministration, the mean t1/2 increased to 10 to 16 h, and the mean time of the maximum concentration in plasma lengthened to 1.5 to 5 h. Compared to the values for BILR 355 given alone, the mean area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity, the maximum concentration in plasma, and the t1/2 of BILR 355 achieved after coadministration with RTV increased 15- to 30-fold, 2- to 5-fold, and 3- to 5-fold, respectively. In both studies, BILR 355 appeared to be safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers when the outcomes in the treated volunteers were compared with those in the placebo group. PMID:18824608

  9. Non-clinical safety and pharmacokinetic evaluations of propylene glycol aerosol in Sprague-Dawley rats and Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Werley, Michael S; McDonald, Paddy; Lilly, Patrick; Kirkpatrick, Daniel; Wallery, Jeffrey; Byron, Peter; Venitz, Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    Aerosolized propylene glycol (PG) was generated as log-normally distributed particulate clouds in different concentrations using a novel capillary aerosol generator (CAG) and evaluated in a battery of non-clinical studies intended to assess its potential inhalation and systemic toxicity in 2 species before ICH-compliant "first-time-in-man" studies. Exposures were nose-only in rats, and via face mask with oropharyngeal tube in dogs. The CAG-generated PG aerosol had a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 2.29μm, with a 1.56 geometric standard deviation (GSD) in the rat studies, and a MMAD of 1.34μm (1.45 GSD) in the dog studies, consistent with expected particle size exposures in man. International Congress on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines were followed, which recommend preliminary non-clinical safety studies using the vehicle and device (CAG-PG) prior to the first human exposure including safety pharmacology, pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, single dose toxicity studies, and repeated dose toxicity studies in two species. In the rat, the only biologically relevant findings included clinical signs of ocular and nasal irritation indicated by minor bleeding around the eyes and nose, and minimal laryngeal squamous metaplasia. This finding is commonly observed in inhalation studies in the rat, and likely related to the unique sensitivity of the tissue, as well as the circuitous airflow pathway through the larynx which increases particle deposition. In the female Beagle dog, treatment-related decreases in hemoglobin, red blood cells and hematocrit were observed in the two highest exposure groups, equivalent to approximately 18 and 60mg/kg/day. In male dogs from the high dose group, similar small decreases, albeit, non-statistically significant decreases were observed in these hematological markers as well. PK studies in rats and dogs showed that the absorption of PG following pulmonary inhalation exposure occurs rapidly, and equilibrium between lung tissue and plasma

  10. Applied Pharmacokinetics: Course Description and Retrospective Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Diane E.

    1984-01-01

    An applied course designed to allow students to formulate pharmacokinetic recommendations individually for actual patient data and compare their recommendations to those of a pharmacokinetic consulting service is described and evaluated, and an objective student evaluation method is outlined. (MSE)

  11. Phase I, Open-Label, Single-Dose Study To Evaluate the Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Telbivudine in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ke, June; Uy, Grace; Bosheva, Miroslava; Qi, Yin; Praestgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Telbivudine is a nucleoside analogue that has been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in adults at 600 mg/day. We conducted a phase I, open-label, first-in-pediatrics study to investigate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a single dose of telbivudine in HBV-infected children and adolescents. Eligible patients were enrolled sequentially from older to younger groups, with evaluation of safety and available pharmacokinetic data after each stratum. Adolescent patients (>12 to 18 years) received a single dose of 600 mg telbivudine as an oral solution, while children aged 2 to 12 years received a single dose of 15 or 25 mg/kg of body weight up to a maximum of 600 mg. Telbivudine was well tolerated; all adverse events were mild, and none occurred in more than one patient. The plasma telbivudine concentration-versus-time profiles in adolescents given 600 mg were similar to the mean profile of healthy adults receiving the same oral dose. Children aged 2 to <6 and 6 to 12 years receiving a single 15-mg/kg dose showed similar plasma exposures. To predict the steady-state exposure, plasma concentration-versus-time profiles for patients aged 2 to 12 years (15 mg/kg) and >12 to 18 years (600 mg) were fitted to a two-compartment 1st-order, microconstant, lag time, 1st-order elimination pharmacokinetic (PK) model. This analysis predicted the following dosages to mimic exposures in healthy adults receiving 600 mg/day: 20 mg/kg/day for children 2 to 12 years and 600 mg/day for adolescents. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the efficacy of the recommended dose in pediatric patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00907894.) PMID:23774433

  12. The value of population pharmacokinetics and simulation for postmarketing safety evaluation of dosing guidelines for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index: buflomedil as a case study.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Ducher, Michel; Matanza, David; Bleyzac, Nathalie; Uhart, Mathieu; Odouard, Emmanuel; Maire, Pascal; Goutelle, Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Population pharmacokinetics and simulation techniques currently play an important role in new drug development. This paper illustrates the potential value of those methods in postmarketing safety assessment, using buflomedil in elderly patients as an example. We retrospectively assessed the risk of buflomedil overdosing associated with the latest dosing recommendations of the French Drug Agency (AFSSAPS). First, buflomedil concentrations measured in 24 elderly patients were analysed with a nonparametric population approach. Then, the pharmacokinetic model was used to perform a 1000-patient Monte Carlo simulation for the two recommended buflomedil dosage regimens. The maximum concentrations calculated after 10 days of therapy were compared with levels observed in reported cases of toxicity to assess the probability of overdosing. A three-compartment model best fit concentration data. Population predictions showed little bias (-0.14 mg/L) and good precision (8.73 mg(2) /L(2)). Overall results of the simulation study showed that the application of the two recommended dosage regimens of buflomedil was associated with overdosing (C(max) > 10 mg/L) and potential toxicity in 2.9% of geriatric patients. In patients with mild renal impairment, who may receive the higher-dosage regimen by therapeutic error, the probability of overdosing was 6.2%. Despite specific dosing recommendations in case of renal impairment, this study shows that the use of buflomedil could be associated with significant risk of overdosing in geriatric patients. Such results might have enhanced decision-making when buflomedil safety was reassessed by AFSSAPS in 2006. The retrospective case of buflomedil illustrates how these methods may be valuable in postmarketing safety evaluation of potentially toxic drugs.

  13. A Randomized Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Trabodenoson in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Laties, Alan; Rich, Cadmus C.; Stoltz, Randall; Humbert, Vernon; Brickman, Chaim; McVicar, William

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of trabodenoson, a highly selective adenosine mimetic targeting the adenosine A1 receptor. Methods: In Part 1, 60 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to 14 days of twice-daily topical monocular application of placebo or trabodenoson (200, 400, 800, 1,600, 2,400, or 3,200 μg). In Part 2, 10 subjects were randomized to placebo or 8 escalating doses of bilateral trabodenoson (total daily doses: 1,800–6,400 μg). Results: The incidence of treatment-related adverse events in Part 1 was similar in the trabodenoson (27.8%) and placebo (25.0%) groups. Most were mild in intensity. The most common adverse events (AEs) for trabodenoson and placebo were headache (25.0% vs. 33%, respectively) and eye pain (11.1% vs. 4.2%, respectively). Ocular AEs were infrequent (16.7% and 17.9%, respectively), were self-limited, lasted <24 h, and were typically mild in intensity. The most common ocular AE was eye pain (9.5% and 3.6%, respectively), with a single observation of ocular hyperemia (200 μg trabodenoson). Trabodenoson was rapidly absorbed [median time to maximum concentration (tmax): ∼0.08 to 0.27 h] and eliminated (t½: 0.48–2.0 h), with no evidence of drug accumulation. Systemic exposure to topical trabodenoson was dose related but not dose proportional, with a plateau effect at doses ≥2,400 mg per eye. No clinically significant treatment-related systemic AEs were observed, and increasing systemic exposure had no effect on heart rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Ocular doses of trabodenoson up to 3,200 μg per eye were safe and well tolerated in the eye and resulted in no detectable systemic effects in healthy adult volunteers. PMID:27046445

  14. Development of safety profile evaluating pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity of a combination of pioglitazone and olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Nandi, Utpal; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), an antidiabetic drug and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), an antihypertensive drug were administered orally alone and in combination to Wistar albino rats for evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity of individual drugs and their combination. Pharmacokinetic study was performed by orally administering PIO and OLM at single dose of 3 and 2mg/kg, respectively alone and in combination analyzing the plasma samples using LC-MS/MS. Antidiabetic activity evaluation was done in type-2 diabetes mellitus induced animals at same dose level as in pharmacokinetic study daily for 30 days. PIO and/or OLM were administered orally to animals at daily doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days for toxicity study. There was no significant alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of either drug indicating absence of any pharmacokinetic interaction when co-administered. Positive pharmacodynamic interaction between PIO and OLM was established in this study. Two drugs in combination showed no evidence of potentiation of 28-day repeated dose toxicity in animals. Again, drugs, alone and in combination, caused only minor changes in clinical-laboratory tests and histopathological change was not found in the experiment performed. In conclusion, PIO and OLM combination can primarily be stated as safe in terms of present toxicity and pharmacokinetics findings.

  15. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic equivalence and 54-week efficacy and safety of CT-P13 and innovator infliximab in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Sakurai, Takeo; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Ohtsubo, Hideo; Lee, Sang Joon; Nambu, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To demonstrate the pharmacokinetic equivalence of CT-P13 and its innovator infliximab (IFX) in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to compare the efficacy and safety of these drugs, administered for 54 weeks. Methods. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study, 3 mg/kg of CT-P13 or IFX, in combination with methotrexate (MTX) (6–16 mg/week), was administered for 54 weeks to Japanese active RA patients with an inadequate response to MTX, to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic equivalence, based on the area under the curve (AUCτ) (weeks 6–14) and Cmax (week 6) of these drugs, and to compare their efficacy and safety. Results. The CT-P13-to-IFX ratios (90% confidence intervals) of the geometric mean AUCτ and Cmax values in patients negative for antibodies to infliximab at week 14 were 111.62% (100.24–124.29%) and 104.09% (92.12–117.61%), respectively, demonstrating the pharmacokinetic equivalence of these drugs. In the full analysis set, CT-P13 and IFX showed comparable therapeutic effectiveness, as measured by the American College of Rheumatology, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, the European League Against Rheumatism, and other efficacy criteria, at weeks 14 and 30. The incidence of adverse events was similar for these drugs. Conclusion. CT-P13 and IFX, administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in combination with MTX to active RA patients, were pharmacokinetically equivalent and comparable in efficacy and safety. PMID:25736355

  16. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16 h predose to 24 h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1–6. At 1 mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  17. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of fosaprepitant dimeglumine

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Gonzalez, Francheska; Kraft, Walter K.

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common complication in the treatment of patients with cancer. The introduction of the first in class neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant provided additive control on CINV in combination to existing antiemetics. Due to formulation issues, aprepitant is only available for oral administration. Fosaprepitant, a prodrug of aprepitant, was introduced to the market in 2008 as an intravenous bioequivalent to aprepitant. Areas covered in this review This review examines the chemical development of fosaprepitant, its pharmacokinetic properties, approved uses, and potential applications. What the reader will gain The reader will get up-to-date information on the pharmacology and clinical uses of fosaprepitant. Clinical studies have demonstrated pharmacokinetic bioequivalence of aprepitant 125-mg to fosaprepitant 115-mg, as well as comparable efficacy in prevention of acute and delayed emesis following the first day of chemotherapy regimens. Take home message Fosaprepitant is an IV pro-drug of aprepitant that offers a new alternative to patients with CINV. Currently, fosaprepitant can substitute oral aprepitant in the first day of a 3-day regimen. Current studies show that a single-day fosaprepitant regimen is also bioequivalent to the 3-day aprepitant regimen, this could significantly simplify the care for CINV patients in the future. PMID:20795794

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Bioequivalence Evaluation of Cyclobenzaprine Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Tatiane Maria de Lima Souza; Schramm, Simone Grigoleto; Kano, Eunice Kazue; Koono, Eunice Emiko Mori; Ching, Ting Hui; Serra, Cristina Helena dos Reis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics and to evaluate bioequivalence between two different tablet formulations containing the drug. An open, randomized, crossover, single-dose, two-period, and two-sequence design was employed. Tablets were administered to 23 healthy subjects after an overnight fasting and blood samples were collected up to 240 hours after drug administration. Plasma cyclobenzaprine was quantified by means of an LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters related to absorption, distribution, and elimination were calculated. Cyclobenzaprine plasma profiles for the reference and test products were similar, as well as absorption pharmacokinetic parameters AUC (reference: 199.4 ng∗h/mL; test: 201.6 ng∗h/mL), Cmax (reference: 7.0 ng/mL; test: 7.2 ng/mL), and Tmax (reference: 4.5 h; test: 4.6 h). Bioequivalence was evaluated by means of 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC (93%–111%) and Cmax (93%–112%) values for test and reference products, which were within the 80%–125% interval proposed by FDA. Cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics can be described by a multicompartment open model with an average rapid elimination half-life (t(1/2)β) of 3.1 hours and an average terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2)γ) of 31.9 hours. PMID:24151591

  19. Phase I Study Evaluating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of MDX-1303, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody against Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Valerie; Leese, Phillip; Blanset, Diann; Adamcio, Melany; Meldorf, Matthew; Lowy, Israel

    2011-01-01

    MDX-1303 (Valortim) is a fully human monoclonal antibody (hMAb) with a high affinity for Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA). MDX-1303 binds to PA and interferes with the activity of the anthrax toxin; it was selected based on its superior functional activity in the toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay. MDX-1303 has demonstrated efficacy in the postexposure and therapeutic settings in New Zealand White rabbits, cynomolgus monkeys, and African green monkeys. This phase I study sought to characterize the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of MDX-1303 in healthy human subjects. Cohorts of 3 to 10 subjects were administered MDX-1303 as either a single intravenous (i.v.) dose at dose levels of 0.3, 1, 3, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight or as a single intramuscular (i.m.) dose at 100 mg. Forty-six subjects were enrolled, and 16 (35%) of these subjects experienced one or more grade 1 adverse events considered to be related to treatment with MDX-1303. There were no grade 2 to 4 adverse events or serious adverse events (SAEs) considered to be related to treatment. The mean half-life of MDX-1303 ranged from 22 to 33 days across the i.v. administration cohorts and was approximately 32 days following i.m. administration. Systemic exposure following 100-mg i.m. administration was within the range of exposure following 1-mg/kg i.v. administration with a relative bioavailability of approximately 65%. MDX-1303 was generally well tolerated, and no anti-MDX-1303 antibodies were detected following a single dose. PMID:21976227

  20. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself. PMID:26427296

  1. Novel endogenous glycan therapy for retinal diseases: safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetic modeling, and biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Shankar; Li, Huiling; Palamoor, Mallika; de Obarrio, Walter T Luchsinger; Madhura, Dorababu; Meibohm, Bernd; Jablonski, Monica M

    2014-03-01

    Asialo, tri-antennary oligosaccharide (NA3 glycan) is an endogenous compound, which supports proper folding of outer segment membranes, promotes normal ultrastructure, and maintains protein expression patterns of photoreceptors and Müller cells in the absence of retinal pigment epithelium support. It is a potential new therapeutic for atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other retinal degenerative disorders. Herein, we evaluate the safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of NA3. NA3 was injected into the vitreous of New Zealand white rabbits at two concentrations viz. 1 nM (minimum effective concentration (MEC)) and 100 nM (100XMEC) at three time points. Safety was evaluated using routine clinical and laboratory tests. Ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of [(3)H]NA3 were estimated using scintillation counting in various parts of the eye, multiple peripheral organs, and plasma. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by non-compartmental modeling. A 2-aminobenzamide labeling and hydrophilic interaction liquid interaction chromatography were used to assess plasma and vitreous stability. NA3 was well tolerated by the eye. The concentration of NA3 in eye tissues was in the order: vitreous > retina > sclera/choroid > aqueous humor > cornea > lens. Area under the curve (0 to infinity) (AUC∞) was the highest in the vitreous thereby providing a positive concentration gradient for NA3 to reach the retina. Half-lives in critical eye tissues ranged between 40 and 60 h. NA3 concentrations were negligible in peripheral organs. Radioactivity from [(3)H]NA3 was excreted via urine and feces. NA3 was stable at 37°C in vitreous over a minimum of 6 days, while it degraded rapidly in plasma. Collectively, these results document that NA3 shows a good safety profile and favorable ocular pharmacokinetics.

  2. A phase Ib multiple ascending dose study evaluating safety, pharmacokinetics, and early clinical response of brodalumab, a human anti-IL-17R antibody, in methotrexate-resistant rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical response of brodalumab (AMG 827), a human, anti-IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) monoclonal antibody in subjects with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This phase Ib, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multiple ascending dose study enrolled subjects with moderate to severe RA (≥6/66 swollen and ≥8/68 tender joints). Subjects were randomized 3:1 to receive brodalumab (50 mg, 140 mg, or 210 mg subcutaneously every two weeks for 6 doses per group; or 420 mg or 700 mg intravenously every 4 weeks for two doses per group) or placebo. Endpoints included incidence of adverse events (AEs) and pharmacokinetics. Exploratory endpoints included pharmacodynamics, and improvements in RA clinical metrics. Results Forty subjects were randomized to investigational product; one subject discontinued due to worsening of RA (placebo). The study was not designed to assess efficacy. AEs were reported by 70% (7/10) of placebo subjects and 77% (22/30) of brodalumab subjects. Three serious AEs were reported in two subjects; there were no opportunistic infections. Brodalumab treatment resulted in inhibition of IL-17 receptor signaling and receptor occupancy on circulating leukocytes. No treatment effects were observed with individual measures of RA disease activity. On day 85 (week 13) 37% (11/30) of brodalumab subjects and 22% (2/9) of placebo subjects achieved ACR20; 7% (2/30) brodalumab subjects and 11% (1/9) of placebo subjects achieved ACR50; and 0% (0/30) brodalumab subjects and 0% (0/9) of placebo subjects achieved ACR70. Conclusions Multiple dose administration of brodalumab was tolerated in subjects with active RA. There was no evidence of a clinical response to brodalumab in subjects with RA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00771030 PMID:24286136

  3. Rufinamide in children with refractory epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Maria G; Ohman, Inger

    2012-10-01

    We examined the influence of age and type of concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the pharmacokinetics of rufinamide (RUF) as well as its efficacy and safety in 51 children with refractory epilepsy. In a retrospective noninterventional survey, dose-to-concentration ratios of RUF and concomitant AEDs were calculated: the weight-normalized dose (mg/kg/d) divided by the steady-state trough plasma drug level, which was used as a measure of clearance. During treatment with RUF concomitantly with valproic acid (VPA) young children, aged 0 to 4.9 years, had a low clearance of RUF, which did not differ from older children. If not on VPA but on enzyme inducers, young children had a threefold higher clearance of RUF than the older ones. In young children not on VPA, those on enzyme inducers had 1.7-fold higher clearance than those on nonenzyme inducers. In children neither on VPA nor on enzyme inducers, RUF clearance was age-dependent with higher clearance in younger children. Adding RUF did not change the pharmacokinetics of concomitantly used AEDs. Seizure response after 2 to 3 months on RUF treatment was found in 12 of 51 children (23.5%), at mean plasma level of 36.9 ± 22.0 µmol/L. Adverse events were reported in 41% of the patients of which fatigue was most frequent (24%). PMID:22941776

  4. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine delivered in lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Lin, Xia; Tang, Xing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of cinnarizine loaded in lipid emulsion to modify the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine. The cinnarizine-loaded emulsion (CLE) which can remain stable over 18-month storage at 4+/-2 degrees C was prepared by high-pressure homogenization. Nicomp 380 particle sizing system and HPLC were used to evaluate CLE in vitro, while UPLC/MS/MS for pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distributions of CLE were assessed by comparing with the solution form after intravenous administration to rats at a dose of 2mg/kg. The CLE showed significant higher AUC and lower clearance and distribution volume than those of solution form. This helped cinnarizine to reach higher level in vessel, and circulate in the blood stream for a longer time resulting in better therapeutic effect. The tissue distribution exhibited significant lower uptake of CLE emulsion in lung and brain, indicating the advantage of CLE over the solution form in reducing drug precipitation in vivo and toxicity in CNS. Drug safety assessment studies including hemolysis test, intravenous stimulation and injection anaphylaxis revealed that the CLE was safe for intravenous injection. PMID:19770029

  5. Development of nano alpha-ketoglutarate nebulization formulation and its pharmacokinetic and safety evaluation in healthy human volunteers for cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Shaheen; Singh, Thakuri; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2011-05-01

    Development of nano alpha-ketoglutarate (A-KG) nebulization formulation for neutralization of inhaled cyanide ion toxicity. Objectives of the present study were to (a) develop a novel A-KG nebulization formulation against cyanide poisoning, particularly hydrogen cyanide gas (b) validate its respiratory fraction in vitro and in vivo, and (c) create its pharmacokinetic data in human volunteers. The formulation was optimized on the basis of particle size of aerosolized droplets after nebulization in 6 volunteers. Gamma scintigraphy was used to quantify total and regional lung deposition of nebulized A-KG after radiolabeling it with Technetium-99m. The formulation was optimized using 30% ethanol-saline with particle size in the range of 300-500 nm. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that drug nebulization resulted in a significant respirable fraction of 65 ± 0.6% with whole lung deposition of 13 ± 1%. Human pharmacokinetic data was derived in 6 healthy human volunteers with peak serum concentration (C(max)) of 39 ± 3 μg/ml, while the area under curve (AUC) after inhalation was 376 ± 23 μg × h/ml indicating that the drug was rapidly and completely absorbed when targeted directly to lungs. Significant lung deposition of A-KG was achieved with the developed formulation. The formulation appears to have several advantages, including the potential of neutralizing inhaled CN(-) ions in the lungs themselves. It is a safe and efficacious procedure, suitable for hospital or ambulance use in accidental cyanide poisoning cases, or as a preventive approach for fire-rescue teams.

  6. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, highly purified, heat-treated equine rabies immunoglobulin, administered either alone or in association with a purified, Vero-cell rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lang, J; Attanath, P; Quiambao, B; Singhasivanon, V; Chanthavanich, P; Montalban, C; Lutsch, C; Pepin-Covatta, S; Le Mener, V; Miranda, M; Sabchareon, A

    1998-07-30

    A clinical evaluation of a new, purified, heat-treated equine rabies immunoglobulin (PHT-Erig), F(ab')2 preparation, was carried out in Thailand and in the Philippines-two countries where rabies is endemic. An initial prospective, randomised, controlled trial (Study 1), compared the safety and pharmacokinetics (serum concentrations of rabies antibodies) after administration either of PHT-Erig or of a commercially-available, equine rabies immune globulin (Erig PMC). A second trial (Study 2) simulated post-exposure rabies prophylaxis by using a reference cell culture vaccine, the purified Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV), administered in association with either Erig PMC or PHT-Erig. In Study 1, 27 healthy, Thai adults received a 40 IU kg(-1) dose of either Erig PMC (n = 12) or PHT-Erig (n = 15) via the intramuscular (i.m.) route; half of the dose was injected into the deltoid area and the other half into the buttocks. Serum for rabies antibody determination and F(ab')2 concentration was collected at hours (H) 0, 6 and 12, and on day (D) 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15. Both products were safe, with no serious adverse events, and in particular, no anaphylactic reactions or serum sickness was reported. A statistical comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters did not demonstrate bioequivalence of the two products. Nonetheless, the relative bioavailability of 93% and the similar absorption rates suggest the pharmacokinetic profiles of Erig and PHT-Erig are similar. The antibody level in either group were low throughout the 15-day study period. The geometric mean titer (GMT) values ranged from group 0.027-0.117 IU ml(-1) in the Erig group and from 0.029 to 0.072 IU ml(-1) in the PHT-Erig. There was no significant difference between the evolution of GMT values for the two groups. In Study 2, 71 healthy volunteers received 40 IU kg(-1) via the intramuscular route of either Erig PMC (n = 36) or PHT-Erig (n = 35) on D0, in association with five doses of PVRV on D0, D3, D7, D14

  7. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Intraocular Celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stephen J.; Toma, Hassanain; Shah, Rohan; Kompella, Uday B.; Vooturi, Sunil K.; Sheng, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine safety, pharmacokinetics, and anti-inflammatory effects of intraocular celecoxib. Methods. The right eye of animals was injected with 1.5, 3, or 6 mg celecoxib prepared in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Left eyes served as controls and received 0.1 mL DMSO. Electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks, and eyes were enucleated afterward for histopathologic analysis. For pharmacokinetics, 3 mg celecoxib was injected, and vitreous and retina/choroid drug levels were then analyzed at specific time points. For efficacy, 1 μg lipopolysaccharide was injected to induce inflammation; the right eye was then injected with 3 mg celecoxib (six eyes) or 2 mg triamcinolone acetonide (six eyes) and the left eye with saline. Twenty-four hours later, aqueous fluid was removed, and total leukocyte concentration and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration were determined. Results. Histologic and ERG studies demonstrated no signs of retinal or optic nerve toxicity. After a single 3-mg injection, vitreous (0.06 μg/mL) and retina/choroid (132.31 μg/g) celecoxib concentrations at 8 weeks exceeded median inhibitory concentration. Treatment with celecoxib and triamcinolone significantly reduced total leukocyte count by 40% (P = 0.02) and 31% (P = 0.01), respectively. Reduction in PGE2 levels paralleled reduction in leukocyte counts (P < 0.05). There was no increase in intraocular pressure, but cataract formation was observed at higher concentrations. Conclusions. Intraocular injection of celecoxib appeared to be nontoxic and demonstrated excellent penetration into the retina/choroid and sustained drug levels out to 8 weeks. Celecoxib demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory effects, but there was an association with cataract formation at higher doses. PMID:24458149

  8. Randomized clinical trial: pharmacokinetics and safety of multimatrix mesalamine for treatment of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cuffari, Carmen; Pierce, David; Korczowski, Bartosz; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Van Heusen, Heather; Hossack, Stuart; Wan, Hong; Edwards, Alena YZ; Martin, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) use in pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC). Aim To evaluate pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of 5-ASA and metabolite acetyl-5-ASA (Ac-5-ASA) after once-daily, oral administration of multimatrix mesalamine to children and adolescents with UC. Methods Participants (5–17 years of age; 18–82 kg, stratified by weight) with UC received multi-matrix mesalamine 30, 60, or 100 mg/kg/day once daily (to 4,800 mg/day) for 7 days. Blood samples were collected pre-dose on days 5 and 6. On days 7 and 8, blood and urine samples were collected and safety was evaluated. 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA plasma and urine concentrations were analyzed by non-compartmental methods and used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model. Results Fifty-two subjects (21 [30 mg/kg]; 22 [60 mg/kg]; 9 [100 mg/kg]) were randomized. On day 7, systemic exposures of 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA exhibited a dose-proportional increase between 30 and 60 mg/kg/day cohorts. For 30, 60, and 100 mg/kg/day doses, mean percentages of 5-ASA absorbed were 29.4%, 27.0%, and 22.1%, respectively. Simulated steady-state exposures and variabilities for 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA (coefficient of variation approximately 50% and 40%–45%, respectively) were similar to those observed previously in adults at comparable doses. Treatment-emergent adverse events were reported by ten subjects. Events were similar among different doses and age groups with no new safety signals identified. Conclusion Children and adolescents with UC receiving multimatrix mesalamine demonstrated 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA pharmacokinetic profiles similar to historical adult data. Multimatrix mesalamine was well tolerated across all dose and age groups. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01130844. PMID:26893546

  9. A phase I study in paediatric patients to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77, a liposome encapsulated formulation of cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Veal, G J; Griffin, M J; Price, E; Parry, A; Dick, G S; Little, M A; Yule, S M; Morland, B; Estlin, E J; Hale, J P; Pearson, A D J; Welbank, H; Boddy, A V

    2001-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies indicate that cisplatin encapsulated in STEALTH®liposomes (SPI-77) retains anti-tumour activity, but has a much reduced toxicity, compared to native cisplatin. A phase I study was conducted to determine the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of SPI-77 administered to children with advanced cancer not amenable to other treatment. Paediatric patients were treated at doses ranging from 40 to 320 mg m−2by intravenous infusion every 4 weeks. Blood samples taken during, and up to 3 weeks after, administration and plasma and ultrafiltrate were prepared immediately. Urine was collected, when possible, for 3 days after administration. SPI-77 administration was well tolerated with the major toxicity being an infusion reaction which responded to modification of the initial infusion rate of SPI-77. Limited haematological toxicity and no nephrotoxicity were observed. No responses to treatment were seen during the course of this phase I study. Measurement of total plasma platinum showed that cisplatin was retained in the circulation with a half life of up to 134 h, with maximum plasma concentrations approximately 100-fold higher than those reported following comparable doses of cisplatin. Comparison of plasma and whole blood indicated that cisplatin was retained in the liposomes and there was no free platinum measurable in the ultrafiltrate. Urine recovery was less than 4% of the dose administered over 72 h. Results from this phase I study indicate that high doses of liposomal cisplatin can safely be given to patients, but further studies are required to address the issue of reformulation of liposomally bound cisplatin. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11308249

  10. Pharmacokinetics and safety of glimepiride at clinically effective doses in diabetic patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, B; Profozic, V; Metelko, Z; Mrzljak, V; Lange, C; Malerczyk, V

    1996-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of glimepiride were investigated in a single- and a multiple-dose open study in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and renal impairment and an initial creatinine clearance above 10 ml/ min. Patients were divided into three groups with creatinine clearance above 50 ml/min, 20-50 ml/min and under 20 ml/min. Fifteen fasting patients received a single dose of 3 mg glimepiride and serial blood and urine samples were taken over 24 h for pharmacokinetic and efficacy analyses. A further 16 patients received glimepiride over a 3-month period, an initial dose of 1 mg glimepiride being adjusted within the range 1 to 8 mg to achieve good glucose control. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was done on day 1 and after 3 months. Mean relative total clearance and mean volume of distribution of both single (41.6 ml/ min and 8.47 litres, respectively, when creatinine clearance was above 50 ml/min) and multiple doses of glimepiride increased in proportion to the degree of renal impairment (to 91.1 ml/min and 14.98 litres, respectively, when creatinine clearance was below 20 ml/min, single dose), whereas the terminal halflife and mean time remained unchanged. Lower relative total clearance and renal clearance of both glimepiride metabolites correlated significantly with lower creatinine clearance values. Of the 16 patients 12 required between 1 and 4 mg glimepiride to stabilize their fasting blood glucose. Glimepiride was well-tolerated and there were no drug-related adverse events. In conclusion glimepiride is safe, effective and has clearly-definable pharmacokinetics in diabetic patients with renal impairment. The increased plasma elimination of glimepiride with decreasing kidney function is explainable on the basis of altered protein binding with an increase in unbound drug. PMID:8960852

  11. Clindamycin Pharmacokinetics and Safety in Preterm and Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Delmore, Paula; Bloom, Barry T.; Cotten, C. Michael; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth; Shattuck, Karen; Bradford, Kathleen K.; Smith, P. Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Morris, Maurine; Yin, Wanrong; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin may be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a common pathogen causing sepsis in infants, but optimal dosing in this population is unknown. We performed a multicenter, prospective pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety study of clindamycin in infants. We analyzed the data using a population PK analysis approach and included samples from two additional pediatric trials. Intravenous data were collected from 62 infants (135 plasma PK samples) with postnatal ages of <121 days (median [range] gestational age of 28 weeks [23 to 42] and postnatal age of 17 days [1 to 115]). In addition to body weight, postmenstrual age (PMA) and plasma protein concentrations (albumin and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein) were found to be significantly associated with clearance and volume of distribution, respectively. Clearance reached 50% of the adult value at PMA of 39.5 weeks. Simulated PMA-based intravenous dosing regimens administered every 8 h (≤32 weeks PMA, 5 mg/kg; 32 to 40 weeks PMA, 7 mg/kg; >40 to 60 weeks PMA, 9 mg/kg) resulted in an unbound, steady-state concentration at half the dosing interval greater than a MIC for S. aureus of 0.12 μg/ml in >90% of infants. There were no adverse events related to clindamycin use. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01728363.) PMID:26926644

  12. Pharmacokinetics and safety of epinephrine use in liposuction.

    PubMed

    Brown, Spencer A; Lipschitz, Avron H; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Sorokin, Evan; Shepherd, Greene; Grebe, Stefan; Oliver, Lawrence K; Luby, Maureen; Rohrich, Rod J

    2004-09-01

    Patients are routinely exposed to high-dose epinephrine infiltration during large-volume liposuction. Because of the serious cardiovascular side-effect profile of catecholamine overdose, the authors examined the safety of larger-volume liposuction by assessing epinephrine pharmacokinetics. Five female volunteers with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I or II, aged 29 to 40 years and weighing 75.9 to 95 kg, underwent liposuction. The wetting solution contained 7.3 mg (SEM, 0.7 mg) of epinephrine, corresponding to 0.09 mg/kg (0.04 mg/kg). Total plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Approximate exogenous epinephrine absorption was calculated after correction for estimated endogenous epinephrine production. Pharmacokinetic assessments were performed using standard equations. The total plasma epinephrine peak occurred at the final intraoperative reading (5 hours after induction) and was 323 pg/ml (24.8 pg/ml), three to four times maximum baseline resting levels. The norepinephrine level was slightly elevated throughout the study period, with a reversal of the normal epinephrine/norepinephrine ratio (<0.5:1) demonstrated intraoperatively (>5:1). Estimated time to peak exogenous epinephrine level ranged from 1 to 4 hours from the start of infiltration. Area under the plasma concentration versus time curve was approximately 2089 to 2610 pg x hour/ml. Peak exogenous epinephrine concentration was estimated to be 286 to 335 pg/ml. Clearance was 764,508 ml/hour and volume of distribution was 0.4 liter/kg (0.006 liter/kg). Total absorbed epinephrine was estimated, 1.8 mg to 2.2 mg, equivalent to 25 to 32 percent of the infiltrated dose. The reversal of the normal epinephrine/norepinephrine ratio and the fact that norepinephrine levels were within normal range implied that the majority of plasma epinephrine measured was exogenously infiltrated and not endogenously synthesized. On the

  13. Safety, local tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline fosamil administered in a reduced infusion volume

    PubMed Central

    Edeki, Timi; Kujacic, Mirjana; Broadhurst, Helen; Li, Jianguo; Sunzel, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Aims The standard dose of ceftaroline fosamil for patients with normal renal function is 600 mg diluted in 250 ml by 60 min intravenous infusion every 12 h. This two part phase I trial (NCT01577589) assessed safety and local tolerability of multiple ceftaroline fosamil 50 ml and 250 ml infusions, and pharmacokinetics following single administrations of each infusion volume. Methods Part A was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, multiple dose crossover study. Twenty-four healthy subjects were randomized to simultaneous, bilateral ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg and placebo infusions in each arm (50 ml then 250 ml or vice versa) every 12 h for 72 h, with a ≥ 4.5 day washout. Local tolerability was evaluated by the Visual Infusion Phlebitis scale, with scores ≥2 considered infusion site reactions (ISRs). Part B was an open label crossover study. Ten subjects were randomized to single 50 ml and 250 ml ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg infusions on days 1 and 3 (washout on day 2). Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken over 24 h. Results In part A, four subjects (16.7%) experienced ISRs, all of which were associated with placebo infusions. No ISRs were reported for either ceftaroline fosamil 50 ml or 250 ml. Plasma pharmacokinetics (ceftaroline fosamil, active ceftaroline and an inactive metabolite) were similar following single 50 ml and 250 ml infusions in part B. Conclusions No new safety concerns were identified for ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg 50 ml compared with 250 ml. These findings suggest infusion volumes down to 50 ml may be used in patients with fluid intake restrictions. PMID:25041494

  14. Dose selection for the investigational anticancer agent alisertib (MLN8237): Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and exposure-safety relationships.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Zhou, Xiaofei; Ecsedy, Jeffrey; Mould, Diane R; Liu, Hua; Danaee, Hadi; Fingert, Howard; Kleinfield, Robert; Milton, Ashley

    2015-03-01

    We report population pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic-safety analyses to support phase II/III dose/regimen selection of alisertib, a selective Aurora A kinase (AAK) inhibitor. Phase I studies in adult cancer patients evaluated dosing on Days 1-7 in 21-day cycles or Days 1-21 in 35-day cycles, with corresponding maximum tolerated doses of 50 mg twice daily (BID) and 50 mg QD, respectively. Population pharmacokinetic analyses supported dose- and time-linear pharmacokinetics without identification of clinically meaningful covariates. Exposure-related increases in skin mitotic index and decreases in chromosomal alignment/spindle bipolarity in tumor mitotic cells confirmed AAK inhibition. Exposures in the 7-day schedule at or near 50 mg BID are expected to result in tumor AAK inhibition based on pharmacodynamic assessment in patient tumors. Exposure-safety analyses of data from patients receiving doses of 5-200 mg/day in the 7-day schedule support a low (∼7%) predicted incidence of dose-limiting toxicity at 50 mg BID. Taken together, these analyses support a pharmacologically active and acceptably tolerated dose range of alisertib for future clinical development. PMID:25302940

  15. Pharmacokinetic and Safety Analyses of Tenofovir and Tenofovir-Emtricitabine Vaginal Tablets in Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lara E.; Friend, David R.; Garber, David A.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Hendry, R. Michael; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal rapidly disintegrating tablets (RDTs) containing tenofovir (TFV) or TFV and emtricitabine (FTC) were evaluated for safety and pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Two separate animal groups (n = 4) received TFV (10 mg) or TFV-FTC (10 mg each) RDTs, administered near the cervix. A third group (n = 4) received 1 ml TFV gel. Blood plasma, vaginal tissue biopsy specimens, and vaginal fluids were collected before and after product application at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h. A disintegration time of <30 min following vaginal application of the RDTs was noted, with negligible effects on local inflammatory cytokines, vaginal pH, and microflora. TFV pharmacokinetics were generally similar for both RDTs and gel, with peak median concentrations in vaginal tissues and vaginal secretions being on the order of 104 to 105 ng/g (147 to 571 μM) and 106 ng/g (12 to 34 mM), respectively, at 1 to 4 h postdose. At 24 h, however, TFV vaginal tissue levels were more sustained after RDT dosing, with median TFV concentrations being approximately 1 log higher than those with gel dosing. FTC pharmacokinetics after combination RDT dosing were similar to those of TFV, with peak median vaginal tissue and fluid levels being on the order of 104 ng/g (374 μM) and 106 ng/g (32 mM), respectively, at 1 h postdose with levels in fluid remaining high at 24 h. RDTs are a promising alternative vaginal dosage form, delivering TFV and/or FTC at levels that would be considered inhibitory to simian-human immunodeficiency virus in the macaque vaginal microenvironment over a 24-h period. PMID:24566178

  16. Prodrug oncrasin-266 improves the stability, pharmacokinetics, and safety of NSC-743380

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuhong; Wang, Li; Huang, Xiao; Cao, Mengru; Hu, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xiaoping; Meng, Qing H.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Roth, Jack A.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Through synthetic lethality screening of isogenic cell lines with and without the oncogenic KRAS gene and through lead compound optimization, we recently developed a novel anticancer agent designated NSC-743380 (oncrasin-72) that has promising in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity in a subset of cancer cell lines, including KRAS-mutant cancer cells. However, NSC-743380 tends to form dimers, which dramatically reduces its anticancer activity. To improve the physicochemical properties of NSC-743380, we synthesized a prodrug of NSC-743380, designated oncrasin-266, by modifying NSC-743380 with cyclohexylacetic acid and evaluated its in vitro and in vivo properties. Oncrasin-266 spontaneously hydrolyzed in phosphate-buffered saline in a time-dependent manner and was more stable than NSC-743380 in powder or stock solutions. In vivo administration of oncrasin-266 in mice led to the release of NSC-743380 which improved the pharmacokinetics of NSC-743380. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that oncrasin-266 was deposited in liver, whereas released NSC-743380 was detected in liver, lung, kidney, and subcutaneous tumor. Oncrasin-266 was better tolerated in mice at a higher dose level treatment (150–300mg/kg, i.p.) than the parent agent was, suggesting that the prodrug reduced the acute toxicity of the parent agent. Our results demonstrated that the prodrug strategy could improve the stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and safety of NSC-743380. PMID:25182964

  17. Study to Evaluate the Effect of Rifampicin, Ketoconazole, and Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Sativex

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-13

    Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Known Inducer of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Potent Inhibitor of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a CYP2C19 Inhibitor.

  18. PHARMACOKINETIC EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacokinetic evaluation of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mouse.

    1C. Lau, 2M.J. Strynar, 2A.B. Lindstrom, 1R.G. Hanson, 1J.R. Thibodeaux and 3H.A. Barton.

    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, 3Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, 2Human Exposure and Atmospheric...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Ofloxacin in Children with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Draper, Heather R; Thee, Stephanie; Dooley, Kelly E; McIlleron, Helen M; Seddon, James A; Wiesner, Lubbe; Castel, Sandra; Schaaf, H Simon; Hesseling, Anneke C

    2015-10-01

    Ofloxacin is widely used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Data on its pharmacokinetics and safety in children are limited. It is not known whether the current internationally recommended pediatric dosage of 15 to 20 mg/kg of body weight achieves exposures reached in adults with tuberculosis after a standard 800-mg dose (adult median area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0-24], 103 μg · h/ml). We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of ofloxacin in children <15 years old routinely receiving ofloxacin for MDR-TB treatment or preventive therapy. Plasma samples were collected predose and at 1, 2, 4, 8, and either 6 or 11 h after a 20-mg/kg dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental analysis. Children with MDR-TB disease underwent long-term safety monitoring. Of 85 children (median age, 3.4 years), 11 (13%) were HIV infected, and of 79 children with evaluable data, 14 (18%) were underweight. The ofloxacin mean (range) maximum concentration (Cmax), AUC0-8, and half-life were 8.97 μg/ml (2.47 to 14.4), 44.2 μg · h/ml (12.1 to 75.8), and 3.49 h (1.89 to 6.95), respectively. The mean AUC0-24, estimated in 72 participants, was 66.7 μg · h/ml (range, 18.8 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, AUC0-24 was increased by 1.46 μg · h/ml for each 1-kg increase in body weight (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44 to 2.47; P = 0.006); no other assessed variable contributed to the model. No grade 3 or 4 events at least possibly attributed to ofloxacin were observed. Ofloxacin was safe and well tolerated in children with MDR-TB, but exposures were well below reported adult values, suggesting that dosage modification may be required to optimize MDR-TB treatment regimens in children.

  20. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Ziprasidone in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Floyd R.; Miceli, Jeffrey J.; Tensfeldt, Thomas; Robarge, Lisa; Wilner, Keith; Patel, Nick C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to provide single-dose pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability data for ziprasidone in youths with tic disorder, for comparison to adult studies to discern whether ziprasidone pediatric dosing could be modeled from adult data. Method: A single-dose, open-label study of ziprasidone was conducted in youths…

  1. Single-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of pegylated interferon-alpha2b in patients with chronic renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir K; Pittenger, Amy L; Swan, Suzanne K; Marbury, Thomas C; Tobillo, Emlyn; Batra, Vijay; Sack, Marshall; Glue, Paul; Jacobs, Sheila; Affrime, Melton

    2002-10-01

    This study evaluates the pharmacokinetics and safety of pegylated interferon-alpha2b (PEG-Intron) following a single-dose subcutaneous injection into subjects with normal renal function, subjects with chronic renal impairment, and patients on hemodialysis. In this open-label, single-dose, parallel group study, subjects were divided into five groups according to their degree of renal function: four groups as defined by measured creatinine clearance and a fifth hemodialysis dependent group. They received 1 microg/kg PEG-Intron subcutaneously after a 10-hour fast. Pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were performed up to 168 hours postdose. Hemodialysis patients had a second PEG-Intron dose 12 hours prior to a hemodialysis session. PEG-Intron pharmacokinetic parameters (AUCtf, Cmax, and t1/2) increased progressively as CL(CR) declined. All subjects reported at least one adverse event, which were typical of those reported after alpha-interferon administration (e.g., flu-like symptoms, headache). Single-dose PEG-Intron administration to volunteers with normal renal function and chronic renal impairment was safe and well tolerated. In patients with CL(CR) < 30 ml/min, AUCand Cmax values were increased 90% compared with controls, while half-life was increased by up to 40% over controls. Based on the relationship between PEG-Intron apparent clearance and CL(CR), renal clearance accountsfor less than half of its total clearance. Hemodialysis did not affect PEG-Intron apparent clearance.

  2. The novel AKT inhibitor afuresertib shows favorable safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrew; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Harrison, Simon J.; Morris, Shannon R.; Smith, Deborah A.; Brigandi, Richard A.; Gauvin, Jennifer; Kumar, Rakesh; Opalinska, Joanna B.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is constitutively active in hematologic malignancies, providing proliferative and antiapoptotic signals and possibly contributing to drug resistance. We conducted an open-label phase 1 study to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of afuresertib—an oral AKT inhibitor—in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. Seventy-three patients were treated at doses ranging from 25 to 150 mg per day. The MTD was established at 125 mg per day because of 2 dose-limiting toxicities in the 150-mg cohort (liver function test abnormalities). The most frequent adverse events were nausea (35.6%), diarrhea (32.9%), and dyspepsia (24.7%). Maximum plasma concentrations and area under the plasma concentration-time curves from time 0 to 24 hours were generally dose proportional at >75-mg doses; the median time to peak plasma concentrations was 1.5 to 2.5 hours post dose, with a half-life of approximately 1.7 days. Three multiple myeloma patients attained partial responses; an additional 3 attained minimal responses. Clinical activity was also observed in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, and Hodgkin disease. Single-agent afuresertib showed a favorable safety profile and demonstrated clinical activity against hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00881946. PMID:25075128

  3. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Yu, Zhigang; Shenker, Andrew; Wang, Jessie; Pursley, Janice; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; LaCreta, Frank; Frost, Charles E

    2016-05-01

    This open-label study evaluated apixaban pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety in subjects with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment and in healthy subjects following a single 10-mg oral dose. The primary analysis determined the relationship between apixaban AUC∞ and 24-hour creatinine clearance (CLcr ) as a measure of renal function. The relationships between 24-hour CLcr and iohexol clearance, estimated CLcr (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (modification of diet in renal disease [MDRD] equation) were also assessed. Secondary objectives included assessment of safety and tolerability as well as international normalized ratio (INR) and anti-factor Xa activity as pharmacodynamic endpoints. The regression analysis showed that decreasing renal function resulted in modestly increased apixaban exposure (AUC∞ increased by 44% in severe impairment with a 24-hour CLcr of 15 mL/min, compared with subjects with normal renal function), but it did not affect Cmax or the direct relationship between apixaban plasma concentration and anti-factor Xa activity or INR. The assessment of renal function measured by iohexol clearance, Cockcroft-Gault, and MDRD was consistent with that determined by 24-hour CLcr . Apixaban was well tolerated in this study. These results suggest that dose adjustment of apixaban is not required on the basis of renal function alone. PMID:26358690

  4. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Yu, Zhigang; Shenker, Andrew; Wang, Jessie; Pursley, Janice; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; LaCreta, Frank; Frost, Charles E

    2016-05-01

    This open-label study evaluated apixaban pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety in subjects with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment and in healthy subjects following a single 10-mg oral dose. The primary analysis determined the relationship between apixaban AUC∞ and 24-hour creatinine clearance (CLcr ) as a measure of renal function. The relationships between 24-hour CLcr and iohexol clearance, estimated CLcr (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (modification of diet in renal disease [MDRD] equation) were also assessed. Secondary objectives included assessment of safety and tolerability as well as international normalized ratio (INR) and anti-factor Xa activity as pharmacodynamic endpoints. The regression analysis showed that decreasing renal function resulted in modestly increased apixaban exposure (AUC∞ increased by 44% in severe impairment with a 24-hour CLcr of 15 mL/min, compared with subjects with normal renal function), but it did not affect Cmax or the direct relationship between apixaban plasma concentration and anti-factor Xa activity or INR. The assessment of renal function measured by iohexol clearance, Cockcroft-Gault, and MDRD was consistent with that determined by 24-hour CLcr . Apixaban was well tolerated in this study. These results suggest that dose adjustment of apixaban is not required on the basis of renal function alone.

  5. Evaluation of safety and pharmacokinetics of sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate, a novel short chain fatty acid derivative, in a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, and repeat-dose studies in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Susan P; Wargin, William A; Boosalis, Michael S; Wallis, Wayne J; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R; Faller, Douglas V; Welch, William C; Berenson, Ronald J

    2011-08-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease (SCD) and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate (AB), and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous (IV) infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel short chain fatty acids (SCFA) derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with 1 of 4 single dose levels (2, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9 to 15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable pharmacokinetics (PK) profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies.

  6. Single-dose evaluation of safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of newly formulated hydromorphone immediate-release and hydrophilic matrix extended-release tablets in healthy Japanese subjects without co-administration of an opioid antagonist.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Kaoru; Uchida, Naoki; Ishizuka, Hitoshi; Sambe, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Shinichi

    2015-09-01

    This single dose, open-label study investigated the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of newly formulated immediate-release (IR) and hydrophilic matrix extended-release (ER) hydromorphone tablets in healthy Japanese subjects without co-administration of an opioid antagonist under fasting and fed conditions. Plasma and urinary concentrations of hydromorphone and metabolites were measured by liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectroscopy. Following administration of the ER tablet, plasma concentrations of hydromorphone slowly increased with a median tmax of 5.0 h and the Cmax decreased to 37% of the IR tablet, while the AUC0-inf was comparable with that of the IR tablet when administered at the same dose. The degree of fluctuation in the plasma concentration for the ER tablet was much lower than that of the IR tablet and certain levels of plasma concentrations were maintained after 24 h of ER dosing. The AUC0-inf and Cmax increased with food for both IR and ER tablets. The AUC0-inf of hydromorphone-3-glucoside was one-tenth of that of hydromorphone-3-glucuronide. A single oral administration of the hydromorphone tablets would be well-tolerated in healthy Japanese subjects despite a lack of co-administration of an opioid antagonist and the newly developed ER hydromorphone tablets may have the appropriate PK characteristics for once-daily dosing.

  7. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of triflusal and its main active metabolite HTB in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Zhang, Q; Huang, M; Zong, S; Hua, W; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    Triflusal presents comparable antiplatelet activity to aspirin while presenting a more favourable safety profile, and is used in the treatment of thrombosis. The study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of triflusal and its major metabolite 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- benzoic acid (HTB) in healthy Chinese subjects.30 healthy subjects were recruited in this randomized, single-center, and open-label, parallel, single ascending doses (300, 600, 900 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg, once daily for 7 days) study. Plasma samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. Safety was assessed by adverse events, ECG, laboratory testing, and vital signs.Triflusal was safe and well tolerated. After single-dose administration, triflusal was rapidly absorbed with a mean Tmax of 0.55-0.92 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 0.35-0.65 h, HTB was absorbed with a mean Tmax of 2.35-3.03 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 52.5-65.57 h. Cmax and AUC for triflusal and HTB were approximately dose proportional over the 300-900 mg dose range. In the steady state, the accumulation index (R) indicated that the exposure of triflusal increased slightly with repeated dosing, and the exposure of HTB increased obviously. 3 adverse events certainly related to the investigational drugs occurred in the multiple-dose phase.Following oral dosing under fasting condition, triflusal is promptly absorbed and rapidly depleted from the systemic circulation. HTB is quickly generated from triflusal and slowly eliminated. Triflusal accumulates slightly in the body. HTB plasma concentration builds up progressively toward steady-state. PMID:24105106

  8. Small animal model of weightlessness for pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, S; Brunner, L J

    1994-06-01

    As the United States seeks a greater presence in space, physiologic changes associated with space flight become of greater concern. Exposure to a weightless environment has been shown to have numerous effects on body composition and organ function. Alterations include decreases in muscle and liver mass, changes in bone structure and integrity, and fluid shifts markedly affecting cardiovascular functioning. Furthermore, metabolic activity of the liver has been found to be altered in rats after extended periods of weightlessness. As the length of space travel increases, the probability for the need to administer pharmacologic agents to crew members during space flight for prophylaxis or treatment becomes greater. Thus, because of the observed physiologic and metabolic changes associated with weightlessness, it is reasonable to assume that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of xenobiotics administered during space flight may be different that those found in 1g environment. To address these possible changes, the development of a model of weightlessness to investigate possible alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics before space flight is of importance. The tail-suspended rat is a well-described model of weightlessness. During the time of the suspension, the pharmacokinetics of marker compounds can be used to evaluate changes in hepatic and renal physiology. Rats suspended for different periods allow for the investigation of the length of weightlessness exposure and drug pharmacology. Results from the use of the suspended rat model provide valuable information regarding possible pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes associated with weightlessness, and therefore, provide space biomedical researchers with a method of investigating drug administration during space flight missions.

  9. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard; Frymoyer, Adam; Lewandowski, Andrew; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Feig, Daniel I.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Warady, Bradley A.; Goebel, Jens W.; Schwartz, George J.; Lewis, Kenneth; Anand, Ravinder; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options—including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors—are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7–17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard non-compartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n=13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30–59 ml/min per 1.73m2), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  10. Safety and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of aclidinium bromide administered twice daily in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, K; Dilzer, S; Jansat, J M; Garcia Gil, E; Caracta, C F; Ortiz, S

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airway obstruction and increased cholinergic tone. The global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) guidelines recommend long-acting anticholinergics for COPD maintenance treatment. Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist developed for the treatment of COPD. A phase I, randomized, single-blind, multiple-dose clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of multiple doses of twice-daily (BID) aclidinium in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male and female subjects received aclidinium 200 μg, 400 μg, 800 μg, or placebo twice daily for 7 days. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 cohorts and 10 subjects in each cohort were randomized (8:2) to either aclidinium or placebo groups. Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs), laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and ECGs. Plasma samples were obtained at multiple time points throughout the study and analyzed for aclidinium and its inactive acid and alcohol metabolites using a fully validated method of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 9 treatment-emergent AEs were reported (1, placebo; 3, aclidinium 400 μg; 5, aclidinium 800 μg), all of which were mild in severity. No serious AEs were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. PK parameters on Day 7 following BID dosing of aclidinium showed that steady state was achieved for aclidinium and its metabolites. On Days 1 and 7, maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of aclidinium were generally observed at the first PK time point (5 min postdose) and rapidly declined, with plasma concentrations generally less than 10% of Cmax by 6 h postdose in all aclidinium groups. Mean effective t(½) after the evening dose on Day 7 ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 h for aclidinium 400 μg and 800 μg, similar to the terminal t(½) observed on Day 1 (4.5-5.9 h

  11. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals receiving concomitant zidovudine.

    PubMed Central

    Chien, S C; Chow, A T; Rogge, M C; Williams, R R; Hendrix, C W

    1997-01-01

    This phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-design study was conducted to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects concomitantly receiving a stable regimen of zidovudine (AZT). Sixteen HIV-infected males with CD4-cell counts ranging from 100 to 550 and not experiencing significant AZT intolerance were enrolled. Subjects received levofloxacin (350 mg of levofloxacin hemihydrate) or a placebo (eight subjects per treatment group) as a single oral dose on day 1, multiple doses every 8 h from days 3 to 9, and a single dose on day 10. On days 1 and 10, an AZT dose (100 mg) was administered concurrently with the study drug. In between these doses, AZT was administered according to the regimen used by the subject prior to entering the study up to a maximum of 500 mg/day. Plasma levofloxacin concentrations were monitored for 36 h after levofloxacin dosing on day 1, immediately prior to the morning doses on days 3 to 9, and for 72 h after dosing on day 10. Plasma AZT concentrations were monitored on day 0 for baseline (for 6 h after the AZT dose) and for 4 h after the AZT doses on days 1 and 10. Levofloxacin was rapidly absorbed (time to maximum plasma concentration, approximately 1.0 h) and extensively distributed in the body with an apparent volume of distribution of approximately 104 liters (approximately 1.34 liters/kg). Steady-state conditions on day 10 were confirmed. Pharmacokinetic profiles of levofloxacin from single doses and multiple (three-times-daily) doses were similar, with a moderate accumulation (observed day 10-to-day 1 ratio of the maximum plasma concentration, approximately 185% versus expected 169%; for the corresponding ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 8 h [AUC(0-8)], the values were observed 217% versus expected 169%) at steady state. Mean average steady-state peak plasma concentration, plasma levofloxacin concentration at the

  12. Ibogaine: complex pharmacokinetics, concerns for safety, and preliminary efficacy measures.

    PubMed

    Mash, D C; Kovera, C A; Pablo, J; Tyndale, R F; Ervin, F D; Williams, I C; Singleton, E G; Mayor, M

    2000-09-01

    Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid found in the roots of Tabernanthe Iboga (Apocynaceae family), a rain forest shrub that is native to western Africa. Ibogaine is used by indigenous peoples in low doses to combat fatigue, hunger and thirst, and in higher doses as a sacrament in religious rituals. Members of American and European addict self-help groups have claimed that ibogaine promotes long-term drug abstinence from addictive substances, including psychostimulants and opiates. Anecdotal reports attest that a single dose of ibogaine eliminates opiate withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug craving for extended periods of time. The purported efficacy of ibogaine for the treatment of drug dependence may be due in part to an active metabolite. The majority of ibogaine biotransformation proceeds via CYP2D6, including the O-demethylation of ibogaine to 12-hydroxyibogamine (noribogaine). Blood concentration-time effect profiles of ibogaine and noribogaine obtained for individual subjects after single oral dose administrations demonstrate complex pharmacokinetic profiles. Ibogaine has shown preliminary efficacy for opiate detoxification and for short-term stabilization of drug-dependent persons as they prepare to enter substance abuse treatment. We report here that ibogaine significantly decreased craving for cocaine and heroin during inpatient detoxification. Self-reports of depressive symptoms were also significantly lower after ibogaine treatment and at 30 days after program discharge. Because ibogaine is cleared rapidly from the blood, the beneficial aftereffects of the drug on craving and depressed mood may be related to the effects of noribogaine on the central nervous system.

  13. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in osteosarcoma patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gota, Vikram S; Maru, Girish B; Soni, Tejal G; Gandhi, Tejal R; Kochar, Nitin; Agarwal, Manish G

    2010-02-24

    Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant compound obtained from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and inflammatory pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, the clinical literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent due to its low bioavailability in humans. The purpose of this study was to quantify plasma levels of free curcumin after dosing of a solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulation versus unformulated curcumin in healthy volunteers and to determine its tolerability and dose-plasma concentration relationship in late-stage osteosarcoma patients. Doses of 2, 3, and 4 g of SLCP were evaluated in 11 patients with osteosarcoma. Plasma curcumin levels were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The limit of detection of the assay was 1 ng/mL of curcumin. In healthy subjects, the mean peak concentration of curcumin achieved from dosing 650 mg of SLCP was 22.43 ng/mL, whereas plasma curcumin from dosing an equal quantity of unformulated 95% curcuminoids extract was not detected. In both healthy individuals and osteosarcoma patients, high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and nonlinear dose dependency was observed, suggesting potentially complex absorption kinetics. Overall, good tolerability was noted in both healthy and osteosarcoma groups. PMID:20092313

  14. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in osteosarcoma patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gota, Vikram S; Maru, Girish B; Soni, Tejal G; Gandhi, Tejal R; Kochar, Nitin; Agarwal, Manish G

    2010-02-24

    Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant compound obtained from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and inflammatory pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, the clinical literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent due to its low bioavailability in humans. The purpose of this study was to quantify plasma levels of free curcumin after dosing of a solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulation versus unformulated curcumin in healthy volunteers and to determine its tolerability and dose-plasma concentration relationship in late-stage osteosarcoma patients. Doses of 2, 3, and 4 g of SLCP were evaluated in 11 patients with osteosarcoma. Plasma curcumin levels were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The limit of detection of the assay was 1 ng/mL of curcumin. In healthy subjects, the mean peak concentration of curcumin achieved from dosing 650 mg of SLCP was 22.43 ng/mL, whereas plasma curcumin from dosing an equal quantity of unformulated 95% curcuminoids extract was not detected. In both healthy individuals and osteosarcoma patients, high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and nonlinear dose dependency was observed, suggesting potentially complex absorption kinetics. Overall, good tolerability was noted in both healthy and osteosarcoma groups.

  15. The pharmacokinetics and safety of idelalisib in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Robeson, Michelle; Zhou, Huafeng; Hisoire, Grace; Ramanathan, Srini

    2015-08-01

    Idelalisib, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor, is metabolized primarily by aldehyde oxidase to form GS-563117, an inactive metabolite, and is metabolized to a lesser extent by cytochrome P450 3A and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A4. In a mass balance study, the orally administered idelalisib dose was recovered mainly in feces (∼78%). This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single 150-mg dose of idelalisib in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment and in age-, sex-, and weight-matched, healthy controls. The idelalisib maximum observed plasma concentration was generally comparable in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment versus healthy controls, whereas the mean area under the curve was higher (58% to 59%). GS-563117 exposures were lower in impaired versus healthy control subjects, likely because of lower formation in the setting of liver impairment. Exploratory analyses indicated no relevant relationships between idelalisib or GS-563117 plasma exposures and Child-Pugh-Turcotte scores. Single oral doses of idelalisib 150 mg were well tolerated, with most treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and laboratory abnormalities being grades 1 or 2 in severity. As such, no dose adjustment was required when initiating idelalisib treatment in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment, although close monitoring for potential AEs is recommended. PMID:25821156

  16. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous administration of GSK1322322, a peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Jones, Lori S; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Dumont, Etienne

    2013-11-01

    GSK1322322 is the first in a new class of antibiotics that targets peptide deformylase (PDF), an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, eight-cohort phase I trial enrolled 62 healthy volunteers to assess safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles of GSK1322322. GSK1322322 was administered as a single oral or intravenous (IV) dose, escalating from 500 to 3,000 mg or repeat IV doses escalating from 500 to 1,500 mg twice daily. Upon repeat IV administration, GSK1322322 exhibits linear pharmacokinetics over time upon repeat doses as shown by time-invariant pharmacokinetics. A dose-proportional increase in area under concentration-time curve was observed after single or repeat IV dosing, whereas clearance at steady state remained generally unchanged across doses. There was minimal accumulation of GSK1322322 after repeat IV twice-daily administration. After oral tablet doses of GSK1322322 1,000 and 1,500 mg, absolute bioavailability was 69% and 56%, respectively. GSK1322322 administration at single and repeat IV doses and at supratherapeutic single IV doses of 2,000 and 3,000 mg was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability demonstrated in this study, GSK1322322 has the potential to become the first-in-class PDF inhibitor for clinical use.

  17. A First-in-Human Study To Assess the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dole, Kiran; Segal, Florencia Pereyra; Feire, Adam; Magnusson, Baldur; Rondon, Juan C; Vemula, Janardhana; Yu, Jing; Pang, Yinuo; Pertel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause significant disease in immunocompromised patients and treatment options are limited by toxicities. CSJ148 is a combination of two anti-HCMV human monoclonal antibodies (LJP538 and LJP539) that bind to and inhibit the function of viral HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) and the pentameric complex, consisting of glycoproteins gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131. Here, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of LJP538 or LJP539 or their combination in healthy volunteers. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities occurred sporadically with similar incidence between antibody and placebo groups and without any apparent relationship to dose. No subject who received antibody developed a hypersensitivity, infusion-related reaction or anti-drug antibodies. After intravenous administration, both LJP538 and LJP539 demonstrated typical human IgG1 pharmacokinetic properties, with slow clearances, limited volumes of distribution, and long terminal half-lives. The pharmacokinetic parameters were linear and dose proportional for both antibodies across the 50-fold range of doses evaluated in the study. There was no apparent impact on pharmacokinetics when the antibodies were administered alone or in combination. CSJ148 and the individual monoclonal antibodies were safe and well tolerated, with pharmacokinetics as expected for human immunoglobulin.

  18. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of exenatide once weekly in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Nasu, Risa; Yamamura, Ayuko; Kothare, Prajakti A; Mace, Kenneth; Wolka, Anne M; Linnebjerg, Helle

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel study assessed the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of exenatide once weekly (QW) in 30 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) suboptimally controlled by diet and exercise alone or combined with biguanide, sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione, or combinations of these agents (58.6% male; 58+/-9 years; body mass index 26.3+/-2.9 kg/m(2); hemoglobin A(1c) [HbA(1c)] 7.4+/-0.8%; fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 156.1+/-29.1 mg/dL; duration of T2D 6+/-5 years; means +/- SD). Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to subcutaneous placebo QW, exenatide QW 0.8 mg, or exenatide QW 2.0 mg for 10 weeks. All evaluable patients were analyzed (placebo QW, n=10; exenatide QW 0.8 mg, n=10; exenatide QW 2.0 mg, n=9), unless otherwise stated. Steady-state plasma exenatide concentrations were observed by Week 8 of the study. For the evaluable pharmacokinetic population, geometric mean (90% confidence interval) steady-state plasma concentrations (pg/mL) were 81.2 (68.3-96.4) and 344.5 (256.5-462.7) with exenatide QW 0.8 mg (n=8) and exenatide QW 2.0 mg (n=5), respectively. Baseline-to-Week 10 glycemic improvements with placebo QW, exenatide QW 0.8 mg, and exenatide QW 2.0 mg, respectively, were: HbA(1c) (%): -0.4+/-0.3, -1.0+/-0.7, and -1.5+/-0.7; FPG (mg/dL): -20.5+/-20.4, -25.2+/-10.9, and -50.8+/-27.8; and 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose excursions (mg/dL): -8.8+/-26.9, -50.0+/-41.1, and -59.7+/-26.8 (means +/- SD). No serious adverse events (AEs) were reported and no AEs led to study discontinuation in any group. The most frequent AE observed was mild-to-moderate injection site induration. No serious hypoglycemia was reported. Exenatide QW for 10 weeks was well tolerated and improved short-term glycemic control in Japanese patients with suboptimally controlled T2D. PMID:19706990

  19. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of compound SFDAC by intranasal administration of multiple escalating dose in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Thennati, Rajamannar; Khanna, Aman; Khanna, Mallika; Sonaiya, Tushar; Mehta, Tejas; Mehta, Kalpana; Shahi, Pradeep; Patel, Jigneshkumar

    2014-11-01

    A novel corticosteroid compound (short form of IUPAC name: SFDAC) has been discovered by Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company (SPARC) Ltd. A randomized, observer-blind, active-controlled, parallel-groups, intranasal multiple escalating dose study was conducted in healthy male subjects to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of compound SFDAC formulated as an aqueous suspension for intranasal administration. Intranasal sprays of SFDAC, active control fluticasone propionate (FP) and placebo were administered once in a day for 14 days as per randomization. Various clinical evaluations including 24-hour serum cortisol and urinary free cortisol (UFC) profiles were carried out. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time-points and analyzed using a validated chromatographic method for estimation of SFDAC and its metabolite. The results of the study indicate that multiple dose of SFDAC intranasal spray upto 3,200 µg is safe and tolerated. Clinically significant suppression of hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis was not observed. The plasma concentration of SFDAC was found to be below the lower limit of quantification (LLQ) at most time-points for all subjects. SFDAC M1 metabolite was detected only at picogram level in plasma. The safety and pharmacokinetic characteristics of SFDAC observed in this study support further clinical development of the SFDAC nasal spray.

  20. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of microencapsulated octreotide acetate in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chen, T; Miller, T F; Prasad, P; Lee, J; Krauss, J; Miscik, K; Kalafsky, G; McLeod, J F

    2000-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of the marketed formulation of microencapsulated octreotide acetate were evaluated in an open-label study in 22 healthy cholecystectomized subjects. Each subject received a single 30 mg dose of microencapsulated octreotide acetate intramuscularly (i.m.). Concentrations of octreotide, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as well as clinical safety were evaluated over a period of 112 days (16 weeks). After the injection, mean serum octreotide concentration initially increased rapidly, reached the maximum (Cmax, day 1 = 0.96 +/- 0.25 ng/ml) approximately 1.5 hours after dosing, and declined thereafter until 24 hours postdose (Cmin, 24 h = 0.088 +/- 0.093 ng/ml). The octreotide concentration then increased and started a sustained release from day 7 onward. Plateau concentrations were maintained through day 70 and gradually declined to below the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) by day 112. The plateau height (Cplateau (2-112d, 60%)) was 1.68 +/- 0.88 ng/ml, and the duration (delta plateau, 60%) was 30.2 +/- 15.7 days. The integrated concentration-time curve, AUC0-112d, was 2819 +/- 782 (ng.h/ml), and the apparent half-life (t1/2) was 169 hours. To assess the variability, the drug concentrations were determined hourly for 8 hours on day 28, and the mean octreotide concentration, Cavg, day 28' was 1.55 +/- 1.26 ng/ml. The suppression of IGF-1 was statistically significant compared to the baseline (p < 0.05) through day 63; however, there were no appreciable changes in GH and IGFBP-3 concentrations after a single injection of microencapsulated octreotide acetate. Simulation of a 28-day dose schedule suggested that steady-state octreotide concentrations would be reached by the third injection with steady-state concentrations about twofold greater than the first injection. There were no serious adverse events or clinically meaningful changes

  1. [Comparison of the pharmacokinetics and safety of a paclitaxel injection NK and Taxol injection in breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshiaki; Rai, Yoshiaki; Sagara, Yoshiatsu; Matsuyama, Yoshito; Baba, Shinichi; Tamada, Shugo; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ando, Mitsutake

    2009-02-01

    A paclitaxel injection NK (NK) is a generic product containing the same amount of ingredient as a Taxol Injection. We examined the pharmacokinetics and safety of NK compared to the original product in breast cancer patients. As a result, the transition of plasma paclitaxel concentration and pharmacokinetic parameter in NK and the original drug were almost equal, which suggested that these products were bioequivalent. In adjuvant therapy, there was no significant difference in adverse events reported, and these products were approximately equally safe.

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: pharmacokinetics, efficacy, tolerability and safety in renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Davis, T M E

    2014-10-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a new class of blood glucose-lowering therapy with proven efficacy, tolerability and safety. Four of the five commercially available DPP-4 inhibitors are subject to significant renal clearance, and pharmacokinetic studies in people with renal impairment have led to lower recommended doses based on creatinine clearance in order to prevent drug accumulation. Data from these pharmacokinetic studies and from supratherapeutic doses in healthy individuals and people with uncomplicated diabetes during development suggest, however, that there is a wide therapeutic margin. This should protect against toxicity if people with renal impairment are inadvertently prescribed higher doses than recommended. Doses appropriate to renal function are associated with reductions in HbA1c that are equivalent to those observed in people with type 2 diabetes who do not have renal impairment. Recent large-scale cardiovascular safety trials of saxagliptin and alogliptin have identified heart failure as a potential concern and renal impairment may increase the risk of this complication. Although the incidence of pancreatitis does not appear to be significantly increased by DPP-4 inhibitor therapy, renal impairment is also an independent risk factor. Additional data from other ongoing DPP-4 inhibitor cardiovascular safety trials should provide a more precise assessment of the risks of these uncommon complications, including in people with renal impairment. PMID:24684351

  3. Lack of effect of amisulpride on the pharmacokinetics and safety of lithium.

    PubMed

    Canal, Muriel; Legangneux, Eric; van Lier, Jan Jaap; van Vliet, Andre Antonius; Coulouvrat, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    Lithium may be used as adjuvant therapy in schizophrenic patients and antipsychotics can be employed during the early phases of lithium therapy in patients with bipolar disorder. The issue of interactions between lithium and antipsychotics is therefore important. This study investigates the potential influence of repeated administration of amisulpride, an atypical antipsychotic, on the pharmacokinetics of lithium at steady state. Twenty-four healthy male volunteers (aged 1833 yr) received lithium carbonate (500 mg b.i.d.) for 14 d. All subjects were shown to have stable lithium serum concentrations after 57 d and were then randomized to receive double-blind administration of amisulpride (100 mg b.i.d.) or placebo bid from day 8 of lithium administration. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles were obtained on days 7 and 14 for lithium and trough plasma concentrations on days 10, 12 and 14 for amisulpride. Co-administration of amisulpride appeared to exert no effect on the pharmacokinetics of lithium. All treatments were well tolerated and safety assessment revealed no differences between the lithium+placebo and lithium+amisulpride groups. This finding permits the flexible use of amisulpride in patients already receiving lithium therapy.

  4. Pre-formulation characterization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Barnes, Keila Delores

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes has potential chemotherapy effects but very low oral bioavailability in humans. The objectives of this study are to quantitatively characterized and understand the physiochemical properties and the pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol. Solubility of resveratrol was measured in 10 common solvents at 25°C using HPLC. The solution state pH stability of resveratrol was assessed in various USP buffers ranging from pH 2-10 for 24 hours at 37 °C. Human plasma protein binding was determined using ultracentrifugation technique. Stability of resveratrol in human and rat plasma was also assessed at 37°C. Aliquots of blank plasma were spiked with a standard drug concentration to yield final plasma concentration of 50 mug/mL. Samples were analyzed for resveratrol concentration up to 96 hours. A group (n=8) of jugular vein-cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated and received intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg resveratrol. Serial blood samples were collected up to 8 hours after the dose. Plasma concentrations of resveratrol were measured by an established LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed using noncompartmental methods. Resveratrol is more soluble in alcohol and PEG-400, and stable in acidic pH. It binds highly to plasma proteins, and degrades slower in human then rat plasma. Resveratrol exhibits bioexponential disposition after intravenous administration and has a short elimination half-life. Resveratrol displays bioexponential disposition following intravenous administration. The estimated mean maximum concentration was 1045.5 ng/mL and rapidly dropped below 100 ng/mL within 30 minutes. The area under the concentration time curve (AUC) for resveratrol was 13888.7 min*ng/mL The mean terminal elimination half-life was 50.9 minutes. The mean total body clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution of trans-resveratrol were 1711.9mL/min/kg and 91087.8 mL/kg, respectively. Pre

  5. EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT. L H Clark1, H A Barton1, and R W Setzer1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used in eva...

  6. Safety, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics of VGX-1027-A novel oral anti-inflammatory drug in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica C; Menacherry, Stanley; Diehl, Malissa C; Giffear, Mary D; White, C Jo; Juba, Rob; Bagarazzi, Mark L; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Boyer, Jean; Agarwal, Vipin; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bart, Stephen; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2016-03-01

    VGX-1027, a novel oral immune modulator, is under development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single (1-800 mg) and multiple (40-400 mg) oral doses were evaluated in 2 clinical studies. The doses were well tolerated up to 800 mg in a single dose and 200 mg twice daily in multiple doses. Adverse events were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose-related pattern. There were no clinically significant physical or laboratory findings. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that increases in Cmax and AUC0-inf were dose-proportional, and AUC0- τ was approximately dose-proportional. For the single-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 4.9 to 8.7 hours. For the multiple-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 7.05 to 10.05 hours. No accumulation of the drug was observed after day 1, indicating that steady-state concentrations were attained with single and multiple dosing for 5 days. Approximately 90% of the administered dose was excreted in urine as unchanged drug. PMID:27138022

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Moxifloxacin in Children With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thee, Stephanie; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J.; Draper, Heather R.; McIlleron, Helen M.; Wiesner, Lubbe; Castel, Sandra; Schaaf, H. Simon; Hesseling, Anneke C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Moxifloxacin is currently recommended at a dose of 7.5–10 mg/kg for children with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, but pharmacokinetic and long-term safety data of moxifloxacin in children with tuberculosis are lacking. An area under the curve (AUC) of 40–60 µg × h/mL following an oral moxifloxacin dose of 400 mg has been reported in adults. Methods. In a prospective pharmacokinetic and safety study, children 7–15 years of age routinely receiving moxifloxacin 10 mg/kg daily as part of multidrug treatment for MDR tuberculosis in Cape Town, South Africa, for at least 2 weeks, underwent intensive pharmacokinetic sampling (predose and 1, 2, 4, 8, and either 6 or 11 hours) and were followed for safety. Assays were performed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and pharmacokinetic measures calculated using noncompartmental analysis. Results. Twenty-three children were included (median age, 11.1 years; interquartile range [IQR], 9.2–12.0 years); 6 of 23 (26.1%) were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected. The median maximum serum concentration (Cmax), area under the curve from 0–8 hours (AUC0–8), time until Cmax (Tmax), and half-life for moxifloxacin were 3.08 (IQR, 2.85–3.82) µg/mL, 17.24 (IQR, 14.47–21.99) µg × h/mL, 2.0 (IQR, 1.0–8.0) h, and 4.14 (IQR, 3.45–6.11), respectively. Three children, all HIV-infected, were underweight for age. AUC0–8 was reduced by 6.85 µg × h/mL (95% confidence interval, −11.15 to −2.56) in HIV-infected children. Tmax was shorter with crushed vs whole tablets (P = .047). Except in 1 child with hepatotoxicity, all adverse effects were mild and nonpersistent. Mean corrected QT interval was 403 (standard deviation, 30) ms, and no prolongation >450 ms occurred. Conclusions. Children 7–15 years of age receiving moxifloxacin 10 mg/kg/day as part of MDR tuberculosis treatment have low serum concentrations compared with adults receiving 400 mg moxifloxacin daily

  8. Dose comparison of conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia – efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F; Rock, Amy D; Woodward, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of 20 and 40 mg/day conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with hypervolemic or euvolemic hyponatremia. Methods Hyponatremic patients – serum sodium (sNa) ≤130 mEq/L – received either 20 or 40 mg/day of conivaptan for 4 days, following an initial 20 mg loading dose. Efficacy was evaluated by the magnitude and extent of change in sNa. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events, changes in vital signs and laboratory parameters, rate of sNa correction, and frequency of infusion-site reactions. Pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results A total of 37 patients received 20 mg/day and 214 patients received 40 mg/day conivaptan. Baseline-adjusted sNa-area under the concentration–time curve increased by an average of 753.8±499.9 mEq·hr/L (20 mg/day) and 689.2±417.3 mEq·hr/L (40 mg/day) over the course of the 4-day treatment period. The majority of patients in both treatment groups achieved a 4 mEq/L increase in sNa over baseline in ~24 hours (82.5%). Average increase in sNa after 4 days was ~10 mEq/L, varying with dosage level and baseline volume status. Treatment success (normal sNa or increase of ≥6 mEq/L) was attained by 70.3% of patients in the 20 mg/day group and 72.0% in the 40 mg/day group. Conclusion Both 20 and 40 mg/day doses of conivaptan are efficacious in increasing sNa over 4 days of treatment with no observed increase in the frequency of adverse events or specific infusion-site reactions using the higher dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both doses were similar to what has been reported previously, exhibiting greater-than-dose-proportional plasma concentrations. PMID:26848258

  9. Preparation, Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution, Antitumor Efficacy and Safety of Lx2-32c-Containing Liposome

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Guangyao; Ma, Jinbo; Ma, Pengkai; Du, Guangying; Wang, Zongliang; Tian, Jingwei; Fang, Weishuo; Fu, Fenghua

    2014-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane that has been demonstrated to have robust antitumor activity against different types of tumors including several paclitaxel-resistant neoplasms. Since the delivery vehicles for taxane, which include cremophor EL, are all associated with severe toxic effects, liposome-based Lx2-32c has been developed. In the present study, the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, antitumor efficacy and safety characteristics of liposome-based Lx2-32c were explored and compared with those of cremophor-based Lx2-32c. The results showed that liposome-based Lx2-32c displayed similar antitumor effects to cremophor-based Lx2-32c, but with significantly lower bone marrow toxicity and cardiotoxicity, especially with regard to the low ratio of hypersensitivity reaction. In comparing these two delivery modalities, targeting was superior using the Lx2-32c liposome formulation; it achieved significantly higher uptake in tumor than in bone marrow and heart. Our data thus suggested that the Lx2-32c liposome was a novel alternative formulation with comparable antitumor efficacy and a superior safety profiles to cremophor-based Lx2-32c, which might be related to the improved pharmacokinetic and biodistribution characteristics. In conclusion, the Lx2-32c liposome could be a promising alternative formulation for further development. PMID:25506928

  10. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Usach, Iris; Melis, Virginia; Peris, José-Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)/HIV infection. Discussion First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP), delavirdine (DLV) and efavirenz (EFV) are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research. PMID:24008177

  11. Solithromycin Pharmacokinetics in Plasma and Dried Blood Spots and Safety in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Palazzi, Debra L.; Bhattacharya-Mithal, Leena; Al-Uzri, Amira; James, Laura P.; Bradley, John; Neu, Natalie; Jasion, Theresa; Hornik, Christoph P.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Keedy, Kara; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of solithromycin, a fluoroketolide antibiotic, in a phase 1, open-label, multicenter study of 13 adolescents with suspected or confirmed bacterial infections. On days 3 to 5, the mean (standard deviation) maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration versus time curve from 0 to 24 h were 0.74 μg/ml (0.61 μg/ml) and 9.28 μg · h/ml (6.30 μg · h/ml), respectively. The exposure and safety in this small cohort of adolescents were comparable to those for adults. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01966055.) PMID:26883693

  12. Efficacy and safety of deferasirox compared with deferoxamine in sickle cell disease: two-year results including pharmacokinetics and concomitant hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Torres, Marcela; Minniti, Caterina P; Barrette, Stephane; Habr, Dany; Zhang, Yiyun; Files, Beatrice

    2013-12-01

    We report a prospective, randomized, Phase II study of deferasirox and deferoxamine (DFO) in sickle cell disease patients with transfusional iron overload, with all patients continuing on deferasirox after 24 weeks, for up to 2 years. The primary objective was to evaluate deferasirox safety compared with DFO; long-term efficacy and safety of deferasirox was also assessed. We also report, for the first time, the safety and pharmacokinetics of deferasirox in patients concomitantly receiving hydroxyurea. Deferasirox (n = 135) and DFO (n = 68) had comparable safety profiles over 24 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) secondary to drug administration were reported in 26.7% of patients in the deferasirox cohort and 28.6% in the DFO cohort. Gastrointestinal disorders were more common with deferasirox, including diarrhea (10.4% versus 3.6%) and nausea (5.2% versus 3.6%). The most common AE in the DFO group was injection-site pain irritation, which occurred in 7% of patients. Acute renal failure occurred in one patient on deferasirox who was continued on medication despite progressive impairment of renal function parameters. Serum ferritin levels were reduced in both treatment groups. Patients continuing on deferasirox for up to 2 years demonstrated an absolute median serum ferritin decrease of -614 ng/mL (n = 96). Increasing deferasirox dose was associated with improved response and a continued manageable safety profile. Concomitant hydroxyurea administration (n = 28) did not appear to influence the efficacy, safety (including liver and kidney function), and pharmacokinetic parameters of deferasirox.

  13. A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of 2 and 4 Weeks of Twice-Daily Ocular Trabodenoson in Adults with Ocular Hypertension or Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Kenneth N.; DuBiner, Harvey; Slomowitz, Natanya; McVicar, William; Rich, Cadmus C.; Baumgartner, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the safety and ocular hypotensive efficacy of 4 trabodenoson doses administered twice daily over 14 or 28 days in subjects with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase 2 study, patients received unilateral topical twice-daily trabodenoson (50, 100, or 200 mcg) or placebo for 14 days, or 500 mcg trabodenoson or placebo for 28 days. Ocular and systemic safety and tolerability were assessed by examinations, clinical and laboratory studies. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was assessed using Goldmann tonometry. Results: Trabodenoson was well tolerated; no clinically meaningful ocular or systemic side effects were identified. Trabodenoson produced a dose-dependent IOP reduction. IOP reductions in the 500 mcg group were significantly greater than placebo at all time points at Day 28. Mean IOP reductions from diurnal baseline ranged from −3.5 to −5.0 mmHg with a mean change of −4.1 mmHg in the 500 mcg group compared −1.0 to −2.5 mmHg with a mean change of −1.6 mmHg for the placebo group, and the Day 28 drop was significantly greater than at Day 14 (P = 0.0163) indicating improvement in IOP lowering with longer treatment time. IOP remained significantly reduced 24 h after the final 500 mcg dose (P = 0.048). Conclusion: Twice-daily ocular doses of trabodenoson, from 50 to 500 mcg, were well tolerated and showed a dose-related decrease in IOP that was statistically significant and clinically relevant at 500 mcg in patients with ocular hypertension or POAG. PMID:27002298

  14. Pharmacokinetics and safety of JTE-522, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Umemura, Kazuo; Kondo, Kazunao; Nakashima, Mitsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takuo; Takahashi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Aims The pharmacokinetics and safety profile of JTE-522, 4-(4-cyclohexyl-2 methyloxazol-5-yl)-2-fluorobenzensulphonamide, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor were investigated in healthy male volunteers. Methods Initially, as a pilot study, five groups of two subjects were given oral doses of 3–100 mg of JTE-522. After safety assessment, subjects were given 150 and 200 mg of JTE-522. The effect of food-intake on the pharmacokinetics of JTE-522 at a dose of 150 mg was examined. In the multiple-dose study, subjects were given 150 mg of JTE-522 once a day for 7 days. Concentrations of unchanged JTE-522 in plasma, blood and urine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). Concentrations of metabolites were estimated with h.p.l.c. chromatograms and calibration curves for quantification of unchanged JTE-522. Results In the course of this study, no serious abnormality attributable to the test drug was observed, suggesting that JTE-522 was well tolerated in healthy subjects. In a single-dose study, the concentrations of JTE-522 in blood were much higher than the corresponding concentrations in plasma. JTE-522 was readily distributed to blood cells and percentage distribution into blood cells was more than 99.0%. However, the values of Cmax in blood at doses of 100, 150, 200 mg JTE-522 were 15241, 20445 ± 3918 (16333–24556), 20965 ± 3260 (17544–24386) ng ml−1, respectively. These findings suggest that JTE-522 has a high affinity for blood cells and the distribution into blood cells is limited at the higher doses of over 100 mg. In a multiple dose study, pharmacokinetic parameters including t1/2 and AUC after the fourth administration were comparable with that of the seventh administration. Thus, these findings suggest the absence of accumulation on the multiple-dosing of JTE-522. Conclusions These results indicate that JTE-522 has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile for clinical use without any serious adverse events as we

  15. Hemostatic efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a recombinant von Willebrand factor in severe von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Joan C.; Castaman, Giancarlo; Windyga, Jerzy; Kouides, Peter; Ragni, Margaret; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Obermann-Slupetzky, Ortrun; Chapman, Miranda; Fritsch, Sandor; Pavlova, Borislava G.; Presch, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    This phase 3 trial evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) for treatment of bleeds in severe von Willebrand disease (VWD). rVWF was initially administered together with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) and subsequently alone, as long as hemostatic factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) levels were maintained. Pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated in a randomized cross-over design (rVWF vs rVWF:rFVIII at 50 IU VWF:ristocetin cofactor activity [RCo]/kg). Bleed control for all treated bleeds (N = 192 bleeds in 22 subjects) was rated good or excellent (96.9% excellent; 119 of 122 minor, 59 of 61 moderate, and 6 of 7 major bleeds) on a 4-point scale (4 = none to 1 = excellent). A single infusion was effective in 81.8% of bleeds. Treatment success, defined as the number of subjects with a mean efficacy rating of <2.5, was 100%. The PK profile of rVWF was not influenced by rFVIII (mean VWF:RCo terminal half-life: 21.9 hours for rVWF and 19.6 hours for rVWF:rFVIII). FVIII:C levels increased rapidly after rVWF alone, with hemostatic levels achieved within 6 hours and sustained through 72 hours after infusion. Eight adverse events (AEs; 6 nonserious AEs in 4 subjects and 2 serious AEs [chest discomfort and increased heart rate, without cardiac symptomatology] concurrently in 1 subject) were associated with rVWF. There were no thrombotic events or severe allergic reactions. No VWF or FVIII inhibitors, anti-VWF binding antibodies, or antibodies against host cell proteins were detected. These results show that rVWF was safe and effective in treating bleeds in VWD patients and stabilizes endogenous FVIII:C, which may eliminate the need for rFVIII after the first infusion. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01410227. PMID:26239086

  16. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  17. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  18. Pharmacokinetics and unexpected safety issues of LBM415, a novel oral peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rolan, P; Sun, H; Macleod, C; Bracken, K; Evans, T G

    2011-08-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors represent a potential new class of antibiotics targeting a large number of bacterial species. We studied the pharmacokinetics and safety of LBM415, a novel PDF inhibitor, administered as a single oral dose at 100-3,000 mg in the fasted state and at 1,000 mg in the fed state in healthy volunteers. LBM415 was then administered at dosages ranging from 100 mg q.d. to 1,000 mg t.i.d. for 11 days. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed, with a peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of 17.85 ± 5.96 µg/ml at 1,000 mg b.i.d. (the projected therapeutic dose) and an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)(0-24h) of 36.83 ± 10.36 µg/ml·h. The half-life, as determined after a 1,000-mg single dose, was 2.18 ± 0.61 h. The compound was well tolerated at low doses, but at the highest dose, 1,000 mg t.i.d., reversible cyanosis and low oxygen saturation, attributable to methemoglobinemia, were detected on day 11. Oxygen saturation was as low as 88% in one subject on day 11.

  19. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of rufloxacin in normal volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Kisicki, J C; Griess, R S; Ott, C L; Cohen, G M; McCormack, R J; Troetel, W M; Imbimbo, B P

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of rufloxacin were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Two groups of 16 healthy volunteers were given a single oral loading dose of 400 or 600 mg of rufloxacin on day 1 of the study. A single daily maintenance dose of 200 or 300 mg was then administered for a further 9 days; in addition, four subjects in each group received placebos. Rufloxacin levels in plasma and urine were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Following the initial dose, the mean (+/- standard error of the mean) peak concentrations of rufloxacin in plasma were 3.35 +/- 0.12 micrograms/ml in the 400-mg group and 4.54 +/- 0.19 micrograms/ml in the 600-mg group. They were generally reached 2 to 3 h after dosing. At the end of treatment, maximum levels in plasma rose to 4.51 +/- 0.15 and 7.20 +/- 0.25 micrograms/ml in the 400-mg and 600-mg groups, with a mean extent of accumulation (fold) of 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 3.3 +/- 0.1. For the 400-mg and 600-mg groups, the elimination half-lives were 40.0 +/- 1.5 and 44.0 +/- 1.3 h, mean residence times were 57.8 +/- 2.2 and 63.7 +/- 1.8 h, apparent volumes of distribution were 132 +/- 4 and 139 +/- 5 liters, and apparent total body clearance were 39 +/- 1 and 44 +/- 4 ml/min, assuming complete bioavailability. Of the total dose administered, the percentages excreted in urine were 49.6 +/- 1.3 and 51.1 +/-2.1%, with renal clearances of 21 +/- 1 and 22 +/- 2 ml/min, for the 400-mg and 600-mg groups. On the whole, the treatments were well tolerated, but some minor adverse events (mainly headache, insomnia, or abdominal discomfort) were reported for 7 subjects on abnormalities were detected in the laboratory examinations or in ocular function tests. This study shows that a 200-mg daily oral dose of rufloxacin preceded by a loading dose of 400 mg are well tolerated and produce steady-state concentrations in plasma above the MIC for most susceptible pathogens. PMID:1329618

  20. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Effects of LGD-4033, a Novel Nonsteroidal Oral, Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, in Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Basaria, Shehzad; Collins, Lauren; Dillon, E. Lichar; Orwoll, Katie; Storer, Thomas W.; Miciek, Renee; Ulloor, Jagadish; Zhang, Anqi; Eder, Richard; Zientek, Heather; Gordon, Gilad; Kazmi, Syed; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Concerns about potential adverse effects of testosterone on prostate have motivated the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that display tissue-selective activation of androgenic signaling. LGD-4033, a novel nonsteroidal, oral selective androgen receptor modulator, binds androgen receptor with high affinity and selectivity. Objectives. To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and effects of ascending doses of LGD-4033 administered daily for 21 days on lean body mass, muscle strength, stair-climbing power, and sex hormones. Methods. In this placebo-controlled study, 76 healthy men (21–50 years) were randomized to placebo or 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg LGD-4033 daily for 21 days. Blood counts, chemistries, lipids, prostate-specific antigen, electrocardiogram, hormones, lean and fat mass, and muscle strength were measured during and for 5 weeks after intervention. Results. LGD-4033 was well tolerated. There were no drug-related serious adverse events. Frequency of adverse events was similar between active and placebo groups. Hemoglobin, prostate-specific antigen, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or QT intervals did not change significantly at any dose. LGD-4033 had a long elimination half-life and dose-proportional accumulation upon multiple dosing. LGD-4033 administration was associated with dose-dependent suppression of total testosterone, sex hormone–binding globulin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. follicle-stimulating hormone and free testosterone showed significant suppression at 1.0-mg dose only. Lean body mass increased dose dependently, but fat mass did not change significantly. Hormone levels and lipids returned to baseline after treatment discontinuation. Conclusions. LGD-4033 was safe, had favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and increased lean body mass even during this short period without change in prostate-specific antigen. Longer randomized trials should

  1. Relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of the single-dose pharmacokinetics of omecamtiv mecarbil following administration of different modified-release formulations in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Palaparthy, Rameshraja; Banfield, Christopher; Alvarez, Paco; Yan, Lucy; Smith, Brian; Johnson, Jessica; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Malik, Fady

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Omecamtiv mecarbil is a novel small molecule that directly activates cardiac myosin and increases cardiac contractility without increasing cardiac myocyte intracellular calcium. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of several modified-release (MR) formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. Methods: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, 4-way crossover, incomplete block-design study evaluating 5 MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil vs. an immediate-release (IR) formulation. Materials: Healthy subjects were randomized to 1 of 30 possible sequences: within each sequence, subjects were assigned to receive a single 25-mg dose of 2 of the 6 possible formulations in the fasting and/or fed states. Results: 65 subjects were screened and enrolled; 5 were replacement subjects. Pharmacokinetic and safety data were analyzed from 62 and 63 subjects in the fasting and fed states, respectively. Compared with the IR formulation, median tmax was longer (0.5 vs. 2 – 10 hours), and mean Cmax was lower for all 5 MR formulations (262 vs. 34 – 78 ng/mL); t1/2,z was similar (18 – 21 hours). The relative bioavailability was high (> 75%) for three MR formulations but lower (< 65%) for the other two. Overall, the effect of food on omecamtiv mecarbil pharmacokinetics was minimal for four of the MR formulations. The pharmacokinetics of the inactive metabolites M3 and M4 were similar across all formulations. Conclusions: The relative bioavailability of omecamtiv mecarbil was high (> 75%) for 3 of the five MR formulations. Food had a marginal, nonclinically meaningful effect on the pharmacokinetics of the MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. PMID:26709596

  2. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of ticagrelor in Asian patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, Y; Teng, R; Emanuelsson, H

    2014-10-01

    This randomized, active-controlled, double-blind study assessed the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of ticagrelor in Japanese patients and a smaller cohort of non-Japanese Asian patients. The study recruited patients aged 20-80 years who had received aspirin 75-100 mg/day for ≥2 weeks and had percutaneous coronary intervention or acute coronary syndrome >3 months previously. Patients received 4 weeks' treatment with ticagrelor 45 mg bid, ticagrelor 90 mg bid or clopidogrel 75 mg qd (all with aspirin). The inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, final-extent) and pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor were assessed on days 1 and 28. Overall, 139 Asian patients were randomized (ticagrelor 45 mg bid, n = 50; ticagrelor 90 mg bid, n = 43; clopidogrel, n = 46) of whom 118 were Japanese. Mean final-extent IPA was greater with ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus ticagrelor 45 mg bid and with both ticagrelor doses versus clopidogrel. At the end of the dosing interval on day 28, mean final-extent IPA was 10.0% higher (95% confidence interval 0.5-19.5%) for ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus ticagrelor 45 mg bid, 15.1% higher (5.8-24.4%) for ticagrelor 45 mg bid versus clopidogrel, and 25.1% higher (15.5-34.7%) for ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus clopidogrel. In Japanese patients, exposure to ticagrelor and its active metabolite AR-C124910XX increased dose-proportionally. The safety profile of ticagrelor was consistent with previous studies. Ticagrelor was associated with enhanced IPA versus clopidogrel in Japanese patients. PMID:24935072

  3. Pharmacokinetics and safety of 0.5% ivermectin lotion for head louse infestations.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Lydie; Berg, Jeffrey E; Bowman, James P; Murray, John V; Ryan, William G

    2013-01-01

    The safety of a novel 0.5% ivermectin lotion (IVL) and potential for ivermectin absorption after application was investigated in an open-label study in young children, and a human repeat insult patch test (HRIPT) and cumulative irritation test (CIT) assessed any potential for cumulative dermal irritation and contact sensitization. In the pharmacokinetic and safety study, 30 head louse-infested children ages 6 months to 3 years received a 10-minute application of IVL on day 1. Blood was collected before application; 0.5, 1, and 6 hours after rinsing; and on days 2 and 8. Samples from 20 subjects were assayed for ivermectin (test sensitivity 0.05 ng/mL). Liver panel and complete blood counts were completed for all subjects. For the HRIPT/CIT, occlusive patches containing IVL or vehicle control lotion (CL) were repeatedly applied to 220 healthy adult subjects to assess contact sensitization; for cumulative dermal irritation testing, additional patches with normal saline and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were applied to 36 subjects. In the open-label study, all detected ivermectin plasma concentrations were <1 ng/mL. No safety signals emerged, and treatment was well tolerated. In the HRIPT/CIT, IVL was significantly less irritating than normal saline and SDS, with no evidence of dermal irritation or sensitization in human skin. IVL was safe when applied topically, absorption was de minimus, there was no evidence of irritation or sensitization from repeated exposures, and results support the safety of topical IVL use in children as young as 6 months.

  4. Human serum butyrylcholinesterase: in vitro and in vivo stability, pharmacokinetics, and safety in mice.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashima; Sun, Wei; Luo, Chunyuan; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2005-12-15

    The use of exogenously administered cholinesterases (ChEs) as bioscavengers of highly toxic organophosphate (OP) nerve agents is now sufficiently well documented to make them a highly viable prophylactic treatment against this potential threat. Of the ChEs evaluated so far, human serum butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is most suitable for human use. A dose of 200 mg (3 mg/kg) of HuBChE is envisioned as a prophylactic treatment in humans that can protect from an exposure of up to 2 x LD50 of soman. In addition to its use as a prophylactic for a variety of wartime scenarios, including covert actions, it also has potential use for first responders (civilians) reacting to terrorist nerve gas release. We recently, developed a procedure for the large-scale purification of HuBChE, which yielded approximately 6 g of highly purified enzyme from 120 kg of Cohn fraction IV-4. The enzyme had a specific activity of 700-750 U/mg and migrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE. To provide data for initiating an investigational new drug (IND) application for the use of this enzyme as a bioscavenger in humans, we established its pharmacokinetic properties, examined its safety in mice, and evaluated its shelf life at various temperatures. In mice administered various doses up to 90 mg/kg, enzyme activity reached peak levels in circulation at 10 and 24 h following i.p. and i.m. injections, respectively. The enzyme displayed a mean residence time (MRT) of 40-50 h, regardless of the route of administration or dose of injected enzyme. Mice were euthanized 2 weeks following enzyme administration and tissues were examined grossly or microscopically for possible toxic effects. Results suggest that HuBChE does not exhibit any toxicity in mice as measured by general observation, serum chemistry, hematology, gross or histologic tissue changes. The shelf life of this enzyme stored at 4, 25, 37, and 45 degrees C was determined in lyophilized form. The enzyme was found to be stable when stored in

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and 48-Week Efficacy of Oral Raltegravir in HIV-1–Infected Children Aged 2 Through 18 Years

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Zheng, Nan; Acosta, Edward P.; Teppler, Hedy; Homony, Brenda; Graham, Bobbie; Fenton, Terence; Xu, Xia; Wenning, Larissa; Spector, Stephen A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Alvero, Carmelita; Worrell, Carol; Handelsman, Edward; Wiznia, Andrew; Moultrie, Harry; Kindra, Gurpreet; Sanders, Margaret Ann; Williams, Ruth; Jensen, Jennifer; Acevedo, Midnela; Fabregas, Lizbeth; Jurgrau, Andrea; Foca, Marc; Higgins, Alice; Deville, Jaime G.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Carter, Michele F.; Swetnam, John; Wilson, Joan; Donnelly, Margaret; Akleh, Siham; Rigaud, Mona; Kaul, Aditya; Patel, Nehali; Gaur, Aditya; Utech, L. Jill; Cardoso, Edmundo; Moreira, Ana Maria; Santos, Breno; Bobat, Raziya; Mngqibisa, Rosie; Burey, Marlene; Abadi, Jacob; Rosenberg, Michael; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Picard, Donna; Pagano-Therrien, Jessica; Dittmer, Sylvia; Ndiweni, Hilda Ntatule; Patel, Amisha; DelRey, Michelle; McMullen-Jackson, Chivon; Paul, Mary E.; Melvin, Ann; Venema-Weiss, Corry; Lane, Jenna; Beneri, Christy; Ferraro, Denise; Infanzon, Erin; McAuley, James B; Aziz, Mariam; McNichols, Maureen; Pelton, Stephen; McLaud, Deb; Clarke, Diana; Zeichner, Steven; Akar, Arezou; Thompson, Deidre; Douglas, Steven D.; Rutstein, Richard M.; Vincent, Carol A.; Vachon, Mary Elizabeth; Cavallo, Martha; Purswani, Murli Udharam; Masheto, Gaerolwe; Ogwu, Anthony; Kakhu, Tebogo; Viani, Rolando M.; Darcey, Anita,; Norris, Kimberly; Burchett, Sandra K.; Kneut, Catherine; Karthas, Nancy; Casey, Denise; Emmanuel, Patricia; Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge; Rana, Sohail; Houston, Patricia; Mengistab, Mulu; Rathore, Mobeen; Mirza, Ayesha; Gayton, Tabetha; Barr, Emily; Dunn, Jennifer; Hahn, Kerry; Eysallenne, Zulma; Howard, F. Sholar; Graham, Kathleen; Negra, Marinella Della; Queiroz, Wladimir; Lian, Yu Ching; Wara, Diane; Ruel, Ted; VanDyke, Russell; Reilly, Patricia; Bradford, Sheila; van Rensburg, Anita Janse; Dobbels, Els; Bester, Marietjie; Bamji, Mahrukh; Paul, Santa; Sarza, Mirala; Kovacs, Andrea; Homans, James; Spencer, LaShonda; Hofer, Cristna; Abreu, Thalita; Oliveira, Ricardo; Joao, Esau C.; Pinto, Jorge; Ferreira, Flavia; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Cervi, Maria Celia; Isaac, Marcia De Lima; Losso, Marcelo H.; Stankievich, Erica; Foradori, Irene; Tucker, Diane; Church, Joseph; Belzer, Marvin; Hopkins, Johns; Ellen, Jonathan; Agwu, Allison; Laurel, Borkovic

    2014-01-01

    Background. IMPAACT P1066 is a phase I/II open-label multicenter trial to evaluate pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of multiple raltegravir formulations in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected youth. Methods. Dose selection for each cohort (I: 12 to <19 years; II: 6 to <12 years; and III: 2 to <6 years) was based on review of short-term safety (4 weeks) and intensive pharmacokinetic evaluation. Safety data through weeks 24 and 48, and grade ≥3 or serious adverse events (AEs) were assessed. The primary virologic endpoint was achieving HIV RNA <400 copies/mL or ≥1 log10 reduction between baseline and week 24. Results. The targeted pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-12h and C12h) were achieved for each cohort, allowing dose selection for 2 formulations. Of 96 final dose subjects, there were 15 subjects with grade 3 or higher clinical AEs (1 subject with drug-related [DR] psychomotor hyperactivity and insomnia); 16 subjects with grade 3 or higher laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase elevation); 14 subjects with serious clinical AEs (1 with DR rash); and 1 subjects with serious laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase increased). There were no discontinuations due to AEs and no DR deaths. Favorable virologic responses at week 48 were observed in 79.1% of patients, with a mean CD4 increase of 156 cells/µL (4.6%). Conclusions. Raltegravir as a film-coated tablet 400 mg twice daily (6 to <19 years, and ≥25 kg) and chewable tablet 6 mg/kg (maximum dose 300 mg) twice daily (2 to <12 years) was well tolerated and showed favorable virologic and immunologic responses. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00485264. PMID:24145879

  6. Raltegravir for HIV-1 infected children and adolescents: efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kajal B; King, Jennifer R; Acosta, Edward P

    2013-01-01

    Raltegravir was the first HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitor to be approved by the US FDA, in October 2007, for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Raltegravir can be used in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients, as well as for the treatment of multidrug-resistant infection. Raltegravir exists in two formulations: a film-coated tablet administered orally at 400 mg twice daily, and a chewable tablet administered orally at 300 mg twice daily. In 2011, raltegravir was also approved for the treatment of children and adolescents, ages 2–18 years. For adolescents (ages 12–18 years), the recommended dose is 400 mg twice daily (film-coated tablet). If children (ages 6–12 years) weigh at least 25 kg, the film-coated tablet is recommended at 400 mg twice daily. Otherwise, patients receive the chewable tablet according to weight-based dosing at approximately 6 mg/kg/dose. Studies are ongoing for children ages 4 weeks to 2 years, and preliminary efficacy and safety data are promising. This article reviews current studies on the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in the pediatric population and the challenges of treating HIV in children and adolescents. PMID:24600298

  7. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  8. Pharmacokinetics and safety of voriconazole intravenous-to-oral switch regimens in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Kato, Koji; Maeda, Naoko; Fukushima, Keitaro; Goto, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masami; Muto, Chieko; Okayama, Akifumi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Liu, Ping

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of voriconazole following intravenous-to-oral switch regimens used with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects (age 2 to <15 years) at high risk for systemic fungal infection. Twenty-one patients received intravenous-to-oral switch regimens based on a recent population pharmacokinetic modeling; they were given 9 mg/kg of body weight followed by 8 mg/kg of intravenous (i.v.) voriconazole every 12 h (q12h), and 9 mg/kg (maximum, 350 mg) of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 2 to <12 or 12 to <15 years and <50 kg) or 6 mg/kg followed by 4 mg/kg of i.v. voriconazole q12h and 200 mg of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 12 to <15 years and ≥50 kg). The steady-state area under the curve over the 12-h dosing interval (AUC0-12,ss) was calculated using the noncompartmental method and compared with the predicted exposures in Western pediatric subjects based on the abovementioned modeling. The geometric mean (coefficient of variation) AUC0-12,ss values for the intravenous and oral regimens were 51.1 μg · h/ml (68%) and 45.8 μg·h/ml (90%), respectively; there was a high correlation between AUC0-12,ss and trough concentration. Although the average exposures were higher in the Japanese patients than those in the Western pediatric subjects, the overall voriconazole exposures were comparable between these two groups due to large interindividual variability. The exposures in the 2 cytochrome P450 2C19 poor metabolizers were among the highest. Voriconazole was well tolerated. The most common treatment-related adverse events were photophobia and abnormal hepatic function. These recommended doses derived from the modeling appear to be appropriate for Japanese pediatric patients, showing no additional safety risks compared to those with adult patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01383993.).

  9. Evaluation of Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Sodium 2,2 Dimethylbutyrate, a Novel Short Chain Fatty Acid Derivative, in a Phase 1, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Single- and Repeat-Dose Studies in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Wargin, William A.; Boosalis, Michael S.; Wallis, Wayne J.; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R.; Faller, Douglas V.; Welch, William C.; Berenson, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel SCFA derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with one of four single dose levels (2, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9–15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable PK profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies. PMID:21422239

  10. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the novel γ-secretase modulator, E2212, in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Logovinsky, Veronika; Schuck, Edgar; Kaplow, June; Chang, Min-Kun; Miyagawa, Takehiko; Wong, Nancy; Ferry, Jim

    2014-05-01

    E2212, a novel γ-secretase modulator, is under development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single ascending oral doses (10-250 mg, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized) of E2212 were evaluated. In this phase I clinical trial, E2212 was found to be well tolerated in single doses. Maximum tolerated dose was not achieved up to 250 mg. Most AEs were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose related pattern. There were no clinically significant findings on physical and ophthalmologic examinations as well as vital signs, laboratory, ECG and C-SSRS assessments. E2212 was rapidly absorbed, with median tmax values ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. E2212 exhibited biphasic disposition with the terminal t1/2 of 12.5-19.0 h. Renal excretion was the minor pathway for E2212 elimination. Increased PD response (reduction in plasma concentrations of Aβ(x-42)) was observed with increasing doses. The maximum PD response was observed in the highest dose 250 mg cohort, with ΔAUAC(0-24 h) of 44.1% and Amax of 53.6%. These results support further clinical development of E2212.

  11. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals. Trial Registration Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000004997 PMID:25978046

  13. Pharmacokinetics and safety of olmesartan medoxomil in combination with either amlodipine or atenolol compared to respective monotherapies in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bolbrinker, Juliane; Huber, Matthias; Scholze, Jürgen; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate any influence on olmesartan plasma pharmacokinetics from amlodipine or atenolol. We analysed pharmacokinetics and safety of olmesartan medoxomil in combination with either amlodipine or atenolol compared to respective monotherapies in two separate studies. In one study, 18 subjects received once daily treatment for 7 days with olmesartan medoxomil 20 mg alone or with amlodipine 5 mg or amlodipine 5 mg alone. In the other study, atenolol 50 mg once daily replaced amlodipine. Concentration vs. time profiles for olmesartan monotherapy were similar to combination therapy. Mean olmesartan AUC(ss,tau) for olmesartan alone and with amlodipine were 2439 and 2388 ng h/mL and for olmesartan alone and with atenolol were 2340 and 2247 ng h/mL. Corresponding olmesartan C(ss,max) values were 465.7 and 439.5 ng/mL for amlodipine, and 447.4 and 423.8 ng/mL for atenolol. Median t(max) values for olmesartan were 1.5 h for each group in each study. Bioequivalence was established for all pharmacokinetic parameters. Lack of significant pharmacokinetic interactions between olmesartan and amlodipine or atenolol provides a basis for combination therapy.

  14. Investigation of the safety of topical metronidazole from a pharmacokinetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Iida, Junichi; Kudo, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Kento; Yatsuno, Yoshiyuki; Yamagishi, Saori; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Ike, Hideyuki; Sato, Toru; Kagaya, Hajime; Ito, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ) ointment has been used widely as a hospital preparation against cancerous malodor. Although cancerous tissue with ulcer-like symptoms is likely to have a higher capacity to absorb drugs than normal skin, the extent to which MTZ is absorbed when a topical preparation is applied to cancerous tissue remains unclear. Furthermore, few studies have investigated the drug interactions involving MTZ despite its long use in clinical practice. In the present study, plasma concentration of MTZ was measured in a breast cancer patient using MTZ ointment for cancerous malodor and basic research was also conducted with the objective of investigating the safety of topical MTZ from a pharmacokinetic perspective. 4.75 µg/mL (27.8 µM) of MTZ was detected in the patient's plasma, which was close to the plasma concentration after oral dosage of MTZ. In a metabolic inhibition study using human liver microsomes, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9-mediated hydroxylation of S-warfarin was almost unaffected by MTZ at the corresponding concentrations. In addition, 3-d repeated oral administration of MTZ (200 mg/kg/d) to rats did not show any significant effects on the hepatic mRNA levels of various CYP isozymes and CYP2C protein levels. These results suggest that the reported interaction of oral MTZ and S-warfarin was not due to CYP2C9 inhibition and that drug interactions via inhibition of CYP2C9 is unlikely to occur when MTZ ointment is applied to ulcerous skin. This information should be valuable for assessing the safety of MTZ ointment used for mitigating cancerous malodor. PMID:23302640

  15. Safety and pharmacokinetics of extended use of palivizumab in Saudi Arabian infants and children

    PubMed Central

    al-Alaiyan, Saleh; Pollack, Paul; Notario, Gerard F

    2015-01-01

    Background: The peak season of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in warmer climates may extend beyond the typical five-month RSV season of temperate regions. Additional monthly doses of palivizumab may be necessary in warmer regions to protect children at high risk for serious infection by the RSV. Methods: In a Phase II, single-arm, single-center, non-comparative, open-label, prospective study conducted in Saudi Arabia, children at high risk for RSV infection received up to seven monthly injections of palivizumab (15 mg/kg) during the 2000–2001 RSV season. Key enrollment criteria were no previous exposure to palivizumab and gestational age ≤35 weeks, ≤6 months of age at enrollment, or chronic lung disease and ≤24 months of age at enrollment. We wished to assess the safety, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetics of palivizumab as an extended seven-dose regimen. Results: Of 18 enrolled patients, 17 patients received seven palivizumab injections. Seven adverse events (AEs) occurred in five patients. Bronchiolitis was the most commonly reported AE. Six serious AEs occurred in four patients. No AEs were considered related to palivizumab. Trough levels of palivizumab in serum were >40 μg/mL in most patients after the first injection and in 16/18 and 14/17 patients after the fourth and sixth injections, respectively. Except for one patient at one visit, the anti-palivizumab titer was <1:10 at all visits. Conclusion: These data suggest that an extended palivizumab regimen of up to seven monthly doses during the RSV season exhibited an acceptable safety profile in children at high risk for RSV infection in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25767550

  16. Single-dose safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Dumont, Etienne; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Jones, Lori S

    2013-05-01

    GSK1322322 is a potent inhibitor of peptide deformylase, an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. GSK1322322 is active against community-acquired skin and respiratory tract pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens. This phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part, single-dose, dose escalation study (first time in humans) evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of GSK1322322 (powder-in-bottle formulation) in healthy volunteers. In part A, dose escalation included GSK1322322 doses of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,500 mg under fasting conditions and 800 mg administered with a high-fat meal. In part B, higher doses of GSK1322322 (2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 mg) were evaluated under fasting conditions. Of the 39 volunteers enrolled in the study, 29 and 10 volunteers were treated with GSK1322322 and placebo, respectively. Upon single-dose administration, GSK1322322 was absorbed rapidly, with median times to maximum plasma concentration (T(max)) ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. The maximum observed plasma concentration (C(max)) and exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) of GSK1322322 were greater than dose proportional between 100 and 1,500 mg and less than dose proportional between 1,500 and 4,000 mg. Administration of the drug with a high-fat meal reduced the rate of absorption (reduced C(max) and delayed T(max)) without affecting the extent of absorption (no effect on AUC). GSK1322322 was generally well tolerated, with all adverse events being mild to moderate in intensity during both parts of the study. The most frequently reported adverse event was headache. Data from this study support further evaluation of GSK1322322. PMID:23403431

  17. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of macitentan, an endothelin receptor antagonist, in an ascending multiple-dose study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, Patricia N; van Giersbergen, Paul L M; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2013-11-01

    This multiple-ascending-dose study investigated safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics, of macitentan, a new endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) with sustained receptor binding and enhanced tissue penetration properties compared to other ERAs. Healthy male subjects (n = 32) received once daily oral doses of macitentan (1 - 30 mg) or placebo for 10 days. Administration of macitentan was safe and well tolerated. Macitentan had no effect on bile salts, suggesting an improved liver safety profile. The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of macitentan were dose-proportional and were characterized by a median tmax and apparent elimination half-life varying from 6.0 to 8.5 and 14.3 to 18.5 hours, respectively, for the different doses and minimal accumulation. ACT-132577, a metabolite with lower potency than macitentan, had a half-life of about 48 hours and accumulated approximately 8.5-fold. Compared to placebo, administration of macitentan caused a dose-dependent increase in plasma ET-1 with maximum effects attained at 10 mg. A small dose-dependent increase in the 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol urinary excretion ratio was observed, although there were no statistically significant differences between treatments including placebo. Effects of macitentan on cytochrome P450 enzyme 3A4 should be further evaluated in dedicated studies. The present results support investigation of macitentan in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension and ET-1-dependent pathologies.

  18. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of E5564, a lipid A antagonist, during an ascending single-dose clinical study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y Nancy; Rossignol, Daniel; Rose, Jeffrey R; Kao, Richard; Carter, Alison; Lynn, Melvyn

    2003-07-01

    E5564, a structural analog of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is a potent antagonist of the biochemical and physiologic effects of LPS in several in vitro and in vivo models and is currently under clinical development as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess the safety and tolerability of E5564 following a 30-minute intravenous (i.v.) infusion, (2) evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of E5564, and (3) measure the ability of E5564 to block LPS stimulation ex vivo in blood taken from subjects up to 8 hours after ending the infusion. Healthy male volunteers (n = 7/dose group) were randomly assigned to each of four dose levels (350, 1000, 2000, or 3500 micrograms). Within each dose group, 5 subjects received drug and 2 received placebo. E5564 or matching placebo was administered by a 30-minute infusion, and blood samples were collected at predetermined time points. All doses of E5564 were demonstrated to be safe and well tolerated. E5564 plasma concentrations were determined using a validated LC/MS/MS method. The Cmax and AUC of E5564 increased in a dose-proportional manner. E5564 pharma-cokinetics were characterized by a slow clearance (0.67-0.95 mL/h/kg), a small volume of distribution (41-54 mL/kg), and a relatively long elimination half-life (42-51 h). As measured in the ex vivo assay, E5564 inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in a dose-dependent manner, and at the higher doses (2 and 3.5 mg), antagonistic activity was measurable up to 8 hours postinfusion. E5564 lacked LPS-like agonist activity at doses up to 3.5 mg. Taken together, we believe that E5564 is a safe, potent antagonist of LPS in blood and will likely benefit patients in the treatment of LPS-related diseases.

  20. Discovery of a Potent and Selective ROMK Inhibitor with Pharmacokinetic Properties Suitable for Preclinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new subseries of ROMK inhibitors exemplified by 28 has been developed from the initial screening hit 1. The excellent selectivity for ROMK inhibition over related ion channels and pharmacokinetic properties across preclinical species support further preclinical evaluation of 28 as a new mechanism diuretic. Robust pharmacodynamic effects in both SD rats and dogs have been demonstrated. PMID:26191360

  1. Pharmacokinetic, partial pharmacodynamic and initial safety analysis of (-)-epicatechin in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher F; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Shiva, Sruti; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Taub, Pam R; Su, Yongxuan; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dugar, Sundeep; Schreiner, George; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI), a naturally occurring flavanol, has emerged as a likely candidate for cocoa-based product reported reductions in cardiometabolic risk. The present study aimed to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of purified (-)-EPI administered to healthy volunteers. In this phase I, open-label, two-part single- and multiple-dose study, subjects received either a single dose (n = 9) of 50, 100 or 200 mg or multiple doses (n = 8) of 50 mg daily (q.d.) or twice daily (b.i.d) for 5 days. Blood was collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after (-)-EPI administration in the single and multiple dose groups (blood collection repeated in day 5). Samples were analyzed by HPLC-HR-ESI-MS for EPI and metabolite quantification. In the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, blood samples were analyzed for NO surrogates and follistatin levels as well as, platelet mitochondrial complexes I, V and citrate synthase activity levels. (-)-EPI was well tolerated and readily absorbed with further phase 2 metabolism. On day 5, in the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, there were significant increases in plasma nitrite of 30% and 17%, respectively. In the q.d. group on day 5 vs. day 1, platelet mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase activities demonstrated a significant increase of ∼92, 62 and 8%, respectively. Average day 5 follistatin AUC levels were ∼2.5 fold higher vs. day 1 AUC levels in the b.i.d. group. (-)-EPI was safe to use, with no observed adverse effects, and our findings suggest that increases in NO metabolites, mitochondrial enzyme function and plasma follistatin levels may underlie some of the beneficial effects of cocoa products or (-)-EPI as reported in other studies. PMID:25598082

  2. Pharmacokinetic, partial pharmacodynamic and initial safety analysis of (−)-Epicatechin in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christopher F.; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Shiva, Sruti; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Taub, Pam R.; Su, Yongxuan; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dugar, Sundeep; Schreiner, George; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epicatechin ((−)-EPI), a naturally occurring flavanol has emerged as a likely candidate for cocoa-based product reported reductions in cardiometabolic risk. The present study aimed to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of purified (−)-EPI administered to healthy volunteers. In this phase I, open-label, two-part single- and multiple-dose study subjects received either a single dose (n=9) of 50, 100 or 200 mg or multiple doses (n=8) of 50 mg daily (q.d.) or twice daily (b.i.d) for 5 days. Blood was collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 hrs after (−)-EPI administration in the single and multiple dose groups (blood collection repeated in day 5). Samples were analyzed by HPLC-HR-ESI-MS for EPI and metabolites quantification. In the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, blood samples were analyzed for NO surrogates, follistatin, platelet mitochondrial complex I, V and citrate synthase level determinations. (−)-EPI was well tolerated and readily absorbed with further phase 2 metabolism. On day 5, in the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, there were significant increases in plasma nitrite of 30 % and 17 %, respectively. In the q.d. group on day 5 vs. day 1, platelet mitochondria complexes I, IV and citrate synthase activities demonstrated a significant increase of ~ 92, 62 and 8 %, respectively. Average day 5 follistatin AUC levels were ~2.5 fold higher vs. day 1 AUC levels in the b.i.d. group. (−)-EPI was safe with no observed adverse effects and our findings suggest that increases in NO metabolites, mitochondrial enzyme function and plasma follistatin levels may underlie some of the beneficial effects of cocoa products or (−)-EPI as reported in other studies. PMID:25598082

  3. Practical considerations for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Carmel M; Hart, Bruce W

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a well established class of therapeutics as evidenced by a large number of FDA approved mAbs for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Monoclonal antibodies that are molecularly engineered for enhanced functions and pharmacokinetic properties are routinely being considered for development by many biotechnology companies. Safety evaluation of current generation of mAbs poses new challenges due to the highly complex nature of engineering aspects and variability induced by the diverse recombinant cell systems to generate them. This review provides a basic outline for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic antibodies. Important considerations for planning a preclinical program, the types of nonclinical safety studies, and a general timeline for their conduct in relation to clinical trials are described. A list of relevant regulatory documents issued by government agencies is also provided. Adoption of these principles will greatly enhance the quality and relevance of the nonclinical safety data generated and will facilitate future development of mAb therapeutics. PMID:20046568

  4. Evaluation of the influence of sulfur fumigation on the pharmacokinetics of four active ingredients in Si Wu Tang.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ke; Cai, Hao; Liu, Xiao; Tu, Sicong; Cao, Gang; Li, Huan; Zhao, Yingying; Song, Xiaoqing; Lou, Yajing; Qiao, Fengxian; Cai, Baochang

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur fumigation may induce the decrease or the chemical transformation of some active ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines in vitro. Whether sulfur fumigation can cause the pharmacokinetic changes of the active ingredients in vivo is related to the efficacy and the safety of Chinese medicines' application clinically. A sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the simultaneous determination of paeoniflorin, ferulic acid, senkyunolide A, and senkyunolide I in rat plasma by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to evaluate the influence of sulfur fumigation to Si Wu Tang for the first time. Each compound was extracted from plasma samples by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, and the chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Agilent Extend C18 column with a linear gradient elution. The mass spectrometric detection and analysis were performed by using an AB Sciex triple quadrupole 5500 mass spectrometer in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of four compounds in rats after oral administration of sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Si Wu Tang. The results provided a meaningful basis for evaluating the affection of sulfur fumigation to the clinical application and the efficacy of Si Wu Tang. PMID:25354295

  5. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor co-administered with aspirin in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teng, Renli; Maya, Juan; Butler, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The results of two independent, randomized, two-period crossover, single-center studies, conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor ± aspirin, inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) with ticagrelor/aspirin vs. clopidogrel/aspirin, and safety, tolerability, and bleeding times are reported here. In Study A (open-label), 16 volunteers received ticagrelor (50 mg bid Days 1-5; 200 mg bid Days 6-9; one 200 mg dose on Day 10) ± 300 mg qd aspirin (Days 1-10). In Study B (double-blind, double-dummy), 16 volunteers received aspirin (300 mg loading dose/75 mg qd Days 2-9) with either ticagrelor (200 mg bid Days 4-8, one 200 mg dose on Day 9) or clopidogrel (300 mg loading dose Day 4, 75 mg qd Days 5-9). At steady-state ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid), concomitant aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), median time to Cmax (tmax), or mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve for the dosing interval (AUC0-τ) for ticagrelor and its primary metabolite, AR-C124910XX. Following 200 mg bid ticagrelor, mean Cmax and AUC0-τ for both parent and metabolite were comparable with co-administration of aspirin at 75 mg and 300 mg qd. Aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. However, aspirin and ticagrelor had an additive effect on IPA (collagen-induced). Ticagrelor/aspirin increased bleeding times vs. baseline. Ticagrelor/aspirin co-administration was well tolerated at all dose combinations evaluated. In summary, the findings of this study demonstrate that co-administration of aspirin (300 mg qd) with ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid) had no effect on ticagrelor pharmacokinetics or IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. PMID:23249161

  6. Criticality safety evaluation - an endusers's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S T

    1999-05-06

    This paper presents criticality safety evaluations from an enduser's perspective. Overall issues related to a criticality safety evaluation in an operations support setting are discussed. A work flow process is presented which shows the key steps in conducting an effective criticality evaluation. Finally, a few suggestions are given to assist newcomers to this field.

  7. Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sustained-release lanreotide (lanreotide Autogel) in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Akira; Teramoto, Akira; Hizuka, Naomi; Kitai, Kazuo; Ramis, Joaquim; Chihara, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The somatostatin analog lanreotide Autogel has proven to be efficacious for treating acromegaly in international studies and in clinical practices around the world. However, its efficacy in Japanese patients has not been extensively evaluated. We examined the dose-response relationship and long-term efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. In an open-label, parallel-group, dose-response study, 32 patients (29 with acromegaly, 3 with pituitary gigantism) received 5 injections of 60, 90, or 120 mg of lanreotide Autogel over 24 weeks. Four weeks after the first injection, 41% of patients achieved serum GH level of <2.5 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) level was normalized in 31%. Values at Week 24 were 53% for GH and 44% for IGF-I. Dose-dependent decreases in serum GH and IGF-I levels were observed with dose-related changes in pharmacokinetic parameters. In an open-label, long-term study, 32 patients (30 with acromegaly, 2 with pituitary gigantism) received lanreotide Autogel once every 4 weeks for a total of 13 injections. Dosing was initiated with 90 mg and adjusted according to clinical responses at Weeks 16 and/or 32. At Week 52, 47% of patients had serum GH levels of <2.5 ng/mL and 53% had normalized IGF-I level. In both studies, acromegaly symptoms improved and treatment was generally well tolerated although gastrointestinal symptoms and injection site induration were reported. In conclusion, lanreotide Autogel provided early and sustained control of elevated GH and IGF-I levels, improved acromegaly symptoms, and was well tolerated in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. PMID:23337477

  8. Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sustained-release lanreotide (lanreotide Autogel) in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Akira; Teramoto, Akira; Hizuka, Naomi; Kitai, Kazuo; Ramis, Joaquim; Chihara, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The somatostatin analog lanreotide Autogel has proven to be efficacious for treating acromegaly in international studies and in clinical practices around the world. However, its efficacy in Japanese patients has not been extensively evaluated. We examined the dose-response relationship and long-term efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. In an open-label, parallel-group, dose-response study, 32 patients (29 with acromegaly, 3 with pituitary gigantism) received 5 injections of 60, 90, or 120 mg of lanreotide Autogel over 24 weeks. Four weeks after the first injection, 41% of patients achieved serum GH level of <2.5 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) level was normalized in 31%. Values at Week 24 were 53% for GH and 44% for IGF-I. Dose-dependent decreases in serum GH and IGF-I levels were observed with dose-related changes in pharmacokinetic parameters. In an open-label, long-term study, 32 patients (30 with acromegaly, 2 with pituitary gigantism) received lanreotide Autogel once every 4 weeks for a total of 13 injections. Dosing was initiated with 90 mg and adjusted according to clinical responses at Weeks 16 and/or 32. At Week 52, 47% of patients had serum GH levels of <2.5 ng/mL and 53% had normalized IGF-I level. In both studies, acromegaly symptoms improved and treatment was generally well tolerated although gastrointestinal symptoms and injection site induration were reported. In conclusion, lanreotide Autogel provided early and sustained control of elevated GH and IGF-I levels, improved acromegaly symptoms, and was well tolerated in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of phencyclidine and its decadeutero variant

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, A.K.; Hiramatsu, M.; Pechnick, R.N.; Di Stefano, E.

    1989-07-01

    The role of metabolism in the in vivo actions of phencyclidine (PCP) was examined by comparing deuterium-substituted drug with drug of normal isotopic abundance. PCP elicits two responses that differ in their time course, ataxia, which is observable immediately after dosage, and hypothermia, which peaks approximately 90 to 120 min after drug administration. The role of metabolism in these responses was determined by comparing bioavailabilities of deuterium enriched (d10) and normal (d0) PCP with the two responses. Plasma concentration was determined after the i.v. and i.p. administration of d10 and d0 drug and the bioavailability of the d10 was found to be 1.3 to 1.5 times the d0. The clearance of the d10 was also smaller than the d0. The d10, which is pharmacologically equivalent in vitro, is metabolized more slowly than the d0 in vitro. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic bioavailabilities exhibited comparable isotope effects, indicating that both responses are due to the actions of the parent drug.

  10. Preparation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of Tashinone IIA solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhu, Jiabi; Du, Zhiyong; Qin, Bin

    2005-07-01

    Tashinone IIA loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (TA-SLN) coated with poloxamer 188 was prepared by emulsification/evaporation. The TA-SLN was characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The results showed that the TA-SLN had an average diameter of 98.7 nm with a zeta potential of - 31.6 mv and the drug loading of 4.6% and entrapment efficiency of 87.7%. In vitro release experiment showed that the release of Tashinone IIA from TA-SLN was in accordance with the Weibull equation. The best model fitting experimental data was a two-compartment open model with first-order. The area under curve of plasma concentration-time (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) of TA-SLN were much higher than those of Tashinone IIA control solution (TA-SOL). The results of pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits indicated that the formulation of TA-SLN was successful in providing a delivery of slow release of Tashinone IIA. PMID:16109628

  11. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic properties and anaesthetic effects of propofol in a new perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8) emulsion in rats--A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Sonja; Heesch, Elisabeth; Krebs, Jörg; Holm, René; Beck, Grietje; Yard, Benito

    2015-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a safe and widely used anaesthetic, but due to low water solubility and high lipophilicity a difficult compound to formulate. The solubility of propofol in the semifluorinated alkane perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8) is very high (>300 mg/ml). In the present work we investigate if a F6H8-based emulsion could be used as a new intravenous drug delivery system for propofol from a pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety point of view. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated after an intravenous bolus injection of either Disoprivan(®) or a F6H8-based propofol emulsion in Wistar rats. The onset and end of sedation after multiple dosings (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg bw) were examined. Clinical chemistry and histology were assessed. No significant difference was found for any of the pharmacokinetic parameters. No differences in the onset nor the end of sedation in the tested dosages could be detected. Histology scores revealed no differences. A slightly increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was measured after multiple application of the F6H8-propofol emulsion. In conclusion, the F6H8-propofol emulsion showed no significant different pharmacokinetics and sedation properties, compared to a commercial soy-based propofol emulsion. Further, no toxic effects could be detected on the F6H8 emulsion indicating it was a safe excipient in rats.

  12. Pharmacokinetics in patients with chronic liver disease and hepatic safety of incretin-based therapies for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2014-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of chronic liver disease (CLD) such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis, and about one-third of cirrhotic patients have diabetes. However, the use of several antidiabetic agents, such as metformin and sulphonylureas, may be a concern in case of hepatic impairment (HI). New glucose-lowering agents targeting the incretin system are increasingly used for the management of type 2 diabetes. Incretin-based therapies comprise oral inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) (gliptins) or injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. This narrative review summarises the available data regarding the use of both incretin-based therapies in patients with HI. In contrast to old glucose-lowering agents, they were evaluated in specifically designed acute pharmacokinetic studies in patients with various degrees of HI and their hepatic safety was carefully analysed in large clinical trials. Only mild changes in pharmacokinetic characteristics of DPP-4 inhibitors were observed in patients with different degrees of HI, presumably without major clinical relevance. GLP-1 receptor agonists have a renal excretion rather than liver metabolism. Specific pharmacokinetic data in patients with HI are only available for liraglutide. No significant changes in liver enzymes were reported with DPP-4 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists, alone or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, in clinical trials up to 2 years in length. On the contrary, preliminary data suggested that incretin-based therapies may be beneficial in patients with CLD, more particularly in the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Nevertheless, caution should be recommended, especially in patients with advanced cirrhosis, because of a lack of clinical experience with incretin-based therapies in these vulnerable patients.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of the Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Antiretroviral Activity of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barditch-Crovo, Patricia; Deeks, Steven G.; Collier, Ann; Safrin, Sharon; Coakley, Dion F.; Miller, Michael; Kearney, Brian P.; Coleman, Rebecca L.; Lamy, Patrick D.; Kahn, James O.; McGowan, Ian; Lietman, Paul S.

    2001-01-01

    Tenofovir DF is an antiviral nucleotide with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The pharmacokinetics, safety, and activity of oral tenofovir DF in HIV-1-infected adults were evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, escalating-dose study of four doses (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg given once daily). Subjects received a single dose of tenofovir DF or a placebo, followed by a 7-day washout period. Thereafter, subjects received their assigned study drug once daily for 28 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were dose proportional and demonstrated no change with repeated dosing. Reductions in plasma HIV-1 RNA were dose related at tenofovir DF doses of 75 to 300 mg, but there was no increase in virus suppression between the 300- and 600-mg dose cohorts, despite dose-proportional increases in drug exposure. Grade III or IV adverse events were limited to laboratory abnormalities, including elevated creatine phosphokinase and liver function tests, which resolved with or without drug discontinuation and without sequelae. No patients developed detectable sequence changes in the reverse transcriptase gene. PMID:11557462

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Fevipiprant (QAW039), a Novel CRTh2 Receptor Antagonist: Results From 2 Randomized, Phase 1, Placebo-Controlled Studies in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Veit J; Vets, Eva; Gheyle, Lien; Osuntokun, Wande; Larbig, Michael; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Sandham, David; Dubois, Gerald; Elbast, Walid; Goldsmith, Paul; Weiss, Markus

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a novel oral CRTh2 antagonist, fevipiprant (QAW039), in healthy subjects. Peak concentrations of fevipiprant in plasma were observed 1-3 hours postdosing. Concentrations declined in a multiexponential manner, followed by an apparent terminal phase (t1/2 , ∼20 hours). Steady state was achieved in 4 days with <2-fold accumulation. Elimination was partly by renal excretion (≤30% of the dose) and glucuronidation. Food had minimal impact on the PK of fevipiprant, and it was well tolerated at single and multiple oral doses up to 500 mg/day. No dose-dependent adverse events were observed, and all the events were mild or moderate in severity. Systemic concentrations were sufficiently high to achieve relevant target occupancy, considering in vitro pharmacology data. In summary, the data support further development as a once-daily oral therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:27310331

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Fevipiprant (QAW039), a Novel CRTh2 Receptor Antagonist: Results From 2 Randomized, Phase 1, Placebo‐Controlled Studies in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Vets, Eva; Gheyle, Lien; Osuntokun, Wande; Larbig, Michael; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Sandham, David; Dubois, Gerald; Elbast, Walid; Goldsmith, Paul; Weiss, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a novel oral CRTh2 antagonist, fevipiprant (QAW039), in healthy subjects. Peak concentrations of fevipiprant in plasma were observed 1‒3 hours postdosing. Concentrations declined in a multiexponential manner, followed by an apparent terminal phase (t1/2, ∼20 hours). Steady state was achieved in 4 days with <2‐fold accumulation. Elimination was partly by renal excretion (≤30% of the dose) and glucuronidation. Food had minimal impact on the PK of fevipiprant, and it was well tolerated at single and multiple oral doses up to 500 mg/day. No dose‐dependent adverse events were observed, and all the events were mild or moderate in severity. Systemic concentrations were sufficiently high to achieve relevant target occupancy, considering in vitro pharmacology data. In summary, the data support further development as a once‐daily oral therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:27310331

  16. Preclinical studies on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and toxicology of oxfendazole: toward first in human studies.

    PubMed

    Codd, Ellen E; Ng, Hanna H; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C; Horton, R John; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, H Hugo; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    A 2-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased white blood cell levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelmintics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The no observed adverse effect level was determined to be >5 but <25 mg/kg/d and the maximum tolerated dose 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d, resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after 7 days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma, or rat micronucleus assays nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Täubel, Jörg; Ferber, Georg; Fernandes, Sara; Lorch, Ulrike; Santamaría, Eva; Izquierdo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses. Methods In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP), reaction time (RT), spatial working memory (SWM) and visual analogue scales (VAS). Results Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10–40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs) or withdrawals due to treatment–emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests. Conclusions This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine. PMID:27632557

  18. Relationship of pharmacokinetics and drug distribution in tissue to increased safety of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, R M; Singer, A W; Wang, L H; Babbar, S; Guo, L S

    1992-01-01

    The safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution in tissue of an amphotericin B (AmB)-cholesteryl sulfate colloidal dispersion (ABCD) were compared with those of micellar amphotericin B-deoxycholate (m-AmB). Dogs received 14 daily injections of ABCD (0.6 to 10 mg/kg of body weight per day) or m-AmB (0.6 mg/kg/day). Safety was evaluated by monitoring body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and urinalysis during the study and by microscopic examination of tissues at the time of necropsy (day 16). AmB concentrations in plasma were measured in some groups on days 1, 7, and 14 and in necropsy tissue samples. ABCD produced a spectrum of toxic effects in the kidneys, gut, and liver similar to those of m-AmB, but ABCD was eightfold safer than m-AmB. The highest tolerated dose of ABCD (5.0 mg/kg/day) produced effects similar to those of m-AmB (0.6 mg/kg/day). ABCD produced lower concentrations in plasma than an equal dose of m-AmB did. Clearances on days 7 and 14 were higher for ABCD (304 and 295 ml/h.kg) than they were for m-AmB (67 and 53 ml/h.kg). Concentrations in plasma reached steady state after ABCD administration, but they increased after repeated dosing with m-AmB. Diurnal fluctuations in AmB concentrations in plasma were observed 4 to 8 h after the time of dosing. ABCD resulted in lower AmB concentrations in tissue than m-AmB did, except in the reticuloendothelial system. Up to 90% of AmB administered as ABCD was recovered from the liver and spleen on day 16. Reduced drug levels in the kidneys and gut correlated with reduced indications of toxicity in these organs after ABCD administration. Although ABCD increased concentrations of AmB in the reticuloendothelial system, increased toxicity was not observed in these organs. Images PMID:1605595

  19. Pharmacokinetics, thrombogenicity and safety of a double viral inactivated factor IX concentrate compared with a prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, A; Hong, A; Arguello, A; Echenagucia, M; Boadas, A; Fabbrizzi, F; Minichilli, F; Bosch, N B

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic options for developing countries have to assure an optimum safety and efficacy and low-cost antihaemophilic concentrates. A single blind randomized crossover study was carried out in 12 previously treated HB patients, comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK), thrombogenicity (TG) and safety of two plasma-derived double-inactivated (solvent/detergent heating at 100 degrees C, 30 min) factor IX (FIX) concentrates, UMAN COMPLEX DI (product A) [plasma-derived prothrombin concentrates (PCC)] and a high purity FIX concentrate AIMAFIX DI (product B, HPFIX). In a non-bleeding state, they received one single intravenous dose 50 IU FIX kg(-1) of PCC or HPFIX, and after a wash-out period of 14 days, the other product. We evaluated acute tolerance and determined PK parameters based on FIX levels measured over a 50 h postinfusion period. We studied fibrinogen, platelets, antithrombin, F1 + 2, TAT, D-dimer, over a 360 min postinfusion period. Ten cases remained in on-demand treatment for 6 months, five with PCC and five with HPFIX. PK and anti-FIX inhibitors were repeated at 3 and 6 months. No inhibitors were detected. PK values (PCC vs. HPFIX): clearence (CL; mL h(-1) kg(-1)) 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 1.4; the volume of distribution at steady state (mL kg(-1)) 154.9 +/- 54.9 vs. 197.5 +/- 72.5; mean residence time (h) 29.7 +/- 8.1 vs. 30.7 +/- 9.2; T(1/2) (h) 22.3 +/- 7 vs. 23.5 +/- 12.3; incremental recovery (IR; U dL(-1) U(-1) kg(-1)) 0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.13. HPFIX showed significant lower IR and higher CL. There were no differences in PK at 3 and 6 months. In TG, significant increments in TAT and F1 + 2 at 30 min and 6 h were found with PCC. Product B PK results agrees with reported results for other HPFIX preparations. Use of PCC product A has to consider its thrombogenic activity.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of S/GSK1349572, a next-generation HIV integrase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Fujiwara, Tamio; Piscitelli, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    S/GSK1349572 is a novel integrase inhibitor with potent in vitro anti-HIV activity, an in vitro resistance profile different from those of other integrase inhibitors, and favorable preclinical safety and pharmacokinetics (PK). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled single-dose and multiple-dose, dose escalation studies evaluated the PK, safety, and tolerability of S/GSK1349572 for healthy subjects. In the single-dose study, two cohorts of 10 subjects each (8 active, 2 receiving placebo) received suspension doses of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg in an alternating panel design. In the multiple-dose study, three cohorts of 10 subjects each (8 active, 2 receiving placebo) received suspension doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg once daily for 10 days. A cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substudy with midazolam was conducted with the 25-mg dose. Laboratory testing, vital signs, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and PK sampling were performed at regular intervals. S/GSK1349572 was well tolerated. Most adverse events (AEs) were mild, with a few moderate AEs reported. Headache was the most common AE. No clinically significant laboratory trends or ECG changes were noted. PK was linear over the dosage range studied. The steady-state geometric mean area under the concentration-time curve over a dosing interval (AUC(0-tau)) and maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (C(max)) ranged from 16.7 microg.h/ml (coefficient of variation [CV], 15%) and 1.5 microg/ml (CV, 24%) at a 10-mg dose to 76.8 microg.h/ml (CV, 19%) and 6.2 microg/ml (CV, 15%) at a 50-mg dose, respectively. The geometric mean steady-state concentration at the end of the dosing interval (C(tau)) with a 50-mg dose was 1.6 microg/ml, approximately 25-fold higher than the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration (0.064 microg/ml). The half-life was approximately 15 h. S/GSK1349572 had no impact on midazolam exposure, indicating that it does not modulate CYP3A activity. The PK profile suggests that once-daily, low milligram

  1. Dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: rationale, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Duvyanshu; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans P; Hemmer, Bernhard; Warnke, Clemens; Menge, Til; Miller-Little, William A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a fumaric acid ester, is a new orally available disease-modifying agent that was recently approved by the US FDA and the EMA for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fumaric acid has been used for the management of psoriasis, for more than 50 years. Because of the known anti-inflammatory properties of fumaric acid ester, DMF was brought into clinical development in MS. More recently, neuroprotective and myelin-protective mechanism actions have been proposed, making it a possible candidate for MS treatment. Two Phase III clinical trials (DEFINE, CONFIRM) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DMF in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Being an orally available agent with a favorable safety profile, it has become one of the most commonly prescribed disease-modifying agents in the USA and Europe. PMID:25800129

  2. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues.

  3. A Novel Method for Assessing Drug Degradation Product Safety Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models and Stochastic Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Stamatis, Stephen D; Kirsch, Lee E

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety risk due to toxic degradation products is a potentially critical quality issue for a small group of useful drug substances. Although the pharmacokinetics of toxic drug degradation products may impact product safety, these data are frequently unavailable. The objective of this study is to incorporate the prediction capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models into a rational drug degradation product risk assessment procedure using a series of model drug degradants (substituted anilines). The PBPK models were parameterized using a combination of experimental and literature data and computational methods. The impact of model parameter uncertainty was incorporated into stochastic risk assessment procedure for estimating human safe exposure levels based on the novel use of a statistical metric called "PROB" for comparing probability that a human toxicity-target tissue exposure exceeds the rat exposure level at a critical no-observed-adverse-effect level. When compared with traditional risk assessment calculations, this novel PBPK approach appeared to provide a rational basis for drug instability risk assessment by focusing on target tissue exposure and leveraging physiological, biochemical, biophysical knowledge of compounds and species. PMID:25900395

  4. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues. PMID:27506082

  5. Human plasma-derived FVIII/VWD concentrate (Biostate): a review of experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Paul; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Curtin, Julie; Barnes, Chris; Dunkley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex concentrates are used to control bleeding in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or haemophilia A (HA). The properties of these haemostatic factor concentrates vary widely, which can have significant clinical implications. This review provides an extensive overview of the molecular properties, in addition to pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data, and case studies of clinical experience of one such concentrate, Biostate. These data are discussed in the context of various therapeutic applications and compared with other factor concentrate products. Data are presented from data on file from the manufacturer; product information and published experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy study data; and example case studies of clinical experience. The data discussed herein demonstrate that Biostate has well-established efficacy profiles in the treatment of patients with VWD or HA, with the control of bleeding rated as ‘excellent’, ‘good’ or ‘moderate’ in >90% of patients. In an immune-tolerance induction setting, 73% of patients achieved a complete response following treatment with Biostate. Biostate was generally well tolerated in patients with HA or VWD, with infrequent minor adverse events reported and no reported cases of clinically relevant thrombosis. PMID:27114741

  6. A Novel Method for Assessing Drug Degradation Product Safety Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models and Stochastic Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Stamatis, Stephen D; Kirsch, Lee E

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety risk due to toxic degradation products is a potentially critical quality issue for a small group of useful drug substances. Although the pharmacokinetics of toxic drug degradation products may impact product safety, these data are frequently unavailable. The objective of this study is to incorporate the prediction capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models into a rational drug degradation product risk assessment procedure using a series of model drug degradants (substituted anilines). The PBPK models were parameterized using a combination of experimental and literature data and computational methods. The impact of model parameter uncertainty was incorporated into stochastic risk assessment procedure for estimating human safe exposure levels based on the novel use of a statistical metric called "PROB" for comparing probability that a human toxicity-target tissue exposure exceeds the rat exposure level at a critical no-observed-adverse-effect level. When compared with traditional risk assessment calculations, this novel PBPK approach appeared to provide a rational basis for drug instability risk assessment by focusing on target tissue exposure and leveraging physiological, biochemical, biophysical knowledge of compounds and species.

  7. Effectiveness, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Quetiapine in Aggressive Children with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Reed, Michael D.; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Demeter, Christine A.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; McNamara, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide an initial description of the effectiveness and pharmacokinetics (PK) of quetiapine in aggressive children with conduct disorder (CD). Method: This 8-week, open-label outpatient trial, enrolled patients ages 6 to 12 years with CD. Outcome measures included the Rating of Aggression Against People and/or Property Scale…

  8. Safety evaluation of dietary aluminum.

    PubMed

    Soni, M G; White, S M; Flamm, W G; Burdock, G A

    2001-02-01

    Aluminum is a nonessential metal to which humans are frequently exposed. Aluminum in the food supply comes from natural sources, water used in food preparation, food ingredients, and utensils used during food preparations. The amount of aluminum in the diet is small, compared with the amount of aluminum in antacids and some buffered analgesics. The healthy human body has effective barriers (skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract) to reduce the systemic absorption of aluminum ingested from water, foods, drugs, and air. The small amount of aluminum (<1%) that is systemically absorbed is excreted principally in the urine and, to a lesser extent, in the feces. No reports of dietary aluminum toxicity to healthy individuals exist in the literature. Aluminum can be neurotoxic, when injected directly into the brains of animals and when accidentally introduced into human brains (by dialysis or shrapnel). A study from Canada reports cognitive and other neurological deficits among groups of workers occupationally exposed to dust containing high levels of aluminum. While the precise pathogenic role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains to be defined, present data do not support a causative role for aluminum in AD. High intake of aluminum from antacid for gastrointestinal ailments has not been reported to cause any adverse effects and has not been correlated with neurotoxicity or AD. Foods and food ingredients are generally the major dietary sources of aluminum in the United States. Cooking in aluminum utensils often results in statistically significant, but relatively small, increases in aluminum content of food. Common aluminum-containing food ingredients are used mainly as preservatives, coloring agents, leavening agents, anticaking agents, etc. Safety evaluation and approval of these ingredients by the Food and Drug Administration indicate that these aluminum-containing compounds are safe for use in foods.

  9. A cell-based pharmacokinetics assay for evaluating tubulin-binding drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels.

  10. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Activity of Navitoclax, a Targeted High Affinity Inhibitor of BCL-2, in Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wyndham H.; O’Connor, Owen A.; Czuczman, Myron S.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Gerecitano, John F.; Leonard, John P.; Tulpule, Anil; Dunleavy, Kieron; Xiong, Hao; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Cui, Yue; Busman, Todd; Elmore, Steven W.; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Krivoshik, Andrew P.; Enschede, Sari H.; Humerickhouse, Rod A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Background BCL-2 family proteins play a central role in regulating clonal selection and survival of lymphocytes and are frequently over expressed in lymphomas. Navitoclax (ABT-263) is a targeted high-affinity small molecule that occupies the BH3 binding groove of BCL-2 and BCL-XL and inhibits their anti-apoptotic activity. Experimentally, navitoclax kills cells in a BAX/BAK-dependent manner and results in regression of lymphoid tumors in xenograft models. Methods This is a phase I dose-escalation study of navitoclax in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies. Study endpoints included safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetic profile and clinical activity. In addition, mechanism-based pharmacodynamic effects on platelets and lymphocytes were assessed. Navitoclax was orally administered and assessed on an intermittent schedule of once daily for 14 days followed by 7 days off (14/21 days) or on a continuous once daily schedule (21/21 days). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00406809. Findings Fifty-five patients were enrolled, (median age 59 years, IQR 51–67), of whom two did not complete the first cycle and were not evaluable for assessment of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Common toxicities included grade 1/2 diarrhea and fatigue in 31 and 21 patients, respectively. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia were the serious common toxicities with grade 3/4 observed in 29 and 17 patients, respectively. On the intermittent schedule (14/21), 5 DLT’s were observed; two due to hospitalizations for bronchitis and pleural effusion, and one each due to grade 3 transaminase elevation, grade 4 thrombocytopenia and grade 3 cardiac arrhythmia. Navitoclax caused a rapid and dose-dependent decline in peripheral platelets following initial drug exposure, followed by a rebound. To reduce the platelet nadir associated with intermittent dosing, a lead-in dose followed by continuous dosing (21/21 schedule) was examined. Three

  11. A randomized dose-escalation study to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ruxolitinib (INC424) in healthy Japanese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ogama, Yoichiro; Mineyama, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Asuka; Woo, Margaret; Shimada, Naomi; Amagasaki, Taro; Natsume, Kazuto

    2013-03-01

    Ruxolitinib (INC424), a potent and selective oral Janus kinase 1 and 2 inhibitor, was recently approved by the US food and drug administration for the treatment of intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of ruxolitinib have been extensively evaluated in healthy subjects and patients. The present study is the first to investigate the PK and tolerability of ruxolitinib in the Japanese population. Forty subjects were randomized to receive single (10-100 mg) and multiple (10 and 25 mg every 12 h) doses of ruxolitinib or placebo. Cohorts were sequentially enrolled based on the outcome of safety assessments. Ruxolitinib was rapidly absorbed, and its exposure increased dose proportionally up to 100 mg. The half-life of ruxolitinib was approximately 3 h, and drug accumulation was not observed after repeated dosing at a 12-h dosing interval. Decreasing absolute neutrophil counts were observed in five Japanese subjects treated once (100 mg, n = 1) or twice (10 mg, n = 3; 25 mg, n = 1) daily. These events were manageable and reversible upon drug discontinuation. Orally administered ruxolitinib was well tolerated in healthy Japanese volunteers. There were no apparent differences in the safety or PK of ruxolitinib between Japanese and non-Japanese subjects.

  12. Randomised clinical trial: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of repeated doses of TAK-438 (vonoprazan), a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, H; Sakurai, Y; Nishimura, A; Okamoto, H; Hibberd, M; Jenkins, R; Yoneyama, T; Ashida, K; Ogama, Y; Warrington, S

    2015-01-01

    Background TAK-438 (vonoprazan) is a potassium-competitive acid blocker that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Aim To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TAK-438 in healthy Japanese and non-Japanese men. Methods In two Phase I, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, healthy men (Japan N = 60; UK N = 48) received TAK-438 10–40 mg once daily at a fixed dose level for 7 consecutive days. Assessments included safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (intragastric pH). Results Plasma concentration–time profiles of TAK-438 at all dose levels showed rapid absorption (median Tmax ≤2 h). Mean elimination half-life was up to 9 h. Exposure was slightly greater than dose proportional, with no apparent time-dependent inhibition of metabolism. There was no important difference between the two studies in AUC0-tau on Day 7. TAK-438 caused dose-dependent acid suppression. On Day 7, mean 24-h intragastric pH>4 holding time ratio (HTR) with 40 mg TAK-438 was 100% (Japan) and 93.2% (UK), and mean night-time pH>4 HTR was 100% (Japan) and 90.4% (UK). TAK-438 was well tolerated. The frequency of adverse events was similar at all dose levels and there were no serious adverse events. There were no important increases in serum alanine transaminase activity. Serum gastrin and pepsinogen I and II concentrations increased with TAK-438 dose. Conclusions TAK-438 in multiple rising oral dose levels of 10–40 mg once daily for 7 days was safe and well tolerated in healthy men and caused rapid, profound and sustained suppression of gastric acid secretion throughout each 24-h dosing interval. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: NCT02123953 and NCT02141711. PMID:25707624

  13. EVALUATION OF MULTIPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING STRUCTURES FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of PBPK models were developed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate biological processes that may affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of TCE and its metabolites.

  14. A randomized safety and pharmacokinetic trial of daily tenofovir 1% gel in term and near-term pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Richard H; Noguchi, Lisa M; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Biggio, Joseph; Hendrix, Craig W; Marzinke, Mark A; Dai, James Y; Pan, Jason; Na Ayudhya, Ratiya Kunjara; Schwartz, Jill L; Isaacs, Karen; Piper, Jeanna M; Watts, D Heather

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel may reduce incident HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Pregnancy may increase risk of HIV acquisition, and incident HIV in pregnancy potentiates perinatal HIV transmission. Our objective was to investigate the safety and pharmacokinetics of seven days of TFV 1% vaginal gel in term and near-term pregnancy. Methods Ninety-eight healthy pregnant women, stratified to a term cohort followed by a near-term cohort, were enrolled into a 2:1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Women received TFV or placebo gel for seven consecutive days with pharmacokinetic sampling on days 0 and 6. Maternal and cord blood were collected at delivery. Primary end points included laboratory and genital adverse events, adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, and maternal TFV levels. Results Most adverse events were grade 1 and none of the grade 3 or 4 adverse events were related to study product. There was no significant difference in safety end points between the two pregnancy cohorts (p=0.18); therefore, their data were combined. Primary safety end point rates were similar for mothers randomized to the TFV gel vs placebo arm (72.7 and 68.8%, p=0.81). The same was true for newborns in the TFV gel vs placebo arms (4.5% vs 6.3%, p=0.66). All women randomized to TFV had quantifiable serum levels within eight hours of dosing, with low overall median (interquartile range) day 0 and day 6 peak values (3.8 (2.0 to 7.0) and 5.8 (2.6 to 9.4) ng/mL, respectively). Conclusions Daily TFV 1% vaginal gel use in term and near-term pregnancy appears to be safe and produces low serum drug levels. PMID:27658440

  15. Safety, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TV-1106, a long-acting GH treatment for GH deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Sakov, Anat; Rasamoelisolo, Michele; Bassan, Merav; Brown, Kurt; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Background TV-1106 (Teva Pharmaceuticals) is a genetically fused recombinant protein of human GH (hGH) and human serum albumin, in development for treatment of GH deficiency (GHD). TV-1106 is expected to have an extended duration of action compared to daily GH treatment and may enable a reduction in the frequency of injections and improve compliance and quality of life for adults and children requiring GHD therapy. Objective To assess the safety, local tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TV-1106 following single s.c. injections in healthy male volunteers. Methods Subjects (n=56) were assigned to one of seven ascending dose groups (3–100 mg) and received either a single dose of TV-1106 (n=6) or placebo (n=2) by s.c. injection. Results Eighteen subjects reported 43 adverse effects (AEs), which were mild to moderate; no serious AEs (SAEs) occurred. In 50, 70 and 100 mg groups there were mild to moderate increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure that significantly correlated with higher levels of IGF1. TV-1106 showed pharmacokinetic characteristics of a long-acting hGH as demonstrated by a terminal elimination half-life of 23–35 h, delayed time of peak concentration, and systemic levels seen up to 7 days after dosing. IGF1 levels increased in a dose-dependent manner, before reaching a plateau, with levels above baseline extending beyond 7 days post dose. Conclusion Single administration of TV-1106 up to 100 mg was safe in healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics support once-weekly administration in patients with GHD. PMID:26286586

  16. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    PubMed Central

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. Conclusion After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated

  17. EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

  18. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety profiles of etanercept monotherapy in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis: review of seven clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Shinichi; Yuasa, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Noriaki; Sugiyama, Noriko; Wagerle, Lorin Craig; Vlahos, Bonnie; Wajdula, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, including methotrexate, may not be tolerated by all patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and limited international data for etanercept (ETN) monotherapy are available. The aim of this review was to summarize the clinical program for ETN monotherapy in Japanese patients with RA, which has included a pharmacokinetic study, clinical trials for registration, long-term studies, and once-weekly dosing studies. Pharmacokinetic results showed that serum concentrations of ETN were linear with dose levels and were similar to other international studies. Across interventional studies, 652 Japanese patients with active RA were treated with ETN. In the registration studies, ETN treatment led to consistent improvement in American College of Rheumatology 20/50/70 scores, European League Against Rheumatism Good Response, Disease Activity Score 28 erythrocyte sedimentation rate remission, and Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index. In the long-term studies, efficacy was maintained for up to 180 weeks. Similar results were seen in the once-weekly studies. Across the studies, more than 870 patient-years of exposure to ETN were recorded. Discontinuations owing to lack of efficacy or adverse events were modest and no new safety signals were recorded. These studies demonstrated that ETN monotherapy is efficacious and well-tolerated in Japanese patients with RA. PMID:24842477

  19. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, p<0.001; 24 ms, versus alcohol, p<0.05) and had additive negative effects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant. PMID:26464455

  20. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, p<0.001; 24 ms, versus alcohol, p<0.05) and had additive negative effects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant.

  1. Comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of branded and generic formulations of meloxicam in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tacca, Mario Del; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Gori, Giovanni; Pepe, Pasquale; Di Paolo, Antonello; Lastella, Marianna; De Negri, Ferdinando; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between a generic formulation of meloxicam 15 mg tablets (Meloxicam Hexal) and its respective brand product (Mobic), in order to verify whether the generic product conforms to the regulatory standards of bioequivalence in the postmarketing setting. As a secondary exploratory aim, the pharmacodynamic effects of the two formulations were also evaluated by means of rating scales following hyperalgesia induced by cutaneous freeze injury. Subjects and methods A single 15 mg dose of generic or branded meloxicam tablets was administered to 24 healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. Plasma samples, collected for 24 hours after dosing, were assayed for meloxicam concentration by a validated highperformance liquid chromatography method. Results The analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two meloxicam formulations: the 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptance range of 80%–125% (0.84–1.16 for area under the curve [0–24], and 0.89–1.23 for peak concentration). No difference in the pharmacodynamic end point was observed between the two groups. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two meloxicam formulations confirm the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence; pharmacodynamic data indicate a similar antihyperalgesic effect. The two formulations can be used interchangeably in the clinical setting. PMID:23901278

  2. A Phase 1 Randomized, Open Label, Rectal Safety, Acceptability, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of Three Formulations of Tenofovir 1% Gel (the CHARM-01 Study)

    PubMed Central

    Mcgowan, Ian; Cranston, Ross D.; Duffill, Kathryn; Siegel, Aaron; Engstrom, Jarret C.; Nikiforov, Alexyi; Jacobson, Cindy; Rehman, Khaja K.; Elliott, Julie; Khanukhova, Elena; Abebe, Kaleab; Mauck, Christine; Spiegel, Hans M. L.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Rohan, Lisa C.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hiruy, Hiwot; Hendrix, Craig W.; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Anton, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The CHARM-01 study characterized the safety, acceptability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of three tenofovir (TFV) gels for rectal application. The vaginal formulation (VF) gel was previously used in the CAPRISA 004 and VOICE vaginal microbicide Phase 2B trials and the RMP-02/MTN-006 Phase 1 rectal safety study. The reduced glycerin VF (RGVF) gel was used in the MTN-007 Phase 1 rectal microbicide trial and is currently being evaluated in the MTN-017 Phase 2 rectal microbicide trial. A third rectal specific formulation (RF) gel was also evaluated in the CHARM-01 study. Methods Participants received 4 mL of the three TFV gels in a blinded, crossover design: seven daily doses of RGVF, seven daily doses of RF, and six daily doses of placebo followed by one dose of VF, in a randomized sequence. Safety, acceptability, compartmental PK, and explant PD were monitored throughout the trial. Results All three gels were found to be safe and acceptable. RF and RGVF PK were not significantly different. Median mucosal mononuclear cell (MMC) TFV-DP trended toward higher values for RF compared to RGVF (1136 and 320 fmol/106 cells respectively). Use of each gel in vivo was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo colorectal tissue HIV infection. There was also a significant negative correlation between the tissue levels of TFV, tissue TFV-DP, MMC TFV-DP, rectal fluid TFV, and explant HIV-1 infection. Conclusions All three formulations were found to be safe and acceptable. However, the safety profile of the VF gel was only based on exposure to one dose whereas participants received seven doses of the RGVF and RF gels. There was a trend towards higher tissue MMC levels of TFV-DP associated with use of the RF gel. Use of all gels was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo tissue HIV infection. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01575405 PMID:25942472

  3. Moxifloxacin Pharmacokinetic Profile and Efficacy Evaluation in Empiric Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Kragh Thomsen, Marianne; Petersen, Eskild; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    When antimicrobials are used empirically, pathogen MICs equal to clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values must be considered. This is to ensure that the most resistant pathogen subpopulation is appropriately targeted to prevent emergence of resistance. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0–24) values predicted for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0–24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0–24/MIC of >75 for H. influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0–24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature of this population pharmacokinetic model to predict therapeutic success. (Clinical Trials Registration no. NCT01983839.) PMID:25666151

  4. Preliminary efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life study of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yau, Thomas; Cheng, Paul N; Chan, Pierre; Chen, Li; Yuen, Jimmy; Pang, Roberta; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wheatley, Denys N; Poon, Ronnie T

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety profile, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 (Peg-rhAgr1) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients were given weekly doses of Peg-rhAgr1 (1600 U/kg). Tumour response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST 1.1 and modified RECIST criteria. A total of 20 patients were recruited, of whom 15 were deemed evaluable for treatment efficacy. Eighteen patients (90%) were hepatitis B carriers. Median age was 61.5 (range 30-75). Overall disease control rate was 13%, with 2 of the 15 patients achieving stable disease for >8 weeks. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.67-1.73) months, with median overall survival (OS) of all 20 enrolled patients being 5.2 (95% CI: 3.3-12.0) months. PFS was significantly prolonged in patients with adequate arginine depletion (ADD) >2 months versus those who had ≤2 months of ADD (6.4 versus 1.7 months; p = 0.01). The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 non-hematological toxicities. Transient liver dysfunctions (25%) were the most commonly reported serious AEs and likely due to disease progression. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data showed that Peg-rhAgr1 induced rapid and sustained arginine depletion. The overall quality of life of the enrolled patients was well preserved. Peg-rhAgr1 is well tolerated with a good toxicity profile in patients with advanced HCC. A weekly dose of 1600 U/kg is sufficient to induce ADD. Significantly longer PFS times were recorded for patients who had ADD for >2 months.

  5. Safety and Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Neonates, Infants, Children, and Adolescents With Pain or Fever

    PubMed Central

    Zuppa, Athena F.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kenney, Brian F.; Kassir, Nastya; Mouksassi, Samer; Royal, Mike A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The administration of acetaminophen via the oral and rectal routes may be contraindicated in specific clinical settings. Intravenous administration provides an alternative route for fever reduction and analgesia. This phase 1 study of intravenous acetaminophen (Ofirmev, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA) in inpatient pediatric patients with pain or fever requiring intravenous therapy was designed to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of repeated doses over 48 hours. METHODS Neonates (full-term to 28 days) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 6 hours or 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Infants (29 days to <2 years), children (2 to <12 years) and adolescents (≥12 years) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 4 hours or 15 mg/kg every 6 hours. Both noncompartmental and population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approaches were used. Urinary metabolite data were analyzed, and safety and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS Pharmacokinetic parameters of acetaminophen were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with weight allometrically expressed on clearances and central and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vds). Postnatal age, with a maturation function, was a significant covariate on clearance. Total systemic normalized clearance was 18.4 L/hr per 70 kg, with a plateau reached at approximately 2 years. Total central and peripheral Vds of acetaminophen were 16 and 59.5 L/70 kg, respectively. The drug was well tolerated based on the incidence of adverse events. The primary and minor pathways of elimination were acetaminophen glucuronidation, sulfation, and glutathione conjugate metabolites across all age groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen in infants, children, and adolescents was well tolerated and achieved plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with labeled 15 mg/kg body weight doses by oral or rectal administration. PMID:22768009

  6. Pharmacokinetics and safety of recombinant anti-RhD in healthy RhD-negative male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bichler, J; Spycher, M O; Amstutz, H-P; Andresen, I; Gaede, K; Miescher, S

    2004-04-01

    In this first-in-man study, we assessed the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of MonoRho, a human recombinant monoclonal anti-RhD immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody. Eighteen RhD-negative healthy male volunteers were randomized in two groups to receive a single administration of 300 micro g of MonoRho either intravenously or intramuscularly. There were no symptoms of allergic or anaphylactic type reaction in any subject, and there was no evidence of any MonoRho-related changes in laboratory safety parameters. None of the subjects mounted a detectable immune response to MonoRho. Serum samples were obtained up to 91 days after injection to measure anti-D IgG concentrations by flow cytometry. After intramuscular administration of MonoRho, anti-D IgG concentrations gradually increased reaching peak levels after a mean of 3.4 days. After 3 weeks, the mean anti-D IgG concentrations after intravenous and intramuscular administration became virtually equal to each other and remained so thereafter. In both the treatment groups, the mean elimination half-life was about 18 days and thus similar to that described for plasma-derived anti-D IgG. The bioavailability of MonoRho after intramuscular administration was estimated as 46%. The excellent tolerability and safety of MonoRho as well as its expected elimination half-life supports the continued clinical development of this compound.

  7. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry.

  8. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry. PMID:25746166

  9. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  10. A pharmacokinetic and safety study of a fixed oral dose of enzastaurin HCl in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Zhang, Weijing; Yang, Nong; Cui, Yimin; Huang, He; Cai, Ruiqing; Lin, Xiaoting; Fu, Xiaohong; Hong, Huangming; Lin, Tongyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of enzastaurin in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma. Methods Eligible patients received 500 mg of enzastaurin orally once daily. The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin and its metabolites were assessed on days 14 to 18. Patients were allowed to continue receiving the agent in a safety extension phase until disease progression or presentation with unacceptable toxicity. Results Twenty-five patients received at least 1 dose of enzastaurin, and twenty-one patients completed the pharmacokinetic phase. Fifteen patients entered the safety extension phase. Except for transient, asymptomatic grade 3 QT interval prolongation in one patient who had baseline grade 2 QT prolongation, other adverse events were of grade 1 to 2. The t1/2, Cav, ss, and AUCτ, ss for enzastaurin and its primary active metabolite LSN326020 were 14 and 42 h, 1,210 and 907 nmol/L, and 29,100 and 21,800 nmol•h/L, respectively. One patient with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma achieved a partial response that lasted for 8.1 months. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin in Chinese cancer patients were consistent with those observed in previous studies abroad. Enzastaurin 500 mg daily was well tolerated by Chinese patients. We recommend 500 mg daily as the phase II dose in this population. Its efficacy in lymphoma deserves further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01432951 PMID:26942463

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious disease settings and evaluation of dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Hamada, Yukihiro; Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Yamagishi, Yuka; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of arbekacin in patients with MRSA infections is influenced by the peak concentration (Cpeak)/MIC ratio (≧8). A daily arbekacin dose of 4-6 mg/kg is primarily used for the treatment of MRSA infection. However, clinical pharmacokinetic studies of arbekacin that evaluate changes in patients with different infectious diseases have been limited. This study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious diseases and to evaluate its dosing regimens. This work describes a single-centre, retrospective study. The pharmacokinetic parameters of arbekacin were calculated from individual serum-concentration data using WinNonlin ver. 6.3. A total of 331 serum samples were obtained from 170 patients. Our drug concentration-time data were well described by a two-compartment open model. The final model showed that drug clearance was related to creatinine clearance and that the total distribution volume (Vd) was related to actual body weight and the presence of bacteremia. The individual Vd in bacteremia patients was significantly higher than those of other patients (bacteremia: 29.7 ± 0.5 L, pneumonia: 20.8 ± 0.4 L, other infections: 21.4 ± 0.4 L; p < 0.05). Additionally, Monte Carlo simulation showed that target (Cpeak/MIC ≧ 8) attainment was only 10.1%, even at a dose of 6 mg/kg, especially for MRSA bacteremia patients with an arbekacin MIC = 2 μg/mL. In conclusion, our study revealed that the Vd may be higher in bacteremia patients than in patients with other infectious diseases. Therefore, an increase in the daily dose of arbekacin should be considered for bacteremia patients. PMID:27260679

  12. Recombinant human pentraxin-2 therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: safety, pharmacokinetics and exploratory efficacy.

    PubMed

    van den Blink, Bernt; Dillingh, Marlous R; Ginns, Leo C; Morrison, Lake D; Moerland, Matthijs; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Trehu, Elizabeth G; Bartholmai, Brian J; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal fibrogenic repair response upon alveolar injury is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). PRM-151 (recombinant human pentraxin-2, also known as serum amyloid P), has been shown to reduce fibrosis in preclinical lung fibrosis models, and was well tolerated with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in an earlier single-dose phase I study.A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple ascending dose trial was performed to assess the tolerability and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of multiple doses of PRM-151 in IPF patients. Subjects in three successive cohorts (1, 5, or 10 mg·kg(-1) versus placebo) received intravenous study drug on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 15, and were followed-up to day 57.PRM-151 was well tolerated at all dose levels, with no serious adverse reactions. Administration of PRM-151 resulted in two- to eight-fold dose-dependent increases in circulating pentraxin-2 levels. Forced vital capacity and 6-min walk test showed trends towards improvement in the combined PRM-151 dose groups. On high-resolution computed tomography scans, stable or improved lung volume unoccupied by interstitial lung abnormality was noted in some PRM-151 subjects compared to placebo subjects on day 57.The efficacy of PRM-151 in IPF remains to be investigated in dedicated future trials.

  13. Intranasal Abuse Potential, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety of Once-Daily, Single-Entity, Extended-Release Hydrocodone (HYD) in Recreational Opioid Users

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Alessandra; Colucci, Salvatore V.; Kapil, Ram P.; Geoffroy, Pierre; Hopyan, Talar; Levy-Cooperman, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. A once-daily, extended-release hydrocodone bitartrate tablet with abuse-deterrent properties (Hysingla ER® [HYD]) is available for the treatment of chronic pain in appropriate patients. This study evaluated the intranasal abuse potential and pharmacokinetics of HYD coarse and fine particles vs hydrocodone powder or placebo. Design. Single-center, double-blind, positive- and placebo-controlled, randomized, four-treatment crossover study. Subjects. Healthy adult, nondependent, recreational opioid users with a history of intranasal abuse. Methods. During four treatment periods, subjects (N = 31) received hydrocodone powder 60 mg, HYD coarse particles 60 mg, HYD fine particles 60 mg, or placebo, with five-to-seven-day washouts between treatments. Measures over 36 hours postdose included drug-liking and willingness to take drug again, assessed using visual analog scales (VASs), pupillometry, intranasal irritation, and pharmacokinetics. Results. Insufflation of both HYD coarse and fine particles led to lower “At this Moment” Drug Liking VAS peak values compared with hydrocodone powder, but higher values compared with placebo (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Similar results were observed for Overall Drug Liking VAS, Take Drug Again VAS, and Subjective Drug Value. Compared with hydrocodone, insufflation of HYD particles led to reduced miosis and increased nasal irritation. Mean hydrocodone Cmax following insufflation of HYD coarse particles, HYD fine particles, and hydrocodone powder was 27.5, 36.5, and 105.8 ng/mL, respectively; median Tmax was ≥2-fold longer with either HYD particle size than hydrocodone powder; and (Cmax/Tmax) was 9.5, 13.4, and 82.0 ng/mL/h, respectively. Safety was consistent with that of opioid agonists. Conclusions. HYD demonstrated reduced intranasal abuse potential compared with hydrocodone powder. PMID:26814240

  14. Concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl in healthy volunteers: assessment of pharmacokinetic changes and safety following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Christa F; Kumar, Dinesh; Perdomo, Carlos A; Wason, Suman; Cullen, Edward I; Pratt, Raymond D

    2004-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl when administered separately and in combination. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study. In consecutive dosing periods separated by washout periods of ≥3 weeks, healthy volunteers received either oral donepezil HCI 5 mg once daily for 15 days, oral sertraline HCl 50 mg once daily for 5 days followed by 10 days of once-daily sertraline HCl 100 mg, or the simultaneous administration of oral donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl. Plasma donepezil and sertraline concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Safety was evaluated by physical and laboratory evaluations and the monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 19 volunteers (16 male and three female) were enrolled. Three male subjects withdrew from the study prematurely due to AEs (one case of nausea/stomach cramps and one case of eosinophilia during combination treatment, and one upper respiratory tract infection during treatment with sertraline HCl alone). In subjects who completed all three treatment periods (n = 16), the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl did not alter the steady-state (day 15) PK parameters of donepezil HCl. A small (<12%) but statistically significant (P = 0.02) increase in donepezil Cmax was seen after single doses of sertraline HCl and donepezil HCl on day 1 but this was not thought to be clinically meaningful. No significant differences in the tmax or AUC0–24 h of donepezil were observed between the donepezil HCl only or donepezil HCl plus sertraline HCl groups on day 1. No significant changes in sertraline PK parameters were observed either on day 1 (single dose) or on day 15 (steady state) when sertraline HCl was co-administered with donepezil HCl. Generally, the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl was well tolerated, with no serious AEs reported

  15. Safety Pharmacology Evaluation of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Engwall, Michael J; Vargas, Hugo M

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals or biopharmaceuticals (BPs) are molecules such as monoclonal antibodies, soluble/decoy receptors, hormones, enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors that are produced in various biological expression systems and are used to diagnose, treat, or prevent various diseases. Safety pharmacology (SP) assessment of BPs has evolved since the approval of the first BP (recombinant human insulin) in 1982. This evolution is ongoing and is informed by various international harmonization guidelines. Based on these guidelines, the potential undesirable effect of every drug candidate (small molecule or BP) on the cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems, referred to as the "core battery," should be assessed prior to first-in-human administration. However, SP assessment of BPs poses unique challenges such as choice of test species and integration of SP parameters into repeat-dose toxicity studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of SP assessment of BPs using the approval packages of marketed BPs and discusses the past, current, and new and upcoming approach and methods that can be used to generate high-quality data for the assessment of SP of BPs.

  16. Evaluation and optimisation of propofol pharmacokinetic parameters in cats for target-controlled infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattai, A; Pilla, T; Cagnardi, P; Zonca, A; Franci, P

    2016-05-14

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a pharmacokinetic model-driven infusion of propofol in premedicated cats. In a first step, propofol (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously over 60 seconds to induce anaesthesia for the elective neutering of seven healthy cats, premedicated intramuscularly with 0.3 mg/kg methadone, 0.01 mg/kg medetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine. Venous blood samples were collected over 240 minutes, and propofol concentrations were measured via a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters, determined by a three-compartment open linear model, were entered into a computer-controlled infusion pump (target-controlled infusion-1 (TCI-1)). In a second step, TCI-1 was used to induce and maintain general anaesthesia in nine cats undergoing neutering. Predicted and measured plasma concentrations of propofol were compared at specific time points. In a third step, the pharmacokinetic parameters were modified according to the results from the use of TCI-1 and were evaluated again in six cats. For this TCI-2 group, the median values of median performance error and median absolute performance error were -1.85 per cent and 29.67 per cent, respectively, indicating that it performed adequately. Neither hypotension nor respiratory depression was observed during TCI-1 and TCI-2. Mean anaesthesia time and time to extubation in the TCI-2 group were 73.90 (±20.29) and 8.04 (±5.46) minutes, respectively. PMID:27044652

  17. Odanacatib, a selective cathepsin K inhibitor to treat osteoporosis: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics – results from single oral dose studies in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Stoch, S Aubrey; Zajic, Stefan; Stone, Julie A; Miller, Deborah L; Bortel, Lucas; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Pramanik, Barnali; Cilissen, Caroline; Liu, Qi; Liu, Lida; Scott, Boyd B; Panebianco, Deborah; Ding, Yu; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wagner, John A

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of odanacatib (ODN), a cathepsin K inhibitor, in humans. Methods Two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single oral dose studies were performed with ODN (2–600 mg) in 44 healthy volunteers (36 men and eight postmenopausal women). Results Adverse experiences (AEs) with single doses of ODN were transient and mild to moderate, with the exception of one severe AE of gastroenteritis. Headache was the most frequent AE. After absorption of ODN (initial peak concentrations 4–6 h postdose), plasma concentrations exhibited a monophasic decline, with an apparent terminal half-life of ∼40–80 h. The area under the curve0-24 hours (AUC0–24 h), concentration at 24 hours (C24 h) and maximum concentration (Cmax,overal) increased in a less than dose-proportional manner from 2 to 600 mg. Administration of ODN with a high-fat meal led to ∼100% increases in AUC0–24 h, Cmax,day1, Cmax,overall and C24 h relative to the fasted state, while administration with a low-fat meal led to a ∼30% increase in those parameters. Reduction of biomarkers of bone resorption, the C- and N-telopeptides of cross-links of type I collagen, (CTx and NTx, respectively), was noted at 24 h for doses ≥5 mg and at 168 h postdose for ≥10 mg. In postmenopausal women administered 50 mg ODN, reductions in serum CTx of −66% and urine NTx/creatinine (uNTx/Cr) of −51% relative to placebo were observed at 24 h. At 168 h, reductions in serum CTx (−70%) and uNTx/Cr (−78%) were observed relative to baseline. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling characterized the ODN concentration/uNTx/Cr relation, with a modeled EC50 value of 43.8 nM and ∼80% maximal reduction. Conclusions Odanacatib was well tolerated and has a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile suitable for once weekly dosing. PMID:23013236

  18. Improved Safety, Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine through Lactoferrin Nanoparticles during Oral Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    C., Bhaskar; Golla, Kishore; Kondapi, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most referred antiretroviral drug. In spite of its higher bioavailability (50–75%) the most important reason of its cessation are bone marrow suppression, anemia, neutropenia and various organs related toxicities. This study aims at the improvement of oral delivery of AZT through its encapsulation in lactoferrin nanoparticles (AZT-lactonano). The nanoparticles (NPs) are of 50–60 nm in size and exhibit 67% encapsulation of the AZT. They are stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Anti-HIV-1 activity of AZT remains unaltered in nanoformulation in acute infection. The bioavailability and tissue distribution of AZT is higher in blood followed by liver and kidney. AZT-lactonano causes the improvement of pharmacokinetic profile as compared to soluble AZT; a more than 4 fold increase in AUC and AUMC in male and female rats. The serum Cmax for AZT-lactonano was increased by 30%. Similarly there was nearly 2-fold increase in Tmax and t1/2. Our in vitro study confirms that, the endosomal pH is ideal for drug release from NPs and shows constant release from up to 96h. Bone marrow micronucleus assay show that nanoformulation exhibits approximately 2fold lower toxicity than soluble form. Histopathological and biochemical analysis further confirms that less or no significant organ toxicities when nanoparticles were used. AZT-lactonano has shown its higher efficacy, low organs related toxicities, improved pharmacokinetics parameter while keeping the antiviral activity intact. Thus, the nanoformulation are safe for the target specific drug delivery. PMID:26461917

  19. A randomised study in healthy volunteers to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of idarucizumab, a specific antidote to dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Glund, Stephan; Moschetti, Viktoria; Norris, Stephen; Stangier, Joachim; Schmohl, Michael; van Ryn, Joanne; Lang, Benjamin; Ramael, Steven; Reilly, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran with high affinity, is in development as a specific antidote for dabigatran. In this first-in-human, single-rising-dose study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of idarucizumab. Healthy male volunteers aged 18-45 years received between 20 mg and 8 g idarucizumab as a 1-hour intravenous infusion in 10 sequential dose groups, or 1, 2 or 4 g idarucizumab as a 5-minute infusion. Subjects within each dose group were randomised 3:1 to idarucizumab or placebo. A total of 110 randomised subjects received study drug (27 placebo, 83 idarucizumab). Peak and total exposure to idarucizumab increased proportionally with dose. Maximum plasma concentrations were achieved near the end of infusion, followed by a rapid decline, with an initial idarucizumab half-life of ~45 minutes. For the 5-minute infusions, this resulted in a reduction of plasma concentrations to less than 5 % of peak within 4 hours. Idarucizumab (in the absence of dabigatran) had no effect on coagulation parameters or endogenous thrombin potential. Overall adverse event (AE) frequency was similar for idarucizumab and placebo, and no relationship with idarucizumab dose was observed. Drug-related AEs (primary endpoint) were rare (occurring in 2 placebo and 3 idarucizumab subjects) and were mostly of mild intensity; none of them resulted in study discontinuation. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetic profile of idarucizumab meets the requirement for rapid peak exposure and rapid elimination, with no effect on pharmacodynamic parameters. Idarucizumab was safe and well tolerated in healthy males.

  20. Pharmacokinetics in Drug Discovery: An Exposure-Centred Approach to Optimising and Predicting Drug Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Andreas; Lienau, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetics (PK) in drug discovery is to support the optimisation of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of lead compounds with the ultimate goal to attain a clinical candidate which achieves a concentration-time profile in the body that is adequate for the desired efficacy and safety profile. A thorough characterisation of the lead compounds aiming at the identification of the inherent PK liabilities also includes an early generation of PK/PD relationships linking in vitro potency and target exposure/engagement with expression of pharmacological activity (mode-of-action) and efficacy in animal studies. The chapter describes an exposure-centred approach to lead generation, lead optimisation and candidate selection and profiling that focuses on a stepwise generation of an understanding between PK/exposure and PD/efficacy relationships by capturing target exposure or surrogates thereof and cellular mode-of-action readouts in vivo. Once robust PK/PD relationship in animal PD models has been constructed, it is translated to anticipate the pharmacologically active plasma concentrations in patients and the human therapeutic dose and dosing schedule which is also based on the prediction of the PK behaviour in human as described herein. The chapter outlines how the level of confidence in the predictions increases with the level of understanding of both the PK and the PK/PD of the new chemical entities (NCE) in relation to the disease hypothesis and the ability to propose safe and efficacious doses and dosing schedules in responsive patient populations. A sound identification of potential drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK)-related development risks allows proposing of an effective de-risking strategy for the progression of the project that is able to reduce uncertainties and to increase the probability of success during preclinical and clinical development. PMID:26330260

  1. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of GSK2190915, a novel oral anti‐inflammatory 5‐lipoxygenase‐activating protein inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gretchen; King, Christopher D.; Schaab, Kevin; Rewolinski, Melissa; Norris, Virginia; Ambery, Claire; Bentley, Jane; Yamada, Masanori; Santini, Angelina M.; van de Wetering de Rooij, Jeroen; Stock, Nicholas; Zunic, Jasmine; Hutchinson, John H.; Evans, Jilly F.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of the 5‐lipoxygenase‐activating protein inhibitor, GSK2190915, after oral dosing in two independent phase I studies, one in Western European and one in Japanese subjects, utilizing different formulations. Method Western European subjects received single (50–1000 mg) or multiple (10–450 mg) oral doses of GSK2190915 or placebo in a dose‐escalating manner. Japanese subjects received three of four GSK2190915 doses (10–200 mg) plus placebo once in a four period crossover design. Blood samples were collected for GSK2190915 concentrations and blood and urine were collected to measure leukotriene B4 and leukotriene E4, respectively, as pharmacodynamic markers of drug activity. Results There was no clear difference in adverse events between placebo and active drug‐treated subjects in either study. Maximum plasma concentrations of GSK2190915 and area under the curve increased in a dose‐related manner and mean half‐life values ranged from 16–34 h. Dose‐dependent inhibition of blood leukotriene B4 production was observed and near complete inhibition of urinary leukotriene E4 excretion was shown at all doses except the lowest dose. The EC50 values for inhibition of LTB4 were 85 nm and 89 nm in the Western European and Japanese studies, respectively. Conclusion GSK2190915 is well‐tolerated with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in Western European and Japanese subjects that support once daily dosing for 24 h inhibition of leukotrienes. Doses of ≥50 mg show near complete inhibition of urinary leukotriene E4 at 24 h post‐dose, whereas doses of ≥150 mg are required for 24 h inhibition of blood LTB4. PMID:22803688

  2. Pharmacokinetics in Drug Discovery: An Exposure-Centred Approach to Optimising and Predicting Drug Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Andreas; Lienau, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetics (PK) in drug discovery is to support the optimisation of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of lead compounds with the ultimate goal to attain a clinical candidate which achieves a concentration-time profile in the body that is adequate for the desired efficacy and safety profile. A thorough characterisation of the lead compounds aiming at the identification of the inherent PK liabilities also includes an early generation of PK/PD relationships linking in vitro potency and target exposure/engagement with expression of pharmacological activity (mode-of-action) and efficacy in animal studies. The chapter describes an exposure-centred approach to lead generation, lead optimisation and candidate selection and profiling that focuses on a stepwise generation of an understanding between PK/exposure and PD/efficacy relationships by capturing target exposure or surrogates thereof and cellular mode-of-action readouts in vivo. Once robust PK/PD relationship in animal PD models has been constructed, it is translated to anticipate the pharmacologically active plasma concentrations in patients and the human therapeutic dose and dosing schedule which is also based on the prediction of the PK behaviour in human as described herein. The chapter outlines how the level of confidence in the predictions increases with the level of understanding of both the PK and the PK/PD of the new chemical entities (NCE) in relation to the disease hypothesis and the ability to propose safe and efficacious doses and dosing schedules in responsive patient populations. A sound identification of potential drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK)-related development risks allows proposing of an effective de-risking strategy for the progression of the project that is able to reduce uncertainties and to increase the probability of success during preclinical and clinical development.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Clinical Activity of Multiple Doses of RCT-18 in Chinese Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Xia; Hou, Yong; Jiang, Ji; Zhong, Wen; Yao, Xuejing; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Lin; Fang, Jianmin; Zhang, Fengchun; Hu, Pei

    2016-08-01

    RCT-18 is a novel recombinant fusion protein that blocks the activity of a B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand. This was a randomized, single-blind, and placebo-controlled phase 1 study in 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Eligible patients were randomized 3:1 to receive multiple subcutaneous doses of RCT-18 for 4 weeks (180 mg, once weekly) or placebo and monitored over an 84-day observation period for pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, safety, and clinical activity. After multiple-dose RCT-18, the maximal serum concentration (Cmax ) of total and free RCT-18 was reached within 1 to 2 days. Mean elimination half-life for total RCT-18 and free RCT-18 was 11.4 to 26.4 days and 2.4 to 26.5 days, respectively. Slight accumulation was found after multiple subcutaneous administrations. The average accumulation ratios of AUC and Cmax after the fourth administration of RCT-18 were 2.0 and 1.7 for total RCT-18, and 1.8 and 1.6 for free RCT-18. The formation and elimination of BLyS-RCT-18 complex were much slower, with a time to Cmax of 14 to 46 days. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of RCT-18 in SLE patients were similar to those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No positive reaction was detected in the immunogenicity assessments. RCT-18 was biologically active, according to serum immunoglobulin and B-cell levels. Treatment-related IgM and IgA reduction was found during this study. CD19(+) , IgD(+) , and CD27(+) B-cell counts were increased after administration and decreased subsequently. SLE patients treated with RCT-18 were more prone to infections, including moderate and severe infections. Lower dosages of RCT-18 should be considered in further clinical development.

  4. The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's Galileo safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.C.; Gray, L.B.; Huff, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The safety evaluation report (SER) for Galileo was prepared by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) coordinators in accordance with Presidential directive/National Security Council memorandum 25. The INSRP consists of three coordinators appointed by their respective agencies, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). These individuals are independent of the program being evaluated and depend on independent experts drawn from the national technical community to serve on the five INSRP subpanels. The Galileo SER is based on input provided by the NASA Galileo Program Office, review and assessment of the final safety analysis report prepared by the Office of Special Applications of the DOE under a memorandum of understanding between NASA and the DOE, as well as other related data and analyses. The SER was prepared for use by the agencies and the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the Present for use in their launch decision-making process. Although more than 20 nuclear-powered space missions have been previously reviewed via the INSRP process, the Galileo review constituted the first review of a nuclear power source associated with launch aboard the Space Transportation System.

  5. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time. PMID:27595040

  6. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time.

  7. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Puttegowda, Venkatesh Dinnekere; Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Jha, Sajal Kumar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time. PMID:27595040

  8. Exploring flubendazole formulations for use in sheep. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a cyclodextrin-based solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Flubendazole (FLBZ) is a poor water solubility broad-spectrum BZD methylcarbamate anthelmintic compound. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are usually used to increase aqueous solubility of poor hydrosoluble compounds. The comparative in vitro aqueous solubility of FLBZ and other BZD anthelmintics in the presence of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was evaluated in the current work. Additionally, the comparative pharmacokinetic behaviour of FLBZ (and its metabolites) administered by the intraruminal (i.r.) or intraabomasal (i.a.) routes to sheep as either an aqueous CDs-based solution or a conventional carboximethylcellulose (CMC) suspension was assessed. Drug solubility studies involving albendazole, mebendazole, oxfendazole and FLBZ were performed in an aqueous solution (pH 1.2 or 7.4) with or without HPβCD (10%, w/v). The pharmacokinetic study involved two experiments. Experiment 1: In a crossover study, sheep received either a FLBZ-CDs solution (n = 3) or a FLBZ-CMC suspension (n = 3) by the i.r. route (3.8 mg/kg). The treatment Groups were reversed after a 21-days washout period. Experiment 2: sheep (n = 4) were treated by the i.a. route with the FLBZ-CDs solution (3.8 mg/kg). Plasma and abomasal fluid samples were collected between 0 and 72 h post-treatment. Samples were analysed by HPLC. Results Improvement of FLBZ aqueous solubility due to CDs resulted markedly higher than that observed for mebendazole and albendazole. However, oppositely to what was expected, the absorption-related pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any marked formulation-dependant effect. After the i.a. administration of FLBZ, the AUC and the Tmax of the parent compound were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, which is consistent with ruminal bypass. Conclusion The administration of FLBZ as a CDs-based solution, does not seem to achieve great practical relevance for parasite control in sheep. PMID:22640491

  9. Skin safety evaluation of laundry detergent products.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok; Holland, Daniela; Kern, Petra

    2009-01-01

    The conduct of a scientifically sound safety assessment of new ingredients and finished products is essential prior to their introduction into the marketplace. Such assessments are based on a risk assessment paradigm established by the National Academy of Science (NAS, 1983) that consists of a four-step process: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. This risk assessment paradigm has been (1) used as a framework for estimating an adverse health risk posed by environmental chemicals, and (2) applied to systemic toxicological endpoints. The general principles of risk assessment may be applied to skin safety evaluation of consumer products, considering that dermal toxicity is also a threshold phenomenon. This study describes a risk assessment-based approach for skin safety evaluation of laundry detergent products.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and safety of recently approved drugs used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in infants, children, and adults

    PubMed Central

    Gostelow, Martyn; Gonzalez, Daniel; Smith, P. Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a significant cause of morbidity in hospitalized infants. Over the past 15 years, several drugs have been approved for the treatment of S. aureus infections in adults (linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, telavancin, tigecycline, and ceftaroline). The use of there majority of these drugs has extended into the treatment of MRSA infections in infants, frequently with minimal safety or dosing information. Only linezolid is approved for use in infants, and pharmacokinetic data in infants are limited to linezolid and daptomycin. Pediatric trials are underway for ceftaroline, telavancin, and daptomycin; however, none of these studies includes infants. Here, we review current pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy data of these drugs with a specific focus in infants. PMID:24716805

  11. A novel electronic skin patch for delivery and pharmacokinetic evaluation of donepezil following transdermal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonal; Kasha, Purna C; Paturi, Jyotsna; Anderson, Carter; Morris, Russell; Banga, Ajay K

    2013-09-10

    The nature of Alzheimer's disease limits the effectiveness of available oral treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of transdermal iontophoretic delivery of donepezil in a hairless rat model as a potential treatment modality in Alzheimer's and to evaluate the effect of current densities on its pharmacokinetics. Donepezil loaded integrated Wearable Electronic Drug Delivery (WEDD(®)) patches supplied current levels of 0, 0.13, 0.26 and 0.39 mA. Plasma extracted donepezil was analyzed by HPLC. Noncompartmental analysis was used to characterize disposition of the drug. The amount delivered across hairless rat skin and areas under the curve (AUC) were found to rise in proportion to the current levels. Peak plasma levels of 0.094, 0.237 and 0.336 μg/ml were achieved at 0.13, 0.26 and 0.39 mA respectively. Time to peak plasma concentrations was after termination of current and same for all current levels. Transdermal elimination half-life was significantly increased from the true value of 3.2h due to depot formation, prolonging complete absorption of the drug. Donepezil was successfully delivered iontophoretically at levels sufficient to produce pharmacodymanic effect. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated linear kinetics at the current levels used and flip flop kinetics following iontophoretic administration.

  12. Oral pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen to evaluate gastric emptying profiles of Shiba goats.

    PubMed

    Elbadawy, Mohamed; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Aboubakr, Mohamed; Khalil, Waleed Fathy; Shimoda, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen was investigated following oral dosing to Shiba goats in order to evaluate the properties of gastric emptying. Acetaminophen was intravenously and orally administered at 30 mg/kg body weight to goats using a crossover design with a 3-week washout period. The stability of acetaminophen in rumen juice was also assessed. Acetaminophen concentrations were measured by HPLC. Since acetaminophen was stable in rumen juice for 24 hr, the extremely low bioavailability (16%) was attributed to its hepatic extensive first-pass effect. The mean absorption time and absorption half-life were unexpectedly short (4.93 and 3.35 hr, respectively), indicating its marked absorption from the forestomach, which may have been due to its smaller molecular weight. Therefore, acetaminophen was considered to be unsuitable for evaluating gastric emptying in Shiba goats.

  13. Safety and Upper Respiratory Pharmacokinetics of the Hemagglutinin Stalk-Binding Antibody VIS410 Support Treatment and Prophylaxis Based on Population Modeling of Seasonal Influenza A Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Wollacott, Andrew M.; Boni, Maciej F.; Szretter, Kristy J.; Sloan, Susan E.; Yousofshahi, Mona; Viswanathan, Karthik; Bedard, Sylvain; Hay, Catherine A.; Smith, Patrick F.; Shriver, Zachary; Trevejo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza is a major public health concern in vulnerable populations. Here we investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (VIS410) against Influenza A in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Based on these results and preclinical data, we implemented a mathematical modeling approach to investigate whether VIS410 could be used prophylactically to lessen the burden of a seasonal influenza epidemic and to protect at-risk groups from associated complications. Methods Using a single-ascending dose study (n = 41) at dose levels from 2 mg/kg–50 mg/kg we evaluated the safety as well as the serum and upper respiratory pharmacokinetics of a broadly-neutralizing antibody (VIS410) against influenza A (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02045472). Our primary endpoints were safety and tolerability of VIS410 compared to placebo. We developed an epidemic microsimulation model testing the ability of VIS410 to mitigate attack rates and severe disease in at risk-populations. Findings VIS410 was found to be generally safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels, from 2–50 mg/kg. Overall, 27 of 41 subjects (65.9%) reported a total of 67 treatment emergent adverse events (TEAEs). TEAEs were reported by 20 of 30 subjects (66.7%) who received VIS410 and by 7 of 11 subjects (63.6%) who received placebo. 14 of 16 TEAEs related to study drug were considered mild (Grade 1) and 2 were moderate (Grade 2). Two subjects (1 subject who received 30 mg/kg VIS410 and 1 subject who received placebo) experienced serious AEs (Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs) that were not related to study drug. VIS410 exposure was approximately dose-proportional with a mean half-life of 12.9 days. Mean VIS410 Cmax levels in the upper respiratory tract were 20.0 and 25.3 μg/ml at the 30 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses, respectively, with corresponding serum Cmax levels of 980.5 and 1316 μg/mL. Using these pharmacokinetic data, a microsimulation model showed

  14. Safety evaluation of superabsorbent baby diapers.

    PubMed

    Kosemund, Kirstin; Schlatter, Harald; Ochsenhirt, Jennifer L; Krause, Edburga L; Marsman, Daniel S; Erasala, Geetha N

    2009-03-01

    Superabsorbent disposable baby diapers are sophisticated, well-engineered products that provide many benefits including convenience, comfort, exceptional leakage protection, improved hygiene and skin care benefits compared with cloth diapers. Safety assurance is an integral part of the diaper development process at Procter & Gamble, with the goal of ensuring safety for both caregivers and babies. A systematic, stepwise approach to safety assessment starts with a thorough evaluation of new design features and materials, using the principles of general risk assessment including, as appropriate, controlled trials to assess clinical endpoints or independent scientific review of safety data. The majority of the diaper materials are polymers that are safe and do not have inherent toxicity issues. Trace amounts of non-polymeric materials, such as colorants, are assessed based on their skin contact potential. New materials or design features are introduced in marketed products only if they have been shown to be safe under the conditions of recommended or foreseeable use. The product safety continues to be confirmed after launch by means of in-market monitoring. This article provides a broad overview of human safety exposure-based risk assessment used at Procter & Gamble for absorbent hygiene products. PMID:18992296

  15. Tolerability and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Inhaled Dry Powder Tobramycin Free Base in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hagedoorn, Paul; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; de Boer, Anne H.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Bronchiectasis is a condition characterised by dilated and thick-walled bronchi. The presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is associated with a higher hospitalisation frequency and a reduced quality of life, requiring frequent and adequate treatment with antibiotics. Objectives To assess local tolerability and the pharmacokinetic parameters of inhaled excipient free dry powder tobramycin as free base administered with the Cyclops dry powder inhaler to participants with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. The free base and absence of excipients reduces the inhaled powder dose. Methods Eight participants in the study were trained in handling the device and inhaling correctly. During drug administration the inspiratory flow curve was recorded. Local tolerability was assessed by spirometry and recording adverse events. Serum samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 min; 4, 8 and 12 h after inhalation. Results and Discussion Dry powder tobramycin base was well tolerated and mild tobramycin-related cough was reported only once. A good drug dose-serum concentration correlation was obtained. Relatively small inhaled volumes were computed from the recorded flow curves, resulting in presumably substantial deposition in the central airways—i.e., at the site of infection. Conclusions In this first study of inhaled dry powder tobramycin free base in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients, the free base of tobramycin and the administration with the Cyclops dry powder device were well tolerated. Our data support further clinical studies to evaluate safety and efficacy of this compound in this population. PMID:26959239

  16. Safety Evaluation and Imaging Properties of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Piraquive, Joao; Lamberton, Franck; Lux, François; Verset, Michael; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Contamin, Hugues; Tillement, Olivier; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report the safety evaluation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in nonhuman primates (NHP) in the context of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in atherosclerosis bearing animals and healthy controls. In healthy NHP, the pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles demonstrated the absence of dose, time, and sex-effects, as well as a suitable tolerance of intravenous administration of the nanoparticles. We investigated their imaging properties for arterial plaque imaging in a standard diet or a high cholesterol diet NHP, and compared their characteristics with clinically applied Gd-chelate. This preliminary investigation reports the efficient and safe imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27725693

  17. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed. PMID:26730212

  18. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of single, oral doses of GSK1278863, a novel HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, in healthy Japanese and Caucasian subjects.

    PubMed

    Hara, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Wakamatsu, Akira; Caltabiano, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and safety of GSK1278863, a novel prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, following a single oral administration of GSK1278863 from 10 to 100 mg or placebo in Japanese (n = 19), and 10, 25 and 100 mg in Caucasians (n = 14). Dose-proportional increases were observed in AUCinf of GSK1278863 in both ethnic groups, with a 1.3-1.5-fold higher exposure seen in Japanese relative to Caucasians for all doses. This difference in exposure can be mainly explained by the observed differences in body weights between the two groups. Statistically significant increases in erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reticulocyte counts were observed in Japanese subjects after the 50 and 100 mg dose as compared to placebo. In Caucasians, similar to Japanese, EPO and VEGF levels were observed to be increased in response to the 100 mg dose. Drug-related adverse events, including headache and abdominal pain were reported in 3 Japanese subjects, while headache was reported in 3 Caucasians. In conclusion, GSK1278863 was well tolerated, with dose-proportional increases in exposure observed in both groups. There was no evidence of ethnic differences between Japanese and Caucasian with regard to PK or PD.

  19. Phase I study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of plerixafor in children undergoing a second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Panetta, John C.; Cross, Shane; Pillai, Asha; Triplett, Brandon M.; Shook, Dave R.; Dallas, Mari H.; Hartford, Christine; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Choi, John; Leung, Wing

    2015-01-01

    The safety, pharmacokinetics and biological effect of plerixafor in children as part of a conditioning regimen for chemo-sensitization in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have not been studied. This is a phase I study of plerixafor designed to evaluate its tolerability at dose of 0.24 mg/kg given intravenously on day -4 (level 1), day -4, and day -3 (level 2), or day -4, -3, and day -2 (level 3) in combination with fludarabine, thiotepa, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocytic globulin for a second allogeneic HSCT in children with refractory or relapsed leukemia. Immunophenotype analysis was performed on blood and bone marrow prior to and after plerixafor administration. Twelve patients were enrolled. Plerixafor at all 3 levels was well tolerated without dose-limiting toxicity. Transient gastrointestinal side effects of National Cancer Institute grade 1 or 2 in severity were the most common adverse events. The area under the concentration-time curve increased proportionally to the dose level. Plerixafor clearance was higher in males, and increased linearly with body weight, and glomerular filtration rate. The clearance decreased and the elimination half-life increased significantly from dose level 1 to 3 (P < 0.001). Biologically, the proportion of CXCR4-positive blasts and lymphocytes both in the bone marrow and peripheral blood, increased after plerixafor administration. PMID:24769325

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of a Single Intravenous Dose of myo-Inositol in Preterm Infants of 23 to 29 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Dale L.; Ward, Robert M.; Williams, Rick L.; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Cotten, C. Michael; Hallman, Mikko K.; Frantz, Ivan D.; Faix, Roger G.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Das, Abhik; Ball, M. Bethany; O’Shea, T. Michael; Lacy, Conra Backstrom; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bell, Edward F.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myo-inositol given to preterm infants with respiratory distress has reduced death, increased survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and reduced severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in 2 randomized trials. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in extremely preterm infants are needed prior to efficacy trials. Methods Infants of 23–29 weeks gestation were randomized to a single intravenous (IV) dose of inositol at 60 or 120 mg/kg or placebo. Over 96 h, serum levels (sparse sampling population PK) and urine inositol excretion were determined. Population PK models were fit using a nonlinear mixed effects approach. Safety outcomes were recorded. Results A 1-compartment model that included factors for endogenous inositol production, allometric size based on weight, gestational age (GA) strata and creatinine clearance fit the data best. The central volume of distribution was 0.5115 l/kg, the clearance 0.0679 l/kg/h, endogenous production 2.67 mg/kg/h and the half life 5.22 h when modeled without the covariates. During the first 12 h renal inositol excretion quadrupled in the 120 mg/kg group, returning to near baseline after 48 h. There was no diuretic side-effect. No significant differences in adverse events occurred between the 3 groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions A single compartment model accounting for endogenous production satisfactorily described the PK of IV inositol. PMID:24067395

  1. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T; Sykes, David A; Watson, Kenny J; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J; Kent, Toby C

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED50 values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1h; >200 fold at 6h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M2 muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M2 receptor blockade at ED50 doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. PMID:26026369

  2. Safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics and QT concentration-effect modelling of the SirT1 inhibitor selisistat in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Westerberg, Goran; Chiesa, Joseph A; Andersen, Claus A; Diamanti, Daniela; Magnoni, Letizia; Pollio, Giuseppe; Darpo, Borje; Zhou, Meijian

    2015-01-01

    Aim Selisistat (SEN0014196), a first-in-class SirT1 inhibitor, is being developed as a disease-modifying therapy for Huntington's disease. This first-in-human study investigated the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics of single and multiple doses of selisistat in healthy male and female subjects. Method In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, seven cohorts of eight subjects received a single dose of selisistat at dose levels of 5, 25, 75, 150, 300 and 600 mg and four cohorts of eight subjects were administered 100, 200 and 300 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood sampling and safety assessments were conducted throughout the study. Results Selisistat was rapidly absorbed and systemic exposure increased in proportion to dose in the 5–300 mg range. Steady-state plasma concentrations were achieved within 4 days of repeated dosing. The incidence of drug related adverse events showed no correlation with dose level or number of doses received and was comparable with the placebo group. No serious adverse events were reported and no subjects were withdrawn due to adverse events. There were no trends in clinical laboratory parameters or vital signs. No trends in heart rate or ECG parameters, including the QTc interval and T-wave morphology, were observed. There were no findings in physical or neurological examinations or postural control. Transcriptional alteration was observed in peripheral blood. Conclusion Selisistat was safe and well tolerated by healthy male and female subjects after single doses up to 600 mg and multiple doses up to 300 mg day−1. PMID:25223836

  3. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    SciTech Connect

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T.; Sykes, David A.; Watson, Kenny J.; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J.; Kent, Toby C.

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED{sub 50} values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M{sub 2} receptor blockade at ED{sub 50} doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED{sub 50} doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M{sub 2} receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M

  4. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Adams, T B; Cohen, S M; Doull, J; Feron, V J; Goodman, J I; Hall, R L; Marnett, L J; Portoghese, P S; Waddell, W J; Wagner, B M

    2004-04-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is not intended to be viewed as a rigid check list, begins with a description of the chemical composition of the commercial product, followed by a review of the data on the history of dietary use. Next, each constituent of an NFC is assigned to one of 33 congeneric groups of structurally related substances and to one of three classes of toxic potential, each with its own exposure threshold of toxicological concern. The group of substances of unknown structure is placed in the class of greatest toxic potential. In subsequent steps, for each congeneric group the procedure determines the per capita intake, considers metabolic pathways and explores the need and availability of toxicological data. Additional toxicological and analytical data may be required for a comprehensive safety evaluation. The procedure concludes with an evaluation of the NFC in its entirety, also considering combined exposure to congeneric groups. The first experiences with the use of this procedure are very promising. Future safety evaluations of larger numbers of NFCs will indicate the usefulness of the system, either in its present form or in a form modified on the basis of experience.

  5. Evaluation of Factor Xa-Specific Chromogenic Substrate Assays and the Determination of Pharmacokinetics of Fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Yuri, Maiko; Tabe, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Aoki, Jun; Horii, Takashi; Iba, Toshiaki; Ohsaka, Akimichi

    2016-07-01

    Fondaparinux (FPX), a synthesized factor Xa inhibitor, is one of the most popular anticoagulants for the prevention of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although routine monitoring is not required, the bleeding adverse events cannot be neglected, and the measurement of anti-Xa activity is expected to be monitored. The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate the performances of 2 chromogenic assays for the detection of anti-Xa activity. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of FPX was examined using chromogenic assays. Anti-Xa activity was measured using 2 FPX-based chromogenic substrates (S2222 and STA-Liquid Anti-Xa). The reproducibility, detection limits, linearity, and correlations between the substrates were examined using normal plasma doped with low and high concentrations of FPX formulation. In addition, anti-Xa activity in 235 clinical samples from 164 cases treated was measured, and the pharmacokinetics of FPX was evaluated. Both of the tested substrates were capable of accurately measuring the anti-Xa activity of FPX, with a lower limit of 0.05 μg/mL and a coefficient of variation of less than 10%. The repeated administration of FPX induced a gradual but significant increase in the anti-Xa activity, which was negatively correlated with body weight and estimated glomerular filtration rate. No significant correlation between the anti-Xa activity and the occurrence of postoperative VTE or bleeding event was observed. Anti-Xa activity can be successfully determined using 2 chromogenic assays and automated biochemical analyzers. The clinical significance of anti-Xa activity monitoring should be examined in the future study. PMID:26177660

  6. Hemodialysis safety: Evaluation of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Wafaa; Adnouni, Adil; Laouad, Inass

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) safety has become a clinical priority; therefore, the use of checklists for making the dialysis session safe is now widely adopted. The aim of our study was to assess different shortcomings in the clinical practice of nurses working in different Moroccan dialysis centers and to discuss the interest of using such checklists. This cross-sectional study was performed in 13 chronic HD centers. Clinical practice of nurses was evaluated through checklists used in European outpatient dialysis units. We noted several deficiencies mainly related to the clinical evaluation of dialysis patients and to aspects related to hygiene and protection measures against contamination. Optimal safety of dialysis sessions requires the use of simple and reproducible means that improve clinical skills of the health staff. PMID:27215249

  7. Evaluation of the Transport, In Vitro Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a Potent Hallucinogen

    PubMed Central

    Teksin, Zeynep S.; Lee, Insong J.; Nemieboka, Noble N.; Othman, Ahmed A.; Upreti, Vijay V.; Hassan, Hazem E.; Syed, Shariq S.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Eddington, Natalie D.

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A is an unregulated potent hallucinogen isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum. It is the only known non-nitrogenous kappa-opioid selective agonist and rivals synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in potency. This objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro transport, in vitro metabolism, and pharmacokinetic properties of Salvinorin A. The transport characteristics of Salvinorin A were assessed using MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affinity status was assessed by the P-gp ATPase assay. In vitro metabolism studies were performed with various specific human CYP450 isoforms and UGT2B7 to assess the metabolic characteristics of Salvinorin A. Cohorts (n=3) of male Sprague Dawley rats were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of Salvinorin A (10 mg/kg, intraperitonal (i.p.) over a 240 min period. A validated UV-HPLC and LC/MS/MS method was used to quantify the hallucinogen concentrations obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. Salvinorin A displayed a high secretory transport in the MDCK-MDR1 cells (4.07±1.34 × 10-5 cm/s). Salvinorin A also stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration (5-10 μm) dependent manner, suggesting that it may be a substrate of P-gp. A significant decrease in Salvinorin A concentration ranging from 14.7±0.80 % to 31.1±1.20 % was observed after incubation with CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2C18, and CYP2E1, respectively. A significant decrease was also observed after incubation with UGT2B7. These results suggest that Salvinorin A may be a substrate of UGT2B7, CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1 and CYP2C18. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed a relatively fast elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 75 min and a clearance (Cl/F) of 26 L/h/kg. The distribution was extensive (Vd of 47.1 L/kg), however the brain to plasma ratio was 0.050. Accordingly, the brain half life was relatively short, 36 min. Salvinorin A is rapidly eliminated after i.p. dosing

  8. Single, Escalating Dose Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Food Effects of a New Oral Androgen Dimethandrolone Undecanoate in Man: A prototype oral male hormonal contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Nya-Ngatchou, Jean Jacques; Liu, Peter Y.; Amory, John K.; Leung, Andrew; Hull, Laura; Blithe, Diana L.; Woo, Jason; Bremner, William J.; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The novel androgen, dimethandrolone (DMA) has both androgenic and progestational activities, properties that may maximize gonadotropin suppression. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU), an orally bioavailable, longer-acting ester of DMA, for male contraceptive development. Our objective was to examine the safety and pharmacokinetics of single, escalating doses of DMAU (powder in capsule formulation) administered orally with or without food in healthy men. We conducted a randomized, double-blind Phase 1 study. For each dose of DMAU (25 to 800 mg), ten male volunteers received DMAU and two received placebo at two academic medical centers. DMAU was administered both fasting and after a high fat meal (200–800 mg doses). Serial serum samples were collected over 24h following each dose. DMAU was well tolerated without significant effects on vital signs, safety laboratory tests or electrocardiograms. When administered while fasting, serum DMA (active compound) was detectable in only 4/10 participants after the 800mg dose. When administered with a 50% fat meal, serum DMA was detectable in all participants given 200mg DMAU and showed a dose-incremental increase up to 800mg, with peak levels 4 to 8h after taking the dose. Serum gonadotropins and sex hormone concentrations were significantly suppressed 12h after DMAU administration with food at doses above 200mg. This first-in-man study demonstrated that a single, oral dose of DMAU up to 800 mg is safe. A high-fat meal markedly improved DMAU/DMA pharmacokinetics. PMID:24789057

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of FV-100, a Novel Oral Anti-Herpes Zoster Nucleoside Analogue, Administered in Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Young Adult and Elderly Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Pentikis, Helen S.; Matson, Mark; Atiee, George; Boehlecke, Brian; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey W.; Morris, Amy

    2011-01-01

    FV-100 is the prodrug of the highly potent anti-varicella zoster virus bicyclic nucleoside analogue CF-1743. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral FV-100, 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were conducted: (i) a single-ascending-dose study in 32 healthy subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100-, 200-, 400-, and 800-mg doses) with an evaluation of the food effect in the 400-mg group; (ii) a multiple-ascending-dose study in 48 subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100 mg once daily [QD], 200 mg QD, 400 mg QD, 400 mg twice a day, and 800 mg QD for 7 days); and (iii) a 2-part study in subjects aged 65 years and older with a single 400-mg dose in 15 subjects and a 400-mg QD dosing regimen for 7 days in 12 subjects. FV-100 was rapidly and extensively converted to CF-1743, the concentration of which remained above that required to reduce viral activity by 50% for the 24-hour dosing period. Renal excretion of CF-1743 was very low. A high-fat meal reduced exposure to CF-1743; a low-fat meal did not. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly subjects were comparable to those for the younger subjects. FV-100 was well tolerated by all subjects. The pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of FV-100 support its continued investigation for the treatment of herpes zoster and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with once-daily dosing and without dose modifications for elderly or renally impaired patients. PMID:21444712

  10. Nonclinical and pharmacokinetic assessments to evaluate the potential of tedizolid and linezolid to affect mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn; McKee, Edward E; Das, Debaditya; Tulkens, Paul M; Hosako, Hiromi; Fiedler-Kelly, Jill; Passarell, Julie; Radovsky, Ann; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged treatment with the oxazolidinone linezolid is associated with myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and neuropathies, toxicities likely caused by impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis (MPS). To evaluate the potential of the novel oxazolidinone tedizolid to cause similar side effects, nonclinical and pharmacokinetic assessments were conducted. In isolated rat heart mitochondria, tedizolid inhibited MPS more potently than did linezolid (average [± standard error of the mean] 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] for MPS of 0.31 ± 0.02 μM versus 6.4 ± 1.2 μM). However, a rigorous 9-month rat study comparing placebo and high-dose tedizolid (resulting in steady-state area under the plasma concentration-time curve values about 8-fold greater than those with the standard therapeutic dose in humans) showed no evidence of neuropathy. Additional studies explored why prolonged, high-dose tedizolid did not cause these mitochondriopathic side effects despite potent MPS inhibition by tedizolid. Murine macrophage (J774) cell fractionation studies found no evidence of a stable association of tedizolid with eukaryotic mitochondria. Monte Carlo simulations based on population pharmacokinetic models showed that over the course of a dosing interval using standard therapeutic doses, free plasma concentrations fell below the respective MPS IC50 in 84% of tedizolid-treated patients (for a median duration of 7.94 h) and 38% of linezolid-treated patients (for a median duration of 0 h). Therapeutic doses of tedizolid, but not linezolid, may therefore allow for mitochondrial recovery during antibacterial therapy. The overall results suggest that tedizolid has less potential to cause myelosuppression and neuropathy than that of linezolid during prolonged treatment courses. This, however, remains a hypothesis that must be confirmed in clinical studies. PMID:25331703

  11. Evaluation of bioactivity and pharmacokinetic characteristics of PEGylated P.pastoris-expressed erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Ahmad; Najafabadi, Abdolhossein Rouholamini; Roohvand, Farzin; Shafiee, Abbas; Khanahmad, Hossein; Faghihi, Homa; Hedayati, Mohammad H; Tajerzadeh, Hosnieh

    2011-11-01

    High costs of production and relatively short serum half-life of mammalian cell-derived recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) necessitate finding and developing superior hosts/technologies for more efficient production of longer-acting erythropoietic agents. With these aims, we provide the first report on reductive alkylation of low-cost P.pastoris-expressed rHuEpo (PPEpo) with PEG-aldehyde. The PCR-amplified cDNA of native rHuEpo was cloned into the pPICZαA vector and transformed into the yeast Pichia pastoris. The best expressing transformant was selected and employed for secreted-expression of PPEpo using the standard protocols. Purified PPEpo was N-terminally PEGylated with 20-kDa mPEG-propionaldehyde in a low pH (5) condition. The in vitro and in vivo biological activities of purified mono-PEGylated PPEpo was evaluated by the UT-7 cells proliferation assay and normocythaemic mice assay, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined following intravenous administration of Epo proteins in rabbits. While PPEpo showed a higher in vitro bioactivity compared to rHuEpo, no in vivo efficiency was determined for PPEpo. However, the in vivo activity of PEG-PPEpo conjugate was comparable to that of rHuEpo. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the terminal half-life and mean residence time of PEG-PPEpo were increased approximately 4-fold and 6.5-fold respectively, compared with those of PPEpo. The results indicate that N-terminal PEGylation of Pichia-expressed Epo could be considered as a promising approach for generating cost-effective and long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

  12. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = -33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = -33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 681750 ng/mL). Conclusion Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study.

  13. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, Julio S.G.; Schutz, Malte; Schwartz, Robert; Jayaweera, Dushyantha T.; Burnside, Alfred F.; Walmsley, Sharon; Saag, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = −33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = −33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 68-1750 ng/mL). Conclusions Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study. PMID:16926775

  14. Mifamurtide in Metastatic and Recurrent Osteosarcoma: A Patient Access Study with Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic, and Safety Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P.M.; Meyers, P.; Kleinerman, E.; Venkatakrishnan, K.; Hughes, D.P.; Herzog, C.; Huh, W.; Sutphin, R.; Vyas, Y. M.; Shen, V.; Warwick, A.; Yeager, N.; Oliva, C.; Wang, B.; Liu, Y.; Chou, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This non-randomized, patient-access protocol, assessed both safety and efficacy outcomes following liposomal muramyl –tripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE; mifamurtide) in patients with high-risk, recurrent and/or metastatic osteosarcoma. Methods Patients received mifamurtide 2 mg/m2 intravenously twice-weekly ×12 weeks, then weekly ×24 weeks with and without chemotherapy. Serum concentration-time profiles were collected. Adverse events within 24 hours of drug administration were classified as infusion-related adverse events (IRAE); other AEs and overall survival (OS) were assessed. Results The study began therapy in January 2008; the last patient completed therapy in October 2012. 205 patients were enrolled; median age was 16.5 years and 143/204 (72%) had active disease. Mifamurtide serum concentrations declined rapidly in the first 30 minutes post-infusion, then in a loglinear manner 2–6 hours post-dose; t1/2 was 2 hours. There were no readily apparent relationships between age and BSA-normalized clearance, half-life, or pharmacodynamic effects, supporting the dose of 2 mg/m2 mifamurtide across the age range. Patients reported 3,415 IRAE after 7,122 mifamurtide infusions. These were very rarely grade 3 or 4 and most commonly included chills+fever or headache+fatigue symptom clusters. One and two year OS was 70.6% and 41.4%. Patients with initial metastatic disease or progression approximated by within 9 months of diagnosis (N=40) had similar 2-year OS (38.8%) as the entire cohort (41.4%) Conclusions Mifamurtide had a manageable safety profile; PK/PD of mifamurtide in this patient access study was consistent with prior studies. Two-year OS was 41.4%. A randomized clinical trial would be required to definitively determine impact on patient outcomes. PMID:23997016

  15. A probabilistic bridge safety evaluation against floods.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Wei; Muto, Yasunori; Chen, Wei-Lun; Wu, Bang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To further capture the influences of uncertain factors on river bridge safety evaluation, a probabilistic approach is adopted. Because this is a systematic and nonlinear problem, MPP-based reliability analyses are not suitable. A sampling approach such as a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) or importance sampling is often adopted. To enhance the efficiency of the sampling approach, this study utilizes Bayesian least squares support vector machines to construct a response surface followed by an MCS, providing a more precise safety index. Although there are several factors impacting the flood-resistant reliability of a bridge, previous experiences and studies show that the reliability of the bridge itself plays a key role. Thus, the goal of this study is to analyze the system reliability of a selected bridge that includes five limit states. The random variables considered here include the water surface elevation, water velocity, local scour depth, soil property and wind load. Because the first three variables are deeply affected by river hydraulics, a probabilistic HEC-RAS-based simulation is performed to capture the uncertainties in those random variables. The accuracy and variation of our solutions are confirmed by a direct MCS to ensure the applicability of the proposed approach. The results of a numerical example indicate that the proposed approach can efficiently provide an accurate bridge safety evaluation and maintain satisfactory variation. PMID:27386269

  16. A probabilistic bridge safety evaluation against floods.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Wei; Muto, Yasunori; Chen, Wei-Lun; Wu, Bang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To further capture the influences of uncertain factors on river bridge safety evaluation, a probabilistic approach is adopted. Because this is a systematic and nonlinear problem, MPP-based reliability analyses are not suitable. A sampling approach such as a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) or importance sampling is often adopted. To enhance the efficiency of the sampling approach, this study utilizes Bayesian least squares support vector machines to construct a response surface followed by an MCS, providing a more precise safety index. Although there are several factors impacting the flood-resistant reliability of a bridge, previous experiences and studies show that the reliability of the bridge itself plays a key role. Thus, the goal of this study is to analyze the system reliability of a selected bridge that includes five limit states. The random variables considered here include the water surface elevation, water velocity, local scour depth, soil property and wind load. Because the first three variables are deeply affected by river hydraulics, a probabilistic HEC-RAS-based simulation is performed to capture the uncertainties in those random variables. The accuracy and variation of our solutions are confirmed by a direct MCS to ensure the applicability of the proposed approach. The results of a numerical example indicate that the proposed approach can efficiently provide an accurate bridge safety evaluation and maintain satisfactory variation.

  17. Combined use of pharmacokinetic modeling and a steady-state delivery approach allows early assessment of IkappaB kinase-2 (IKK-2) target safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Kishore, Nandini N; Thompson, David C

    2010-03-01

    NF-kappaB activation is clearly linked to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammatory diseases including arthritis. The prominent role of IkappaB kinase-2 (IKK-2) in regulating NF-kappaB signaling in response to proinflammatory stimuli has made IKK-2 a primary anti-inflammation therapeutic target. PHA-408, a potent and selective IKK-2 inhibitor, was identified internally and used for our studies to assess this target. In early in vivo studies, PHA-408 demonstrated efficacy at high doses; however, the correlation between PHA-408 exposure and efficacy could not be established using standard dosing paradigms for the rat disease models. Similar concerns arose from early in vivo safety studies where appropriate NOAEL margins were not achieved. Following a full investigation of the physicochemical properties of the molecule and pharmacokinetic modeling, an oral steady-state delivery strategy was designed to administer PHA-408 to the rat for both efficacy and safety studies. Using this steady-state delivery, a clear dose-response relationship was established between plasma concentrations of PHA-408 and efficacy in the rat arthritis model. The same steady-state delivery approach was used to demonstrate the target safety. In summary, a combination of pharmacokinetic modeling with a steady-state delivery approach allowed us to establish confidence in both the mechanism and safety of the target.

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Inducible Cytokine Responses during a Phase 1 Trial of the Oral Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor ITF2357 (Givinostat)

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Antonio; Monzani, Valmen; Reznikov, Leonid L; Leoni, Flavio; Fossati, Gianluca; Modena, Daniela; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    ITF2357 (givinostat) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties at low nanomolar concentrations. We report here a phase I safety and pharmacokinetics trial in healthy males administered 50, 100, 200, 400 or 600 mg orally. After 50 mg, mean maximal plasma concentrations reached 104 nmol/L 2 h after dosing, with a half-life of 6.9 h. After 100 mg, maximal concentration reached 199 nmol/L at 2.1 h with a half-life of 6.0 h. Repeat doses for 7 consecutive days of 50, 100 or 200 mg resulted in nearly the same kinetics. There were no serious adverse effects (AEs) and no organ toxicities. However, there was a dose-dependent but transient fall in platelets. After 7 daily doses of 50 or 100 mg, the mean decrease in platelets of 17 and 25% was not statistically significant and returned to baseline within 14 d. Blood removed from the subjects after oral dosing was cultured ex vivo with endotoxin, and the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-1Ra, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10 was determined. Maximal reduction in IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6 and IFNγ was observed 4 h after dosing but returned to baseline at 12 h. There was no significant reduction in IL-1Ra or IL-10. With daily dosing, the fall in cytokine production in blood cultures observed on day 7 was nearly the same as that of the first day. We conclude that dosing of 50 or 100 mg ITF2357 is safe in healthy humans and transiently but repeatedly reduces the production of proinflammatory cytokines without affecting production of antiinflammatory cytokines. PMID:21365126

  19. Pharmacokinetics, safety and inducible cytokine responses during a phase 1 trial of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor ITF2357 (givinostat).

    PubMed

    Furlan, Antonio; Monzani, Valmen; Reznikov, Leonid L; Leoni, Flavio; Fossati, Gianluca; Modena, Daniela; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    ITF2357 (givinostat) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties at low nanomolar concentrations. We report here a phase I safety and pharmacokinetics trial in healthy males administered 50, 100, 200, 400 or 600 mg orally. After 50 mg, mean maximal plasma concentrations reached 104 nmol/L 2 h after dosing, with a half-life of 6.9 h. After 100 mg, maximal concentration reached 199 nmol/L at 2.1 h with a half-life of 6.0 h. Repeat doses for 7 consecutive days of 50, 100 or 200 mg resulted in nearly the same kinetics. There were no serious adverse effects (AEs) and no organ toxicities. However, there was a dose-dependent but transient fall in platelets. After 7 daily doses of 50 or 100 mg, the mean decrease in platelets of 17 and 25% was not statistically significant and returned to baseline within 14 d. Blood removed from the subjects after oral dosing was cultured ex vivo with endotoxin, and the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-1Ra, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10 was determined. Maximal reduction in IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6 and IFNγ was observed 4 h after dosing but returned to baseline at 12 h. There was no significant reduction in IL-1Ra or IL-10. With daily dosing, the fall in cytokine production in blood cultures observed on day 7 was nearly the same as that of the first day. We conclude that dosing of 50 or 100 mg ITF2357 is safe in healthy humans and transiently but repeatedly reduces the production of proinflammatory cytokines without affecting production of antiinflammatory cytokines. PMID:21365126

  20. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  1. Safety evaluation of genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Martens, M A

    2000-06-01

    The concept of substantial equivalence has been accepted as the cornerstone of the health hazard assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods (OECD 1993). Substantial equivalence is the most practical approach to address the safety of foods or food components derived from GM crops and is based on comparison of the phenotypic and compositional characteristics of the parent crop and the GM crop. Basically, three categories of GM crops can be considered (FAO/WHO 1996; EU 1997): (a) GM crops which have the same composition as the parent crop, (b) GM crops which have the same composition as the parent crop with the exception of a well-defined trait, and (c) GM crops which are different from the parent crop. For the safety assessment of the first category of GM foods only a molecular characterisation of the genetic insert is sufficient, whereas for the second category a safety assessment of the expressed protein(s) is also required. For the last category an extensive evaluation including bioavailability and wholesomeness studies are required, beside the molecular characterisation and safety assessment of the expressed protein(s) and their products. By molecular characterisation is meant the position, nature, stability and number of copies of the inserted DNA. Substantial equivalence is established by the determination of the phenotypic characteristics (e.g. resistance against diseases, agronomic properties) and the complete chemical composition of the plant including nutrients, toxicants, antinutrients, and allergens. The toxicity of the expressed protein(s) is assessed by their homology with known protein toxins, degradation in the gastro-intestinal tract, stability to food processing and acute toxicity in rodents. The possible allergenicity of the expressed proteins is evaluated by comparison of their amino acid sequence with that of known allergens and determination of their stability to digestion and food processing. If the source of the genetic insert is allergenic

  2. Preparation of codeine-resinate and chlorpheniramine-resinate sustained-release suspension and its pharmacokinetic evaluation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huan-Xiang; Cheng, Gang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhong, Guo-Ping; Huang, Min

    2007-06-01

    the release rate of both drugs. But the release of codeine from its resinate beads was much more rapid than chlorpheniramine released from its resinate beads in the same ionic strength release medium. The drug release specification of the CCSS, where release mediums were 0.05 M KCl solution for codeine and 0.5 M KCl solution for chlorpheniramine, was established to be in conformance with in vivo performance. Relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the CCSS, using commercial immediate-release tablets as the reference preparation, were performed following a randomized two-way crossover design in beagle dogs. The drug concentrations in plasma were measured by a validated LC-MS/MS method to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of CCSS. This LC-MS/MS method demonstrated high accuracy and precision for bioanalysis, and was proved quick and reliable for the pharmacokinetic studies. The results showed that the CCSS had the longer value of Tmax and the lower value of Cmax, which meant an obviously sustained release effect, and its relative bioavailability of codeine and chlorpheniramine were (103.6 +/- 14.6)% and (98.1 +/- 10.3)%, respectively, compared with the reference preparation. These findings indicated that a novel liquid sustained release suspension made by using IERs as carriers and subsequent fluidized bed coating might provide a constant plasma level of the active pharmaceutical ingredient being highly beneficial for various therapeutic reasons.

  3. Tolerability, safety, and pharmacokinetics of the novel cathepsin A inhibitor SAR164653 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Joachim; Lehmann, Anne; Paehler, Tobias; Lukacs, Zoltan; Ruf, Sven; Sadowski, Thorsten; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; Ruetten, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Cathepsin A (CathA) is a lysosomal protein where it forms a stable complex with neuraminidase and ß-galactosidase. CathA also has enzymatic activity and is involved in the degradation of many peptides. CathA was recently discovered as a target for heart failure, fostering the development of CathA inhibitors with SAR164653 as a frontrunner. The first-in-man study investigated single oral doses from 20 to 800 mg of SAR164653 followed by repeat dose studies at doses up to 800 mg in healthy young and elderly subjects. SAR164653 was safe and well tolerated at doses up to 800 mg in healthy subjects, and a maximum tolerated dose could not be determined from the study. Activity of ß-galactosidase measured in leukocytes did not show any abnormalities. The tmax was 1.0 to 2.5 hours, and the t1/2 was ∼5-11 after single dosing; exposure increased less than dose proportional. Following multiple dosing, accumulation was not observed, Cmax and AUC0-24 increased in a dose-proportional manner, and t1/2 was around 14-20 hours. The novel CathA inhibitor SAR164653 was found to have a favorable safety profile in these early phase 1 studies, but further studies are required to confirm if SAR164653 is equally safe in patients undergoing long-term treatment. PMID:27119579

  4. Developing Methodologies for Evaluating the Earthquake Safety of Existing Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, B.; And Others

    This report contains four papers written during an investigation of methods for evaluating the safety of existing school buildings under Research Applied to National Needs (RANN) grants. In "Evaluation of Earthquake Safety of Existing Buildings," by B. Bresler, preliminary ideas on the evaluation of the earthquake safety of existing buildings are…

  5. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) SERF cask

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1997-10-24

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) documents the ability of the Special Environmental Radiometallurgy Facility (SERF) Cask to meet the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B quantities (up to highway route controlled quantities) of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This document shall be used to ensure that loading, tie down, transport, and unloading of the SERF Cask are performed in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  6. Methods and software tools for design evaluation in population pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Joakim; Bazzoli, Caroline; Ogungbenro, Kay; Aliev, Alexander; Leonov, Sergei; Duffull, Stephen; Hooker, Andrew C; Mentré, France

    2015-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models are increasingly used in drug development and in academic research; hence, designing efficient studies is an important task. Following the first theoretical work on optimal design for nonlinear mixed-effects models, this research theme has grown rapidly. There are now several different software tools that implement an evaluation of the Fisher information matrix for population PKPD. We compared and evaluated the following five software tools: PFIM, PkStaMp, PopDes, PopED and POPT. The comparisons were performed using two models, a simple-one compartment warfarin PK model and a more complex PKPD model for pegylated interferon, with data on both concentration and response of viral load of hepatitis C virus. The results of the software were compared in terms of the standard error (SE) values of the parameters predicted from the software and the empirical SE values obtained via replicated clinical trial simulation and estimation. For the warfarin PK model and the pegylated interferon PKPD model, all software gave similar results. Interestingly, it was seen, for all software, that the simpler approximation to the Fisher information matrix, using the block diagonal matrix, provided predicted SE values that were closer to the empirical SE values than when the more complicated approximation was used (the full matrix). For most PKPD models, using any of the available software tools will provide meaningful results, avoiding cumbersome simulation and allowing design optimization.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence evaluation of leflunomide tablets in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y-J; Shim, E-J; Kim, H-S; Oh, M; Shon, J-H; Shin, J-G; Moon, B-S; Song, G-S; Kim, E-Y

    2013-12-01

    Leflunomide is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of a test drug (CJ leflunomide) and a commercially available reference drug (Arava®) at 2 doses (10 and 20 mg) in healthy Korean volunteers. This was a single-dose (28 individuals enrolled at each dose group), randomized, open-label, 2-way crossover study. The 2 treatment periods were separated by a 56-day wash-out interval. Blood sampling was conducted until 672 h after drug administration. Plasma teriflunomide (active metabolite of leflunomide) concentrations were determined, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Bioequivalence was evaluated using an ANOVA model, based on the AUCt and the Cmax after administration of leflunomide tablets. Bioequivalence was defined as the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of AUCt and Cmax for the test and reference drugs being within the range of 0.80-1.25. The GMRs (90% CI) for AUCt and Cmax were 0.9506 (0.9091-0.9941) and 0.9861 (0.9360-1.0389), respectively, in the 10 mg study, and 0.9524 (0.9101-0.9968) and 0.9740 (0.9314-1.0186), respectively, in the 20 mg study. The 90% CIs of AUCt and Cmax at each dose were within the accepted range for bioequivalence. Based on the results, the test drug (CJ leflunomide) was bioequivalent to the commercially available reference drug (Arava®) at both doses. PMID:23884659

  8. Evaluation of the route dependency of the pharmacokinetics and neuro-pharmacokinetics of tramadol and its main metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Behjat; Gholami, Mahdi; Lavasani, Hoda; Rouini, Mohammadreza

    2016-09-20

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a centrally acting analgesic used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. It has three main metabolites: O-desmethyltramadol (M1), N-desmethyltramadol (M2), and N,O-didesmethyltramadol (M5). Because of the frequent use of tramadol by patients and drug abusers, the ability to determine the parent drug and its metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid is of great importance. In the present study, a pharmacokinetic approach was applied using two groups of five male Wistar rats administered a 20mg/kg dose of tramadol via intravenous (i.v.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. Plasma and CSF samples were collected at 5-360min following tramadol administration. Our results demonstrate that the plasma values of Cmax (C0 in i.v. group) and area under the curve (AUC)0-t for tramadol were 23,314.40±6944.85 vs. 3187.39±760.25ng/mL (Cmax) and 871.15±165.98 vs. 414.04±149.25μg·min/mL in the i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between i.v. and i.p. plasma values for tramadol metabolites (p>0.05). Tramadol rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) (5.00±0.00 vs. 10.00±5.77min in i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively). Tramadol and its metabolites (M1 and M2) were present to a lesser extent in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in the plasma. M5 hardly penetrated the CSF, owing to its high polarity. There was no significant difference between the AUC0-t of tramadol in plasma (414.04±149.25μg·min/mL) and CSF (221.81±83.02μg·min/mL) in the i.p. group. In addition, the amounts of metabolites (M1 and M2) in the CSF showed no significant differences following both routes of administration. There were also no significant differences among the Kp,uu,CSF(0-360) (0.51±0.12 vs. 0.63±0.04) and Kp,uu,CSF(0-∞) (0.61±0.10 vs. 0.62±0.02) for i.v. and i.p. pathways, respectively (p>0.05). Drug targeting efficiency (DTE) values of tramadol

  9. Evaluation of the route dependency of the pharmacokinetics and neuro-pharmacokinetics of tramadol and its main metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Behjat; Gholami, Mahdi; Lavasani, Hoda; Rouini, Mohammadreza

    2016-09-20

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a centrally acting analgesic used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. It has three main metabolites: O-desmethyltramadol (M1), N-desmethyltramadol (M2), and N,O-didesmethyltramadol (M5). Because of the frequent use of tramadol by patients and drug abusers, the ability to determine the parent drug and its metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid is of great importance. In the present study, a pharmacokinetic approach was applied using two groups of five male Wistar rats administered a 20mg/kg dose of tramadol via intravenous (i.v.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. Plasma and CSF samples were collected at 5-360min following tramadol administration. Our results demonstrate that the plasma values of Cmax (C0 in i.v. group) and area under the curve (AUC)0-t for tramadol were 23,314.40±6944.85 vs. 3187.39±760.25ng/mL (Cmax) and 871.15±165.98 vs. 414.04±149.25μg·min/mL in the i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between i.v. and i.p. plasma values for tramadol metabolites (p>0.05). Tramadol rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) (5.00±0.00 vs. 10.00±5.77min in i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively). Tramadol and its metabolites (M1 and M2) were present to a lesser extent in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in the plasma. M5 hardly penetrated the CSF, owing to its high polarity. There was no significant difference between the AUC0-t of tramadol in plasma (414.04±149.25μg·min/mL) and CSF (221.81±83.02μg·min/mL) in the i.p. group. In addition, the amounts of metabolites (M1 and M2) in the CSF showed no significant differences following both routes of administration. There were also no significant differences among the Kp,uu,CSF(0-360) (0.51±0.12 vs. 0.63±0.04) and Kp,uu,CSF(0-∞) (0.61±0.10 vs. 0.62±0.02) for i.v. and i.p. pathways, respectively (p>0.05). Drug targeting efficiency (DTE) values of tramadol

  10. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  11. 3-Methyl-methcathinone: Pharmacokinetic profile evaluation in pigs in relation to pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shimshoni, Jakob A; Britzi, Malka; Sobol, Eyal; Willenz, Udi; Nutt, David; Edery, Nir

    2015-06-01

    3-Methyl-methcathinone (3-MMC) is a novel, synthetic cathinone analog, recently linked to poisoning events among recreational users. The lack of pharmacological data on 3-MMC, prompted us to explore its pharmacokinetic profile as well as its effect on feeding behavior, weight gain, and serum biochemistry. 3-MMC was administered to male pigs (n=3, three months old) as a single intravenous dose (0.3 mg/kg), followed by a multiple oral dose administration (3 mg/kg) for five days and plasma and tissue concentrations determined. Concomitantly a control group consisting of two healthy male pigs received saline solution instead of 3-MMC according to the same administration schedule. 3-MMC effects on complete blood count, biochemistry, feed intake, and body weight were examined. The pigs were sacrificed and submitted to a pathological and histopathological examination. 3-MMC displayed rapid absorption with a peak concentration achieved within 5-10 min after oral ingestion and a plasma half-life of 0.8 h. The bioavailability was about 7%. 3-MMC tissue levels were below detectable levels 24 h after the last oral dosage. No treatment-related clinical signs were observed and no histopathological findings were detected. 3-MMC caused significant change in daily feed intake and weight gain over time. The animals treated with 3-MMC displayed a lower rate of increase in mean body weight. Caution needs to be practiced in terms of extrapolating the present data to human safety, due to the low sample size, low dosage, and the relatively short study duration as well as the lack of data on abuse potential of 3-MMC.

  12. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed t...

  13. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed ...

  14. A Prospective, Multicenter, Phase I Matched-Comparison Group Trial of Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Efficacy of Riluzole in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael G.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Burau, Keith D.; Chow, Diana S.L.; Tator, Charles; Teng, Angela; Toups, Elizabeth G.; Harrop, James S.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Johnson, Michele M.; Harkema, Susan J.; Boakye, Maxwell; Guest, James D.; Wilson, Jefferson R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A prospective, multicenter phase I trial was undertaken by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of, as well as obtain pilot data on, the effects of riluzole on neurological outcome in acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-six patients, with ASIA impairment grades A–C (28 cervical and 8 thoracic) were enrolled at 6 NACTN sites between April 2010 and June 2011. Patients received 50 mg of riluzole PO/NG twice-daily, within 12 h of SCI, for 14 days. Peak and trough plasma concentrations were quantified on days 3 and 14. Peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure to riluzole varied significantly between patients. On the same dose basis, Cmax did not reach levels comparable to those in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Riluzole plasma levels were significantly higher on day 3 than on day 14, resulting from a lower clearance and a smaller volume of distribution on day 3. Rates of medical complications, adverse events, and progression of neurological status were evaluated by comparison with matched patients in the NACTN SCI Registry. Medical complications in riluzole-treated patients occurred with incidences similar to those in patients in the comparison group. Mild-to-moderate increase in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels were found in 14–70% of patients for different enzymes. Three patients had borderline severe elevations of enzymes. No patient had elevated bilirubin on day 14 of administration of riluzole. There were no serious adverse events related to riluzole and no deaths. The mean motor score of 24 cervical injury riluzole-treated patients gained 31.2 points from admission to 90 days, compared to 15.7 points for 26 registry patients, a 15.5-point difference (p=0.021). Patients with cervical injuries treated with riluzole had more-robust conversions of impairment grades to higher grades than the comparison group. PMID:23859435

  15. A prospective, multicenter, phase I matched-comparison group trial of safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of riluzole in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Robert G; Fehlings, Michael G; Frankowski, Ralph F; Burau, Keith D; Chow, Diana S L; Tator, Charles; Teng, Angela; Toups, Elizabeth G; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Johnson, Michele M; Harkema, Susan J; Boakye, Maxwell; Guest, James D; Wilson, Jefferson R

    2014-02-01

    A prospective, multicenter phase I trial was undertaken by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of, as well as obtain pilot data on, the effects of riluzole on neurological outcome in acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-six patients, with ASIA impairment grades A-C (28 cervical and 8 thoracic) were enrolled at 6 NACTN sites between April 2010 and June 2011. Patients received 50 mg of riluzole PO/NG twice-daily, within 12 h of SCI, for 14 days. Peak and trough plasma concentrations were quantified on days 3 and 14. Peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure to riluzole varied significantly between patients. On the same dose basis, Cmax did not reach levels comparable to those in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Riluzole plasma levels were significantly higher on day 3 than on day 14, resulting from a lower clearance and a smaller volume of distribution on day 3. Rates of medical complications, adverse events, and progression of neurological status were evaluated by comparison with matched patients in the NACTN SCI Registry. Medical complications in riluzole-treated patients occurred with incidences similar to those in patients in the comparison group. Mild-to-moderate increase in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels were found in 14-70% of patients for different enzymes. Three patients had borderline severe elevations of enzymes. No patient had elevated bilirubin on day 14 of administration of riluzole. There were no serious adverse events related to riluzole and no deaths. The mean motor score of 24 cervical injury riluzole-treated patients gained 31.2 points from admission to 90 days, compared to 15.7 points for 26 registry patients, a 15.5-point difference (p=0.021). Patients with cervical injuries treated with riluzole had more-robust conversions of impairment grades to higher grades than the comparison group.

  16. Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Human Immune Globulin Subcutaneous, 20 % in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in North America.

    PubMed

    Suez, Daniel; Stein, Mark; Gupta, Sudhir; Hussain, Iftikhar; Melamed, Isaac; Paris, Kenneth; Darter, Amy; Bourgeois, Christelle; Fritsch, Sandor; Leibl, Heinz; McCoy, Barbara; Gelmont, David; Yel, Leman

    2016-10-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) typically require life-long intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy to prevent recurrent infections. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a highly concentrated (20 %) Ig preparation for SC administration (IGSC 20 %) were evaluated in a prospective trial in patients with PIDD. A total of 74 patients (aged 3-83 years) received 4327 IGSC 20 % infusions over a median of 380.5 days. The rate of validated serious bacterial infections was 0.012 event/patient-year (p < 0.0001 compared with the historical control), and the annualized rate of infection was 2.41 events/patient. Median IgG trough levels were >14.5 g/l. The median maximum infusion rate was 60 ml/h/site (range 4.4-180), resulting in a median infusion duration of 0.95 h. A volume ≥30 ml was infused per site in 74.8 % of IGSC 20 % infusions. Most (84.9 %) infusions were administered using ≤2 infusion sites; for 99.8 % of infusions, there was no need to interrupt/stop administration or reduce the infusion rate. No related serious adverse event (AE) occurred during IGSC 20 % treatment; related non-serious AEs occurred at a rate of 0.036 event/infusion. The incidence of related local AEs was 0.015 event/infusion and of related systemic AEs was 0.021 event/infusion; most were mild in severity, none severe. Increased infusion rates or volumes were not associated with higher AE rates. The investigated IGSC 20 % treatment was shown to be effective and safe, enabling higher infusion rates and volumes per site compared to conventional SC treatments, resulting in fewer infusion sites and shorter infusion durations. PMID:27582171

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Bortezomib in Patients with Advanced Malignancies and Varying Degrees of Liver Dysfunction: Phase 1 NCI Organ Dysfunction Working Group Study NCI-6432

    PubMed Central

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Sarantopoulos, John; Mulkerin, Daniel; Shibata, Stephen I; Hamilton, Anne; Dowlati, Afshin; Mani, Sridhar; Rudek, Michelle A; Takimoto, Chris H; Neuwirth, Rachel; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Ivy, Percy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib undergoes oxidative hepatic metabolism. This study (NCI-6432; NCT00091117) was conducted to evaluate bortezomib pharmacokinetics and safety in patients with varying degrees of hepatic impairment, to inform dosing recommendations in these special populations. Methods Patients received bortezomib on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of 21-day cycles. Patients were assigned to four hepatic function groups based on the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group classification. Those with normal function received bortezomib at the 1.3 mg/m2 standard dose. Patients with severe, moderate, and mild impairment received escalating doses from 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mg/m2, respectively, up to a 1.3 mg/m2 maximum. Serial blood samples were collected for 24 hours post-dose on days 1 and 8, cycle 1, for bortezomib plasma concentration measurements. Results Sixty-one patients were treated, including 14 with normal hepatic function and 17, 12, and 18 with mild, moderate, and severe impairment, respectively. Mild hepatic impairment did not alter dose-normalized bortezomib exposure (AUC0-tlast) or Cmax compared with patients with normal function. Mean dose-normalized AUC0-tlast was increased by approximately 60% on day 8 in patients with moderate or severe impairment. Conclusions Patients with mild hepatic impairment do not require a starting dose adjustment of bortezomib. Patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment should be started at a reduced dose of 0.7 mg/m2. PMID:22394984

  18. Bone Penetration of Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid Evaluated by Population Pharmacokinetics and Monte Carlo Simulation▿

    PubMed Central

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Kinzig, Martina; Bulitta, Jürgen B.; Hennig, Friedrich F.; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sörgel, Fritz; Gusinde, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Amoxicillin (amoxicilline)-clavulanic acid has promising activity against pathogens that cause bone infections. We present the first evaluation of the bone penetration of a beta-lactam by population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic profiling via Monte Carlo simulations. Twenty uninfected patients undergoing total hip replacement received a single intravenous infusion of 2,000 mg/200 mg amoxicillin-clavulanic acid before surgery. Blood and bone specimens were collected. Bone samples were pulverized under liquid nitrogen with a cryogenic mill, including an internal standard. The drug concentrations in serum and total bone were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We used NONMEM and S-ADAPT for population pharmacokinetic analysis and a target time of the non-protein-bound drug concentration above the MIC for ≥50% of the dosing interval for near-maximal bactericidal activity in serum. The median of the ratio of the area under the curve (AUC) for bone/AUC for serum was 20% (10th to 90th percentile for between-subject variability [variability], 16 to 25%) in cortical bone and 18% (variability, 11 to 29%) in cancellous bone for amoxicillin and 15% (variability, 11 to 21%) in cortical bone and 10% (variability, 5.1 to 21%) in cancellous bone for clavulanic acid. Analysis in S-ADAPT yielded similar results. The equilibration half-lives between serum and bone were 12 min for amoxicillin and 14 min for clavulanic acid. For a 30-min infusion of 2,000 mg/200 mg amoxicillin-clavulanic acid every 4 h, amoxicillin achieved robust (≥90%) probabilities of target attainment (PTAs) for MICs of ≤12 mg/liter in serum and 2 to 3 mg/liter in bone and population PTAs above 95% against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in bone and serum. The AUC of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was 5 to 10 times lower in bone than in serum, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid achieved a rapid equilibrium and favorable population PTAs against pathogens commonly

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a 1,3-dicyclohexylurea nanosuspension formulation to support early efficacy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlstrom, Jan L.; Chiang, Po-Chang; Ghosh, Sarbani; Warren, Chad J.; Wene, Steve P.; Albin, Lesley A.; Smith, Mark E.; Roberds, Steven L.

    2007-06-01

    Time and resource constraints necessitate increasingly early decisions to advance or halt pre-clinical drug discovery programs. Early discovery or “tool” compounds may be potent inhibitors of new targets, but all too often they exhibit poor pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties that make early assessment of in vivo efficacy difficult. 1,3-Dicyclohexylurea, a potent and selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), reduces blood pressure in hypertensive preclinical animal models when administered intraperitoneally using DMSO/corn oil as a delivery vehicle. However, the poor aqueous solubility of DCU poses a challenge for in vivo dosing in a multiple dose situation. Therefore, we developed a nanosuspension formulation of DCU to support oral, intravenous bolus and intravenous infusion dosing. Use of the nanosuspension formulation maintained DCU free plasma levels above the sEH IC50 and demonstrated that the application of formulation technology can accelerate in vivo evaluation of new targets by enabling pharmacodynamic studies of poorly soluble compounds.

  20. Prospective evaluation of pharmacokinetically guided dosing of carboplatin in Japanese patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimokata, Tomoya; Ando, Yuichi; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hamada, Akinobu; Kawada, Kenji; Saito, Hideyuki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    The Calvert formula, that is, carboplatin dose (mg) = target area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) × (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] + 25), has not been validated in Japanese subjects in whom the GFR was accurately measured. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the validity of this formula for Japanese patients with cancer and modify it for this population. The GFR was measured on the basis of inulin clearance, which is considered to reflect the accurate GFR. Inulin clearance was measured in 28 patients with cancer. The adjusted 24-h creatinine clearance (24-h Ccr) was unbiased (mean prediction error [MPE] ± SE = -2.3 ± 4.5%) and acceptably precise (root mean squared error = 23.7%) for GFR assessment. The pharmacokinetics of carboplatin were analyzed in 21 patients with a GFR of 17.2-91.4 mL/min. The original Calvert formula overestimated carboplatin clearance, resulting in an MPE of 14.3%. When we revised the Calvert formula for Japanese patients by substituting a non-renal clearance of 15 for 25, that is, dose = target AUC × (GFR + 15), the MPE decreased to -0.1% (P < 0.001). We conclude that the adjusted 24-h Ccr is acceptably precise for GFR assessment, and the non-renal clearance of carboplatin is suggested to be lower in Japanese patients with cancer than in their Western counterparts.

  1. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of tobramycin DPI formulations in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; Goole, Jonathan; Van Gansbeke, Bernard; Blocklet, Didier; Knoop, Christiane; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2008-02-01

    Tobramycin dry powder formulations were evaluated by gamma scintigraphy and pharmacokinetic methods. In an open single-dose, three-treatment, three-period, cross-over study, nine cystic fibrosis patients received both the two test products and the reference product Tobi (nebulizer solution) in order to assess lung deposition and systemic comparative bioavailability of the two investigational inhaled products versus the marketed inhaled comparator product. The percentage of dose (mean+/-SD) in the whole lung was 53.0+/-10.0% for the tobramycin Form 1, 34.1+/-12.4% for the tobramycin Form 2 and 7.6+/-2.7% for the comparator product Tobi. Lung deposition expressed as a percentage of the nominal dose was thus estimated to be 7.0 and 4.5 times higher for the Tobra Form 1 and Tobra Form 2 than for the Tobi, respectively. Furthermore, the systemic bioavailability (adjusted to correspond to the same drug dose as that of the comparator product deposited in the lung) was found to be 1.6 times higher for the comparator product Tobi than for the two DPI formulations. The principal advantages of the DPI formulations include reduced systemic availability and thus, side effects, and higher dose levels of the drug at the site of drug action. PMID:17574400

  2. High-heat tank safety issues evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1993-05-10

    Subsection (b) of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, {open_quotes}Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation{close_quotes} (PL 101-510), requires the Secretary of Energy to {open_quotes}identify those tanks that may have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to uncontrolled increase in temperature or pressure{close_quotes}. One of the tanks that has been identified to meet this criteria is single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (Wilson and Reep 1991). This report presents the results of an evaluation of the safety issue associated with tank 241-C-106: the continued cooling required for high heat generation in tank 241-C-106. If tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, continued addition of water for cooling could possibly increase the amount of leakage to the soil column. In turn, if the current methods of cooling tank 241-C-106 are stopped, the sludge temperatures may exceed established temperature limits, the long term structural integrity of the tank liner and concrete would be jeopardized, leading to an unacceptable release to the environment. Among other conclusions, this evaluation has determined that tank 241-C-106 contains enough heat generating wastes to justify retaining this tank on the list {open_quotes}Single-Shell Tanks With High Heat Loads (>40,000 Btu/H){close_quotes} and that to confirm the structural integrity needed for the retrieval of the contents of tank 241-C-106, an updated structural analysis and thermal analysis need to be conducted. Other findings of this evaluation are also reported.

  3. Effect of severe renal impairment on umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol pharmacokinetics and safety: a single-blind, nonrandomized study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rashmi; Hardes, Kelly; Brealey, Noushin; Tombs, Lee; Preece, Andrew; Kelleher, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Background Umeclidinium and vilanterol, long-acting bronchodilators for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are primarily eliminated via the hepatic route; however, severe renal impairment may adversely affect some elimination pathways other than the kidney. Objectives To evaluate the effect of severe renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol. Methods Nine patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min) and nine matched healthy volunteers received a single dose of umeclidinium 125 μg; and after a 7- to 14-day washout, a single dose of umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg. Results No clinically relevant increases in plasma umeclidinium or vilanterol systemic exposure (area under the curve or maximum observed plasma concentration) were observed following umeclidinium 125 μg or umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration. On average, the amount of umeclidinium excreted in 24 hours in urine (90% confidence interval) was 88% (81%–93%) and 89% (81%–93%) lower in patients with severe renal impairment compared with healthy volunteers following umeclidinium 125 μg and umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration, respectively. Treatments were well tolerated in both populations. Conclusion Umeclidinium 125 μg or umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 μg administration to patients with severe renal impairment did not demonstrate clinically relevant increases in systemic exposure compared with healthy volunteers. No dose adjustment for umeclidinium and umeclidinium/vilanterol is warranted in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:25565796

  4. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  5. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Zanamivir Treatment in Hospitalized Adults With Influenza: An Open-label, Multicenter, Single-Arm, Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Francisco M.; Man, Choy Y.; van der Horst, Charles; Francois, Bruno; Garot, Denis; Máňez, Rafael; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Lorente, José A.; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Brealey, David; Zhao, Henry H.; Weller, Steve; Yates, Phillip J.; Peppercorn, Amanda F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Intravenous zanamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor suitable for treatment of hospitalized patients with severe influenza. Methods. Patients were treated with intravenous zanamivir 600 mg twice daily, adjusted for renal impairment, for up to 10 days. Primary outcomes included adverse events (AEs), and clinical/laboratory parameters. Pharmacokinetics, viral load, and disease course were also assessed. Results. One hundred thirty patients received intravenous zanamivir (median, 5 days; range, 1–11) a median of 4.5 days (range, 1–7) after onset of influenza; 83% required intensive care. The most common influenza type/subtype was A/H1N1pdm09 (71%). AEs and serious AEs were reported in 85% and 34% of patients, respectively; serious AEs included bacterial pulmonary infections (8%), respiratory failure (7%), sepsis or septic shock (5%), and cardiogenic shock (5%). No drug-related trends in safety parameters were identified. Protocol-defined liver events were observed in 13% of patients. The 14- and 28-day all-cause mortality rates were 13% and 17%. No fatalities were considered zanamivir related. Pharmacokinetic data showed dose adjustments for renal impairment yielded similar zanamivir exposures. Ninety-three patients, positive at baseline for influenza by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, showed a median decrease in viral load of 1.42 log10 copies/mL after 2 days of treatment. Conclusions. Safety, pharmacokinetic and clinical outcome data support further investigation of intravenous zanamivir. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01014988. PMID:23983212

  6. First-in-man safety and pharmacokinetics of synthetic ozonide OZ439 demonstrates an improved exposure profile relative to other peroxide antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Moehrle, Joerg J; Duparc, Stephan; Siethoff, Christoph; Giersbergen, Paul L M; Craft, J Carl; Arbe-Barnes, Sarah; Charman, Susan A; Gutierrez, Maria; Wittlin, Sergio; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Aims To assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of a new synthetic ozonide antimalarial, OZ439, in a first-in-man, double-blind study in healthy volunteers. Methods OZ439 was administered as single oral daily doses of a capsule formulation (50–1200 mg) or an oral dispersion (400–1600 mg, fed and fasted states) and for up to 3 days as an oral dispersion (200–800 mg day−1). Plasma concentrations of OZ439 and its metabolites were measured by LC-MS. Results The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of OZ439 was characterized by a tmax of around 3 h, followed by a multiphasic profile with a terminal half-life of 25–30 h. The PK parameters were approximately dose proportional for each group and profiles of the metabolites followed a similar pattern to that of the parent compound. Following dosing for 3 days, accumulation was less than two-fold but steady-state was not achieved. In the presence of food, no effect was observed on the t1/2 of OZ439 while the exposure was increased by 3 to 4.5-fold. Exposure was higher and inter-subject variability was reduced when OZ439 was administered as an oral dispersion compared with a capsule. The urinary clearance of OZ439 and its metabolites was found to be negligible and OZ439 did not induce CYP3A4. The antimalarial activity profiles of a subset of serum samples suggested that the major antimalarial activity originated from OZ439 rather than from any of the metabolites. Conclusion The safety and pharmacokinetic profile of OZ439 merits progression to phase 2a proof of concept studies in the target population of acute uncomplicated malaria. PMID:22759078

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Gentamicin Pharmacokinetic Model That Facilitates Opportunistic Gentamicin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Germovsek, Eva; Kent, Alison; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Lutsar, Irja; Klein, Nigel; Turner, Mark A; Sharland, Mike; Nielsen, Elisabet I; Heath, Paul T; Standing, Joseph F

    2016-08-01

    Trough gentamicin therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is time-consuming, disruptive to neonatal clinical care, and a patient safety issue. Bayesian models could allow TDM to be performed opportunistically at the time of routine blood tests. This study aimed to develop and prospectively evaluate a new gentamicin model and a novel Bayesian computer tool (neoGent) for TDM use in neonatal intensive care. We also evaluated model performance for predicting peak concentrations and the area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 h to time t h (AUC0- t). A pharmacokinetic meta-analysis was performed on pooled data from three studies (1,325 concentrations from 205 patients). A 3-compartment model was used with the following covariates: allometric weight scaling, postmenstrual and postnatal age, and serum creatinine concentration. Final parameter estimates (standard errors) were as follows: clearance, 6.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg of body weight; central volume (V), 26.5 (0.6) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q), 2.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V2, 21.2 (1.5) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q2), 0.3 (0.05) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V3, 148 (52.0) liters/70 kg. The model's ability to predict trough concentrations from an opportunistic sample was evaluated in a prospective observational cohort study that included data from 163 patients and 483 concentrations collected in five hospitals. Unbiased trough predictions were obtained; the median (95% confidence interval [CI]) prediction error was 0.0004 (-1.07, 0.84) mg/liter. Results also showed that peaks and AUC0- t values could be predicted (from one randomly selected sample) with little bias but relative imprecision, with median (95% CI) prediction errors being 0.16 (-4.76, 5.01) mg/liter and 10.8 (-24.9, 62.2) mg · h/liter, respectively. neoGent was implemented in R/NONMEM and in the freely available TDMx software. PMID:27270281

  8. First‐in‐human study assessing safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of BI 409306, a selective phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitor, in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Katja; Feifel, Ulrich; Hoch, Anja; Zimdahl‐Gelling, Heike; Sand, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, dose proportionality and relative bioavailability of tablet and oral solution formulations of BI 409306 in healthy male subjects, and to compare the safety and pharmacokinetics in subjects who were extensive metabolizers (EMs) or poor metabolizers (PMs) of cytochrome P450 (CYP)‐2C19. Methods The present randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, single‐centre study evaluated single rising doses of BI 409306 (0.5–500 mg) administered as a tablet or oral solution to EMs or PMs. Results Of 80 enrolled subjects (mean age 36.7 years), 79 (CYP2C19 EMs, 71; CYP2C19 PMs, eight) received treatment and completed the study. Adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate in intensity. Overall, 17/71 (23.9%) EMs and 6/8 (75.0%) PMs experienced 28 and eight AEs, respectively, of which, 25 and seven AEs, respectively, were considered to be drug related. The most frequently reported AEs were nervous system and eye disorders; all occurred shortly (20–30 min) after administration and mostly resolved within 1–2 h. No serious AEs occurred. BI 409306 systemic absorption and elimination were rapid; peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached <1 h after drug administration, and the half‐life ranged from 0.99 h to 2.71 h. Both the tablet and oral solution resulted in similar exposures. In PMs, at dose levels of 10 mg and 100 mg, Cmax was 2.2–2.3‐fold higher, and the area under the plasma concentration–time curve over the time interval 0 extrapolated to infinity was 4.1–5.0‐fold higher compared with EMs. Conclusions In healthy male subjects, BI 409306 was generally safe and well tolerated, with rapid absorption and elimination. Systemic exposure was higher in CYP2C19 PMs than EMs at the same dose level. PMID:27378314

  9. Systematic safety evaluation on photoluminescent carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Gao, Zhongcai; Gao, Guo; Wo, Yan; Wang, Yuxia; Shen, Guangxia; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared using the improved nitric acid oxidation method. The C-dots were characterized by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The C-dots were subjected to systematic safety evaluation via acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, and genotoxicity experiments (including mouse bone marrow micronuclear test and Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test). The results showed that the C-dots were successfully prepared with good stability, high dispersibility, and water solubility. At all studied C-dot dosages, no significant toxic effect, i.e., no abnormality or lesion, was observed in the organs of the animals. Therefore, the C-dots are non-toxic to mice under any dose and have potential use in fluorescence imaging in vivo, tumor cell tracking, and others.

  10. Metabolite profiling and pharmacokinetic evaluation of hydrocortisone in a perfused three-dimensional human liver bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M; Hughes, David J; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Dyer, Rachel L; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Wishnok, John S; Griffith, Linda G; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2015-07-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte-Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase-ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8-10% of the loss, and 45-52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour(-1), 6.6 × 10(-5) l⋅hour(-1), and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  11. Arthroscopic latarjet procedure: safety evaluation in cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Assunção, Jorge Henrique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in cadavers. METHODS : Twelve cadaveric shoulders underwent arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in our laboratory for arthroscopy, by four different surgeons. Following surgery, the specimens were subjected to radiographic examination and evaluated by an independent examiner. Nineteen parameters were evaluated, including the coracoid graft fixation, positioning and angulation of the screws, neurological damage and integrity of tendons. RESULTS : Four procedures were considered to be satisfactory, with no difference among the surgeons. The mean angulation of the screws was 27.2°. The subscapularis splitting was, on average, 17.8mm from the upper edge. The coracoid graft was properly positioned relative to equator of the glenoid in 11 cases. There was no injury to the axillary or musculocutaneous nerves. The main complications were: interposition of soft tissue, suprascapular nerve injury, articular deviation of the graft, diastasis and conjoined tendon injury. CONCLUSION : The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a complex technique in which each step must be precise to reduce the risk of complications. Our study showed a high risk of failure of the procedure. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453657

  12. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management.

  13. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management. PMID:25374273

  14. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Quick-Dissolving Polymeric Vaginal Films Delivering the Antiretroviral IQP-0528 for Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Priya; Zhang, Jining; Martin, Amy; Kelley, Kristin; McNicholl, Janet M; Buckheit, Robert W; Smith, James M; Ham, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, microbicides or drugs delivered as quick-dissolving films may be more acceptable to women than gels because of their compact size, minimal waste, lack of an applicator, and easier storage and transport. This has the potential to improve adherence to promising products for preexposure prophylaxis. Vaginal films containing IQP-0528, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, were evaluated for their pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Polymeric films (22 by 44 by 0.1 mm; providing 75% of a human dose) containing IQP-0528 (1.5%, wt/wt) with and without poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle encapsulation were inserted vaginally into pigtailed macaques in a crossover study design (n = 6). With unencapsulated drug, the median (range) vaginal fluid concentrations of IQP-0528 were 160.97 (2.73 to 2,104), 181.79 (1.86 to 15,800), and 484.50 (8.26 to 4,045) μg/ml at 1, 4, and 24 h after film application, respectively. Median vaginal tissue IQP-0528 concentrations at 24 h were 3.10 (0.03 to 222.58) μg/g. The values were similar at locations proximal, medial, and distal to the cervix. The IQP-0528 nanoparticle-formulated films delivered IQP-0528 in vaginal tissue and secretions at levels similar to those obtained with the unencapsulated formulation. A single application of either formulation did not disturb the vaginal microflora or the pH (7.24 ± 0.84 [mean ± standard deviation]). The high mucosal IQP-0528 levels delivered by both vaginal film formulations were between 1 and 5 log higher than the in vitro 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) of 0.146 μg/ml. The excellent coverage and high mucosal levels of IQP-0528, well above the IC90, suggest that the films may be protective and warrant further evaluation in a vaginal repeated low dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) transmission study in macaques and clinically in women. PMID:27139475

  15. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of pasireotide LAR in patients with acromegaly: a randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase I study.

    PubMed

    Petersenn, Stephan; Bollerslev, Jens; Arafat, Ayman M; Schopohl, Jochen; Serri, Omar; Katznelson, Laurence; Lasher, Janet; Hughes, Gareth; Hu, Ke; Shen, George; Reséndiz, Karina Hermosillo; Giannone, Vanessa; Beckers, Albert

    2014-11-01

    Pasireotide (SOM230), a multireceptor-targeted somatostatin analogue, has exhibited favorable safety/tolerability in several clinical studies. A long-acting-release (LAR) formulation of pasireotide may offer advantages over the subcutaneous formulation. This randomized, open-label, Phase I study evaluated the safety, PK, and PD of pasireotide LAR 20, 40, or 60 mg/month in patients with acromegaly. Safety assessments and blood samples for PK and PD were taken at designated time points. Thirty-five patients were randomized and completed the study. Steady-state pasireotide concentrations were achieved following three monthly injections. Trough pasireotide concentrations (ng/mL) 28 days after each injection were: 2.48, 4.16, and 3.10 (20 mg group); 6.42, 6.62, and 7.12 (40 mg group); and 9.51, 11.7, and 13.0 (60 mg group). At study end, 51% and 57% of patients achieved GH levels ≤2.5 μg/L and IGF-1 levels below ULN, respectively. Compared with baseline, fasting blood glucose and HbA1c levels increased, whereas fasting blood insulin levels decreased. Acromegaly symptoms were generally improved. Adverse events were mostly gastrointestinal and mild/moderate. Pasireotide LAR was generally well tolerated. Steady-state PK was achieved after three monthly doses; exposures were approximately dose proportional. Control of GH, IGF-1, and symptoms improved, suggesting that pasireotide LAR may be an effective treatment for acromegaly.

  16. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between cilnidipine and valsartan, in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieon; Lee, Howard; Jang, Kyungho; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Shin, Dongseong; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although cilnidipine and valsartan are widely coadministered to patients with hypertension, their drug–drug interaction potential has not been investigated. This study compared the pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and tolerability profiles of cilnidipine and valsartan, both alone and in combination, in healthy male subjects. Patients and methods Fifty-four subjects, enrolled into an open-label, single-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study, randomly received cilnidipine (10 mg), valsartan (160 mg), or both according to one of six sequences. Blood samples were collected at baseline and up to 24 hours after drug administration in each period. Plasma concentrations of cilnidipine and valsartan were determined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to the last measurable time (AUClast) were estimated using a noncompartmental method. Tolerability was evaluated by assessing adverse events (AEs), vital signs, electrocardiograms, and clinical laboratory tests. Blood pressure was also measured for PD assessment. Results A total of 51 subjects completed the study. The PK profile of cilnidipine was not significantly affected by coadministered valsartan; the geometric mean ratio and 90% confidence interval (90% CI) of AUClast for cilnidipine with and without valsartan was 1.04 (0.98–1.10). Likewise, cilnidipine did not affect the PK of valsartan; the geometric mean ratio (90% CI) of AUClast for valsartan with and without cilnidipine was 0.94 (0.83–1.07). Coadministration of cilnidipine and valsartan reduced blood pressure in an additive way. No serious AEs were reported, and both cilnidipine and valsartan were well tolerated. Conclusion Coadministered cilnidipine and valsartan do not cause a significant PK or PD interaction, and they are well tolerated. PMID:25336921

  17. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical evaluations on ceftriaxone in neonates and premature infants].

    PubMed

    Shiro, H; Kusumoto, Y; Satoh, Y; Oikawa, T; Osano, M

    1988-03-01

    Ceftriaxone (CTRX) was clinically evaluated and its pharmacokinetics studied in neonates and premature infants, and the results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. Average blood levels of CTRX after intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg in 3 neonates with birth weights of 2,500 g or more were 45.32 mcg/ml at 15 minutes, 28.91 mcg/ml at 1 hour, 15.76 mcg/ml at 6 hours, and 16.28 mcg/ml at 12 hours, and the half-life was 9.93 hours. The half-life in a newly born premature infant (less than 1 day) was 28.90 hours, and in a premature infant 6 days old it was 12.90 hours. 2. Average blood levels after intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg to 2 neonates aged 0 and 3 days with birth weights of 2,500 g or more, were 129.7 mcg/ml at 15 minutes, 60.94 mcg/ml at 1 hour, 32.04 mcg/ml at 6 hours, and 24.23 mcg/ml at 12 hours, and the half-life was 8.95 hours. The half-life in a newly born premature infant (less than 1 day) was 20.70 hours. 3. Urinary recovery rates of CTRX in 12 hours after intravenous administration of 10 or 20 mg/kg to 6 neonates aged 0 to 3 days (including premature infants) ranged from 13.8 to 50.6%. 4. Clinical efficacies of CTRX were excellent or good in 3 of 4 neonates including infants suspected of having infections (efficacy rate: 75%). 5. As a side effect, diarrhea was noted in 1 case. PMID:3404644

  18. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-yong; Wan, Li-li; Yang, Quan-jun; Han, Yong-long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5 mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40 mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72 h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC–MS–MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40 mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC{sub 0–t} and C{sub max} of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40 mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  19. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Wan, Li-Li; Yang, Quan-Jun; Han, Yong-Long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC-MS-MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC0-t and Cmax of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  20. Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, D P

    2006-06-26

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  1. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture ...

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Internet-Based Pharmacokinetic Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedaya, Mohsen A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based, interactive, learner-centered, asynchronous instructional module for pharmacokinetics that requires minimal computer knowledge to operate. Main components are concept presentation, a simulation exercise, and self-assessment questions. The module has been found effective in teaching the steady state concept at the…

  3. A Safety Index and Method for Flightdeck Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    2000-01-01

    If our goal is to improve safety through machine, interface, and training design, then we must define a metric of flightdeck safety that is usable in the design process. Current measures associated with our notions of "good" pilot performance and ultimate safety of flightdeck performance fail to provide an adequate index of safe flightdeck performance for design evaluation purposes. The goal of this research effort is to devise a safety index and method that allows us to evaluate flightdeck performance holistically and in a naturalistic experiment. This paper uses Reason's model of accident causation (1990) as a basis for measuring safety, and proposes a relational database system and method for 1) defining a safety index of flightdeck performance, and 2) evaluating the "safety" afforded by flightdeck performance for the purpose of design iteration. Methodological considerations, limitations, and benefits are discussed as well as extensions to this work.

  4. The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, and ease of use of a novel portable metered-dose cannabis inhaler in patients with chronic neuropathic pain: a phase 1a study.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Ogintz, Miri; Almog, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is often refractory to standard pharmacological treatments. Although growing evidence supports the use of inhaled cannabis for neuropathic pain, the lack of standard inhaled dosing plays a major obstacle in cannabis becoming a "main stream" pharmacological treatment for neuropathic pain. The objective of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, efficacy, and ease of use of a novel portable thermal-metered-dose inhaler (tMDI) for cannabis in a cohort of eight patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain and on a stable analgesic regimen including medicinal cannabis. In a single-dose, open-label study, patients inhaled a single 15.1 ± 0.1 mg dose of cannabis using the Syqe Inhaler device. Blood samples for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC were taken at baseline and up to 120 minutes. Pain intensity (0-10 VAS), adverse events, and satisfaction score were monitored following the inhalation. A uniform pharmacokinetic profile was exhibited across all participants (Δ(9)-THC plasma Cmax ± SD was 38 ± 10 ng/mL, Tmax ± SD was 3 ± 1 minutes, AUC₀→infinity ± SD was 607 ± 200 ng·min/mL). Higher plasma Cmax increase per mg Δ(9)-THC administered (12.3 ng/mL/mg THC) and lower interindividual variability of Cmax (25.3%), compared with reported alternative modes of THC delivery, were measured. A significant 45% reduction in pain intensity was noted 20 minutes post inhalation (P = .001), turning back to baseline within 90 minutes. Tolerable, lightheadedness, lasting 15-30 minutes and requiring no intervention, was the only reported adverse event. This trial suggests the potential use of the Syqe Inhaler device as a smokeless delivery system of medicinal cannabis, producing a Δ(9)-THC pharmacokinetic profile with low interindividual variation of Cmax, achieving pharmaceutical standards for inhaled drugs. PMID:25118789

  5. The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, and ease of use of a novel portable metered-dose cannabis inhaler in patients with chronic neuropathic pain: a phase 1a study.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Ogintz, Miri; Almog, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is often refractory to standard pharmacological treatments. Although growing evidence supports the use of inhaled cannabis for neuropathic pain, the lack of standard inhaled dosing plays a major obstacle in cannabis becoming a "main stream" pharmacological treatment for neuropathic pain. The objective of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, efficacy, and ease of use of a novel portable thermal-metered-dose inhaler (tMDI) for cannabis in a cohort of eight patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain and on a stable analgesic regimen including medicinal cannabis. In a single-dose, open-label study, patients inhaled a single 15.1 ± 0.1 mg dose of cannabis using the Syqe Inhaler device. Blood samples for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC were taken at baseline and up to 120 minutes. Pain intensity (0-10 VAS), adverse events, and satisfaction score were monitored following the inhalation. A uniform pharmacokinetic profile was exhibited across all participants (Δ(9)-THC plasma Cmax ± SD was 38 ± 10 ng/mL, Tmax ± SD was 3 ± 1 minutes, AUC₀→infinity ± SD was 607 ± 200 ng·min/mL). Higher plasma Cmax increase per mg Δ(9)-THC administered (12.3 ng/mL/mg THC) and lower interindividual variability of Cmax (25.3%), compared with reported alternative modes of THC delivery, were measured. A significant 45% reduction in pain intensity was noted 20 minutes post inhalation (P = .001), turning back to baseline within 90 minutes. Tolerable, lightheadedness, lasting 15-30 minutes and requiring no intervention, was the only reported adverse event. This trial suggests the potential use of the Syqe Inhaler device as a smokeless delivery system of medicinal cannabis, producing a Δ(9)-THC pharmacokinetic profile with low interindividual variation of Cmax, achieving pharmaceutical standards for inhaled drugs.

  6. A food effect study and dose proportionality study to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of bardoxolone methyl in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teuscher, Nathan S; Kelley, Richard J; Dumas, Emily O; Klein, Cheri Enders; Awni, Walid M; Meyer, Colin J

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of food on the plasma pharmacokinetics of bardoxolone methyl, an antioxidant inflammation modulator, at a 20 mg dose, and the dose proportionality of bardoxolone methyl pharmacokinetics from 20 to 80 mg. It was a single-dose study conducted at a single center in 32 healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years using an amorphous spray-dried dispersion formulation of bardoxolone methyl. In Part A, 16 subjects received single 20 mg doses of bardoxolone methyl under fasting and non-fasting conditions. In Part B, 16 subjects received a single 60 or 80 mg dose of bardoxolone methyl and a matching placebo dose under fasting conditions. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken over 120 hours following dose administration. Single dose administration of 20, 60, and 80 mg bardoxolone methyl was safe and well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. Total bardoxolone methyl exposure was unchanged in the presence of food. However, doses of bardoxolone methyl above 20 mg appear to have a saturated dissolution or absorption process and are associated with less than proportional increases in drug exposure. PMID:27128838

  7. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  8. 78 FR 47010 - Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Technical Specifications Task Force Traveler... requesting public comment on the proposed model safety evaluation (SE) for plant- specific adoption of... ADAMS Accession Number ML13053A075. The proposed model SE for plant-specific adoption of...

  9. The safety-critical software evaluation assistant (SEA)

    SciTech Connect

    Persons, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Computer Safety and Reliability Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is researching the evaluation of software used in safety-critical applications. This paper describes one, of the research and development efforts currently underway to model the software evaluation process and to develop a software evaluation tool. One of the primary techniques available for determining the safety of software proposed for use in safety-critical applications is to evaluate the software development process and the resulting products. This model of the evaluation process was influenced by several factors the underlying motivation was to identify, control and reduce the risk inherent in building safety-critical software systems. This prototype tool, the Software Evaluation Assistant (SEA), assists and guides evaluators as they analyze safety-critical software. SEA describes specific evaluation goals, provides a brief overview of the specific evaluation process, identifies potential, risks of not performing the evaluation, identifies the skills required to carry out the evaluation of a particular topic, identifies the material that should typically be available for the evaluation, and poses questions used to examine and rate the software item.

  10. Critically safety evaluation for K Basins sandfilters

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Criticality safety for K Basins sandfilters was considered. No credible normal or off-normal scenarios were determined which could compromise criticality safety and result in a K{sub eff} {>=} 0.98. The conclusion is that, due to the physical form and isotopic distribution of the fissionable material, there is no possibility of a nuclear criticality in the sandfilter. For this reason, there is no need for a criticality alarm system for the K Basins sandfilters.

  11. A Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Presurgical Trial of Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Springett, Gregory M.; Husain, Kazim; Neuger, Anthony; Centeno, Barbara; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Hutchinson, Tai Z.; Lush, Richard M.; Sebti, Saïd; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol (VEDT), a natural vitamin E from plants, has shown anti-neoplastic and chemoprevention activity in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigated VEDT in patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia in a window-of-opportunity preoperative clinical trial to assess its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and apoptotic activity. Methods Patients received oral VEDT at escalating doses (from 200 to 3200 mg) daily for 13 days before surgery and one dose on the day of surgery. Dose escalation followed a three-plus-three trial design. Our primary endpoints were safety, VEDT pharmacokinetics, and monitoring of VEDT-induced neoplastic cell apoptosis (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00985777). Findings In 25 treated patients, no dose-limiting toxicity was encountered; thus no maximum-tolerated dose was reached. One patient had a drug-related adverse event (diarrhea) at a 3200-mg daily dose level. The effective half-life of VEDT was ~ 4 h. VEDT concentrations in plasma and exposure profiles were quite variable but reached levels that are bioactive in preclinical models. Biological activity, defined as significant induction of apoptosis in neoplastic cells as measured by increased cleaved caspase-3 levels, was seen in the majority of patients at the 400-mg to 1600-mg daily dose levels. Interpretation VEDT from 200 to 1600 mg daily taken orally for 2 weeks before pancreatic surgery was well tolerated, reached bioactive levels in blood, and significantly induced apoptosis in the neoplastic cells of patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia. These promising results warrant further clinical investigation of VEDT for chemoprevention and/or therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26844278

  12. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor Figitumumab (CP-751,871) in Combination with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Daniel D.; Pollak, Michael N.; Cohen, Roger B.; Eisenberg, Peter D.; Haluska, Paul; Yin, Donghua; Lipton, Allan; Demers, Laurence; Leitzel, Kim; Hixon, Mary L.; Terstappen, Leon W.; Garland, Linda; Paz-Ares, Luis G.; Cardenal, Felipe; Langer, Corey J.; Gualberto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This phase 1 study was conducted to determine the recommended phase 2 dose of the selective insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) inhibitor figitumumab (F, CP-751,871) given in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Patients received paclitaxel 200 mg/m2, carboplatin (area under the curve of 6), and F (0.05–20 mg/kg) q3 weeks for up to six cycles. Patients with objective response or stable disease were eligible to receive additional cycles of single agent F until disease progression. Safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic endpoints were investigated. Results Forty-two patients, including 35 with stages IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), were enrolled in eight dose escalation cohorts. A maximum tolerated dose was not identified. Severe adverse events possibly related to F included fatigue, diarrhea, hyperglycemia, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase elevation, and thrombocytopenia (one case each). F plasma exposure parameters increased with dose. Fifteen objective responses (RECIST) were reported, including two complete responses in NSCLC and ovarian carcinoma. Notably, levels of bioactive IGF-1 seemed to influence response to treatment with objective responses in patients with a high baseline-free IGF-1 to IGF binding protein-3 ratio seen only in the 10 and 20 mg/kg dosing cohorts. Conclusions F was well tolerated in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin. Based on its favorable safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties, the maximal feasible dose of 20 mg/kg has been selected for further investigation. PMID:19745765

  13. Safety and pharmacokinetics of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in adults with clinically stable schizophrenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ascending multiple doses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patrick; Dirks, Bryan; Gertsik, Lev; Walling, David; Stevenson, Annette; Corcoran, Mary; Raychaudhuri, Aparna; Ermer, James

    2014-12-01

    To assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), a d-amphetamine prodrug, this double-blind study enrolled adults with clinically stable schizophrenia who were adherent (≥12 weeks) to antipsychotic pharmacotherapy. The participants received placebo or ascending LDX doses (50, 70, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg) daily for 5 days at each dose (dose periods, 1-6; days, 1-5). Of the 31 enrolled participants, 27 completed the study (placebo, n = 6; LDX, n = 21). Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were reported by 4 participants receiving placebo and by 23 participants receiving LDX (all doses) with no serious AEs while on active treatment. For all periods, the mean postdose change on day 5 (up to 12 hours postdose) in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse, respectively, ranged from -4.62 to 8.05 mm Hg, -3.67 to 4.43 mm Hg, and -3.57 to 14.43 beats per minute for placebo and -3.83 to 11.25 mm Hg, -1.55 to 5.80 mm Hg, and -0.36 to 21.26 beats per minute for LDX. With ascending LDX dose, the mean (SD) maximum plasma concentration for LDX-derived d-amphetamine ranged from 51.68 (10.28) to 266.27 (56.55) ng/mL. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve for 24 hours ranged from 801.8 (170.2) to 4397.9 (1085.9) ng[BULLET OPERATOR]h/mL. The d-amphetamine maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve increased linearly with ascending LDX dose. Antipsychotic agents did not markedly affect d-amphetamine pharmacokinetics. Over a wide range of ascending doses, LDX safety profile in adults with schizophrenia was consistent with previous findings with no unexpected treatment-emergent AEs. Pulse tended to increase with LDX dose; overall, blood pressure did not increase with LDX dose. Consistent with previous studies, pharmacokinetic parameters increased linearly with increasing LDX dose.

  14. Safety and biosimilarity of ior(®) EPOCIM compared with Eprex(®) based on toxicologic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic studies in the Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Pucaj, Kresimir; Riddle, Katherine; Taylor, Simon R; Ledon, Nuris; Bolger, Gordon T

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the safety, pharmacodynamic (PD), and pharmacokinetic (PK) biosimilarity of the human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) products ior(®) EPOCIM and Eprex(®) following a 28-day repeated intravenous dose administration in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats with a 14-day recovery period. Safety profiling was based on clinical observations, clinical pathology, and pathology findings for control rats dosed with vehicle and rats dosed either with 30, 300, and 600 I.U./kg of ior(®) EPOCIM or 600 I.U. of Eprex(®) . Adverse findings for both ior(®) EPOCIM and Eprex(®) were similar and were a consequence of thrombotic events (ulcerative skin lesions, swollen hock joints/lameness, stomach ulcers) and decreased body weight gains, all known adverse reactions to this class of drug in rats. With the exception of stomach ulcers, all other adverse findings were fully reversible. Neither drug stimulated the production of antidrug antibodies. As expected, ior(®) EPOCIM and Eprex(®) both increased reticulocyte, red blood cell, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels in rats. The PK of EPO following dosing with ior(®) EPOCIM was well behaved and consistent with the literature. The results of this study imply that ior(®) EPOCIM and Eprex(®) had safety profiles, PD responses, and toxicokinetic profiles that were biosimilar.

  15. Genetic variation in aryl N-acetyltransferase results in significant differences in the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of amifampridine (3,4-diaminopyridine) phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Haroldsen, Peter E; Garovoy, Marvin R; Musson, Donald G; Zhou, Huiyu; Tsuruda, Laurie; Hanson, Boyd; O’Neill, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of amifampridine phosphate for neuromuscular junction disorders is increasing. The metabolism of amifampridine occurs via polymorphic aryl N-acetyltransferase (NAT), yet its pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profiles, as influenced by this enzyme system, have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of NAT phenotype and genotype on the PK and safety profiles of amifampridine in healthy volunteers (N = 26). A caffeine challenge test and NAT2 genotyping were used to delineate subjects into slow and fast acetylators for PK and tolerability assessment of single, escalating doses of amifampridine (up to 30 mg) and in multiple daily doses (20 mg QID) of amifampridine. The results showed that fast acetylator phenotypes displayed significantly lower Cmax, AUC, and shorter t1/2 for amifampridine than slow acetylators. Plasma concentrations of the N-acetyl metabolite were approximately twofold higher in fast acetylators. Gender differences were not observed. Single doses of amifampridine demonstrated dose linear PKs. Amifampridine achieved steady state plasma levels within 1 day of dosing four times daily. No accumulation or time-dependent changes in amifampridine PK parameters occurred. Overall, slow acetylators reported 73 drug-related treatment-emergent adverse events versus 6 in fast acetylators. Variations in polymorphic NAT corresponding with fast and slow acetylator phenotypes significantly affects the PK and safety profiles of amifampridine. PMID:25692017

  16. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  17. Development and evaluation of a Bayesian pharmacokinetic estimator and optimal, sparse sampling strategies for ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Kashuba, A D; Ballow, C H; Forrest, A

    1996-01-01

    Data were gathered during an activity-controlled trial in which seriously ill, elderly patients were randomized to receive intravenous ceftazidime or ciprofloxacin and for which adaptive feedback control of drug concentrations in plasma and activity profiles was prospectively performed. The adaptive feedback control algorithm for ceftazidime used an initial population model, a maximum a posteriori (MAP)-Bayesian pharmacokinetic parameter value estimator, and an optimal, sparse sampling strategy for ceftazidime that had been derived from data in the literature obtained from volunteers. Iterative two-stage population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to develop an unbiased MAP-Bayesian estimator and updated optimal, sparse sampling strategies. The final median values of the population parameters were follows: the volume of distribution of the central compartment was equal to 0.249 liter/kg, the volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment was equal to 0.173 liter/kg, the distributional clearance between the central and peripheral compartments was equal to 0.2251 liter/h/kg, the slope of the total clearance (CL) versus the creatinine clearance (CLCR) was equal to 0.000736 liter/h/kg of CL/1 ml/min/1.73 m2 of CLCR, and nonrenal clearance was equal to + 0.00527 liter/h/kg. Optimal sampling times were dependent on CLCR; for CLCR of > or = 30 ml/min/1.73 m2, the optimal sampling times were 0.583, 3.0, 7.0, and 16.0 h and, for CLCR of < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2, optimal sampling times were 0.583, 4.15, 11.5, and 24.0 h. The study demonstrates that because pharmacokinetic information from volunteers may often not be reflective of specialty populations such as critically ill elderly individuals, iterative two-stage population pharmacokinetic analysis, MAP-Bayesian parameter estimation, and optimal, sparse sampling strategy can be important tools in characterizing their pharmacokinetics. PMID:8843294

  18. Criticality safety benchmark evaluation project: Recovering the past

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, E.F.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of the Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company is provided in this paper. The purpose of the project is to provide a source of evaluated criticality safety experiments in an easily usable format. Another project goal is to search for any experiments that may have been lost or contain discrepancies, and to determine if they can be used. Results of evaluated experiments are being published as US DOE handbooks.

  19. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectivenessof the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  20. The evaluation of the safety benefits of combined passive and on-board active safety applications.

    PubMed

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006-2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectiveness of the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  1. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermal Generator, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  2. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  3. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  4. A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the effect of oral doses of rizatriptan 10 mg on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Shadle, C R; Liu, G; Goldberg, M R

    2000-03-01

    Rizatriptan (MAXALT), a potent, oral 5-HT1B/1D agonist with a rapid onset of action, is available now for the acute treatment of migraine. This study examined the pharmacokinetic and clinical interaction between rizatriptan 10 mg and the components (ethinyl estradiol [EE] 35 micrograms and norethindrone [NET] 1.0 mg) of a well-established oral contraceptive combination product, ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. Levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a protein increased by EE to which NET binds, were also examined. In this two-period crossover study, 20 healthy young female subjects received a coadministration of 8 days of rizatriptan treatment (6 days of single-dose 10 mg rizatriptan and 2 days of multiple-dose rizatriptan, 10 mg q 4 hours for three doses, giving a total daily dose of 30 mg on Days 7 and 8) or matching placebo along with their daily dose (one tablet) of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 within their oral contraceptive cycle. Plasma was sampled for EE, NET, and SHBG concentrations. Safety evaluations included routine laboratory safety studies, physical examinations, and monitoring for ECG, vital signs, and adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of EE or NET between the rizatriptan and placebo treatment periods, thus indicating that rizatriptan had no meaningful effect on the disposition of either the EE or the NET component of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The SHBG concentration did not change throughout the entire study. Clinically, coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 was well tolerated. Blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature showed no consistent trend or clinically important changes. Adverse events following coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 were similar to those reported when placebo was given with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The findings of this study indicate that there is little potential for dosages as high as 30 mg/day, the maximum recommended dosing schedule, of rizatriptan

  5. Evaluation of a Personal Safety Program with Latino Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Maureen C.; Wurtele, Sandy K.; Alonso, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a personal safety educational program designed for Latino families attending preschools in a large metropolis. Seventy-eight children who participated in the Kids Learning About Safety program were compared to 45 control children. Compared with controls, participating children demonstrated enhanced ability to recognize…

  6. Fire safety evaluation system for NASA office/laboratory buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, H. E.

    1986-11-01

    A fire safety evaluation system for office/laboratory buildings is developed. The system is a life safety grading system. The system scores building construction, hazardous areas, vertical openings, sprinklers, detectors, alarms, interior finish, smoke control, exit systems, compartmentation, and emergency preparedness.

  7. Determination of Appropriate Weight-Based Cutoffs for Empiric Cefazolin Dosing Using Data from a Phase 1 Pharmacokinetics and Safety Study of Cefazolin Administered for Surgical Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients Aged 10 to 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Michael L.; Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Cetnarowski, Wes

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 40 years of worldwide usage, relatively few data have been published on the pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in pediatric surgical patients. The primary objectives of this study were to examine the pharmacokinetics and safety of cefazolin in children 10 to 12 years of age (inclusive) receiving 1 or 2 g of cefazolin, based on body weight. This multiple-center, open-label study enrolled pediatric patients electively scheduled for surgical procedures who required cefazolin as part of their routine clinical management. Patients weighing ≥25 to <50 kg received a 1-g dose, and patients weighing ≥50 to ≤85 kg received a 2-g dose. Postdose pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were conducted following drug administration. Cefazolin concentration-time data were analyzed by using both noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetics methods. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to identify appropriate weight-based cutoffs for the dosing of children aged 10 to 17 years of age. Twelve patients were enrolled in this study and provided the requisite pharmacokinetic data. In general, cefazolin was well tolerated. The mean cefazolin terminal elimination half-life, clearance, and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity in this population were 1.95 h, 0.804 ml/min/kg, and 607 mg · h/liter, respectively. Patients weighing 50 to 60 kg exhibited elevated cefazolin exposures. Observed pharmacokinetic parameters and simulation results indicated that a weight-based cutoff of 60 kg is predicted to provide cefazolin exposure consistent with that observed in normal, healthy adults at recommended doses for surgical prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01904357.) PMID:25941220

  8. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  9. Controlled release of thyrotropin releasing hormone from microspheres: evaluation of release profiles and pharmacokinetics after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Heya, T; Mikura, Y; Nagai, A; Miura, Y; Futo, T; Tomida, Y; Shimizu, H; Toguchi, H

    1994-06-01

    The drug-release kinetics of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) containing copoly(dl-lactic/glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The drug was encapsulated in PLGA using an in-water drying method through a water in oil in water emulsion. The drug release from the PLGA microspheres in vitro correlated well with that in vivo, and pseudo-zero-order release kinetics were observed. The pharmacokinetics of TRH following administration of this controlled-release parenteral dosage form have been also examined in rats. Following a transient increase in the plasma level due to an initial burst, steady-state plasma levels were observed. The duration of drug release estimated from the plasma level was comparable with the results in the in vitro and in vivo release studies. The steady-state plasma levels correlated well with the levels predicted from the pharmacokinetic parameters following a single subcutaneous or intravenous injection of TRH solution. The results of this study confirm the previously reported in vivo sustained release of TRH achieved with this drug-delivery system. PMID:9120809

  10. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  11. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern.

  12. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  13. Influence Map Methodology for Evaluating Systemic Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    "Raising the bar" in safety performance is a critical challenge for many organizations, including Kennedy Space Center. Contributing-factor taxonomies organize information about the reasons accidents occur and therefore are essential elements of accident investigations and safety reporting systems. Organizations must balance efforts to identify causes of specific accidents with efforts to evaluate systemic safety issues in order to become more proactive about improving safety. This project successfully addressed the following two problems: (1) methods and metrics to support the design of effective taxonomies are limited and (2) influence relationships among contributing factors are not explicitly modeled within a taxonomy.

  14. Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  15. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source---Radioisotope Thermal Generator (GPHS-RTG), the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) and the author performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics, Tolerability, and Safety of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine-Piperaquine in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Papua New Guinean Women

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, John M.; Moore, Brioni R.; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Tawat, Somoyang; Yadi, Gumal; Lorry, Lina; Siba, Peter M.; Batty, Kevin T.; Robinson, Leanne J.; Mueller, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The tolerability, safety, and disposition of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and piperaquine (PQ) were assessed in 32 pregnant (second/third trimester) and 33 nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women randomized to adult treatment courses of DHA-PQ (three daily doses) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)-PQ (three daily PQ doses, single dose of SP). All dose adminstrations were observed, and subjects fasted for 2 h postdose. Plasma PQ was assayed by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and DHA was assessed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed using a population-based approach. Both regimens were well tolerated. There was an expected increase in the rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT interval which was independent of pregnancy and treatment. Two pregnant and two nonpregnant women had Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia which cleared within 48 h, and no other subject became slide positive for malaria during 42 days of follow-up. Of 30 pregnant women followed to delivery, 27 (90%) delivered healthy babies and 3 (10%) had stillbirths; these obstetric outcomes are consistent with those in the general population. The area under the plasma PQ concentration-time curve (AUC0–∞) was lower in the pregnant patients (median [interquartile range], 23,721 μg · h/liter [21,481 to 27,951 μg · h/liter] versus 35,644 μg · h/liter [29,546 to 39,541 μg · h/liter]; P < 0.001) in association with a greater clearance relative to bioavailability (73.5 liters/h [69.4 to 78.4] versus 53.8 liters/h [49.7 to 58.2]; P < 0.001), but pregnancy did not influence the pharmacokinetics of DHA. The apparent pharmacokinetic differences between the present study and results from other studies of women with uncomplicated malaria that showed no effect of pregnancy on the AUC0–∞ of PQ and greater bioavailability may reflect differences in postdose fat intake, proportions of women with malaria, and/or racial differences in drug

  17. Population pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-piperaquine in pregnant and nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, John M; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Tawat, Somoyang; Yadi, Gumal; Lorry, Lina; Siba, Peter M; Batty, Kevin T; Robinson, Leanne J; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-07-01

    The tolerability, safety, and disposition of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and piperaquine (PQ) were assessed in 32 pregnant (second/third trimester) and 33 nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women randomized to adult treatment courses of DHA-PQ (three daily doses) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)-PQ (three daily PQ doses, single dose of SP). All dose adminstrations were observed, and subjects fasted for 2 h postdose. Plasma PQ was assayed by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and DHA was assessed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed using a population-based approach. Both regimens were well tolerated. There was an expected increase in the rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT interval which was independent of pregnancy and treatment. Two pregnant and two nonpregnant women had Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia which cleared within 48 h, and no other subject became slide positive for malaria during 42 days of follow-up. Of 30 pregnant women followed to delivery, 27 (90%) delivered healthy babies and 3 (10%) had stillbirths; these obstetric outcomes are consistent with those in the general population. The area under the plasma PQ concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was lower in the pregnant patients (median [interquartile range], 23,721 μg · h/liter [21,481 to 27,951 μg · h/liter] versus 35,644 μg · h/liter [29,546 to 39,541 μg · h/liter]; P < 0.001) in association with a greater clearance relative to bioavailability (73.5 liters/h [69.4 to 78.4] versus 53.8 liters/h [49.7 to 58.2]; P < 0.001), but pregnancy did not influence the pharmacokinetics of DHA. The apparent pharmacokinetic differences between the present study and results from other studies of women with uncomplicated malaria that showed no effect of pregnancy on the AUC0-∞ of PQ and greater bioavailability may reflect differences in postdose fat intake, proportions of women with malaria, and/or racial differences in drug

  18. Population pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-piperaquine in pregnant and nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, John M; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Tawat, Somoyang; Yadi, Gumal; Lorry, Lina; Siba, Peter M; Batty, Kevin T; Robinson, Leanne J; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-07-01

    The tolerability, safety, and disposition of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and piperaquine (PQ) were assessed in 32 pregnant (second/third trimester) and 33 nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women randomized to adult treatment courses of DHA-PQ (three daily doses) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)-PQ (three daily PQ doses, single dose of SP). All dose adminstrations were observed, and subjects fasted for 2 h postdose. Plasma PQ was assayed by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and DHA was assessed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed using a population-based approach. Both regimens were well tolerated. There was an expected increase in the rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT interval which was independent of pregnancy and treatment. Two pregnant and two nonpregnant women had Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia which cleared within 48 h, and no other subject became slide positive for malaria during 42 days of follow-up. Of 30 pregnant women followed to delivery, 27 (90%) delivered healthy babies and 3 (10%) had stillbirths; these obstetric outcomes are consistent with those in the general population. The area under the plasma PQ concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was lower in the pregnant patients (median [interquartile range], 23,721 μg · h/liter [21,481 to 27,951 μg · h/liter] versus 35,644 μg · h/liter [29,546 to 39,541 μg · h/liter]; P < 0.001) in association with a greater clearance relative to bioavailability (73.5 liters/h [69.4 to 78.4] versus 53.8 liters/h [49.7 to 58.2]; P < 0.001), but pregnancy did not influence the pharmacokinetics of DHA. The apparent pharmacokinetic differences between the present study and results from other studies of women with uncomplicated malaria that showed no effect of pregnancy on the AUC0-∞ of PQ and greater bioavailability may reflect differences in postdose fat intake, proportions of women with malaria, and/or racial differences in drug

  19. CRITICALITY SAFETY LIMIT EVALUATION PROGRAM (CSLEP) & QUICK SCREENS, ANSWERS TO EXPEDITED PROCESSING LEGACY CRITICALITY SAFETY LIMITS & EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-02-21

    Since the end of the cold war, the need for operating weapons production facilities has faded. Criticality Safety Limits and controls supporting production modes in these facilities became outdated and furthermore lacked the procedure based rigor dictated by present day requirements. In the past, in many instances, the formalism of present day criticality safety evaluations was not applied. Some of the safety evaluations amounted to a paragraph in a notebook with no safety basis and questionable arguments with respect to double contingency criteria. When material stabilization, clean out, and deactivation activities commenced, large numbers of these older criticality safety evaluations were uncovered with limits and controls backed up by tenuous arguments. A dilemma developed: on the one hand, cleanup activities were placed on very aggressive schedules; on the other hand, a highly structured approach to limits development was required and applied to the cleanup operations. Some creative approaches were needed to cope with the limits development process.

  20. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  1. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology.

  2. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies of liposomal antioxidant formulations containing N-acetylcysteine, α-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Misagh; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Smith, Milton G; Bolger, Gordon; Pucaj, Kresimir; Suntres, Zacharias E

    2013-07-01

    The safety and pharmacokinetic profile of liposomal formulations containing combinations of the antioxidants α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine in beagle dogs was examined. Each group consisted of beagle dogs of both genders with a control group receiving empty dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes (330 mg/kg DPPC, EL), and test groups receiving liposomes prepared from DPPC lipids with (i) N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (60 mg/kg NAC [L-NAC]); (ii) NAC and α-tocopherol (αT) (60 mg/kg NAC and 25 mg/kg α-tocopherol [L-αT-NAC]) and (iii) NAC and γ-tocopherol (60 mg/kg NAC and 25 mg/kg γ-tocopherol (γT) [L-γT-NAC]). The dogs in the control group (EL) and three test groups exhibited no signs of toxicity during the dosing period or day 15 post treatment. Weight gain, feed consumption and clinical pathology findings (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis) were unremarkable in all dogs and in all groups. Results from the pharmacokinetic study revealed that the inclusion of tocopherols in the liposomal formulation significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) and β-half life for NAC; the tocopherols had greater impact on the clearance of NAC, where reductions of central compartment clearance (CL) ranged from 56% to 60% and reductions of tissue clearance (CL2) ranged from 73% to 77%. In conclusion, there was no treatment-related toxicity in dogs at the maximum feasible dose level by a single bolus intravenous administration while the addition of tocopherols to the liposomal formulation prolonged the circulation of NAC in plasma largely due to a decreased clearance of NAC.

  3. Effects of strong CYP2D6 and 3A4 inhibitors, paroxetine and ketoconazole, on the pharmacokinetics and cardiovascular safety of tamsulosin

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Joachim; Tatami, Shinji; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Mattheus, Michaela; Mehlburger, Ludwig; Wein, Martina; Michel, Martin C

    2011-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine and strong CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics and safety (orthostatic challenge) of tamsulosin. METHODS Two open-label, randomized, two-way crossover studies were conducted in healthy male volunteers (extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers). RESULTS Co-administration of multiple oral doses of 20 mg paroxetine once daily with a single oral dose of the 0.4 mg tamsulosin HCl capsule increased the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) values of Cmax and AUC(0,∞) of tamsulosin by factors of 1.34 (90% CI 1.21, 1.49) and 1.64 (90% CI 1.44, 1.85), respectively, and increased the terminal half-life (t1/2) of tamsulosin HCl from 11.4 h to 15.3 h. Co-administration of multiple oral doses of 400 mg ketoconazole once dailywith a single oral dose of the 0.4 mg tamsulosin increased the gMean values of Cmax and AUC(0,∞) of tamsulosin by a factor of 2.20 (90% CI 1.96, 2.45) and 2.80 (90% CI 2.56, 3.07), respectively. The terminal half-life was slightly increased from 10.5 h to 11.8 h. These pharmacokinetic changes were not accompanied by clinically significant alterations of haemodynamic responses during orthostatic stress testing. CONCLUSION The exposure to tamsulosin is increased upon co-administration of strong CYP2D6 inhibitors and even more so of strong 3A4 inhibitors, but neither PK alteration was accompanied by clinically significant haemodynamic changes during orthostatic stress testing. PMID:21496064

  4. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies of liposomal antioxidant formulations containing N-acetylcysteine, α-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Misagh; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Smith, Milton G; Bolger, Gordon; Pucaj, Kresimir; Suntres, Zacharias E

    2013-07-01

    The safety and pharmacokinetic profile of liposomal formulations containing combinations of the antioxidants α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine in beagle dogs was examined. Each group consisted of beagle dogs of both genders with a control group receiving empty dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes (330 mg/kg DPPC, EL), and test groups receiving liposomes prepared from DPPC lipids with (i) N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (60 mg/kg NAC [L-NAC]); (ii) NAC and α-tocopherol (αT) (60 mg/kg NAC and 25 mg/kg α-tocopherol [L-αT-NAC]) and (iii) NAC and γ-tocopherol (60 mg/kg NAC and 25 mg/kg γ-tocopherol (γT) [L-γT-NAC]). The dogs in the control group (EL) and three test groups exhibited no signs of toxicity during the dosing period or day 15 post treatment. Weight gain, feed consumption and clinical pathology findings (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis) were unremarkable in all dogs and in all groups. Results from the pharmacokinetic study revealed that the inclusion of tocopherols in the liposomal formulation significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) and β-half life for NAC; the tocopherols had greater impact on the clearance of NAC, where reductions of central compartment clearance (CL) ranged from 56% to 60% and reductions of tissue clearance (CL2) ranged from 73% to 77%. In conclusion, there was no treatment-related toxicity in dogs at the maximum feasible dose level by a single bolus intravenous administration while the addition of tocopherols to the liposomal formulation prolonged the circulation of NAC in plasma largely due to a decreased clearance of NAC. PMID:23384394

  5. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of fluticasone furoate, a novel inhaled corticosteroid, in children aged 5-11 years with persistent asthma: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Amanda; Allen, Ann; VanBuren, Sandi; Hamilton, Melanie; Tombs, Lee; Kempsford, Rodger; Qaqundah, Paul

    2014-03-01

    This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study characterized the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of fluticasone furoate (FF) in children (5-11 years) with persistent asthma. Twenty-seven children received inhaled FF 100 µg or placebo via the ELLIPTA™ dry powder inhaler once daily for 14 days, with a ≥7 day washout period. Adverse events (AEs) were reported by eight (31%) and four (16%) subjects during FF 100 µg and placebo treatment, respectively. Headache was reported by three subjects during FF 100 µg treatment and by no subjects during placebo treatment, all other AEs were reported by only one subject on either treatment; there were no serious AEs. Following repeat dosing, the arithmetic mean (SD) FF Cmax was 26.71 pg/mL (9.16) at 31 minutes post-dose. Arithmetic mean (SD) FF AUC(0-t) was 121.44 pg h/mL (83.04). Arithmetic mean values for weighted mean (SD) serum cortisol (0-12 hours) on day 14 were 56.49 (16.51) and 67.57 (20.66) ng/mL for FF 100 µg and placebo, respectively. No clinically significant effect of FF on serum cortisol levels was observed. FF was well tolerated. Pharmacokinetic profiles were well defined and did not differ between age groups in the study population, and no clinically significant suppression of serum cortisol was observed. PMID:27128459

  6. Evaluation of utility of pharmacokinetic studies in phase I trials of two oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kehua; House, Larry; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Seminerio, Michael J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There are many phase I trials of oncology drug combinations, very few of which report clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions. We hypothesized that the utility of such pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies is low in the absence of a mechanistic hypothesis. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed 152 phase I (2 drug) combination studies published in 2007–2011. Results Only 28 (18%) studies had an implicit or explicit rationale, either inhibition/induction of a drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter, co-substrates for the same enzyme or transporter, potential for end-organ toxicity, or protein binding. Only 12 (8%) studies demonstrated a statistically significant DDI, based on change in clearance (or area under the curve) of parent drug and/or active metabolite. There was a strong association between a rationale and a demonstrable drug interaction, as only 2% of studies without a rationale demonstrated a DDI, compared to 32% of studies with a rationale (Fisher’s exact test, p<10−6). Conclusion DDI studies should not be routinely performed as part of phase I trials of oncology combinations. PMID:24056785

  7. Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study Comparing the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Tefibazumab to Placebo for Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Weems, J. John; Steinberg, James P.; Filler, Scott; Baddley, John W.; Corey, G. Ralph; Sampathkumar, Priya; Winston, Lisa; John, Joseph F.; Kubin, Christine J.; Talwani, Rohit; Moore, Thomas; Patti, Joseph M.; Hetherington, Seth; Texter, Michele; Wenzel, Eric; Kelley, Violet A.; Fowler, Vance G.

    2006-01-01

    Tefibazumab (Aurexis), a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the surface-expressed adhesion protein clumping factor A, is under development as adjunctive therapy for serious Staphylococcus aureus infections. Sixty patients with documented S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) were randomized and received either tefibazumab at 20 mg/kg of body weight as a single infusion or a placebo in addition to an antibiotic(s). The primary objective of the study was determining safety and pharmacokinetics. An additional objective was to assess activity by a composite clinical end point (CCE). Baseline characteristics were evenly matched between groups. Seventy percent of infections were healthcare associated, and 57% had an SAB-related complication at baseline. There were no differences between the treatment groups in overall adverse clinical events or alterations in laboratory values. Two patients developed serious adverse events that were at least possibly related to tefibazumab; one hypersensitivity reaction was considered definitely related. The tefibazumab plasma half-life was 18 days. Mean plasma levels were <100 μg/ml by day 14. A CCE occurred in six patients (four placebo and two tefibazumab patients) and included five deaths (four placebo and one tefibazumab patient). Progression in the severity of sepsis occurred in four placebo and no tefibazumab patients. Tefibazumab was well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to those of other monoclonal antibodies. Additional trials are warranted to address the dosing range and efficacy of tefibazumab. PMID:16870768

  8. Pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of drisapersen in non-ambulant subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Results of a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Voit, Thomas; Rosales, Xiomara Q.; Servais, Laurent; Kraus, John E.; Wardell, Claire; Morgan, Allison; Dorricott, Susie; Nakielny, Joanna; Quarcoo, Naashika; Liefaard, Lia; Drury, Tom; Campion, Giles; Wright, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, lethal neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin protein due to mutations of the dystrophin gene. Drisapersen is a 2′-O-methyl-phosphorothioate oligonucleotide designed to skip exon 51 in dystrophin pre-mRNA to restore the reading frame of the mRNA. This study assessed safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of drisapersen after a single subcutaneous administration in non-ambulatory subjects. Eligible subjects were non-ambulant boys aged ≥9 years, in wheelchairs for ≥1 to ≤4 years, with a diagnosis of DMD resulting from a mutation correctable by drisapersen treatment. Four dose cohorts were planned (3, 6, 9 and 12 mg/kg), but study objectives were met with the 9 mg/kg dose. Less than proportional increase in exposure was demonstrated over the 3–9 mg/kg dose range, though post hoc analysis showed dose proportionality was more feasible over the 3–6 mg/kg range. Single doses of drisapersen at 3 and 6 mg/kg did not result in significant safety or tolerability concerns; however, at the 9 mg/kg dose, pyrexia and transient elevations in inflammatory parameters were seen. The maximum tolerated dose of 6 mg/kg drisapersen was identified for further characterization in multiple dose studies in the non-ambulant DMD population. PMID:24321374

  9. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of SRS 9971 shipping package

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    This evaluation is requested to revise the criticality evaluation used to generate Chapter 6 (Criticality Evaluation) of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for shipment Of UO{sub 3} product from the Uranium Solidification Facility (USF) in the SRS 9971 shipping package. The pertinent document requesting this evaluation is included as Attachment I. The results of the evaluation are given in Attachment II which is written as Chapter 6 of a NRC format SARP.

  10. A Phase II clinical trial of a mixture of plasma-derived factor VIIa and factor X (MC710) in haemophilia patients with inhibitors: haemostatic efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, A; Fukutake, K; Takamatsu, J; Shima, M; Hanabusa, H; Mugishima, H; Amano, K; Takedani, H; Tamashima, S; Matsushita, T; Tawa, A; Tanaka, I; Higasa, S; Kosaka, Y; Fujii, T; Sakai, M; Migita, M; Kawakami, K; Ohashi, Y; Saito, H

    2013-11-01

    MC710, a mixture of plasma-derived activated factor VII and factor X at a protein weight ratio of 1:10, is a novel bypassing agent for haemostasis in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. In a Phase II trial, we evaluated the haemostatic efficacy and safety of single doses of MC710, and investigated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in nine joint bleeding episodes in six male haemophilia patients with inhibitors. This trial was a multi-centre, open-label, non-randomized study of two doses (60 and 120 μg kg(-1) as FVIIa dose), allowing the re-administration of different MC710 dosages to the same subjects. Haemostatic efficacy was assessed by evaluating reduction in pain and swelling, as well as increase in range of motion in a bleeding joint. The results of the study showed that in nine bleeding episodes, seven treatments were rated as 'excellent' or 'effective' according to investigator's rating system of efficacy at 8 h after administration. No serious or severe adverse events were observed after administration; furthermore, measurement of several diagnostic markers revealed no signs or symptoms of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The haemostatic potential of MC710 was confirmed at doses of 60 and 120 μg kg(-1) in this trial. MC710 is thus expected to be a safe and efficacious novel bypassing agent for controlling bleeding in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. PMID:23738888

  11. Murine Efficacy and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Flaviviral NS5 Capping Enzyme 2-Thioxothiazolidin-4-One Inhibitor BG-323.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Kristen M; Gullberg, Rebekah C; Soltani, Elnaz; Steel, J Jordan; Geiss, Brian J; Keenan, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne flavivirus infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identification of drug targets and novel antiflaviviral compounds to treat these diseases has become a global health imperative. A previous screen of 235,456 commercially available small molecules identified the 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one family of compounds as inhibitors of the flaviviral NS5 capping enzyme, a promising target for antiviral drug development. Rational drug design methodologies enabled identification of lead compound BG-323 from this series. We have shown previously that BG-323 potently inhibits NS5 capping enzyme activity, displays antiviral effects in dengue virus replicon assays and inhibits growth of West Nile and yellow fever viruses with low cytotoxicity in vitro. In this study we further characterized BG-323's antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that BG-323 was able to reduce replication of WNV (NY99) and Powassan viruses in culture, and we were unable to force resistance into WNV (Kunjin) in long-term culture experiments. We then evaluated the antiviral activity of BG-323 in a murine model. Mice were challenged with WNV NY99 and administered BG-323 or mock by IP inoculation immediately post challenge and twice daily thereafter. Mice were bled and viremia was quantified on day three. No significant differences in viremia were observed between BG-323-treated and control groups and clinical scores indicated both BG-323-treated and control mice developed signs of illness on approximately the same day post challenge. To determine whether differences in in vitro and in vivo efficacy were due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties of BG-323, we conducted a pharmacokinetic evaluation of this small molecule. Insights from pharmacokinetic studies indicate that BG-323 is cell permeable, has a low efflux ratio and does not significantly inhibit two common cytochrome P450 (CYP P450) isoforms thus suggesting this molecule may be less

  12. Phase I Study Assessing the Pharmacokinetic Profile, Safety, and Tolerability of a Single Dose of Ceftazidime-Avibactam in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jon; Arrieta, Antonio; Bishai, Raafat; Das, Shampa; Delair, Shirley; Edeki, Timi; Holmes, William C.; Li, Jianguo; Moffett, Kathryn S.; Mukundan, Deepa; Perez, Norma; Romero, José R.; Speicher, David; Sullivan, Janice E.; Zhou, Diansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a single dose of ceftazidime-avibactam in pediatric patients. A phase I, multicenter, open-label PK study was conducted in pediatric patients hospitalized with an infection and receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Patients were enrolled into four age cohorts (cohort 1, ≥12 to <18 years; cohort 2, ≥6 to <12 years; cohort 3, ≥2 to <6 years; cohort 4, ≥3 months to <2 years). Patients received a single 2-h intravenous infusion of ceftazidime-avibactam (cohort 1, 2,000 to 500 mg; cohort 2, 2,000 to 500 mg [≥40 kg] or 50 to 12.5 mg/kg [<40 kg]; cohorts 3 and 4, 50 to 12.5 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected to describe individual PK characteristics for ceftazidime and avibactam. Population PK modeling was used to describe characteristics of ceftazidime and avibactam PK across all age groups. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Thirty-two patients received study drug. Mean plasma concentration-time curves, geometric mean maximum concentration (Cmax), and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were similar across all cohorts for both drugs. Six patients (18.8%) reported an adverse event, all mild or moderate in intensity. No deaths or serious adverse events occurred. The single-dose PK of ceftazidime and avibactam were comparable between each of the 4 age cohorts investigated and were broadly similar to those previously observed in adults. No new safety concerns were identified. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01893346.) PMID:27503642

  13. Pharmacological Evaluation and Preliminary Pharmacokinetics Studies of a New Diclofenac Prodrug without Gastric Ulceration Effect

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Moreira, Vanessa; Campos, Michel Leandro; Chelucci, Rafael Consolin; Barbieri, Karina Pereira; de Castro Souto, Pollyana Cristina Maggio; Matsubara, Márcio Hideki; Teixeira, Catarina; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Chin, Chung Man

    2012-01-01

    Long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy has been associated with several adverse effects such as gastric ulceration and cardiovascular events. Among the molecular modifications strategies, the prodrug approach is a useful tool to discover new safe NSAIDs. The 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one is a diclofenac prodrug which demonstrated relevant anti-inflammatory properties without gastro ulceration effect. In addition, the prodrug decreases PGE2 levels, COX-2 expression and cellular influx into peritoneal cavity induced by carrageenan treatment. Preliminary pharmacokinetic studies have shown in vivo bioconversion of prodrug to diclofenac. This prodrug is a new nonulcerogenic NSAID useful to treat inflammatory events by long-term therapy. PMID:23203127

  14. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  15. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. PMID:26893559

  16. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom-up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability.

  17. Infliximab therapy for intestinal, neurological, and vascular involvement in Behcet disease: Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics in a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Toshifumi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Sato, Noriko; Ozaki, Kunihiko; Kondo, Kazuoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem disease associated with a poor prognosis in cases of gastrointestinal, neurological, or vascular involvement. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of infliximab (IFX) in BD patients with these serious complications who had displayed poor response or intolerance to conventional therapy. IFX at 5 mg/kg was administered to 18 patients (11 intestinal BD, 3 neurological BD [NBD], and 4 vascular BD [VBD]) at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46. In patients who showed inadequate responses to IFX after week 30, the dose was increased to 10 mg/kg. We then calculated the percentage of complete responders according to the predefined criteria depending on the symptoms and results of examinations (ileocolonoscopy, brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum inflammatory markers), exploring the percentage of complete responders at week 30 (primary endpoint). The percentage of complete responders was 61% (11/18) at both weeks 14 and 30 and remained the same until week 54. Intestinal BD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms along with decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after week 2. Consistently, scarring or healing of the principal ulcers was found in more than 80% of these patients after week 14. NBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms, imaging findings, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. VBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms after week 2 with reductions in CRP levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging findings showed reversal of inflammatory changes in 3 of the 4 VBD patients. Irrespective of the type of BD, all patients achieved improvement in quality of life, leading to the dose reduction or withdrawal of steroids. IFX dose was increased to 10 mg/kg in 3

  18. Safety Evaluation of Topical Valproate Application

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Young; Seop, Song Yi; Hyun, Moo Yeol; Yoo, Kwang Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Cho, Jae-We

    2013-01-01

    The potential role of topical valproate (VPA) in hair regrowth has been recently suggested. However, safety reports of VPA as a topical formulation are lacking. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether VPA causes skin irritation in humans. We first performed a cell viability test and showed that VPA did not exhibit toxicity toward HaCaT keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and RBL-3H mast cells. We then performed clinical patch test and skin irritation test through transdermal drug delivery with the help of microneedle rollers. No significant findings were obtained in the clinical patch test. In the skin irritation test, only 1 patient showed erythema at 1 hr, but the irritation reaction faded away within a few hours. Erythema and edema were not observed at 24 hr. We concluded that VPA has minimal potential to elicit skin irritation. Therefore, we consider that VPA can safely be applied to human skin. PMID:24278633

  19. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  20. An Evaluation Tool for Agricultural Health and Safety Mobile Applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Iris; Ellis, Tammy; Yoder, Aaron; Keifer, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    As the use of mobile devices and their software applications, or apps, becomes ubiquitous, use amongst agricultural working populations is expanding as well. The smart device paired with a well-designed app has potential for improving workplace health and safety in the hands of those who can act upon the information provided. Many apps designed to assess workplace hazards and implementation of worker protections already exist. However, the abundance and diversity of such applications also presents challenges regarding evaluation practices and assignation of value. This is particularly true in the agricultural workspace, as there is currently little information on the value of these apps for agricultural safety and health. This project proposes a framework for developing and evaluating apps that have potential usefulness in agricultural health and safety. The evaluation framework is easily transferable, with little modification for evaluation of apps in several agriculture-specific areas.

  1. An Evaluation Tool for Agricultural Health and Safety Mobile Applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Iris; Ellis, Tammy; Yoder, Aaron; Keifer, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    As the use of mobile devices and their software applications, or apps, becomes ubiquitous, use amongst agricultural working populations is expanding as well. The smart device paired with a well-designed app has potential for improving workplace health and safety in the hands of those who can act upon the information provided. Many apps designed to assess workplace hazards and implementation of worker protections already exist. However, the abundance and diversity of such applications also presents challenges regarding evaluation practices and assignation of value. This is particularly true in the agricultural workspace, as there is currently little information on the value of these apps for agricultural safety and health. This project proposes a framework for developing and evaluating apps that have potential usefulness in agricultural health and safety. The evaluation framework is easily transferable, with little modification for evaluation of apps in several agriculture-specific areas. PMID:27494309

  2. Safety of Disposable Diaper Materials: Extensive Evaluations Validate Use.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Helmes, C Tucker; White, Jeffrey C; Zhou, Shaoying

    2014-06-24

    Disposable diapers are primarily composed of polymers, such as cellulose, polypropylene, polyester, and polyethylene, which are biologically inert and not bioavailable. They are used in clothes, fabrics, personal hygiene products, and other materials that are commonly in contact with the skin. Each component used throughout the production process must undergo rigorous safety evaluations and assessments and are proven to be well tolerated and safe for their intended uses. No materials are incorporated into a diaper until their safety is confirmed through robust assessments, and additional factors are integrated into the process to compensate for the uncertainty associated with extrapolating toxicity data. After a thorough assessment of the materials and final product, extensive skin compatibility evaluations are conducted as appropriate. This rigorous safety process provides reassurance that consumers can rely on the safety of these diapers.

  3. A phase I, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic evaluation of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-fuoro-2′-deoxycytidine, administered with tetrahydrouridine

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert J.; Kummar, Shivaani; Beumer, Jan H.; Blanchard, M. Suzette; Ruel, Christopher; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Carroll, Mary I.; Hou, Jessie M.; Li, Chun; Lenz, Heinz J.; Eiseman, Julie L.; Doroshow, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (DNMT) are active antineoplastic agents. We conducted the first-in-human phase I trial of 5-fluoro-2′-deoxycytidine (FdCyd), a DNMT inhibitor stable in aqueous solution, in patients with advanced solid tumors. Objectives were to establish the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of FdCyd + tetrahydrouridine (THU). Methods FdCyd + THU were administered by 3 h IV infusion on days 1–5 every 3 weeks, or days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. FdCyd was administered IV with a fixed 350 mg/m2/day dose of THU to inhibit deamination of FdCyd. Pharmacokinetics of FdCyd, downstream metabolites and THU were assessed by LC–MS/MS. RBC γ-globin expression was evaluated as a pharmacodynamics biomarker. Results Patients were enrolled on the 3-week schedule at doses up to 80 mg/m2/day without dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) prior to transitioning to the 4-week schedule, which resulted in an MTD of 134 mg/m2/day; one of six patients had a first-cycle DLT (grade 3 colitis). FdCyd ≥40 mg/m2/day produced peak plasma concentrations >1 μM. Although there was inter-patient variability, γ-globin mRNA increased during the first two treatment cycles. One refractory breast cancer patient experienced a partial response (PR) of >90 % decrease in tumor size, lasting over a year. Conclusions The MTD was established at 134 mg/m2 FdCyd + 350 mg/m2 THU days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. Based on toxicities observed over multiple cycles, good plasma exposures, and the sustained PR observed at 67 mg/m2/day, the phase II dose for our ongoing multi-histology trial is 100 mg/m2/day FdCyd with 350 mg/m2/day THU. PMID:25567350

  4. [Comics for traffic education: evaluation of a traffic safety campaign].

    PubMed

    Bonfadelli, H

    1989-01-01

    Traffic safety campaigns often are ineffective to change driving behavior because they don't reach the target group or are recognized only by people who are already interested or concerned. The evaluation of a traffic safety campaign called "Leo Lässig", addressed to young new drivers, shows that recognition and acceptance by the target group were stimulated by the age-conform means of comic-strips.

  5. Bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and safety of riociguat given as an oral suspension or crushed tablet with and without food

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Reiner; Becker, Corina; Unger, Sigrun; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Some patients have difficulty swallowing tablets; therefore, 2 randomized, nonblinded, crossover studies compared the relative bioavailability of riociguat oral suspensions and immediate-release (IR) tablet and of crushed-tablet preparations versus whole IR tablet. In study 1, 30 healthy subjects received 5 single riociguat doses: 0.3 and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL suspensions), 0.15 mg (0.03 mg/mL), and 1.0 mg (whole IR tablet) under fasted conditions and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL) after a high-fat, high-calorie American-style breakfast. In study 2, 25 healthy men received 4 single 2.5-mg doses: whole IR tablet and crushed IR tablet suspended in applesauce and water, respectively, under fasted conditions, and whole IR tablet after a continental breakfast. In study 1, dose-normalized pharmacokinetics of riociguat oral suspensions and 1.0-mg whole IR tablet were similar in fasted conditions; 90% confidence intervals for riociguat area under the curve (AUC) to dose and mean maximum concentration (Cmax) to dose were within bioequivalence criteria. After food, dose-normalized AUC and Cmax decreased by 15% and 38%, respectively. In study 2, riociguat exposure was similar for all preparations; AUC ratios for crushed-IR-tablet preparations to whole IR tablet were within bioequivalence criteria. The Cmax increased by 17% for crushed IR tablet in water versus whole IR tablet. Food intake decreased Cmax of the whole tablet by 16%, with unaltered AUC versus fasted conditions. Riociguat bioavailability was similar between the oral suspensions and the whole IR tablet; exposure was similar between whole IR tablet and crushed-IR-tablet preparations. Minor food effects were observed. Results suggest that riociguat formulations are interchangeable. PMID:27162630

  6. Pharmacokinetics and safety of olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler in subjects with impaired hepatic or renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christina; Luedtke, Doreen; Unseld, Anna; Hamilton, Alan; Halabi, Atef; Wein, Martina; Formella, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In two trials, the influences of hepatic and renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of olodaterol, a novel long-acting inhaled β2-agonist for treatment of COPD, were investigated. Subjects and methods The first trial included eight subjects with mild hepatic function impairment (Child–Pugh A), eight subjects with moderate impairment (Child–Pugh B), and 16 matched healthy subjects with normal hepatic function. The second trial included eight subjects with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL·min−1) and 14 matched healthy subjects with normal renal function. Subjects received single doses of 20 or 30 μg olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler. Results Olodaterol was well tolerated in all subjects. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 4 hours (AUC0–4) for subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment compared to healthy subjects were 97% (75%–125%) and 105% (79%–140%), respectively. Corresponding values for dose-normalized maximum concentration (Cmax) were 112% (84%–151%) (mild impairment) and 99% (73%–135%) (moderate impairment). The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of AUC0–4 for subjects with severe renal impairment compared to healthy subjects was 135% (94%–195%), and for Cmax was 137% (84%–222%). There was no significant relationship between creatinine clearance and AUC0–4 or Cmax. Renal clearance of olodaterol was reduced to 20% of normal in severe renal impairment. Conclusion Mild to moderate hepatic function impairment or severe renal function impairment did not result in a clinically relevant increase of olodaterol systemic exposure after a single inhaled dose. PMID:27051282

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of sulbactam against Acinetobacter baumannii in in vitro and murine thigh and lung infection models.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ikawa, Kazuro; Watanabe, Erika; Shigemi, Akari; Umezaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Koyo; Ueno, Keiichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has become globally associated with nosocomial infections. Sulbactam, a potent inhibitor of β-lactamases, was previously shown to be active against A. baumannii strains in vitro and effective against A. baumannii infections. However, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of sulbactam against A. baumannii infections has not yet been performed. This is necessary because optimisation of dosing regimens should be based on PK/PD analysis. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo PK/PD analyses of sulbactam were performed using murine thigh and lung infection models of A. baumannii to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulbactam. Sulbactam showed time-dependent bactericidal activity in vitro against A. baumannii. The PK/PD index that best correlated with its in vivo effects was the time that the free drug concentration remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (fT>MIC) both in the thigh (R(2)=0.95) and lung (R(2)=0.96) infection models. Values of fT>MIC for a static effect and 1, 2 and 3log10 kill, respectively, were 21.0%, 32.9%, 43.6% and 57.3% in the thigh infection model and 20.4%, 24.5%, 29.3% and 37.3% in the lung infection model. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo time-dependent activities of sulbactam against A. baumannii infection and demonstrate that sulbactam was sufficiently bactericidal when an fT>MIC of >60% against A. baumannii thigh infection and >40% against A. baumannii lung infection was achieved.

  8. Antibacterial efficacy and pharmacokinetic evaluation of sanguinarine in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) following a single intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Ling, F; Wu, Z-Q; Jiang, C; Liu, L; Wang, G-X

    2016-08-01

    Sanguinarine (SA), with antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities against fish pathogens, exhibits great potential commercial use in aquaculture. However, little information on pharmacokinetics of SA restricts further application in aquaculture. In this study, pharmacokinetics of SA in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) following a single intraperitoneal administration [10 mg kg(-1) BW (body weight)] was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The peak concentration (Cmax ) of SA in kidney was 11.8 μg g(-1) , which was higher than in other tissues and plasma. The terminal half-life in fish tissue and plasma was as follows: 42.3 h (kidney) > 37.2 h (liver) > 20.1 h (gill) > 18.8 h (muscle) > 10.9 h (spleen) > 10.0 h (plasma). Additionally, we determined the bacterial loads in tissues of common carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila after i.p. administration of SA at 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) BW. The results showed that i.p. administration of SA at 10 mg kg(-1) BW significantly enhanced antibacterial efficacy against A. hydrophila, where the antibacterial ratio in the gill, kidney, spleen and liver on day 5 was 95.13%, 93.33%, 90.09% and 92.82%, respectively. Overall, these results suggested the potential of SA to treat A. hydrophila infection in common carp farming industry. PMID:26763075

  9. Bioanalytical method for evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the GCP-II inhibitor 2-phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA).

    PubMed

    Rais, Rana; Rojas, Camilo; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Rudek, Michelle A; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    2-Phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) is a potent and selective inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase-II, an enzyme which catabolizes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. 2-PMPA demonstrates robust efficacy in numerous animal models of neurological disease, however its pharmacokinetics has not yet been fully described. 2-PMPA is a highly polar compound with multiple negative charges causing significant challenges for analysis in biological matrices. Here we report a derivatization method for the acidic groups that involved protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by reaction with N-tert-butyldimethysilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). The silylated analyte with transitions (683→551.4) and the internal standard (669→537.2) were monitored by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray positive ionization mode. The method was subsequently used to evaluate 2-PMPA pharmacokinetics in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 100mg/kg 2-PMPA resulted in maximum concentration in plasma of 275μg/mL at 0.25h. The half-life, area under the curve, apparent clearance, and volume of distribution were 0.64h, 210μg×h/mL, 7.93mL/min/kg, and 0.44L/kg, respectively. The tissue/plasma ratios in brain, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion were 0.018, 0.120 and 0.142, respectively. In summary, a sensitive analytical method for 2-PMPA is reported that can be employed for similarly charged molecules.

  10. Phase I Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Combined Valproic Acid/Doxorubicin Treatment in Dogs with Spontaneous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittenburg, Luke A.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Thamm, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are targeted anti-cancer agents with a well-documented ability to act synergistically with cytotoxic agents. We recently demonstrated that the HDACi valproic acid (VPA) sensitizes osteosarcoma cells to doxorubicin (DOX) in vitro and in vivo. As there are no published reports on the clinical utility of HDACi in dogs with spontaneous cancers, we sought to determine a safe and biologically effective dose of VPA administered prior to a standard dose of DOX. Methods 21 dogs were enrolled into eight cohorts in an accelerated dose-escalation trial consisting of pre-treatment with oral VPA followed by DOX on a three-week cycle. Blood and tumor tissue were collected for determination of serum VPA concentration and evaluation of pharmcodynamic effects by immunofluorescence cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Serum and complete blood counts were obtained for determination of changes in DOX pharmacokinetics or hematologic effects. Results All doses of VPA were well tolerated. Serum VPA concentrations increased linearly with dose. DOX pharmacokinetics were comparable to those in dogs receiving DOX alone. A positive correlation was detected between VPA dose and histone hyperacetylation in PBMC. No potentiation of DOX-induced myelosuppression was observed. Histone hyperacetylation was documented in tumor and PBMC. Responses included 2/21 complete, 3/21 partial, 5/21 stable disease, and 11/21 progressive disease. Conclusions VPA can be administered to dogs at doses up to 240 mg/kg/day prior to a standard dose of DOX. In addition, we have developed the PK/PD tools necessary for future studies of novel HDACi in the clinical setting of canine cancer. PMID:20705615

  11. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  12. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the anticancer prodrug simmitecan in different experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-yi; Li, Xiu-xue; Du, Fei-fei; Yang, Jun-ling; Niu, Wei; Xu, Fang; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetics and disposition of simmitecan (L-P) that was a water-soluble ester prodrug of chimmitecan (L-2-Z) with potent anti-tumor activities in different experimental animals, and to assess its drug-drug interaction potential. Methods: SD rats were injected with a single iv bolus doses of L-P (3.75, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion and metabolism of L-P and its active metabolite L-2-Z were studied through quantitative measurements and metabolite profiling with LC/MS. The binding of L-P and L-2-Z to rat plasma proteins was examined using an ultrafiltration method. Systemic exposures of beagle dogs to L-P as well as drug distribution in tumors of the nude mice xenograft model of human hepatic cancer SMMC-7721 cells were also examined. The metabolism of L-P by liver mcirosomal carboxylesterase in vitro was investigated in different species. The effects of L-P and L-2-Z on cytochrome P450 enzymes were examined using commercial screening kits. Results: The in vivo biotransformation of L-P to L-2-Z showed a significant species difference, with a mean elimination half-life t1/2 of approximately 1.4 h in rats and 1.9 h in dogs. The systemic exposure levels of L-P and L-2-Z were increased in a dose-dependent manner. In rats, approximately 66% of L-P and 79% of L-2-Z were bound to plasma proteins. In rats and the nude mice bearing human hepatic cancers, most organ tissues had significantly higher concentrations of L-P than the corresponding plasma levels. In the tumor tissues, the L-P levels were comparable to those of plasma, whereas the L-2-Z levels were lower than the L-P levels. In rats, L-P was eliminated mainly via biliary excretion, but metabolism played an important role in elimination of the intact L-P. Finally, L-P and L-2-Z exerted moderate inhibition on the activity of CYP3A4 in vitro. Conclusion: L-P and L-2-Z have relatively short elimination half-lives and L-P is mainly eliminated via

  13. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of milrinone in adults undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, J F; Hines, R L; Royster, R L; James, R L

    1995-10-01

    Milrinone can reverse acute postischemic myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, although neither the appropriate bolus dose nor its pharmacokinetics has been established for cardiac surgical patients. Consenting patients undergoing cardiac surgery received milrinone (25, 50, or 75 micrograms/kg) in an open-label, dose-escalating study if their cardiac index was < 3 L.min-1.m-2 after separation from bypass. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and cardiac index were determined before and after the administration of milrinone. Timed blood samples were obtained for measurement of milrinone plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic analysis. Twenty-nine of 60 consenting patients had cardiac indices < 3 L.min-1.m-2 after separation from bypass, received milrinone, and completed the protocol. All three bolus doses of milrinone significantly increased cardiac index. The 50- and 75-micrograms/kg doses produced significantly larger increases in cardiac index than the 25-micrograms/kg dose; however, the 75-micrograms/kg dose did not produce a significantly larger increase in cardiac index than did the 50-micrograms/kg dose. Two of 10 patients receiving milrinone 25 micrograms/kg, but no patient receiving either 50 or 75 micrograms/kg, required early epinephrine rescue when the cardiac index failed to increase by > 15%. The 75-micrograms/kg dose was associated with a case of ventricular tachycardia. The three-compartment model better described milrinone drug disposition than the two-compartment model by both visual inspection and Schwartz-Bayesian criterion. There was only limited evidence of dose-dependence, so data from all three doses are reported together (and normalized to the 50-micrograms/kg dose). Data from one patient was discarded (samples mislabeled). Using mixed-effects nonlinear regression (for n = 28), the following volumes were determined for the three compartments: V1 = 11.1 L, V2 = 16.9 L, and V3 = 363 L

  14. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Cyanidin-3-Glucoside after 2-Week Administration of Black Bean Seed Coat Extract in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sangil; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the pharmacokinetics of C3G on data from twelve subjects, after 2-week multiple dosing of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Cheongjakong-3-ho) seed coat extract, using the mixed effect analysis method (NONMEM, Ver. 6.2), as well as the conventional non-compartmental method. We also examined the safety and tolerability. The PK analysis used plasma concentrations of the C3G on day 1 and 14. There was no observed accumulation of C3G after 2-week multiple dosing of black bean seed coat extract. The typical point estimates of PK were CL (clearance)=3,420 l/h, V (volume)=7,280 L, Ka (absorption constant)=9.94 h-1, ALAG (lag time)=0.217 h. The black bean seed coat extract was well tolerated and there were no serious adverse events. In this study, we confirmed that a significant amount of C3G was absorbed in human after given the black bean seed coat extract. PMID:22915990

  15. Pharmacokinetics and safety of a novel recombinant human von Willebrand factor manufactured with a plasma-free method: a prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Kempton, Christine; Millar, Carolyn; Romond, Edward; Shapiro, Amy; Birschmann, Ingvild; Ragni, Margaret V.; Gill, Joan Cox; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Klamroth, Robert; Wong, Wing-Yen; Chapman, Miranda; Engl, Werner; Turecek, Peter L.; Suiter, Tobias M.

    2013-01-01

    Safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) combined at a fixed ratio with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) were investigated in 32 subjects with type 3 or severe type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) in a prospective phase 1, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. rVWF was well tolerated and no thrombotic events, inhibitors, or serious adverse events were observed. The PK of rVWF ristocetin cofactor activity, VWF antigen, and collagen-binding activity were similar to those of the comparator plasma-derived (pd) VWF-pdFVIII. In vivo cleavage of ultra-large molecular-weight rVWF multimers by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13; the endogenous VWF protease) and generation of characteristic satellite bands were demonstrated. In 2 subjects with specific nonneutralizing anti-VWF–binding antibodies already detectable before rVWF infusion, a reduction in VWF multimers and VWF activity was observed. Stabilization of endogenous FVIII was enhanced following post–rVWF-rFVIII infusion as shown by the difference in area under the plasma concentration curve compared with pdVWF-pdFVIII (AUC0-∞) (P < .01). These data support the concept of administering rVWF alone once a therapeutic level of endogenous FVIII is achieved. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00816660. PMID:23777763

  16. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a novel fast dissolving film formulation of flupentixol dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdelbary, Ahmed; Bendas, Ehab R; Ramadan, Afaf A; Mostafa, Dalia A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop fast dissolving oral film of the antipsychotic drug, flupentixol dihydrochloride, to enhance its bioavailability, optimize its therapeutic effect when used to treat depression with anxiety, and increase the convenience and compliance by the mentally ill, developmentally disable, elderly, and pediatric patients. Six formulae were prepared with different concentrations of water-soluble polymers vis. hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E5) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by solvent casting technique. The prepared films were subjected to characterization for folding endurance, weight variations, thickness, disintegration time, drug release pattern, and drug content. Physical compatibility between the drug and excipients was guaranteed in the selected formulation (2% HPMC) by means of differential scanning calorimetry analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. This formulation revealed high stability after testing according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. In vivo studies based on single phase parallel design were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers. The concentration of flupentixol dihydrochloride in plasma samples was analyzed by a developed validated LC-MS/MS assay method and the pharmacokinetic parameters of the established formulation were compared with the commercially available oral tablets. Faster rate of absorption of flupentixol could be obtained from the oral film formulation and the relative bioavailability was found to be 151.06% compared to the marketed product. PMID:25142820

  17. Synthesis and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Siderophore Biosynthesis Inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kathryn M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Dawadi, Surendra; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed biosynthetic step of the mycobactins, which are important virulence factors associated with iron acquisition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MbtA is a validated therapeutic target for antitubercular drug development. 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1) is a bisubstrate inhibitor of MbtA and exhibits exceptionally potent biochemical and antitubercular activity. However, 1 suffers from sub-optimal drug disposition properties resulting in a short half-life (t1/2), low exposure (AUC), and low bioavailability (F). Four strategies were pursued to address these liabilities including the synthesis of prodrugs, increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl moiety, modulation of the lipophilicity, and strategic introduction of fluorine into 1. Complete pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of all compounds was performed. The most successful modifications involved fluorination of the nucleoside that provided substantial improvements in t1/2 and AUC. Increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl linker yielded incremental enhancements while modulation of the lipophilicity and prodrug approaches led to substantially poorer PK parameters. PMID:26110337

  18. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice.

  19. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice. PMID:23850188

  20. Effect of coadministered fat on the tolerability, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in Papua New Guinean children with uncomplicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Moore, B R; Benjamin, J M; Salman, S; Griffin, S; Ginny, E; Page-Sharp, M; Robinson, L J; Siba, P; Batty, K T; Mueller, I; Davis, T M E

    2014-10-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/kg doses were given with water (n = 14, group A) or milk (n = 16, group B), with regular clinical/laboratory assessment and blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma PQ was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection, and DHA was assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models for PQ and DHA were developed using a population-based approach. DHA-PQ was generally well tolerated, and initial fever and parasite clearance were prompt. There were no differences in the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) for PQ (median, 41,906 versus 36,752 μg · h/liter in groups A and B, respectively; P = 0.24) or DHA (4,047 versus 4,190 μg · h/liter; P = 0.67). There were also no significant between-group differences in prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc) initially during follow-up, but the QTc tended to be higher in group B children at 24 h (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 15 ± 10 versus 6 ± 15 ms(0.5) in group A, P = 0.067) and 168 h (10 ± 18 versus 1 ± 23 ms(0.5), P = 0.24) when plasma PQ concentrations were relatively low. A small amount of fat does not change the bioavailability of DHA-PQ in children, but a delayed persistent effect on ventricular repolarization cannot be excluded.

  1. Effect of coadministered fat on the tolerability, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in Papua New Guinean children with uncomplicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Moore, B R; Benjamin, J M; Salman, S; Griffin, S; Ginny, E; Page-Sharp, M; Robinson, L J; Siba, P; Batty, K T; Mueller, I; Davis, T M E

    2014-10-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/kg doses were given with water (n = 14, group A) or milk (n = 16, group B), with regular clinical/laboratory assessment and blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma PQ was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection, and DHA was assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models for PQ and DHA were developed using a population-based approach. DHA-PQ was generally well tolerated, and initial fever and parasite clearance were prompt. There were no differences in the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) for PQ (median, 41,906 versus 36,752 μg · h/liter in groups A and B, respectively; P = 0.24) or DHA (4,047 versus 4,190 μg · h/liter; P = 0.67). There were also no significant between-group differences in prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc) initially during follow-up, but the QTc tended to be higher in group B children at 24 h (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 15 ± 10 versus 6 ± 15 ms(0.5) in group A, P = 0.067) and 168 h (10 ± 18 versus 1 ± 23 ms(0.5), P = 0.24) when plasma PQ concentrations were relatively low. A small amount of fat does not change the bioavailability of DHA-PQ in children, but a delayed persistent effect on ventricular repolarization cannot be excluded. PMID:25049242

  2. Azithromycin to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in ureaplasma-infected preterm infants: pharmacokinetics, safety, microbial response, and clinical outcomes with a 20-milligram-per-kilogram single intravenous dose.

    PubMed

    Viscardi, Rose M; Othman, Ahmed A; Hassan, Hazem E; Eddington, Natalie D; Abebe, Elias; Terrin, Michael L; Kaufman, David A; Waites, Ken B

    2013-05-01

    Ureaplasma respiratory tract colonization is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. Previously, we demonstrated that a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of azithromycin (10 mg/kg of body weight) is safe but inadequate to eradicate Ureaplasma spp. in preterm infants. We performed a nonrandomized, single-arm open-label study of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of intravenous 20-mg/kg single-dose azithromycin in 13 mechanically ventilated neonates with a gestational age between 24 weeks 0 days and 28 weeks 6 days. Pharmacokinetic data from 25 neonates (12 dosed with 10 mg/kg i.v. and 13 dosed with 20 mg/kg i.v.) were analyzed using a population modeling approach. Using a two-compartment model with allometric scaling of parameters on body weight (WT), the population PK parameter estimates were as follows: clearance, 0.21 liter/h × WT(kg)(0.75) [WT(kg)(0.75) indicates that clearance was allometrically scaled on body weight (in kilograms) with a fixed exponent of 0.75]; intercompartmental clearance, 2.1 liters/h × WT(kg)(0.75); central volume of distribution (V), 1.97 liters × WT (kg); and peripheral V, 17.9 liters × WT (kg). There was no evidence of departure from dose proportionality in azithromycin exposure over the tested dose range. The calculated area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC90 (AUC24/MIC90) for the single dose of azithromycin (20 mg/kg) was 7.5 h. Simulations suggest that 20 mg/kg for 3 days will maintain azithromycin concentrations of >MIC50 of 1 μg/ml for this group of Ureaplasma isolates for ≥ 96 h after the first dose. Azithromycin was well tolerated with no drug-related adverse events. One of seven (14%) Ureaplasma-positive subjects and three of six (50%) Ureaplasma-negative subjects developed physiologic BPD. Ureaplasma was eradicated in all treated Ureaplasma-positive subjects. Simulations suggest that a multiple-dose regimen may be efficacious for microbial

  3. FFTF railroad tank car Safety Evaluation for Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1995-09-21

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations considered necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14

  4. FFTF railroad tank car safety evaluation for packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1996-10-25

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer cif the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14.

  5. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  6. Evaluation of a personal safety program with Latino preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; Wurtele, Sandy K; Alonso, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a personal safety educational program designed for Latino families attending preschools in a large metropolis. Seventy-eight children who participated in the Kids Learning About Safety program were compared to 45 control children. Compared with controls, participating children demonstrated enhanced ability to recognize inappropriate touches, learned correct genital terminology, were able to recognize the inappropriateness of touch requests made by "good" people, demonstrated higher levels of personal safety skills, and learned general safety rules. Gains in knowledge were maintained at three-month follow-up testing for all content areas except genital terminology. Although feedback provided by participating families was positive, recruiting participants and maintaining attendance at sessions was difficult. Discussion includes recommendations for future research and engagement of this population. PMID:22809044

  7. Synthesis and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Degradable Shell Crosslinked Polymer Nanoparticles with Poly(carboxybetaine) vs. Poly(ethylene glycol) Surface-grafted Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Sun, Guorong; Samarajeewa, Sandani; Zou, Jiong; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Welch, Michael J.; Liu, Yongjian; Wooley, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles with tunable pharmacokinetics are desirable for various biomedical applications. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is well known to create “stealth” effects to stabilize and extend the blood circulation of nanoparticles. In this work, poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB), a new non-fouling polymer material, was incorporated as surface-grafted coatings, conjugated onto degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (dSCKs) composed of poly(acrylic acid)- based shells and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) cores, to compare the in vivo pharmacokinetics to their PEG-functionalized analogs. A series of five dSCKs was prepared from amphiphilic block copolymers, having different numbers and lengths of either PEG or PCB grafts, by supramolecular assembly in water followed by shell crosslinking, and then studied by a lactate assay to confirm their core hydrolytic degradabilities. Each dSCK was also conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocyclic chelators and tyramine moieties to provide for 64Cu and/or radiohalogen labeling. The high specific activity of 64Cu radiolabeling ensured nanogram administration of dSCKs for in vivo evaluation of their pharmacokinetics. Biodistribution studies demonstrated comparable in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of PCB-grafted dSCKs to their PEG-conjugated counterparts. These results indicated that PCB-functionalized dSCKs have great potential as a theranostic platform for translational research. PMID:23043240

  8. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  9. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics evaluation of a thermosensitive chitosan based hydrogel containing liposomal doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shuangxia; Dai, Yu; Li, Cuiyun; Qiu, Zhixia; Wang, Xin; Tian, Fengjie; Zhou, Sufeng; Liu, Qi; Xing, Han; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing; Li, Ning

    2016-09-20

    In situ gelling thermosensitive hydrogel formulation has been reported to effectively sustain the release of macromolecules for a long time. However, the low-molecular-weight hydrophilic drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are not suitable for intratumoral injection because the release will complete within one day. In this study, liposomal doxorubicin (LipDOX) was added into the hydrogel to form a novel thermosensitive formulation which prolonged the sustained release of DOX. DOX+C/GP (doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate) was prepared to compare with LipDOX+C/GP (liposomal doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate hydrogel). The particle size of DOX-loaded liposome was 94.2nm and the encapsulation efficiency of DOX was near 98%. In vitro release experiments, the release of DOX in both DOX+C/GP group and LipDOX+C/GP group increased along with the increasing pH of buffers. However, the LipDOX+C/GP group with lower initial burst release had a much longer releasing duration than DOX+C/GP group (21days vs. 24h). In vitro and in vivo antitumor experiments demonstrated that LipDOX+C/GP group had better antineoplastic effect and less toxicity than DOX+C/GP group. Pharmacokinetics study showed LipDOX+C/GP exhibited a higher AUC0-t and longer MRT than DOX+C/GP in blood and tumor, which indicated that LipDOX+C/GP obtained an enhanced antitumor activity compared with DOX+C/GP. In addition, the lower distribution index (the ratio of AUC of normal tissue/AUC of tumor tissue) of the LipDOX+C/GP implied it had lower toxicity to normal tissues than DOX+C/GP. Therefore, the novel thermosensitive hydrogel formulation was potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. PMID:27388491

  11. Evaluation of a Novel Nicotine Inhaler Device: Part 1—Arterial and Venous Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Alex; Redfern, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the United Kingdom, licensed nicotine-containing products can be recommended to reduce the harm associated with smoking. Many smokers find currently available nicotine replacement products unsatisfactory. The arterial and venous pharmacokinetics (PK) of nicotine delivered via a novel inhaler device were determined. Methods: Results are reported for Parts A (N = 18) and C (N = 18) of a 4-part (A–D) Phase I study. Participants (18–55 years, ≥10 cigarettes/day, smoking within 1hr of waking, expired carbon monoxide >10 ppm on screening) orally inhaled 2 single doses of nicotine (2 of 3 dose levels [0.22, 0.45, and 0.67 mg]) (Part A) and repeated hourly doses of 0.67mg nicotine for 12hr (Part C), via the novel device. Arterial and venous PK and tolerability were assessed. Results: In Part A, mean arterial plasma nicotine concentrations at 2min after the start of inhalation were 1.10, 2.06, and 2.59ng/mL for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. Mean maximum arterial plasma nicotine concentrations (C max) were 2.11, 3.73, and 4.38ng/mL and mean times to C max were 10.2, 7.3, and 6.5min after the start of inhalation for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. In Part C, the mean pre- and postdose venous plasma nicotine concentration increased steadily and fluctuated in the range 8–10mg/mL after 9hr. The novel device was well tolerated; most adverse events were mild. Conclusion: The novel inhaler device delivers nicotine rapidly into the systemic circulation and offers a viable alternative to cigarettes for those finding it difficult to quit the behavioral and sensorial aspects of smoking. PMID:25385878

  12. Nanosuspension formulations for low-soluble drugs: pharmacokinetic evaluation using spironolactone as model compound.

    PubMed

    Langguth, P; Hanafy, A; Frenzel, D; Grenier, P; Nhamias, A; Ohlig, T; Vergnault, G; Spahn-Langguth, H

    2005-03-01

    Various particle sizes of spironolactone as a model low solubility drug were formulated to yield micro-and nanosuspensions of the type solid lipid nanoparticles and DissoCubes. Seven oral and one i.v. formulations were tested in an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats with the aim of characterizing the bioavailability of spironolactone on the basis of its metabolites canrenone and 7-alpha-thiomethylspirolactone. In addition, a dose escalation study was carried out using nonmicronized spironolactone suspension as well as a nanosuspension type DissoCubes. On the basis of AUC as well as Cmax ratios, three groups of formulations were distinguished. The biggest improvement was seen with a solid lipid nanoparticle formulation yielding a 5.7-fold increase in AUC for canrenone and a similar improvement based on the Cmax metric, followed by a group of three formulations containing nanosized, micronized, and coarse drug material and surfactant. The DissoCubes nanosuspension yielded highly significant improvements in bioavailability averaging 3.3-fold in AUC and 3.0-fold in terms of Cmax for canrenone. The third class encompasses all other formulations, which showed very little to no improvement in bioavailability. The results show that the particle size minimization was not the major determining factor in the bioavailability improvement. Rather, the type of surfactant used as stabilizer in the formulations was of greater importance. Improvement in drug solubility in the intestine as well as in dissolution rate of spironolactone are the most likely mechanisms responsible for the observed effect, although additional mechanisms such as permeability enhancement may also be involved. PMID:15830727

  13. Co-administration of darunavir and a new pharmacokinetic booster: formulation strategies and evaluation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van Gyseghem, Elke; Baert, Lieven; Van Remoortere, Pieter; van 't Klooster, Gerben; Rouan, Marie-Claude; Voorspoels, Jody; de Kock, Herman; Schueller, Laurent; Rosier, Jan; Grooten, Liesbeth; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2010-10-01

    Various formulations for combination of the anti-HIV protease inhibitor darunavir (DRV) and TMC41629, a pharmacokinetic booster for DRV, were studied. TMC41629 (a BCS-IV compound) was formulated in capsules, as polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) solution, binary or ternary self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS), inclusion complex with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) or polyvinylpyrrolidone-co-vinylacetate 64 (PVP/VA64) extrudate. In addition, tablets were prepared using unmilled or micronized powder and a disintegrant. On co-administration with DRV tablets in dogs, DRV plasma concentration levels were boosted by TMC41629, the PVP/VA64 extrudate achieving the highest DRV levels (2-fold increase). Yet, with extrudate prepared with both compounds, no boosting effect was observed, likely due to transition of DRV from crystalline solvate to amorphous state. Therefore, a co-formulation, combining DRV as crystalline solvate with amorphous TMC41629, was developed. DRV/kappa-carrageenan 80/20% (w/w) beads coated with TMC41629 released at least 80% within 1h in 0.01M HCl with 0.5% sodium lauryl sulphate, TMC41629 dissolving faster than DRV. In dogs, the DRV exposure increased 2.7-fold with the TMC41629-coated beads relative to DRV alone, yet remained lower, but less variable, than following co-administration as separate formulations. Coating of TMC41629 on DRV/kappa-carrageenan beads is a suitable technique for co-formulation, whereby TMC41629 can function as a booster of DRV.

  14. Formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a paclitaxel nanosuspension for intravenous delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming; Wang, Liyao; Xu, Yuanlong; Cheng, Xiaodan; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a diterpenoid isolated from Taxus brevifolia. It is effective for various cancers, especially ovarian and breast cancer. Due to its aqueous insolubility, it is administered dissolved in ethanol and Cremophor® EL (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany), which can cause serious allergic reactions. In order to eliminate Cremophor EL, paclitaxel was formulated as a nanosuspension by high-pressure homogenization. The nanosuspension was lyophilized to obtain the dry paclitaxel nanoparticles (average size, 214.4 ± 15.03 nm), which enhanced both the physical and chemical stability of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Paclitaxel dissolution was also enhanced by the nanosuspension. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the crystallinity of paclitaxel was preserved during the high-pressure homogenization process. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of paclitaxel were compared after intravenous administration of paclitaxel nanosuspension and paclitaxel injection. In rat plasma, paclitaxel nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (P < 0.01) reduced area under the concentration curve (AUC)0–∞ (20.343 ± 9.119 μg · h · mL−1 vs 5.196 ± 1.426 μg · h · mL−1), greater clearance (2.050 ± 0.616 L · kg−1 · h−1 vs 0.556 ± 0.190 L · kg−1 · h−1), and shorter elimination half-life (5.646 ± 2.941 vs 3.774 ± 1.352 hours) compared with the paclitaxel solution. In contrast, the paclitaxel nanosuspension resulted in a significantly greater AUC0–∞ in liver, lung, and spleen (all P < 0.01), but not in heart or kidney. PMID:21796250

  15. Strategies to evaluate the safety of bioengineered foods.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    A number of genetically modified (GM) crops bioengineered to express agronomic traits including herbicide resistance and insect tolerance have been commercialized. Safety studies conducted for the whole grains and food and feed fractions obtained from GM crops (i.e., bioengineered foods) bear similarities to and distinctive differences from those applied to substances intentionally added to foods (e.g., food ingredients). Similarities are apparent in common animal models, route of exposure, duration, and response variables typically assessed in toxicology studies. However, because of differences in the nutritional and physical properties of food ingredients and bioengineered foods and in the fundamental goals of the overall safety assessment strategies for these different classes of substances, there are recognizable differences in the individual components of the safety assessment process. The fundamental strategic difference is that the process for food ingredients is structured toward quantitative risk assessment whereas that for bioengineered foods is structured for the purpose of qualitative risk assessment. The strategy for safety assessment of bioengineered foods focuses on evaluating the safety of the transgenic proteins used to impart the desired trait or traits and to demonstrate compositional similarity between the grains of GM and non-GM comparator crops using analytical chemistry and, in some cases, feeding studies. Despite these differences, the similarities in the design of safety studies conducted with bioengineered foods should be recognized by toxicologists. The current paper reviews the basic principles of safety assessment for bioengineered foods and compares them with the testing strategies applied to typical food ingredients. From this comparison it can be seen that the strategies used to assess the safety of bioengineered foods are at least as robust as that used to assess the safety of typical food ingredients.

  16. Analysis techniques for airborne laser range safety evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, M. S.; Jenkins, D. L.; Doerflein, R. D.

    1982-08-01

    Techniques to evaluate safety of airborne laser operations on the range are reported. The objectives of the safety evaluations were to (1) protect civilian and military personnel from the hazards associated with lasers, (2) provide users with the least restrictive constraints in which to perform their mission and still maintain an adequate degree of safety, and (3) develop a data base for the Navy in the event of suspected laser exposure of other related incidents involving military or civilian personnel. A microcomputer code, written in ASNI 77 FORTRAN, has been developed, which will provide safe flight profiles for airborne laser systems. The output of this code can also be used in establishing operating areas for ground based Lasers. Input to the code includes output parameters, NOHD and assigned buffer zone for the laser system, as well as parameters describing the geometry of the range.

  17. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project on the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J.B.; Brennan, S.A.; Scott, L.

    2000-07-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in October 1992 by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) defense programs and is documented in the Transactions of numerous American Nuclear Society and International Criticality Safety Conferences. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) handbook, International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The ICSBEP Internet site was established in 1996 and its address is http://icsbep.inel.gov/icsbep. A copy of the ICSBEP home page is shown in Fig. 1. The ICSBEP Internet site contains the five primary links. Internal sublinks to other relevant sites are also provided within the ICSBEP Internet site. A brief description of each of the five primary ICSBEP Internet site links is given.

  18. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa. PMID:18778758

  19. Facile synthesis, pharmacokinetic and systemic clearance evaluation, and positron emission tomography cancer imaging of 64Cu-Au alloy nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Luehmann, Hannah; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal biodistribution and significant renal and hepatobiliary excretion. PET imaging showed low non-specific tumor uptake, indicating its potential for active targeting of clinically relevant biomarkers in tumor and metastatic organs.Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal

  20. Recommendations for preparing the criticality safety evaluation of transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, H.R.; Parks, C.V.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides recommendations on preparing the criticality safety section of an application for approval of a transportation package containing fissile material. The analytical approach to the evaluation is emphasized rather than the performance standards that the package must meet. Where performance standards are addressed, this report incorporates the requirements of 10 CFR Part 71. 12 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. 21 CFR 315.6 - Evaluation of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... information may include, but is not limited to, the dose, route of administration, frequency of use, half-life of the ligand or carrier, half-life of the radionuclide, and results of clinical and preclinical... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of safety. 315.6 Section 315.6 Food...

  2. 21 CFR 601.35 - Evaluation of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... information may include, but is not limited to, the dose, route of administration, frequency of use, half-life of the ligand or carrier, half-life of the radionuclide, and results of clinical and preclinical... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evaluation of safety. 601.35 Section 601.35...

  3. 21 CFR 601.35 - Evaluation of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... information may include, but is not limited to, the dose, route of administration, frequency of use, half-life of the ligand or carrier, half-life of the radionuclide, and results of clinical and preclinical... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of safety. 601.35 Section 601.35...

  4. 21 CFR 601.35 - Evaluation of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... information may include, but is not limited to, the dose, route of administration, frequency of use, half-life of the ligand or carrier, half-life of the radionuclide, and results of clinical and preclinical... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evaluation of safety. 601.35 Section 601.35...

  5. 21 CFR 315.6 - Evaluation of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... information may include, but is not limited to, the dose, route of administration, frequency of use, half-life of the ligand or carrier, half-life of the radionuclide, and results of clinical and preclinical... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evaluation of safety. 315.6 Section 315.6 Food...

  6. Experimental Development and Evaluation of a Shop Safety Attitude Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettis, Mervin Dale

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a shop safety attitude scale that could be administered at the beginning of a shop course to help identify students who may be accident repeaters. A semantic differential scale was adapted from one originated by Osgood and his associates (1964) and administered to a sample of 125 university…

  7. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) 221 T sodium tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-02-04

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the transport of approximately 820 kg (1800 lb) of solid sodium between the 200 W Area and the 337 Building in the 300 Area of Hanford to be processed for disposal. This SEP authorizes a one-time shipment.

  8. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  9. A phase I dose‐escalation study to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bendell, Johanna C.; Kelley, Robin K.; Shih, Kent C.; Grabowsky, Jennifer A.; Bergsland, Emily; Jones, Suzanne; Martin, Thomas; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Matsutani, Tomoo; Xu, Shuichan; Wong, Lilly; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xiaoling; Mortensen, Deborah S.; Chopra, Rajesh; Hege, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for tumor development, yet mTOR inhibitors have yielded modest results. This phase 1 study investigated the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS Patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma received an initial dose of 7.5‐60 mg of CC‐223, followed by oral daily dosing in 28‐day cycles until disease progression. The primary objective was to determine the safety, tolerability, nontolerated dosage, maximum tolerated dosage (MTD), and preliminary pharmacokinetic profile. Secondary objectives were to evaluate pharmacodynamic effects and to describe preliminary efficacy. RESULTS Twenty‐eight patients were enrolled and received ≥1 dose of CC‐223. The most common treatment‐related grade 3 adverse events were hyperglycemia, fatigue, and rash. Four patients had dose‐limiting toxicities, including hyperglycemia, rash, fatigue, and mucositis. Therefore, 45 mg/d was determined to be the MTD. The pharmacokinetics of CC‐223 demonstrated a mean terminal half‐life ranging from 4.86 to 5.64 hours and maximum observed plasma concentration ranging from 269 to 480 ng/mL in patients who received CC‐223 ≥45 mg/d. Phosphorylation of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway biomarkers in blood cells was inhibited by CC‐223 ≥30 mg/d with an exposure‐response relationship. Best responses included 1 partial response (breast cancer; response duration 220 days; 30‐mg/d cohort), stable disease (8 patients across ≥15 mg/d cohorts; response duration range, 36‐168 days), and progressive disease (12 patients). The disease control rate was 32%. CONCLUSIONS CC‐223 was tolerable, with manageable toxicities. Preliminary antitumor activity, including tumor regression, and evidence of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway inhibition were observed. Cancer 2015;121:3435–43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26177599

  10. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    SciTech Connect

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  11. Evaluation of protein safety in the context of agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Bryan; Astwood, James D; Cunny, Helen; Conn, Robin Eichen; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Macintosh, Susan; Meyer, Linda S; Privalle, Laura; Gao, Yong; Mattsson, Joel; Levine, Marci

    2008-05-01

    One component of the safety assessment of agricultural products produced through biotechnology is evaluation of the safety of newly expressed proteins. The ILSI International Food Biotechnology Committee has developed a scientifically based two-tiered, weight-of-evidence strategy to assess the safety of novel proteins used in the context of agricultural biotechnology. Recommendations draw upon knowledge of the biological and chemical characteristics of proteins and testing methods for evaluating potential intrinsic hazards of chemicals. Tier I (potential hazard identification) includes an assessment of the biological function or mode of action and intended application of the protein, history of safe use, comparison of the amino acid sequence of the protein to other proteins, as well as the biochemical and physico-chemical properties of the proteins. Studies outlined in Tier II (hazard characterization) are conducted when the results from Tier I are not sufficient to allow a determination of safety (reasonable certainty of no harm) on a case-by-case basis. These studies may include acute and repeated dose toxicology studies and hypothesis-based testing. The application of these guidelines is presented using examples of transgenic proteins applied for agricultural input and output traits in genetically modified crops along with recommendations for future research considerations related to protein safety assessment.

  12. Evaluation of human pharmacokinetics, therapeutic dose and exposure predictions using marketed oral drugs.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, D F; Collington, J; Austin, R P; Riley, R J

    2007-06-01

    In this article approaches to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) are discussed and the capability of the exemplified methodologies to estimate individual PK parameters and therapeutic dose for a set of marketed oral drugs has been assessed. For a set of 63 drugs where the minimum efficacious concentration (MEC) and human PK were known, the clinical dose was shown to be well predicted or in some cases over-estimated using a simple one-compartment oral PK model. For a subset of these drugs, in vitro potency against the primary human targets was gathered, and compared to the observed MEC. When corrected for plasma protein binding, the MEC of the majority of compounds was < or=3 fold over the respective in vitro target potency value. A series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to predict the human PK parameters. Metabolic clearance was generally predicted well from human hepatocytes. Interestingly, for this compound set, allometry or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ratio methods appeared to be applicable for renal CL even where CL(renal) > GFR. For approximately 90% of compounds studied, the predicted CL using in vitro-in vivo (IVIV) extrapolation together with a CL(renal) estimate, where appropriate, was within 2-fold of that observed clinically. Encouragingly volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) estimated in preclinical species (rat and dog) when corrected for plasma protein binding, predicted human V(ss) successfully on the majority of occasions--73% of compounds within 2-fold. In this laboratory, absorption estimated from oral rat PK studies was lower than the observed human absorption for most drugs, even when solubility and permeability appeared not to be limiting. Preliminary data indicate absorption in the dog may be more representative of human for compounds absorbed via the transcellular pathway. Using predicted PK and MEC values estimated from in vitro potency assays there was a good correlation between predicted and observed dose

  13. Rapid-onset intranasal delivery of anticonvulsants: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Gorukanti, S; Choi, Y M; Kim, K H

    2000-04-10

    Intranasal (IN) administration is a promising approach for rapid-onset delivery of medications. In order to assess the feasibility of this approach for the emergency treatment of status epilepticus, three anticovulsants, i.e. diazepam (DZ), clonazepam (CZ), and a monocarbamate-based new compound (MCA) were studied in rabbits for the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) response following intravenous (IV) and IN administrations. The animals were intranasally dosed with DZ (1 mg/kg), CZ (0.2 mg/kg), and MCA (5 mg/kg), dissolved in 200 microl of vehicle consisting of propylene glycol (PG), ethanol (EtOH), and water in the presence or absence of 1% sodium glycocholate (SGC) using single and repeated dosing schedules. Both DZ and CZ were absorbed very rapidly from 1% SGC/60% PG-30% EtOH-10% Water after IN single application; the T(max)'s were less than 2 min. The absorption rate of MCA was relatively slower with the peak time of 13-32 min. The bioavailability of single IN administration for DZ, CZ, and MCA determined over the first 2 or 4 h was found to be 77, 45, and 79%, respectively. The peak plasma level of DZ increased linearly with increasing the volume fraction of EtOH in the ternary cosolvent (20% to 60%). A repeated IN application of DZ, 5 min after the first dose, doubled the C(max) and AUC(0-2 h) values of the first one, whereas those of CZ and MCA resulted in an increase of 73-94% of the first dose. A single IN application of DZ- and CZ-containing formulations produced a PD response within 1.5 min, which was comparable to that of an IV injection. These results suggest that single or repeated IN applications of DZ, CZ, and MCA in a hydroalcohol-glycolic formulation might represent a viable approach to achieving a rapid systemic absorption of these anticonvulsants during the emergency treatment of status epilepticus and other types of seizures.

  14. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus.

  15. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus. PMID:18307504

  16. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  17. First-in-Humans Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840, a New Chemical Entity with Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruderer, Shirin; Hurst, Noémie; de Kanter, Ruben; Miraval, Tommaso; Pfeifer, Thomas; Donazzolo, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Emerging resistance to antimalarial agents raises the need for new drugs. ACT-451840 is a new compound with potent activity against sensitive and resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains. This was a first-in-humans single-ascending-dose study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840 across doses of 10, 50, 200, and 500 mg in healthy male subjects. In the 200- and 500-mg dose groups, the effect of food was investigated, and antimalarial activity was assessed using an ex vivo bioassay with P. falciparum. No (serious) adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported. At the highest dose level, the peak drug concentration (Cmax) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity of ACT-451840 under fasted conditions reached 11.9 ng/ml and 100.6 ng · h/ml, respectively, and these were approximately 13-fold higher under fed conditions. Food did not affect the half-life (approximately 34 h) of the drug, while the Cmax was attained 2.0 and 3.5 h postdose under fasted and fed conditions, respectively. The plasma concentrations estimated by the bioassay were approximately 4-fold higher than those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several potentially active metabolites were also identified. ACT-451840 was well tolerated across all doses. Exposure to ACT-451840 significantly increased with food. The bioassay indicated the presence of circulating active metabolites. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02186002.) PMID:25421475

  18. First-in-humans study of the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840, a new chemical entity with antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Shirin; Hurst, Noémie; de Kanter, Ruben; Miraval, Tommaso; Pfeifer, Thomas; Donazzolo, Yves; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-02-01

    Emerging resistance to antimalarial agents raises the need for new drugs. ACT-451840 is a new compound with potent activity against sensitive and resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains. This was a first-in-humans single-ascending-dose study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840 across doses of 10, 50, 200, and 500 mg in healthy male subjects. In the 200- and 500-mg dose groups, the effect of food was investigated, and antimalarial activity was assessed using an ex vivo bioassay with P. falciparum. No (serious) adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported. At the highest dose level, the peak drug concentration (Cmax) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity of ACT-451840 under fasted conditions reached 11.9 ng/ml and 100.6 ng·h/ml, respectively, and these were approximately 13-fold higher under fed conditions. Food did not affect the half-life (approximately 34 h) of the drug, while the Cmax was attained 2.0 and 3.5 h postdose under fasted and fed conditions, respectively. The plasma concentrations estimated by the bioassay were approximately 4-fold higher than those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several potentially active metabolites were also identified. ACT-451840 was well tolerated across all doses. Exposure to ACT-451840 significantly increased with food. The bioassay indicated the presence of circulating active metabolites. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02186002.). PMID:25421475

  19. Safety evaluation methodology for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods for coal extraction systems were developed. The analysis examines the soundness of the design, whether or not the major hazards have been eliminated or reduced, and how the reduction would be accomplished. The quantitative methodology establishes the approximate impact of hazards on injury levels. The results are weighted by peculiar geological elements, specialized safety training, peculiar mine environmental aspects, and reductions in labor force. The outcome is compared with injury level requirements based on similar, safer industries to get a measure of the new system's success in reducing injuries. This approach provides a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of hazards and their effects than existing safety analyses.

  20. Preparation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of oral self-emulsifying system for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Song, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yingxin; Zhao, Qianqian; Zhang, Xuemei; Pan, Weisan; Yang, Xinggang

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed aiming to develop a new solid self-emulsifying system (SMEDDS) for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam and evaluate the bioavailability in Wister rats by oral gavage. Liquid SMEDDS of Lornoxicam was formulated with Labrafil M 1944 CS as oil phase, Kolliphor HS 15 as a surfactant and Transcutol HP as a cosurfactant after screening various vehicles. The microemulsion system selected from the phase diagram and optimized by central composite design (CCD) response surface method was transformed into solid-SMEDDS (S-SMEDDS) by lyophilization using sucrose as cryoprotectant. The formulations were further characterized by the particle size, poly dispersity index (PDI), self-emulsifying time, zeta potential, transmission electron microscope (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics. Results of DSC studies confirmed that the drug was incorporated in the S-SMEDDS. The in vitro drug release from Lornoxicam SMEDDS was found to be greatly higher in comparison with that from the commercial tablets. It was indicated that SMEDDS might be effective in reducing the effect of pH variability of Lornoxicam and improving the release performance of Lornoxicam. HPLC system was applied to study the concentration of Lornoxicam in the plasma of the Wister rats after oral administration of Lornoxicam SMEDDS and Lornoxicam commercial tablets. The pharmacokinetics parameters of the rats were C(max) 1065.91 ± 224.90 and 1855.22 ± 748.25 ngmL(-1), T(max) were 2.5 ± 0.4 h and 1.8 ± 0.5 h, and AUC(0∼t) were 5316.35 ± 323.62 and 7758.07 ± 241.57 ngmL(-1) h, respectively. Calculated by AUC(0∼∞), the relative bioavailability of Lornoxicam S-SMEDDS was 151.69 ± 15.32%. It suggested that this S-SMEDDS could be used as a successful oral solid dosage form to improve the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam as well.

  1. Children's Agricultural Safety Network: Evaluating Organizational Effectiveness and Impacts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Wendl, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Coalitions that are effectively organized and led are more likely to achieve their intended program outcomes and impacts, as well as achieve sustainability. External evaluation of the coalition's governance and leadership can help identify strengths and areas for improvement. This article describes the evaluation of the Children's Agricultural Safety Network (CASN)-a national coalition, or network of 45 organizational members. The conceptual framework, Internal Coalition Outcomes Hierarchy, guided the evaluation. We used a mixed-methods approach to answer study's primary objectives from the perspective of CASN members and leaders for (a) organizational effectiveness, (b) network impact, and (c) member benefits. We collected quantitative data using a survey and the Internal Coalition Effectiveness (ICE) instrument. Focused interviews were conducted by phone to gather rich data on examples. Combined findings showed that both members and leaders rated the CASN effective in all construct areas that define successful coalitions. Members feel as invested in CASN success as do leaders. The major impact of CASN has been as a national leader and clearinghouse for childhood safety issues, and the most frequently cited example of impact was the national tractor safety campaign. Members identified the benefits of CASN membership as networking, resource sharing, and opportunities to enhance their knowledge, skills, and practices in the area. Members also valued the national attention that CASN was able to bring to the important issues in childhood agricultural safety. Suggestions for improvement were to focus on more research to improve best practices and strengthen dissemination and implementation science. PMID:25906269

  2. Children's Agricultural Safety Network: Evaluating Organizational Effectiveness and Impacts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Wendl, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Coalitions that are effectively organized and led are more likely to achieve their intended program outcomes and impacts, as well as achieve sustainability. External evaluation of the coalition's governance and leadership can help identify strengths and areas for improvement. This article describes the evaluation of the Children's Agricultural Safety Network (CASN)-a national coalition, or network of 45 organizational members. The conceptual framework, Internal Coalition Outcomes Hierarchy, guided the evaluation. We used a mixed-methods approach to answer study's primary objectives from the perspective of CASN members and leaders for (a) organizational effectiveness, (b) network impact, and (c) member benefits. We collected quantitative data using a survey and the Internal Coalition Effectiveness (ICE) instrument. Focused interviews were conducted by phone to gather rich data on examples. Combined findings showed that both members and leaders rated the CASN effective in all construct areas that define successful coalitions. Members feel as invested in CASN success as do leaders. The major impact of CASN has been as a national leader and clearinghouse for childhood safety issues, and the most frequently cited example of impact was the national tractor safety campaign. Members identified the benefits of CASN membership as networking, resource sharing, and opportunities to enhance their knowledge, skills, and practices in the area. Members also valued the national attention that CASN was able to bring to the important issues in childhood agricultural safety. Suggestions for improvement were to focus on more research to improve best practices and strengthen dissemination and implementation science.

  3. ADMET evaluation in drug discovery. 11. PharmacoKinetics Knowledge Base (PKKB): a comprehensive database of pharmacokinetic and toxic properties for drugs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongyue; Wang, Junmei; Zhou, Rui; Li, Youyong; Yu, Huidong; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-05-25

    Good and extensive experimental ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) data is critical for developing reliable in silico ADMET models. Here we develop a PharmacoKinetics Knowledge Base (PKKB) to compile comprehensive information about ADMET properties into a single electronic repository. We incorporate more than 10 000 experimental ADMET measurements of 1685 drugs into the PKKB. The ADMET properties in the PKKB include octanol/water partition coefficient, solubility, dissociation constant, intestinal absorption, Caco-2 permeability, human bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-plasma partitioning ratio, volume of distribution, metabolism, half-life, excretion, urinary excretion, clearance, toxicity, half lethal dose in rat or mouse, etc. The PKKB provides the most extensive collection of freely available data for ADMET properties up to date. All these ADMET properties, as well as the pharmacological information and the calculated physiochemical properties are integrated into a web-based information system. Eleven separated data sets for octanol/water partition coefficient, solubility, blood-brain partitioning, intestinal absorption, Caco-2 permeability, human oral bioavailability, and P-glycoprotein inhibitors have been provided for free download and can be used directly for ADMET modeling. The PKKB is available online at http://cadd.suda.edu.cn/admet.

  4. Development of a novel model for comparative evaluation of intranasal pharmacokinetics and effects of anti-allergic nasal sprays.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Daniel; Bachert, Claus; Högger, Petra

    2012-01-01

    For locally acting drugs, an extended residence time in the nasal cavity is desirable and related to a prolonged effect. We sought to develop a model for comparative determination of intranasal pharmacokinetics. We embedded human respiratory tissue into a solid matrix and coated the surface with artificial nasal fluid. Nasal spray suspensions of fluticasone propionate (FP) and budesonide (Bud) as well as a solution of azelastine hydrochloride (AZ) were applied onto the surface and removed after 30 min to simulate mucociliary clearance. As exemplary anti-inflammatory measure, we evaluated the inhibition of IL-8 release from epithelial cells. FP and Bud were initially bound to the same extent to the tissue gel while AZ displayed a more 4-fold higher binding than FP or Bud. After equilibrium with plasma, approximately 5-fold higher tissue concentrations of AZ compared to FP and 77-fold higher levels in relation to Bud were determined. This tissue retention revealed an excellent correlation with the volume of distribution of the respective drugs (r=0.9999, p ≤ 0.05). The inhibitory effect of FP on IL-8 release was approximately 5-fold more pronounced compared to AZ. The present model realistically mirrors conditions in vivo where solubility and tissue absorption of intranasally applied drugs compete with mucociliary clearance mechanisms. PMID:21945271

  5. Contrasting toxicokinetic evaluations and interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling approaches for small molecules and biologics: applicability to biosimilar development.

    PubMed

    Offman, Elliot; Edginton, Andrea N

    2013-06-01

    1. A 2-fold threshold typically used for prediction accuracy of interspecies scaling of clearance (CL) may be too liberal when using pharmacokinetic similarity in animals to advance biosimilar candidate selection for clinical testing. The purpose of this review is to identify interspecies scaling methods for use in de-risking biosimilar development prior to clinical testing. 2. Scaling approaches for predicting macromolecule CL were identified through literature review. Reports that evaluated predicted and observed human CLs for ≥5 individual compounds were considered. Absolute average fold-error (AAFE) was calculated for each method along with the proportion of compounds with individual fold-error values within a tighter threshold of 0.7-1.3. 3. Traditional simple allometry with a minimum of three species and the rule of exponents performed inconsistently with some groups of compounds resulting in a greater than 2-fold error (i.e. AAFE > 2). For monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), simplified allometric approaches employing a single species (monkey) with a fixed exponent of 0.85 consistently resulted in lower AAFEs and a higher proportion of compounds within the tighter range of 0.7-1.3. 4. For macromolecules, and particularly mAbs, employing single-species monkey "simplified" allometric approaches with a fixed exponent of 0.85 may be more appropriate than traditional allometric approaches. PMID:23244626

  6. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  7. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Functional Effects of the Nogo-A Monoclonal Antibody in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, First-In-Human Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Vincent; Pradat, Pierre-François; Corse, Andrea; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rix Brooks, Benjamin; Caress, James B.; Cudkowicz, Merit; Kolb, Stephen J.; Lange, Dale; Leigh, P. Nigel; Meyer, Thomas; Milleri, Stefano; Morrison, Karen E.; Orrell, Richard W.; Peters, Gary; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Shefner, Jeremy; Lavrov, Arseniy; Williams, Nicola; Overend, Phil; Price, Jeffrey; Bates, Stewart; Bullman, Jonathan; Krull, David; Berges, Alienor; Abila, Bams; Meno-Tetang, Guy; Wurthner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG), and clinical laboratory tests). Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological), and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01–15 mg/kg) was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab) showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated co

  8. Road network safety evaluation using Bayesian hierarchical joint model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Huang, Helai

    2016-05-01

    Safety and efficiency are commonly regarded as two significant performance indicators of transportation systems. In practice, road network planning has focused on road capacity and transport efficiency whereas the safety level of a road network has received little attention in the planning stage. This study develops a Bayesian hierarchical joint model for road network safety evaluation to help planners take traffic safety into account when planning a road network. The proposed model establishes relationships between road network risk and micro-level variables related to road entities and traffic volume, as well as socioeconomic, trip generation and network density variables at macro level which are generally used for long term transportation plans. In addition, network spatial correlation between intersections and their connected road segments is also considered in the model. A road network is elaborately selected in order to compare the proposed hierarchical joint model with a previous joint model and a negative binomial model. According to the results of the model comparison, the hierarchical joint model outperforms the joint model and negative binomial model in terms of the goodness-of-fit and predictive performance, which indicates the reasonableness of considering the hierarchical data structure in crash prediction and analysis. Moreover, both random effects at the TAZ level and the spatial correlation between intersections and their adjacent segments are found to be significant, supporting the employment of the hierarchical joint model as an alternative in road-network-level safety modeling as well.

  9. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  10. Preclinical pharmacokinetic and toxicological evaluation of MIF-1 peptidomimetic, PAOPA: examining the pharmacology of a selective dopamine D2 receptor allosteric modulator for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mattea L; Basu, Dipannita; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Johnson, Rodney L; Mishra, Ram K

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental illness characterized by a breakdown in cognition and emotion. Over the years, drug treatment for this disorder has mainly been compromised of orthosteric ligands that antagonize the active site of the dopamine D2 receptor. However, these drugs are limited in their use and often lead to the development of adverse movement and metabolic side effects. Allosteric modulators are an emerging class of therapeutics with significant advantages over orthosteric ligands, including an improved therapeutic and safety profile. This study investigates our newly developed allosteric modulator, PAOPA, which is a specific modulator of the dopamine D2 receptor. Previous studies have shown PAOPA to attenuate schizophrenia-like behavioral abnormalities in preclinical models. To advance this newly developed allosteric drug from the preclinical to clinical stage, this study examines the pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicological profile of PAOPA. Results from this study prove the effectiveness of PAOPA in reaching the implicated regions of the brain for therapeutic action, particularly the striatum. Pharmacokinetic parameters of PAOPA were found to be comparable to current market antipsychotic drugs. Necropsy and histopathological analyses showed no abnormalities in all examined organs. Acute and chronic treatment of PAOPA indicated no movement abnormalities commonly found with the use of current typical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, acute and chronic PAOPA treatment revealed no hematological or metabolic abnormalities classically found with the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Findings from this study demonstrate a better safety profile of PAOPA, and necessitates the progression of this newly developed therapeutic for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  11. A new goldfish model to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used for motion sickness in different gravity loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Smith, Cedric M.; Schraeder, Paul L.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a new goldfish model to predict pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic effects of drugs used to treat motion sickness administered in differing gravity loads. The assumption of these experiments is that the vestibular system is dominant in producing motion sickness and that the visual system is secondary or of small import in the production of motion sickness. Studies will evaluate the parameter of gravity and the contribution of vision to the role of the neurovestibular system in the initiation of motion sickness with and without pharmacologic agents. Promethazine will be studied first. A comparison of data obtained in different groups of goldfish will be done (normal vs. acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded vs. sham operated). Some fish will be bilaterally blinded 10 months prior to initiation of the experiment (designated the chronically bilaterally blinded group of goldfish) to evaluate the neuroplasticity of the nervous system and the associated return of neurovestibular function. Data will be obtained under differing gravity loads with and without a pharmacological agent for motion sickness. Experiments will differentiate pharmacological effects on vision vs. neurovestibular input to motion sickness. Comparison of data obtained in the normal fish and in acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded fish with those obtained in fish with intact and denervated otoliths will differentiate if the visual or neurovestibular system is dominant in response to altered gravity and/or drugs. Experiments will contribute to validation of the goldfish as a model for humans since plasticity of the central nervous system allows astronauts to adapt to the altered visual stimulus conditions of 0-g. Space motion sickness may occur until such an adaptation is achieved.

  12. Lecithin and PLGA-based self-assembled nanocomposite, Lecithmer: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Seby Elsy; Fariya, Mayur K; Rajawat, Gopal Singh; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the drug delivery potential of polymer lipid hybrid nanocomposites (Lecithmer®) composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and soya lecithin. Core-shell structure of Lecithmer was evident from cryo-TEM images. Daunorubicin (DNR) and lornoxicam (LNX)-incorporated Lecithmer nanocomposites were evaluated for anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. DNR- and LNX-loaded Lecithmer had mean particle size of ∼335 and ∼282.7 nm, respectively. Lecithmer formulated with different cationic lipids resulted in lower particle size (∼120 nm) and positive zeta potential. Entrapment efficiency of DNR and LNX was 93.16 and 88.59 %, respectively. In vitro release of DNR from Lecithmer was slower compared to PLGA nanoparticles. DNR release from Lecithmer was significantly higher at pH 5.5 (80.96 %) as compared to pH 7.4 (55.95 %), providing advantage for selective tumor therapy. Similarly, sustained release of LNX (30 % in 10 h) was observed at pH 7.4. DNR in Lecithmer showed superior cytotoxicity on human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pharmacokinetic study in Wistar rats with i.v. administered DNR-loaded Lecithmer showed higher volume of distribution, lower elimination rate constant, and longer half-life (81.68 L, 0.3535 h(-1), 1.96 h) as compared to DNR solution (57.46 L, 0.4237 h(-1), 1.635 h). Pharmacodynamic evaluation of orally administered LNX-loaded Lecithmer showed superior anti-inflammatory activity with maximum inhibition of 81.2 % vis-à-vis 53.57 % in case of LNX suspension. In light of these results, Lecithmer can be envisaged as a promising nanosystem for parenteral as well as oral drug delivery.

  13. Phase 1 Study of Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTC299, an Inhibitor of Stress‐Regulated Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas; Elfring, Gary; Northcutt, Valerie; Cao, Liangxian; Moon, Young‐Choon; Riebling, Peter; Dali, Mandar; Hirawat, Samit; Babiak, John; Colacino, Joseph; Almstead, Neil; Spiegel, Robert; Peltz, Stuart W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract PTC299 is a novel small molecule that specifically blocks the production of protein from selected mRNAs that under certain conditions use noncanonical ribosomal translational pathways. Hypoxia, oncogenic transformation, and viral infections limit normal translation and turn on these noncanonical translation pathways that are sensitive to PTC299. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) is an example of a transcript that is posttranscriptionally regulated. Single doses of PTC299 (0.03 to 3 mg/kg) were administered orally to healthy volunteers in a phase 1 single ascending‐dose study. In a subsequent multiple ascending‐dose study in healthy volunteers, multiple‐dose regimens (0.3 to 1.2 mg/kg twice a day or 1.6 mg/kg 3 times a day for 7 days) were evaluated. PTC299 was well tolerated in these studies. As expected in healthy volunteers, mean plasma VEGF levels did not change. Increases in Cmax and AUC of PTC299 were dose‐proportional. The target trough plasma concentration associated with preclinical efficacy was achieved within 7 days at doses of 0.6 mg/kg twice daily and above. These data demonstrate that PTC299 is orally bioavailable and well tolerated and support clinical evaluation of PTC299 in cancer, certain viral infections, or other diseases in which deregulation of translational control is a causal factor. PMID:27310330

  14. Tools to evaluate pharmacokinetics data for establishing maximum residue limits for approved veterinary drugs: examples from JECFA's work.

    PubMed

    Sanders, P; Henri, J; Laurentie, M

    2016-05-01

    Maximum residue limits (MRLs) for residues of veterinary drugs are the maximum concentrations of residues permitted in or on a food by national or regional legislation. In the process of MRLs recommendations by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), analysis of pharmacokinetic data describing the ADME process (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) is a crucial step and requires the use of different pharmacokinetic tools. The results of animal metabolism studies are the prime determinants of the residue definition in food commodities. Substances labelled with radioactive isotopes are used so that the disposition of the residue can be followed as total residue and main metabolites concentrations. Residue depletion studies with radiolabelled parent drug will lead to the estimate of the time course of the total residue and to determine a marker residue. Depletion studies with an unlabelled drug provide more information on the time course of the marker residue in raw commodities after administration under approved practical conditions of use. By use of this information and after conversion with the total/residue marker ratio, MRLs are derived by comparison of the acceptable daily intake with the daily intakes calculated with different scenarios of dietary exposure. Progress in pharmacokinetic model such as physiologically based pharmacokinetics and population pharmacokinetics will drive the future research in this field to improved veterinary drug development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443212

  15. Using photographic interpretation to evaluate the safety of home environments.

    PubMed

    Lehna, Carlee; Twyman, Stephanie; Myers, John

    2016-12-01

    In the US there were 400,000 home fires resulting in 2755 deaths, 12,450 injuries, and $6.9B lost. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content-validity of photographs taken in the home for use as an educational instrument to teach about "safe" and "unsafe" fire safety practice for adults and older adults. A total of 73 home fire safety experts were provided 27 photographs to evaluate home fire safety practice. Initially, a Krippendorff's alpha was calculated for the first 24 questions to evaluate inter-rater reliability, and differences in demographics were evaluated. Unique codes and themes for the last three questions were identified and inter-rater reliability examined. A majority of respondents were female (n = 43, 60.6%), college educated (n = 61, 83.6%), nurses (n = 25, 33.8%), or worked for a fire department (n = 21, 29.6%). Their mean age was 45.5 years and they had 11.05 years of experience. The first 24 questions had high inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.831). No significant differences existed between the strata of the demographic variables (all p-values > 0.05). Similarly, based on the codes and themes identified, the last three questions had moderate-to-good inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.764). Providing photographs as a 'seek-and-find' or 'What's wrong with this picture?' tools and simplified visual images is an excellent way to aid recognition of unsafe home fire safety environments. Education through non-traditional visual methods increases the possibility of change for diverse low-literacy populations. PMID:27617192

  16. Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of CEP-26401, a high-affinity histamine-3 receptor antagonist, following single and multiple dosing in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Spiegelstein, Ofer; Stevens, Jasper; Van Gerven, Joop; Nathan, Pradeep J; Maynard, James P; Mayleben, David W; Hellriegel, Edward; Yang, Ronghua

    2016-10-01

    CEP-26401 is a novel orally active, brain-penetrant, high-affinity histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonist, with potential therapeutic utility in cognition enhancement. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose escalation studies with single (0.02 to 5 mg) or multiple administration (0.02 to 0.5 mg once daily) of CEP-26401 were conducted in healthy subjects. Plasma and urine samples were collected to investigate CEP-26401 pharmacokinetics. Pharmacodynamic endpoints included a subset of tasks from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) and nocturnal polysomnography. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling was conducted on one CANTAB and one polysomnography parameter of interest. CEP-26401 was slowly absorbed (median tmax range 3-6 hours) and the mean terminal elimination half-life ranged from 24-60 hours. Steady-state plasma concentrations were achieved within six days of dosing. CEP-26401 exhibits dose- and time-independent pharmacokinetics, and renal excretion is a major elimination pathway. CEP-26401 had a dose-dependent negative effect on sleep, with some positive effects on certain CANTAB cognitive parameters seen at lower concentrations. The derived three compartment population pharmacokinetic model, with first-order absorption and elimination, accurately described the available pharmacokinetic data. CEP-26401 was generally well tolerated up to 0.5 mg/day with most common treatment related adverse events being headache and insomnia. Further clinical studies are required to establish the potential of low-dose CEP-26401 in cognition enhancement.

  18. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING TO DESIGN STUDIES FOR PATHWAY-SPECIFIC EXPOSURE MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Validating an exposure pathway model is difficult because the biomarker, which is often used to evaluate the model prediction, is an integrated measure for exposures from all the exposure routes/pathways. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a method to use pharmacokeneti...

  19. Extended Evaluation of Virological, Immunological and Pharmacokinetic Endpoints of CELADEN: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Celgosivir in Dengue Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Cynthia; Wei, Yuan; Watanabe, Satoru; Lee, How Sung; Khoo, Yok Moi; Fan, Lu; Rathore, Abhay P. S.; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Choy, Milly M.; Kamaraj, Uma S.; Sessions, October M.; Aw, Pauline; de Sessions, Paola F.; Lee, Bernett; Connolly, John E.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Wijaya, Limin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny Guek-Hong

    2016-01-01

    CELADEN was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with confirmed dengue fever to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celgosivir (A study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01619969). Celgosivir was given as a 400 mg loading dose and 200 mg bid (twice a day) over 5 days. Replication competent virus was measured by plaque assay and compared to reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) of viral RNA. Pharmacokinetics (PK) correlations with viremia, immunological profiling, next generation sequence (NGS) analysis and hematological data were evaluated as exploratory endpoints here to identify possible signals of pharmacological activity. Viremia by plaque assay strongly correlated with qPCR during the first four days. Immunological profiling demonstrated a qualitative shift in T helper cell profile during the course of infection. NGS analysis did not reveal any prominent signature that could be associated with drug treatment; however the phylogenetic spread of patients’ isolates underlines the importance of strain variability that may potentially confound interpretation of dengue drug trials conducted during different outbreaks and in different countries. Celgosivir rapidly converted to castanospermine (Cast) with mean peak and trough concentrations of 5727 ng/mL (30.2 μM) and 430 ng/mL (2.3 μM), respectively and cleared with a half-life of 2.5 (± 0.6) hr. Mean viral log reduction between day 2 and 4 (VLR2-4) was significantly greater in secondary dengue than primary dengue (p = 0.002). VLR2-4 did not correlate with drug AUC but showed a trend of greater response with increasing Cmin. PK modeling identified dosing regimens predicted to achieve 2.4 to 4.5 times higher Cmin. than in the CELADEN trial for only 13% to 33% increase in overall dose. A small, non-statistical trend towards better outcome on platelet nadir and difference between maximum and minimum hematocrit was observed in celgosivir-treated patients with secondary dengue

  20. [Bacteriological, pharmacokinetic and clinical evaluations of cefpirome sulfate in the pediatric field. Pediatric Study Group of Cefpirome].

    PubMed

    Fujii, R; Abe, T; Meguro, H; Tajima, T; Nakazawa, S; Sato, H; Hirama, Y; Narita, A; Matsumoto, K; Nakazawa, S

    1991-01-01

    A research group was organized with the purpose of making basic and clinical studies on cefpirome sulfate (HR810, CPR), a newly developed cephalosporin antibiotic, in the pediatric field. Through meetings a joint research was done involving 19 key institutions and their related facilities throughout Japan. The obtained results are summarized as follows. 1. Antibacterial Activities Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined against 71 Gram-positive and 110 Gram-negative bacteria in the present clinical trials. CPR showed antibacterial activities 2-16 times higher than those of ceftazidime (CAZ) against Staphylococcus aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria including MRSA. Against Gram-negative bacteria, CPR showed a somewhat broad range of distribution in MIC against Branhamella catarrhalis, while the antibiotic inhibited the growth of all the strains of Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae at concentrations no more than 0.10 and 0.20 micrograms/ml, respectively. 2. Blood Concentrations and Urinary Excretion Rates The pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients was investigated with a dose of 20 mg/kg in most cases via one shot intravenous injection or 30- and 60-minute intravenous drip infusion. Mean blood concentrations of CPR at 15 minutes after one shot intravenous injection of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg were 51.2, 70.5, and 123.5 micrograms/ml, with half-lives of 1.21, 1.39, and 1.53 hours, respectively. Urinary excretion rates in 6 hours were 63.6, 66.0 and 71.6%, respectively for the 3 dose levels. After 30- and 60-minute intravenous drip infusions at the same dose, the pharmacokinetic parameters observed were similar to those obtained with one shot injections. 3. Concentration in the Cerebrospinal Fluid CPR penetrated well into the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with purulent meningitis and levels of 1.85-24.2 micrograms/ml 45-60 minutes were achieved after intravenous injection at a dose of 40-80 mg/kg, the penetration rate of CPR was at an

  1. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT/RETURN FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-26

    The purpose of this design calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of transportation casks performed in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) and Buffer Area meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''Transportation Cask Receipt/Return Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170217], Section 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of the following items: (1) Evaluate criticality effects for both dry and fully flooded conditions pertaining to TCRRF and Buffer Area operations for defense in depth. (2) Evaluate Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the TCRRF as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). This evaluation includes credible fuel reconfiguration conditions. In addition to the scope of work listed above, an evaluation was also performed of modeling assumptions for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) regarding inclusion of plenum and end regions of the active fuel. This calculation is limited to CSNF and US Department of Energy (DOE) SNF. it should be mentioned that the latter waste form is evaluated more in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167614]). Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the US Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the TCRRF and Buffer Area and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions

  2. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoxia Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  3. Safety evaluation of rebaudioside A produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rumelhard, Mélina; Hosako, Hiromi; Eurlings, Irene M J; Westerink, Walter M A; Staska, Lauren M; van de Wiel, Jeanine A G; La Marta, James

    2016-03-01

    The safety of rebaudioside A, produced fermentatively by Yarrowia lipolytica encoding the Stevia rebaudiana metabolic pathway (fermentative Reb A), is based on several elements: first, the safety of steviol glycosides has been extensively evaluated and an acceptable daily intake has been defined; second, the use of Y. lipolytica, an avirulent yeast naturally found in foods and used for multiple applications; and third the high purity of fermentative Reb A and its compliance with internationally defined specifications. A bacterial reverse mutation assay and an in vitro micronucleus test conducted with fermentative Reb A provide evidence for its absence of mutagenicity, clastogenicity and aneugenicity. The oral administration of fermentative Reb A to Sprague-Dawley rats for at least 91 days did not lead to any adverse effects at consumption levels up to 2057 mg/kg bw/day for males and 2023 mg/kg bw/day for females, which were concluded to be the No Observed Adverse Effect Levels. The results were consistent with outcomes of previous studies conducted with plant-derived rebaudioside A, suggesting similar safety profiles for fermentative and plant-derived rebaudioside A. The results of the toxicity studies reported here support the safety of rebaudioside A produced fermentatively from Y. lipolytica, as a general purpose sweetener. PMID:26776281

  4. Solid lipid nanoparticles for nose to brain delivery of haloperidol: in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Mohd; Sara, Udai Vir Singh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, haloperidol (HP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared to enhance the uptake of HP to brain via intranasal (i.n.) delivery. SLNs were prepared by a modified emulsification–diffusion technique and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and stability. All parameters were found to be in an acceptable range. In vitro drug release was found to be 94.16±4.78% after 24 h and was fitted to the Higuchi model with a very high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9941). Pharmacokinetics studies were performed on albino Wistar rats and the concentration of HP in brain and blood was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The brain/blood ratio at 0.5 h for HP-SLNs i.n., HP sol. i.n. and HP sol. i.v. was 1.61, 0.17 and 0.031, respectively, indicating direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood–brain barrier. The maximum concentration (Cmax) in brain achieved from i.n. administration of HP-SLNs (329.17±20.89 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) was significantly higher than that achieved after i.v. (76.95±7.62 ng/mL, Tmax 1 h), and i.n. (90.13±6.28 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) administration of HP sol. The highest drug-targeting efficiency (2362.43%) and direct transport percentage (95.77%) was found with HP-SLNs as compared to the other formulations. Higher DTE (%) and DTP (%) suggest that HP-SLNs have better brain targeting efficiency as compared to other formulations. PMID:26579417

  5. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia.

  6. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics of single-dose chloroquine in malnourished children with malaria- a comparative study with normally nourished children

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Prashant P.; Gogtay, Nithya Jaideep; Karande, Sunil; Shah, V.; Thatte, Urmila M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Studies on antimalarial kinetics in children or adults who are undernourished or malnourished are both limited and have yielded conflicting results. The present study was carried out with the objectives of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of single dose chloroquine and its metabolite desethylchloroquine in children who were undernourished and compare them with children who were normally nourished. Methods: Children of either gender between the ages of 5 and 12 years, smear positive for P. vivax malaria and classified either as well nourished or undernourished were included. Undernourishment was adjudged based on the Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) classification of protein energy malnutrition [PEM] which in turn was based on Khadilkar's growth charts. All participants received 10 mg/kg on the first day followed by 10 mg/kg on Day 2 and 5 mg/kg on Day 3 along with supportive treatment. Blood samples for the levels of chloroquine [CQ] and desethylchloroquine [DECQ] were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 hours and 14 days after the first dose and levels assessed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Results: A total of 12 children who were normally nourished and 13 who were undernourished were studied. Wide inter-individual variability was seen in the levels of both drug and metabolite in both groups of patients. However, the differences in Cmax, AUC 0-inf, Clearance, half life and Vd between the two groups were not significantly different. Discussion: Our results indicate that dosage requirement is unlikely to be needed for chloroquine in undernourished children with uncomplicated P. vivax malaria. PMID:27721533

  7. Preparation, In Vitro Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Respirable Porous Microparticles Containing Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Kundawala, Aliasgar; Patel, Vishnu; Patel, Harsha; Choudhary, Dhaglaram

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to prepare and evaluate rifampicin microparticles for the lung delivery of rifampicin as respirable powder. The microparticles were prepared using chitosan by the spray-drying method and evaluated for aerodynamic properties and pulmonary drug absorption. To control the drug release, tripoly-phosphate in different concentrations 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 was employed to get a sustained drug release profile. The microparticles were evaluated for drug loading, % entrapment efficiency, tapped density, morphological characteristics, and in vitro drug release studies. Aerosol properties were determined using the Andersen cascade impactor. Porous microparticles with particle sizes (d0.5) less than 10 μm were obtained. The entrapment of rifampicin in microparticles was up to 72%. In vitro drug release suggested that the crosslinked microparticles showed sustained release for more than 12 hrs. The drug release rate was found to be decreased as the TPP concentration was increased. The microparticles showed a fine particle fraction in the range of 55–63% with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) values below 3 μm. The in vivo pulmonary absorption of the chitosan microparticles suggested a sustained drug release profile up to 72 hrs with an elimination rate of 0.010 per hr. The studies revealed that the spray-dried porous microparticles have suitable properties to be used as respirable powder in rifampicin delivery to the lungs. PMID:25853075

  8. Evaluation of criteria for developing traffic safety materials for Latinos.

    PubMed

    Streit-Kaplan, Erica L; Miara, Christine; Formica, Scott W; Gallagher, Susan Scavo

    2011-03-01

    This quantitative study assessed the validity of guidelines that identified four key characteristics of culturally appropriate Spanish-language traffic safety materials: language, translation, formative evaluation, and credible source material. From a sample of 190, the authors randomly selected 12 Spanish-language educational materials for analysis by 15 experts. Hypotheses included that the experts would rate materials with more of the key characteristics as more effective (likely to affect behavioral change) and rate materials originally developed in Spanish and those that utilized formative evaluation (e.g., pilot tests, focus groups) as more culturally appropriate. Although results revealed a weak association between the number of key characteristics in a material and the rating of its effectiveness, reviewers rated materials originally created in Spanish and those utilizing formative evaluation as significantly more culturally appropriate. The findings and methodology demonstrated important implications for developers and evaluators of any health-related materials for Spanish speakers and other population groups.

  9. Long-Term Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Drisapersen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Results from an Open-Label Extension Study

    PubMed Central

    Goemans, Nathalie M.; Tulinius, Már; van den Hauwe, Marleen; Kroksmark, Anna-Karin; Buyse, Gunnar; Wilson, Rosamund J.; van Deutekom, Judith C.; de Kimpe, Sjef J.; Lourbakos, Afrodite; Campion, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Background Drisapersen induces exon 51 skipping during dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing and allows synthesis of partially functional dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with amenable mutations. Methods This 188-week open-label extension of the dose-escalation study assessed the long-term efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of drisapersen (PRO051/GSK2402968), 6 mg/kg subcutaneously, in 12 DMD subjects. Dosing was once weekly for 72 weeks. All subjects had a planned treatment interruption (weeks 73–80), followed by intermittent dosing (weeks 81–188). Results Subjects received a median (range) total dose of 5.93 (5.10 to 6.02) mg/kg drisapersen. After 177 weeks (last efficacy assessment), median (mean [SD]) six-minute walk distance (6MWD) improved by 8 (-24.5 [161]) meters for the 10 subjects able to complete the 6MWD at baseline (mean age [SD]: 9.5 [1.9] years). These statistics include 2 subjects unable to complete the test at later visits and who scored “zero”. When only the 8 ambulant subjects at week 177 were taken into account, a median (mean [SD]) increase of 64 (33 [121]) meters in 6MWD was observed. Of 7 subjects walking ≥330 m at extension baseline, 5 walked farther at week 177. Of 3 subjects walking <330 m, 2 lost ambulation, while 1 declined overall but walked farther at some visits. Over the 188 weeks, the most common adverse events were injection-site reactions, raised urinary α1-microglobulin and proteinuria. Dystrophin expression was detected in all muscle biopsies obtained at week 68 or 72. Conclusion Drisapersen was generally well tolerated over 188 weeks. Possible renal effects, thrombocytopenia and injection-site reactions warrant continued monitoring. Improvements in the 6MWD at 12 weeks were sustained after 3.4 years of dosing for most patients. For a small, uncontrolled study, the outcomes are encouraging, as natural history studies would anticipate a decline of over 100 meters over a 3-year period in a comparable

  10. Riluzole pharmacokinetics in young patients with spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abbara, Chadi; Estournet, Brigitte; Lacomblez, Lucette; Lelièvre, Benedicte; Ouslimani, Amal; Lehmann, Blandine; Viollet, Louis; Barois, Annie; Diquet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    AIMS The objective of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of riluzole in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). METHODS Fourteen patients were enrolled in an open-label, nonrandomized and repeat-dose pharmacokinetic study. All participants were assigned to receive 50 mg riluzole orally for 5 days. Riluzole plasma concentrations were determined from samples obtained at day 5. RESULTS The pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that a dose of 50 mg once a day was sufficient to obtain a daily total exposure [AUC(0,24 h) = 2257 ng ml−1 h] which was comparable with results obtained in adult healthy volunteers or ALS patients in whom a dose of 50 mg twice a day is recommended. The pharmacokinetic simulation demonstrated that the administration of 50 mg twice a day could result in higher concentrations, hence reduced safety margin. CONCLUSION The dose of 50 mg once a day was chosen for the clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of riluzole in SMA patients. PMID:21284699

  11. Preclinical Study of Single-Dose Moxidectin, a New Oral Treatment for Scabies: Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics Compared to Two-Dose Ivermectin in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bernigaud, Charlotte; Aho, Ludwig Serge; Dreau, Dominique; Kelly, Andrew; Sutra, Jean-François; Moreau, Francis; Lilin, Thomas; Botterel, Françoise; Guillot, Jacques; Chosidow, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Scabies is one of the commonest dermatological conditions globally; however it is a largely underexplored and truly neglected infectious disease. Foremost, improvement in the management of this public health burden is imperative. Current treatments with topical agents and/or oral ivermectin (IVM) are insufficient and drug resistance is emerging. Moxidectin (MOX), with more advantageous pharmacological profiles may be a promising alternative. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a porcine scabies model, 12 pigs were randomly assigned to receive orally either MOX (0.3 mg/kg once), IVM (0.2 mg/kg twice) or no treatment. We evaluated treatment efficacies by assessing mite count, clinical lesions, pruritus and ELISA-determined anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies reductions. Plasma and skin pharmacokinetic profiles were determined. At day 14 post-treatment, all four MOX-treated but only two IVM-treated pigs were mite-free. MOX efficacy was 100% and remained unchanged until study-end (D47), compared to 62% (range 26–100%) for IVM, with one IVM-treated pig remaining infected until D47. Clinical scabies lesions, pruritus and anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies had completely disappeared in all MOX-treated but only 75% of IVM-treated pigs. MOX persisted ~9 times longer than IVM in plasma and skin, thereby covering the mite’s entire life cycle and enabling long-lasting efficacy. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that oral single-dose MOX was more effective than two consecutive IVM-doses, supporting MOX as potential therapeutic approach for scabies. PMID:27732588

  12. Pharmacokinetics Evaluation of Carbon Nanotubes Using FTIR Analysis and Histological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Claudia; Tudor, Matea Cristian; Constantin, Bele; Flaviu, Tabaran; Stefan, Razvan; Maria, Bindea; Chira, Sergiu; Braicu, Cornelia; Pop, Laura; Petric, Roxana Cojocneanu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are biologically non-toxic and long-circulating nanostructures that have special physical properties. This study was focused on developing alternative methods that track carbon nanotubes, like FR-IR to classical tissue histological procedure. FT-IR absorption spectra were used to confirm the carboxylation of carbon nanotubes and to evaluate the presence of carbon nanotubes from bulk spleen samples and histologically prepared samples (control spleen and spleen with SWCNT-COOH). FT-IR spectrum of spleen sample from animals injected with CNTs shows major spectral differences consisting in infrared bands located at ~1173 cm(-1), ~ 1410 cm(-1); ~1658 cm(-1), ~1737 cm(-1) and around 1720 cm(-1) respectively. In terms of localization of carbon nanotubes, selective accumulation of marginal zone macrophages and splenic red pulp is observed for all treated groups, indicating the presence of carbon nanotubes even at 3, 4 and 7 days after treatment. In summary, we believe that histological evaluation and FT-IR can provide more characteristic information about the pharmacokinetcis and the clearance of carbon nanotubes.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and molecular detoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, J R; Perotti, B Y; Berkman, C E; Lin, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters used from in vivo and in vitro studies that are important in order to understand the major conceptual approaches of toxicokinetics and the disposition of environmental chemicals. In vitro biochemical information concerning the detoxication of environmental chemicals is also presented. The discussion leads to a more complete appreciation for the use of in vitro measurements for in vivo correlations. The concept of interspecies scaling in the interpolation and extrapolation of fundamental biochemical metabolic processes is illustrated with a number of examples. Additional examples of in vitro-in vivo correlations are presented in the evaluation of the impact of chemical exposure to humans. Finally, several important metabolic detoxication enzymes are presented, including the mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases as well as carboxylesterases and glucuronosyltransferases, to provide insight into the processes of chemical detoxication in mammalian tissue and blood. Because interspecies scaling and the pharmacokinetics of chemical disposition have already shown their usefulness in understanding some examples of chemical disposition, our summary focuses on showing the usefulness of the pharmacokinetic equations and providing confidence in using the approach for in vitro-in vivo correlations. Ultimately, the presentation may provide the reader with a conceptual framework for future evaluation of the human health risks associated with environmental toxicants. PMID:8722108

  14. 21 CFR 70.42 - Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives. 70.42 Section 70.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.42 Criteria for evaluating the safety of...

  15. 21 CFR 70.42 - Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives. 70.42 Section 70.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.42 Criteria for evaluating the safety of...

  16. 21 CFR 70.42 - Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives. 70.42 Section 70.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.42 Criteria for evaluating the safety of...

  17. The role of quantitative safety evaluation in regulatory decision making of drugs.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Aloka G; Izem, Rima; Keeton, Stephine; Kim, Clara Y; Levenson, Mark S; Soukup, Mat

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of safety is a critical component of drug review at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Statisticians are playing an increasingly visible role in quantitative safety evaluation and regulatory decision-making. This article reviews the history and the recent events relating to quantitative drug safety evaluation at the FDA. The article then focuses on five active areas of quantitative drug safety evaluation and the role Division of Biometrics VII (DBVII) plays in these areas, namely meta-analysis for safety evaluation, large safety outcome trials, post-marketing requirements (PMRs), the Sentinel Initiative, and the evaluation of risk from extended/long-acting opioids. This article will focus chiefly on developments related to quantitative drug safety evaluation and not on the many additional developments in drug safety in general.

  18. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to evaluate intramuscular tetracycline treatment protocols to prevent antimicrobial resistance in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2015-03-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols.

  19. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model To Evaluate Intramuscular Tetracycline Treatment Protocols To Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise

    2014-01-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. PMID:25547361

  20. 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety) based pyroprocessing facility safety evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, J.H.; Choung, W.M.; You, G.S.; Moon, S.I.; Park, S.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2013-07-01

    The big advantage of pyroprocessing for the management of spent fuels against the conventional reprocessing technologies lies in its proliferation resistance since the pure plutonium cannot be separated from the spent fuel. The extracted materials can be directly used as metal fuel in a fast reactor, and pyroprocessing reduces drastically the volume and heat load of the spent fuel. KAERI has implemented the SBD (Safeguards-By-Design) concept in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The goal of SBD is to integrate international safeguards into the entire facility design process since the very beginning of the design phase. This paper presents a safety evaluation plan using a conceptual design of a reference pyroprocessing facility, in which 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety)-By-Design (3SBD) concept is integrated from early conceptual design phase. The purpose of this paper is to establish an advanced pyroprocessing hot cell facility design concept based on 3SBD for the successful realization of pyroprocessing technology with enhanced safety and proliferation resistance.

  1. [Micronization of magnolia bark extract by RESS as well as dissolution and pharmacokinetics evaluation].

    PubMed

    He, Shuai; Lei, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Shou-yao; Zhang, Zhong-yi

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility and superiority of using rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) technology in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. The extract of magnolia bark (EMB) was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2) extraction technology. Microparticles of EMB were manufactured by RESS technology. The effects of operating temperature and pressure on the contents of the active ingredient in the particles were evaluated by HPLC. The effect of expansion conditions on the particle size distribution of EMB particles was investigated. The smallest sample (mean size: 4.7 microm) was obtained under the RESS condition: pressure of 25 MPa, temperature of 50 degrees C and a nozzle size of 100 microm. The characteristics of microparticles were also studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. The dissolution rate study showed that microparticles had a significantly faster dissolution rate than normal material particles. After oral raw EMB suspension, the mean areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(0-t)) of honokiol and magnolol were found to be (4.23 +/- 0.36) and (5.46 +/- 0.57) mg x h x L(-1), respectively, which were increased significantly, i.e. (5.41 +/- 0.63) and (7.24 +/- 0.83) mg x h x L(-1) when micronized EMB suspension was administered orally in SD rats (P < 0.05). Similarly, the mean maximum plasma concentrations of honokiol and magnolol increased from (1.55 +/- 0.22) and (2.35 +/- 0.14) mg x L(-1) (raw EMB) to (2.31 +/- 0.17) and (2.84 +/- 0.21) mg x L(-1) (micronized EMB), respectively. The results of t-test demonstrated that AUC(0-t) and Cmax value for honokiol and magnolol was significantly increased with the micronization compared to raw EBM (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that the RESS was applicable for preparing microparticles of EMB at low operating temperature. The process was simple, free of environment pollution

  2. Safety evaluation methodology for advanced coal extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, W.F.

    1981-07-15

    To be acceptable to the coal industry, an advanced extraction system must provide a significant improvement over conventional systems in cost, safety, environmental impact, and conservation of unmined coal. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation methodologies were developed to assist the designer in determining if a proposed extraction design will be safer than existing systems. The qualitative analysis is a process which tests the new system against regulations and hazards of existing similar systems. The analysis examines the soundness of the design, whether or not the major hazards have been eliminated or reduced, and how the reduction would be accomplished. The quantitative methodology provides the designer with a means of establishing the approximate impact of hazards on injury levels. The results are further weighted by peculiar geological elements, specialized safety training, peculiar mine environmental aspects, and reductions in labor force. The outcome is compared with injury level requirements based on similar, safer industries to get a measure of the new system's success in reducing injuries. This approach provides a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of hazards and their effects than existing safety analyses.

  3. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiation Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a site

  4. Curriculum and Evaluation Guide for Safety Education Programs. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 40.00.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Carlee S.

    Designed to assist Bureau of Indian Affairs school officials in the identification of safety education program needs, this evaluation guide focuses upon the basic operational components in a safety education program. The means for establishing an evaluation design for safety education are presented via a flexible model appropriate for most…

  5. Xingnaojing mPEG2000-PLA modified microemulsion for transnasal delivery: pharmacokinetic and brain-targeting evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ran; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Pan; Bai, Jie; Li, Pengyue; Du, Shouying; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Xingnaojing microemulsion (XNJ-M) administered intranasally is used for stroke treatment. In order to decrease the XNJ-M-induced mucosal irritation, XNJ-M modified by mPEG2000-PLA (XNJ-MM) were prepared in a previous work. The present work aimed to assess the impact of mPEG2000-PLA on pharmacokinetic features and brain-targeting ability of XNJ-M. The bioavailability and brain-target effects of borneol and geniposide in XNJ-M and XNJ-MM were compared in mice after intravenous (i.v.) and intranasal (i.n.) administrations. Gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods were developed for the quantification of borneol and geniposide. Blood and brain samples were collected from mice at different time points after i.v. and i.n. treatments with borneol at 8.0 mg/kg, geniposide at 4.12 mg/kg. In addition, near-infrared fluorescence dye, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl indotricarbocyanine iodide was loaded into microemulsions to evaluate the brain-targeting ability of XNJ-M and XNJ-MM by near-infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. For XNJ-M and XNJ-MM, the relative brain targeted coefficients (Re) were 134.59% and 198.09% (borneol), 89.70% and 188.33% (geniposide), respectively. Besides, significant near-infrared fluorescent signal was detected in the brain after i.n. administration of microemulsions, compared with that of groups for i.v. administration. These findings indicated that mPEG2000-PLA modified microemulsion improved drug entry into blood and brain compared with normal microemulsion: the introduction of mPEG2000-PLA in microemulsion resulted in brain-targeting enhancement of both fat-soluble and water-soluble drugs. These findings provide a basis for the significance of mPEG2000-PLA addition in microemulsion, defining its effects on the drugs in microemulsion.

  6. [In vitro safety evaluation study of Angong Niuhuang Wan].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-mei; Zhang, Su; Wang, Mei-bo; Xia, Jing; Li, Li-min; Wang, Ke; Ji, Shen

    2015-01-01

    To study a vitro extraction method to determine soluble mercury and mercury species in Angong Niuhuang Wan and investigate a vitro safety evaluation method, the best extraction scheme was determined after a great deal of conditioning experiments focusing on how the solvent, purification, duration of extraction and purification etc impact on mercury extraction. Soluble mercury was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and mercury species were determined by high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Result show that the best extraction method of soluble mercury and its species was ultrasonic extraction in artificial intestinal juice at 37 °C for 2 hours, letting it stand for 20 hours and taking the supermatant. The method was reproducible, which could simulate the human body environment to maximum extent. Methyl mercury, ethyl mercury and Hg2+ were not found in the extracts of Angong Niuhuang, although the content of soluble mercury was high. It Was concluded that the method could be applied to the vitro extraction and determination of soluble mercury and mercury species in Chinese traditional medicines containing cinnabar. Methyl mercury, ethyl mercury and Hg2+ could be taken as the targets of in vitro safety evaluation of Angong Niuhuang.

  7. Evaluation of Margins of Safety in Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Len; Powell, Mollie M.; Soffa, Matthew A.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential steps in assuring reliable performance of high cost critical brazed structures is the assessment of the Margin of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints. In many cases the experimental determination of the failure loads by destructive testing of the brazed assembly is not practical and cost prohibitive. In such cases the evaluation of the MS is performed analytically by comparing the maximum design loads with the allowable ones and incorporating various safety or knock down factors imposed by the customer. Unfortunately, an industry standard methodology for the design and analysis of brazed joints has not been developed. This paper provides an example of an approach that was used to analyze an AlBeMet 162 (38%Be-62%Al) structure brazed with the AWS BAlSi-4 (Al-12%Si) filler metal. A practical and conservative interaction equation combining shear and tensile allowables was developed and validated to evaluate an acceptable (safe) combination of tensile and shear stresses acting in the brazed joint. These allowables are obtained from testing of standard tensile and lap shear brazed specimens. The proposed equation enables the assessment of the load carrying capability of complex brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading.

  8. Synthesis, cytotoxic evaluation and in silico pharmacokinetic prediction of some benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hari Narayana Moorthy, N S; Karthikeyan, C; Trivedi, Piyush

    2009-11-01

    Cancer is one of the life threatening diseases and the development of novel anticancer molecules is limited by many reasons. In the present investigation, some novel benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives as DNA intercalator was designed with optimized pharmacokinetic features for cancer treatment. The compounds with desired pharmacokinetic profile were synthesized and structurally characterized. Cytotoxic activity study against HL-60 tumor cell lines shows that 10-dimethyl carboxamido derivative of benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid is found to be the most active in the series with cytotoxic activity (IC(50) = 19 microM) comparable to cisplatin (IC(50) = 7 microM). The study concluded that the novel benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives were found to have enhanced DNA binding affinity and exhibited significant activity in vitro against HL-60 cell lines. This work will also guide for further development of effective DNA intercalators for cancer treatment.

  9. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24.

  10. Evaluation of Sexual Dimorphism in the Efficacy and Safety of Simvastatin/Atorvastatin Therapy in a Southern Brazilian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smiderle, Lisiane; Lima, Luciana O.; Hutz, Mara Helena; der Sand, Cézar Roberto Van; der Sand, Luiz Carlos Van; Ferreira, Maria Elvira Wagner; Pires, Renan Canibal; Almeida, Silvana; Fiegenbaum, Marilu

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is the primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and statins have been effective in controlling lipid levels. Sex differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins contribute to interindividual variations in drug efficacy and toxicity. Objective To evaluate the presence of sexual dimorphism in the efficacy and safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment. Methods Lipid levels of 495 patients (331 women and 164 men) were measured at baseline and after 6 ± 3 months of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment to assess the efficacy and safety profiles of both drugs. Results Women had higher baseline levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared with men (p < 0.0001). After treatment, women exhibited a greater decrease in plasma TC and LDL-C levels compared with men. After adjustment for covariates, baseline levels of TC and LDL-C influenced more than 30% of the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy (p < 0.001), regardless of sex. Myalgia [with or without changes in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels] occurred more frequently in women (25.9%; p = 0.002), whereas an increase in CPK and/or abnormal liver function was more frequent in in men (17.9%; p = 0.017). Conclusions Our results show that baseline TC and LDL-C levels are the main predictors of simvastatin/atorvastatin therapy efficacy, regardless of sex. In addition, they suggest the presence of sexual dimorphism in the safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin. The effect of sex differences on receptors, transporter proteins, and gene expression pathways needs to be better evaluated and characterized to confirm these observations. PMID:25120083

  11. Practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety assessment

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Akira; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland has characteristic morphological and biochemical features that render it particularly susceptible to the actions of xenobiotics. As is the case with other endocrine organs, the adrenal gland is under the control of upstream organs (hypothalamic-pituitary system) in vivo, often making it difficult to elucidate the mode of toxicity of a test article. It is very important, especially for pharmaceuticals, to determine whether a test article-related change is caused by a direct effect or other associated factors. In addition, antemortem data, including clinical signs, body weight, food consumption and clinical pathology, and postmortem data, including gross pathology, organ weight and histopathologic examination of the adrenal glands and other related organs, should be carefully monitored and evaluated. During evaluation, the following should also be taken into account: (1) species, sex and age of animals used, (2) metabolic activation by a cytochrome P450 enzyme(s) and (3) physicochemical properties and the metabolic pathway of the test article. In this review, we describe the following crucial points for toxicologic pathologists to consider when evaluating adrenal toxicity: functional anatomy, blood supply, hormone production in each compartment, steroid biosynthesis, potential medulla-cortex interaction, and species and gender differences in anatomical features and other features of the adrenal gland which could affect vulnerability to toxic effects. Finally practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety studies are discussed. PMID:26441474

  12. Evaluation of the culture of safety: survey of clinicians and managers in an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Pronovost, P; Weast, B; Holzmueller, C; Rosenstein, B; Kidwell, R; Haller, K; Feroli, E; Sexton, J; Rubin, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: Despite the emphasis on patient safety in health care, few organizations have evaluated the extent to which safety is a strategic priority or their culture supports patient safety. In response to the Institute of Medicine's report and to an organizational commitment to patient safety, we conducted a systematic assessment of safety at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) and, from this, developed a strategic plan to improve safety. The specific aims of this study were to evaluate the extent to which the culture supports patient safety at JHH and the extent to which safety is a strategic priority. Methods: During July and August 2001 we implemented two surveys in disparate populations to assess patient safety. The Safety Climate Scale (SCS) was administered to a sample of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other ICU staff. SCS assesses perceptions of a strong and proactive organizational commitment to patient safety. The second survey instrument, called Strategies for Leadership (SLS), evaluated the extent to which safety was a strategic priority for the organization. This survey was administered to clinical and administrative leaders. Results: We received 395 completed SCS surveys from 82% of the departments and 86% of the nursing units. Staff perceived that supervisors had a greater commitment to safety than senior leaders. Nurses had higher scores than physicians for perceptions of safety. Twenty three completed SLS surveys were received from 77% of the JHH Patient Safety Committee members and 50% of the JHH Management Committee members. Management Committee responses were more positive than Patient Safety Committee, indicating that management perceived safety efforts to be further developed. Strategic planning received the lowest scores from both committees. Conclusions: We believe this is one of the first large scale efforts to measure institutional culture of safety and then design improvements in health care. The survey results suggest that strategic

  13. Population pharmacokinetic models for cefuroxime and metronidazole used in combination as prophylactic agents in colorectal surgery: Model-based evaluation of standard dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Soraluce, Amaia; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Campo Cimarras, Eugenia; Sáenz de Ugarte Sobrón, Jaione; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The antibiotics used for prophylaxis in colorectal surgery must maintain appropriate plasma concentrations during the entire surgery to avoid surgical site infections caused by aerobes and anaerobes; cefuroxime plus metronidazole is one of the combinations used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of cefuroxime plus metronidazole administration as prophylaxis in colorectal surgery. In total, 63 patients electively undergoing rectal or colon surgery were administered 1500mg of cefuroxime and 1500mg of metronidazole in 15-min and 1-h infusions, respectively, prior to surgery. Blood samples were withdrawn during and after surgery for determination of plasma concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using NONMEM 7.2.0. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations were performed to explore the ability of different dosage regimens to achieve the pharmacodynamic targets. Pharmacokinetics for both antibiotics were best described by a two-compartment model. Elimination of cefuroxime was conditioned by creatinine clearance (CLCr). The half-life of cefuroxime was 1.5h for patients with normal renal function and 4.9h in patients with renal impairment. Elimination and distribution of metronidazole were affected by patient body weight (BW). PK/PD analysis revealed that a single-dose protocol of 1500mg of cefuroxime and metronidazole is adequate in short surgeries (≤2h). However, for longer surgeries, recommendations are suggested depending on the patient's CLCr and BW. Additional doses of cefuroxime are needed for patients with moderate renal impairment or those presenting normal renal function. For metronidazole, an additional dose is needed for patients with a BW of 90kg.

  14. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of SMT C1100, a 2-Arylbenzoxazole Utrophin Modulator, following Single- and Multiple-Dose Administration to Pediatric Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ricotti, Valeria; Spinty, Stefan; Roper, Helen; Hughes, Imelda; Tejura, Bina; Robinson, Neil; Layton, Gary; Davies, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose SMT C1100 is a utrophin modulator being evaluated as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study, the first in pediatric DMD patients, reports the safety, tolerability and PK parameters of single and multiple doses of SMT C1100, as well as analyze potential biomarkers of muscle damage. Methods This multicenter, Phase 1 study enrolled 12 patients, divided equally into three groups (A–C). Group A were given 50 mg/kg on Days 1 and 11, and 50 mg/kg bid on Days 2 to 10. Group B and C received 100 mg/kg on Days 1 and 11; Group B and Group C were given 100 mg/kg bid and 100 mg/kg tid, respectively, on Days 2 to 10. A safety review was performed on all patients following the single dose and there was at least 2 weeks between each dose escalation, for safety and PK review. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored throughout the study. Results Most patients experienced mild AEs and there were no serious AEs. Two patients required analgesia for pain (headache, ear pain and toothache). One patient experienced moderate psychiatric AEs (abnormal behaviour and mood swings). Plasma concentrations of SMT C1100 at Days 1 and 11 indicated a high degree of patient variability regardless of dose. Unexpectedly the SMT C1100 levels were significantly lower than similar doses administered to healthy volunteers in an earlier clinical study. In general, individual baseline changes of creatine phosphokinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase levels fell with SMT C1100 dosing. Conclusions SMT C1100 was well tolerated in pediatric DMD patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02383511 PMID:27055247

  15. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic of once-daily boosted saquinavir (1500/100 mg) together with 2 nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in real life: a multicentre prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ritonavir-boosted saquinavir (SQVr) is nowadays regarded as an alternative antiretroviral drug probably due to several drawbacks, such as its high pill burden, twice daily dosing and the requirement of 200 mg ritonavir when given at the current standard 1000/100 mg bid dosing. Several once-daily SQVr dosing schemes have been studied with the 200 mg SQV old formulations, trying to overcome some of these disadvantages. SQV 500 mg strength tablets became available at the end of 2005, thus facilitating a once-daily regimen with fewer pills, although there is very limited experience with this formulation yet. Methods Prospective, multicentre study in which efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of a regimen of once-daily SQVr 1500/100 mg plus 2 NRTIs were evaluated under routine clinical care conditions in either antiretroviral-naïve patients or in those with no previous history of antiretroviral treatments and/or genotypic resistance tests suggesting SQV resistance. Plasma SQV trough levels were measured by HPLV-UV. Results Five hundred and fourteen caucasian patients were included (47.2% coinfected with hepatitis C and/or B virus; 7.8% with cirrhosis). Efficacy at 52 weeks (plasma RNA-HIV <50 copies/ml) was 67.7% (CI95: 63.6 - 71.7%) by intention-to-treat, and 92.2% (CI95: 89.8 - 94.6%) by on-treatment analysis. The reasons for failure were: dropout or loss to follow-up (18.4%), virological failure (7.8%), adverse events (3.1%), and other reasons (4.6%). The high rate of dropout may be explained by an enrollement and follow-up under routine clinical care condition, and a population with a significant number of drug users. The median SQV Cmin (n = 49) was 295 ng/ml (range, 53-2172). The only variable associated with virological failure in the multivariate analysis was adherence (OR: 3.36; CI95, 1.51-7.46, p = 0.003). Conclusions Our results suggests that SQVr (1500/100 mg) once-daily plus 2 NRTIs is an effective regimen, without severe clinical adverse

  16. Preliminary safety evaluation for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shapley, J.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-14

    This Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) describes and analyzes the installation and operation of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The SPS is a combination of components required to expedite the safe and timely storage of Plutonium (Pu) oxide. The SPS program will receive site Pu packages, process the Pu for storage, package the Pu into metallic containers, and safely store the containers in a specially modified storage vault. The location of the SPS will be in the 2736- ZB building and the storage vaults will be in the 2736-Z building of the PFP, as shown in Figure 1-1. The SPS will produce storage canisters that are larger than those currently used for Pu storage at the PFP. Therefore, the existing storage areas within the PFP secure vaults will require modification. Other modifications will be performed on the 2736-ZB building complex to facilitate the installation and operation of the SPS.

  17. Safety Evaluation for Hull Waste Treatment Process in JNC

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, H.; Kurakata, K.

    2002-02-26

    Hull wastes and some scrapped equipment are typical radioactive wastes generated from reprocessing process in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). Because hulls are the wastes remained in the fuel shearing and dissolution, they contain high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started the project of Hull Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF) to treat these solid wastes using compaction and incineration methods since 1993. It is said that Zircaloy fines generated from compaction process might burn and explode intensely. Therefore explosive conditions of the fines generated in compaction process were measured. As these results, it was concluded that the fines generated from the compaction process were not hazardous material. This paper describes the outline of the treatment process of hulls and results of safety evaluation.

  18. Food safety evaluation of broccoli and radish sprouts.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Frías, Juana; Gulewicz, Piotr; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Vidal-Valverde, Concepción

    2008-05-01

    Three cultivars of broccoli seeds (Brassica oleracea var. italica), cv. Tiburon, cv. Belstar and cv. Lucky, and two cultivars of radish seeds (Raphanus sativus), cv. Rebel and cv. Bolide, were germinated for three and five days and safety aspects such as microbiological counts and biogenic amines were investigated. Cytotoxicity evaluation was also carried out. Broccoli and radish sprouts contained numbers of mesophilic, psychrotrophic, total and faecal coliform bacteria which are the usual counts for minimally processed germinated seeds. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine increased during sprout production although these levels were below those permitted by legislation (5 mg/100 g of edible food). Broccoli and radish sprouts demonstrated no toxic effects on proliferation and viability of HL-60 cells and should be included in our diets as healthy and safe fresh foods.

  19. Safety evaluation of chemically modified beta-lactoglobulin administered intravaginally.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuetao; Qiu, Lixia; Wang, Yonghong; Wang, Yue; Meng, Yuanguang; Zhu, Yun; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is no specific antiviral therapy for treatment of HPV infection. Jiang and colleagues previously reported that anhydride-modified proteins have inhibitory activities against multiple viruses including HPV. Here, we evaluated the safety of 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride-modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin, designated JB01, vaginally applied in women infected by high-risk HPV. After the vaginal application of JB01 in 38 women for 3 months, no serious adverse events were reported, and normalization of the vaginal micro-environment has been observed. It can be concluded that JB01-BD is safe for vaginal use in HPV-infected women, suggesting its potential application for the treatment of HPV infection.

  20. [Safety evaluation of micronomicin. III. Teratogenicity studies in rats].

    PubMed

    Hara, T; Nishikawa, S; Miyazaki, H; Ohguro, Y

    1983-01-01

    Micronomicin (MCR) is a new aminoglycoside antibiotic produced by Micromonospora sagamiensis var. nonreducans which was isolated from soil collected at Sagamihara by Nara et al. The purified antibiotic showed a close similarity to gentamicin C complex in physical and chemical properties. The antibacterial activity of MCR is broad-spectrum and almost equal to that of gentamicin C complex. MCR exhibits particularly high activity against Pseudomonas, Proteus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia, etc. and high activity against some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to gentamicin C1a. Teratogenicity studies of MCR in rats were carried out by intravenous injection for safety evaluation (Dose; 25, 50 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg). The results of studies are as follows. 1. Fetal malformation attributable to MCR was not observed at any dose. 2. Suppression of maternal weight gain was observed at the dose levels of 50 mg/kg and over. 3. There was no adverse effect on new borns at any dose.

  1. MRI evaluation and safety in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5-T and 3-T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges, and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, and sedation considerations, and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  2. MRI Evaluation and Safety in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5T and 3T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, sedation considerations and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI-conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  3. Pharmacokinetic Comparability of a Biosimilar Trastuzumab Anticipated from Its Physicochemical and Biological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P.; López-Morales, Carlos A.; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Perdomo-Abúndez, Francisco C.; Pérez, Néstor O.; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Estrada-Marín, Larisa; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F.; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Comparability between a biosimilar and its reference product requires the evaluation of critical quality attributes that may impact on its pharmacological response. Herein we present a physicochemical characterization of a biosimilar trastuzumab focused on the attributes related to the pharmacokinetic response. Capillary isoelectrofocusing (cIEF) and cation exchange chromatography (CEX) were used to evaluate charge heterogeneity; glycosylation profiles were assessed through hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC); aggregates content was evaluated through size exclusion chromatography (SEC) while binding affinity to FcRn was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The biosimilar trastuzumab and its reference product exhibited a high degree of similarity for the evaluated attributes. In regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters, randomized, double blind, and two-arm parallel and prospective study was employed after the administration of a single intravenous dose in healthy volunteers. No significant differences were found between the pharmacokinetic profiles of both products. Our results confirm that similarity of the critical quality attributes between a biosimilar product, obtained from a different manufacturing process, and the reference product resulted in comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, diminishing the uncertainty related to the biosimilar's safety and efficacy. PMID:26682224

  4. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL) versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.80–1.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion

  5. Research on the safety evaluation index of urban rail transit network operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xuemei; Wang, Xi

    2011-12-01

    The traditional safety evaluation of urban rail transit operation was limited to the station or line, not from the perspective of the whole network operation safety. Specific to the characteristics of the urban rail transit network operation in the new situation, based on complex network theory, the urban rail transit network model was established, and the formalized description of the network model was given. Based on above, from the passenger traffic, environment and other aspects, the safety evaluation index of urban rail transit network operation was established, which included hidden trouble indexes, accident indexes and safety economic index, aiming at to provide support for overall safety evaluation.

  6. Preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation of praziquantel loaded in poly (methyl methacrylate) nanoparticle using a HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Malhado, Mayara; Pinto, Douglas P; Silva, Aline C A; Silveira, Gabriel P E; Pereira, Heliana M; Santos, Jorge G F; Guilarducci-Ferraz, Carla V V; Viçosa, Alessandra L; Nele, Márcio; Fonseca, Laís B; Pinto, José Carlos C S; Calil-Elias, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is the drug recommended by the World Health Organization for treatment of schistosomiasis. However, the treatment of children with PZQ tablets is complicated due to difficulties to adapt the dose and the extremely bitter taste of PZQ. For this reason, poly (methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles loaded with Praziquantel (PZQ-NP) were developed for preparation of a new formulation to be used in the suspension form. For this reason, the main aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of PZQ-NP, through HPLC-MS/MS assays. Analyses were performed with an Omnisphere C18 column (5.0 μm×4.6 mm×150.0 mm), using a mixture of an aqueous solution containing 0.1 wt% of formic acid and methanol (15:85-v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.800mL/min. Detection was performed with a hybrid linear ion-trap triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with multiple reactions monitoring in positive ion mode via electrospray ionization. The monitored transitions were m/z 313.18>203.10 for PZQ and m/z 285.31>193.00 for the Internal Standard. The method was validated with the quantification limit of 1.00 ng/mL, requiring samples of 25 μL for analyses. Analytic responses were calibrated with known concentration data, leading to correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.99. Validation performed with rat plasma showed that PZQ was stable for at least 10 months when stored below -70 °C (long-term stability), for at least 17 h when stored at room temperature (RT, 22 °C) (short-term stability), for at least 47 h when stored at room temperature in auto-sampler vials (post-preparative stability) and for at least 8 successive freeze/thaw cycles at -70 °C. For PK assays, Wistar rats, weighing between 200 and 300 g were used. Blood samples were collected from 0 to 24 h after oral administration of single doses of 60 mg/kg of PZQ-NP or raw PZQ (for the control group). PZQ was extracted from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction with terc-butyl methyl

  7. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  8. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin loaded in folic acid-targeted liposomes in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chen; Ma, Xiao-Qiong; Xu, Yong; Peng, Li-Hua; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-02-01

    A previous study has reported diacid metabolite (DM) as the stable form of norcantharidin (NCTD), which is almost 100% metabolized to DM-NCTD. However, the unreliable pharmacokinetic characteristics of DM-NCTD could result in low bioavailability, hindering the clinical use of DM-NCTD in the treatment of diseases. A liposomal drug delivery system could overcome the shortcomings of DM-NCTD by improving the relative bioavailability (Fr), reducing drug toxicity, and increasing the therapeutic efficacy. However, there are no data concerning the pharmacokinetics of a DM-NCTD-loaded liposomal drug delivery system in animals, which is required for assessing its safety profile. Therefore, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of DM-NCTD in mouse plasma. Standard curves were linear (r=0.9966) over the range 10.0-1.00×10(4)ng/ml in mouse plasma with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 10ng/ml. This study successfully investigated the pharmacokinetics of DM-NCTD and DM-NCTD encapsulated in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/PEG-Liposome) or folic acid (FA)-PEG-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG-Liposome) in Kunming mice after a single intravenous dose of 2mg/kg. The plasma profile data of the three groups adhered to a two-compartment model. Compared with the DM-NCTD group, the Liposome groups had longer circulation times following intravenous administration in mice, and the Fr of DM-NCTD increased significantly (P<0.05). Furthermore, the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) declined with an increase in the volume of distribution (Vd) from the PEG-Liposome to the FA-PEG-Liposome groups, which indicates a more efficient removal of the drug from the plasma of the FA-PEG-Liposome group. This result suggests a possible increased risk of DM-NCTD intoxication in normal tissues with FA-PEG-Liposomes. Based on this study, further investigation of the biodistribution of DM

  9. Preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation of a new formulation of a bifendate solid dispersion using a supercritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Muhua; Zhao, Longshan; Yang, Dan; Ma, Jin; Wang, Xianglin; Zhang, Tianhong

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a new formulation of a bifendate solid dispersion in beagle dogs, a novel, sensitive and rapid supercritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SFC-MS/MS) method was established and validated. Plasma samples were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Separation of bifendate and diazepam (internal standard, IS) was performed on an HSS C18 SB column (3×100mm, 1.8μm) with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 (≥99.99%) - methanol (95:5, v/v) at a flow rate of 2mL/min and the compensation solvent was methanol with 2% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. A tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. Quantification of the ion transitions was at m/z 419.2→387.0 and 284.5→193.2 for bifendate and IS, respectively. The method was sensitive with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.5ng/mL and linear over the concentration range 0.5-250ng/mL. All the validation data, such as precision, accuracy, extraction recovery and matrix effect, were all within acceptable criteria. The method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of bifendate in beagle dogs after oral administration of a bifendate solid dispersion.

  10. CNS Delivery and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of DALDA Analgesic Peptide Analog Administered in Nano-Sized Oil-in-Water Emulsion Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Lipa; Gattacceca, Florence; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although neuro-active peptides are highly potent as central nervous system (CNS) therapeutics, their systemic delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is limited due to lack of permeability in the brain and rapid systemic metabolism. In this study, we aimed at enhancing the brain delivery and stability of chemically modified [D-Arg2, Lys4]-dermorphin-(1-4)-amide)] (DALDA) peptide to achieve prolonged analgesic effects. Methods The C8-DALDA peptide analog was encapsulated in an oil-in-water nanoemulsion formulation made specifically with oils rich in omega-3 rich polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to enhance CNS availability. The nanoemulsion formulation was administered systemically in CD-1 mice and qualitative and quantitative biodistribution was evaluated. We have also examined the effect of curcumin, which is known to down-regulate efflux transporters and inhibit systemic metabolism, on the pharmacokinetic properties of the peptide. Results Qualitative and quantitative biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies in mice clearly demonstrated improved plasma and brain exposure of modified DALDA when administered in nanoemulsion, thereby providing an exciting opportunity towards improved efficacy and/or lowered dose of the peptide. The various dosing regimens tested for modified DALDA solution and curcumin nanoemulsion directed towards a novel combination strategy for improved systemic delivery of peptides across the BBB. Conclusions Encapsulation of the drug in PUFA nanoemulsions is an effective strategy for delivery of peptides. This work provides a novel combination strategy for improved delivery of peptides to the brain. PMID:24297071

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Ketoconazole and Voriconazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Oxcarbazepine and Its Main Metabolite MHD in Rats by UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Gu, Ermin; Wang, Shuanghu; Zheng, Xiang; Chen, Mengchun; Wang, Li; Hu, Guoxin; Cai, Jian-ping; Zhou, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Oxcarbazepine (OXC), a second-generation antiepileptic drug, undergoes rapid reduction with formation of the active metabolite 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxy-carbazepine (MHD) in vivo. In this study, a method for simultaneous determination of OXC and MHD in rat plasma using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) was developed and validated. Under given chromatographic conditions, OXC, MHD and internal standard diazepam were separated well and quantified by electrospray positive ionization mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring transitions mode. The method validation demonstrated good linearity over the range of 10-2,000 ng/mL for OXC and 5-1,000 ng/mL for MHD. The lower limit of quantification was 5 ng/mL for OXC and 2.5 ng/mL for MHD, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of OXC and MHD in rats, with or without pretreatment by ketoconazole (KET) and voriconazole (VOR). Statistics indicated that KET and VOR significantly affected the disposition of OXC and MHD in vivo, whereas VOR predominantly interfered with the disposition of MHD. This method is suitable for pharmacokinetic study in small animals. PMID:26499119

  12. Population pharmacokinetic approach to evaluate the effect of CYP2D6, CYP3A, ABCB1, POR and NR1I2 genotypes on donepezil clearance

    PubMed Central

    Noetzli, Muriel; Guidi, Monia; Ebbing, Karsten; Eyer, Stephan; Wilhelm, Laurence; Michon, Agnès; Thomazic, Valérie; Stancu, Ioana; Alnawaqil, Abdel-Messieh; Bula, Christophe; Zumbach, Serge; Gaillard, Michel; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; von Gunten, Armin; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2014-01-01

    Aims A large interindividual variability in plasma concentrations has been reported in patients treated with donepezil, the most frequently prescribed antidementia drug. We aimed to evaluate clinical and genetic factors influencing donepezil disposition in a patient population recruited from a naturalistic setting. Methods A population pharmacokinetic study was performed including data from 129 older patients treated with donepezil. The patients were genotyped for common polymorphisms in the metabolic enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP3A, in the electron transferring protein POR and the nuclear factor NR1I2 involved in CYP activity and expression, and in the drug transporter ABCB1. Results The average donepezil clearance was 7.3 l h−1 with a 30% interindividual variability. Gender markedly influenced donepezil clearance (P < 0.01). Functional alleles of CYP2D6 were identified as unique significant genetic covariate for donepezil clearance (P < 0.01), with poor metabolizers and ultrarapid metabolizers demonstrating, respectively, a 32% slower and a 67% faster donepezil elimination compared with extensive metabolizers. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic parameters of donepezil were well described by the developed population model. Functional alleles of CYP2D6 significantly contributed to the variability in donepezil disposition in the patient population and should be further investigated in the context of individual dose optimization to improve clinical outcome and tolerability of the treatment. PMID:24433464

  13. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess

  14. Safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluation of AVI-4658.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Weller, Doreen L; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by dystrophin gene mutations. Restoration of dystrophin by exon skipping was demonstrated with the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) class of splice-switching oligomers, in both mouse and dog disease models. The authors report the results of Good Laboratory Practice-compliant safety pharmacology and genotoxicity evaluations of AVI-4658, a PMO under clinical evaluation for DMD. In cynomolgus monkeys, no test article-related effects were seen on cardiovascular, respiratory, global neurological, renal, or liver parameters at the maximum feasible dose (320 mg/kg). Genotoxicity battery showed that AVI-4658 has no genotoxic potential at up to 5000 microg/mL in an in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test and a bacterial reverse mutation assay. In the mouse bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus test, a single intravenous injection up to 2000 mg/kg was generally well tolerated and resulted in no mutagenic potential. These results allowed initiation of systemic clinical trials in DMD patients in the United Kingdom.

  15. Safety evaluation of filamentous fungi isolated from industrial doenjang koji.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Jo, Eun Hye; Hong, Eun Jin; Kim, Kyung Min; Lee, Inhyung

    2014-10-01

    A few starters have been developed and used for doenjang fermentation but often without safety evaluation. Filamentous fungi were isolated from industrial doenjang koji, and their potential for mycotoxin production was evaluated. Two fungi were isolated; one was more dominantly present (90%). Both greenish (SNU-G) and whitish (SNU-W) fungi showed 97% and 95% internal transcribed spacer sequence identities to Aspergillus oryzae/flavus, respectively. However, the SmaI digestion pattern of their genomic DNA suggested that both belong to A. oryzae. Moreover, both fungi had morphological characteristics similar to that of A. oryzae. SNU-G and SNU-W did not form sclerotia, which is a typical characteristic of A. oryzae. Therefore, both fungi were identified to be A. oryzae. In aflatoxin gene cluster analysis, both fungi had norB-cypA genes similar to that of A. oryzae. Consistent with this, aflatoxins were not detected in SNU-G and SNU-W using ammonia vapor, TLC, and HPLC analyses. Both fungi seemed to have a whole cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) gene cluster based on PCR of the maoA, dmaT, and pks-nrps genes, which are key genes for CPA biosynthesis. However, CPA was not detected in TLC and HPLC analyses. Therefore, both fungi seem to be safe to use as doenjang koji starters and may be suitable fungal candidates for further development of starters for traditional doenjang fermentation.

  16. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. Each agency head shall ensure that any performance evaluation of any...

  17. Evaluation of the predictive performance of a pharmacokinetic model for propofol in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata).

    PubMed

    Miyabe-Nishiwaki, T; Masui, K; Kaneko, A; Nishiwaki, K; Nishio, T; Kanazawa, H

    2013-04-01

    Propofol is a short-acting intravenous anesthetic used for induction/maintenance anesthesia. The objective of this study was to assess a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for Japanese macaques during a step-down infusion of propofol. Five male Japanese macaques were immobilized with ketamine (10 mg/kg) and atropine (0.02 mg/kg). A bolus dose of propofol (5 mg/kg) was administrated intravenously (360 mg/kg/h) followed by step-down infusion at 40 mg/kg/h for 10 min, 20 mg/kg/h for 10 min, and then 15 mg/kg/h for 100 min. Venous blood samples were repeatedly collected following the administration. The plasma concentration of propofol (Cp) was measured by high-speed LC-FL. PPK analyses were performed using NONMEM VII. Median absolute prediction error and median prediction error (MDPE), the indices of prediction inaccuracy and bias, respectively, were calculated, and PE - individual MDPE vs. time was depicted to show the variability of prediction errors. In addition, we developed another population pharmacokinetic model using previous and current datasets. The previous PK model achieved stable prediction of propofol Cp throughout the study period, although it underestimates Cp. The step-down infusion regimen described in this study would be feasible in macaques during noninvasive procedures.

  18. Safety evaluation of substances consumed as technical ingredients (food additives).

    PubMed

    Poulsen, E

    1991-01-01

    The different types of acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) are described as used by the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and the EEC Scientific Committee for Food (SCF). The allocation is discussed of a full ADI or a temporary ADI, and examples are given for the establishment (or withdrawal) of these ADIs. The flavours cinnamyl anthranillate and the solvent 2-nitropropane (both withdrawn), the sweeteners cyclamate and saccharin and the antioxidant BHA (all three changed) but not abolished. For BHA and saccharin the ADI was retained by both committees in spite of some evidence of carcinogenicity to experimental animals. ADI--'not specified' is specially discussed and it is recommended that numerical ADIs are used whenever possible. With an ADI--'not specified' it should be stated which use (and intake) levels are toxicologically acceptable. Some compounds evaluated by the two committees are discussed, e.g. the colours: Allura red AC, erythrosine, canthaxanthin and the caramels; three anti-oxidants: BHA, BHT and the gallates; the sweeteners: polyols, aspartame, saccharin and cyclamates. Four recommendations are made: (1) a numerical basis be given for the levels allocated an ADI--'not specified' or 'acceptable'; (2) lowering of the conventional safety factor be considered when the effects found are trivial--higher safety factors be considered when the toxic effects are serious or even irreversible; (3) ADIs should, whenever possible, be based on a combination of human and animal data; (4) ADIs might be allocated to compounds indicating animal carcinogenicity, if the compound is non-genotoxic, the mechanism clearly secondary and/or species-specific.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of BAY 12-9566 and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (naproxen, ibuprofen) during coadministration in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Woodruff, M; Agarwal, V; Liu, P; Sundaresan, P

    2001-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic interactions between BAY 12-9566 and two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), naproxen and ibuprofen, were investigated in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The study comprised six groups: two NSAID groups with three levels of treatment (BAY 12-9566 400 mg, BAY 12-9566 100 mg, and placebo). Plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-tau), Cmax, and tmax) were determined for each treatment group following 5 days of NSAID administration, 14 days of BAY 12-9566 administration, and 14 days of concurrent NSAID and BAY 12-9566 administration. For most conditions, the total plasma drug concentrations of both NSAID and BAY 12-9566 were diminished by coadministration; total plasma BAY 12-9566 was not affected by ibuprofen treatment. Importantly, the free drug concentrations were largely unaffected by coadministration. Most side effects were mild or moderate in intensity, and all events, with the exception of headache, were reported in both NSAID groups and in both placebo and BAY 12-9566 groups.

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of the Effect on System Safety Engineer Training Course for the Aerospace Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekita, Ryuichi; Yamada, Shu

    The system safety has been being applied in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ‧s launch vehicle and satellite development projects. The engineering state of system safety has some room for improvement. Therefore, JAXA is continuously working for system safety improvement. The system safety engineer training course is the top priority for the improvement. This paper represents the practical training evaluation way using Kirkpatrick‧s 4-level approach and the actual results in JAXA system safety engineer training course. Also this paper represents the importance of the engineer training evaluation as a part of PDCA cycle in the industry field.

  1. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  2. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  3. Pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnection of herbal medicines and its potential solutions with cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Fang; Lu, Meng; Ji, Wei; Niu, Fang; Zha, Weibin; Wu, Xiaolan; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there is a global trend of using herbal medicines to treat various chronic diseases and promote health. But the controversy over the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines is a focus of attention, primarily because of the many unknown and unrevealed natures of herbal medicines, which strongly restricts their application and development. Pharmacokinetics is a bridge linking the herbal medicines and their pharmacological responses. It is assumed in traditional pharmacokinetics that an excellent drug should have appropriate pharmacokinetic behaviours and its pharmacological effect is related with plasma drug concentrations. However, most herbal medicines exhibit excellent pharmacological responses despite poor pharmacokinetic behaviours. As most drugs are intracellulartargeted, we put forward cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy, which is focused on the intracellular fate of drugs. This strategy could partially explain the marked pharmacological activities of herbal medicines from their intracellular pharmacokinetic behaviours, rather than their plasma concentrations. It is a helpful complementarity to traditional pharmacokinetics, and takes a potential role in the research and development of new herb-origined drugs. In this review, the pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnections of herbal medicines (such as ginseng, berberine and danshen) are retrospected. Then our proposed cellular pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic strategy, its characteristics, as well as its research procedures are described, followed by the subcellular distributions of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes which are the determinants of cellular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics. Finally, our successful applications of cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy in elucidating ginsenoside Rh2 as an adjuvant agent and tanshinone IIA as an anticancer agent are illustrated.

  4. Preparation, in vitro characterization, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic evaluation of chitosan-based plumbagin microspheres in mice bearing B16F1 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mandala Rayabandla, Sunil Kumar; Aithal, Kiran; Anandam, Aravind; Shavi, Gopal; Nayanabhirama, Udupa; Arumugam, Karthik; Musmade, Prashant; Bhat, Krishnamoorthy; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2010-04-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy and systemic toxicity of chitosan-based plumbagin microspheres in comparison to free plumbagin. The optimized formulation had a mean particle size of 106.35 mum with an encapsulation efficiency of 80.12%. Pharmacokinetic studies showed a 22.2-fold increase in elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of plumbagin from chitosan microspheres as compared to free plumbagin. Administration of plumbagin microspheres resulted in a significant tumor growth inhibition and reduced systemic toxicity. These results suggest that chitosan-based microspheres could be a promising strategy for the systemic delivery of anti-cancer agents like plumbagin. PMID:20100068

  5. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  6. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between palifermin and heparin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Gillespie, Brad; Smith, Brian; Smith, William; Lissmats, Agneta; Rudebeck, Mattias; Kullenberg, Torbjörn; Olsson, Birgitta

    2015-10-01

    Oral mucositis, a severe complication during chemo- and/or radiotherapy, is prevented with palifermin treatment, a recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF-7). The FGF family belongs to the larger family of heparin-binding growth factors. Because it has been shown that heparin modulates binding of KGF to the KGF receptor and subsequently affects cellular proliferation induced by the KGF mitogenic signal, it is critical to understand the drug-drug interactions between palifermin and heparin, particularly because of heparin's narrow therapeutic margin. Two studies were performed in healthy subjects to characterize the effect of palifermin on the pharmacodynamics of heparin (activated partial thromboplastin time) and evaluate the impact of heparin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (Ki67 staining of buccal mucosal tissue) of palifermin. Results demonstrated a pronounced pharmacokinetic interaction; heparin coadministration increased the palifermin AUC 4- to 5-fold and decreased its half-life by 40%-45%, suggesting an approximate 70%-80% decrease in palifermin clearance and volume of distribution. These changes in the pharmacokinetics of palifermin during coadministration of heparin, however, did not affect the pharmacodynamic effect of palifermin, or the anticoagulant activity of heparin, and did not lead to increased safety findings. Therefore, these results suggest that dose adjustments for heparin and palifermin are not warranted when administered concurrently.

  7. Consideration of the production methods and safety evaluation of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Liu, D T

    1988-01-01

    Cytokines are natural endogenous substances whose biological effects in humans are little known when given in therapeutic rather than physiologic doses. Yet, there is intense interest i