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Sample records for evaluate subjective impression

  1. Wettability changes in polyether impression materials subjected to immersion disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shweta; Kamat, Giridhar; Shetty, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Disinfection of impression materials prevents cross-contamination; however, the disinfectants may alter the wettability property. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the wettability changes of polyether impression material after immersing in four different chemical disinfectant solutions for a period of 10 min and 30 min, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples of polyether dental impression material (Impregum soft, 3MESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were randomly divided into nine groups with five specimens each. Each specimen was disc shaped, flat of 32 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness. The samples were immersed in four disinfectant solutions: 2% Glutaraldehyde, 5% sodium hypochlorite, 0.05% iodophor, and 5.25% phenol for 10 min and 30 min, respectively. The control was without disinfection. Wettability of the samples was assessed by measuring the contact angle by using the Telescopic Goniometer. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (Fisher's test) and Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons at 5% level of significance. Results: The contact angle of 20.21° ± 0.22° were recorded in the control samples. After 10 min, the samples that were immersed in 5% sodium hypochlorite and 5.25% phenol showed significant statistical increase in the contact angle as compared to the control (P < 0.001). After 30 min of disinfection, only the samples immersed in 0.05% iodophor showed there were no significant changes in the contact angle, whereas the other disinfectants significantly increased the contact angle and decreased the wettability of the polyether material. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, 2% glutaraldehyde proved safe for 10 min of immersion disinfection while 0.05% iodophor holds promise as an effective disinfectant without affecting the wettability of the material. PMID:24130593

  2. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  3. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals.

  4. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals. PMID:24427225

  5. Comparison of digital and conventional impression techniques: evaluation of patients’ perception, treatment comfort, effectiveness and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare two impression techniques from the perspective of patient preferences and treatment comfort. Methods Twenty-four (12 male, 12 female) subjects who had no previous experience with either conventional or digital impression participated in this study. Conventional impressions of maxillary and mandibular dental arches were taken with a polyether impression material (Impregum, 3 M ESPE), and bite registrations were made with polysiloxane bite registration material (Futar D, Kettenbach). Two weeks later, digital impressions and bite scans were performed using an intra-oral scanner (CEREC Omnicam, Sirona). Immediately after the impressions were made, the subjects’ attitudes, preferences and perceptions towards impression techniques were evaluated using a standardized questionnaire. The perceived source of stress was evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Scale. Processing steps of the impression techniques (tray selection, working time etc.) were recorded in seconds. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon Rank test, and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results There were significant differences among the groups (p < 0.05) in terms of total working time and processing steps. Patients stated that digital impressions were more comfortable than conventional techniques. Conclusions Digital impressions resulted in a more time-efficient technique than conventional impressions. Patients preferred the digital impression technique rather than conventional techniques. PMID:24479892

  6. Evaluation of dimensional stability and accuracy of autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Subash M; Vijitha, D; Karthikeyan, S; Balasubramanian, R; Satish, A

    2013-12-01

    Dimensionally stable autoclavable impressions will be effective in controlling the cross-infection and contamination caused by patient's saliva and other oral secretions. The accuracy of newly introduced autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material was assessed for its dimensional stability and accuracy. A standard metal model (Dentoform, U-501, Columbia) was customised for impression making. The impressions were made using the newly introduced polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (AFFINIS, Coltene/Whaledent AG, 9450 Alstalten, Switzerland). Fifty impressions were made and were divided into two groups A and B of 25 each. Group A was the control sample (non-autoclaved impressions) and group B was the test sample (autoclaved impressions), which was subjected to the steam autoclave procedure at 134 °C for 18 min, casts were poured in type IV gypsum products. The customised metal model, casts obtained from control and test group were subjected to laboratory evaluation with help of a travelling microscope (×10 magnification), and digital vernier calliper (0.01 mm/10 μm accuracy). Data analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and One-Sample t test to evaluate the overall accuracy (P < 0.005). As a result, there was an average reduction of 0.016 μm in overall dimension between the test and the control group when compared with the master model, which is not statistically or clinically significant. The newly introduced polyvinyl siloxane impression material is accurate and dimensional stable for clinical use when steam autoclaved at 134 °C for 18 min.

  7. [Subjective impressions of bowing actions and their appropriateness in specific social contexts].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Junichi; Gyoba, Jiro

    2015-02-01

    The current study used video clips of bowing actions depicted by three-dimensional computer graphics. The bend angle (15 degrees and 45 degrees) and duration of the bent posture (0-4.5 seconds) were varied. In the first experiment, the participants rated their subjective impressions of the bowing actions. The bowing actions that were made at a 45 degrees angle and held for more than 1 second were rated as courteous. Bowing motions held for shorter durations were rated as smooth. In the second experiment, the participants evaluated whether a bowing action was appropriate for a specific social context. The participants judged 15 degrees-angle bowing of no/ very short duration appropriate for greeting, 45 degrees-angle bowing of no / short duration appropriate for gratitude, and 45 degrees-angle bowing for about 2 seconds appropriate for an apology. The results of these two experiments are discussed in terms of how angle and duration influence the impressions and evaluations of the appropriateness of a bowing acion.

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  10. Evaluation of the occlusal contact of crowns fabricated with the bite impression method.

    PubMed

    Makino, Sachi; Okada, Daizo; Shin, Chiharu; Ogura, Reiko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-30

    In prosthodontic treatment, reconstruction of a proper occlusal contact relationship is very important as well as reconstruction of a proper interproximal relationship and marginal fitness. Unfortunately, occlusal relationships are sometimes lost in the process of occlusal adjustment of crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal contacts of single crown fabricated by two different types of impression techniques. Nine subjects, whose molars required treatment with crown restoration, were enrolled in this study. Full cast crowns were fabricated using two types of impression techniques: the conventional impression method (CIM) and the bite impression method (BIM). The occlusal contacts of crowns were precisely evaluated at the following stages: after occlusal adjustment on the articulator (Step 0), before occlusal adjustment in the mouth (Step 1), after occlusal adjustment at the intercuspal position (Step 2), and after occlusal adjustment during lateral and protrusive excursions (Step 3). The number of occlusal contacts of the crowns on the functional cusps fabricated with BIM was significantly greater than that with CIM after occlusal adjustment. For this reason, the crowns fabricated with BIM might have a more functionally desirable occlusal surface compared to the crowns fabricated with CIM.

  11. Accuracy and stability of impression materials subjected to chemical disinfection - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kotsiomiti, E; Tzialla, A; Hatjivasiliou, K

    2008-04-01

    Disinfection of impressions by immersion or spraying with disinfecting solutions is considered nowadays mandatory for effective infection control. The purpose of this review was to examine existing evidence on the effects that chemical disinfection may have on critical qualities of impressions, namely dimensional accuracy and stability over time. A PubMed search was conducted to include original laboratory research articles written in English, published between 1980 and 2005 in peer-reviewed journals and investigating the effect of chemical disinfection, by immersion or spraying, on the dimensional changes that the impression materials experience after setting. Studies were also sought manually, by tracing the references cited in the retrieved articles. The reports on dimensional changes of disinfected impression materials, although rather numerous, are difficult to compare and analyze because of variations of the experimental design. The investigations broadly agree that the disinfection process does not generally affect the dimensional integrity of the impressions, in spite of the statistically significant differences occasionally found. However, the immersion in the disinfecting solution encourages water absorption phenomena in the case of the so-called hydrophilic impression materials, especially after the long-term immersion. Chemical interactions between impressions and disinfectants may occur, but they do not appear to influence the dimensional behaviour of the former. The overall effect of the disinfection is influenced not only by the changes experienced by the impression per se, but also by the alterations of the acrylic tray containing the impression and of the gypsum product poured in it.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Ultraviolet Disinfection on Dimensional Stability of the Polyvinyl Silioxane Impressions.” an in-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Surekha R; Dahane, Trupti M; Nimonkar, Sharayu V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infection control is an important concept in the present day practice of dentistry. The prosthodontists are at an added risk of transmission because of the infection spreading through the contaminated lab equipments while working in the lab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of UV light disinfection on dimensional stability of polyvinyl siloxane impressions. Materials and Methods : Impressions were made in perforated custom tray. After polymerization of impression, half the samples were disinfected in UV light and remaining samples were not subjected to disinfection and poured in die stone which served as control group. Linear dimensions were measured on the cast with travelling microscope of 0.001accuracy. Result : The result showed that UV light disinfectant showed no significant dimensional changes on impressions. Conclusion: Hence, it can be safely used to disinfect impressions in clinical prosthodontic procedures. PMID:25386528

  14. Evaluation of effect of tray space on the accuracy of condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether impression materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Aeran, Himanshu

    2012-09-01

    Optimal thickness of impression materials in the custom tray in order to get the most accurate impression. To investigate the effect of different tray spacer thickness on the accuracy and the dimensional stability of impressions made from monophasic condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether impression materials. Three different types of elastomeric monophasic impression materials were used for making the impression of a master die with tray having tray spacer thickness of 2, 4 and 6 mm. Each type of impression was poured in die stone after 1 h. Each cast was analyzed by a travelling microscope and compared with the master die. The data was tabulated and subjected to statistical evaluation. The results of the study indicated that the impressions made from 2 to 4 mm spaced trays produced more accurate stone casts when compared to 6 mm spaced tray. No statistical significant differences were observed between the accuracy and dimensional stability of the three materials tested. Minimum changes were observed when the cast was poured after 1 h and the tray space was 2 mm for all the materials tested. It is therefore advisable not to exceed tray space of 2 mm.

  15. First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the need for constant…

  16. First Impressions and Professor Reputation: Influence on Student Evaluations of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchert, Stephanie; Laws, Eric L.; Apperson, Jennifer M.; Bregman, Norman J.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the effects of professor reputation versus first impressions on student evaluations of instruction. Students in 19 Psychology courses completed course evaluation surveys either before meeting the instructor or 2 weeks into the semester. Both groups then completed the course evaluation again at the end of the semester. Unlike…

  17. Personal evaluation structure of environmental sounds: experiments of subjective evaluation using subjects' own terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Keiji; Kojima, Takaya; Hirate, Kotaroh; Yasuoka, Masahito

    2004-10-01

    In this study, we conducted an experiment to investigate the evaluation structure that lies at the basis of peoples' psychological evaluation of environmental sounds. In the experiment, subjects were given cards on each of which a name of one of the environmental sounds in the specified context is written. Then they did the following three tasks: (1) to sort the cards into groups by the similarity of their impressions of the imagined sounds; (2) to name each group with the word that best represented their overall impression of the group; and (3) to evaluate all sounds on the cards using the words obtained in the previous task. These tasks were done twice: once assuming they heard the sounds at ease inside their homes and once while walking outside in a resort theme park. We analysed the similarity of imagined impression between the sounds with a cluster analysis and clusters of sounds were produced, namely, sounds labelled "natural," "transportation," and so on. A principal component analysis revealed the three major factors of the evaluation structure for both contexts and they were interpreted as preference, activity and sense of daily life.

  18. Do first impressions count? A comparison of subjective and psychologic assessment of spinal patients.

    PubMed

    Grevitt, M; Pande, K; O'Dowd, J; Webb, J

    1998-01-01

    Psychologic factors may have a major influence on the outcome of treatment for back pain. Psychologic disturbance is manifest as emotional distress and may be associated with inappropriate symptoms and signs. Few outcome studies describe the patient population in terms of their psychologic profile. Anecdotal evidence suggested that the routine use of psychologic screening tests in British spine practice was rare. An audit of the prevalent use of psychologic testing amongst a selected group of British spinal surgeons was conducted. This was followed by a prospective, double blind comparison of subjective evaluations of patients with formal psychologic tests. The principal aim was to determine how accurately treating physicians could identify psychologically distressed patients. A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant members of the British Orthopaedic Spine Society. Details of their current practice and frequency of use of psychologic tests was obtained. In a subsequent study, 125 consecutive new patients attending a back pain clinic were initially evaluated by questionnaires and classified as either psychologically distressed or non-distressed. These patients were then interviewed and examined by treating physicians, who then allocated them to one of four psychologic categories, using predefined criteria. The two results were compared and sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for the subjective evaluations were calculated. Sixty-three percent of respondents to the postal survey either never or only occasionally used any form of psychologic testing in assessing back pain patients. The follow-up prospective study demonstrated that experienced spinal surgeons achieved only a 26% sensitivity when trying to identify distressed patients. The specificity for identifying non-distressed patients was 96%. The predictive value of a "distressed" evaluation was 69%. The predictive value for non-distressed patients was 77%. Subjective psychologic assessment of

  19. An evaluation of dimensional accuracy of one-step and two-step impression technique using addition silicone impression material: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pande, Neelam A; Parkhedkar, R D

    2013-09-01

    The study is aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy, the effect of undercut of two different configurations and the elastic recovery of addition silicone impression material assessed indirectly, by measuring the dimensions on stone models recorded from the impression of the master model, using one-step and two-step impression technique, for addition silicone impression materials. Measurements are taken to evaluate horizontal or linear and vertical dimensional changes, of the abutment V and abutment C from the stainless steel model. Heavy body/light body material is used for making one-step impression technique in a custom tray. Putty/light body is used for taking two-step technique in a stock metal tray. Improved die stone is used for pouring the impression. The different 11 locations on the dies produced by two different techniques are measured microscopically on image analyzer and compared with those of stainless steel model. Anova test was applied to test the differences of mean values of inter and intra abutment measurements, to calculate p value. Unpaired t test was applied to calculate t value. Results showed less deviation of stone models produced by one-step technique from stainless steel model, whereas the deviation of stone models produced by two-step is comparatively more. (p < 0.01). This difference of deviation is significantly less in one-step as compared to two-step technique. One-step is sufficiently dimensionally accurate than two-step technique in conjunction with addition silicone impression material. They have the best elastic recovery from the two undercut configurations.

  20. Computerized determination scheme for histological classification of breast mass using objective features corresponding to clinicians' subjective impressions on ultrasonographic images.

    PubMed

    Hizukuri, Akiyoshi; Nakayama, Ryohei; Kashikura, Yumi; Takase, Haruhiko; Kawanaka, Hiroharu; Ogawa, Tomoko; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2013-10-01

    It is often difficult for clinicians to decide correctly on either biopsy or follow-up for breast lesions with masses on ultrasonographic images. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized determination scheme for histological classification of breast mass by using objective features corresponding to clinicians' subjective impressions for image features on ultrasonographic images. Our database consisted of 363 breast ultrasonographic images obtained from 363 patients. It included 150 malignant (103 invasive and 47 noninvasive carcinomas) and 213 benign masses (87 cysts and 126 fibroadenomas). We divided our database into 65 images (28 malignant and 37 benign masses) for training set and 298 images (122 malignant and 176 benign masses) for test set. An observer study was first conducted to obtain clinicians' subjective impression for nine image features on mass. In the proposed method, location and area of the mass were determined by an experienced clinician. We defined some feature extraction methods for each of nine image features. For each image feature, we selected the feature extraction method with the highest correlation coefficient between the objective features and the average clinicians' subjective impressions. We employed multiple discriminant analysis with the nine objective features for determining histological classification of mass. The classification accuracies of the proposed method were 88.4 % (76/86) for invasive carcinomas, 80.6 % (29/36) for noninvasive carcinomas, 86.0 % (92/107) for fibroadenomas, and 84.1 % (58/69) for cysts, respectively. The proposed method would be useful in the differential diagnosis of breast masses on ultrasonographic images as diagnosis aid.

  1. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Suresh S; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; Somasundaram, P; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. Materials and Methods: The impression materials used for the study were, dentsply aquasil (addition silicone polyvinylsiloxane syringe and putty), zetaplus (condensation silicone putty and light body), and impregum penta soft (polyether). All impressions were made according to manufacturer’s instructions. Dimensional changes were measured before and after different disinfection procedures. Result: Dentsply aquasil showed smallest dimensional change (−0.0046%) and impregum penta soft highest linear dimensional changes (−0.026%). All the tested elastomeric impression materials showed some degree of dimensional changes. Conclusion: The present study showed that all the disinfection procedures produce minor dimensional changes of impression material. However, it was within American Dental Association specification. Hence, steam autoclaving and microwave method can be used as an alternative method to chemical sterilization as an effective method. PMID:26435611

  3. Impression Evaluation and Eye Movement Related to The Characteristic Expression as Elements in Abstract Paintings: Mondrian, Malewitsch and Rothko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Kiyomi

    This paper has the purpose to inspect differences regarding impression evaluation and eye movement by comparing characteristic expression as elements in abstract paintings. Malewitsch's paintings which emphasize oblique lines and inclined rectangles elicited impression evaluations such as “hard”, “irritable”, “dynamic” and “exciting”. Mondrian's paintings which emphasize vertical and horizontal line elicited impression evaluations such as “cheerful” and “light”. Rothko's paintings which are obscure outlines elicited impression evaluations such as “mild”, “comfortable”, “relaxing”, “static” and “tedious”. Paintings that have clear vertical and horizontal lines elicit a trend toward higher mean line-of-sight velocity. Paintings that have many distinctive expression elements elicit large frequency of long gaze point. This study indicates that vertical lines, horizontal lines, oblique lines, obscure outlines, and other expression elements in abstract paintings are influencing factors for impression evaluation and eye movement. This suggests that mutual interactions of components that constitute paintings cannot be disregarded. This study is inspection of common impression and perception caused by appreciation of paintings.

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of the Dimensional Stability of Three Different Elastomeric Impression Materials after Autoclaving – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Kiran Kumar; Ravuri, Rajyalakshmi; Tella, Suchita

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials at three different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Standardized stainless steel master die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. The impression materials used for the study were condensation silicone (GP1), addition silicone (GP2) and polyether (GP3). A total of 45 samples of the stainless steel die were made (n = 45), that is 15 samples for each group. Impression materials were mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions and were loaded into the mold to make an impression of the die. Impressions were identified with the help of numerical coding system and measurements were made using stereomicroscope (MAGNUS MSZ-Bi) of 0.65x magnification with the help of image analysis software (IMACE PRO-INSIGHT VERSION.The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one way analysis of variance and student t-test for comparison between the groups. Results: Within the limitations of the study statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all the three impression materials at three different time intervals but this change was not clinically significant. Conclusion: It is well-known fact that all impressions should be disinfected to avoid possible transmission of infectious diseases either by direct contact or cross contamination. Immersion and spray disinfection as well as various disinfection solutions have been tested and proven to be effective for this purpose. But for elastomeric impression materials these methods have proven to be ineffective as they do not prevent cross contamination among the dental team. So autoclaving was one of the most effective sterilization procedure for condensation silicone and addition silicone. Since polyether is hydrophilic it is better to disinfect the impressions as recommended by the manufacturer or by immersion or spray

  5. Evaluation of Different Disinfactants on Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Quality of Type IV Gypsum Casts Retrieved from Elastomeric Impression Materials

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P K; Kamble, Suresh S; Chaurasia, Ranjitkumar Rampratap; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Tiwari, Samarth; Bansal, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study was done to evaluate the dimensional stability and surface quality of Type IV gypsum casts retrieved from disinfected elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods: In an in vitro study contaminated impression material with known bacterial species was disinfected with disinfectants followed by culturing the swab sample to assess reduction in level of bacterial colony. Changes in surface detail reproduction of impression were assessed fallowing disinfection. Results: All the three disinfectants used in the study produced a 100% reduction in colony forming units of the test organisms. Conclusion: All the three disinfectants produced complete disinfection, and didn’t cause any deterioration in surface detail reproduction. How to cite the article: Pal PK, Kamble SS, Chaurasia RR, Chaurasia VR, Tiwari S, Bansal D. Evaluation of dimensional stability and surface quality of type IV gypsum casts retrieved from disinfected elastomeric impression materials. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):77-81. PMID:25083038

  6. Effects of accessibility and subjective relevance on the use of piecemeal and category information in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Köpetz, Catalina; Kruglanski, Arie W

    2008-05-01

    Three studies investigated the process by which categorical and individuating information impacts impression formation. The authors assumed that (a) both types of information are functionally equivalent in serving as evidence for interpersonal judgments and (b) their use is determined by their accessibility and perceived applicability to the impression's target. The first study constituted an extended replication of Pavelchak's experiment, and it showed that its results, initially interpreted to suggest the primacy in impression formation of category over trait information, may have been prompted by differential accessibility of the category versus trait information in some experimental conditions of the original research. Studies 2 and 3 additionally explored the role of informational accessibility manipulated in different ways. Study 3 demonstrated also that the effect of accessibility is qualified by the information's apparent relevance to the judgmental target.

  7. Efficacy of different disinfectant systems on alginate and addition silicone impression materials of Indian and international origin: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Samra, R K; Bhide, S V

    2010-09-01

    Study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of commonly used disinfectants and to study qualitatively and quantitatively the persistence of microflora on the untreated (control group) and the disinfected impression surface after 24 h. Disinfectant systems used were immersion systems like glutaraldehyde, sodium hypochlorite and the ultraviolet chamber. The effect of disinfectant on most commonly used Indian impression materials was carried out in this study and results compared with the most commonly used foreign brands for irreversible hydrocolloid and addition silicone. Impressions were made of 25 healthy volunteers. These were disinfected and incubated in an incubator for 24 h at 37°C for aerobic organisms. The inoculation in nutrient media was done to test the viability of microorganisms that can persist after rinsing and disinfection of the impression surface. The colony forming units were counted and compared with that of control group. Control group of all the impression material samples showed growth of Streptococcus viridans, Diphtheroids, Streptococcus pneumoniae to a greater extent. The growth of Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aerugenosa and Staphyloccus albus was present in all the groups but to a lesser extent. The persistence of the microflora on the impression surface of both the studied brands was similar but the concentration of organisms in the alginate control group was two folds as compared to addition silicone group. Use of ultraviolet chamber gave better results compared to the studied immersion systems. All the disinfection systems were effective in reducing the microbial load with ultraviolet chamber as the most effective.

  8. Evaluation of oral scanning in comparison to impression using three-dimensional registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogle-Kim, Yur-Chung; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Jäger, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods in fixed prosthodontics. The fabrication requires data on the patient's denture shape. This information is generally obtained as a hard copy from an impression mold. Alternatively, one can acquire the data electronically using oral optical three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, which determine the surface of the denture. The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the accuracy of three dimensional scanning with that of conventional impressions and give a statement how far the scanner provides a clinical alternative with equal or better precision. Data from 10 teeth were acquired in the dental office with a polyether impression material and an oral scanner. Data from the impressions were digitalized by means of micro computed tomography. The data were then 3D registered to identify the potential differences between impression and optical scan. We could demonstrate that the oral scanner's data and the conventional impressions are comparable.

  9. Evaluation of accuracy of casts of multiple internal connection implant prosthesis obtained from different impression materials and techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Malesh; Garg, Pooja; Prithviraj, D R

    2014-04-01

    Movement of impression copings inside the impression material using a direct (open tray) impression technique during clinical and laboratory phases may cause inaccuracy in transferring the 3-dimensional spatial orientation of implants intraorally to the cast. Consequently, the prosthesis may require corrective procedures. This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of 3 different impression techniques using polyether and vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material to obtain a precise cast for multiple internal connection implants. A reference acrylic resin model with 4 internal connection implants was fabricated. Impressions of the reference model were made using 3 different techniques and 2 different impression materials. The study consisted of 24 specimens divided into 6 groups of 4 each. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone (Kalrock, Kalabhai Karson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, India). All casts were evaluated for the positional accuracy (mm) of the implant replica heads using a profile projector. These measurements were compared to the measurements calculated on the reference resin model, which served as a control. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures to evaluate group means. The results revealed significant difference for anterior implant distance between the 2 impression materials (P < .01) and also among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). The lowest mean variation was found with the polyether impression material and the splinted technique. For posterior implants, the results suggested no significant difference between the 2 impression materials (P ≥ .05). Although results were not statistically significant, the polyether impression material showed the lowest mean variation as compared to the VPS impression material. However, there was a significant difference among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). Among the 3 different techniques, the lowest mean variation between 2 posterior

  10. Evaluation of factors affecting the accuracy of impressions using quantitative surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, I K; DeLong, R; Pintado, M R; Malik, R

    1995-01-01

    Impression material goes from a plastic to an elastic state during setting. Movement of the impression and excessive seating pressure during this transition can cause distortion in the impressions. The purpose of this study is to determine if the impression distortion is related to movement during setting or to distortion of the putty phase in the two-step impressioning technique. A master model of a maxillary quadrant of teeth was impressed using four different procedures: 1) one-step technique without movement (1S-NM); 2) one-step technique with movement (1S-M); 3) two-step technique without movement (2S-NM); and 4) two-step technique with movement (2S-M). An artificial oral environment and surface analysis technique of the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics were used to produce the impressions and measure their accuracy. A digitized image of the first premolar of the master model was aligned with a digitized image of the first premolar of each epoxy model using AnSur. The root mean squared difference (RMS) between the aligned images is a measure of the distortion. The corresponding RMS values for the different methods were: 1S-NM = 23.7 +/- 9.21; 1S-M = 20.4 +/- 3.9; 2S-NM = 20.5 +/- 7.7; 2S-M = 21.3 +/- 4.4. Statistical analysis using a two-way analysis of variance showed no difference at the 0.05 level of significance. Pairwise comparison using the Tukey method showed that neither technique (one-step vs two-step) nor movement is a significant factor. These results showed that low seating pressure will not cause any greater distortions in the two-step impression technique than in the one-step technique, and minor movement during the setting of the impression material will no cause distortion.

  11. Efficacy of different disinfectant systems on alginate and addition silicone impression materials of Indian and international origin: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Samra, R K; Bhide, S V

    2010-09-01

    Study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of commonly used disinfectants and to study qualitatively and quantitatively the persistence of microflora on the untreated (control group) and the disinfected impression surface after 24 h. Disinfectant systems used were immersion systems like glutaraldehyde, sodium hypochlorite and the ultraviolet chamber. The effect of disinfectant on most commonly used Indian impression materials was carried out in this study and results compared with the most commonly used foreign brands for irreversible hydrocolloid and addition silicone. Impressions were made of 25 healthy volunteers. These were disinfected and incubated in an incubator for 24 h at 37°C for aerobic organisms. The inoculation in nutrient media was done to test the viability of microorganisms that can persist after rinsing and disinfection of the impression surface. The colony forming units were counted and compared with that of control group. Control group of all the impression material samples showed growth of Streptococcus viridans, Diphtheroids, Streptococcus pneumoniae to a greater extent. The growth of Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aerugenosa and Staphyloccus albus was present in all the groups but to a lesser extent. The persistence of the microflora on the impression surface of both the studied brands was similar but the concentration of organisms in the alginate control group was two folds as compared to addition silicone group. Use of ultraviolet chamber gave better results compared to the studied immersion systems. All the disinfection systems were effective in reducing the microbial load with ultraviolet chamber as the most effective. PMID:21886411

  12. Conjunctival impression cytology versus routine tear function tests for dry eye evaluation in contact lens wearers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prachi; Bhargava, Rahul; Arora, Yogesh C.; Kaushal, Sidharth; Kumar, Manjushri

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Prolonged contact lens wear is often accompanied by dryness of the eyes. The aim of this study was to compare conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) and tear film tests such as tear film break up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test for dry eye evaluation in contact lens wearers and measure their correlation with dry eye symptoms. Setting: A case control study was done at three referral eye centers. Materials and Methods: The eyes of 230 contact lens users were compared to 250 eyes of age- and sex-matched controls. Participants were recruited based on their response to a questionnaire of dry eye symptoms, (Dry Eye Scoring System, DESS©) and measurements of TBUT, Schirmer test, and CIC was done. A correlation analysis between symptom severity and tear film tests was performed. Pearson's coefficient, R2 > 0.5 was considered significant. Results: As compared to controls (r2 = 0.010), Nelson grade correlated significantly with dry eye symptoms (r2 = 0.765), among cases. However, there was moderate correlation between dry eye symptoms, Schirmer test, and TBUT (r2 = 0.557 and 0.530, respectively) among cases and a weak correlation among controls (r2 = 0.130 and 0.054, respectively). The sensitivity of TBUT was 86.4%, specificity was 82.4%, positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 4.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.46-5.85)], and negative LR was 0.09. The sensitivity of the Schirmer test was 48.2%, specificity 88%, LR 2.12 (95% CI 1.48-2.96), and negative LR 0.83. Conclusion: CIC correlates better than Schirmer and TBUT with dry eye symptoms. It may be the most appropriate test for dry-eye evaluation in contact lens wearers. PMID:26811575

  13. Changing the Subject of Your Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Patricia Anne; Maloney, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    In most districts, the evaluation of superintendents by the members of the board of education takes place in executive session of the board behind closed doors. Few board members or superintendents question the status quo. Most evaluation forms are merely collections of subjective checklists that catalog approved personality traits, attributes,…

  14. Amelanotic corneally displaced malignant conjunctival melanoma: a case report evaluated with impression cytology.

    PubMed

    Barros, Jeison de Nadai; Motono, Márcia; Costa, Felipe D'Almeida; Cunha, Marcelo Carvalho da; Chojniak, Martha Motono

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the case of a 65-year-old Caucasian female who presented with an amelanotic malignant conjunctival melanoma and highlight the clinical and pathological features of this rare entity that displayed exclusive corneal invasive growth without evidence of conjunctival tumors other than primary acquired melanosis. Impression cytology aided in the initial diagnosis. The patient underwent surgical treatment. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an invasive amelanotic melanoma limited to the cornea and exhibiting S-100, Melan A, and HMB-45 positivity. The absence of pigmentation delayed early clinical detection and treatment. Awareness of this nonpigmented melanoma is important for early recognition and appropriate management.

  15. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  16. Voting for a personality: Do first impressions and self-evaluations affect voting decisions?

    PubMed Central

    Koppensteiner, Markus; Stephan, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Participants were asked to assess their own personality (i.e. Big Five scales), the personality of politicians shown in brief silent video clips, and the probability that they would vote for these politicians. Response surface analyses (RSA) revealed noteworthy effects of self-ratings and observer-ratings of openness, agreeableness, and emotional stability on voting probability. Furthermore, the participants perceived themselves as being more open, more agreeable, more emotionally stable, and more extraverted than the average politician. The study supports previous findings that first impressions affect decision making on important issues. Results also indicate that when only nonverbal information is available people prefer political candidates they perceive as having personality traits they value in themselves. PMID:25089064

  17. Voting for a personality: Do first impressions and self-evaluations affect voting decisions?

    PubMed

    Koppensteiner, Markus; Stephan, Pia

    2014-08-01

    Participants were asked to assess their own personality (i.e. Big Five scales), the personality of politicians shown in brief silent video clips, and the probability that they would vote for these politicians. Response surface analyses (RSA) revealed noteworthy effects of self-ratings and observer-ratings of openness, agreeableness, and emotional stability on voting probability. Furthermore, the participants perceived themselves as being more open, more agreeable, more emotionally stable, and more extraverted than the average politician. The study supports previous findings that first impressions affect decision making on important issues. Results also indicate that when only nonverbal information is available people prefer political candidates they perceive as having personality traits they value in themselves.

  18. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex and person evaluation: forming impressions of others varying in financial and moral status.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Jasmin; Gyurovski, Ivo

    2014-10-15

    The current study investigated ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) activity during impression formation of individuals varying on distinct dimensions of social status. In a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, participants were presented with photographs of faces paired with a colored background indicating their lower, same, or higher financial status, or lower, same, or higher moral status. Participants were asked to form an impression of the targets, but were not instructed to explicitly evaluate them based on social status. Building on previous findings (Cloutier, Ambady, Meagher, & Gabrieli, 2012), a region of interest analysis revealed the interaction of status dimension and level in VMPFC, finding not only preferential response to targets with higher compared to lower moral status as previously demonstrated, but also greater response to targets with lower compared to higher financial status. The implications of these results are discussed with an emphasis towards better understanding the impact of social status on social cognition and uncovering the neural substrates of person evaluation. PMID:24936688

  19. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex and person evaluation: forming impressions of others varying in financial and moral status.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Jasmin; Gyurovski, Ivo

    2014-10-15

    The current study investigated ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) activity during impression formation of individuals varying on distinct dimensions of social status. In a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, participants were presented with photographs of faces paired with a colored background indicating their lower, same, or higher financial status, or lower, same, or higher moral status. Participants were asked to form an impression of the targets, but were not instructed to explicitly evaluate them based on social status. Building on previous findings (Cloutier, Ambady, Meagher, & Gabrieli, 2012), a region of interest analysis revealed the interaction of status dimension and level in VMPFC, finding not only preferential response to targets with higher compared to lower moral status as previously demonstrated, but also greater response to targets with lower compared to higher financial status. The implications of these results are discussed with an emphasis towards better understanding the impact of social status on social cognition and uncovering the neural substrates of person evaluation.

  20. Reproducibility of sterilized rubber impressions.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Khalid M; Hassan, Ahmed M; Hodges, J S

    2004-01-01

    Impressions, dentures and other dental appliances may be contaminated with oral micro-flora or other organisms of varying pathogenicity from patient's saliva and blood. Several approaches have been tried to control the transmission of infectious organisms via dental impressions and because disinfection is less effective and has several drawbacks for impression characterization, several sterilization methods have been suggested. This study evaluated the reproducibility of rubber impressions after sterilization by different methods. Dimensional accuracy and wettability of two rubber impression materials (vinyl polysiloxane and polyether) were evaluated after sterilization by each of three well-known methods (immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde for 10 h, autoclaving and microwave radiation). Non-sterilized impressions served as control. The effect of the tray material on impression accuracy and the effect of topical surfactant on the wettability were also evaluated. One-way ANOVA with Dunnett's method was used for statistical analysis. All sterilizing methods reduced the reproducibility of rubber impressions, although not always significantly. Microwave sterilization had a small effect on both accuracy and wettability. The greater effects of the other methods could usually be overcome by using ceramic trays and by spraying impression surfaces with surfactant before pouring the gypsum mix. There was one exception: glutaraldehyde still degraded dimensional accuracy even with ceramic trays and surfactant. We conclude that a) sterilization of rubber impressions made on acrylic trays was usually associated with a degree of dimensional change; b) microwave energy seems to be a suitable technique for sterilizing rubber impressions; c) topical surfactant application helped restore wettability of sterilized impressions. PMID:15798825

  1. Subjective evaluation of HEVC in mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ray; Kalva, Hari

    2013-03-01

    Mobile compute environments provide a unique set of user needs and expectations that designers must consider. With increased multimedia use in mobile environments, video encoding methods within the smart phone market segment are key factors that contribute to positive user experience. Currently available display resolutions and expected cellular bandwidth are major factors the designer must consider when determining which encoding methods should be supported. The desired goal is to maximize the consumer experience, reduce cost, and reduce time to market. This paper presents a comparative evaluation of the quality of user experience when HEVC and AVC/H.264 video coding standards were used. The goal of the study was to evaluate any improvements in user experience when using HEVC. Subjective comparisons were made between H.264/AVC and HEVC encoding standards in accordance with Doublestimulus impairment scale (DSIS) as defined by ITU-R BT.500-13. Test environments are based on smart phone LCD resolutions and expected cellular bit rates, such as 200kbps and 400kbps. Subjective feedback shows both encoding methods are adequate at 400kbps constant bit rate. However, a noticeable consumer experience gap was observed for 200 kbps. Significantly less H.264 subjective quality is noticed with video sequences that have multiple objects moving and no single point of visual attraction. Video sequences with single points of visual attraction or few moving objects tended to have higher H.264 subjective quality.

  2. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  3. A prospective clinical evaluation of electronically mixed polyvinyl siloxane impression materials: results from the prosthetic "SuperStudy"--a consumer evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kugel, G; Swift, E J; Sorensen, J A; Tucker, J H; Dunne, J T

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials incorporating a polyether carbosilane wetting agent and mixed with an electronic mixing system (Pentamix) were clinically compared with traditionally delivered (i.e., automixed) PVS impression materials during routine use by 1,505 general and specialized dental practitioners evaluating more than 30,000 impressions. Each study participant selected 20 patients and used standard tooth-preparation procedures appropriate to the therapy required, supplied specific data on each case, and ultimately evaluated the marginal detail, fit, and success of the final restorations. The areas requiring evaluation upon completion of the final restorations were ranked between "excellent," "good," "poor," and "remake needed," among users of the PVS materials with the electronic mixing system. About 80% of the respondents rated the Pentamix system as easier to mix and deliver than the gun or hand-mixed systems and two thirds said it was faster to mix. The system also received high scores for hygienic delivery, ease of mixing, and clean-up.

  4. About subjective evaluation of adaptive video streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Samira; Brunnström, Kjell; Garcia, Narciso

    2015-03-01

    The usage of HTTP Adaptive Streaming (HAS) technology by content providers is increasing rapidly. Having available the video content in multiple qualities, using HAS allows to adapt the quality of downloaded video to the current network conditions providing smooth video-playback. However, the time-varying video quality by itself introduces a new type of impairment. The quality adaptation can be done in different ways. In order to find the best adaptation strategy maximizing users perceptual quality it is necessary to investigate about the subjective perception of adaptation-related impairments. However, the novelties of these impairments and their comparably long time duration make most of the standardized assessment methodologies fall less suited for studying HAS degradation. Furthermore, in traditional testing methodologies, the quality of the video in audiovisual services is often evaluated separated and not in the presence of audio. Nevertheless, the requirement of jointly evaluating the audio and the video within a subjective test is a relatively under-explored research field. In this work, we address the research question of determining the appropriate assessment methodology to evaluate the sequences with time-varying quality due to the adaptation. This was done by studying the influence of different adaptation related parameters through two different subjective experiments using a methodology developed to evaluate long test sequences. In order to study the impact of audio presence on quality assessment by the test subjects, one of the experiments was done in the presence of audio stimuli. The experimental results were subsequently compared with another experiment using the standardized single stimulus Absolute Category Rating (ACR) methodology.

  5. Evaluation of effectiveness of microwave irradiation for disinfection of silicone elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Abhilasha; Vinod, V; Bhasin, Vinny; Mathew, Xavier; Sajjan, Suresh; Ahmed, Syed Tauqheer

    2013-06-01

    Use of domestic microwave oven has been suggested as a method of disinfecting a number of dental materials used in dental practice. This study was done to analyse the effect of microwave irradiation on vinyl polysiloxane putty impression material (3M ESPE, Express™ STD) contaminated with test organisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans. 180 square shaped specimens of addition silicon putty material were prepared and divided into 3 groups for three test organisms. The 3 groups were subdivided into 4 subgroups (n = 15) for different exposure parameters (control group 5, 6 and 7 min exposure at 650 W. The specimens were contaminated using standard inoculums of test organism and then were irradiated using domestic microwaves. Broth cultures of the control and test group specimens were plated on selective media culture plates. Colonies formed were counted. Data analyses included Kruskal-Walli's ANOVA and Mann-Whitney's tests. Nil values shows complete elimination of C. albicans and P. aeruginosa after 5, 6 and 7 min exposure. Staphylococcus aureus showed colonies with the mean value of 7.6 × 10(3) ± 2.3 × 10(3), 4.6 × 10(3) ± 2.6 × 10(3) after 5 and 6 min respectively and nil values after 7 min exposure. 5 min exposure caused complete elimination of C. albicans and P. aeruginosa strains, while 7 min exposure eliminated S. aureus completely.

  6. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects.

  7. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  8. Comparative evaluation of dimensional accuracy of different polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impression techniques-in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Ramandeep; Railkar, Bhargavi; Musani, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dimensional accuracy when making impressions is crucial to the quality of fixed prosthodontic treatment, and the impression technique is a critical factor affecting this accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of the casts obtained from one step double mix, two step double mix polyvinyl siloxane putty- wash impression techniques using three different spacer thicknesses (0.5mm, 1mm and 1.5mm), in order to determine the impression technique that displays the maximum linear dimensional accuracy. Materials & Methods: A Mild steel model with 2 abutment preparations was fabricated, and impressions were made 15 times with each technique. All impressions were made with an addition-reaction silicone impression material (Express, 3M ESPE) and customarily made perforated metal trays. The 1-step putty/light-body impressions were made with simultaneous use of putty and light-body materials. The 2-step putty/light-body impressions were made with 0.5-mm, 1mm and 1.5mm-thick metal-prefabricated spacer caps. The accuracy of the 4 different impression techniques was assessed by measuring 7 dimensions (intra- and inter abutment) (20-μm accuracy) on stone casts poured from the impressions of the mild steel model. The data were analyzed by one sample‘t’ test. Results: The stone dies obtained with all the techniques had significantly larger or smaller dimensions as compared to those of the mild steel model (P<0.05). The order for highest to lowest deviation from the mild steel model was: single step putty/light body, 2-step putty/light body with 0.5mm spacer thickness, 2-step putty/light body1.5mm spacer thickness, and 2-step putty/light body with 1mm spacer thickness. Significant differences among all of the groups for both absolute dimensions of the stone dies, and their standard deviations from the master model (P<0.05), were noted. Conclusions: The 2-step putty/light-body impression technique with 1mm spacer thickness was

  9. Can we undo our first impressions?: The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Thomas C.; Ferguson, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Little work has examined whether implicit evaluations can be effectively “undone” after learning new revelations. Across 7 experiments, participants fully reversed their implicit evaluation of a novel target person after reinterpreting earlier information. Revision occurred across multiple implicit evaluation measures (Experiments 1a and 1b), and only when the new information prompted a reinterpretation of prior learning versus did not (Experiment 2). The updating required active consideration of the information, as it emerged only with at least moderate cognitive resources (Experiment 3). Self-reported reinterpretation predicted (Experiment 4) and mediated (Experiment 5) revised implicit evaluations beyond the separate influence of how thoughtfully participants considered the new information in general. Finally, the revised evaluations were durable three days later (Experiment 6). We discuss how these results inform existing theoretical models, and consider implications for future research. PMID:25798625

  10. Can we undo our first impressions? The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mann, Thomas C; Ferguson, Melissa J

    2015-06-01

    Little work has examined whether implicit evaluations can be effectively "undone" after learning new revelations. Across 7 experiments, participants fully reversed their implicit evaluation of a novel target person after reinterpreting earlier information. Revision occurred across multiple implicit evaluation measures (Experiments 1a and 1b), and only when the new information prompted a reinterpretation of prior learning versus did not (Experiment 2). The updating required active consideration of the information, as it emerged only with at least moderate cognitive resources (Experiment 3). Self-reported reinterpretation predicted (Experiment 4) and mediated (Experiment 5) revised implicit evaluations beyond the separate influence of how thoughtfully participants considered the new information in general. Finally, the revised evaluations were durable 3 days later (Experiment 6). We discuss how these results inform existing theoretical models, and consider implications for future research.

  11. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  12. Teaching Effectiveness, Impression Management, and Dysfunctional Behavior: Student Evaluation of Teaching Control Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumbley, D. Larry; Reichelt, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Student evaluation of teaching (SET) questionnaires are used in many countries, although much current research questions the validity of these surveys. US research indicates that more than 90 percent of academic accounting departments use this performance measurement. This paper aims to focus on the validity of SET data.…

  13. [EVALUATION OF CHANGES OF GEOMETRICAL PARAMETERS OF ALGINATE DENTAL IMPRESSIONS DUE TO THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL AND MICROWAVE DISINFECTION METHOD USING 3D TECHNOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Nespraydko, V P; Shevchuk, V A; Michaylov, A A; Lyseyko, N V

    2015-01-01

    This clinical and laboratory study evaluated the effect of two methods of disinfection in different modes at the volume changes of alginate dental impressions and plaster models poured from them, as compared to the same parameters of plastic master models (PMM), using three-dimensional non-contact laser scanner and software. Immersion chemical disinfection for 15 min, microwave disinfection at 354 W for 10 minutes and combined disinfection with the power of 319 W for 4 minutes did not significantly affect the volumetric dimensional accuracy of the alginate impressions (P > 0.05). PMID:27491163

  14. Findings from subjective evaluations and driver ratings of vehicle dynamics: steering and handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Gómez, Gaspar L.; Nybacka, Mikael; Bakker, Egbert; Drugge, Lars

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates subjective assessments (SA) of vehicle handling and steering feel tests, both numerical and verbal, to understand drivers' use of judgement scales, rating tendencies and spread. Two different test methods are compared: a short multi-vehicle first-impression test with predefined-driving vs the standard extensive single-vehicle free-driving tests, both offering very similar results but with the former saving substantial testing time. Rating repeatability is evaluated by means of a blind test. Key SA questions are identified by numerical subjective assessment autocorrelations and by generating word clouds from the most used terms in verbal assessments, with both methods leading to similar key parameters. The results exposed in this paper enable better understanding of SA, allowing improving the overall subjective testing and evaluation process, and improving the data collection and analysis process needed before identifying correlations between SA and objective metrics.

  15. Subjective Evaluations of Motion Area and Velocity Characteristics of Dual Manipulator in Young and Elderly People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Mitsumasa; Yoda, Asako; Shiota, Yasuhito

    In this study, we conducted a subjective evaluation experiment of a dual manipulator, which exhibits different motion characteristics. There are three motion characteristics: two of which are age-related, and the third is a robot motion characteristic and is newly added to these two motions. The motions are evaluated from motion areas and motion velocities. Subjects are elderly and young people, and the impressions of the motions are compared in two of the different age groups by the Semantic Differential (SD) method. The obtained results indicate that there are age differences in the evaluation of three manipulator motion areas. The elderly people show a higher reliability and a higher familiarity in a robot motion area than in the other two motions. The elderly people seem to be more affected by the manipulator motion than the young people. Therefore, a careful consideration is required when planning the motion of a manipulator for elderly people.

  16. Pressure produced on the residual maxillary alveolar ridge by different impression materials and tray design: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Subash M; Mohan, Chenthil Arun; Vijitha, D; Balasubramanian, R; Satish, A; Kumar, Mahendira

    2013-12-01

    Increased ridge resorption may occur due to inappropriate pressure applied during final impression making phase of complete denture fabrication. This study was done to evaluate the pressure applied on the residual ridge while making impressions with two tray designs (with and without spacer) using, zinc oxide eugenol and light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material. Five edentulous subjects were randomly selected. For each of the five subjects four maxillary final impressions were made and were labelled as, Group A-Impression made with tray without spacer using zinc oxide eugenol impression, Group B-Impression made with tray with spacer using zinc oxide eugenol impression material, Group C-Impression made with tray without spacer using light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material, Group D-Impression made with tray with spacer using light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material. During the impression procedure a closed hydraulic system was used to remotely measure the pressures produced in three areas. The pressure produced were calibrated according to the micro strain record. Statistical comparisons of readings were done using t test and ANOVA. The acquired data revealed that ZOE produced an average pressures value of 26.534 and 72.05 microstrain, while light body PVS produced 11.430 and 37.584 microstrain value with and without spacer respectively. Significantly high values were recorded on the vault of the palate when using trays without spacer. The use of light body polyvinyl siloxane and zinc oxide eugenol impression material showed insignificant difference. Within the limitations of this study, tray design has a significantly effected on the pressures produced, while the impression materials does not have any significant difference.

  17. Cutoff score on the apathy evaluation scale in subjects with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Mel B; Burke, David T; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese; Goldstein, Richard; Jacob, Loyal; Kettell, Jennifer

    2002-06-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine a cutoff score on the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) that predicts a clinician's designation of a subject with TBI as apathetic or not. Forty-five outpatients with TBI completed the AES-S, and 37 family members, friends, or significant others filled out the AES-I. Three clinicians prospectively gave their impressions of the presence or absence of apathy and retrospectively chose the degree of apathy on a 7-point subjective rating scale. The data was analysed by logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. No cutoff score on the AES-S or AES-I was found to have reasonable sensitivity and specificity with respect to the ability to predict the clinician's designation of a subject as apathetic. The AES requires further study if it is to be used to measure apathy following TBI.

  18. Visual Impression of Lighting from a Window and a Ceiling: the Effect of Their Compound Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sangpil; Ishida, Taiichiro; Iwai, Wataru

    This study was conducted to examine how our visual impression of the lighting space will change when the ratio of the amount of daylight from a window to light from an entire ceiling is changed. In order to evaluate the subjective impression of illuminance distribution for lighting conditions, this study adopted an experimental method using two scale models. The standard box was lit by only the light from the entire ceiling, and the evaluation box was lit by the light from the window and the light from the entire ceiling. Subjects were asked to rate their overall impression for the state of light in the evaluation box by comparing with standard box. Our findings indicate that the compound ratio of 20 to 40% from the window and 80 to 60% from the ceiling would be beneficial in terms of psychological impression for ordinal office spaces.

  19. [Effect of the viscosity of alginate impression materials on the preliminary impression for complete dentures].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Natsumi; Akiba, Norihisa; Uchida, Tatsuro

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of the viscosity of alginate impression materials on the results of the preliminary impressions for complete dentures. Five experimental alginate impression materials with different viscosity were prepared based on a conventional material. Fifteen complete denture wearers were selected and impressions on using the experimental materials were taken. Impressions were evaluated by the success rates at the mylohyoid ridge area (MR), buccal area (BL) and retromolar pad area (RP). The success rates had a tendency to increase as the viscosity rose at MR and RP. The success rates at BL were not significantly different among the materials. Our results indicate that the viscosity of alginate impression materials has a great effect on the results of preliminary impression for complete dentures, especially at MR. Impression materials with high viscosity may be suitable for recording the anatomical form of the alveolar ridge better than those with low viscosity.

  20. Subjective evaluation of higher dynamic range video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is able to capture a wide range of luminance values, closer to what the human eye can perceive. However, for capture and display technologies, it is important to answer the question on the significance of higher dynamic range for user preference. This paper answers this question by investigating the added value of higher dynamic range via a rigorous set of subjective experiments using paired comparison methodology. Video sequences at four different peak luminance levels were displayed side-by-side on a Dolby Research HDR RGB backlight dual modulation display (aka `Pulsar'), which is capable of reliably displaying video content at 4000 cd=m2 peak luminance. The results of the subjective experiment demonstrate that the preference of an average viewer increases logarithmically with the increase in the maximum luminance level at which HDR content is displayed, with 4000 cd=m2 being the most attractive option.

  1. Dimensional accuracy of 2-stage putty-wash impressions: influence of impression trays and viscosity.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Markus; Ferger, Paul; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the impression tray and viscosity of the wash material on the dimensional accuracy of impressions taken using a 2-stage putty-wash technique. Identically shaped metal stock trays (MeTs) and disposable plastic stock trays (DiTs) were used for taking impressions (n = 10) of a mandibular cast (4 abutments) with 2 different impression materials. Dies were poured and the relative diameter deviation was calculated after measurement. Zero viscosity of the materials was determined. Dimensional accuracy was significantly affected when DiTs were used. Lower-viscosity wash materials led to more precise impressions.

  2. Subjective impressions do not mirror online reading effort: concurrent EEG-eyetracking evidence from the reading of books and digital media.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Pleimling, Dominique; Hosemann, Jana; Füssel, Stephan; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the rapidly changing circumstances of our increasingly digital world, reading is also becoming an increasingly digital experience: electronic books (e-books) are now outselling print books in the United States and the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, many readers still view e-books as less readable than print books. The present study thus used combined EEG and eyetracking measures in order to test whether reading from digital media requires higher cognitive effort than reading conventional books. Young and elderly adults read short texts on three different reading devices: a paper page, an e-reader and a tablet computer and answered comprehension questions about them while their eye movements and EEG were recorded. The results of a debriefing questionnaire replicated previous findings in that participants overwhelmingly chose the paper page over the two electronic devices as their preferred reading medium. Online measures, by contrast, showed shorter mean fixation durations and lower EEG theta band voltage density--known to covary with memory encoding and retrieval--for the older adults when reading from a tablet computer in comparison to the other two devices. Young adults showed comparable fixation durations and theta activity for all three devices. Comprehension accuracy did not differ across the three media for either group. We argue that these results can be explained in terms of the better text discriminability (higher contrast) produced by the backlit display of the tablet computer. Contrast sensitivity decreases with age and degraded contrast conditions lead to longer reading times, thus supporting the conclusion that older readers may benefit particularly from the enhanced contrast of the tablet. Our findings thus indicate that people's subjective evaluation of digital reading media must be dissociated from the cognitive and neural effort expended in online information processing while reading from such devices.

  3. Subjective Impressions Do Not Mirror Online Reading Effort: Concurrent EEG-Eyetracking Evidence from the Reading of Books and Digital Media

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Pleimling, Dominique; Hosemann, Jana; Füssel, Stephan; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the rapidly changing circumstances of our increasingly digital world, reading is also becoming an increasingly digital experience: electronic books (e-books) are now outselling print books in the United States and the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, many readers still view e-books as less readable than print books. The present study thus used combined EEG and eyetracking measures in order to test whether reading from digital media requires higher cognitive effort than reading conventional books. Young and elderly adults read short texts on three different reading devices: a paper page, an e-reader and a tablet computer and answered comprehension questions about them while their eye movements and EEG were recorded. The results of a debriefing questionnaire replicated previous findings in that participants overwhelmingly chose the paper page over the two electronic devices as their preferred reading medium. Online measures, by contrast, showed shorter mean fixation durations and lower EEG theta band voltage density – known to covary with memory encoding and retrieval – for the older adults when reading from a tablet computer in comparison to the other two devices. Young adults showed comparable fixation durations and theta activity for all three devices. Comprehension accuracy did not differ across the three media for either group. We argue that these results can be explained in terms of the better text discriminability (higher contrast) produced by the backlit display of the tablet computer. Contrast sensitivity decreases with age and degraded contrast conditions lead to longer reading times, thus supporting the conclusion that older readers may benefit particularly from the enhanced contrast of the tablet. Our findings thus indicate that people's subjective evaluation of digital reading media must be dissociated from the cognitive and neural effort expended in online information processing while reading from such devices. PMID:23405265

  4. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, T; Tsokas, K

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature on elastomeric impression materials, is presented in this paper. The article mentions the composition and the most important properties of the elastomeric impression materials used in dental practice. The clinical significance of these materials, physical and mechanical properties are also emphasized. In addition some new elastomeric impression materials with improved properties and a new (experimental) light-cured impression material, are mentioned. Another part of this article is the biocompatibility of these materials. In the end the great significance of handling is outlined. PMID:2130039

  5. ETI: Our first impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  6. The neural dynamics of updating person impressions.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Cai, Yang; Todorov, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Person perception is a dynamic, evolving process. Because other people are an endless source of social information, people need to update their impressions of others based upon new information. We devised an fMRI study to identify brain regions involved in updating impressions. Participants saw faces paired with valenced behavioral information and were asked to form impressions of these individuals. Each face was seen five times in a row, each time with a different behavioral description. Critically, for half of the faces the behaviors were evaluatively consistent, while for the other half they were inconsistent. In line with prior work, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) was associated with forming impressions of individuals based on behavioral information. More importantly, a whole-brain analysis revealed a network of other regions associated with updating impressions of individuals who exhibited evaluatively inconsistent behaviors, including rostrolateral PFC, superior temporal sulcus, right inferior parietal lobule and posterior cingulate cortex.

  7. The neural dynamics of updating person impressions.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Cai, Yang; Todorov, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Person perception is a dynamic, evolving process. Because other people are an endless source of social information, people need to update their impressions of others based upon new information. We devised an fMRI study to identify brain regions involved in updating impressions. Participants saw faces paired with valenced behavioral information and were asked to form impressions of these individuals. Each face was seen five times in a row, each time with a different behavioral description. Critically, for half of the faces the behaviors were evaluatively consistent, while for the other half they were inconsistent. In line with prior work, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) was associated with forming impressions of individuals based on behavioral information. More importantly, a whole-brain analysis revealed a network of other regions associated with updating impressions of individuals who exhibited evaluatively inconsistent behaviors, including rostrolateral PFC, superior temporal sulcus, right inferior parietal lobule and posterior cingulate cortex. PMID:22490923

  8. Age, Cumulative Trauma and Stressful Life Events, and Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms among Older Adults in Prison: Do Subjective Impressions Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maschi, Tina; Morgen, Keith; Zgoba, Kristen; Courtney, Deborah; Ristow, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aging prison population in the United States presents a significant public health challenge with high rates of trauma and mental health issues that the correctional system alone is ill-prepared to address. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of age, objective, and subjective measures of trauma and stressful…

  9. Eyeblinks in formation of impressions.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Miyata, Y

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of frequency of one's eyeblinks on creating a personal impression. The subjects, 102 males and 127 females, ages 15 to 60 years, rated on a 7-point semantic differential scale a rarely blinking person or a frequently blinking person described on a question-sheet. A factor analysis of the ratings yielded three factors, interpreted as Nervousness, Unfriendliness, and Lack of intelligence. The frequently blinking person was rated as more nervous and less intelligent than the rarely blinking person. Present results provided evidence that frequency of eyeblinks may play an important role on the formation of impressions. Further implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:8902035

  10. Forming impressions from incongruent traits.

    PubMed

    Casselden, P A; Hampson, S E

    1990-08-01

    The factors that affect the ease with which impressions are formed from incongruent trait pairs are investigated. In Experiments 1 and 2, trait pairs that were both descriptively and evaluatively congruent, as well as ones that were only evaluatively congruent, were found to be more imaginable and to be perceived as more frequently co-occurring than incongruent trait pairs. In Experiment 3, response latency provided a converging measure of ease of imaginability. Experiment 4 examined written descriptions of targets described by these trait pairs, and found more attempts to integrate the congruent than the incongruent pairs. These findings are discussed in terms of the relation between laypersons' impressions of personality and formal personality assessment.

  11. Forming impressions from incongruent traits.

    PubMed

    Casselden, P A; Hampson, S E

    1990-08-01

    The factors that affect the ease with which impressions are formed from incongruent trait pairs are investigated. In Experiments 1 and 2, trait pairs that were both descriptively and evaluatively congruent, as well as ones that were only evaluatively congruent, were found to be more imaginable and to be perceived as more frequently co-occurring than incongruent trait pairs. In Experiment 3, response latency provided a converging measure of ease of imaginability. Experiment 4 examined written descriptions of targets described by these trait pairs, and found more attempts to integrate the congruent than the incongruent pairs. These findings are discussed in terms of the relation between laypersons' impressions of personality and formal personality assessment. PMID:2213498

  12. Subjective comparison and evaluation of speech enhancement algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2007-01-01

    Making meaningful comparisons between the performance of the various speech enhancement algorithms proposed over the years, has been elusive due to lack of a common speech database, differences in the types of noise used and differences in the testing methodology. To facilitate such comparisons, we report on the development of a noisy speech corpus suitable for evaluation of speech enhancement algorithms. This corpus is subsequently used for the subjective evaluation of 13 speech enhancement methods encompassing four classes of algorithms: spectral subtractive, subspace, statistical-model based and Wiener-type algorithms. The subjective evaluation was performed by Dynastat, Inc. using the ITU-T P.835 methodology designed to evaluate the speech quality along three dimensions: signal distortion, noise distortion and overall quality. This paper reports the results of the subjective tests. PMID:18046463

  13. Effects of implant angulation, material selection, and impression technique on impression accuracy: a preliminary laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sveikata, Kestutis; Savickas, Raimondas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary laboratory study was to evaluate the effects of 5- and 25-degree implant angulations in simulated clinical casts on an impression's accuracy when using different impression materials and tray selections. A convenience sample of each implant angulation group was selected for both open and closed trays in combination with one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials. The influence of material and technique appeared to be significant for both 5- and 25-degree angulations (P < .05), and increased angulation tended to decrease impression accuracy. The open-tray technique was more accurate with highly nonaxially oriented implants for the small sample size investigated.

  14. Impression formation: the role of expressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Riggio, R E; Friedman, H S

    1986-02-01

    This research examined the effects of personality/social skills and individual differences in expressive style on impression formation. Particular attention was given to the role of nonverbal behaviors in the formation of initial impressions. Sixty-two subjects were measured on self-report personality and communication skill scales, on posed emotional sending ability, and on physical attractiveness. Subjects were then videotaped while giving a spontaneous "explanation." Trained coders measured five separate nonverbal cue factors displayed by the subjects in the videotapes. Groups of untrained judges viewed the tapes and rated their impressions of the subjects on scales of likability, speaking effectiveness, and expressivity-confidence. Male subjects who were nonverbally skilled and extraverted tended to display more outwardly focused and fluid expressive behaviors, and made more favorable impressions on judges, than did males who scored low on the measures of nonverbal skills and extraversion. Females who were nonverbally skilled displayed more facial expressiveness, which led to more favorable initial impressions. Sex differences may reflect basic differences in the acquisition and use of expressive nonverbal cues by males and females. PMID:3517289

  15. The subjective evaluation of noise from light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects evaluated the sounds of a light aircraft and a motorcycle. Particular emphasis was placed on examining the duration of the sounds. Thirty subjects gave annoyance ratings to a total of 50 sounds, with peak levels between 65 and 85dB(A). It was found that aircraft and motorcycles have differing optimum duration corrections. The conventional duration correction used in the calculation of EPNL is far from being the optimum for light aircraft.

  16. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  17. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  18. The influence of impression trays on the accuracy of stone casts poured from irreversible hydrocolloid impressions.

    PubMed

    Mendez, A J

    1985-09-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine which of four commonly used impression trays yields the best results when making irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. This objective was achieved by evaluating the comparative accuracy of stone casts obtained from irreversible hydrocolloid impressions made with trays of different characteristics. The following conclusions are drawn from this study. Some kind of distortion can be expected in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions with the use of any of the tested impression trays. The perforated trays (B and D) reproduce more accurately the distances along the length and the width of the arch than the nonperforated trays (A and C). The depth of the palatal vault (distance f-g) is reproduced most accurately by the Rim-lock nonperforated tray (A) followed closely by the stock perforated (B) and the custom nonperforated (C) trays. Under the conditions of this study, all the impressions had a tendency to be oversized except the impressions made with the stock perforated tray (B). Those impressions were slightly undersized for all but two measured distances. Clinically significant inaccuracies produced by any of the four tested impression trays were not found in this study.

  19. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  20. Comparative evaluation of pressure generated on a simulated maxillary oral analog by impression materials in custom trays of different spacer designs: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sakshi; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Tandan, Amrit; Dwivedi, Ravi; Gupta, Swati; Agarwal, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Literature reveals that masticatory load on denture bearing tissues through complete dentures should be maximum on primary stress bearing areas and least on relief area in accordance with the histology of underlying tissues. A study to validate the existing beliefs was planned to compare the pressure on mucosa using selective pressure technique and minimal pressure technique, with the incorporation of two different impression materials utilizing the pressure sensors during secondary impression procedure. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using a maxillary analog. Three pressure sensors were imbedded in the oral analog, one in the mid palatine area and the other two in the right and left ridge crest. Custom trays of two different configurations were fabricated. The two impression materials tested were light body and zinc oxide eugenol. A total of 40 impressions were made. A constant weight of 1 kg was placed, and the pressure was recorded as initial and end pressures. Results: A significant difference in the pressure produced using different impression materials was found (P < 0.001). Light body vinyl polysiloxane produced significantly lesser pressure than zinc oxide eugenol impression materials. The presence of relief did affect the magnitude of pressure at various locations. Conclusion: All impression materials produced pressure during maxillary edentulous impression making. Tray modification is an important factor in changing the amount of pressure produced. The impression materials used also had a significant role to play on the pressures acting on the tissues during impression procedure. Clinical Implication: Light body VPS impression material may be recommended to achieve minimal pressure on the denture bearing tissues in both selective as well as minimal pressure techniques. PMID:27041902

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P < 0.05). The study concluded that the

  2. Linking automatic evaluation to mood and information processing style: consequences for experienced affect, impression formation, and stereotyping.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, Tanya L; van Baaren, Rick B; Bargh, John A

    2006-02-01

    According to the feelings-as-information account, a person's mood state signals to him or her the valence of the current environment (N. Schwarz & G. Clore, 1983). However, the ways in which the environment automatically influences mood in the first place remain to be explored. The authors propose that one mechanism by which the environment influences affect is automatic evaluation, the nonconscious evaluation of environmental stimuli as good or bad. A first experiment demonstrated that repeated brief exposure to positive or negative stimuli (which leads to automatic evaluation) induces a corresponding mood in participants. In 3 additional studies, the authors showed that automatic evaluation affects information processing style. Experiment 4 showed that participants' mood mediates the effect of valenced brief primes on information processing. PMID:16478316

  3. Benefit From Directional Microphone Hearing Aids: Objective and Subjective Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Sung; Jin, Sun Hwa; Choi, Ji Eun; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to find and compare the effect of directional (DIR) processing of two different hearing aids via both subjective and objective methods, to determine the association between the results of the subjective and objective evaluations, and to find out individual predictive factors influencing the DIR benefit. Methods Twenty-six hearing aid users fitted unilaterally with each two different experimental hearing aid performed modified Korean Hearing in Noise Test (K-HINT) in three DIR conditions; omnidirectional (OMNI) mode, OMNI plus noise reduction feature, fixed DIR mode. In order to determine benefits from DIR benefit within a hearing aid and compare performance of the DIR processing between hearing aids, a subjective questionnaire was administrated on speech quality (SQ) and discomfort in noise (DN) domain. Correlation analysis of factors influencing DIR benefit was accomplished. Results Benefits from switching OMNI mode to DIR mode within both hearing aids in K-HINT were about 2.8 (standard deviation, 3.5) and 2.1 dB SNR (signal to ratio; SD, 2.5), but significant difference in K-HINT results between OMNI and OMNI plus noise reduction algorithm was not shown. The subjective evaluation resulted in the better SQ and DN scores in DIR mode than those in OMNI mode. However, the difference of scores on both SQ and DN between the two hearing aids with DIR mode was not statistically significant. Any individual factors did not significantly affect subjective and objective DIR benefits. Conclusion DIR benefit was found not only in the objective measurement performed in the laboratory but also in the subjective questionnaires, but the subjective results was failed to have significant correlation with the DIR benefit obtained in the K-HINT. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual DIR benefit were still hard to explain. PMID:26330918

  4. Airbag Impressions in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows where the rover's airbags left impressions in the martian soil. The drag marks were made after the rover successfully landed at Meridiani Planum and its airbags were retracted. The rover can be seen in the foreground.

  5. Virtual First Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2005-01-01

    Frequently, a nurse's first and only contact with a graduate school, legislator, public health official, professional organization, or school nursing colleague is made through e-mail. The format, the content, and the appearance of the e-mail create a virtual first impression. Nurses can manage their image and the image of the profession by…

  6. Impressions of Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Agnes

    2005-01-01

    I was early arriving for an appointment with the superintendent at the school where I would begin my first year as an elementary school principal. While I waited, I reflected on my first teaching job, where I had formed my first and most lasting impressions of leadership from the principal. Now it was my turn to be a principal, and I aspired to…

  7. Meteorologic factors and subjective sleep continuity: a preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Juhi; Grandner, Michael; Crittenden, Crista; Smith, Michael T.; Perlis, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken to evaluate whether environmental factors other than bright light influence the individual’s ability to initiate and maintain sleep. In the present analyses, nine meteorologic variables were evaluated for their possible relationship to self-reported sleep continuity in a sample of 43 subjects over a period of 105 days. In this preliminary analysis, high barometric pressure, low precipitation, and lower temperatures were significantly correlated with good sleep continuity. Interestingly, ambient light and lunar phase were not found to be strongly associated sleep diary measures.

  8. Meteorologic factors and subjective sleep continuity: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Juhi; Grandner, Michael; Crittenden, Crista; Smith, Michael T; Perlis, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken to evaluate whether environmental factors other than bright light influence the individual's ability to initiate and maintain sleep. In the present analyses, nine meteorologic variables were evaluated for their possible relationship to self-reported sleep continuity in a sample of 43 subjects over a period of 105 days. In this preliminary analysis, high barometric pressure, low precipitation, and lower temperatures were significantly correlated with good sleep continuity. Interestingly, ambient light and lunar phase were not found to be strongly associated sleep diary measures. PMID:15316762

  9. An Impress Method of Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawarkiewicz, Patricia

    The effectiveness of the impress method of reading instruction, in which the student and teacher read aloud simultaneously, was studied. The subjects were 24 fourth and fifth grade students from a New Jersey school, whose reading level was a year or more below grade placement (indicated by scores on a standardized achievement test) and who…

  10. Rubrics for clinical evaluation: objectifying the subjective experience.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Julie J; Stacy, Annette S

    2009-03-01

    Rubrics have historically been used in secondary and higher education to evaluate specific assignments or tasks. There is little mention of rubrics in the nursing literature, particularly in the area of clinical evaluation. A strong case can be made for expanding the traditional use of a rubric to include its validity with clinical evaluation. Clinical evaluation remains a challenge, even for seasoned faculty. Faculty and students often interpret clinical course objectives differently. Coupled with this concern is the subjectivity of the evaluation. The use of "novice" clinical faculty, who inevitably struggle with discerning and justifying anything but stellar student performance, further compounds these issues. Rubrics also facilitate the grading experience for faculty and students. Faculty often find themselves making repetitive written comments to students. These comments can be incorporated into the rubric, thus shortening grading time while increasing the quality and quantity of instructor feedback. When clarified in a rubric, course objectives become "real". Student benefits include increased critical thinking and a more realistic approach to self-evaluation. Clinical rubrics can be developed from existing course objectives. Though perhaps tedious in initial development, both faculty and student satisfaction with the clinical evaluation process can be enhanced with the use of rubrics. PMID:19083270

  11. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  12. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  13. Investigation of Method for Changing Impression of Musical Piece by Changing its Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Okamatsu, Keita; Matsuo, Kazuhisa

    We propose a simple method that changes impression of musical piece by changing its tempo and investigate psycho-physiological effects of the method with listening experiment. In the experiment, 8 subjects listened same musical pieces with various tempi, and analysis of heartbeat and Semantic-Differential method were used. In 6 out of 10 adjective pairs, inverted-U shapes were observed, and peak tempi of them were different. Moreover, “relaxed” evaluation might be related to listener's heart rate in rest. These results suggest possibility of constructing novel media player that changes impression of musical piece.

  14. A subjective evaluation of synthesized STOL airplane noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A magnitude-estimation experiment was conducted to evaluate the subjective annoyance of the noise generated by possible future turbofan STOL aircraft as compared to that of several current CTOL aircraft. In addition, some of the units used to scale the magnitude of aircraft noise were evaluated with respect to their applicability to STOL noise. Twenty test subjects rated their annoyance to a total of 119 noises over a range of 75 PNdb to 105 PNdb. Their subjective ratings were compared with acoustical analysis of the noises in terms of 28 rating scale units. The synthesized STOL noises of this experiment were found to be slightly more annoying than the conventional CTOL noises at equal levels of PNL and EPNL. Over the range of levels investigated the scaling units, with a few exceptions, were capable of predicting the points of equal annoyance for all of the noises with plus or minus 3 dB. The inclusion of duration corrections, in general, improved the predictive capabilities of the various scaling units; however, tone corrections reduced their predictive capabilities.

  15. Subjective and objective evaluation of veal lean color.

    PubMed

    Lagoda, H L; Wilson, L L; Henning, W R; Flowers, S L; Mills, E W

    2002-07-01

    Because veal lean color continues to be a primary factor that determines veal carcass value and is typically assessed by subjective means, it is important to explore objective methods for color assessment. Objective and subjective evaluations of veal flank and breast lean color were compared as predictors of longissimus lean color at 24 h postmortem. One hundred fifty special-fed Holstein veal calves were Kosher-slaughtered with blood samples collected upon exsanguination and analyzed for hematocrit and hemoglobin content. Lean color was evaluated in the flank and breast at 0, 6, 12, and 24 h postmortem. Color of the longissimus was evaluated at 6 h, when possible, and at 24 h. A panel of three trained individuals used a 5-point color standard developed in the Netherlands to visually evaluate lean color. A Minolta Chromameter CR-300 was used to obtain L*, a*, and b* values. A plant employee assigned packer grades at slaughter. Temperature and pH were also measured at each time period. Hemoglobin was more highly correlated than hematocrit with colorimeter values. Hemoglobin levels correlated well with a* values of the flank at 0 h postmortem (r = 0.52) although the correlation declined at 24 h (r = 0.30). The correlation between packer grades and 24-h visual loin color was r = 0.41. Visual loin color at 24 h postmortem was selected as the predicted variable for regression analysis. Temperature and pH did not contribute significantly to any prediction equations. The equation using breast L*, a*, and b* values at 24 h postmortem to predict 24-h loin color gave a higher prediction coefficient (R2 = 0.44) than the corresponding equation using 0-h breast values (R2 = 0.28). Objective measurement of lean color may be useful in veal carcass grading because it is more precise than subjective methods and would allow for uniformity among processing plants.

  16. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  17. Custom impression trays. Part II: Removal forces.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C; Moseley, J P

    1994-03-01

    When choosing a material for making custom impression trays, it is important to understand the forces to which the tray will be subjected during removal of the completed impression from the oral cavity. Such forces have not been recorded in the dental literature. The purpose of Part II of this three-part series was to record these forces in vitro, using two different tray-removal methods. A polymethyl methacrylate custom tray was used during this study. Results from this investigation indicated that it is easier to remove a completed impression, made with a custom tray, by a single point of anterior force application (224 N) than by force application evenly around the tray (514 N). The recorded force values from this investigation will be used in Part III of this series.

  18. You want to give a good impression? Be honest! Moral traits dominate group impression formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Sacchi, Simona; Rusconi, Patrice; Cherubini, Paolo; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that warmth and competence are core dimensions on which perceivers judge others and that warmth has a primary role at various phases of impression formation. Three studies explored whether the two components of warmth (i.e., sociability and morality) have distinct roles in predicting the global impression of social groups. In Study 1 (N= 105) and Study 2 (N= 112), participants read an immigration scenario depicting an unfamiliar social group in terms of high (vs. low) morality, sociability, and competence. In both studies, participants were asked to report their global impression of the group. Results showed that global evaluations were better predicted by morality than by sociability or competence-trait ascriptions. Study 3 (N= 86) further showed that the effect of moral traits on group global evaluations was mediated by the perception of threat. The importance of these findings for the impression-formation process is discussed.

  19. You want to give a good impression? Be honest! Moral traits dominate group impression formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Sacchi, Simona; Rusconi, Patrice; Cherubini, Paolo; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that warmth and competence are core dimensions on which perceivers judge others and that warmth has a primary role at various phases of impression formation. Three studies explored whether the two components of warmth (i.e., sociability and morality) have distinct roles in predicting the global impression of social groups. In Study 1 (N= 105) and Study 2 (N= 112), participants read an immigration scenario depicting an unfamiliar social group in terms of high (vs. low) morality, sociability, and competence. In both studies, participants were asked to report their global impression of the group. Results showed that global evaluations were better predicted by morality than by sociability or competence-trait ascriptions. Study 3 (N= 86) further showed that the effect of moral traits on group global evaluations was mediated by the perception of threat. The importance of these findings for the impression-formation process is discussed. PMID:22435848

  20. Visual Impression of Lighting from a Window and a Ceiling: a Comparison between the Compound Lighting and the Uniform Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sangpil; Ishida, Taiichiro; Iguchi, Masayuki; Iwai, Wataru

    The purpose of this study is to understand the change of impression by comparing the uniformity lighting with the compound lighting. The experiment is carried out with the two scaled-models that were supposed to be an office space. One is lit by the uniform lighting and the other by the compound lighting. Subjects were asked to evaluate the point of difference by semantic differential rating on their overall impression after comparing with two rooms. The results showed that the impressions of compound lighting were more positive score than that of uniformity lighting on the items of ‘dim-bright’, ‘dislike-like’, ‘artificial-natural’ and ‘closed-open’, and that there was no significant difference in impressions between two spaces on other items.

  1. Drug and dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Maller, Sudhakara V; Karthik, K S; Maller, Udita S; Abraham, Mathew C; Kumar, Rachuri Narendra; Manikandan, R

    2012-08-01

    Guidelines to prevent cross contamination with infectious agents have been instituted for dental clinical and laboratory procedures. However, compliance by dental offices and clinics in disinfecting impression material has not been universal. Techniques for disinfecting impression materials are spraying or immersing impression materials. These techniques can reduce the surface detail and dimensional accuracy of impressions; most disinfectants are irritants. This study reviewed whether antimicrobial activity can be achieved by mixing certain drugs with the impression material and their effects on the disinfection are achieved through such additions.

  2. Subjective probability intervals: how to reduce overconfidence by interval evaluation.

    PubMed

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost abolished when they evaluate the probability that the same intervals include the quantity. The authors successfully apply a method for adaptive adjustment of probability intervals as a debiasing tool and discuss a tentative explanation in terms of a naive sampling model. According to this view, people report their experiences accurately, but they are naive in that they treat both sample proportion and sample dispersion as unbiased estimators, yielding small bias in probability evaluation but strong bias in interval production. PMID:15521796

  3. Subjective voice quality evaluation in a satellite communications environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, E. V.; Lavalley, R. W.; Hardy, W. C.

    The development of a subjective test procedure for evaluating voice quality is described. The technical characteristics of the satellite communication system are analyzed in order to identify the factors that impair voice quality. The factors that affect the system are: (1) low volume, (2) constant noise, (3) busting noise, (4) noise on speech, (5) speech distortion, (6) incomplete words, (7) garbling, (8) mutual interpretation, and (9) echo. The communication system was rated by test callers based on the occurrence of each noise impairment, the effect of the impairments on the call quality, and the overall quality of the call. Analysis of the data reveals that it is feasible to develop a voice quality evaluation system based on electronic measurements of parameters that predict the occurrence and severity of the nine impairments.

  4. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Turetz, Meredith; Liu, Mengling; Shao, Yongzhao; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Friedman, Stephen M.; Maslow, Carey B.; Marmor, Michael; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2015-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848) from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475) from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5) and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20). Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001). In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range) R5 0.436 (0.206) versus 0.314 (0.129) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085) versus 0.004 (0.042) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001). In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05). Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms. PMID:27730155

  5. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence.

  6. Joint custody: preliminary impressions.

    PubMed

    Awad, G A

    1983-02-01

    Joint custody is currently a popular and debatable issue. It is felt that some of the controversy is due to the lack of agreement on a definition. Following some examples of the differences in personal and judicial definitions of joint custody, a classification of custody is offered. Four types of custody arrangements are described: Absolute Sole Custody, Sole Custody, Non-Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed) and Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed). A critical review of the literature follows. Finally, clinical impressions about the two types of joint custody are discussed. PMID:6839267

  7. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence. PMID:24006720

  8. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Reflecting and Diffusing Surfaces in Auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The performance of reflectors and diffusers used in auditoria have been evaluated both objectively and subjectively. Two accurate systems have been developed to measure the scattering from surfaces via the cross correlation function. These have been used to measure the scattering from plane panels, curved panels and quadratic residue diffusers (QRDs). The scattering measurements have been used to test theoretical prediction methods based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral equation. Accurate prediction methods were found for all surfaces tested. The limitations of the more approximate methods have been defined. The assumptions behind Schroeder's design of the QRD have been tested and the local reacting admittance assumption found to be valid over a wide frequency range. It was found that the QRD only produces uniform scattering at low frequencies. For an on-axis source the scattering from a curved panel was as good as from a QRD. For an oblique source the QRD produced much more uniform scattering than the curved panel. The subjective measurements evaluated the smallest perceivable change in the early sound field, the part most influenced by reflectors and diffusers. A natural sounding simulation of a concert hall field within an anechoic chamber was used. Standard objective parameters were reasonable values when compared to values found in real halls and subjective preference measurements. A difference limen was measured for early lateral energy fraction (.048 +/-.005); inter aural cross correlation (.075 +/-.008); clarity index (.67 +/-.13 dB); and centre time (8.6 +/- 1.6 ms). It was found that: (i) when changes are made to diffusers and reflectors, changes in spatial impression will usually be larger than those in clarity; and (ii) acousticians can gain most by paying attention to lateral sound in auditoria. It was also found that: (i) diffuse reflections in the early sound field

  9. Trouble-shooting dual arch impressions II.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1997-09-01

    Dual arch impression procedures can produce accurate impressions and bite registrations for the fabrication of single crowns. To accomplish this, the dentist must select an appropriately sized and shaped tray, appropriate impression material and a dual arch impression procedure suitable for each case. Dual arch impression procedures can save impression material and chair time.

  10. A physiological and subjective evaluation of meditation, hypnosis, and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R; Martin, J S; Furst, M L; Dubin, L L

    1977-01-01

    Ss were monitored for respiratory rate, pulse rate, blood pressure, skin resistance, EEG activity, and muscle activity. They were monitored during the alert state, meditation (TM or simple word type), hypnosis (relaxation and task types), and relaxation. Ss gave a verbal comparative evaluation of each state. The results showed significantly better relaxation responses for the relaxation states (relaxation, relaxation-hypnosis, meditation) than for the alert state. There were no significant differences between the relaxation states except for the measure "muscle activity" in which meditation was significantly better than the other relaxation states. Overall, there were significant differences between task-hypnosis and relaxation-hypnosis. No significant differences were found between TM and simple word meditation. For the subjective measures, relaxation-hypnosis and meditation were significantly better than relaxation, but no significant differences were found between meditation and relaxation-hypnosis.

  11. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  12. Subjective memory evaluation before and after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Hayman-Abello, Brent; Hayman-Abello, Susan; Derry, Paul; McLachlan, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Subjective memory (SM), a self-evaluation of memory, in contrast to objective memory (OM) measured by neuropsychological testing, is less well studied in patients with epilepsy. We assessed SM before and after temporal lobectomy. The Frequency of Forgetting 10 scale (FOF-10), developed to evaluate SM in dementia, was given before and one year after temporal lobectomy. Reliability and validity for use in epilepsy were first assessed. Measures of depression (CES-D) and neuroticism (PANAS) were done before and after surgery as well as complete neuropsychological assessment of OM. Correlation analysis between FOF-10 results and all the other variables was implemented. In 48 patients the FOF-10 was reliable and valid showing high internal consistency in all items (Cronbach's alpha >0.82) and high reproducibility (p<0.01). The FOF-10 also correlated with the memory assessment clinics self rating scale (MAC-S) (p<0.01). FOF-10 scores improved or were unchanged postoperatively in 28 patients (58%) and worsened in 20 (42%). The FOF-10 did not significantly correlate with memory scores from neuropsychological testing but did correlate with perceived word finding difficulty (p<0.001) and postoperative depression (p<0.05). A reduction in number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after surgery distinguished those with improved postoperative SM. No correlation was found between SM and neuroticism, side of surgery or number of seizures. The FOF-10 is a brief and reliable measure of subjective memory in patients with epilepsy. Perceived memory impairment reflects more emotional state, language problems and quantity of AEDs than actual defects in memory function. These results would potentially be useful in presurgical counselling and management of memory issues after temporal lobe surgery.

  13. Dimensional stability of autopolymerizing acrylic resin impression trays.

    PubMed

    Fehling, A W; Hesby, R A; Pelleu, G B

    1986-05-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the optimal interval between fabrication of an autopolymerizing acrylic resin custom impression tray and making a final impression. Twenty mandibular arch-shaped trays, 10 each of Fastray and Formatray resin, were evaluated for dimensional change. Both materials behaved similarly. Cross-arch contraction of the borders of buccal flanges and unilateral expansion of the borders of buccal-to-lingual flanges were observed. These changes indicate distortion. Linear dimensional changes occurred throughout 6 hours, which suggests that any impression made in a methyl methacrylate acrylic resin custom impression tray should be poured as soon as is conveniently possible. Significant linear dimensional changes were observed for only 40 minutes from the initiation of tray fabrication. This study concludes that while an aged tray is preferred, it is acceptable to make an impression in an autopolymerizing resin custom impression tray after 40 minutes.

  14. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  15. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: “metallic and unpleasant” and “powerful”. LAeq had a strong relationship with “powerful impression”, calculated sharpness was positively related to “metallic impression”, and “unpleasant impression” was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating

  16. Implant overdenture impressions using a dynamic impression concept

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Kil; Park, Sang-Hun; Lee, Cheong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic impression is a functional impression that records the functional movement of the patient's own muscle and muscle attachment. This process reduces the number of random factors. This article describes a method for making a special tray using a dynamic impression concept that was made from provisional dentures used for implant healing. The individual tray is used to make a wash-impression to record the features of the mucosa in detail. The main advantage of this technique is that it provides a functional relationship of the implant components to the supporting tissues without overextension because provisional denture had been used for 2 months and the border length of individual tray was nearly the same as that of provisional denture. The delivery of the prosthesis constructed using this impression technique is time-saving because there is no need for border molding and there are fewer post-insertion appliance adjustments. PMID:24605209

  17. Making a Great First Impression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Managers and business owners often base hiring decisions on first impressions. That is why it is so important to teach students to make a great first impression--before they go on that first job interview. Managers do not have unrealistic expectations, they just want to hire people who they believe can develop into valuable employees. A nice…

  18. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  19. Trouble-shooting dual arch impressions.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1996-02-01

    Dual arch impression techniques enable the dentist to capture an impression of the prepared tooth, the opposing teeth and the occlusal registration in one procedure. This saves chair time and impression material.

  20. Using Subjective Teacher Evaluations to Examine Principals' Personnel Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Master, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is at the center of current education policy reform. Most evaluation systems rely at least in part on principals' assessments of teachers, and their discretionary judgments carry substantial weight. However, we know relatively little about what they value when determining evaluations and high stakes personnel decisions. The…

  1. 43 CFR 3420.1-1 - Lands subject to evaluation for leasing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... 3420.1-1 Section 3420.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Competitive Leasing § 3420.1-1 Lands subject to evaluation for leasing. All lands subject to coal leasing under the mineral leasing laws are subject to evaluation under this subpart (43 CFR 3400.2)....

  2. 43 CFR 3420.1-1 - Lands subject to evaluation for leasing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 3420.1-1 Section 3420.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Competitive Leasing § 3420.1-1 Lands subject to evaluation for leasing. All lands subject to coal leasing under the mineral leasing laws are subject to evaluation under this subpart (43 CFR 3400.2)....

  3. Subjective Probability Intervals: How to Reduce Overconfidence by Interval Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost…

  4. Subjective evaluations of recent productions of television with stereophonic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A series of subjective tests were conducted to assess the improvement given by stereophonic sound with television in comparison to the conventional monophonic equivalent. The test material consisted of extracts from eight, recently produced, television stereo programs. They represented the wide range of BBC television program output and, since some types of program were new to television stereo, their production by this means was obviously experimental. Both technically and nontechnically qualified people took part in the tests but, with a few exceptions, they returned similar subjective responses. The tests showed a marked preference for the stereo presentation. Of the eight program extracts, five gained an average of two subjective grades of improvement. These items fell into the categories of music, sport and science fiction. The remaining program only benefitted marginally from stereo. The subjects' criticisms have suggested some modification of production techniques and it can be expected that as these are refined, viewers' enjoyment of television programs will be further enhanced by the television stereo presentation.

  5. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  6. A rare allergy to a polyether dental impression material.

    PubMed

    Mittermüller, Pauline; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-08-01

    Polyether impression materials have been used in dentistry for more than 40 years. Allergic reactions to these materials such as reported in the 1970s ceased after replacement of a catalyst. Very recently, however, patients have started to report symptoms that suggest a new allergic reaction from polyether impression materials. Here, we report on the results of allergy testing with polyether impression materials as well as with its components. Eight patients with clinical symptoms of a contact allergy (swelling, redness or blisters) after exposure to a polyether impression material were subjected to patch tests, two of them additionally to a prick test. A further patient with atypical symptoms of an allergy (nausea and vomiting after contact with a polyether impression material in the oral cavity) but with a history of other allergic reaction was also patch tested. The prick tests showed no immediate reactions in the two patients tested. In the patch tests, all eight patients with typical clinical symptoms showed positive reactions to the mixed polyether impression materials, to the base paste or to a base paste component. The patient with the atypical clinical symptoms did not show any positive patch test reactions. Polyether impression materials may evoke type IV allergic reactions. The causative agent was a component of the base paste. In consideration of the widespread use of this impression material (millions of applications per year) and in comparison to the number of adverse reactions from other dental materials, the number of such allergic reactions is very low. In very scarce cases, positive allergic reactions to polyether impression materials are possible.

  7. Effects of Exposure to Advertisements on Audience Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Mie; Kasuga, Masao; Nagao, Yoshihide; Shono, Toru; Norose, Yuka; Oku, Ritsuya; Nogami, Akira; Miyazawa, Yoshitaka

    This study investigated effects of listening and/or watching commercial-messages (CMs) on audience impressions. We carried out experiments of TV advertisements presentation in conditions of audio only, video only, and audio-video. As results, we confirmed the following two effects: image-multiple effect, that is, the audience brings to mind various images that are not directly expressed in the content, and marking-up effect, that is, the audience concentrates on some images that are directly expressed in the content. The image-multiple effect, in particular, strongly appeared under the audio only condition. Next, we investigated changes in the following seven subjective responses; usage image, experience, familiarity, exclusiveness, feeling at home, affection, and willingness to buy, after exposure to advertisements under conditions of audio only and audio-video. As a result, noting that the image-multiple effect became stronger as the evaluation scores of the responses increased.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  13. Evaluation of Occupational Cold Environments: Field Measurements and Subjective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, A. Virgílio M.; GASPAR, Adélio R.; RAIMUNDO, António M.; QUINTELA, Divo A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study. PMID:24583510

  14. Evaluation of occupational cold environments: field measurements and subjective analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Virgílio M; Gaspar, Adélio R; Raimundo, António M; Quintela, Divo A

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study.

  15. Evaluating the Role of Content in Subjective Video Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Vrgovic, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Video quality as perceived by human observers is the ground truth when Video Quality Assessment (VQA) is in question. It is dependent on many variables, one of them being the content of the video that is being evaluated. Despite the evidence that content has an impact on the quality score the sequence receives from human evaluators, currently available VQA databases mostly comprise of sequences which fail to take this into account. In this paper, we aim to identify and analyze differences between human cognitive, affective, and conative responses to a set of videos commonly used for VQA and a set of videos specifically chosen to include video content which might affect the judgment of evaluators when perceived video quality is in question. Our findings indicate that considerable differences exist between the two sets on selected factors, which leads us to conclude that videos starring a different type of content than the currently employed ones might be more appropriate for VQA. PMID:24523643

  16. Automated Tools for Subject Matter Expert Evaluation of Automated Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David M.; Bejar, Isaac I.; Sax, Anne

    2004-01-01

    As automated scoring of complex constructed-response examinations reaches operational status, the process of evaluating the quality of resultant scores, particularly in contrast to scores of expert human graders, becomes as complex as the data itself. Using a vignette from the Architectural Registration Examination (ARE), this article explores the…

  17. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  18. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  19. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    PubMed

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms. PMID:17202022

  20. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    PubMed

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  1. Effects of Music on Image Impression and Relationship between Impression and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keiko; Mitsukura, Yasue

    Auditory information plays an integral role in AV media because even identical images are perceived differently when they are matched with different music. However, we now present a few studies in which the changes in subjective perceptions were analyzed on the basis of the physical properties of the perceived items. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music on image impression in terms of the physical properties of images. In this paper, we first elucidate the changes in subjective impressions when the image is presented by itself and when it is presented with music. Secondly, to clarify the relation between the impression of an image or music and physical properties, we compare the different image or music perceptions with each other and also compare their respective physical properties, which include color information, structural information, and frequency characteristics. As a result, the color information of an image containing green or saturation colors and the power of the music were strongly correlated with adjectives expressing activity. Moreover, the entropy of saturation correlated with words expressing spatial extent.

  2. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  3. 47 CFR 73.7001 - Services subject to evaluation by point system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services subject to evaluation by point system... Educational Channels, and for Certain Applications for Noncommercial Educational Stations on Non-Reserved Channels § 73.7001 Services subject to evaluation by point system. (a) A point system will be used...

  4. How do children form impressions of persons? They average.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, C; Franz, C M; Hoving, K L

    1975-05-01

    The experiment reported was concerned with impression formation in children. Twelve subjects in each of Grades K, 2, 4, and 6 rated several sets of single trait words and trait pairs. The response scale consisted of a graded series of seven schematic faces which ranged from a deep frown to a happy smile. A basic question was whether children use an orderly integration rule in forming impressions of trait pairs. The answer was clear. At all grade levels a simple averaging model adequately accounted for pair ratings. A second question concerned how children resolve semantic inconsistencies. Responses to two highly inconsistent trait pairs suggested that subjects responded in the same fashion, essentially averaging the two traits in a pair. Overall, the data strongly supported an averaging model, and indicated that impression formation of children is similar to previous results obtained from adults. PMID:21287081

  5. How do children form impressions of persons? They average.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, C; Franz, C M; Hoving, K L

    1975-05-01

    The experiment reported was concerned with impression formation in children. Twelve subjects in each of Grades K, 2, 4, and 6 rated several sets of single trait words and trait pairs. The response scale consisted of a graded series of seven schematic faces which ranged from a deep frown to a happy smile. A basic question was whether children use an orderly integration rule in forming impressions of trait pairs. The answer was clear. At all grade levels a simple averaging model adequately accounted for pair ratings. A second question concerned how children resolve semantic inconsistencies. Responses to two highly inconsistent trait pairs suggested that subjects responded in the same fashion, essentially averaging the two traits in a pair. Overall, the data strongly supported an averaging model, and indicated that impression formation of children is similar to previous results obtained from adults.

  6. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  7. How Sexual Orientation and Physical Attractiveness Affect Impressions of Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Donald; And Others

    Stereotyped impressions of male homosexuals and the underlying importance of sexuality in social attraction and perceptions were investigated. Male (N=80) and female (N=80) college students responded to either an attractive or an unattractive photo of a male stimulus person, who was identified to half of the subjects as a homosexual. Compared to…

  8. Design, Implementation, and Opening to the Public of an Impression-Based Music Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Tadahiko; Ohta, Kimiko

    Impression-based music retrieval helps users in finding musical pieces that suit their preferences, feelings, or mental states from the huge volume of a music database. We have therefore developed an impression-based music retrieval system that enables this. Users are asked to select one or more pairs of impression words from the multiple pairs presented by the system and estimate each of the selected pairs on a seven-step scale in order to input their impressions into the system. For instance, if they want to locate musical pieces that will create a happy impression, they should check the radio button ``Happy'' in the impression scale, ``Very happy -- Happy -- A little happy -- Neutral -- A little sad -- Sad -- Very sad,'' where a pair of impression words with a seven-step scale is called an ``impression scale'' in this paper. The system would measure the distance between the impressions of every musical piece in a user-specified music database and the impressions inputted by the user, and determine candidate musical pieces to be presented as retrieval results. In this paper, we define the form of vectors that numerically express impressions of musical pieces, and propose a method of generating such a vector from a musical piece. The most significant attribute of this method is that it uses n-gram statistics of information on pitch, strength, and length of every tone in that musical piece as features extracted from it. We also present the results of evaluating the performance of the system.

  9. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces.

  10. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces. PMID:24897907

  11. Normative perceptions and past-year consequences as predictors of subjective evaluations and weekly drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jennifer E; Read, Jennifer P; Colder, Craig R

    2013-11-01

    Problem drinking during the college years continues to be an important area of study. Subjective evaluations of consequences have recently been demonstrated to predict future drinking behavior; however, what predicts those evaluations is yet unknown. Social Learning Theory (SLT) provides a guiding framework in this study. Primary aims are to investigate whether individual differences in past experience with alcohol consequences and normative perceptions of alcohol consequences predict subjective evaluations (i.e., the extent to which consequences are perceived as negative, aversive, or severe) and weekly drinking behavior. We also test whether evaluations mediate the influence of past consequences and norms on weekly drinking behavior. Following a baseline assessment, participants (N = 96 regularly drinking college students, 52% female) completed ten weekly web-based surveys on previous week alcohol use, consequences, and subjective evaluations of those consequences. A series of hierarchical linear models were used to test hypotheses. Most mediational pathways were not supported - weekly level evaluations do not appear to fully explain the effect of norms or past experience on weekly level drinking behavior. However, results demonstrated that normative perceptions of and past experience with consequences were associated with both weekly drinking behavior and subjective evaluations, and evaluations remained significant predictors of alcohol use behavior after accounting for these important between-person influences. Findings support the importance placed by SLT on cognition in drinking behavior, and suggest that norms for consequences and subjective evaluations may be appropriate targets of intervention in college students.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be placed... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  15. Subjective Performance Evaluation in the Public Sector: Evidence from School Inspections. CEE DP 135

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Iftikhar

    2012-01-01

    Performance measurement in the public sector is largely based on objective metrics, which may be subject to gaming behaviour. This paper investigates a novel subjective performance evaluation system where independent inspectors visit schools at very short notice, publicly disclose their findings and sanction schools rated fail. First, I…

  16. Evaluating Interventions for Young Gifted Children Using Single-Subject Methodology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Rosalind L.; Kemp, Coral

    2013-01-01

    Single-subject experimental designs have long been used in special education to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for exceptional children. However, the design has not been used widely in gifted education. In this article, an overview of the main features of single-subject design is presented, and its potential for application in gifted…

  17. Formal Operational Reasoning and the Primacy Effect in Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmquist, Wendy Jean

    1979-01-01

    Results showed that when information about a target individual was presented in two internally consistent blocks which were mutually contradictory, impressions produced by concrete operational adolescents contained a significantly greater proportion of evaluative statements in the same evaluative direction as the first block of information…

  18. An Improved Correlation between Impression and Uniaxial Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Miranda, Pedro; Becher, Paul F

    2006-01-01

    A semiempirical correlation between impression and uniaxial creep has been established by Hyde et al. [Int. J. Mech. Sci. 35, 451 (1993) ] using finite element results for materials exhibiting general power-law creep with the stress exponent n in the range 2 {<=} n {<=} 15. Here, we derive the closed-form solution for a special case of viscoelastic materials, i.e., n = 1, subjected to impression creep and obtain the exact correlation between impression and uniaxial creep. This analytical solution serves as a checkpoint for the finite element results. We then perform finite element analyses for the general case to derive a semiempirical correlation, which agrees well with both analytical viscoelastic results and the existing experimental data. Our improved correlation agrees with the correlation of Hyde et al. for n {>=} 4, and the difference increases with decreasing n for n<4.

  19. Evaluation of Subjective Measurement Systems with Focus on Workmanship Scratches and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Jesse

    2011-02-24

    The presence of workmanship defects at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) is not a new problem nor is it an easy one to remedy. The lack of well defined parameters, subjective evaluations, and operator dependency makes this problem difficult to analyze. At the time of project assignment, workmanship defects comprised approximately 50% of all non-conformance reports for internally produced products. Not all of these non-conformances result in product rejections, thus inferring that inconsistency in evaluations were present. The purpose of this study was to identify a method for evaluating an operator’s ability to properly characterize subjective defects. Since the scope of the project was limited to no funding, scratch depth was selected as the only criteria to evaluate. It was determined that the introduction of a reference standard coupled with a predefined gate-sorting technique approved by the customer can statistically improve an operators ability to perform subjective evaluations.

  20. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  1. Impression creep characterization of TiAl weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.S.; Aikin, R.M. Sr.; Martin, P.L.; Patterson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Impression Creep technique has been applied to XD{trademark} TiAl weldments to evaluate the local creep resistance of the fusion zone and the heat affected zone. The material used in this study was TiAl produced by Martin Marietta Research Laboratories, using their patented ingot processing which incorporates 1 to 10 {mu}m diameter particles of carbide, nitride or boride compounds. The impression creep technique uses a small indenter to locally evaluate the creep resistance of the heterogeneous microstructure developed during the welding process. The indenters used in this investigation were 1 mm in diameter. Results obtained from the impression creep tests are compared to results obtained from constant stress tensile creep tests on the base material. Creep resistance of the heat affected zone and the fusion zone are compared to and contrasted with the base material strength. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Building the edentulous impression--a layering technique using multiple viscosities of impression material.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph; Lobel, William; Garcia, Lily T; Monarres, Alfonso; Hammesfahr, Paul D

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a novel impression technique. The procedure demonstrates a building, or layering, method of impression making that maintains the integrity between layers of the impression materials of varying viscosities and controls the path of insertion, minimizing the incidence of overextension. To build a detailed impression of the tissue-bearing surfaces, the clinician selects the proper viscosity of impression material based on the diagnosed tissue condition.

  3. The Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Multichannel Expansion in Wide Dynamic Range Compression Hearing Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plyler, Patrick N.; Lowery, Kristy J.; Hamby, Hilary M.; Trine, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of multichannel expansion on the objective and subjective evaluation of 20 listeners fitted binaurally with 4-channel, digital in-the-ear hearing instruments were investigated. Method: Objective evaluations were conducted in quiet using the Connected Speech Test (CST) and in noise using the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) at 40,…

  4. Clinical success rates for polyether crown impressions when mixed dynamically and statically.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, Marc; Johnson, Glen H; Faggion, Clovis; Klose, Christina; Mitov, Gergo; Nothdurft, Frank P; Pospiech, Peter R; Rammelsberg, Peter; Ohlmann, Brigitte; Schwarz, Stefanie; Stober, Thomas; Schiller, Petra; Pritsch, Maria

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare success rates of dual-viscosity impressions for two types of mixing techniques of the polyether elastomeric impression material. Additionally, influencing parameters on the success rates should be evaluated. The expectation was that there would be no difference between the success rates for the two mixing techniques. Two centres enrolled 290 subjects (727 teeth) into the trial. Patients were randomized for the two types of mixing techniques. One step, dual-viscosity impressions were made with either statically mixed Impregum Soft tray material (SAM) or dynamically mixed Impregum Penta H DuoSoft (DMM). Low viscosity Impregum Garant L DuoSoft was used for both groups. Gingival displacement involved the use of two braided cords. Full-arch trays were used exclusively. Both critical defects and operator errors were assessed for the first impression taken by trained dentists. The primary outcome was impression success. For comparison of the two mixing techniques, the odds ratio for success and the corresponding one-sided 95% confidence interval was calculated by a logistic regression model. To account for the dependence between several teeth within one patient, the method of general estimating equations was used. The overall impression success rate was 35.4%. Both mixing techniques showed equal success rates indicated by an OR of 1.0 and a lower limit of the one-sided 95% confidence interval of 0.71. Using this result to develop the corresponding interval for the difference, it could be shown that the success rate using SAM was at most 8.2% lower than that when using DMM with a probability of 95%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of other potential influencing factors showed position of finish line (p = 0.008, supra compared to mixed), blood coagulation disorder (p = 0.021) and the level of training of the clinician (student vs dentist, p=0.008) to have an independent influence on the success rate. Dynamic mechanical

  5. Valence processing of first impressions in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chi-Lin; Wang, Min-Ying; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2016-05-25

    Previous studies have suggested that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) plays a central role in processing first impressions; however, little is known about how dmPFC processes different valences of first impressions. Moreover, it is still unclear as to whether the dmPFC shows lateralization or only induces different levels of activation when processing positive and negative impressions. To address these questions in the present study, the brain activities for the impression judgments expressed by participants were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. For each real facial picture, participants were asked to evaluate their first impressions on a scale from 'bad' to 'good' using a keyboard. The results showed that although the right dmPFC has a higher sensitivity in processing impressions, both the hemispheres of dmPFC showed a significant trend where the activation of positive impressions was higher than the negative ones. Accordingly, it is proposed that the dmPFC acts as a single mechanism responsible for delineating the processing of first impressions rather than two lateralized systems. Therefore, a 'positivity dominance hypothesis' is also proposed, which states that dmPFC in both hemispheres have a higher sensitivity and priority for positive impressions than negative ones. The present study provides valuable findings with respect to the role of the dmPFC in the processes of first impression formation. PMID:27035730

  6. Valence processing of first impressions in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chi-Lin; Wang, Min-Ying; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2016-05-25

    Previous studies have suggested that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) plays a central role in processing first impressions; however, little is known about how dmPFC processes different valences of first impressions. Moreover, it is still unclear as to whether the dmPFC shows lateralization or only induces different levels of activation when processing positive and negative impressions. To address these questions in the present study, the brain activities for the impression judgments expressed by participants were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. For each real facial picture, participants were asked to evaluate their first impressions on a scale from 'bad' to 'good' using a keyboard. The results showed that although the right dmPFC has a higher sensitivity in processing impressions, both the hemispheres of dmPFC showed a significant trend where the activation of positive impressions was higher than the negative ones. Accordingly, it is proposed that the dmPFC acts as a single mechanism responsible for delineating the processing of first impressions rather than two lateralized systems. Therefore, a 'positivity dominance hypothesis' is also proposed, which states that dmPFC in both hemispheres have a higher sensitivity and priority for positive impressions than negative ones. The present study provides valuable findings with respect to the role of the dmPFC in the processes of first impression formation.

  7. [Influence of the type of impression material, impression tray and making impression technology on the dimensional accuracy and depth of impression material penetration into "gingival sulcus". In vitro study].

    PubMed

    Riakhovskiĭ, A N; Muradov, M A

    2005-01-01

    Results of the profound study of influence of the type of impression material, impression tray and making impression technology upon main quality characteristics of the precise impression (dimensional accuracy and depth of impression material penetration into gingival sulcus) are reviewed. Original method to investigate depth of impression material penetration into gingival sulcus on experimental model is described. The impression technology exercises more influence on quality characteristics of the precise impression than type of the used material and impression tray. Optimal combination of different viscosity impression materials with technology of making impression has been defined.

  8. Empirical impression technique for artificial eye fitting.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, J A; Hughes, M O

    1990-01-01

    Using an impression of the anophthalmic socket to facilitate the design of an artificial eye is common practice today. The Modified Impression technique was described in the American Journal of Ophthalmology, February 1969, by Lee Allen and Howard E. Webster. It is a highly successful method that involves taking an impression of the socket using an impression tray, then making a wax casting of the impression, and final modifications to the anterior aspect of the wax model. A different technique has been in use in our office and elsewhere for more than 15 years, also with a high degree of success. We've dubbed it the "Empirical/Impression" method. It involves similar steps to the Modified Impression system, but in different order: first a wax model of the anterior aspect of the eye is designed and modified; second, an impression is made of the socket, using this wax model as an impression tray. The primary advantage of this method is efficiency. It involves one less laboratory procedure, hence making a "one-day custom eye" a reality. Although this process can be used in almost any case, the Modified Impression technique may work better for certain highly irregular sockets where "reading" the fornices by empirical means may be difficult. Either method requires a highly skilled and experienced fitter to make appropriate modifications to the anterior aspect of the prosthesis.

  9. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity. PMID:26558615

  10. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity.

  11. Enhancing the authenticity of assessments through grounding in first impressions.

    PubMed

    Humă, Bogdana

    2015-09-01

    This article examines first impressions through a discursive and interactional lens. Until now, social psychologists have studied first impressions in laboratory conditions, in isolation from their natural environment, thus overseeing their discursive roles as devices for managing situated interactional concerns. I examine fragments of text and talk in which individuals spontaneously invoke first impressions of other persons as part of assessment activities in settings where the authenticity of speakers' stances might be threatened: (1) in activities with inbuilt evaluative components and (2) in sequential contexts where recipients have been withholding affiliation to speakers' actions. I discuss the relationship between authenticity, as a type of credibility issue related to intersubjective trouble, and the characteristics of first impression assessments, which render them useful for dealing with this specific credibility concern. I identify four features of first impression assessments which make them effective in enhancing authenticity: witness positioning (Potter, 1996, Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric and social construction, Sage, London), (dis)location in time and space, automaticity, and extreme formulations (Edwards, 2003, Analyzing race talk: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the research interview, Cambridge University Press, New York).

  12. A comparison of the effects of different methods of impression build-up on earmoulds.

    PubMed

    Macrae, J H

    1991-06-01

    An investigation was carried out into effects of three types of impression build-up (patting down of impressions, special earmould-maker build-up and the multistage impression technique) on the dimensions, static pressure seal, degree of acoustic seal and the subjective tightness and comfort of earmoulds. Patting down the impression significantly improved the degree of acoustic seal provided by earmoulds without making them feel tighter or less comfortable. However, special build-up was much more effective than patting down and the multistage impression technique was slightly more effective than special build-up in improving the degree of acoustic seal. The improvement in acoustic seal provided by both multistage and specially built-up earmoulds can usually be obtained without an unacceptable level of discomfort. Patting down the impression did not improve the chance of obtaining a static pressure seal. Special build-up of the impression by the earmould-maker significantly increased the proportion of earmoulds which provided a static pressure seal but an even higher proportion of earmoulds made from multistage impressions provided a seal. Dimension results indicated that an increase in earmould-maker build-up of the minor axis at the beginning of the canal segment of the impression would improve the acoustic seal provided by specially built-up earmoulds and that earmoulds with rounder tips are more likely to provide a static pressure seal than earmoulds with more elliptical tips. The better the impression material fills the ear canal, the rounder the tip of the impression, and the rounder the tip of the earmould made from the impression.

  13. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Part 1: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; Bradley, D V; Hilton, T J; Kruse, S K

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of four disinfectants for irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Impressions were made of a sterile metal model of the maxillary arch that had been contaminated with one of the following bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium bovis, or Bacillus subtilis. The impressions were cultured before and after immersion in one of the following disinfectants: lodofive, OMC II, 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, or Alcide LD. Alcide LD achieved a 4-log10 (99.99%) or greater reduction in colony forming units for all five organisms plus mixed oral flora. Sodium hypochlorite achieved a 4-log10 reduction in three of the five organisms and mixed oral flora. Iodofive and OMC II were ineffective against all test organisms and mixed oral flora. PMID:7802909

  14. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Part 1: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; Bradley, D V; Hilton, T J; Kruse, S K

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of four disinfectants for irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Impressions were made of a sterile metal model of the maxillary arch that had been contaminated with one of the following bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium bovis, or Bacillus subtilis. The impressions were cultured before and after immersion in one of the following disinfectants: lodofive, OMC II, 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, or Alcide LD. Alcide LD achieved a 4-log10 (99.99%) or greater reduction in colony forming units for all five organisms plus mixed oral flora. Sodium hypochlorite achieved a 4-log10 reduction in three of the five organisms and mixed oral flora. Iodofive and OMC II were ineffective against all test organisms and mixed oral flora.

  15. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition.

  16. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition. PMID:26302673

  17. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in impression materials and stock edentulous impression trays have resulted in simplified approaches to impression making in removable prosthodontics. Once considered an absolute necessity, it is now possible to avoid the need for custom impression trays. In an effort to achieve reliable master casts in a single appointment, new and innovative procedures are now available. This article, the first in a 3-part series, will review historical information, basic concepts, materials considerations, and philosophic approaches to impression making in complete-denture therapy. A modem technique using readily available impression materials will be described and illustrated so readers can consider the benefits of incorporation into their daily management of edentulous patients.

  18. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: Edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2009-02-01

    Recent advances in impression materials and stock edentulous impression trays have resulted in simplified approaches to impression making in removable prosthodontics. Once considered an absolute necessity, it is now possible to avoid the need for custom impression trays. In an effort to achieve reliable master casts in a single appointment, new and innovative procedures are now available. This article, the first in a 3-part series, will review historical information, basic concepts, materials considerations, and philosophic approaches to impression making in complete-denture therapy. A modern technique using readily available impression materials will be described and illustrated so readers can consider the benefits of incorporation into their daily management of edentulous patients.

  19. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (P<.05). In three-dimensional analysis, the biggest difference was seen between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P<.05). The second premolar showed significantly bigger three-dimensional deviations than the second molar in the three-dimensional deviations (P>.05). PMID:26816576

  20. A fuzzy MCDM model with objective and subjective weights for evaluating service quality in hotel industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoraghi, Nima; Amiri, Maghsoud; Talebi, Golnaz; Zowghi, Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (FMCDM) model by integrating both subjective and objective weights for ranking and evaluating the service quality in hotels. The objective method selects weights of criteria through mathematical calculation, while the subjective method uses judgments of decision makers. In this paper, we use a combination of weights obtained by both approaches in evaluating service quality in hotel industries. A real case study that considered ranking five hotels is illustrated. Examples are shown to indicate capabilities of the proposed method.

  1. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: Immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2007-09-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (ie, immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  2. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (i.e., immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  3. Testing thermal comfort of trekking boots: an objective and subjective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arezes, P M; Neves, M M; Teixeira, S F; Leão, C P; Cunha, J L

    2013-07-01

    The study of the thermal comfort of the feet when using a specific type of shoe is of paramount importance, in particular if the main goal of the study is to attend to the needs of users. The main aim of this study was to propose a test battery for thermal comfort analysis and to apply it to the analysis of trekking boots. Methodologically, the project involves both objective and subjective evaluations. An objective evaluation of the thermal properties of the fabrics used in the boots was developed and applied. In addition, the thermal comfort provided when using the boots was also assessed both subjective and objectively. The evaluation of the thermal comfort during use, which was simulated in a laboratory environment, included the measurement of the temperature and moisture of the feet. The subjective assessment was performed using a questionnaire. From the results obtained, it was possible to define an optimal combination of fabrics to apply to trekking boots by considering the provided thermal insulation, air permeability and wicking. The results also revealed that the subjective perception of thermal comfort appears to be more related to the increase in temperature of the feet than to the moisture retention inside the boot. Although the evaluation of knits used in the boots indicated that a particular combination of fibres was optimal for use in the inner layer, the subjective and objective evaluation of thermal comfort revealed that the evaluation provided by users did not necessarily match the technical assessment data. No correlation was observed between the general comfort and specific thermal comfort assessments. Finally, the identification of thermal discomfort by specific foot areas would be useful in the process of designing and developing boots.

  4. A single-subject approach to evaluating vehicle safety belt reminders: Back to basics

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Thomas D.; Geller, E. Scott

    1991-01-01

    A single-subject ABA reversal design was applied to evaluate the effectiveness of a limited 8-s safety belt reminder system and two modified reminder systems (a delayed and second reminder) to increase the safety belt use of 13 drivers. The research was conducted with a specially equipped research vehicle that permitted the manipulation of different safety belt reminder stimuli and the unobtrusive recording of a driver's belt use. For 2 subjects, the limited 8-s reminder increased safety belt use. For another 2 subjects, the second reminder markedly increased belt use. Some subjects were uninfluenced by the reminder systems presented; others always buckled up during both baseline and intervention conditions. The approach and results are discussed with regard to the application of behavior analysis methodologies (e.g., cumulative records) and principles (e.g., schedules of reinforcement) to advance the utility and investigation of safety belt reminder systems. PMID:16795740

  5. Light-polymerized materials for custom impression trays.

    PubMed

    Wirz, J; Jaeger, K; Schmidli, F

    1990-01-01

    Custom trays are indispensable for making impressions with elastomeric products. Previous studies have demonstrated that certain autopolymerized materials are particularly suitable, but had some limitations. The recently introduced halogen-light-polymerized resins permit fabrication of custom trays that have the needed physical properties for accuracy and strength. No storage period is necessary for completion of polymerization, and the trays are not subject to distortion in moisture, making them suitable for use in the electroforming of casts.

  6. Subjective Outcome and Objective Outcome Evaluation Findings: Insights from a Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: As there are few studies examining the relationship between subjective and objective outcome evaluation findings, this study investigated the linkage between these two types of outcomes in the Chinese culture. Method: In an experimental study, 3,298 Chinese secondary school students responded to the Chinese Positive Youth Development…

  7. Forensic Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations: Assessing Subjectivity and Bias in Professional Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Mark D.; Sandoval, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluators examining the same evidence often arrive at substantially different conclusions in forensic assessments of child sexual abuse (CSA). This study attempts to identify and quantify subjective factors that contribute to such disagreements so that interventions can be devised to improve the reliability of case decisions. Methods:…

  8. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05). In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings. PMID:25878678

  9. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1.

  10. The effect of tray selection on the accuracy of elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G E; Johnson, G H; Drennon, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of reproduction of stone casts made from impressions using different tray and impression materials. The tray materials used were an acrylic resin, a thermoplastic, and a plastic. The impression materials used were an additional silicone, a polyether, and a polysulfide. Impressions were made of a stainless steel master die that simulated crown preparations for a fixed partial denture and an acrylic resin model with cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks in stainless steel that typify clinical intra-arch distances. Impressions of the fixed partial denture simulation were made with all three impression materials and all three tray types. Impressions of the cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks were made by using all three tray types with only the addition reaction silicone impression material. Impressions were poured at 1 hour with a type IV dental stone. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA with a sample size of five. Results indicated that custom-made trays of acrylic resin and the thermoplastic material performed similarly regarding die accuracy and produced clinically acceptable casts. The stock plastic tray consistently produced casts with greater dimensional change than the two custom trays. PMID:2404101

  11. Effect of impression material on surface reactive layer when casting pure titanium in phosphate investment.

    PubMed

    Komasa, Y; Moriguchi, A; Asai, M; Nezumi, M; Kakimoto, K; Gonda, Y

    1998-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of impression materials used in preparation of pure titanium castings on the surface reactive layer. Surface roughness of the refractory models before and after firing was smaller when silicone rather than agar impression material was used. The surface roughness of castings prepared with T-invest varied little with the impression material. However, the surface roughness of the castings prepared with CD Titaninvest was less when silicone impression material was used. Surface hardness of the castings was slightly greater when agar impression material was used, and metallic texture analysis of the surface of the castings showed a chill layer and a columnar crystal layer extending from the surface toward the interior. A relatively non-corroded white layer and a markedly corroded black layer were observed in the chill layer, and their thickness was smaller when silicone impression material was used. Use of the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) to determine distribution of various elements in the superficial layer of the casting plates showed that the reactive layer contained less P and Si when silicone impression material was used rather than agar. NH4H2 PO4, which is a component of the bonding material in the investment, was present at a high concentration in the superficial layer of the agar impression material. This shows the importance of preparing refractory models with a non-water-absorbing impression material to obtain pure titanium casting plates with a smaller reactive layer.

  12. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging. PMID:25244469

  13. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging.

  14. Individualized impression trays from existing complete dentures.

    PubMed

    McArthur, D R

    1980-11-01

    This technique can be used to avoid the making of preliminary impressions for complete dentures in patients with abnormally small oral openings. With this method, the patient must have existing dentures, and the border extensions must be adequate to serve as individualized impression trays.

  15. Imaging first impressions: distinct neural processing of verbal and nonverbal social information.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Bente, Gary; von Cramon, D Yves; Schilbach, Leonhard; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Vogeley, Kai

    2012-03-01

    First impressions profoundly influence our attitudes and behavior toward others. However, little is known about whether and to what degree the cognitive processes that underlie impression formation depend on the domain of the available information about the target person. To investigate the neural bases of the influence of verbal as compared to nonverbal information on interpersonal judgments, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal parametrically increased with increasing strength of evaluation based on either short text vignettes or mimic and gestural behavior. While for verbal stimuli the increasing strength of subjective evaluation was correlated with increased neural activation of precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PC/PCC), a similar effect was observed for nonverbal stimuli in the amygdala. These findings support the assumption that qualitatively different cognitive operations underlie person evaluation depending upon the stimulus domain: while the processing of nonverbal person information may be more strongly associated with affective processing as indexed by recruitment of the amygdala, verbal person information engaged the PC/PCC that has been related to social inferential processing. PMID:22227133

  16. Imaging first impressions: distinct neural processing of verbal and nonverbal social information.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Bente, Gary; von Cramon, D Yves; Schilbach, Leonhard; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Vogeley, Kai

    2012-03-01

    First impressions profoundly influence our attitudes and behavior toward others. However, little is known about whether and to what degree the cognitive processes that underlie impression formation depend on the domain of the available information about the target person. To investigate the neural bases of the influence of verbal as compared to nonverbal information on interpersonal judgments, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal parametrically increased with increasing strength of evaluation based on either short text vignettes or mimic and gestural behavior. While for verbal stimuli the increasing strength of subjective evaluation was correlated with increased neural activation of precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PC/PCC), a similar effect was observed for nonverbal stimuli in the amygdala. These findings support the assumption that qualitatively different cognitive operations underlie person evaluation depending upon the stimulus domain: while the processing of nonverbal person information may be more strongly associated with affective processing as indexed by recruitment of the amygdala, verbal person information engaged the PC/PCC that has been related to social inferential processing.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of subject thickness on the exposure index in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Takeshi; Takeda, Kazuki; Murakami, Seiichi; Ogawa, Haruhisa; Ogawa, Masato; Sakamoto, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The exposure index (EI) was proposed as a new X-ray dose index by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and has since been implemented as an international standard. The EI is calculated by use of an approximation equation under IEC-specified calibration conditions. However, several factors encountered in clinical practice, including the patient's body thickness and the tube voltage, differ with regard to these calibration conditions. We, therefore, require a solid water phantom-based function that can incorporate the IEC-specified conditions and different subject thicknesses to evaluate the effects of subject thickness on the EI. Here, we assumed average thicknesses of 10 cm for a child, 15 cm for slender patients, and 21 cm for an average adult abdomen and we evaluated errors, that are included in the EI, which were calculated by use of the function. Our results suggested that the EI depends on the subject thickness. At the 21-cm thickness (average adult abdomen), the display EI exhibited a small error level. In contrast, EI values calculated from the calibration conditions exhibited maximum errors that were as high as 34 % at the lower subject thicknesses (10 and 15 cm), suggesting a significant influence of the subject thickness on the EI. In conclusion, the EI should be used cautiously during the examination of children and thin patients, with a complete understanding of the discrepancy revealed by our study results.

  18. Mental workload and cognitive task automaticity: an evaluation of subjective and time estimation metrics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wickens, C D

    1994-11-01

    The evaluation of mental workload is becoming increasingly important in system design and analysis. The present study examined the structure and assessment of mental workload in performing decision and monitoring tasks by focusing on two mental workload measurements: subjective assessment and time estimation. The task required the assignment of a series of incoming customers to the shortest of three parallel service lines displayed on a computer monitor. The subject was either in charge of the customer assignment (manual mode) or was monitoring an automated system performing the same task (automatic mode). In both cases, the subjects were required to detect the non-optimal assignments that they or the computer had made. Time pressure was manipulated by the experimenter to create fast and slow conditions. The results revealed a multi-dimensional structure of mental workload and a multi-step process of subjective workload assessment. The results also indicated that subjective workload was more influenced by the subject's participatory mode than by the factor of task speed. The time estimation intervals produced while performing the decision and monitoring tasks had significantly greater length and larger variability than those produced while either performing no other tasks or performing a well practised customer assignment task. This result seemed to indicate that time estimation was sensitive to the presence of perceptual/cognitive demands, but not to response related activities to which behavioural automaticity has developed.

  19. Subjective audio quality evaluation of embedded-optimization-based distortion precompensation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Defraene, Bruno; van Waterschoot, Toon; Diehl, Moritz; Moonen, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Subjective audio quality evaluation experiments have been conducted to assess the performance of embedded-optimization-based precompensation algorithms for mitigating perceptible linear and nonlinear distortion in audio signals. It is concluded with statistical significance that the perceived audio quality is improved by applying an embedded-optimization-based precompensation algorithm, both in case (i) nonlinear distortion and (ii) a combination of linear and nonlinear distortion is present. Moreover, a significant positive correlation is reported between the collected subjective and objective PEAQ audio quality scores, supporting the validity of using PEAQ to predict the impact of linear and nonlinear distortion on the perceived audio quality. PMID:27475197

  20. Subjective audio quality evaluation of embedded-optimization-based distortion precompensation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Defraene, Bruno; van Waterschoot, Toon; Diehl, Moritz; Moonen, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Subjective audio quality evaluation experiments have been conducted to assess the performance of embedded-optimization-based precompensation algorithms for mitigating perceptible linear and nonlinear distortion in audio signals. It is concluded with statistical significance that the perceived audio quality is improved by applying an embedded-optimization-based precompensation algorithm, both in case (i) nonlinear distortion and (ii) a combination of linear and nonlinear distortion is present. Moreover, a significant positive correlation is reported between the collected subjective and objective PEAQ audio quality scores, supporting the validity of using PEAQ to predict the impact of linear and nonlinear distortion on the perceived audio quality.

  1. MRI evaluation of brain iron in earlier- and later-onset Parkinson's disease and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Bartzokis, G; Cummings, J L; Markham, C H; Marmarelis, P Z; Treciokas, L J; Tishler, T A; Marder, S R; Mintz, J

    1999-02-01

    Tissue iron levels in the extrapyramidal system of earlier- and later-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects were evaluated in vivo using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method. The method involves scanning subjects in both high- and low-field MRI instruments, measuring tissue relaxation rate (R2), and calculating the field-dependent R2 increase (FDRI) which is the difference between the R2 measured with the two MRI instruments. In tissue, only ferritin iron is known to increase R2 in a field-dependent manner and the FDRI measure is a specific measure of this tissue iron pool. Two groups of male subjects with PD and two age-matched groups of normal control males were studied. The two groups of six subjects with PD consisted of subjects with earlier- or later-onset (before or after age 60) PD. FDRI was measured in five subcortical structures: the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR), substantia nigra compacta (SNC), globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus, and in one comparison region; the frontal white matter. Earlier-onset PD subjects had significant (p < 0.05) increases in FDRI in the SNR, SNC, putamen, and globus pallidus, while later-onset PD subjects had significantly decreased FDRI in the SNR when compared to their respective age-matched controls. Controlling for illness duration or structure size did not meaningfully alter the results. Published post-mortem studies on SN iron levels indicate decreased ferritin levels and increased free iron levels in the SN of older PD subjects, consistent with the decreased FDRI observed in our later-onset PD sample, which was closely matched in age to the post-mortem PD samples. The FDRI results suggest that disregulation of iron metabolism occurs in PD and that this disregulation may differ in earlier- versus later-onset PD. PMID:10215476

  2. Evaluation of an Indoor Sonic Boom Subjective Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Rathsam, Jonathan; Klos, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    A sonic boom simulator at NASA Langley Research Center has been constructed for research on human response to low-amplitude sonic booms heard indoors. Research in this facility will ultimately lead to development of a psychoacoustic model for single indoor booms. The first subjective test was designed to explore indoor human response to variations in sonic boom rise time and amplitude. Another goal was to identify loudness level variability across listener locations within the facility. Finally, the test also served to evaluate the facility as a laboratory research tool for studying indoor human response to sonic booms. Subjects listened to test sounds and were asked to rate their annoyance relative to a reference boom. Measurements of test signals were conducted for objective analysis and correlation with subjective responses. Results confirm the functionality of the facility and effectiveness of the test methods and indicate that loudness level does not fully describe indoor annoyance to the selected sonic boom signals.

  3. Subjective evaluation with FAA criteria: A multidimensional scaling approach. [ground track control management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Parkin, L.; Wempe, T. E.; Huff, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    Perceived orderliness in the ground tracks of five A/C during their simulated flights was studied. Dynamically developing ground tracks for five A/C from 21 separate runs were reproduced from computer storage and displayed on CRTS to professional pilots and controllers for their evaluations and preferences under several criteria. The ground tracks were developed in 20 seconds as opposed to the 5 minutes of simulated flight using speedup techniques for display. Metric and nonmetric multidimensional scaling techniques are being used to analyze the subjective responses in an effort to: (1) determine the meaningfulness of basing decisions on such complex subjective criteria; (2) compare pilot/controller perceptual spaces; (3) determine the dimensionality of the subjects' perceptual spaces; and thereby (4) determine objective measures suitable for comparing alternative traffic management simulations.

  4. Impression Cytology of the Lid Wiper Area.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; van Doorn, Kevin; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Jones, Lyndon W

    2016-01-01

    Few reports on the cellular anatomy of the lid wiper (LW) area of the inner eyelid exist and only one report makes use of cytological methods. The optimization of a method of collecting, staining and imaging cells from the LW region using impression cytology (IC) is described in this study. Cells are collected from the inner surface of the upper eyelid of human subjects using hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes, and stained with cytological dyes to reveal the presence of goblet cells, mucins, cell nuclei and various degrees of pre- and para-keratinization. Immunocytochemical dyes show cell esterase activity and compromised cell membranes by the use of a confocal scanning laser microscope. Up to 100 microscopic digital images are captured for each sample and stitched into a high-resolution, large scale image of the entire IC span. We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of IC than reported before, appropriate for identifying cellular morphologies and metabolic activity in the LW area. To our knowledge, this is the first time this selection of fluorescent dyes was used to image LW IC membranes. This protocol will be effective in future studies to reveal undocumented details of the LW area, such as assessing cellular particularities of contact lens wearers or patients with dry eye or lid wiper epitheliopathy. PMID:27584693

  5. Subjective soundscapes qualitative research in the experience and evaluation of environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Uwe

    2001-05-01

    If the subjective experience and evaluation of environmental noise shall be considered and integrated into the current soundscape research, the use of qualitative research methods used in sociology and psychology will become necessary. A triangulation of research methods for measuring objective noise and for the subjective evaluation of noises and sounds on the background of subjective meanings of health and healthy living will be a fruitful way to a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of soundscapes in the context of health and quality of life. In this contribution, a selection of qualitative research methods will be presented that allows for analyzing subjective experiences with environmental noise. Interviews focusing on narratives of episodes and situations (e.g., the episodic interview, Flick, 2002) will be outlined. Issues of how to assess the quality of qualitative research and its results will be addressed and finally the benefits and limits of the triangulation of different methods (e.g., interviews and focus groups or interviews and physical measures) will be discussed. Research experiences from the author's recent studies on health concepts of health professionals will be used for illustration.

  6. Subjective evaluation of a concert hall's acoustics using a free-format-type questionnaire and comparison with objective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki; Beranek, Leo L.

    2002-11-01

    A free-format type of audiences' judgment of the acoustical properties of a hall and music critics' writings were used as the basis for this study. These subjective responses are related to the Dai-Ichi Seimei Hall in Tokyo. This hall is an oval-shaped, one-balcony space, seating 767 persons. Its primary use is for various types of chamber music and solo-instrument performances. Eight acoustical attributes were investigated, ''reverberation,'' ''clarity,'' ''loudness,'' ''intimacy,'' ''spaciousness,'' ''balance,'' ''localization,'' and ''timbre,'' plus ''general impression.'' Subjective comments about these attributes were obtained. Objective measurements were made in the hall and are compared with those made in several similar-sized halls of two shapes. In the rear seats of two oval-shaped halls the strength factor GE (determined in the first 80 ms of the impulse response) was greater than the GE found in the rear seats of similar-sized rectangular halls. The subjective results and the objective measurements were closely correlated, especially for reverberation, clarity, and warmth (a subcomponent of timbre). It was suggested that the greater strength GE in the rear seats made the hall seem smaller and thus more intimate. The subjective comments also confirmed the hall's wide applicability, indicating that the acoustical characteristics used for its design were well chosen.

  7. Motivational influences on impression formation: outcome dependency, accuracy-driven attention, and individuating processes.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, S L; Fiske, S T

    1987-09-01

    How might being outcome dependent on another person influence the processes that one uses to form impressions of that person? We designed three experiments to investigate this question with respect to short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency. In all three experiments, subjects expected to interact with a young man formerly hospitalized as a schizophrenic, and they received information about the person's attributes in either written profiles or videotapes. In Experiment 1, short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency led subjects to use relatively individuating processes (i.e., to base their impressions of the patient on his particular attributes), even under conditions that typically lead subjects to use relatively category-based processes (i.e., to base their impressions on the patient's schizophrenic label). Moreover, in the conditions that elicited individuating processes, subjects spent more time attending to the patient's particular attribute information. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the attention effects in Experiment 1 were not merely a function of impression positivity and that outcome dependency did not influence the impression formation process when attribute information in addition to category-level information was unavailable. Finally, Experiment 3 manipulated not outcome dependency but the attentional goal of forming an accurate impression. We found that accuracy-driven attention to attribute information also led to individuating processes. The results of the three experiments indicate that there are important influences of outcome dependency on impression formation. These results are consistent with a model in which the tendency for short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency to facilitate individuating impression formation processes is mediated by an increase in accuracy-driven attention to attribute information.

  8. Motivational influences on impression formation: outcome dependency, accuracy-driven attention, and individuating processes.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, S L; Fiske, S T

    1987-09-01

    How might being outcome dependent on another person influence the processes that one uses to form impressions of that person? We designed three experiments to investigate this question with respect to short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency. In all three experiments, subjects expected to interact with a young man formerly hospitalized as a schizophrenic, and they received information about the person's attributes in either written profiles or videotapes. In Experiment 1, short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency led subjects to use relatively individuating processes (i.e., to base their impressions of the patient on his particular attributes), even under conditions that typically lead subjects to use relatively category-based processes (i.e., to base their impressions on the patient's schizophrenic label). Moreover, in the conditions that elicited individuating processes, subjects spent more time attending to the patient's particular attribute information. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the attention effects in Experiment 1 were not merely a function of impression positivity and that outcome dependency did not influence the impression formation process when attribute information in addition to category-level information was unavailable. Finally, Experiment 3 manipulated not outcome dependency but the attentional goal of forming an accurate impression. We found that accuracy-driven attention to attribute information also led to individuating processes. The results of the three experiments indicate that there are important influences of outcome dependency on impression formation. These results are consistent with a model in which the tendency for short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency to facilitate individuating impression formation processes is mediated by an increase in accuracy-driven attention to attribute information. PMID:3656080

  9. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression...

  14. Subjective evaluation of H.265/HEVC based dynamic adaptive video streaming over HTTP (HEVC-DASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) standard is becoming increasingly popular for real-time adaptive HTTP streaming of internet video in response to unstable network conditions. Integration of DASH streaming techniques with the new H.265/HEVC video coding standard is a promising area of research. The performance of HEVC-DASH systems has been previously evaluated by a few researchers using objective metrics, however subjective evaluation would provide a better measure of the user's Quality of Experience (QoE) and overall performance of the system. This paper presents a subjective evaluation of an HEVC-DASH system implemented in a hardware testbed. Previous studies in this area have focused on using the current H.264/AVC (Advanced Video Coding) or H.264/SVC (Scalable Video Coding) codecs and moreover, there has been no established standard test procedure for the subjective evaluation of DASH adaptive streaming. In this paper, we define a test plan for HEVC-DASH with a carefully justified data set employing longer video sequences that would be sufficient to demonstrate the bitrate switching operations in response to various network condition patterns. We evaluate the end user's real-time QoE online by investigating the perceived impact of delay, different packet loss rates, fluctuating bandwidth, and the perceived quality of using different DASH video stream segment sizes on a video streaming session using different video sequences. The Mean Opinion Score (MOS) results give an insight into the performance of the system and expectation of the users. The results from this study show the impact of different network impairments and different video segments on users' QoE and further analysis and study may help in optimizing system performance.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound evaluation of "healthy" joints in young subjects with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Iervolino, S; Soscia, E; Tosetto, A; Coppola, A; Schiavulli, M; Marrone, E; Ruosi, C; Salvatore, M; Di Minno, G

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) are increasingly used in haemophilia A (HA) to detect early joint changes. A total of 40 clinically asymptomatic joints, never involved by bleeding events ["healthy joints" (HJ)], were evaluated by MRI and, in parallel, by US in 20 young subjects with severe HA (22.45 ± 2.72 years old; no history of arthritides, of viral infections or of inhibitors against factor VIII). The same joints were evaluated in 20 matched non-haemophilic (no-HA) subjects (mean age 23.90 ± 2.31 years, P = 0.078 vs. HA subjects). US images were obtained with specific probe positions according to validated procedures. A validated US score and progressive (P-MRI) and additive (A-MRI) MRI scores were employed for data collection and analysis. The US score was higher in HA than in no-HA subjects (3.40 ± 1.72 vs. 0.80 ± 1.10, P < 0.001). Taking into account only moderate/severe alterations, joint effusion was found in 55% of HA and in 5% of no-HA joints (P < 0.001); synovial hypertrophy was found in 20% of HA and in none of the no-HA joints; cartilage erosion was found in 30% of HA and in none of no-HA joints. MRI examinations confirmed these findings and the US score correlated with the A-MRI (r = 0.732, P < 0.001) and with the P-MRI (r = 0.598, P < 0.001) scores. MRI and US data significantly correlated as to effusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002), synovial hypertrophy (r = 0.633, P = 0.036) and cartilage erosion (r = 0.734, P = 0.010). Despite inherent limitations, joint US examination identified subclinical abnormalities of HJ in young subjects with severe HA.

  16. [The correlation between subjective and objective voice evaluation in organic and functional larynx disorders].

    PubMed

    Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bozena; Pruszewicz, Antoni; Obrebowski, Andrzej; Swidziński, Piotr

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop and introduce into phoniatric diagnostic procedures the complex methodology of vocal function assessment, on the basis of comparison of subjective and objective voice estimation. The set of complex voice evaluation ought to include perceptual examination of the voice quality with quantitative GRBAS scale as a subjective method, vocal folds vibrations in videostroboscopy as a quasi-objective method and acoustic voice estimation in Multi Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) as an objective method. The basic assumption of this report is to prove correlation existence for vocal folds vibration quality in videostroboscopy, parameters describing acoustic wave generating by vibration system in larynx (MDVP) and perceptual subjective voice assessment (GRBAS scale) in organic and functional voice disorders. Research was conducted on 100 subjects (65 with organic and 35 with functional voice disorder), aged 7-74 years randomly chosen from population of patients treated at the Department of Phoniatrics and Audiology, Karol Marcinkowski University School of Medical Sciences in Poznań in 1996-2001 and 60 subjects as a control group without any voice disorders according to phoniatric examination. The research methodology include perceptual voice evaluation based on Japanese (Hirano) GRBAS scale adapted to Polish language, in scale 0 to 3 as well as the vibrations of vocal folds in videostroboscopy with attempt at quantification (scale 1 to 3) of selected measure and for acoustic analysis of Multi Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) for 17 estimated parameters. Due to results and statistic analysis the own, new scale of dysphonia severity was introduced.

  17. Technique for making flexible impression trays for the microstomic patient.

    PubMed

    Whitsitt, J A; Battle, L W

    1984-10-01

    This impression technique can be used for patients in whom routine use of stock impression trays is hindered by microstomia. Putty wash material can be manipulated with minimal effort and time. Placing the completed preliminary impression in a free-flowing mix of dental stone stabilizes the impression material and facilitates boxing and pouring of the impression. The resultant preliminary casts can then be used for diagnostic purposes and for making rigid sectional trays for final impressions.

  18. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  20. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  1. Subjective evaluation of MPEG-2 video with and without B frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Gregory W.; Tweedy, Ernest P.

    1999-11-01

    Two studies examined the effect of B-frames on subjective quality of MPEG-2 video. One study used consumer judgments in a variant of the standard CCIR Recommendation 500-5 procedure for collecting subjective evaluations. The other study used the judgments of a single expert in adjusting the bit rate necessary for MPEG-2 without B-frames to be subjectively equal to MPEG-2 with B-frames at a given bit rate. The results of the two studies were qualitatively similar. Summary of results: Picture quality improved with increase in bit rate until a saturation point was reached. The introduction of B-frames improved picture quality, especially for difficult source material. This was more noticeable at the lower bit rates (e.g., 3 Mb/s). The difference in bit rate between MPEG-2 with and without B-frames varied substantially with the source material. For example, for basketball, 5 Mb/s with B-frames was subjectively equal to 8 Mb/s without B-frames, but for other material the difference was near zero.

  2. [Torticollis spasmodicus, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Subjective evaluation of therapy by patients].

    PubMed

    Birner, P; Schnider, P; Müller, J; Wissel, J; Fuchs, I; Auff, E

    1999-10-01

    Injections with botulinum toxin type A (BTX) are considered the first-line treatment for spasmodic torticollis (ST), blepharospasm (BL) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). Because BTX brings only temporary and partial relief, patients frequently try other additional therapies to minimize their symptoms. The subjective rating of all therapies ever tried by patients with ST, BL and HFS was evaluated by using a simple questionnaire. Two hundred questionnaires were considered (112 TS, 54 BL, 34 HFS). BTX was rated subjectively the best therapy in all three diagnostic groups (median: 2 = good effect). Despite Citalopram and physiotherapy (median: 3 = average effect), all other therapies were rated with a median of > or = 4 (= minimal effect). Patients with ST tried 7.7, patients with BL 2.4 and patients with HFS 2.6 different types of therapy. In conclusion, BTX is the most effective treatment for patients with ST, BL and HFS, as rated subjectively. Further evaluation of therapies additional to BTX injections is recommended.

  3. Subjective and objective evaluation of sense of space for vehicle occupants based on anthropometric data.

    PubMed

    Hiamtoe, Pitarn; Steinhardt, Florian; Köhler, Uwe; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    At present, the number of the vehicle requirements has been continuously increasing. These requirements can be related to the customer as well as the technical requirements. Among these, the "feeling of space" of the occupants inside the vehicles can be regarded as one of the most important factors. In this respect, the driver and passengers should be able to experience positive feeling of space inside the vehicle. There are numerous factors that can influence the sense of space inside the vehicle. These include geometry (vehicle dimensions), light exposure, ambient lights, colors, material selection and material surface. Depending on the selection, the sense of space can be dramatically influenced by these factors. In general, human feeling is subjective and cannot be measured by any instrument. The measure can nevertheless be carried out by utilizing the method of subjective evaluation. Throughout the experiments, the method of evaluation is developed and the factors which can influence the interior feeling are analyzed. In this process, psychological perception, architectural aspects and anthropometry are considered and knowledge from the other domains is transferred in the form of a multidisciplinary approach. The experiments with an aim to evaluate the overall sense of space in the vehicle are carried out based on the physical mock up of BMW 1 series (E87). The space perception with different interior dimensions and anthropometric data of test persons are also analyzed. The use of Computer Aided Technology was shown by CATIA V5, PCMAN and RAMSIS. The results show a good correlation between the subjective evaluation and the geometric values.

  4. Multilingual subjective methodology and evaluation of low-rate digital voice processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimolitsas, Spiros; Corcoran, Franklin L.; Baraniecki, Marion R.; Phipps, John G., Jr.

    The methodology and results for a multilingual evaluation of source encoding algorithms operating at 16 kbit/s are presented. The evaluation was conducted in three languages (English, French, and Madarin), using listener opinion subjective assessments to determine whether 'toll-quality' performance is possible at 16 kbit/s. The study demonstrated that toll-quality voice is indeed possible at 16 kbit/s, and that several of the methods evaluated are more robust under high bit error conditions than either 32- or 64-kbit/s encoding. Thus, 16-kbit/s voice coding technology is currently suitable for many applications with the public-switched telephone network, including the next generation of digital circuit multiplication equipment, and integrated services digital network videotelephony.

  5. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review.

  6. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review. PMID:27621540

  7. Visual observation of the dynamic flow of elastomer rubber impression material between the impression tray and oral mucosa while seating the impression tray.

    PubMed

    Nishigawa, G; Natsuaki, N; Maruo, Y; Okamoto, M; Minagi, S

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to inspect visually, the dynamics of the impression flow at seating of the impression tray. The effects of the relief and the escape hole of the impression tray on the impression flow were also examined. Three types of the transparent impression tray (flat tray, relief tray and escape hole tray) were prepared. Transparent silicone polymer was put on the impression tray surface. Four drops of the dark blue silicone impression material was injected into the transparent silicone polymer on the impression tray. The impression tray was seated on the model of the denture-supporting mucosa. The movement of the four drops caused by the impression flow was visually recorded with the video camera and examined. The result for the flat tray showed that the impression material moved from inside to the outside. It was also shown that the speed of the moved impression material increased as the seating of the impression tray advanced. The results for the relief tray and the escape hole tray showed the effect of the relief and the escape hole prepared to the impression tray on the speed and the direction of the flow of the impression material.

  8. Multi-attribute subjective evaluations of manual tracking tasks vs. objective performance of the human operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siapkaras, A.

    1977-01-01

    A computational method to deal with the multidimensional nature of tracking and/or monitoring tasks is developed. Operator centered variables, including the operator's perception of the task, are considered. Matrix ratings are defined based on multidimensional scaling techniques and multivariate analysis. The method consists of two distinct steps: (1) to determine the mathematical space of subjective judgements of a certain individual (or group of evaluators) for a given set of tasks and experimental conditionings; and (2) to relate this space with respect to both the task variables and the objective performance criteria used. Results for a variety of second-order trackings with smoothed noise-driven inputs indicate that: (1) many of the internally perceived task variables form a nonorthogonal set; and (2) the structure of the subjective space varies among groups of individuals according to the degree of familiarity they have with such tasks.

  9. Investigating the visual inspection subjectivity on the contrast-detail evaluation in digital mammography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Medeiros, Regina B.; Schiabel, Homero

    2014-03-01

    A major difficulty in the interpretation of mammographic images is the low contrast and, in the case of early detection of breast cancer, the reduced size of the features of malignancy on findings such as microcalcifications. Furthermore, image assessment is subject to significant reliance of the capacity of observation of the expert that will perform it, compromising the final diagnosis accuracy. Thinking about this aspect, this study evaluated the subjectivity of visual inspection to assess the contrast-detail in mammographic images. For this, we compared the human readings of images generated with the CDMAM phantom performed by four observers, enabling to determining a threshold of contrast visibility in each diameter disks present in the phantom. These thresholds were compared graphically and by statistical measures allowing us to build a strategy for use of contrast and detail (dimensions) as parameters of quality in mammography.

  10. Extended stereopsis evaluation of professional and amateur soccer players and subjects without soccer background

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Jan; Tong, Jie; Hornegger, Joachim; Schmidt, Michael; Eskofier, Björn; Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Stereopsis is one of several visual depth cues. It has been evaluated for athletes of different types of sports in the past. However, most studies do not cover the full range of stereopsis performance. Therefore, we propose computer-supported stereopsis tests that provide an extended assessment and analysis of stereopsis performance including stereo acuity and response times. By providing stationary and moving stimuli they cover static and dynamic stereopsis, respectively. The proposed stereopsis tests were used to compare professional and amateur soccer players with subjects without soccer background. The soccer players could not perform significantly (p ≤ 0.05) superior than the subjects without soccer background. However, the soccer players showed significantly (p ≤ 0.01) superior choice reaction times for monocular stimuli. The results are in congruence with previous findings in literature. PMID:25368596

  11. Influence of alginate impression materials and storage time on surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Moreti, Ana F F; Martinelli, Julia; Berger, Sandrine B; Meneghel, Luciana L; Caixeta, Rodrigo V; Sinhoreti, Mário A C

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds prepared using different alginate impression materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5, or Jeltrate Plus) and with different storage times (1, 3, and 5 days) to models from molds that were filled immediately with no storage time. The molds were prepared over a matrix containing 50-μm line, (ISO 1563 standard) under pressure with a perforated metal tray. The molds were removed 2 minutes after loss of sticky consistency and either filled immediately or stored in closed jars at 100% relative humidity and 37°C for 1, 3, or 5 days. The molds were filled with dental plaster (Durone IV). Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-μm wide line, which was 25 mm in length, according to ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to analysis of variance. The 50-μm wide line (ISO 1563 standard) was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the storage time. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean dimensional accuracy values of stone models made from molds composed of different alginate impression materials and with different storage times (p = 0.989). In conclusion, storing the mold for five days prior to filling did not change the surface detail reproduction or dimensional accuracy of the alginates examined in this study.

  12. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA.

    PubMed

    Michael, Andrew M; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift).

  13. Evaluation of subjective and objective cyclodeviation following oblique muscle weakening procedures

    PubMed Central

    Thanikachalam, S; Kedar, Sachin; Bhola, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the subjective and objective cyclodeviational changes following different weakening procedures on superior and inferior oblique muscles Design: Comparative case series Materials and Methods: In a prospective institution based study, 16 cases of A pattern horizontal strabismus having superior oblique overaction were randomized to superior oblique weakening procedures: either silicon expander or translational-recession. Similarly, 20 cases of V pattern horizontal strabismus with inferior oblique overaction were randomized for inferior oblique weakening procedures: either 10 mm Fink′s recession or modified Elliot and Nankin′s anteropositioning. Cyclodeviation was assessed subjectively with the synoptophore and objectively using the fundus photograph before surgery and 3 months postoperatively. Change in cyclodeviation was measured by subjective and objective methods. The index of surgical effect (ISE) was defined as the net torsional change postoperatively. Results: The difference between the extorsional change induced by the two superior oblique procedures, silicone expander (-6°) and translational recession (-11.3°), was statistically significant (P=0.001). Translational recession caused more extorsional change (ISE=296%) than silicone expander surgery (ISE=107%). The two inferior oblique weakening procedures, Fink′s recession (+2.5°) and modified Elliot and Nankin′s anteropositioning (+4.7°) produced equitable amount of intorsional shift with no statistical difference (P=0.93). Objective measurements were significantly more than the subjective measurements. Conclusions: Different weakening procedures on oblique muscles produce different changes in cyclodeviation, which persists even up to 3 months. Subjective cyclodeviation is less than the objective measurements indicating partial compensation by sensorial adaptations. PMID:18158402

  14. Correlating objective and subjective evaluation of texture appearance with applications to camera phone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan B.; Coppola, Stephen M.; Jin, Elaine W.; Chen, Ying; Clark, James H.; Mauer, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Texture appearance is an important component of photographic image quality as well as object recognition. Noise cleaning algorithms are used to decrease sensor noise of digital images, but can hinder texture elements in the process. The Camera Phone Image Quality (CPIQ) initiative of the International Imaging Industry Association (I3A) is developing metrics to quantify texture appearance. Objective and subjective experimental results of the texture metric development are presented in this paper. Eight levels of noise cleaning were applied to ten photographic scenes that included texture elements such as faces, landscapes, architecture, and foliage. Four companies (Aptina Imaging, LLC, Hewlett-Packard, Eastman Kodak Company, and Vista Point Technologies) have performed psychophysical evaluations of overall image quality using one of two methods of evaluation. Both methods presented paired comparisons of images on thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCD), but the display pixel pitch and viewing distance differed. CPIQ has also been developing objective texture metrics and targets that were used to analyze the same eight levels of noise cleaning. The correlation of the subjective and objective test results indicates that texture perception can be modeled with an objective metric. The two methods of psychophysical evaluation exhibited high correlation despite the differences in methodology.

  15. Custom impression trays. Part III: A stress distribution model.

    PubMed

    Moseley, J P; Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C

    1994-05-01

    All resins used to make custom impression trays exhibit plastic deformation at some force value; therefore it is important to compare the physical property values of such materials with the stresses to which impression trays are subjected during dental procedures. A simple mathematical model of a custom tray was developed to predict stress distributions in this final part of a three-part investigation. Experimental stress analysis of such a tray confirmed the accuracy of the model, which was then used to predict the maximum stress experienced by the tray during removal of a completed impression from the oral cavity. The results of this analysis indicated that these stresses would be significantly lower than the yield stress for a commonly used polymethyl methacrylate resin or a light-polymerized resin. The stresses were also sufficiently low for us to conclude that thermoplastic resins would not permanently deform; however, the stresses encountered in the experimental confirmation procedure were close to the yield stress values for these materials.

  16. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants' personality traits as described in the 'Big Five Inventory' (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits. PMID

  17. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants' personality traits as described in the 'Big Five Inventory' (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits.

  18. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants’ personality traits as described in the ‘Big Five Inventory’ (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits

  19. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  20. Subjective evaluation of the interference protection ratio for frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellites including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting satellite service.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation Tests Performed on Space Shuttle Leading- Edge Materials Subjected to Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Bodis, James R.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space shuttle Return To Flight efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tests were performed on reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite panels subjected to ballistic foam impact. The impact tests were conducted to refine and verify analytical models of an external tank foam strike on the space shuttle leading edge. The NDE tests were conducted to quantify the size and location of the resulting damage zone as well as to identify hidden damage.

  2. Development of a clinical global impression scale for fatigue.

    PubMed

    Targum, Steven D; Hassman, Howard; Pinho, Maria; Fava, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Physical, cognitive, and affective components of fatigue are often associated with depression and other Axis I psychiatric disorders. We developed two, single item global assessment scales to specifically evaluate symptoms of fatigue. 101 subjects visiting a clinical trial site consented to participate in this reliability and validity study. Diagnoses included Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. There were two clinic visits during which the modified Clinician and Patient Impressions of Fatigue rating instruments were administered in conjunction with the MGH cognitive and physical functioning questionnaire (MGH-CPFQ), a validated patient-rated 7-item scale. CGI-Severity and PGI-Severity for fatigue were well correlated at two separate visits (p < 0.00005). At visit 1, the mean CGI-S for fatigue was 3.33 ± 1.53 (SD) and the PGI-S for fatigue was 3.57 ± 1.70 (r = 0.75; p = 0.000). At visit 1, the total MGH-CPFQ was 21.66 ± 6.92. Both CGI-S and PGI-S measures for fatigue were highly correlated with the MGH-CPFQ: CGI-S (r = 076; p < 0.00005); PGI-S (r = 0.62; p < 0.00005). Both the PGI-S and CGI-S for fatigue revealed temporal stability and convergent validity for the MGH-CPFQ (r = 0.83 for CGI-S and 0.73 for PGI-S). There was high internal consistency between the two independent CGI raters at visit 2 as demonstrated by a kappa statistic = 0.971 (CGI-S) and 0.868 (CGI-I) and Cronbach's alpha = 0.998 (CGI-S) and 0.941 (CGI-I). As shown here, the modified CGI and PGI instruments for fatigue are reliable measures of fatigue and both measures are validated with the MGH-CPFQ instrument.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of spasticity in upper limbs in hemiplegic subject using a mathmatical model.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Kato, Ryoko; Obata, Shitaro; Uchida, Ryusei

    2005-01-01

    This is a proposal for a new technique for evaluating spasticity in the upper limbs of hemiplegic patients. Each subject sat on a chair or stood up, and his or her forearm was extended or flexed by a physician. The subject was instructed to relax. The elbow joint angle, torque, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis muscles were measured. The relationship between the elbow joint angle and torque was approximated with a mathematical model, which consisted of elastic components depending on both muscle activities and elbow joint angle, by the least squares method. The inertia and visco-elastic coefficients were obtained. The elbow angle response was then estimated with the obtained inertia and visco-elastic coefficients by the Runge-Kutta method, and the estimated elbow angle was compared to the observed one. The relationships between the elbow angle and torque were approximated well with the model. Next, the average elasticity was calculated and compared to the modified Ashworth scale. The average elasticity had a tendency to increase as the Ash- worth scale increased. In addition, the average elasticity varied depending on the posture of the subjects. PMID:17281787

  4. Computer-aided evaluation of radiologist's reproducibility and subjectivity in mammographic density assessment.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Ilijan; Kotoromanović, Zdenka; Belaj, Nenad; Margaretić, Damir; Ivezić, Zdravko; Katić, Miroslav; Zibar, Lada; Faj, Dario; Stimac, Damir; Matić, Mate

    2013-12-01

    Mammographic density is an independent risk of breast cancer. This study has evaluated the radiologists' reproducibility and subjectivity in breast density estimation and in order to decrease the radiologists' subjective errors the computer software was developed. The very good reproducibility existed in the strong correlation with the first and the second mammogram assessment after three month period for each radiologist (correlation coefficient 0.73-1, p < 0.001). The strong correlation was present in the case of all 5 radiologists when compared among themselves and compared with software aided MDEST-Mammographic Density Estimation (correlation coefficient 0.651-0.777, p < 0.001). Detected differences in glandular tissue percentage determination occurred in the case of two experienced radiologists, out of 5 (one radiologist with more than 5 year experience and one with more than 10 year experience, p < 0.01), but in the case of breast type determination (American College of Radiology-ACR I-IV), the detected difference occurred in one radiologist with the least experience (less than 5 years, p < 0.001). It can be concluded that the estimation of glandular tissue percentage in breast density is rather subjective method, especially if it is expressed with absolute percentage, but the determination of type of breast (ARCI-IV) depends on the radiologist's experience. This study showed that software aided determination of glandular tissue percentage and breast type can be of a great benefit in the case of less experienced radiologists.

  5. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  6. Cytogenomic Evaluation of Subjects with Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Conotruncal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Karen Regina; Mergener, Rafaella; Huber, Janaina; Campos Pellanda, Lucia; Riegel, Mariluce

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the detection of genomic abnormalities in congenital heart disease (CHD), the etiology of CHD remains largely unknown. CHD is the most common birth defect and is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality, and conotruncal defects constitute 20% of all CHD cases. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to retrospectively study 60 subjects with conotruncal defects and identify genomic imbalances. The DNA copy number variations (CNVs) detected were matched with data from genomic databases, and their clinical significance was evaluated. We found that 38.3% (23/60) of CHD cases possessed genomic imbalances. In 8.3% (5/60) of these cases, the imbalances were causal or potentially causal CNVs; in 8.3% (5/60), unclassified CNVs were identified; and in 21.6% (13/60), common variants were detected. Although the interpretation of the results must be refined and there is not yet a consensus regarding the types of CHD cases in which array-CGH should be used as a first-line test, the identification of these CNVs can assist in the evaluation and management of CHD. The results of such studies emphasize the growing importance of the use of genome-wide assays in subjects with CHD to increase the number of genomic data sets associated with this condition. PMID:26137477

  7. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  8. Functional MRI evaluation of supplementary motor area language dominance in right- and left-handed subjects.

    PubMed

    Dalacorte, Amauri; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters; Maurer das Neves, Carlos Magno; Anes, Maurício; Dacosta, Jaderson Costa

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique widely used in the evaluation of the brain function that provides images with high temporal and spatial resolution. Investigation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) function is critical in the pre-surgical evaluation of neurological patients, since marked individual differences and complex overlapping with adjacent cortical areas exist, and it is important to spare the SMA from lesions when adjacent cortical tissue is surgically removed. We used fMRI to assess the activity of SMA in six right-handed and six left-handed healthy volunteers when a task requiring silent repetition of a series of words was given. Brain activation areas in each of the subjects were localized according to the standard Talairach coordinate space, and the individual voxels for each map were compared after 3D sagittal images were created and SMA was delimited. Quantitative analysis of hemispheric and bilateral SMA activation was described as mean ± standard deviation of hot points/total points. The results show that the language task induced bilateral SMA activation. Left SMA activation was significantly higher than right SMA activation in both right-handed and left-handed subjects.

  9. An evaluation of the safety and efficacy of bimatoprost for eyelash growth in pediatric subjects

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Mark; Bruce, Suzanne; Wirta, David; Yoelin, Steven G; Lee, Sungwook; Mao, Cheri; VanDenburgh, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the safety and effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% for treatment of eyelash hypotrichosis in a pediatric population. Patients and methods This multicenter, randomized, double-masked, parallel-group study was conducted at seven sites in the US and Brazil. Subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis caused by chemotherapy or alopecia areata (aged 5–17 years) or healthy adolescents aged 15–17 years were enrolled (N=71). Subjects applied bimatoprost 0.03% or vehicle to upper eyelid margins once nightly for 4 months and were followed for 1 month post-treatment. Eyelash prominence was assessed using the validated 4-grade Global Eyelash Assessment scale with photonumeric guide. Changes in eyelash length, thickness, and darkness were measured by digital image analysis. Safety was assessed by adverse events and ophthalmic observations. Results Eyelash prominence improved in a significantly greater proportion of subjects treated with bimatoprost compared with vehicle at month 4 (70.8% versus 26.1%; P<0.001). This benefit was sustained at month 5 post-treatment assessment. Digital image analysis measures were significantly improved with bimatoprost. Significant treatment benefits with bimatoprost versus vehicle were evident among the healthy adolescents but not in the postchemotherapy or alopecia areata subgroups. The safety profile of bimatoprost was consistent with previous studies in adults. Conclusion Bimatoprost was safe and well tolerated in pediatric subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis. In this study with limited sample size, subgroup analyses showed that treatment was effective in healthy adolescents with no concurrent contributing medical condition, but not in those with eyelash hypotrichosis due to chemotherapy or alopecia areata. PMID:27022239

  10. Evaluation of a subject-specific musculoskeletal modelling framework for load prediction in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenxian; Zhang, Zhifeng; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-08-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) multibody dynamics (MBD) models have been used to predict in vivo biomechanics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, a full lower limb MSK MBD modelling approach for TKA that combines subject-specific skeletal and prosthetic knee geometry has not yet been applied and evaluated over a range of patients. This study evaluated a subject-specific MSK MBD modelling framework for TKA using force-dependent kinematics (FDK) and applied it to predict knee contact forces during gait trials for three patients implanted with instrumented prosthetic knees. The prediction accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean absolute deviation (MAD), root mean square error (RMSE), Pearson correlation coefficient (ρ), and Sprague and Geers metrics of magnitude (M), phase (P) and combined error (C). Generally good agreements were found between the predictions and the experimental measurements from all patients for the medial contact forces (150 N < MAD <178 N, 174 N < RMSE < 224 N, 0.87 < ρ < 0.95, -0.04 < M < 0.20, 0.06 < P < 0.09, 0.08 < C < 0.22) and the lateral contact force (113 N < MAD <195 N, 131 N < RMSE < 240 N, 0.41 < ρ < 0.82, -0.25 < M < 0.34, 0.08 < P < 0.22, 0.13 < C < 0.36). The results suggest that the subject-specific MSK MBD modelling framework for TKA using FDK has potential as a powerful tool for investigating the functional outcomes of knee implants.

  11. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  12. How To Achieve Better Impressions in Computer-Mediated Communication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    This paper presents a review of the literature on impression formation in face-to-face (FtF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) and provides impression management recommendations for CMC users in a variety of environments. The first section provides an introduction to impression formation. Factors affecting impression formation in FtF and…

  13. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    PubMed Central

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  14. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  15. Accuracy of three implant impression techniques with different impression materials and stones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won-Gun; Vahidi, Farhad; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lim, Bum-Soon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of casts made using three different impression techniques to obtain an accurate definitive cast for fabrication of multiple-implant prostheses. Twelve experimental groups were formed combining the following conditions: three impression techniques, two impression materials, and two cast materials. The main effects of the three factors were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance using the full factorial general linear model between factors. The results showed that there were no significant differences in mean values for the transferred dimensions between the control and experimental groups. None of the measurements in the horizontal plane of the definitive casts demonstrated significant differences among the impression techniques with different impression and cast materials (P > .01).

  16. Three-dimensional laser scanning and reconstruction of ear canal impressions for optimal design of hearing aid shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognola, Gabriella; Parazzini, Marta; Svelto, Cesare; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grandori, Ferdinando

    2003-05-01

    The hearing aid shell (or earmold) couples the hearing aid with the user ear. Proper fitting of the earmold to the subject ear canal is required to achieve satisfactory wearing comfort, reduction in acoustic feedback, and unwanted changes in the electroacoustic characteristics of the aid. To date, the hearing aid shell manufacturing process is fully manual: the shell is fabricated as a replica of the impression of the subject ear canal. The typical post-impression processes made on the ear impression modify the physical dimensions and the shape of the final shell thus affecting the overall performance of the hearing aid. In the proposed approach, the surface of the original ear impression is 3D laser scanned by a prototype equipment consisting of a pair of CCD cameras and a commercial He-Ne laser. The digitized surface is reconstructed by means of iterative deformations of a geometrical model of simple and regular shape. The triangular mesh thus obtained is smoothed by a non-shrinking low-pass spatial filter. With this approach, post-impression processes are no more needed because the digitally reconstructed impression can be directly fed to rapid prototyping equipments, thus achieving a better accuracy in obtaining an exact replica of the ear impression. Furthermore, digital reconstruction of the impression allows for simple and reliable storage and transmission of the model without handling a physical object.

  17. Facial feedback effects on impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, H; Kurono, K

    1993-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of facial expressions upon social cognitive processes in which the impression of another person is formed. In each experiment, 30 female college students were induced to display or conceal their facial reactions to a hypothetical target person whose behaviors were mildly hostile (Exp. 1) or mildly friendly (Exp. 2), or their facial expressions were not manipulated. Displaying the facial expressions shifted the impression into the congruent directions with hedonic values corresponding to the facial expressions. Concealing the facial expressions, however, did not influence impression formation. Also, the positive-negative asymmetry was observed in the facial feedback effects, that is, the negative facial expression had a stronger effect on social cognition than the positive one. PMID:8170774

  18. Handshaking, gender, personality, and first impressions.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, W F; Phillips, J B; Brown, J D; Clanton, N R; Stein, J L

    2000-07-01

    Although people's handshakes are thought to reflect their personality and influence our first impressions of them, these relations have seldom been formally investigated. One hundred twelve participants had their hand shaken twice by 4 trained coders (2 men and 2 women) and completed 4 personality measures. The participants' handshakes were stable and consistent across time and coders. There were also gender differences on most of the handshaking characteristics. A firm handshake was related positively to extraversion and emotional expressiveness and negatively to shyness and neuroticism; it was also positively related to openness to experience, but only for women. Finally, handshake characteristics were related to the impressions of the participants formed by the coders. These results demonstrate that personality traits, assessed through self-report, can predict specific behaviors assessed by trained observers. The pattern of relations among openness, gender, handshaking, and first impressions suggests that a firm handshake may be an effective form of self-promotion for women.

  19. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  20. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  1. Effect of impression technique on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaping; Hobson, Ross S; McCabe, John F

    2004-01-01

    If the effects of surface preparation (eg, acid etching, laser preparation, crystal growth) are to be investigated on the same tooth from which the bond strength is recorded, a method of surface replication is required that does not affect the subsequent bond. This study investigated the effect of 2 different methods of taking impressions on bond strength. Three groups of 11 mandibular incisors were used. The labial enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds. Group A (control) had no impression taken; in group B (silicone), impressions were taken with silicone impression material before bonding; in group C (polyether), an impression was taken with polyether before bonding. After the impressions were taken, GAC brackets (A Company, San Diego, Calif) were bonded to the labial surfaces of the etched enamel with Transbond XT light-cured composite (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). Teeth with bonded brackets were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, and then bond strength was measured on a testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also recorded. The lowest bond strength was found after silicone replication (mean [standard deviation]: 8.6 [1.7] MPa) and the highest in the control group (21.2 [4.0] MPa). There was no significant difference between the control group and the polyether replication group (19.1 [4.7] MPa). The surface detail replications of polyether and silicone were found to be identical. It was concluded that polyether had no significant effect on bond strength and was suitable for surface replication before bonding. Polyether allows replication of the enamel surface without a significant effect on bond strength, and this technique could be used to examine the relationship between enamel preparation techniques and subsequent bond strength between composite and enamel.

  2. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  3. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  4. Tensile bond strength between custom tray and elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Oka, Morihiko; Minagi, Shogo; Irie, Masao; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how to achieve sufficient and stable adhesive strength between impression material and tray. Impression materials were molded between autopolymerizing resin columns, and tensile strength was measured as a function of these factors: tray storage time (1, 2, 4, 7, and 10 days), adhesive drying time (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes), and tray surface roughness (air abrasion, bur-produced roughness, and no treatment). Tensile bond strength was not affected by tray storage time throughout the entire evaluation period of 10 days. As for tray adhesive drying time, Reprosil and Exaimplant yielded extremely low values for drying times of 10 minutes or less (P<0.05), while Imprint II and Impregum were not influenced by drying time. Vinyl polysiloxane achieved the highest adhesive strength with bur-produced roughness, which was significantly higher than with air abrasion or no treatment (P<0.05), whereas polyether achieved the lowest value with bur-produced roughness (P<0.05). It was concluded that surface treatment of custom tray should be adapted to the type of impression material used to achieve optimum bond strength.

  5. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  6. Moderation of genetic factors by parental divorce in adolescents' evaluations of family functioning and subjective wellbeing.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Niels; Boomsma, Dorret I; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J; Bartels, Meike

    2010-04-01

    Adolescents' evaluations of family functioning may have a significant impact on their subjective well-being and adjustment. The aim of the study was to investigate the degree to which genetic and environmental influences affect variation in evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life and the overlap between them. We assessed whether genetic and environmental influences are moderated by parental divorce by analyzing self-report data from 6,773 adolescent twins and their non-twin siblings. Genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in general family functioning and family conflict, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls than boys in general family functioning. Genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in quality of life, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls. Evidence was found for interaction between genetic factors and parental divorce: genetic influence on general family functioning was larger in participants from divorced families. The overlap between general family functioning and quality of life, and family conflict and quality of life was accounted for the largest part by genetic effects, with nonshared environmental effects accounting for the remaining part. By examining the data from monozygotic twins, we found evidence for interaction between genotype and nonshared, non-measured, environmental influences on evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life.

  7. Modeling subjective evaluation of soundscape quality in urban open spaces: An artificial neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Kang, Jian

    2009-09-01

    This research aims to explore the feasibility of using computer-based models to predict the soundscape quality evaluation of potential users in urban open spaces at the design stage. With the data from large scale field surveys in 19 urban open spaces across Europe and China, the importance of various physical, behavioral, social, demographical, and psychological factors for the soundscape evaluation has been statistically analyzed. Artificial neural network (ANN) models have then been explored at three levels. It has been shown that for both subjective sound level and acoustic comfort evaluation, a general model for all the case study sites is less feasible due to the complex physical and social environments in urban open spaces; models based on individual case study sites perform well but the application range is limited; and specific models for certain types of location/function would be reliable and practical. The performance of acoustic comfort models is considerably better than that of sound level models. Based on the ANN models, soundscape quality maps can be produced and this has been demonstrated with an example.

  8. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  9. Repeatability of the Evaluation of Perception of Dyspnea in Normal Subjects Assessed Through Inspiratory Resistive Loads

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andréia K; Ziegler, Bruna; Konzen, Glauco L; Sanches, Paulo R.S; Müller, André F; Pereira, Rosemary P; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Study the repeatability of the evaluation of the perception of dyspnea using an inspiratory resistive loading system in healthy subjects. Methods: We designed a cross sectional study conducted in individuals aged 18 years and older. Perception of dyspnea was assessed using an inspiratory resistive load system. Dyspnea was assessed during ventilation at rest and at increasing resistive loads (0.6, 6.7, 15, 25, 46.7, 67, 78 and returning to 0.6 cm H2O/L/s). After breathing in at each level of resistive load for two minutes, the subject rated the dyspnea using the Borg scale. Subjects were tested twice (intervals from 2 to 7 days). Results: Testing included 16 Caucasian individuals (8 male and 8 female, mean age: 36 years). The median scores for dyspnea rating in the first test were 0 at resting ventilation and 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 7 and 1 point, respectively, with increasing loads. The median scores in the second test were 0 at resting and 0, 0, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4 and 0.5 points, respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.57, 0.80, 0.74, 0.80, 0.83, 0.86, 0.91, and 0.92 for each resistive load, respectively. In a generalized linear model analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the levels of resistive loads (p<0.001) and between tests (p=0.003). Dyspnea scores were significantly lower in the second test. Conclusion: The agreement between the two tests of the perception of dyspnea was only moderate and dyspnea scores were lower in the second test. These findings suggest a learning effect or an effect that could be at least partly attributed to desensitization of dyspnea sensation in the brain. PMID:25614771

  10. Physiological and subjective evaluation of a human-robot object hand-over task.

    PubMed

    Dehais, Frédéric; Sisbot, Emrah Akin; Alami, Rachid; Causse, Mickaël

    2011-11-01

    In the context of task sharing between a robot companion and its human partners, the notions of safe and compliant hardware are not enough. It is necessary to guarantee ergonomic robot motions. Therefore, we have developed Human Aware Manipulation Planner (Sisbot et al., 2010), a motion planner specifically designed for human-robot object transfer by explicitly taking into account the legibility, the safety and the physical comfort of robot motions. The main objective of this research was to define precise subjective metrics to assess our planner when a human interacts with a robot in an object hand-over task. A second objective was to obtain quantitative data to evaluate the effect of this interaction. Given the short duration, the "relative ease" of the object hand-over task and its qualitative component, classical behavioral measures based on accuracy or reaction time were unsuitable to compare our gestures. In this perspective, we selected three measurements based on the galvanic skin conductance response, the deltoid muscle activity and the ocular activity. To test our assumptions and validate our planner, an experimental set-up involving Jido, a mobile manipulator robot, and a seated human was proposed. For the purpose of the experiment, we have defined three motions that combine different levels of legibility, safety and physical comfort values. After each robot gesture the participants were asked to rate them on a three dimensional subjective scale. It has appeared that the subjective data were in favor of our reference motion. Eventually the three motions elicited different physiological and ocular responses that could be used to partially discriminate them.

  11. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    PubMed Central

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  12. [Preoperative evaluation before non cardiac surgery in subjects older than 65 years].

    PubMed

    Mureddu, Gian Francesco; Faggiano, Pompilio; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Non cardiac surgery is becoming increasingly common in elderly patients; they are usually affected by overt cardiac disease or show multiple risk factors, responsible for a higher incidence of perioperative fatal or nonfatal cardiac events. Of interest, acute myocardial infarction occurring in the perioperative period shows a high mortality rate in people over 65 years old. The cardiovascular risk stratification and perioperative management of subjects undergoing noncardiac surgery have been recently updated in the 2014 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines. However, several critical points still lack of strong evidence and are based on expert opinions only. For example, the use of drugs, such as beta-blockers, before, during and after the surgery, presents many uncertainties regarding the selection of patients more likely to benefit, dosage and duration of therapy, and effects on outcome. Data on elderly patients undergoing non cardiac surgery are scarce. Accordingly, a prospective registry enrolling a large number of aged subjects undergoing non cardiac surgery (particularly at high or intermediate risk) should be able to give us adequate insights on the management strategies currently used, on the incidence of death or cardiovascular events in the postoperative period and on the areas of potential improvement in care. Furthermore, the effects on outcome of structured programs of Guidelines implementation in the clinical practice of cardiologists, anesthesiologists and other health personnel involved in perioperative care, could be positive and should be evaluated. PMID:25481937

  13. A subjective evaluation of high-chroma color with wide color-gamut display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Junko; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    2009-01-01

    Displays tends to expand its color gamut, such as multi-primary color display, Adobe RGB and so on. Therefore displays got possible to display high chroma colors. However sometimes, we feel unnatural some for the image which only expanded chroma. Appropriate gamut mapping method to expand color gamut is not proposed very much. We are attempting preferred expanded color reproduction on wide color gamut display utilizing high chroma colors effectively. As a first step, we have conducted an experiment to investigate the psychological effect of color schemes including highly saturated colors. We used the six-primary-color projector that we have developed for the presentation of test colors. The six-primary-color projector's gamut volume in CIELAB space is about 1.8 times larger than the normal RGB projector. We conducted a subjective evaluation experiment using the SD (Semantic Differential) technique to find the quantitative psychological effect of high chroma colors.

  14. Subjective evaluation of the effect of noise and interference on frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.; Trenholm, R.

    1984-12-01

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellite systems including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. Also results of just-perceptible interference tests due to adjacent channel interferer at various intercarrier spacings and for different receive filter characteristics on the wanted signal path are presented. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting-satellite service.

  15. Simultaneous objective and subjective evaluation of meclofenamate sodium in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Smith, R P; Powell, J R

    1987-09-01

    Eighteen patients participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, crossover study of meclofenamate sodium in women with primary dysmenorrhea. Simultaneous evaluations of pain intensity and pain relief, sampling of continuous intrauterine pressure recording, and monitoring of blood meclofenamate levels were carried out. Improvements in pain intensity and pain relief were observed at 45 minutes and reached statistical significance at and beyond 1 hour 45 minutes after meclofenamate therapy. Ten of 14 uterine pressure parameters showed statistically significant responses after drug therapy and 12 of the 14 parameters showed statistically significant differences in time-response patterns. Statistically significant changes were noted as early as 45 minutes after meclofenamate therapy. Statistically significant correlations were found between and among the parameters of blood drug level and the subjective and objective measures. No drug-related adverse effects were found.

  16. Do first impressions count? Frailty judged by initial clinical impression predicts medium-term mortality in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B R; Batterham, A M; Hollingsworth, A C; Durrand, J W; Danjoux, G R

    2016-06-01

    Recognising frailty during pre-operative assessment is important. Frail patients experience higher mortality rates and are less likely to return to baseline functional status following the physiological insult of surgery. We evaluated the association between an initial clinical impression of frailty and all-cause mortality in 392 patients attending our vascular pre-operative assessment clinic. Prevalence of frailty assessed by the initial clinical impression was 30.6% (95% CI 26.0-35.2%). There were 133 deaths in 392 patients over a median follow-up period of 4 years. Using Cox regression, adjusted for age, sex, revised cardiac risk index and surgery (yes/no), the hazard ratio for mortality for frail vs. not-frail was 2.14 (95% CI 1.51-3.05). The time to 20% mortality was 16 months in the frail group and 33 months in the not-frail group. The initial clinical impression is a useful screening tool to identify frail patients in pre-operative assessment.

  17. Subjective Supervisor Evaluations: Can They Survive Title VII Suits after Watson vs. Fort Worth Bank and Trust?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Katherine

    1989-01-01

    The Supreme Court's landmark 1988 ruling that the "disparate impact" theory could be used to challenge as discriminatory an employer's reliance on the subjective evaluations of supervisors in hiring, promotion, and salary decisions is discussed. (MSE)

  18. Impression formation in children: influence of gender and expectancy.

    PubMed

    McAninch, C B; Manolis, M B; Milich, R; Harris, M J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information on subsequent impression formation and recall of a target peer was examined. 64 boys and 50 girls (ages 8 to 12) were given an expectancy that a stimulus child was either shy or outgoing. Subjects rated the target on several dimensions (e.g., friendly, shy) and then watched a videotape of a boy or girl confederate acting out a script containing both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information. Subjects then rated the target child again and freely recalled as much of what the target said as they could remember. Results revealed that when children are presented with both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information, impression formation appears largely attribute based, and the influence of the initial expectancy appears mitigated. However, ratings of liking appeared to be more influenced by the initial expectancy than by subsequent behavioral information. In addition, the results indicated that many of Maccoby's conclusions regarding the effects of gender on social interactions also apply to children's social information processing, indicating a strong bias toward same-sex peers. PMID:8222885

  19. Articular Cartilage: Evaluation with Fluid-suppressed 7.0-T Sodium MR Imaging in Subjects with and Subjects without Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Babb, James; Xia, Ding; Chang, Gregory; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Abramson, Steven B.; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the potential use of sodium magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of cartilage, with and without fluid suppression by using an adiabatic pulse, for classifying subjects with versus subjects without osteoarthritis at 7.0 T. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. The knee cartilage of 19 asymptomatic (control subjects) and 28 symptomatic (osteoarthritis patients) subjects underwent 7.0-T sodium MR imaging with use of two different sequences: one without fluid suppression (radial three-dimensional sequence) and one with fluid suppression (inversion recovery [IR] wideband uniform rate and smooth truncation [WURST]). Fluid suppression was obtained by using IR with an adiabatic inversion pulse (WURST pulse). Mean sodium concentrations and their standard deviations were measured in the patellar, femorotibial medial, and lateral cartilage regions over four consecutive sections for each subject. The minimum, maximum, median, and average means and standard deviations were calculated over all measurements for each subject. The utility of these measures in the detection of osteoarthritis was evaluated by using logistic regression and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Bonferroni correction was applied to the P values obtained with logistic regression. Results: Measurements from IR WURST were found to be significant predicators of all osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score of 1–4) and early osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score of 1 or 2). The minimum standard deviation provided the highest AUC (0.83) with the highest accuracy (>78%), sensitivity (>82%), and specificity (>74%) for both all osteoarthritis and early osteoarthritis groups. Conclusion: Quantitative sodium MR imaging at 7.0 T with fluid suppression by using adiabatic IR is a potential biomarker for osteoarthritis. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23468572

  20. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  1. Additivity of Clothing Cues in First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of information integration was used to predict that in first impression situations, clothing/physical appearance cues have differential importance depending upon the type of judgment elicited. Female college students (N=104) viewed and responded to slides of colored line drawings of female stimulus persons. Multiple regression of data…

  2. Interpersonal Teaching Style and Student Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldren, Jeffrey; Hively, Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Assuming that learning is an inherently social process, this research explores interpersonal variables that affect teaching. Specifically, does the interpersonal teaching style affect student impressions of the instructor? Eighty-five undergraduates viewed one of three ten-minute videos that portrayed either an authoritarian, authoritative, or…

  3. Borescope Device Takes Impressions In Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Richard F.; Turner, Laura J.

    1990-01-01

    Maneuverable device built around borescope equipped to make impression molds of welded joints in interior surfaces of ducts. Molds then examined to determine degress of mismatch in welds. Inserted in duct, and color-coded handles on ends of cables used to articulate head to maneuver around corners. Use of device fairly easy and requires little training.

  4. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions with sodium hypochlorite. Part II: Effect on gypsum.

    PubMed

    Vandewalle, K S; Charlton, D G; Schwartz, R S; Reagan, S E; Koeppen, R G

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of various immersion times and concentrations of sodium hypochlorite on irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and resultant gypsum casts. Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions of a test die were immersed for 1, 5, or 10 minutes in water (control), 5.25%, 0.525%, and 0.0525% sodium hypochlorite and then cast in a Type III stone and a Type V stone. Each stone specimen was evaluated for detail reproduction, dimensional change, surface roughness, and surface hardness. The results indicated that impressions may be immersed in sodium hypochlorite for any of the experimental times and concentrations without negative effects on Type V stone casts. However, immersion of impressions in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite causes some surface deterioration on Type III stone casts. PMID:7993542

  5. New thermal wave aspects on burn evaluation of skin subjected to instantaneous heating.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Chen, X; Xu, L X

    1999-04-01

    Comparative studies on the well-known Pennes' equation and the newly developed thermal wave model of bioheat transfer (TWMBT) were performed to investigate the wave like behaviors of bioheat transfer occurred in thermal injury of biological bodies. The one-dimensional TWMBT in a finite medium was solved using separation of variables and the analytical solution showed distinctive wave behaviors of bioheat transfer in skin subjected to instantaneous heating. The finite difference method was used to simulate and study practical problems involved in burn injuries in which skin was stratified as three layers with various thermal physical properties. Deviations between the TWMBT and the traditional Pennes' equation imply that, for high flux heating with extremely short duration (i.e., flash fire), the TWMBT which accounts for finite thermal wave propagation may provide realistic predictions on burn evaluation. A general heat flux criterion has been established to determine when the thermal wave propagation dominates the principal heat transfer process and the TWMBT can be used for tissue temperature prediction and burn evaluation. A preliminary interpretation on the mechanisms of the wave like behaviors of heat transfer in living tissues was conducted. The application of thermal wave theory can also be possibly extended to other medical problems which involve instantaneous heating or cooling.

  6. A simple pain model for the evaluation of analgesic effects of NSAIDs in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sycha, Thomas; Gustorff, Burkhard; Lehr, Stephan; Tanew, Adrian; Eichler1, Hans-Georg; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-01-01

    Aims Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to counteract inflammation and inflammation-induced sensitization of nociceptors by inhibiting peripheral prostaglandin synthesis. We evaluated an experimental pain model for NSAIDs, that included an inflammatory component to mimic clinical inflammatory pain conditions. Methods The study was performed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover design on 32 healthy volunteers. A small skin area of the proximal upper leg was irradiated with a UVB source using three times the individually estimated minimal erythema dose. Twenty hours after irradiation skin temperature, heat pain threshold and tolerance in sunburn spot were measured using a thermal sensory testing. These measurements were repeated 2 h after medication of either 800 mg ibuprofen as single oral dose or placebo capsules. Effects of ibuprofen on outcome parameters were assessed with analyses of covariance (ancova). Results Placebo did not affect heat pain threshold or tolerance. By contrast, ibuprofen increased heat pain threshold by 1.092 °C [confidence interval (CI) 0.498, 1.695; P = 0.0008) compared with placebo. Heat pain tolerance also increased significantly by 1.618 °C (CI 1.062, 2.175; P = 0.0001). Conclusion The pain model we evaluated was well tolerated in all subjects and the effects of ibuprofen were highly significant. This model is simple, sensitive to NSAIDs' effects and therefore has potential for future experimental pain studies. PMID:12895189

  7. Subjective evaluation and electroacoustic theoretical validation of a new approach to audio upmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, John S.

    and subjective methods investigated system performance with a variety of test stimuli for solo musical performances reproduced using a loudspeaker in an orchestral concert-hall and recorded using different microphone techniques. The objective and subjective evaluations combined with a comparative study with two commercial systems demonstrate that the proposed system provides a new, computationally practical, high sound quality solution to upmixing.

  8. Outcomes of breeding soundness evaluation of 2898 yearling bulls subjected to different classification systems.

    PubMed

    Higdon, H L; Spitzer, J C; Hopkins, F M; Bridges, W C

    2000-04-01

    This study is a retrospective analysis comparing data on yearling bull breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) subjected to 3 different classification systems: the Society for Theriogenology (SFT) 1983 and 1993 systems, and the Western Canadian Association of Bovine Practitioners (WC) 1993 system. Data were collected at 5 performance bull-test stations located in South Carolina and Tennessee from 1986 through 1996. Yearling bulls (n=2898) that were 10 to 20 mo of age were used in the analysis. To simplify analysis, bulls were determined to be either satisfactory or unsatisfactory potential breeders (including those classified as questionable, deferred or unsatisfactory). Data were analyzed 1) within location where a location was treated as an individual experiment, 2) with breeds and locations collapsed, and 3) within age-group where each age-group was treated as an individual experiment. An ANOVA was performed using GLM procedures of SAS, and this model was used to generate least square means for the proportion of bulls classified as satisfactory and the 5 possible unsatisfactory outcomes due to inadequacies in scrotal circumference, spermatozoal morphology, spermatozoal motility, a combination of inadequate spermatozoal morphology and motility, or physical abnormalities. Inadequate scrotal circumference or physical abnormality did not affect differences for BSE outcomes among systems. Using the SFT93 system, bulls failed at a higher rate due to inadequate spermatozoal morphology (P < 0.05) than when subjected to the SFT83 system. In the WC93 system, a higher percentage of bulls failed due to inadequate spermatozoal motility and to a combination of inadequate spermatozoal morphology and motility than in the other 2 systems (P < 0.05). The proportion of bulls in this data failing under the WC93 system appears to be the result of overestimation.

  9. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 3: implant and external impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2009-06-01

    Today, dental implant therapy is considered a valuable asset of mainstream dental therapeutics by both patients and clinicians. In many ways, the availability of implant therapy to facilitate the support, stability, and retention of dental prostheses has revolutionized the profession and the procedures dentists accomplish on a daily basis. From another perspective, the procedures used to fabricate dental implant restorations are but modifications of previously existing, proven, and reliable techniques. This is particularly true when considering impression making for implant overdentures. Part 3 of this article series looks at the use of vinyl polysiloxane impression material systems for making definitive impressions for implant overdentures. Once constructed, it is critical that all removable dental prostheses possess external contours that are geometrically compatible with the anatomic and functional requirements of the oral tissues. Therefore, this article also will address a technique for diagnostically assessing external denture contours using vinyl polysiloxane external impression procedures.

  10. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics part 3: implant and external impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2007-10-01

    Today, dental implant therapy is considered a valuable asset of mainstream dental therapeutics by both patients and clinicians. In many ways, the availability of implant therapy to facilitate the support, stability, and retention of dental prostheses has revolutionized the profession and the procedures dentists accomplish on a daily basis. From another perspective, the procedures used to fabricate dental implant restorations are but modifications of previously existing, proven, and reliable techniques. This is particularly true when considering impression making for implant overdentures. Part 3 of this article series looks at the use of vinyl polysiloxane impression material systems for making definitive impressions for implant overdentures. Once constructed, it is critical that all removable dental prostheses possess external contours that are geometrically compatible with the anatomic and functional requirements of the oral tissues. Therefore, this article also will address a technique for diagnostically assessing external denture contours using vinyl polysiloxane external impression procedures.

  11. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Birgit; Haupt, Heidemarie; Szczepek, Agnieszka J; Sandmann, Jörg; Gross, Johann; Klapp, Burghard F; Kiesewetter, Holger; Kalus, Ulrich; Stöver, Timo; Caffier, Philipp P

    2009-01-01

    Background Vardenafil (Levitra®) represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21) or matching placebo tablets (N = 21) administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication), and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ), the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36), audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds) and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status). Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA). Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36), objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil studies. Conclusion

  12. The effects of disposable and custom-made impression trays on the accuracy of impressions.

    PubMed

    Burton, J F; Hood, J A; Plunkett, D J; Johnson, S S

    1989-06-01

    This study indicates that some non-rigid impression trays, including disposable plastic trays and custom-made acrylic resin trays, may produce unreliable results when used with some medium-bodied elastomers. The study does not question the well-documented clinical accuracy of these elastomers when they are used with rigid trays. Disposable plastic trays are found to be acceptable when used with a combination of reversible and non-reversible hydrocolloid impression materials.

  13. Psychometric Evaluation of the Tagalog and German Subjective Happiness Scales and a Cross-Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Viren; Stieger, Stefan; Voracek, Martin; Dressler, Stefan G.; Eisma, Laura; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) has recently been developed as a more complete measure for the assessment of molar subjective happiness. In the present study, we report on the translation and validation of German and Tagalog versions of the SHS and conduct an initial cross-cultural examination of subjective happiness. In Study 1, 960…

  14. Estimation of Physical Activity Levels Using Cell Phone Questionnaires: A Comparison With Accelerometry for Evaluation of Between-Subject and Within-Subject Variations

    PubMed Central

    Bexelius, Christin; Sandin, Sven; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Litton, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity promotes health and longevity. Further elaboration of the role of physical activity for human health in epidemiological studies on large samples requires accurate methods that are easy to use, cheap, and possible to repeat. The use of telecommunication technologies such as cell phones is highly interesting in this respect. In an earlier report, we showed that physical activity level (PAL) assessed using a cell phone procedure agreed well with corresponding estimates obtained using the doubly labeled water method. However, our earlier study indicated high within-subject variation in relation to between-subject variations in PAL using cell phones, but we could not assess if this was a true variation of PAL or an artifact of the cell phone technique. Objective Our objective was to compare within- and between-subject variations in PAL by means of cell phones with corresponding estimates using an accelerometer. In addition, we compared the agreement of daily PAL values obtained using the cell phone questionnaire with corresponding data obtained using an accelerometer. Methods PAL was measured both with the cell phone questionnaire and with a triaxial accelerometer daily during a 2-week study period in 21 healthy Swedish women (20 to 45 years of age and BMI from 17.7 kg/m2 to 33.6 kg/m2). The results were evaluated by fitting linear mixed effect models and descriptive statistics and graphs. Results With the accelerometer, 57% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40%-66%) of the variation was within subjects, while with the cell phone, within-subject variation was 76% (95% CI 59%-83%). The day-to-day variations in PAL observed using the cell phone questions agreed well with the corresponding accelerometer results. Conclusions Both the cell phone questionnaire and the accelerometer showed high within-subject variations. Furthermore, day-to-day variations in PAL within subjects assessed using the cell phone agreed well with corresponding accelerometer

  15. Subjective evaluations and objective measurements of the ischial-ramal containment prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Umezu, Y; Ogata, H; Ohmine, S; Shinkoda, K; Arizono, H

    1999-06-01

    We examined 12 transfemoral amputees, 6 using the IRC socket and 6 the QL socket, to confirm whether the ischial-ramal containment (IRC) socket is truly superior to the quadrilateral (QL) socket. In subjective evaluation, the IRC group was significantly better in the total score and in items of comfort, that is, to sit on a chair and lumbar lordosis at heel off (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.05), better but not significant in the items of comfortable to wear, comfortable to go up and down stairs, and truncal sway during stance phase. By computed tomography, the femur of the IRC group was kept in a position significantly more medial than that of the QL group (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.05); but no significant difference in gluteal medial muscle atrophy ratios between the two groups was found (Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05). By X-ray, the stump of the IRC group was maintained significantly more adducted during one foot standing on the prosthesis (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.05), but the lateral force ratio during mid-stance of the IRC group was smaller, but not significantly, than that of the QL group. Physiological cost index (PCI), an indirect simple method for evaluating oxygen consumption of gait, had no significant difference between the two groups (Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05), and a multiple regression analysis revealed that the stump length ratio and lateral force ratio during mid-stance were significant explanatory variables for predicting PCI (adjusted R square: 0.87, F-value: 11.85, P < 0.05). The results of this study have revealed that the advantage of the IRC socket is a tender feeling of the stump, but that the metabolic efficiency is not superior to the QL socket at the most comfortable speed. PMID:10434359

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy of orange roughy (Hoplostetbus atlanticus) oil in subjects with dry skin.

    PubMed

    Domoto, N; Koriyama, T; Chu, B-S; Tsuji, T

    2012-08-01

    Moisturizers have beneficial effects in treating dry skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) oil, a marine-derived wax ester, on skin dryness in comparison with a reference commercially available petrolatum-based moisturizer (Vaseline) and untreated control. Subjects (n = 24) with moderate to severe skin dryness at the lower limb of legs (Study 1) and with certain degree of skin dryness on the face and the forearms (n = 22, Study 2) were treated twice a day for 42 consecutive days with the test products in randomized clinical trials. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured at the beginning and the end of Study 1, whereas skin hydration was measured at the beginning, after 3 and 6 weeks of the application (the end of the study) in Study 2. Changes in the skin dryness were assessed by a dermatologist using a video microscopy. In Study 1, the dryness score of skin applied with orange roughy oil improved significantly (P < 0.01) in 6 weeks. The skin looked smooth with no or little dry scaly skin. Orange roughy oil was evaluated with a 60% efficacy in treating skin dryness by the expert, which comparable to that of petrolatum (68%). No significant change in TEWL was found either in orange roughy oil or petrolatum treatment, although the values showed a tendency to improve in both cases. Similarly, the results of the skin capacitance in Study 2 showed a significant improvement of the skin symptoms after 3 and 6 weeks. These results showed that the performance of orange roughy oil in treating skin dryness was comparable to that of petrolatum.

  17. A Test of an Impression Management Interpretation of Public Responses to Positive Inequity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Alba N.; Tedeschi, James T.

    Recent evidence indicates that subjects experience "distress" when they are beneficiaries of an inequitable distribution of rewards in a dyad. Yet, reinforcement theory postulates that individuals should experience more pleasure, the greater the reward they receive. An impression management hypothesis would reconcile these apparently opposing…

  18. The Influence of Physical Attractiveness and Dress on Campus Recruiters' Impressions of Female Job Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kim K. P.; Roach-Higgins, Mary E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of physical attractiveness, dress, and job type upon 300 college recruiters' impressions of females' employment potential was investigated. Subjects rated female applicants from a photograph on eight employment potential statements. Results indicate that the applicant's style of dress exerted a consistent influence on recruiters'…

  19. Evaluation of sound fields in a concert hall involving scattered reflections applying the subjective preference theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Yukio

    2003-08-01

    Convex tilted rear walls in a stage enclosure, an array of circular columns installed in front of walls, and triangular reflectors above the stage were newly adopted as scattering obstacles in an acoustic design of Tsuyama Music Cultural Hall, called ``Bell Fole‸t Tsuyama.'' The fundamental shape of the hall was designed using the theory of subjective preference. To calculate the effects of scattered reflections on a sound field in a real concert hall is extremely laborious. For this reason, the evaluation of effects of scattered reflections on the sound field in the hall was made experimentally by use of a 110 acoustical scale. After construction of the hall, therefore, sound fields of the hall, which involves scattered reflections caused by the tilted convex rear, by the array of circular columns, and by the triangular reflectors, were measured using four orthogonal physical factors (LL, Δt1, Tsub, IACC) described in the theory and the acoustical character of these scattering obstacles was clarified. Results clearly showed that these new attempts on scattered reflections substantially improved the quality of the sound field in the hall. Thesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from Yukio Suzumura. E-mail address: ysuzu11@lapis.plala.or.jp

  20. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  1. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics. PMID:25900004

  2. [Evaluation of tolerance of a modified protein diet in obese subjects].

    PubMed

    Kolanowski, J; Col-Debeys, C; Brohet, C R

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the benefits and the potential risks of a very low calorie protein-diet in obese patients with metabolic abnormalities and at increased cardiovascular risk. To this end, the 420 kcal diet (with 50% of energy as protein) was administered for 10 days to 10 grossly obese subjects with glucose intolerance, hyperlipemia, arterial hypertension, ischemic cardiopathy and thrombotic risk related to high levels of fibrinogen factor VIII and reduced fibrinolytic activity. Weights loss averaged 360 g/day with a mean protein loss of 17 g/day occurring essentially during the very early phase of the diet. There was a rapid normalisation of blood pressure, plasma lipids and glycaemia. With the exception of a slightly negative potassium balance other ion remained in balance. There was no change in electrocardiogram, in parameters of blood coagulation or in hepatic and renal function. There was only a moderate increase in ketonaemia and plasma urate. It appears therefore, that an 8 to 10 day very low calorie protein-diet is well tolerated even in obese patients with increased cardiovascular risk, and that it corrects of several metabolic abnormalities without alteration in cardiac, hepatic or renal function.

  3. Dental arch asymmetry in young healthy human subjects evaluated by Euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G

    1993-03-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. A recently proposed method (Euclidean distance matrix analysis; EDMA) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. Here it has been applied to study the asymmetry of mandibular and maxillary arches in 50 men and 45 women with sound dentitions. The centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar) were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. The form of the right and left maxillary and mandibular hemi-arches was separately assessed by calculating all the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth within arch and side. Side differences were tested by EDMA. In men, the maxillary and the mandibular arches were both symmetrical (i.e. there were no significant differences in size or shape between the left and right hemi-arches). In women, the mandibular arch was symmetrical, but in the maxillary arch the two antimeres had a significantly different shape. No size differences were found between the left and right female hemi-arches.

  4. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Saber, Fariba; Abolfazli, Nader; Kohsoltani, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm) between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05). Results Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05). Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made. PMID:23346339

  5. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers. PMID:19579694

  6. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers.

  7. Adhesion of elastomeric impression materials to trays.

    PubMed

    Bindra, B; Heath, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tensile and shear adhesive bond strengths of two addition cured silicones (Provil and Express) and a polyether (Impregum) impression material to brass, poly(methylmethacrylate) and visible light-cured (VLC) tray resin were determined. Adhesive application significantly increased the bond strength; Provil and Express adhered most strongly to brass; whilst the Impregum-VLC combination produced the strongest bond. Indeed, VLC resin generated greater adhesion than acrylic resin. Exchanging the adhesives specified for each silicone material generally resulted in higher bond strengths. No correlation was established between speed of separation of the test surfaces and bond strength. For optimum clinical performance, the impression material (adhesive) tray material giving the highest bond strength should be utilized.

  8. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Wadlinger, Heather A; Luevano, Victor X; White, Benjamin M; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2011-08-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed.

  9. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Wadlinger, Heather A.; Luevano, Victor X.; White, Benjamin M.; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:25339791

  10. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist.

  11. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001), harmony (p < 0.001), and symmetry (p < 0.001) of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used. PMID:25144175

  12. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001), harmony (p < 0.001), and symmetry (p < 0.001) of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  13. Otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyong-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases of otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material. The symptoms of patients with retained impression material are characteristic of the length of time the impression material is retained. In case 1 had a chronic discharge and granulation tissue of the middle ear, while case 2 presented with acute pain and dizziness. The management for retained impression material may require surgical interventions, which can be safely accomplished by standard otologic techniques.

  14. Influence of social and behavioural characteristics of users on their evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in shopping malls.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qi; Kang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale subjective survey was conducted in six shopping malls in Harbin City, China, to determine the influence of social and behavioural characteristics of users on their evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort. The analysis of social characteristics shows that evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by income and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Meanwhile, evaluation of acoustic comfort evaluation is influenced by income, education level, and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.60 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). The effect of gender and age on evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort is statistically insignificant. The effects of occupation are mainly caused by the differences in income and education level, in which the effects of income are greater than that of education level. In terms of behavioural characteristics, evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by the reason for visit, frequency of visit, and length of stay, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Evaluation of acoustic comfort is influenced by the reason for visit to the site, the frequency of visit, length of stay, and also season of visit, with correlation coefficients of 0.10 to 0.30 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In particular, users who are waiting for someone show lower evaluation of acoustic comfort, whereas users who go to shopping malls more than once a month show higher evaluation of acoustic comfort. On the contrary, the influence of the period of visit and the accompanying persons are found insignificant.

  15. Effects of heating appliances with different energy efficiencies on associations among work environments, physiological responses, and subjective evaluation of workload.

    PubMed

    Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Ayabe, Makoto; Haruyama, Yasuo; Seo, Akihiko; Katamoto, Shizuo; Ito, Akiyoshi; Muto, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    To clarify the association between heat stress, physiological responses and subjective workload evaluations in kitchens using an induction heating stove (IH stove) or gas stove. The study design was an experimental trial involving 12 young men. The trial measured ambient dry-bulb temperature, globe temperature, wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and relative humidity; the subjects' weight, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen uptake, amount of activity, body temperature, subjective awareness of heat and workload before and after mock cooking for 30 min. The IH stove insignificantly increased heat indicators in the work environment and workers showed lower oxygen uptake, skin temperature, subjective awareness of heat and workload after heat exposure. Both physiological load and subjective awareness of heat and workload were slight in kitchens using the IH stove, which provided a better work environment.

  16. A comparative evaluation of disinfection effect of exposures to ultra-violet light and direct current glow discharge on Candida Albicans colonies coated over elastomeric impression material: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study is to compare the efficacy of ultra-violet light (U-V light) and direct current glow discharge in disinfecting Candida Albicans coated elastomeric impression material. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty samples of addition silicone material in the form of circular discs measuring (diameter-30 mm, thickness-3 mm) were prepared. Samples were divided into four groups namely A, B, C, D, with each group containing 60 samples. All samples in each group were sub grouped as follows for exposure time 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s respectively. Group A samples were exposed to U-V light with 8 watts. Group B samples were exposed to U-V light with 16 watts. Group C samples were exposed to U-V light with 24 watts. Group D samples were exposed to direct current glow discharge. After exposure, the impression material was swabbed on sabourauds dextrose agar (SDA) plates and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The total number of colonies indicating the number of C. Albicans that survived the direct current glow discharge and U-V light treatment was then determined using a microscope. Results and Conclusion: Group A samples exhibited proportionate decrease in the number of colonies with each greater time of exposure. Group B samples exhibited proportionate decrease in the number of colonies with each greater time of exposure. Group C samples exhibited total absence of C. Albicans colonies at 90 s exposure. In Group D samples there was a proportionate decrease in number of C. Albicans colonies with exposure to direct current glow discharge for more seconds. Hence, this study reveals that exposure to U-V light drastically reduced the C. Albicans colonies compared with exposure to direct current glow discharge. It was observed that with greater wattage of U-V light tube in U-V light unit chamber, greater decrease in colony count was observed in lesser time of exposure. PMID:23946583

  17. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold...

  20. Changes in Personality Impressions Formed by Status-Oriented Individuals who Differ in Need-for-Social Approval (NA) or Locus-of-Control Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuder, Mary E.; And Others

    Examined are changes in personality impressions formed by status-oriented individuals who differ in Need for Social Approval (NA) or Locus of Control of Reinforcement (I-E). Subjects recorded their initial and final personality impressions of speakers ascribed either high or low social status. High NA observers (or Externals) showed most positive…

  1. Influence of Blackness on Visual Impression of Color Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Tetsuya; Koike, Yoshiki; Matsushima, Sakurako; Ishikawa, Tomoharu; Ozaki, Koichi; Ayama, Miyoshi

    Two experiments, using color images of Japanese lacquer objects, investigated the relation between the strength of blackness and the visual and artistic impression of digital color images presented on a display. The first experiment determined the mean RGB values of black surface areas in the test stimuli where observers began to perceive the areas as “black”, and the mean RGB values where observers perceived the areas “really black”. Results indicate that to perceive a “really black” surface, RGB values should be lower than those of the original image in some pictures. The second experiment investigated, how, and to what degree the RGB values of black areas affect the visual impression of an artistic picture. Three factors, “high-quality axis”, “mysterious axis”, and “feeling of material axis”, were extracted by factor analysis. Results indicate that the Art students seem to be more sensitive in the evaluations along the “high-quality axis” and “mysterious axis” than the Engineering students are, while the opposite tendency is observed in the evaluation along the “feeling of material axis”.

  2. The associations among prior drinking consequences, subjective evaluations, and subsequent alcohol outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zaso, Michelle J.; Park, Aesoon; Kim, Jueun; Gellis, Les A.; Kwon, Hoin; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the many positive and negative psychosocial consequences of alcohol use are well documented, evidence of the association between prior drinking consequences and subsequent alcohol-related outcomes is mixed. Social learning theory highlights that cognitive appraisals of prior drinking consequences play a crucial intermediate role in the relation of prior drinking consequences with subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. This prospective study was designed to test the mediating effects of subjective evaluations (i.e., perceived valence and controllability) in the association of prior drinking consequences with change in binge drinking and drinking consequences over time. Participants were 171 college students (68% female, 74% White, mean age = 18.95 years [SD = 1.35]) who completed two online surveys, with an average interval of 68 days [SD = 10.22] between assessments. Path analyses of the data did not support mediational effects of perceived valence or controllability of prior drinking consequences on subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. Specifically, greater frequency of negative consequences was associated with lower perceived valence and controllability, and greater frequency of positive consequences was associated with lower perceived controllability of the experienced consequences. However, perceptions of valence and controllability were not in turn associated with subsequent binge drinking and drinking consequences. Instead, greater frequency of positive consequences was directly associated with greater subsequent frequency of binge drinking. Findings highlight the importance of prior positive consequences in the escalation of binge drinking over a short period of time, although this relation may not be accounted for by perceptions of valence and controllability of the prior drinking consequences. PMID:27214171

  3. The associations among prior drinking consequences, subjective evaluations, and subsequent alcohol outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaso, Michelle J; Park, Aesoon; Kim, Jueun; Gellis, Les A; Kwon, Hoin; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Although the many positive and negative psychosocial consequences of alcohol use are well documented, evidence of the association between prior drinking consequences and subsequent alcohol-related outcomes is mixed. Social learning theory highlights that cognitive appraisals of prior drinking consequences play a crucial intermediate role in the relation of prior drinking consequences with subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. This prospective study was designed to test the mediating effects of subjective evaluations (i.e., perceived valence and controllability) in the association of prior drinking consequences with change in binge drinking and drinking consequences over time. Participants were 171 college students (69% female, 74% White, M age = 18.95 years, SD = 1.35) who completed 2 online surveys, with an average interval of 68 days (SD = 10.22) between assessments. Path analyses of the data did not support mediational effects of perceived valence or controllability of prior drinking consequences on subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. Specifically, greater frequency of negative consequences was associated with lower perceived valence and controllability, and greater frequency of positive consequences was associated with lower perceived controllability of the experienced consequences. However, perceptions of valence and controllability were not in turn associated with subsequent binge drinking and drinking consequences. Instead, greater frequency of positive consequences was directly associated with greater subsequent frequency of binge drinking. Findings highlight the importance of prior positive consequences in the escalation of binge drinking over a short period of time, although this relation may not be accounted for by perceptions of valence and controllability of the prior drinking consequences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27214171

  4. A Single Subject Evaluation of the K-P Diet for Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlton-Bennet, Jocelyn A.; Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1987-01-01

    A single subject ABAB design was employed to determine the effectiveness of the Feingold Kaiser Permanente (K-P) diet in the treatment of a six-year-old hyperkinetic male. Results indicated the K-P diet was effective in controlling the subject's hyperkinesis, nutritionally adequate, and moderately difficult to implement. (Author/DB)

  5. Evaluation of adrenomedullin levels in renal parenchyma subjected to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Kemal; Sari, Ibrahim; Balat, Ayşe; Erbağci, Ahmet; Yurtseven, Cihanser; Yağci, Faruk; Karakök, Metin

    2003-08-01

    Despite its safety and efficacy, the traumatic effects of high-energy shock waves (HESW) on renal morphology and function during long-term follow-up have yet to be elucidated. Although the main target of shock waves is the stone located in the kidney, the surrounding tissue and other organs are also subjected to trauma during this procedure. In contrast to renal blood flow evaluation after shock wave treatment, ischemic development, causing varying degrees of damage at the tissue level, has not been well evaluated. The renoprotective peptide adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent vasorelaxing, natriuretic and cell growth modulating peptide, which is thought to act as an autocrine/paracrine regulator in renal glomeruli and tubules. In this experimental study, renal parenchymal AM levels were assessed in an attempt to evaluate the effect of HESW on the tissue levels of this peptide, which may be responsible for the regulation of ischemia induced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy(ESWL), in a rabbit model. Thirty white New Zealand rabbits, each weighing 3-5 kg were used. The animals were divided into three main groups, and varying numbers of shock waves (1000, 1500, 2000) were applied under fluoroscopic localization to the same kidney of all animals. Ketamine HCl anesthesia was administered (15-20 mg/kg) and all of the procedures were performed with a Multimed 2000 lithotriptor. Untreated contralateral kidneys were evaluated as controls. Following HESW application, the treated and untreated kidneys of each animal were removed through bilateral flank incisions under ketamine HCl anesthesia after 24 h and 7 days, respectively. Tissue AM levels were assessed with immunohistochemistry. During the early follow-up period (24 h), both treated and untreated kidneys showed a moderate to high degree of AM positivity. The number of tubules stained with AM increased as the number of shock waves increased and the expression of this protein became evident, possibly due to a higher

  6. Neuro-impressions: interpreting the nature of human creativity

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Todd Lael

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the creative process is essential for realizing human potential. Over the past four decades, the author has explored this subject through his brain-inspired drawings, paintings, symbolic sculptures, and experimental art installations that present myriad impressions of human creativity. These impressionistic artworks interpret rather than illustrate the complexities of the creative process. They draw insights from empirical studies that correlate how human beings create, learn, remember, innovate, and communicate. In addition to offering fresh aesthetic experiences, this metaphorical art raises fundamental questions concerning the deep connections between the brain and its creations. The author describes his artworks as embodiments of everyday observations about the neuropsychology of creativity, and its all-purpose applications for stimulating and accelerating innovation. PMID:23091455

  7. The Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): measuring agentic and communal forms of impression management.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Sabrina A; Rogers, Katherine H; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2014-01-01

    Measures of impression management have yet to incorporate two-factor models of person perception. The 2 primary factors are often labeled agency and communion. In Study 1, we assembled a new measure of impression management—the Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): It comprises 2 subscales designed specifically to tap agentic and communal content. Both subscales showed adequate alpha reliabilities under both honest and faking conditions. In Study 2, the BIMI was cross-validated in a new sample: The subscales remained relatively independent, and their reliabilities remained solid. A coherent pattern of personality correlates also supported the validities of both subscales. In Study 3, the differential sensitivity of the 2 subscales was demonstrated by manipulating the job type in simulated job applications. Implications and applications of the BIMI are discussed. PMID:24328818

  8. The CA Integrated Subject File II. Evaluation of Alternative Data Base Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Zipperer, William C.

    1974-01-01

    The relative retrieval performances of the CA Integrated Subject File (CAISF), CA Condensates, and a Merged File created from these two data bases were measured. Retrieval performance is reported in terms of recall, precision values, and costs. (Author/JB)

  9. Evaluation of the Highly Variable Agomelatine Pharmacokinetics in Chinese Healthy Subjects to Support Bioequivalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Liu, Shi-Kun; Tan, Hong-Yi; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Zhang, Ran-Ran; Xiang, Yu-Xia; Huang, Jie; Huang, Lu; Yuan, Hong; Yang, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aim to obtain the intra-subject coefficient of variability of a highly variable antidepressant agomelatine in humans, and propose an adjusted bioequivalence assessment strategy. Methods A single-dose, randomized crossover design was conducted in four periods (reference administered thrice, placebo administered once) separated by seven days. A validated LC-MS/MS assay was used to measure drug concentrations in serial blood samples. Results The intra-subject coefficient of variability was calculated using the residual variance of ANOVA analysis, and the results for Cmax and AUC0-t was 78.34% and 43.52%, respectively, in Chinese healthy subjects. The sample size required for standard BE study were 124(192, 340) if the expected deviation between the reference and generic products was set to 0 (5%, 10%). Conclusions Agomelatine meets the criteria for highly variable drug in Chinese healthy male subjects, and the traditional BE criteria for agomelatine needs to be adjusted to alleviate the resource and ethical burden of using a large numbers of subjects in clinical trials. Our clinical data on the intra-subject variability of agomelatine PK in Chinese healthy population enables to adjust bioequivalence (BE) assessment approach for agomelatine based on the RSABE approaches recommended by regulatory agencies. Trial Registration ChiCTR.org ChiCTR-TTRCC-13003835 PMID:25330096

  10. Phoenix Makes an Impression on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression dubbed Yeti and looking like a wide footprint -- made on the Martian soil by the Robotic Arm scoop on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008).

    Touching the ground is the first step toward scooping up soil and ice and delivering the samples to the lander's experiments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Observations and impressions from lunar orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, T. K.; El-Baz, F.; Laidley, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    On Apollo 16, the command module pilot made observations of particular surface features and processes to complement photographic and other remotely sensed data. Emphasis was placed on geological problems that required the extreme dynamic range and color sensitivities of the human eye; repetitive observations of varying sun angles and viewing directions; and, in some cases, on-the-scene interpretations. Visual observations and impressions recorded during the mission verified the effectiveness of the hardware and techniques used. The orbiting observer functioned both as a sensor, in otherwise inaccessible areas such as earthshine and shadows, and as a designator of potentially significant data that were acquired on the photographic record.

  12. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal.

  13. Effect of blackness level on visual impression of color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Tetsuya; Koike, Yoshiki; Matsushima, Sakurako; Ayama, Miyoshi

    2008-02-01

    In this study, two experiments were conducted to clarify the relation between RGB values and perceived blackness. In the first experiment, the average RGB values of black surface areas in the test stimuli where observers begin to perceive the areas 'black', and further another average RGB values where observers perceive the areas 'really black' were determined. Results indicate that to realize a 'really black' surface, RGB values should be lower than those of the original image in some pictures. In the second experiment, how and to what degree the RGB values of black area affect the visual impression of artistic picture was investigated. Three dimensions, "high-quality axis", "mysterious axis", and "feeling of material axis", were extracted by factor analysis. Results indicate that the Art students seem to be more sensitive in the evaluations along the "high-quality axis" and "mysterious axis" than the Engineering students, while the opposite tendency is shown in the evaluation along the "feeling of material axis".

  14. MicroSIFT Courseware Evaluations (199-222). Set 10. Including Subject and Title Indexes Covering Sets 1-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This document consists of 24 microcomputer software package evaluations prepared by the MicroSIFT (Microcomputer Software and Information for Teachers) Clearinghouse at the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. Each software review lists source, cost, ability level, subject, topic, medium of transfer, required hardware, required software,…

  15. Evaluation of the Research in the Scope of the Proficiency of Teachers in Terms of Subject, Aim, Method, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaskaya, Alper

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the researches that were conducted in our country on proficiency of the teachers in terms of subject, aim, method and results, and was to state the necessary points to be taken into consideration in the choice of methods. 21 researches in the scope of proficiency of teachers were examined for this…

  16. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models: influence of disinfectant solutions and alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Borsato, Thaís Teixeira; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini-Jr, Alcides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds disinfected with 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to models produced using molds which were not disinfected, with 3 alginate materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5 and Jeltrate Plus). The molds were prepared over matrix containing 20-, 50-, and 75-µm lines, performed under pressure with perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following gelation and either disinfected (using one of the solutions by spraying followed by storage in closed jars for 15 min) or not disinfected. The samples were divided into 12 groups (n=5). Molds were filled with dental gypsum Durone IV and 1 h after the start of the stone mixing the models were separated from the tray. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-µm line with 25 mm in length, in accordance with the ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to ANOVA. The 50 µm-line was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the disinfection procedure. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean values of dimensional accuracy in combinations between disinfectant procedure and alginate impression material (p=0.2130) or for independent factors. The disinfectant solutions and alginate materials used in this study are no factors of choice regarding the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

  17. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Madani, Azam S; Moraditalab, Azizollah; Haghi, Hamidreza Rajati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO), Straumann tissue-level (STL), and Straumann bone-level (SBL). Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the models were made using open-tray and closed-tray techniques. Closed-tray impressions were made using snap-on (STL model), transfer coping (TC) (BIO model) and TC plus plastic cap (TC-Cap) (SBL model). The impressions were poured with type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant analog heads in each dimension (x, y and z axes), and the linear displacement (ΔR) were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Results: The ΔR values of the snap-on technique were significantly lower than those of TC and TC-Cap techniques (P < 0.001). No significant differences were found between closed and open impression techniques for STL in Δx, Δy, Δz and ΔR values (P = 0.444, P = 0.181, P = 0.835 and P = 0.911, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, the snap-on implant-level impression technique resulted in more three-dimensional accuracy than TC and TC-Cap, but it was similar to the open-tray technique. PMID:26604956

  18. Human subject evaluation of the controlled resistance exercise device (C-red) for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; DeWitt, John

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is an effective countermeasure to the muscle and bone atrophy associated with the unloading experienced during spaceflight. Long duration spaceflight will require compact exercise devices that are capable of delivering sufficient loading to prevent physiological losses while meeting strict mass and volume requirements. Accordingly, a controlled resistance exercise device (C-RED), developed as an advanced exercise concept for NASA, uses an electric motor for resistance and is programmed to simulate inertial loading based on barbell acceleration and desired resistance mass. The barbell acts as a movable pulley increasing efficiency by doubling the created load. Human subject testing of the functionality of the device was conducted in a laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Subjects performed ten resistance exercises typically used by astronauts at three freely chosen load levels. The results indicate that subjects were able to perform all exercises with resistance loads that were typical to those used in the gymnasium with loads ranges of 4-1600 N, and bilateral symmetry of ground reaction force was quantified for the deadlift. A survey also was given to each subject to allow the users to express their opinions regarding the device. The subject questionnaire showed that the dumbbell attachment exercises were preferred to the barbell exercises. The positive preliminary results indicate promise for the device. PMID:25996698

  19. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obese and Non-Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Jyoti; Muthukrishnan, Shobitha; Kohli, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and more specifically, visceral obesity, has been consistently associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. Epidemiological studies indicate that at least two-third of the prevalence of hypertension can be directly attributed to obesity. Studies also suggest that hypertensive patients have impaired cardiac autonomic function. Aim The objective of the study was to examine any added effects of obesity on cardiac autonomic dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods Hypertensive subjects (n=45) between 35-60 years of age were divided into two groups; Group A (n=30) consisted of non-obese hypertensive subjects and Group B (n=15) consisted of obese (BMI≥30kg/m2) hypertensive subjects. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using four tests – Heart rate response to immediate standing (30:15 ratio), standing to lying ratio (S/L ratio), Blood pressure response to immediate standing and Cold Pressor Test (CPT). Results There were no significant differences for autonomic function tests between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects (p >0.05). Conclusion The results showed that there are no significant differences in the cardiac autonomic function responses between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects. PMID:27504394

  20. Objective and subjective hardness of a test item used for evaluating food mixing ability.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Fueki, K; Garrett, N R; Ohyama, T

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare objective and subjective hardness of selected common foods with a wax cube used as a test item in a mixing ability test. Objective hardness was determined for 11 foods (cream cheese, boiled fish paste, boiled beef, apple, raw carrot, peanut, soft/hard rice cracker, jelly, plain chocolate and chewing gum) and the wax cube. Peak force (N) to compress each item was obtained from force-time curves generated with the Tensipresser. Perceived hardness ratings of each item were made by 30 dentate subjects (mean age 26.9 years) using a visual analogue scale (100 mm). These subjective assessments were given twice with a 1 week interval. High intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability were seen for all foods (ICC > 0.68; P < 0.001). One-way anova found a significant effect of food type on both the objective hardness score and the subjective hardness rating (P < 0.001). The wax cube showed significant lower objective hardness score (32.6 N) and subjective hardness rating (47.7) than peanut (45.3 N, 63.5) and raw carrot (82.5 N, 78.4) [P < 0.05; Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW)-F]. A significant semilogarithmic relationship was found between the logarithm of objective hardness scores and subjective hardness ratings across twelve test items (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). These results suggest the wax cube has a softer texture compared with test foods traditionally used for masticatory performance test, such as peanut and raw carrot. The hardness of the wax cube could be modified to simulate a range of test foods by changing mixture ratio of soft and hard paraffin wax.

  1. Subjective evaluations of integer cosine transform compressed Galileo solid state imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Gold, Yaron; Grant, Terry; Chuang, Sherry

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes a study conducted for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, using 15 evaluators from 12 institutions involved in the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of integer cosine transform (ICT) compression using specially formulated quantization (q) tables and compression ratios on acceptability of the 800 x 800 x 8 monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated visually by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were evaluated. Each evaluator viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high-resolution monitor; each was compressed using a different q level. First the evaluators selected the image with the highest overall quality to support them in their visual evaluations of image content. Next they rated each image using a scale from one to five indicating its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four preselected types of images with and without noise were presented to each evaluator.

  2. Subjective evaluations of integer cosine transform compressed Galileo solid state imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Gold, Yaron; Grant, Terry; Chuang, Sherry

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, using 15 evaluators from 12 institutions involved in the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of integer cosine transform (ICT) compression using specially formulated quantization (q) tables and compression ratios on acceptability of the 800 x 800 x 8 monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated visually by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were evaluated. Each evaluator viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high-resolution monitor; each was compressed using a different q level. First the evaluators selected the image with the highest overall quality to support them in their visual evaluations of image content. Next they rated each image using a scale from one to five indicating its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four preselected types of images with and without noise were presented to each evaluator.

  3. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    PubMed

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems.

  4. Does My Program Really Make a Difference? Program Evaluation Utilizing Aggregate Single-Subject Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    In the current climate of increasing fiscal and clinical accountability, information is required about overall program effectiveness using clinical data. These requests present a challenge for programs utilizing single-subject data due to the use of highly individualized behavior plans and behavioral monitoring. Subsequently, the diversity of the…

  5. On metrics for objective and subjective evaluation of high dynamic range video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoo, Koohyar; Gu, Zhouye; Baylon, David; Luthra, Ajay

    2015-09-01

    In high dynamic range (HDR) video, it is possible to represent a wider range of intensities and contrasts compared to the current standard dynamic range (SDR) video. HDR video can simultaneously preserve details in very bright and very dark areas of a scene whereas these details become lost or washed out in SDR video. Because the perceived quality due to this increased fidelity may not fit the same model of perceived quality in the SDR video, it is not clear whether the objective metrics that have been widely used and studied for SDR visual experience are reasonably accurate for HDR cases, in terms of correlation with subjective measurement for HDR video quality. This paper investigates several objective metrics and their correlation to subjective quality for a variety of HDR video content. Results are given for the case of HDR content compressed at different bit rates. In addition to rating the relevance of each objective metric in terms of its correlation to the subjective measurements, comparisons are also presented to show how closely different objective metrics can predict the results obtained by subjective quality assessment in terms of coding efficiency provided by different coding processes.

  6. Evaluation of behavioral changes and subjective distress after exposure to coercive inpatient interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence to underpin decisions on what constitutes the most effective and least restrictive form of coercive intervention when responding to violent behavior. Therefore we compared ratings of effectiveness and subjective distress by 125 inpatients across four types of coercive interventions. Methods Effectiveness was assessed through ratings of patient behavior immediately after exposure to a coercive measure and 24 h later. Subjective distress was examined using the Coercion Experience Scale at debriefing. Regression analyses were performed to compare these outcome variables across the four types of coercive interventions. Results Using univariate statistics, no significant differences in effectiveness and subjective distress were found between the groups, except that patients who were involuntarily medicated experienced significant less isolation during the measure than patients who underwent combined measures. However, when controlling for the effect of demographic and clinical characteristics, significant differences on subjective distress between the groups emerged: involuntary medication was experienced as the least distressing overall and least humiliating, caused less physical adverse effects and less sense of isolation. Combined coercive interventions, regardless of the type, caused significantly more physical adverse effects and feelings of isolation than individual interventions. Conclusions In the absence of information on individual patient preferences, involuntary medication may be more justified than seclusion and mechanical restraint as a coercive intervention. Use of multiple interventions requires significant justification given their association with significant distress. PMID:22647058

  7. Subjective evaluation of a prototype earmuff exhibiting flat and nonlinear attenuation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stokes, J P; Royster, L H; Pearson, R G; Royster, J D

    1991-02-01

    Subjective user responses were obtained for a test earmuff exhibiting approximately flat (uniform) attenuation of about 25 dB from 500 to 8000 Hz for sound pressure levels (SPLs) less than 120 dB. At SPLs above 120 dB, the test earmuff exhibited nonlinear (level-dependent) attenuation characteristics such that noise reduction increased with increasing sound level. The study population consisted of police officers from the Raleigh, North Carolina, Police Department as they were performing arms requalification by executing a series of firing programs during two sequential and identical relays. The study subjects wore either the test earmuff or a comparable conventional earmuff during the first relay, then the alternate protector for the second relay with the order counterbalanced. Results indicated a significant preference for the test earmuff in three comparison areas: comfort, perceived hearing protection, and speech understanding. The study demonstrates that ammunition type and level of noise exposure contributed significantly to a preference in favor of the test earmuff. The subjects who used the quietest of the ammunition types rated the test earmuff significantly better than the remaining subjects with respect to speech understanding. PMID:2011979

  8. The surface electromyographic evaluation of the Functional Reach in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Maranesi, E; Fioretti, S; Ghetti, G G; Rabini, R A; Burattini, L; Mercante, O; Di Nardo, F

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a comprehensive assessment of myoelectric activity of the main muscles involved in the Functional Reach (FR) test, in 24 elderly subjects. A specific protocol for the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal acquisition during FR-test was developed. Results show that anterior muscles activate following a caudo-cranial order. Tibialis Anterior (TA) is the first to be activated (-18.0±16.3% of the FR-period), together with Rectus Femoris (-10.4±17.9%). Then, Rectus Abdominis (19.7±24.7%) and Sternocleidomastoideus (19.9±15.6%) activate after the FR-start. Hamstrings, Soleus, and L4-level Erectores Spinae (posterior muscles) activate after the FR-start in this order (11.4±16.8%, 17.7±16.6%, and 35.2±29.0%, respectively) and remain active until the movement end. The analysis of the kinematic strategies adopted by subjects revealed an association between TA-activation patterns and two kinematic strategies (hip/mixed strategy), quantified by an increase (p<0.05) of TA-activity duration in subjects adopting the hip strategy (89.9±34.5) vs. subjects adopting the mixed strategy (27.0±16.8). This suggests that TA sEMG activity could be able to discriminate among kinematic strategies, providing different information on balance control. Thus, the present analysis represents the first attempt to quantify the sEMG activity during FR-test in elderly subjects, providing an early contribution in building a reference frame for balance assessment in clinical context. PMID:26752782

  9. Dimensional stability of elastomeric impression materials: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, F S; Popoff, D A V; Castro, C D L; Silva, G C; Magalhães, C S; Moreira, A N

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to review the literature concerning the dimensional stability of dental elastomeric impression materials, to support recommendations to control the variables that influence the accuracy of these materials. An electronic search of the Scopus and PubMed databases was performed in November 2010. Articles were selected according to the following inclusion criteria: investigation of the dimensional stability of dental elastomers, an experimental study, sample size reported, laboratory tests described, and published in an English language peer-reviewed journal. The search resulted in 47 articles published between 1958 and 2008; of these, 24 were selected for inclusion in the present study. Great variability was discovered in the experimental methodologies used, such as different working times, temperatures and storage mediums for the impressions, impression techniques, material thicknesses, tray types, and methods of evaluation. Despite the lack of standardization among the studies, this review supports the following recommendations to control the dimensional stability: impressions should be stored at temperatures between 21 +/- 2 degrees C; polyether impressions should be stored in an environment with a relative humidity below 50%; time until pouring has been settled for each elastomer material.

  10. How do you say 'hello'? Personality impressions from brief novel voices.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Phil; Todorov, Alexander; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    On hearing a novel voice, listeners readily form personality impressions of that speaker. Accurate or not, these impressions are known to affect subsequent interactions; yet the underlying psychological and acoustical bases remain poorly understood. Furthermore, hitherto studies have focussed on extended speech as opposed to analysing the instantaneous impressions we obtain from first experience. In this paper, through a mass online rating experiment, 320 participants rated 64 sub-second vocal utterances of the word 'hello' on one of 10 personality traits. We show that: (1) personality judgements of brief utterances from unfamiliar speakers are consistent across listeners; (2) a two-dimensional 'social voice space' with axes mapping Valence (Trust, Likeability) and Dominance, each driven by differing combinations of vocal acoustics, adequately summarises ratings in both male and female voices; and (3) a positive combination of Valence and Dominance results in increased perceived male vocal Attractiveness, whereas perceived female vocal Attractiveness is largely controlled by increasing Valence. Results are discussed in relation to the rapid evaluation of personality and, in turn, the intent of others, as being driven by survival mechanisms via approach or avoidance behaviours. These findings provide empirical bases for predicting personality impressions from acoustical analyses of short utterances and for generating desired personality impressions in artificial voices. PMID:24622283

  11. Knowing versus liking: Separating normative knowledge from social desirability in first impressions of personality.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine H; Biesanz, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    There are strong differences between individuals in the tendency to view the personality of others as similar to the average person. That is, some people tend to form more normatively accurate impressions than do others. However, the process behind the formation of normatively accurate first impressions is not yet fully understood. Given that the average individual's personality is highly socially desirable (Borkenau & Zaltauskas, 2009; Wood, Gosling & Potter, 2007), individuals may achieve high normative accuracy by viewing others as similar to the average person or by viewing them in an overly socially desirable manner. The average self-reported personality profile and social desirability, despite being strongly correlated, independently and strongly predict first impressions. Further, some individuals have a more accurate understanding of the average individual's personality than do others. Perceivers with more accurate knowledge about the average individual's personality rated the personality of specific others more normatively accurately (more similar to the average person), suggesting that individual differences in normative judgments include a component of accurate knowledge regarding the average personality. In contrast, perceivers who explicitly evaluated others more positively formed more socially desirable impressions, but not more normatively accurate impressions.

  12. How do you say 'hello'? Personality impressions from brief novel voices.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Phil; Todorov, Alexander; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    On hearing a novel voice, listeners readily form personality impressions of that speaker. Accurate or not, these impressions are known to affect subsequent interactions; yet the underlying psychological and acoustical bases remain poorly understood. Furthermore, hitherto studies have focussed on extended speech as opposed to analysing the instantaneous impressions we obtain from first experience. In this paper, through a mass online rating experiment, 320 participants rated 64 sub-second vocal utterances of the word 'hello' on one of 10 personality traits. We show that: (1) personality judgements of brief utterances from unfamiliar speakers are consistent across listeners; (2) a two-dimensional 'social voice space' with axes mapping Valence (Trust, Likeability) and Dominance, each driven by differing combinations of vocal acoustics, adequately summarises ratings in both male and female voices; and (3) a positive combination of Valence and Dominance results in increased perceived male vocal Attractiveness, whereas perceived female vocal Attractiveness is largely controlled by increasing Valence. Results are discussed in relation to the rapid evaluation of personality and, in turn, the intent of others, as being driven by survival mechanisms via approach or avoidance behaviours. These findings provide empirical bases for predicting personality impressions from acoustical analyses of short utterances and for generating desired personality impressions in artificial voices.

  13. How Do You Say ‘Hello’? Personality Impressions from Brief Novel Voices

    PubMed Central

    McAleer, Phil; Todorov, Alexander; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    On hearing a novel voice, listeners readily form personality impressions of that speaker. Accurate or not, these impressions are known to affect subsequent interactions; yet the underlying psychological and acoustical bases remain poorly understood. Furthermore, hitherto studies have focussed on extended speech as opposed to analysing the instantaneous impressions we obtain from first experience. In this paper, through a mass online rating experiment, 320 participants rated 64 sub-second vocal utterances of the word ‘hello’ on one of 10 personality traits. We show that: (1) personality judgements of brief utterances from unfamiliar speakers are consistent across listeners; (2) a two-dimensional ‘social voice space’ with axes mapping Valence (Trust, Likeability) and Dominance, each driven by differing combinations of vocal acoustics, adequately summarises ratings in both male and female voices; and (3) a positive combination of Valence and Dominance results in increased perceived male vocal Attractiveness, whereas perceived female vocal Attractiveness is largely controlled by increasing Valence. Results are discussed in relation to the rapid evaluation of personality and, in turn, the intent of others, as being driven by survival mechanisms via approach or avoidance behaviours. These findings provide empirical bases for predicting personality impressions from acoustical analyses of short utterances and for generating desired personality impressions in artificial voices. PMID:24622283

  14. Reproducibility of optic disk evaluation in supine subjects with a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II laser tomographic scanner

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yosuke; Akita, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Joji; Nakamura-Kadohiro, Yuko; Tanaka, Junko; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and reliability of optic disk evaluation in supine subjects with a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II (HRT II). Methods One eye was randomly selected for evaluation by HRT II in each of eleven healthy subjects. Five images were obtained by each of two experienced operators at two separate visits with the subjects in both sitting and supine positions. A stand was constructed to allow stable, handheld operation of the HRT II head for imaging of the supine subjects. Measurements of optic disk parameters obtained in the supine position were compared with those obtained in the sitting position. The reliability of measurements in the supine position was evaluated by calculating both the coefficients of variation for measurements made by one observer on the first visit and the interobserver and intervisit intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs); the values obtained were compared with those obtained for the sitting position. Results Measurements of all parameters made in the supine position were highly similar to those made in the sitting position. The coefficients of variation obtained for each parameter in the sitting and supine positions ranged from 5.67% to 14.16% and from 2.18% to 16.08%, respectively. The interobserver ICC values in the sitting and supine positions were ≥0.978 and ≥0.989, respectively. The intervisit ICC values in the sitting and supine positions were ≥0.958 and ≥0.983, respectively. Conclusion Handheld operation of the HRT II in a custom-designed stand is feasible for optic disk evaluation in the supine subjects who were not able to maintain the sitting position. PMID:27601876

  15. Antibacterial efficacy and effect of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid for dental impressions: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. Shafath; Charles, P. David; Cholan, R.; Russia, M.; Surya, R.; Jailance, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate whether the extract of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid powder decreases microbial contamination during impression making without affecting the resulting casts. Materials and Methods: Twenty volunteers were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10). Group A 30 ml extract of M. citrifolia L diluted in 30 ml of water was mixed to make the impression with irreversible hydrocolloid material. Group B 30 ml deionized water was mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid material to make the impressions following which the surface roughness and dimensional stability of casts were evaluated. Results: Extract of M. citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid decreased the percentage of microorganisms when compared with water (P < 0.001) but did not affect the surface quality or dimensional stability of the casts. Conclusion: Mixing the extract of M. citrifolia L. with irreversible hydrocolloid powder is an alternative method to prevent contamination without sacrificing impression quality. PMID:26538926

  16. Depression and the impression-formation continuum: piecemeal processing despite the availability of category information.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J A; Weary, G

    1993-04-01

    A study explored depressed-nondepressed differences in impression formation. From S. T. Fiske and S. L. Neuberg's (1990) model of impression formation, mildly depressed perceivers were hypothesized to engage in more piecemeal processing when forming an impression of a target other, even when nondepressed perceivers would typically use less effortful, categorical processing. With an idiographic technique designed by M. Pavelchak (1989), depressed Ss were shown to use trait attributes in evaluating a person, even when induced to categorize the individual. Nondepressed Ss relied on category information when available, replicating Pavelchak's study. Depressed Ss' results are interpreted as arising from a motivation to engage in effortful analysis of social information, stemming from feelings of lack of control over life events. PMID:8473980

  17. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions with sodium hypochlorite. Part I: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Beyerle, M P; Hensley, D M; Bradley, D V; Schwartz, R S; Hilton, T J

    1994-01-01

    Current American Dental Association infection control guidelines recommend immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions, and this study further defines the parameters for use of sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite has been shown to be an effective disinfectant for impressions; however, it has not been fully evaluated for optimum immersion time and concentration. In this study, irreversible hydrocolloid impressions contaminated with different bacteria were immersed in varying concentrations of sodium hypochlorite for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. Dilute solutions of sodium hypochlorite (0.525% or 0.0525%) produced a 4-log10 (99.99%) reduction in colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa after 1 to 5 minutes' immersion. Full-strength sodium hypochlorite (5.25%) required 5 minutes to produce a 4-log10 reduction of Bacillus subtilis. A 4-log10 reduction of Mycobacterium bovis was not obtained under any conditions examined. PMID:7916888

  18. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions with sodium hypochlorite. Part I: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Beyerle, M P; Hensley, D M; Bradley, D V; Schwartz, R S; Hilton, T J

    1994-01-01

    Current American Dental Association infection control guidelines recommend immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions, and this study further defines the parameters for use of sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite has been shown to be an effective disinfectant for impressions; however, it has not been fully evaluated for optimum immersion time and concentration. In this study, irreversible hydrocolloid impressions contaminated with different bacteria were immersed in varying concentrations of sodium hypochlorite for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. Dilute solutions of sodium hypochlorite (0.525% or 0.0525%) produced a 4-log10 (99.99%) reduction in colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa after 1 to 5 minutes' immersion. Full-strength sodium hypochlorite (5.25%) required 5 minutes to produce a 4-log10 reduction of Bacillus subtilis. A 4-log10 reduction of Mycobacterium bovis was not obtained under any conditions examined.

  19. Depression and the impression-formation continuum: piecemeal processing despite the availability of category information.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J A; Weary, G

    1993-04-01

    A study explored depressed-nondepressed differences in impression formation. From S. T. Fiske and S. L. Neuberg's (1990) model of impression formation, mildly depressed perceivers were hypothesized to engage in more piecemeal processing when forming an impression of a target other, even when nondepressed perceivers would typically use less effortful, categorical processing. With an idiographic technique designed by M. Pavelchak (1989), depressed Ss were shown to use trait attributes in evaluating a person, even when induced to categorize the individual. Nondepressed Ss relied on category information when available, replicating Pavelchak's study. Depressed Ss' results are interpreted as arising from a motivation to engage in effortful analysis of social information, stemming from feelings of lack of control over life events.

  20. The Neurological Impress Method as a Reading Intervention for Students with Emotional Behavior Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Neurological Impress Method as an intervention to improve reading skills in elementary school children with emotional disabilities. When educators work with children with emotional disabilities, the focus is often on modifying behaviors. This focus on behavior rather than academics…

  1. The Warm-Cold Study: A Classroom Demonstration of Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symbaluk, Diane G.; Cameron, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure for teaching experimental design to students in the social sciences. Argues that by replicating Solomon Asch's and H. Kelley's classic studies on impression formation, students learn how to conduct experiments, analyze data, and evaluate the significance of research. Provides instructions for implementing the strategy. (DSK)

  2. Dimensional stability ofautoclave sterilised addition cured impressions and trays.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Etemad-Shahidi, S; Millar, B J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional accuracy of impressions following sterilisation by autoclaving. Dental impressions (75) were of a dentoform containing 6 reference points. The impressions were split into 5 groups of 15, each group used a different impression technique. Groups were divided into 3 subgroups with 5 impressions as control, 5 for disinfection by Perform-ID and 5 being autoclaved. Measurements were made using a travelling light microscope. A minimal significant dimensional difference (0.01impression method. No significant dimensional differences were observed for all other groups (P>0.05). The trays and materials tested were suitable for the autoclave sterilisation.

  3. [Impression Formation in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders].

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael; Dymke, Tina; Hüttner, Susanne; Schnaubelt, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    The first item of any psychopathological assessment is "general impression". There is some research under the heading of "impression formation" which shows that the outer appearance of a person decides about how a person is perceived by others and how others react. Impression formation is an important factor in social interaction. This is of special importance in mental disorders, which may express themselves in a distorted impression formation. As impression formation is by and large an emotional process, measurement can be done by adjective lists. An example is the bipolar MED rating scale. Such lists can be used in therapy to help patients and therapists to understand the problem and initiate modifications. A special group intervention in occupational therapy is described. Results suggest that impression formation is quite objective, that self- and observer judgments coincide and that therapy can help to adopt a less irritating outer appearance. PMID:27286526

  4. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Materials and Methods: Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. Results: The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. Conclusion: The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials. PMID:26124605

  5. Subjective evaluation of auralizations created from multi-channel anechoic recordings of a talker in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Wang, Lily M.

    2005-04-01

    A high degree of speech intelligibility is very important in educational environments. When designing such spaces, like classrooms, auralizations can be used to subjectively assess the degree of speech intelligibility and clarity. Auralizations are most commonly made by convolving the impulse response (IR) of an omni-directional source with a single channel anechoic speech recording. This paper explores the idea of using multi-channel recordings to create the auralizations, using a female talker in motion. An omni-directional source is split into quadrants and the IR is calculated for each section. These IR's are convolved with the appropriate channel of the anechoic recording and then the four auralizations are mixed to create one final auralization. The auralizations were made using four-channel anechoic recordings of a person walking on a platform while talking. Subjective tests were conducted to determine the ease with which subjects could identify the direction of the movement of the source in rooms with varying amounts of absorption. This method can be used to create more realistic classroom auralizations, as teachers typically move around the room as they teach. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Decisions in Motion: Decision Dynamics during Intertemporal Choice reflect Subjective Evaluation of Delayed Rewards.

    PubMed

    O'Hora, Denis; Carey, Rachel; Kervick, Aoife; Crowley, David; Dabrowski, Maciej

    2016-02-12

    People tend to discount rewards or losses that occur in the future. Such delay discounting has been linked to many behavioral and health problems, since people choose smaller short-term gains over greater long-term gains. We investigated whether the effect of delays on the subjective value of rewards is expressed in how people move when they make choices. Over 600 patrons of the RISK LAB exhibition hosted by the Science Gallery Dublin(TM) played a short computer game in which they used a computer mouse to choose between amounts of money at various delays. Typical discounting effects were observed and decision dynamics indicated that choosing smaller short-term rewards became easier (i.e., shorter response times, tighter trajectories, less vacillation) as the delays until later rewards increased. Based on a sequence of choices, subjective values of delayed outcomes were estimated and decision dynamics during initial choices predicted these values. Decision dynamics are affected by subjective values of available options and thus provide a means to estimate such values.

  7. Decisions in Motion: Decision Dynamics during Intertemporal Choice reflect Subjective Evaluation of Delayed Rewards

    PubMed Central

    O’Hora, Denis; Carey, Rachel; Kervick, Aoife; Crowley, David; Dabrowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    People tend to discount rewards or losses that occur in the future. Such delay discounting has been linked to many behavioral and health problems, since people choose smaller short-term gains over greater long-term gains. We investigated whether the effect of delays on the subjective value of rewards is expressed in how people move when they make choices. Over 600 patrons of the RISK LAB exhibition hosted by the Science Gallery DublinTM played a short computer game in which they used a computer mouse to choose between amounts of money at various delays. Typical discounting effects were observed and decision dynamics indicated that choosing smaller short-term rewards became easier (i.e., shorter response times, tighter trajectories, less vacillation) as the delays until later rewards increased. Based on a sequence of choices, subjective values of delayed outcomes were estimated and decision dynamics during initial choices predicted these values. Decision dynamics are affected by subjective values of available options and thus provide a means to estimate such values. PMID:26867497

  8. Demographic and psychological variables affecting test subject evaluations of ride quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, N. C.; Conley, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Ride-quality experiments similar in objectives, design, and procedure were conducted, one using the U.S. Air Force Total In-Flight Simulator and the other using the Langley Passenger Ride Quality Apparatus to provide the motion environments. Large samples (80 or more per experiment) of test subjects were recruited from the Tidewater Virginia area and asked to rate the comfort (on a 7-point scale) of random aircraft motion typical of that encountered during STOL flights. Test subject characteristics of age, sex, and previous flying history (number of previous airplane flights) were studied in a two by three by three factorial design. Correlations were computed between one dependent measure, the subject's mean comfort rating, and various demographic characteristics, attitudinal variables, and the scores on Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. An effect of sex was found in one of the studies. Males made higher (more uncomfortable) ratings of the ride than females. Age and number of previous flights were not significantly related to comfort ratings. No significant interactions between the variables of age, sex, or previous number of flights were observed.

  9. The influence of prototype fidelity and aesthetics of design in usability tests: effects on user behaviour, subjective evaluation and emotion.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Juergen; Sonderegger, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    An empirical study examined the impact of prototype fidelity on user behaviour, subjective user evaluation and emotion. The independent factors of prototype fidelity (paper prototype, computer prototype, fully operational appliance) and aesthetics of design (high vs. moderate) were varied in a between-subjects design. The 60 participants of the experiment were asked to complete two typical tasks of mobile phone usage: sending a text message and suppressing a phone number. Both performance data and a number of subjective measures were recorded. The results suggested that task completion time may be overestimated when a computer prototype is being used. Furthermore, users appeared to compensate for deficiencies in aesthetic design by overrating the aesthetic qualities of reduced fidelity prototypes. Finally, user emotions were more positively affected by the operation of the more attractive mobile phone than by the less appealing one.

  10. A video Clinical Global Impression (CGI) in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Pelissolo, Antoine; Rotge, Jean-Yves; Jaafari, Nematollah; Machefaux, Sebastien; Quentin, Solene; Bui, Eric; Bruno, Nicolas; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Polosan, Mircea; Baup, Nicolas; Papetti, François; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Mallet, Luc; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas

    2011-03-30

    The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) is frequently used in clinical research because of its face validity and ease of use but data on its reliability are scarce. Our goal was to estimate the reliability of the scale and compare reliability between face-to-face and video scoring. We analyzed 50 different video interviews recorded during 5 visits of a crossover trial to study the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Six specialized clinicians rated the CGI using these videos, providing 300 different ratings. The intraclass correlation was lower at inclusion (0.30 [0.13-0.50]) than at later visits (0.68 [0.61-0.80]). Reliability was not influenced by the patients' stimulation status. The mean of at least two independent evaluations of the video is needed to achieve an ICC greater than 0.8. The video CGI is a valid clinical outcome measure suitable for clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377).

  11. Impression Management in Survey Responding: Easier for Collectivists or Individualists?

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Hila; Shavitt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments indicate that when individualists and collectivists engage in impression management on self-reports, they do so through different psychological mechanism s. Collectivists do so through a relatively automatic process. Thus, they can impression manage even when cognitively busy. Individualists impression manage through a more effortful process. Therefore, they can do so only when the situation permits effortful processing. These findings highlight distinct conditions under which social norms may influence consumer self-reports across cultures. PMID:23175618

  12. [Impression traces from firearms on cadaver skin].

    PubMed

    Püschel, K; Koops, E; Kulle, K J

    1996-01-01

    Guns may occasionally leave traces on human skin, for example by compression/impression of the tissue (esp. in the area of livores), by contact-transfer of dirt, oil, and rust, or by forming the pattern of blood-smears. The case of a 31-year-old drug-addict is presented in detail: The man committed suicide by shooting himself (entrance hole under the chin). When the dead body was found there was no weapon at the scene. By careful securing of evidence and analyzing the pattern of metallisations (identified as rust from the old pistol) it was reconstructed that the suicident held the pistol (identified as Russian Tokarew TT33-7.62 mm) in his hand for many hours postmortem until it was removed by an unknown thief. PMID:8687278

  13. [Impression traces from firearms on cadaver skin].

    PubMed

    Püschel, K; Koops, E; Kulle, K J

    1996-01-01

    Guns may occasionally leave traces on human skin, for example by compression/impression of the tissue (esp. in the area of livores), by contact-transfer of dirt, oil, and rust, or by forming the pattern of blood-smears. The case of a 31-year-old drug-addict is presented in detail: The man committed suicide by shooting himself (entrance hole under the chin). When the dead body was found there was no weapon at the scene. By careful securing of evidence and analyzing the pattern of metallisations (identified as rust from the old pistol) it was reconstructed that the suicident held the pistol (identified as Russian Tokarew TT33-7.62 mm) in his hand for many hours postmortem until it was removed by an unknown thief.

  14. A new method for making casts from irreversible hydrocolloid impressions.

    PubMed

    Steas, A

    1991-03-01

    This method of making casts from alginate (irreversible hydrocolloid) edentulous impressions is a departure from the usual procedures. It consists of recognizing the weaknesses of the materials being used and handling them to the best advantage to minimize deleterious effects. A proper dental stone mixed with an accelerator is painted over the entire anatomic surface of the impression. A base is added only after the first application of stone sets. This method protects against volume change of the irreversible hydrocolloid impression material and distortion of the unsupported portions of the impression.

  15. Evaluation of a subject-specific, torque-driven computer simulation model of one-handed tennis backhand groundstrokes.

    PubMed

    Kentel, Behzat B; King, Mark A; Mitchell, Sean R

    2011-11-01

    A torque-driven, subject-specific 3-D computer simulation model of the impact phase of one-handed tennis backhand strokes was evaluated by comparing performance and simulation results. Backhand strokes of an elite subject were recorded on an artificial tennis court. Over the 50-ms period after impact, good agreement was found with an overall RMS difference of 3.3° between matching simulation and performance in terms of joint and racket angles. Consistent with previous experimental research, the evaluation process showed that grip tightness and ball impact location are important factors that affect postimpact racket and arm kinematics. Associated with these factors, the model can be used for a better understanding of the eccentric contraction of the wrist extensors during one-handed backhand ground strokes, a hypothesized mechanism of tennis elbow.

  16. Evaluation of Efficacy of Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Subjects with Myositis and Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Seema; Iyengar, Asha R; B V, Subash; Joshi, Revan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to determine if ultrasonography of masseter can be used to evaluate the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) such as myositis and myofascial pain. Methods Fifteen TMD subjects with myofascial pain/myositis who satisfied the RDC/McNeil criteria were included in the study. All the subjects were administered TENS therapy for a period of 6 days (30 minutes per session). The mouth opening (in millimeters) and severity of pain (visual analogue scale score) and ultrasonographic thickness of the masseter (in millimeters) in the region of trigger/tender areas was assessed in all the subjects both prior and post TENS therapy. A comparison of the pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the VAS score, mouth opening and masseter thickness was done with the help of a t-test. Results There was a significant reduction in the thickness of masseter muscle (P = 0.028) and VAS scores (P < 0.001) post TENS therapy. There was also a significant improvement in the mouth opening (P = 0.011) post TENS therapy. Conclusions In the present study, ultrasonography was found to be an effective measuring tool in the assessment of TENS therapy in subjects with myositis and myofascial pain. PMID:26839665

  17. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P. ); Short, S.A. ); McDonald, J.R. ); McCann, M.W. Jr. and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA ); Murray, R.C. ); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Effect of adding impression material to mandibular denture space in Piezography.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Okuno, I; Nokubi, T

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of adding impression material on denture space using a piezographical record. Subjects were ten voluntary edentulous patients, aged from 61 to 84 years old. A maxillary trial denture with anterior artificial teeth and a mandibular base plate with a keel were inserted into the oral cavity. Three ml of tissue-conditioning materials was injected on the base plate for each trial. Afterwards, the patients were instructed to pronounce various phonemes, so that tongue, cheeks and lips conformed to the denture space. The impression complexes were cut at the level of the estimated occlusal plane. Occlusal analogues were made by duplicating the impression complexes. Measurements were performed for five analogues from the first to fifth additions for each subject. The data were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA), and a Friedman's test followed by a Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons with a level of significance at 5%. At the molar and premolar positions, the bucco-lingual widths of the occlusal table increased significantly at incremental injection of impression materials from P1 to P4. The midpoints of the analogues were located at a distance of 1.5 mm buccally at the molar position and at a distance of 1.9 mm buccally at the premolar position from the top of the alveolar crest, independent of the addition of impression material. It was concluded that denture space was regulated by volume of material and was located slightly on the buccal side from the crest of the residual alveolar ridge.

  19. Subjective evaluation of the combined influence of satellite temperature sounding data and increased model resolution on numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present evaluation is concerned with (1) the significance of prognostic differences resulting from the inclusion of satellite-derived temperature soundings, (2) how specific differences between the SAT and NOSAT prognoses evolve, and (3) comparison of two experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences general circulation model. The subjective evaluation indicates that the beneficial impact of sounding data is enhanced with increased resolution. It is suggested that satellite sounding data posses valuable information content which at times can correct gross analysis errors in data sparse regions.

  20. Quadruple Injection of Hypothalamic Peptides to Evaluate Pituitary Function in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenborn, K. C.; Jubiz, William

    1985-01-01

    A single intravenous injection of four hypothalamic releasing hormones—corticotropin-, growth hormone-, gonadotropin- and thyrotropin-releasing hormones—was administered to normal subjects. Except for the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, a statistically significant increase in all anterior pituitary hormone levels occurred. Transient flushing was the only consistent side effect. In the same persons, results were compared with those obtained with insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a single-dose overnight metyrapone test. Growth hormone and cortisol responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were similar but prolactin increment was less than that obtained by the peptide injection. ACTH increments from both tests were substantially less than those obtained by the overnight metyrapone test. We conclude that pituitary function can be effectively studied in normal subjects by the combination of a metyrapone test with a triple bolus of growth hormone-, thytropin- and gonadotropin-releasing hormones, but not by a quadruple bolus of the hypothalamic peptides. Compared with insulin-induced hypoglycemia, this approach yields more information with fewer side effects. PMID:3919507

  1. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  2. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. PMID:25940058

  3. Accuracy and precision of silicon based impression media for quantitative areal texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Robert H; Darras, Laurent P; Purnell, Mark A

    2015-05-20

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis.

  4. Accuracy and Precision of Silicon Based Impression Media for Quantitative Areal Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Robert H.; Darras, Laurent P.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis. PMID:25991505

  5. What can the study of first impressions tell us about attitudinal ambivalence and paranoia in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Todorov, Alexander; Rebani, Yasmina; Ferrari, Kelsey; Lee, Sang Han; Calderone, Daniel; Nolan, Karen A; Butler, Pamela; Malaspina, Dolores; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-04-30

    Although social cognition deficits have been associated with schizophrenia, social trait judgments - or first impressions - have rarely been studied. These first impressions, formed immediately after looking at a person's face, have significant social consequences. Eighty-one individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 62 control subjects rated 30 neutral faces on 10 positive or negative traits: attractive, mean, trustworthy, intelligent, dominant, fun, sociable, aggressive, emotionally stable and weird. Compared to controls, patients gave higher ratings for positive traits as well as for negative traits. Patients also demonstrated more ambivalence in their ratings. Patients who were exhibiting paranoid symptoms assigned higher intensity ratings for positive social traits than non-paranoid patients. Social trait ratings were negatively correlated with everyday problem solving skills in patients. Although patients appeared to form impressions of others in a manner similar to controls, they tended to assign higher scores for both positive and negative traits. This may help explain the social deficits observed in schizophrenia: first impressions of higher degree are harder to correct, and ambivalent attitudes may impair the motivation to interact with others. Consistent with research on paranoia and self-esteem, actively-paranoid patients' positive social traits judgments were of higher intensity than non-paranoid patients'.

  6. Removal of latex glove contaminants prior to taking poly (vinylsiloxane) impressions.

    PubMed

    Browning, G C; Bromme, J C; Murchison, D F

    1994-11-01

    Sulfur compounds found in latex gloves may be deposited on teeth and gingiva, inhibiting the setting of poly(vinylsiloxane) impression materials. The objective of this in vivo study was to screen a variety of methods to remove these contaminants. Ten patients were each tested with eight decontamination methods. Before each trial, the facial surfaces and adjacent gingiva of the maxillary central and lateral incisors were contaminated with 20 wipes of a latex glove. Decontamination methods included a 30-second rinse with mouthwash, 3% hydrogen peroxide, or air-water syringe; a 30-second toothbrush scrub with water, mouthwash, or hydrogen peroxide; a 30-second cotton pellet-Cavidry scrub; and a 30-second cleaning with a prophy cup and pumice. A 10-second water rinse followed each method except the air-water syringe and Cavidry groups. A low-viscosity poly(vinylsiloxane) impression material was then used to take an impression of the area. To test surface inhibition, the gingival, tooth, and palatal impression surfaces were wiped with cotton-tipped applicators, and the degree of inhibition was subjectively categorized by two independent investigators. Mechanical decontamination with a toothbrush or pumice was significantly more effective than was rinsing alone, regardless of the solution used.

  7. Downplaying Positive Impressions: Compensation Between Warmth and Competence in Impression Management

    PubMed Central

    Holoien, Deborah Son; Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    The compensation effect demonstrates a negative relationship between the dimensions of warmth and competence in impression formation in comparative contexts. However, does compensation between warmth and competence extend to impression management? Two studies examined whether people actively downplay their warmth in order to appear competent and downplay their competence in order to appear warm. In Studies 1a and 1b, participants selected words pretested to be high or low in warmth and competence to include in an e-mail message to people they wanted to impress. As predicted, participants downplayed their competence when they wanted to appear warm (Study 1a) and downplayed their warmth when they wanted to appear competent (Study 1b). In Studies 2a and 2b, compensation also occurred when participants introduced themselves to another person, as evidenced by the questions they selected to answer about themselves, their self-reported goals, and their open-ended introductions. Compensation occurred uniquely between warmth and competence and not for other dimensions, such as healthiness (Study 2a) and political interest (Study 2b), which suggests that the compensation effect extends beyond a mere zero-sum exchange between dimensions. PMID:24550571

  8. Downplaying Positive Impressions: Compensation Between Warmth and Competence in Impression Management.

    PubMed

    Holoien, Deborah Son; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-01-01

    The compensation effect demonstrates a negative relationship between the dimensions of warmth and competence in impression formation in comparative contexts. However, does compensation between warmth and competence extend to impression management? Two studies examined whether people actively downplay their warmth in order to appear competent and downplay their competence in order to appear warm. In Studies 1a and 1b, participants selected words pretested to be high or low in warmth and competence to include in an e-mail message to people they wanted to impress. As predicted, participants downplayed their competence when they wanted to appear warm (Study 1a) and downplayed their warmth when they wanted to appear competent (Study 1b). In Studies 2a and 2b, compensation also occurred when participants introduced themselves to another person, as evidenced by the questions they selected to answer about themselves, their self-reported goals, and their open-ended introductions. Compensation occurred uniquely between warmth and competence and not for other dimensions, such as healthiness (Study 2a) and political interest (Study 2b), which suggests that the compensation effect extends beyond a mere zero-sum exchange between dimensions. PMID:24550571

  9. 47 CFR 73.7001 - Services subject to evaluation by point system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... evaluate mutually exclusive applications for new radio, television, and FM translator facilities, and for... mutually exclusive applications for new radio, television, and FM translator facilities, and for major... television translator and low power television facilities, and for major changes to existing facilities,...

  10. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  11. Subjectivity, Intentionality, and Manufactured Moves: Teachers' Perceptions of Voice in the Evaluation of Secondary Students' Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    Composition theorists concerned with students' academic writing ability have long questioned the application of voice as a standard for writing competence, and second language compositionists have suggested that English language learners may be disadvantaged by the practice of emphasizing voice in the evaluation of student writing. Despite these…

  12. Donor-site morbidity after fibula free flap transfer: a comparison of subjective evaluation using a visual analogue scale and point evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Vittayakittipong, P

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to compare the visual analogue scale (VAS) with the point evaluation system (PES) in the subjective evaluation of donor-site morbidity after fibula free flap transfer; (2) to compare the functional outcomes of fibula free flap surgery between patients with a normal body mass index (BMI) and patients with a high BMI, and between skin paddle and non-skin paddle harvesting; and (3) to determine the correlation between functional outcomes and related factors. This study included 15 patients who underwent a vascularized fibula free flap transfer for oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. Demographic data, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Subjective self-evaluation of functional outcomes was done using a VAS followed by a PES. Comparison of the VAS and PES scores was assessed with Pearson's correlation coefficient. The statistical significance was set at P<0.05. The VAS score was significantly correlated with the PES score (r=0.63, P=0.01). The tourniquet times for the skin paddle group were longer than for the non-skin paddle group (P=0.02), while the satisfaction score of the non-skin paddle group was higher than that of the skin paddle group (P=0.03). The VAS is a potential option for the subjective evaluation of donor-site morbidity after fibula free flap transfer.

  13. Evaluation of Candida albicans formation on feldspathic porcelain subjected to four surface treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Karayazgan, Banu; Atay, Arzu; Saracli, Mehmet Ali; Gunay, Yumushan

    2010-03-01

    Candida albicans, known for its adhesion on prosthetic materials and oral tissues, is the most frequently encountered fungal infection in dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of four different surface treatment methods and immersion in artificial saliva on the surface roughness of and candida adhesion on dental porcelains. The four surface treatment methods were namely: natural glaze, overglaze, dual ion exchange, and polishing. Surface roughness of porcelain was evaluated using a surface profilometer and by SEM. Candida adhesion was examined by culturing two Candida strains on porcelain specimens followed by a colorimetric method using XTT/Coenzyme Q0. It became evident that Candida adhesion was found more in the specimens treated with natural glaze and polishing. Further, by the visual inspection of SEM images and comparison of surface roughness, polished and natural-glazed specimens showed rougher surface characteristics than overglazed and dual-ion-exchanged specimens. PMID:20379024

  14. Prefabricated custom impression trays for the altered cast technique.

    PubMed

    Lund, P S; Aquilino, S A

    1991-12-01

    Removable partial prosthodontic treatment requires multiple patient appointments with intermediate laboratory steps. A technique is described that allows the removable partial denture framework try-in and the impression for the altered cast to be efficiently completed in a single appointment. The method uses prefabricated custom impression trays that are readily attached to the framework after the try-in.

  15. Impression Creep Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Naveena; Vijayanand, D.

    2013-02-01

    Impression creep tests have been carried out at 923 K on 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.14, and 0.22 wt.% nitrogen, under different applied stress levels. It was observed that the impression creep depth versus time curves were similar to the creep curves obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. The impression creep curves were characterized by a loading strain and primary and secondary creep stages similar to uniaxial creep curves. The tertiary stage observed in uniaxial creep curves was absent. The steady-state impression velocity was found to increase with increasing applied stress. The equivalent steady-state creep rates calculated from impression velocities were found to be in good agreement with the steady-state creep rates obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. Equivalence between applied stress and steady-state impression velocity with uniaxial creep stress and steady-state creep rate, respectively, has been established based on the laws of mechanics for time-dependent plasticity. It was found that impression velocity was sensitive to the variation in nitrogen content in the steel; impression velocity decreased with increasing nitrogen content, and the results obtained in this study were in agreement with those obtained from uniaxial creep tests.

  16. A Study of Peer Tutors Using the Neurological Impress Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.

    A study investigated the efficacy of using the neurological impress method in peer tutoring during reading instruction. The neurological impress reading method is a unison reading procedure in which the student and teacher or tutor read aloud simultaneously and quickly, with the student placed slightly in front of the teacher so that the teacher's…

  17. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  18. Impression Management and the Control of Social Anxieties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rowland S.

    Impression management refers to the concept that people engaged in interaction will attempt to control the image of themselves that others form. This provides a foundation for social interaction, giving others information about who we are and what to expect from us. A central concern of impression management is the manner in which we are evaluated…

  19. Read Two Impress: An Intervention for Disfluent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Rasinski, Timothy; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a research-based method to increase students' reading fluency. The method is called Read Two Impress, which is derived from the Neurological Impress Method and the method of repeated readings. The authors provide step-by-step procedures to effectively implement the reading fluency intervention. Previous research indicates that…

  20. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  1. Impression Management: The Web Presence of College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joanne Cardin

    2013-01-01

    Leadership profile pages on organizational websites have become staged opportunities for impression management. This research uses content analysis to examine the strategies of assertive impression management used to construct the leadership Web presence of the 70 presidents of national public universities, as identified in the "US News and…

  2. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  3. Subjective evaluations of multiple three-dimensional displays by a stereo-deficient viewer: an interesting case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Ellis, Sharon A.; Harrington, Lawrence K.; Havig, Paul R.

    2014-06-01

    A study was conducted with sixteen observers evaluating four different three-dimensional (3D) displays for usability, quality, and physical comfort. One volumetric display and three different stereoscopic displays were tested. The observers completed several different types of questionnaires before, during and after each test session. All observers were tested for distance acuity, color vision, and stereoscopic acuity. One observer in particular appeared to have either degraded or absent binocular vision on the stereo acuity test. During the subjective portions of the data collection, this observer showed no obvious signs of depth perception problems and finished the study with no issues reported. Upon further post-hoc stereovision testing of this observer, we discovered that he essentially failed all tests requiring depth judgments of fine disparity and had at best only gross levels of stereoscopic vision (failed all administered stereoacuity threshold tests, testing up to about 800 arc sec of disparity). When questioned about this, the stereo-deficiency was unknown to the observer, who reported having seen several stereoscopic 3D movies (and enjoyed the 3D experiences). Interestingly, we had collected subjective reports about the quality of three-dimensional imagery across multiple stereoscopic displays from a person with deficient stereo-vision. We discuss the participant's unique pattern of results and compare and contrast these results with the other stereo-normal participants. The implications for subjective measurements on stereoscopic three-dimensional displays and for subjective display measurement in general are considered.

  4. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical study evaluates the early efficacy of aflapin in subjects with osteoarthritis of knee.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Amar A; Mishra, Artatrana; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2011-01-01

    Aflapin(®) is a novel synergistic composition derived from Boswellia serrata gum resin (Indian Patent Application No. 2229/CHE/2008). Aflapin is more efficacious as an anti-inflammatory agent compared to the existing Boswellia products, 5-Loxin(®) and traditional 65% Boswellia extract. A 30-day, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted to validate the efficacy of Aflapin(®) in the management of clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (Clinical trial registration number: ISRCTN69643551). Sixty eligible OA subjects selected through screening were included in the study. The subjects received either 100 mg (n=30) of Aflapin(®) or placebo (n=30) daily for 30 days. Each subject was evaluated for pain and physical functions by using the standard tools (visual analog scale, Lequesne's Functional Index, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) at the baseline (day 0), and at days 5, 15 and 30. A series of biochemical tests in serum, urine and hematological parameters established the safety of Aflapin. The observations suggest that Aflapin conferred clinically and statistically significant improvements in pain scores and physical function scores in OA subjects. Aflapin provided significant improvements in pain score and functional ability in as early as 5 days of treatment. In conclusion, our observations suggest that Aflapin is a safe, fast acting and effective alternative intervention in the management of OA. PMID:22022214

  5. Randomized, Cross-Over Evaluation of Mobile Phone vs Paper Diary in Subjects with Mild to Moderate Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Eli O; Kelley, Norma; Hovell, Melbourne F

    2008-01-01

    Diaries are frequently used to evaluate therapy. Forgetfulness, however, can lead to missed entries. With paper diaries, these missing entries can be backfilled, compromising the reasons for using a diary. Electronic diaries are a potential means of mitigating this limitation. The pilot study was conducted to evaluate use of a mobile phone diary. Twelve subjects with mild persistent asthma were randomly assigned to mobile or paper diary for 2 weeks and then crossed over to use the other diary type for next 2 weeks. Of the 12 subjects, 7 preferred the mobile diary. However, the mean prevalence of missing data was greater when using the mobile (18% ± 9%) compared to paper diary (9% ± 4%; P = 0.05). In conclusion, the mobile diary was preferred by slightly more subjects. The greater prevalence of missing data when using this diary most likely results from the inability to backfill missing entries. Trial Registration: Clintrials.gov NCT00367263 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00367263). PMID:19412327

  6. [About the mutual compensation between advantages of Chinese and Western medical subjective indices for measurement and evaluation].

    PubMed

    Nie, Hui; Wang, Qi; Li, Rong-hua

    2010-12-01

    Upon the background of new medical model being formed, to make measurement/evaluation with subjective indices (SIM/E) has become a new hot-spot in Western medical researches and much methodological achievements have been made, but difficulties in comprehensive evaluation and result interpretation are still encountered. SIM/E has played important guideline roles in Chinese medicine (CM) clinical practice, and since it is characterized by holism and syndrome differentiation, it showed great advantage in comprehensive evaluation and result interpretation, though further standardization is yet required. To analyze the related tools and scientific regulations of SIM/E in Western medicine, and establish the concept, domain and conceptual framework of a SIM/E system based on the CM syndrome theory should be feasible to realize the mutual compensation between advantages of the two medical sciences, and promote the progress of SIM/E.

  7. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal. PMID:9656923

  8. Evaluation of a closed loop inductive power transmission system on an awake behaving animal subject.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Kwon, Ki Yong; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents in vivo experimental results for a closed loop wireless power transmission system to implantable devices on an awake behaving animal subject. In this system, wireless power transmission takes place across an inductive link, controlled by a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (TRF7960) operating at 13.56 MHz. Induced voltage on the implantable secondary coil is rectified, digitized by a 10-bit analog to digital converter, and transmitted back to the primary via back telemetry. Transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) circuitry were mounted on the back of an adult rat with a nominal distance of ~7 mm between their coils. Our experiments showed that the closed loop system was able to maintain the Rx supply voltage at the designated 3.8 V despite changes in the coils' relative distance and alignment due to animal movements. The Tx power consumption changed between 410 ~ 560 mW in order to deliver 27 mW to the receiver. The open loop system, on the other hand, showed undesired changes in the Rx supply voltage while the Tx power consumption was constant at 660 mW. PMID:22256112

  9. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness.

  10. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness. PMID:27630984

  11. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness. PMID:27630984

  12. Soil properties and perceived disturbance of grasslands subjected to mechanized military training: Evaluation of an index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Althoff, D.P.; Althoff, P.S.; Lambrecht, N.D.; Gipson, P.S.; Pontius, J.S.; Woodford, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanized maneuver training impacts the landscape by creating depressions, compacting soils, producing bare ground areas, transporting seeds of invasive plants, and crushing vegetation. We measured 3 physical, 13 chemical, and 2 biological soil properties and used a disturbance index (DI) based on perceptions of soil conditions on a military installation to assess the condition of 100 ?? 100 m plots (1 ha): 10 in 2002 and 10 in 2004. Potential DI scores range from 0 (no appreciable evidence of disturbance) to 1 (>95 per cent of the plot disturbed). Bulk density, porosity (%), and water content (%) - all at 5-1-10-0cm depth, and nematode family richness (NFR) were significantly, negatively correlated (Spearman coefficients, rs) with the DI of both years. The strong negative correlation (rs., = -0.69 in 2002, -0.79 in 2004) of NFR with the DI appears to reflect the status of nematode diversity and, therefore, may serve as a useful, inexpensive approach to rapidly assessing grasslands subjected to mechanized military training. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of thermal comfort in university classrooms through objective approach and subjective preference analysis.

    PubMed

    Nico, Maria Anna; Liuzzi, Stefania; Stefanizzi, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Assessing thermal comfort becomes more relevant when the aim is to maximise learning and productivity performances, as typically occurs in offices and schools. However, if, in the offices, the Fanger model well represents the thermal occupant response, then on the contrary, in schools, adaptive mechanisms significantly influence the occupants' thermal preference. In this study, an experimental approach was performed in the Polytechnic University of Bari, during the first days of March, in free running conditions. First, the results of questionnaires were compared according to the application of the Fanger model and the adaptive model; second, using a subjective scale, a complete analysis was performed on thermal preference in terms of acceptability, neutrality and preference, with particular focus on the influence of gender. The user possibility to control the indoor plant system produced a significant impact on the thermal sensation and the acceptability of the thermal environment. Gender was also demonstrated to greatly influence the thermal judgement of the thermal environment when an outdoor cold climate occurs.

  14. Comprehensive evaluation of coagulation in swine subjected to isolated primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Prat, Nicolas J; Montgomery, Robbie; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A; Sarron, Jean-Claude; Destombe, Casimir; May, Philippe; Magnan, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Blast is one of the major causes of injury and death in recent armed conflicts. With increased use of improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 71% of combat casualties are caused by explosions. Blast injuries can range from primary (caused by shock wave) to quaternary injuries (e.g., burns), and such injuries can result in an acute coagulopathy denoted by a hypocoagulable state. It is not clear if this coagulopathy observed in victims of explosion is caused by local or general effect of the primary blast injury itself. In this study, 13 pigs were subjected to severe isolated open-field blast injury and we measured indices of coagulation impairment during the first hour after injury: ROTEM, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, coagulation factors, thrombin generation potential, platelet count, platelet activation, platelet function, and procoagulant microparticle formation. After 1 h, the mortality was 33%. No coagulation dysfunction was observed in the survivors in this period. This study presented a highly reproducible and consistent isolated blast injury in large mammals with comprehensive coagulation testing. The data suggest that isolated primary blast injury is not responsible for acute coagulopathy of trauma in victims of explosion but seems to lead to an early hypercoagulable state.

  15. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion. PMID:26015714

  16. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise. PMID:26723357

  17. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise.

  18. Conjunctival impression cytology: bright hope of children.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    A practical method of screening for pre-clinical xerophthalmia due to vitamin A deficiency, called conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), is described as it is being used in a training stage in the Philippines. The noninvasive technic consists of touching the conjunctiva with a filter paper disc, and fixing and staining the disc on a slide for histology. Normally goblet cells with mucin spots are seen among sheets of epithelial cells. In abnormal conjunctiva from vitamin A deficient individuals, the epithelial cells are enlarged, and goblet cells are lacking. These specimens may be obtained from areas of the conjunctiva that appear clinically normal. The equipment needed is millipore paper, a hand-held suction pump with 5 feet of tubing, tissue or gauze, screw-top vials, labels, fixative, Papanicolaou stain, and a microscope. Vitamin A supplements can be given to affected children, or to the whole population at risk. With CIC training materials donated by International Center for Epidemiologic and Preventive Ophthalmology (ICEPO) at the Wilmer Institute, and the School of Hygiene and Public Health of the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, the 1st training class was certified by the Nutrition Center of the Philippines. Twice yearly training of physicians and technologists has been recommended.

  19. Subjective vs. objective evaluation of gallbladder opacification during oral cholecystography in comparative clinical trials: implications for studies involving visual assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, G.T.; Hunter, T.B.; Berk, R.N.; Patton, D.D.; Capp, M.P.

    1982-07-01

    Radiographs and CT images taken during oral cholecystography in dogs were interpreted in an independent, blind fashion by three radiologists on two occasions and visual assessment of gallbladder density compared to the actual CT values. While there was significant intra- and inter-observer variation, the mean scores for the observers' interpretations of both radiographs and prints correlated well with the actual CT values (p > 0.05). In five out of six comparisons between first and second readings, the observers gave a lower score on the second reading. The considerable variation reflects the problems inherent in subjective evaluation of agents that produce small but measurable differences in radiographic density. Studies involving such subjective data have to be carefully designed in order to obtain meaningful results.

  20. Neural correlates of self-deception and impression-management.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Tom F D; Burgess, Jenny; Wilkinson, Iain D; Hunter, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Self-deception and impression-management comprise two types of deceptive, but generally socially acceptable behaviours, which are common in everyday life as well as being present in a number of psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish and dissociate the 'normal' brain substrates of self-deception and impression-management. Twenty healthy participants underwent fMRI scanning at 3T whilst completing the 'Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding' test under two conditions: 'fake good', giving the most desirable impression possible and 'fake bad' giving an undesirable impression. Impression-management scores were more malleable to manipulation via 'faking' than self-deception scores. Response times to self-deception questions and 'fake bad' instructions were significantly longer than to impression-management questions and 'fake good' instructions respectively. Self-deception and impression-management manipulation and 'faking bad' were associated with activation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Impression-management manipulation was additionally associated with activation of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior middle temporal gyrus. 'Faking bad' was additionally associated with activation of right vlPFC, left temporo-parietal junction and right cerebellum. There were no supra-threshold activations associated with 'faking good'. Our neuroimaging data suggest that manipulating self-deception and impression-management and more specifically 'faking bad' engages a common network comprising mPFC and left vlPFC. Shorter response times and lack of dissociable neural activations suggests that 'faking good', particularly when it comes to impression-management, may be our most practiced 'default' mode. PMID:25527112

  1. Automatic control of a robot camera for broadcasting and subjective evaluation and analysis of reproduced images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Daiichiro; Ishikawa, Akio; Tsuda, Takao; Shimoda, Shigeru; Fukushima, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    We are studying about an intelligent robot camera that can automatically shoot an object and produce images with a powerful sense of reality as if a very skilled cameraman were at work. In this study, we designed a control algorithm based on cameramen's techniques for the control of the robot camera and conducted a series of experiments to understand the effects of camera work on how images look to viewers. The findings were as follows: (1) Evaluation scores are high when actual data by cameraman, especially typical data, are used as the position adjusting velocity curve of the target. (2) Evaluation scores are relatively high for images taken with feedback-feedforward camera control method when the target moves in one direction. (3) When both the direction and velocity of the target change and when the target gets bigger and faster in the view finder, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep the target within the view finder using the control method that imitates the human camera handling. (4) The method with mechanical feedback, on the other hand, is able to cope with rapid changes in the target's direction and velocity, constantly keeping the target within the view finder. Even so, the viewer finds the image rather mechanical than natural.

  2. Intrapulmonary vascular remodeling: MSCT-based evaluation in COPD and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosnier, Adeline; Fetita, Catalin; Thabut, Gabriel; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Whether COPD is generally known as a small airway disease, recent investigations suggest that vascular remodeling could play a key role in disease progression. This paper develops a specific investigation framework in order to evaluate the remodeling of the intrapulmonary vascular network and its correlation with other image or clinical parameters (emphysema score or FEV1) in patients with smoking- or genetic- (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency - AATD) related COPD. The developed approach evaluates the vessel caliber distribution per lung or lung region (upper, lower, 10%- and 20%- periphery) in relation with the severity of the disease and computes a remodeling marker given by the area under the caliber distribution curve for radii less than 1.6mm, AUC16. It exploits a medial axis analysis in relation with local caliber information computed in the segmented vascular network, with values normalized with respect to the lung volume (for which a robust segmentation is developed). The first results obtained on a 34-patient database (13 COPD, 13 AATD and 8 controls) showed significant vascular remodeling for COPD and AATD versus controls, with a negative correlation with the emphysema degree for COPD, but not for AATD. Significant vascular remodeling at 20% lung periphery was found both for the severe COPD and AATD patients, but not for the moderate groups. Also the vascular remodeling in AATD did not correlate with the FEV1, nor with DLCO, which might suggest independent mechanisms for bronchial and vascular remodeling in the lung.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE THORACOABDOMINAL MOBILITY OF OBESE SUBJECTS IN PRE-BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VELOSO, Ana Paula Limongi Richardelli; CUSMANICH, Karla Garcez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity can affect the thorax, diaphragm, and alterations in respiratory function even if the lungs are within normality. The respiratory compliance is very reduced by the increase in fat mass. Aim: To evaluate the effect of the physical therapeutic respiratory exercises on the thoracoabdominal mobility of obese individuals in pre-bariatric surgery Methods: Cross-sectional and descriptive study, which used the cirtometry (axillary, xiphoid and abdominal) to evaluate the mobility of 74 individuals, 27 men and 47 women, in pre-bariatric surgery, assisted by the team EMAD, after eight weeks of physiotherapy, following a protocol of exercises, reevaluating and compared the measures pre and post intervention. Results: Had positive correlation abdominal mobility in the total volume of all participants (p=0.010) and also for all the measures in the measurement of residual volume in three levels (p=0.000). Comparing genders, in total volume, cirtometry abdominal greater for women (p=0.015) when compared to men and residual volume, significance for either men or women in all measurements (p=0.000). Conclusion: Obese patients that underwent the physiotherapeutic treatment during the preoperative period, had pré respiratory dynamics improved by the increase in the mobility of the chest cavity and by the improvement of respiratory conscience. PMID:27683774

  4. Subject matter expert and public evaluations of a veterinary toxicology course brochure-writing assignment.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David C; Alpi, Kristine M; Chappell, Kimberly H

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary schools are increasingly developing students' communication skills, with an emphasis placed on practice conveying medical and scientific knowledge to different audiences. We describe how patient-centered written communication has been integrated into the training of veterinary students using toxicology-related preventive materials. Third-year veterinary students were given an assignment to prepare a client-focused brochure related to veterinary toxicology. Since 2010, 148 students have completed this assignment, with an average score of 93.4%. Use of a grading rubric was instituted in 2011 and resulted in a more rigorous assessment of the brochures by the course instructors. In this study, we evaluated a sample (n=6) selected from 10 brochures volunteered for further public and expert assessment. Each brochure was measured for readability and assessed with a rubric for perceived usefulness and acceptability by 12 veterinary toxicologists and 10 or 11 adult members of the public attending a college of veterinary medicine open house. Veterinary toxicologist review anticipated that the brochures would be useful for most clients, and the public reviewers confirmed this assessment. Evaluation of the brochures using set marking criteria and readability indexes showed that students had successfully targeted the chosen audiences. Feedback showed that the general public rated the sample brochures highly in terms of quality, usefulness, and interest. Completion of this study has resulted in revision of the grading rubric, an increased use of brochure examples, and additional instruction in readability assessment and brochure development, thereby improving the assignment as a learning exercise.

  5. Subjective evaluation of physical and mental workload interactions across different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ranjana K; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both physical and mental demands, and their interactions, have been shown to increase biomechanical loading and physiological reactivity as well as impair task performance. Because these interactions have shown to be muscle-dependent, the aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the NASA Task Load Index (NASA TLX) and Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) to evaluate physical and mental workload during muscle-specific tasks. Twenty-four participants performed upper extremity and low back exertions at three physical workload levels in the absence and presence of a mental stressor. Outcome measures included RPE and NASA TLX (six sub-scales) ratings. The findings indicate that while both RPEs and NASA TLX ratings were sensitive to muscle-specific changes in physical demand, only an additional mental stressor and its interaction with either physical demand or muscle groups influenced the effort sub-scale and overall workload scores of the NASA TLX. While additional investigations in actual work settings are warranted, the NASA TLX shows promise in evaluating perceived workload that is sensitive not only to physical and mental demands but also sensitive in determining workload for tasks that employ different muscle groups.

  6. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  7. Instructor and student pilots' subjective evaluation of a general aviation simulator with a terrain visual system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiteley, G. W.; Harris, R. L., Sr.

    1978-01-01

    Ten student pilots were given a 1 hour training session in the NASA Langley Research Center's General Aviation Simulator by a certified flight instructor and a follow-up flight evaluation was performed by the student's own flight instructor, who has also flown the simulator. The students and instructors generally felt that the simulator session had a positive effect on the students. They recommended that a simulator with a visual scene and a motion base would be useful in performing such maneuvers as: landing approaches, level flight, climbs, dives, turns, instrument work, and radio navigation, recommending that the simulator would be an efficient means of introducing the student to new maneuvers before doing them in flight. The students and instructors estimated that about 8 hours of simulator time could be profitably devoted to the private pilot training.

  8. Numerical Evaluation Of Shape Memory Alloy Recentering Braces In Reinforced Concrete Buildings Subjected To Seismic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Winsbert Curt

    Seismic protective techniques utilizing specialized energy dissipation devices within the lateral resisting frames have been successfully used to limit inelastic deformation in reinforced concrete buildings by increasing damping and/or altering the stiffness of these structures. However, there is a need to investigate and develop systems with self-centering capabilities; systems that are able to assist in returning a structure to its original position after an earthquake. In this project, the efficacy of a shape memory alloy (SMA) based device, as a structural recentering device is evaluated through numerical analysis using the OpenSees framework. OpenSees is a software framework for simulating the seismic response of structural and geotechnical systems. OpenSees has been developed as the computational platform for research in performance-based earthquake engineering at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). A non-ductile reinforced concrete building, which is modelled using OpenSees and verified with available experimental data is used for the analysis in this study. The model is fitted with Tension/Compression (TC) SMA devices. The performance of the SMA recentering device is evaluated for a set of near-field and far-field ground motions. Critical performance measures of the analysis include residual displacements, interstory drift and acceleration (horizontal and vertical) for different types of ground motions. The results show that the TC device's performance is unaffected by the type of ground motion. The analysis also shows that the inclusion of the device in the lateral force resisting system of the building resulted in a 50% decrease in peak horizontal displacement, and inter-story drift elimination of residual deformations, acceleration was increased up to 110%.

  9. Evaluating the subject-performed task effect in healthy older adults: relationship with neuropsychological tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Rita; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Souchay, Céline; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background An enhancement in recall of simple instructions is found when actions are performed in comparison to when they are verbally presented – the subject-performed task (SPT) effect. This enhancement has also been found with older adults. However, the reason why older adults, known to present a deficit in episodic memory, have a better performance for this type of information remains unclear. In this article, we explored this effect by comparing the performance on the SPT task with the performance on other tasks, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms that may explain this effect. Objective We hypothesized that both young and older adult groups should show higher recall in SPT compared with the verbal learning condition, and that the differences between age groups should be lower in the SPT condition. We aimed to explore the correlations between these tasks and known neuropsychological tests, and we also measured source memory for the encoding condition. Design A mixed design was used with 30 healthy older adults, comparing their performance with 30 healthy younger adults. Each participant was asked to perform 16 simple instructions (SPT condition) and to only read the other 16 instructions (Verbal condition – VT). The test phase included a free recall task. Participants were also tested with a set of neuropsychological measures (speed of processing, working memory and verbal episodic memory). Results The SPT effect was found for both age groups; but even for SPT materials, group differences in recall persisted. Source memory was found to be preserved for the two groups. Simple correlations suggested differences in correlates of SPT performance between the two groups. However, when controlling for age, the SPT and VT tasks correlate with each other, and a measure of episodic memory correlated moderately with both SPT and VT performance. Conclusions A strong effect of SPT was observed for all but one, which still displayed the expected aging

  10. Post Test Evaluation of HSCT Nozzle Acoustic Liner Subcomponents Subjected to a Hot Acoustic Durability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Lee, Kuan

    2008-01-01

    The acoustic liner system designed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was tested in a thermal-acoustic environment. Five ceramic matrix composite (CMC) acoustic tile configurations, five bulk acoustic absorbers, and one thermal protection system design were tested. The CMC acoustic tiles were subjected to two 2 3/4 hr ambient temperature acoustic exposures to measure their dynamic response. One exposure was conducted on the tiles alone and the second exposure included the tiles and the T-foam bulk absorber. The measured tile RMS strains were small. With or without the T-foam absorber, the dynamic strains were below strain levels that would cause damage during fatigue loading. After the ambient exposure, a 75-hr durability test of the entire acoustic liner system was conducted using a thermal-acoustic cycle that approximated the anticipated service cycle. Acoustic loads up to 139 dB/Hz and temperatures up to 1670 F (910 C) were employed during this 60 cycle test. During the durability test, the CMC tiles were exposed to temperatures up to 1780 F and a transient through thickness gradient up to 490 F. The TPS peak temperatures on the hot side of the panels ranged from 750 to 1000 F during the 60 cycles. The through thickness delta T ranged from 450 to 650 F, varying with TPS location and cycle number. No damage, such as cracks or chipping, was observed in the CMC tiles after completion of the testing. However, on tile warped during the durability test and was replaced after 43 or 60 cycles. No externally observed damage was found in this tile. No failure of the CMC fasteners occurred, but damage was observed. Cracks and missing material occurred, only in the fastener head region. No indication of damage was observed in the T-foam acoustic absorbers. The SiC foam acoustic absorber experienced damage after about 43 cycles. Cracking in the TPS occurred around the attachment holes and under a vent. In spite of the development of damage, the TPS maintained

  11. [The evaluation of the time of gastric radio-isotopic emptying in subjects with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Allegra, G; Costa, R; Scaffidi, L; Campisi, D; Cangialosi, G; Scaffidi, A

    1996-03-01

    Abnormal gastro-intestinal motility is a well-recognized complication of autonomic neuropathy in diabetics; delayed gastric emptying is frequently documented. Various pharmacologic agents have been used to treat this complication such as cisapride. We have evaluated the effects of cisapride on gastric emptying in nine diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy through radio-scintigraphic method. Gastric emptying diabetic patients was significantly prolonged compared control subjects (p < 0.01). In our study cisapride increased gastric emptying, but this did not reach statistical significance. We concluded that cisapride may be considered as a good alternative in cases where limited efficacy or side effects preclude the use of metoclopramide.

  12. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  13. Brief Report: Impression Formation in High-Functioning Autism--Role of Nonverbal Behavior and Stereotype Activating Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Caroline; Dratsch, Thomas; Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about whether stereotypes influence social judgments of autistic individuals, in particular when they compete with tacit face-to-face cues. We compared impression formation of 17 subjects with high-functioning autism (HFA) and 17 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls. Information about the profession of a job applicant served as…

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Impression Management Strategies and Leadership Emergence: The Moderating Roles of Gender and Virtualness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Yong-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal study spanning a twelve-week time period and involving 165 undergraduate students to examine the combined impact of gender and impression management strategies on leader emergence by members relying on low versus high virtualness. The subjects were formed into 44 self-managed work groups and charged with completing…

  15. Impression Cytology with Transfer in xerophthalmia and conjunctival diseases.

    PubMed

    Resnikoff, S; Luzeau, R; Filliard, G; Amedee-Manesme, O

    1992-11-01

    During a countrywide survey, we assessed the prevalence of clinical signs of xerophthalmia and of major conjunctival diseases in a randomized sample of 2,445 subjects representative of the population of the Republic of Djibouti. On a part of this sample, conjunctival Impression Cytology with Transfer (ICT) test and a plasma retinol determination were performed. Xerophthalmia as a public health problem was displayed by clinical signs (Bitot's spots, corneal scars among preschool children), low plasma retinol levels and ICT test results: 9.3% with deficient cytology in the rural area and 12.3% in the urban one (age-standardized rates). Results of ICT were related to age (p < 0.00001). Vitamin A deficiency was prevalent not only in preschool children but also up to 15 years. Moreover, ICT results are influenced by conjunctival diseases: compared to age-matched controls, there were more abnormal cytologies among patients with trachomatous inflammation (p = 0.025), conjunctivitis (p = 0.024) or Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (p = 0.015). Thus ICT shouldn't be performed among children with conjunctival diseases. In the region under study conjunctival diseases had high rates of prevalence: 16.4% of trachomatous scarrings in the urban area (standardized rate), 8% of conjunctivitis among rural preschool children, and 5% of Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis among children between 5 and 14 years in both areas. PMID:1490836

  16. Cardiovascular risk evaluation and prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in subjects with asymptomatic carotid artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Notaristefano, Antonio; Chieppa, Domenico; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella; Sassara, Marco; Altini, Corinna; Quistelli, Giovanni; Lepera, Mario Erminio; Favale, Stefano; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Silent ischemia is an asymptomatic form of myocardial ischemia, not associated with angina or anginal equivalent symptoms, which can be demonstrated by changes in ECG, left ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in a group of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods: A total of 37 patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques, without chest pain or dyspnea, was investigated. These patients were studied for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and family history of cardiac disease, and underwent technetium-99 m sestamibi myocardial stress-rest scintigraphy and echo-color Doppler examination of carotid arteries. Results: A statistically significant relationship (P = 0.023) was shown between positive responders and negative responders to scintigraphy test when both were tested for degree of stenosis. This relationship is surprising in view of the small number of patients in our sample. Individuals who had a positive scintigraphy test had a mean stenosis degree of 35% ± 7% compared with a mean of 44% ± 13% for those with a negative test. Specificity of our detection was 81%, with positive and negative predictive values of 60% and 63%, respectively. Conclusion: The present study confirms that carotid atherosclerosis is associated with coronary atherosclerosis and highlights the importance of screening for ischemic heart disease in patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques, considering eventually plaque morphology (symmetry, composition, eccentricity or concentricity of the plaque, etc) for patient stratification. PMID:21468172

  17. Robust health evaluation of gearbox subject to tooth failure with wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Miao, Qiang; Kang, Rui

    2009-07-01

    Machinery condition monitoring is a key step to perform condition-based maintenance (CBM) policy. In this paper, a novel health evaluation method based on wavelet decomposition is proposed. In the process of wavelet decomposition, a new index is defined to choose the optimal detail signal. After that, frequency spectrum growth index (FSGI) is proposed to serve as a quantitative description of machine health condition. This index is helpful for maintenance decision-making. At the same time, a semi-dynamic threshold criterion that can be used to check the existence of fault is established. In order to demonstrate the performance of this index with its semi-dynamic threshold, a comprehensive study with three sets of vibration data collected from a mechanical diagnostics test bed is conducted to validate this method. The analysis results indicate that the proposed method is insensitive to the selection of wavelet function and wavelet decomposition level, which means that FSGI has excellent performance in gear early fault detection.

  18. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  19. Objective versus Subjective Assessment of Methylphenidate Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor, Iris; Meidad, Sheera; Zalsman, Gil; Zemishlany, Zvi; Tyano, Sam; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Subjective improvement-assessment in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), following a single dose of methylphenidate (MPH) was compared to performance on the Test-of-Variables-of-Attention (TOVA). Self-perception was assessed with the clinical-global-impression-of-change (CGI-C). Participants included 165 ADHD subjects (M:F ratio…

  20. Dimensional stability of polyvinyl siloxane impression material reproducing the sulcular area.

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, Shifra; Levy, Guy; Brosh, Tamar; Harel, Noga; Ganor, Yehuda; Pilo, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The dimensional stability of a thin intra sulcular impression material reproducing the preparation finish line was evaluated. Impressions were taken of a stainless-steel master model of a simulated abutment with a 'gingival sulcus' using Express regular, Express fast and Aquasil. The putty-wash two-step technique was applied with spacer thicknesses of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm. Mid mesiodistal and bucco-lingual measurements were taken directly from the sulcular impression material after 0.5, 2, 24, 48 and 72 h via a Toolmaker's microscope. The discrepancies between the measurements of the impression material and the master model were calculated. The discrepancies changed significantly over time (p<0.001). The use of a 0.5 mm spacer resulted in a negative deviation from the model (2-46 µm), minimally after 2 h. The use of 1 and 1.5 mm spacers showed a positive deviation from the model (21-52 µm) and both are equally recommended. Investment can be postponed until 72 h.

  1. Evaluation of Carcass Hygiene in Sheep Subjected to Gas De-Pelting With Different Skinning Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Branciari, Raffaella; Miraglia, Dino; Stocchi, Roberta; Rea, Stefano; Loschi, Anna Rita

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the hygienic status of sheep carcasses skinned with two different procedures, the pulling down and Y cut methods, with and without the use of compressed filtered air inflation. Five sheep carcasses per day for each of the four skinning methods considered were sampled on ten different slaughtering days using wet and dry swab techniques at a local abattoir specialised in ovine slaughtering. A pool of four different sampling sites (brisket, shoulder, thorax and rump) was considered for each animal. Furthermore, ten animals were also randomly selected on different slaughtering days for each of the four skinning techniques and the four sampling sites were separately swabbed and analysed in each animal. The total viable count (TVC) and Enterobacte riaceae count were performed and the presence of Salmonella spp. was also tested. The daily average mean value of each parameter was in compliance with limits set by Regulation (EC) 1441/2007, falling into satisfactory or acceptable category for Enterobacteriaceae and within the acceptable level range for TVC for both the methods used with and without air de-pelting. For both TVC and Enterobacteriaceae count, no statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were recorded between samples obtained from carcasses skinned with and without air inflation for either of the skinning methods used and any of the sites sampled. No Salmonella spp. were detected in any of the tested samples. Nonetheless, no improvement in the carcass hygiene was detected either and, for this reason, other aspects should be taken into consideration when considering adopting the gas de-pelting method. PMID:27800363

  2. Objective and subjective evaluation of donor-site morbidity after nipple sharing for nipple areola reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haslik, W; Nedomansky, J; Hacker, S; Nickl, S; Schroegendorfer, K F

    2015-02-01

    Nipple reconstruction is of importance in achieving the best possible aesthetic outcome after breast reconstruction. Nipple sharing is a common technique; this study focused on the potential morbidity at the donor nipple. Between 2008 and 2012, 26 patients underwent nipple sharing at our institution. The donor nipple was examined before and after the procedure (mean follow-up of 21 months). Sensitivity, projection, diameter, and patient satisfaction were evaluated. The sensitivity in the donor nipple decreased, albeit insignificantly, from 1.2 g/mm2 (0.8-1.6) to 1.8 g/mm2 (0.8-4.8) (p=0.054, n=26). The projection due to graft removal decreased from 8.0 mm (6.8-10.0) to 4.5 mm (4.0-5.0) (p=0.001). Of the patients, 88% were "very satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied" with the sensitivity and 89% with the symmetry between the donor and reconstructed nipple. At least 60% of the patients were "very satisfied" with all aesthetic outcome parameters (projection, appearance, naturalness, color, and shape). All patients would agree to undergo this procedure again, if necessary. Nipple sharing was associated with minimal morbidity at the donor nipple. The postoperative projection was adequate. Regardless of whether simultaneous mastopexy was performed, the loss of sensitivity was minimal and presumably imperceptible to the patient. By using no sutures after graft removal and letting the donor nipple heal spontaneously, scarring was minimized and the natural appearance and good sensitivity of the donor nipple were preserved.

  3. Contamination level of alginate impressions arriving at a dental laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Fiehn, N-E; Owall, B

    2002-09-01

    The contamination level of alginate impressions delivered to a large dental laboratory in Sweden was determined. One hundred and seven consecutive alginate impressions were included during 7 days. Samples were taken and transferred into sterile physiological saline and analysed microbiologically for colony-forming units (cfu) as well as nonhemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, and beta-hemolytic colonies. After sampling, the clinics were contacted and asked to fill in simple questionnaires about their routines of disinfecting impressions. The questionnaire study revealed that about half of the clinics had some kind of disinfection routine, while the others rinsed in running water only. Seventy-two percent of the impressions yielded growth of bacteria, with a median number of 1.3x10(2) cfu. Thirteen per cent of the samples yielded >10(3) cfu, with a maximum number of 3.4x10(4) cfu. The majority of isolates were non- and alpha-hemolytic bacteria. Growth was recorded in 61.3% of disinfected impressions, and the numbers of bacteria in disinfected and nondisinfected impressions were similar. These findings raise the question of whether impressions need to be disinfected or if proper handling and hygienic procedures are sufficient to block the possible route of infection. PMID:12271349

  4. Social relevance enhances memory for impressions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1 using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2 older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults' ability to successfully retrieve contextual information.

  5. Contamination level of alginate impressions arriving at a dental laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Fiehn, N-E; Owall, B

    2002-09-01

    The contamination level of alginate impressions delivered to a large dental laboratory in Sweden was determined. One hundred and seven consecutive alginate impressions were included during 7 days. Samples were taken and transferred into sterile physiological saline and analysed microbiologically for colony-forming units (cfu) as well as nonhemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, and beta-hemolytic colonies. After sampling, the clinics were contacted and asked to fill in simple questionnaires about their routines of disinfecting impressions. The questionnaire study revealed that about half of the clinics had some kind of disinfection routine, while the others rinsed in running water only. Seventy-two percent of the impressions yielded growth of bacteria, with a median number of 1.3x10(2) cfu. Thirteen per cent of the samples yielded >10(3) cfu, with a maximum number of 3.4x10(4) cfu. The majority of isolates were non- and alpha-hemolytic bacteria. Growth was recorded in 61.3% of disinfected impressions, and the numbers of bacteria in disinfected and nondisinfected impressions were similar. These findings raise the question of whether impressions need to be disinfected or if proper handling and hygienic procedures are sufficient to block the possible route of infection.

  6. The Subjective Evaluation Experiments on an Automatic Video Editing System Using Vision-based Head Tracking for Multiparty Conversations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemae, Yoshinao; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Junji; Ozawa, Shinji

    This paper presents experiments conducted to evaluate an automatic video editing system, founded on vision-based head tracking, that clearly conveys face-to-face multiparty conversations, such as meetings, to viewers. Systems that archive meetings and teleconferences to effectively facilitate human communication are attracting considerable interest. Conventional systems use a fixed-viewpoint camera and simple camera selection based on participants' utterances. Unfortunately, they fail to adequately convey who is talking to whom and nonverbal information about participants etc., to viewers. To solve this problem, we previously proposed an automatic video editing system using vision-based head tracking. This paper describes subjective evaluation experiments in which videos of entire conversations with 3 participants were presented to viewers; the results confirm the effectiveness of our system.

  7. Self-compassion training modulates alpha-amylase, heart rate variability, and subjective responses to social evaluative threat in women.

    PubMed

    Arch, Joanna J; Brown, Kirk Warren; Dean, Derek J; Landy, Lauren N; Brown, Kimberley D; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of research has revealed that social evaluative stressors trigger biological and psychological responses that in chronic forms have been linked to aging and disease. Recent research suggests that self-compassion may protect the self from typical defensive responses to evaluation. We investigated whether brief training in self-compassion moderated biopsychological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in women. Compared to attention (placebo) and no-training control conditions, brief self-compassion training diminished sympathetic (salivary alpha-amylase), cardiac parasympathetic, and subjective anxiety responses, though not HPA-axis (salivary cortisol) responses to the TSST. Self-compassion training also led to greater self-compassion under threat relative to the control groups. In that social stress pervades modern life, self-compassion represents a promising approach to diminishing its potentially negative psychological and biological effects.

  8. Evaluation of the autonomic response in healthy subjects during treadmill training with assistance of a robot-driven gait orthosis.

    PubMed

    Magagnin, Valentina; Porta, Alberto; Fusini, Laura; Licari, Vittorio; Bo, Ivano; Turiel, Maurizio; Molteni, Franco; Cerutti, Sergio; Caiani, Enrico G

    2009-04-01

    Body weight supported treadmill training assisted with a robotic driven gait orthosis is an emerging clinical tool helpful to restore gait in individuals with loss of motor skills. However, the autonomic response during this rehabilitation protocol is not known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the autonomic response during a routine protocol of motor rehabilitation through spectral and symbolic analyses of short-term heart rate variability in a group of 20 healthy subjects (11 men, mean age 25+/-3.8 years). The protocol included the following phases: (1) sitting position; (2) standing position; (3) suspension during subject instrumentation; (4 and 5) robotic-assisted treadmill locomotion at 1.5km/h and 2.5km/h respectively with partial body weight support; (6) standing recovery after exercise. Results showed a significant tachycardia associated with the reduction in variance during the suspended phase of the protocol compared to the sitting position. Spectral analysis did not demonstrate any significant autonomic response during the entire protocol, while symbolic analysis detected an increase in sympathetic modulation during body suspension and an increase of vagal modulation during walking. These results could be used to improve understanding of the cardiovascular effects of rehabilitation in subjects undergoing robotic driven gait orthosis treadmill training.

  9. Evaluation of mandibular length in subjects with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using the cervical vertebrae maturation.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Rodrigo; Sadoco, Elaine Cristina; Armond, Mônica Costa; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mandibular size in boys and girls with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, taking into consideration the bone maturation stage, as defined by the cervical vertebrae maturation. One hundred and sixty cephalometric radiographs were obtained from subjects (aged between 7 and 12 years) with Class I or Class II skeletal patterns, according to the ANB angle and WITS appraisal. The Class I sample consisted of 80 subjects (40 boys, 40 girls). The Class II sample also consisted of 80 subjects (40 boys, 40 girls). On a cross-sectional basis, mandibular length (Co-Gn) was compared between groups and genders. The between-stages changes were also evaluated, with the cervical vertebrae analysis used for establishing the bone maturation stages at CS2, CS3, CS4 and CS5. The results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The mandibular length differed between skeletal patterns only at the earlier stages of development. In the Class I pattern, the mandibular lengths of boys were greater than those of girls at stages CS2, CS4 and CS5, whereas in the Class II pattern, the mandibular lengths of boys were greater than those of girls at stages CS2, CS3 and CS4. The present results indicate a sexual dimorphism in the mandibular length at almost all stages of bone maturation, in exception of the CS5 stage in Class II.

  10. Modeling the Step-like Response in the Upper Limbs of Hemiplegic Subjects for Evaluation of Spasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Uchida, Ryusei

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new modeling technique for quantitative evaluation of spasticity in the upper limbs of hemiplegic patients. Each subject lay on a bed, and his forearm was supported with a jig to measure the elbow joint angle. The subject was instructed to relax and not to resist the step-like load which was applied to extend the elbow joint. The elbow joint angle and electromyogram (EMG) of the biceps muscle, triceps muscle and brachioradialis muscle were measured. First, the step-like response was approximated with a proposed mathematical model based on musculoskeletal and physiological characteristics by the least square method. The proposed model involved an elastic component depending on both muscle activities and elbow joint angle. The responses were approximated well with the proposed model. Next, the torque generated by the elastic component was estimated. The normalized elastic torque was approximated with a dumped sinusoid by the least square method. The reciprocal of the time constant and the natural frequency of the normalized elastic torque were calculated and they varied depending on the grades of the modified Ashworth scale of the subjects. It was suggested that the proposed modeling technique would provide a good quantitative index of spasticity as shown in the relationship between the reciprocal of the time constant and the natural frequency.

  11. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: an evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, K

    1991-01-01

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply--besides a strict discipline--balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality. PMID:11540741

  12. Effect of rider experience and evaluator expertise on subjective grading of lameness in sound and unsound sports horses under saddle.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Fernando J; Waldner, Cheryl; Reed, Stephen; Autet, Fernando; Corbeil, Louise; Campbell, John

    2014-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether rider experience influences the assessment and grading of lameness in horses based on under-saddle gait analysis. Thirteen adult sports horses in active training were included in the study. After a baseline lameness and neurologic examination by the principal investigators, horses were videotaped while being ridden by an experienced and a less experienced rider. A 3-minute video was made for each horse and rider and 26 videos were randomly ordered and compiled on a DVD. Veterinarians with different levels of experience in evaluating lameness and veterinary students viewed the DVD and assigned a lameness score to each horse/rider combination. In a model accounting for the expertise of the evaluator, there was no difference in overall lameness scores between experienced and less experienced riders. This result was consistent for both sound and unsound horses. The overall lameness scores reported by specialists and students, however, differed significantly. The lameness score reported by the study participants while the horse was ridden was significantly associated with the subjective baseline lameness assessment reported by the principal investigators for the same limb when the horse was not under saddle. Additional work is necessary to determine whether riders with even lower skill levels would further alter the balance and motion pattern of the horse and have more influence on subjective grading of lameness. PMID:24688169

  13. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: An evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Kitsou

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply—besides a strict discipline—balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality.

  14. Subjective and objective parameters in the evaluation of radiofrequency ablation of the inferior turbinate do not correlate: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Gerstenberger, Claus; Rant, Bettina; Nemetz, Ulrike; Brezjak-Kahlert, Christiana; Wolf, Axel; Freudenschuss, Kurt; Wolf, Gerald

    2016-08-01

    Inferior turbinate hypertrophy is a common cause of nasal obstruction. We conducted a prospective study to correlate subjective and objective parameters in assessing the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Our initial study population was made up of 10 patients who presented with nasal obstruction; 1 patient was lost to follow-up, leaving us with 7 women and 2 men, aged 26 to 65 years (mean: 37.9 ± 12.8), and 16 turbinates (7 bilateral, 1 right, and 1 left). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, Nasal Obstruction and Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) questionnaire scores, rhinomanometry results, and CT- and MRI-based volumetry were obtained before RFA and 6 months afterward. For the subjective parameters, the mean pre- and postoperative VAS scores for the 16 turbinates were 6.6 ± 1.6 and 2.8 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001), respectively, and the mean pre- and postoperative NOSE scores in the 9 patients were 15.3 ± 3.1 and 5.8 ± 5.4 (p = 0.003). For the objective parameters, the mean pre- and postoperative rhinomanometry values at 150 Pa were 241.0 ± 141.3 and 265.4 ± 157.3 ml/sec (p = 0.403), and the mean pre- and postoperative volumetry values were 5.3 ± 2.5 and 5.0 ± 2.1 cm(3) (p = 0.551). Note that only the differences in the subjective parameters reached statistical significance. RFA of the inferior turbinates as a treatment for nasal obstruction is safe and easy. However, our study found a discrepancy between the subjective and objective outcomes parameters, as the former showed highly significant improvement and the latter showed only a slight improvement that did not reach statistical significance. PMID:27551845

  15. The Apathy Evaluation Scale: A Comparison of Subject, Informant, and Clinician Report in Cognitively Normal Elderly and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Brendan; Donovan, Nancy J.; Munro, Catherine E.; Aghjayan, Sarah L.; Wigman, Sarah E.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marshall, Gad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Apathy is a common neuropsychiatric symptom in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Detecting apathy accurately may facilitate earlier diagnosis of AD. The Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) is a promising tool for measurement of apathy in prodromal and possibly preclinical AD. Objective To compare the three AES sub-scales—subject-reported (AES-S), informant-reported (AES-I), and clinician-reported (AES-C)—over time in individuals at risk for AD due to MCI and advanced age (cognitively normal [CN] elderly). Methods Mixed effects longitudinal models were used to assess predictors of score for each AES sub-scale. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess which AES sub-scales predict progression from MCI to AD dementia. Results Fifty seven MCI and 18 CN subjects (ages 53–86) were followed for 1.4±1.2 years and 0.7±0.7 years, respectively. Across the three mixed effects longitudinal models, the common findings were associations between greater apathy and greater years in study, a baseline diagnosis of MCI (compared to CN), and male sex. CN elderly self-reported greater apathy compared to that reported by informants and clinicians, while individuals with MCI under-reported their apathy compared to informants and clinicians. Of the three sub-scales, the clinician-reported AES (AES-C) best predicted transition from MCI to AD dementia. Conclusion In a sample of CN elderly and elderly with MCI, apathy increased over time, particularly in men and those with MCI. Self-reported AES scores may be more sensitive than informant and clinician-report when subjects are CN, but less reliable if subjects have MCI. Moreover, the clinician-reported AES sub-scale predicted progression from MCI to AD dementia. PMID:26401564

  16. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity.

  17. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. PMID:25090148

  18. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions. PMID:27688385

  19. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kršek, Hrvoje; Dulčić, Nikša

    2015-03-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients' lost functions.

  20. Fatal anaphylactic shock due to a dental impression material.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Spagnolo, Elvira Ventura; Cardia, Giulio; Minciullo, Paola L

    2009-01-01

    Materials used for dental impressions are usually safe. This study describes a case of fatal anaphylaxis that appeared immediately after the oral mucosa came into contact with an alginate paste used for dental impressions. The cadaveric examination and the postmortem toxicology report confirmed that the cause of death was anaphylactic shock. The patient was affected by both cardiovascular and lung diseases that worsened the condition and forbade the use of epinephrine. To the authors' knowledge, dental impression materials, and alginate in particular, have not been reported previously as being a cause of anaphylaxis.

  1. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions.

  2. Statistical analysis on the concordance of the radiological evaluation of fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction☆

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Gonçalves; da Cruz Cerqueira, Sergio Auto; de Lima, Alexandre Fernandes; de Mathias, Marcelo Bezerra; Aramburu, José Paulo Gabbi; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the current classifications for fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, since the classifications made using traditional radiographs in anteroposterior and lateral views have been questioned regarding their reproducibility. In the literature, it has been suggested that other options are needed, such as use of preoperative radiographs on fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction, with stratification by the evaluators. The aim was to demonstrate which classification systems present better statistical reliability. Results In the Universal classification, the results from the third-year resident group (R3) and from the group of more experienced evaluators (Staff) presented excellent correlation, with a statistically significant p-value (p < 0.05). Neither of the groups presented a statistically significant result through the Frykman classification. In the AO classification, there were high correlations in the R3 and Staff groups (respectively 0.950 and 0.800), with p-values lower than 0.05 (respectively <0.001 and 0.003). Conclusion It can be concluded that radiographs performed under traction showed good concordance in the Staff group and in the R3 group, and that this is a good tactic for radiographic evaluations of fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. PMID:26962498

  3. A new generation of sterile and radiopaque impression materials: an in vitro cytotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Coppi, Chiara; Paolinelli Devincenzi, Chiara; Bortolini, Sergio; Consolo, Ugo; Tiozzo, Roberta

    2007-07-01

    Impression materials are largely used to record the geometry of dental tissue. Hence, the assessment of their possible cytotoxicity is a necessary step in the evaluation of their biocompatibility. The present study is carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new elastomeric sterile and radiopaque impression material. Human gingival fibroblasts, cultured in vitro are exposed directly to Elite Implant in three different viscosities, heavy, medium, and light. At 3, 9, 24, 48, and 72 h, the cellular proliferation is evaluated. In parallel, human gingival fibroblasts are exposed indirectly by means of fluid extracts of Elite Implant. The cellular viability is evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, (MTT) assay (Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The gingival fibroblasts proliferation and viability are unaffected by the presence of Elite Implant. This new impression material may represent a safe medical device for clinical and surgical applications. In addition, this material is radiopaque and, thus, can be identified radiographically. PMID:17065163

  4. Influence of Some Hypnotist and Subject Variables on Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Robert P.; Land, Jay M.

    1971-01-01

    As predicted, subjects run by the objectively warmer, more competent appearing hypnosis obtained significantly higher susceptibility scores. Structured warmth produced significant differences only in subjects run by the objectively less warm hypnotists. Both structured warmth and experience affected subjects' subjective impressions of whether they…

  5. Accuracy of Gypsum Casts after Different Impression Techniques and Double Pouring

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Stephania Caroline Rodolfo; Messias, Aion Mangino; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of gypsum casts after different impression techniques and double pouring. Ten patients were selected and for each one it was obtained 5 partial putty/wash impressions with vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) material from teeth #13 to #16 with partial metal stock trays. The following techniques were performed: (1) one-step; two-step relief with: (2) PVC film; (3) slow-speed tungsten carbide bur and scalpel blade, (4) small movements of the tray and (5) without relief—negative control. The impressions were disinfected with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes and stored during 110 and 230 minutes for the first and second pouring, respectively, with type IV gypsum. Three intra-oral lateral photographs of each patient were taken using a tripod and a customized radiographic positioner. The images were imported into ImageJ software and the total area of the buccal surface from teeth #13 to #16 was measured. A 4.0% coefficient of variance was criterion for using these measurements as Baseline values. The casts were photographed and analyzed using the same standardization for the clinical images. The area (mm2) obtained from the difference between the measurements of each gypsum cast and the Baseline value of the respective patient were calculated and analyzed by repeated-measures two way-ANOVA and Mauchly’s Sphericity test (α = 0.05). No significant effect was observed for Impression technique (P = 0.23), Second pouring (P = 0.99) and their interaction (P = 0.25). The impression techniques and double pouring did not influence the accuracy of the gypsum casts. PMID:27736967

  6. A selective-pressure impression technique for the edentulous maxilla.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jacqueline P; Raghavendra, Sangeetha; Taylor, Thomas D

    2004-09-01

    This article describes a selective-pressure impression technique for the edentulous maxilla that is intended to compensate for the polymerization shrinkage of heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin and provides improved palatal adaptation of the definitive denture base.

  7. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces.

  8. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces. PMID:21209992

  9. A study of the antimicrobial properties of impression tray adhesives.

    PubMed

    Herman, D A

    1993-01-01

    Three impression tray adhesives were tested for their antimicrobial actions on three bacteria strains used for disinfectant studies. The colony forming unit (CFU) counts from plating the adhesive-exposed bacteria showed a significant reduction in number compared with the CFU of the controls. Statistical analyses confirmed the significant reduction (p < 0.05) for all but one test case. Proper infection control procedures should always be followed, but the added benefits of disinfection by impression tray adhesives can help prevent cross contamination.

  10. Subjective results of a simulator evaluation using synthetic terrain imagery presented on a helmet-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rate, Christopher R.; Probert, Andrew; Wright, David; Corwin, William H.; Royer, Rick

    1994-06-01

    Combat mission scenarios require pilots to maneuver their aircraft over and around various terrain features at high speeds and low altitudes day, night, or in adverse meteorological conditions. While current systems (e.g., Night Vision Goggles and FLIR) provide some support for the pilot, they are not adequate in many weather conditions. However, the effects of adverse weather can be overcome using the U. S. Defense Mapping Agency's digital terrain elevation database to create a synthetic terrain image (STI). The concept of synthetically derived terrain imagery, projected as background on a Helmet-Mounted Display, was investigated in regards to its utility for enhancing pilot terrain awareness. An initial study using four Lockheed pilots and six USAF pilots was conducted to determine subjective preference of STI formats. A follow-on study, using two preferred formats, evaluated STI in a full-mission simulation environment. Six F-16 pilots completed a half day of training and a one day evaluation. Data was collected on missions involving low level navigation, followed by a laser guided bomb loft or offset roll- in dive bomb attack. Thirteen missions per pilot were completed including bomb runs using LANTIRN without STI. All the runs were at night with either 'poor' or 'good' FLIR conditions over rough or moderately rolling terrain. The evaluation indicated that pilots found STI to be useful and offered real-time support for low level navigation. Some problems still exist (e.g., field of view of HMD), which will be investigated in future studies.

  11. Outcomes in Economic Evaluations of Public Health Interventions in Low‐ and Middle‐Income Countries: Health, Capabilities and Subjective Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Lorgelly, Paula; Yamabhai, Inthira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Public health programmes tend to be complex and may combine social strategies with aspects of empowerment, capacity building and knowledge across sectors. The nature of the programmes means that some effects are likely to occur outside the healthcare sector; this breadth impacts on the choice of health and non‐health outcomes to measure and value in an economic evaluation. Employing conventional outcome measures in evaluations of public health has been questioned. There are concerns that such measures are too narrow, overlook important dimensions of programme effect and, thus, lead to such interventions being undervalued. This issue is of particular importance for low‐income and middle‐income countries, which face considerable budget constraints, yet deliver a large proportion of health activities within public health programmes. The need to develop outcome measures, which include broader measures of quality of life, has given impetus to the development of a variety of new, holistic approaches, including Sen's capability framework and measures of subjective wellbeing. Despite their promise, these approaches have not yet been widely applied, perhaps because they present significant methodological challenges. This paper outlines the methodological challenges for the identification and measurement of broader outcomes of public health interventions in economic evaluation in low‐income and middle‐income countries. PMID:26804360

  12. An evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human subject with the use of bio-impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papezova, S.; Papez, V.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on a living human organism was monitored using a bio-impedance evaluation of vasodilatation effects. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human being was implemented by means of a quantitative evaluation of changes in the bio-impedance of the tissue. The pulse of the magnetic field was controlled by a pseudo-random impulse signal using a power switch that controlled the current of the applicator coil. The peak magnetic field flux density was approximately 60 mT. The bio-impedance was measured by a four-electrode method by means of a radiofrequency narrow band vector bioimpedance meter. Experiments were performed on the magnetic exposure of the forearm of an exposed human subject. During exposure to a magnetic field, the bio-impedance change signal level increases above the normal level, and reaches the maximum level after about 10 minutes. The maximum value is approximately 50 % higher than the normal level.

  13. Outcomes in Economic Evaluations of Public Health Interventions in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Health, Capabilities and Subjective Wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Greco, Giulia; Lorgelly, Paula; Yamabhai, Inthira

    2016-02-01

    Public health programmes tend to be complex and may combine social strategies with aspects of empowerment, capacity building and knowledge across sectors. The nature of the programmes means that some effects are likely to occur outside the healthcare sector; this breadth impacts on the choice of health and non-health outcomes to measure and value in an economic evaluation. Employing conventional outcome measures in evaluations of public health has been questioned. There are concerns that such measures are too narrow, overlook important dimensions of programme effect and, thus, lead to such interventions being undervalued. This issue is of particular importance for low-income and middle-income countries, which face considerable budget constraints, yet deliver a large proportion of health activities within public health programmes. The need to develop outcome measures, which include broader measures of quality of life, has given impetus to the development of a variety of new, holistic approaches, including Sen's capability framework and measures of subjective wellbeing. Despite their promise, these approaches have not yet been widely applied, perhaps because they present significant methodological challenges. This paper outlines the methodological challenges for the identification and measurement of broader outcomes of public health interventions in economic evaluation in low-income and middle-income countries.

  14. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Subjective Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking. For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a two-site placebo-controlled alcohol administration study (N=215). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the following: (1) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition (2) good internal consistency, (3) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use, and (4) concurrent/incremental utility in accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high arousal negative and low arousal positive subscales. PMID:23647036

  15. Music performance anxiety in skilled pianists: effects of social-evaluative performance situation on subjective, autonomic, and electromyographic reactions.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Michiko; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Murakoshi, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Music performance anxiety (MPA), or stage fright in music performance, is a serious problem for many musicians, because performance impairment accompanied by MPA can threaten their career. The present study sought to clarify on how a social-evaluative performance situation affects subjective, autonomic, and motor stress responses in pianists. Measurements of subjective state anxiety, heart rate (HR), sweat rate (SR), and electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper extremity muscles were obtained while 18 skilled pianists performed a solo piano piece(s) of their choice under stressful (competition) and non-stressful (rehearsal) conditions. Participants reported greater anxiety in the competition condition, which confirmed the effectiveness of stress manipulation. The HR and SR considerably increased from the rehearsal to competition condition reflecting the activation of sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, participants showed higher levels of the EMG magnitude of proximal muscles (biceps brachii and upper trapezius) and the co-contraction of antagonistic muscles in the forearm (extensor digitorum communis and flexor digitorum superficialis) in the competition condition. Although these responses can be interpreted as integral components of an adaptive biological system that creates a state of motor readiness in an unstable or unpredictable environment, they can adversely influence pianists by disrupting their fine motor control on stage and by increasing the risk of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Music performance anxiety in skilled pianists: effects of social-evaluative performance situation on subjective, autonomic, and electromyographic reactions.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Michiko; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Murakoshi, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Music performance anxiety (MPA), or stage fright in music performance, is a serious problem for many musicians, because performance impairment accompanied by MPA can threaten their career. The present study sought to clarify on how a social-evaluative performance situation affects subjective, autonomic, and motor stress responses in pianists. Measurements of subjective state anxiety, heart rate (HR), sweat rate (SR), and electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper extremity muscles were obtained while 18 skilled pianists performed a solo piano piece(s) of their choice under stressful (competition) and non-stressful (rehearsal) conditions. Participants reported greater anxiety in the competition condition, which confirmed the effectiveness of stress manipulation. The HR and SR considerably increased from the rehearsal to competition condition reflecting the activation of sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, participants showed higher levels of the EMG magnitude of proximal muscles (biceps brachii and upper trapezius) and the co-contraction of antagonistic muscles in the forearm (extensor digitorum communis and flexor digitorum superficialis) in the competition condition. Although these responses can be interpreted as integral components of an adaptive biological system that creates a state of motor readiness in an unstable or unpredictable environment, they can adversely influence pianists by disrupting their fine motor control on stage and by increasing the risk of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:19701628

  17. Evaluation of acceleration and deceleration cardiac processes using phase-rectified signal averaging in healthy and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bas, Rosana; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Valencia, Jose F; Voss, Andreas; de Luna, Antonio Bayés; Caminal, Pere

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of the Phase-Rectified Signal Averaging (PRSA) method for improved risk prediction in cardiac patients. Moreover, this technique, which separately evaluates acceleration and deceleration processes of cardiac rhythm, allows the effect of sympathetic and vagal modulations of beat-to-beat intervals to be characterized. Holter recordings of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) patients were analyzed: high-risk (HR), who suffered sudden cardiac death (SCD) during the follow-up; and low-risk (LR), without any kind of cardiac-related death. Moreover, a control group of healthy subjects was analyzed. PRSA indexes were analyzed, for different time scales T and wavelet scales s, from RR series of 24 h-ECG recordings, awake periods and sleep periods. Also, the behavior of these indexes from simulated data was analyzed and compared with real data results. Outcomes demonstrated the PRSA capacity to significantly discriminate healthy subjects from IDC patients and HR from LR patients on a higher level than traditional temporal and spectral measures. The behavior of PRSA indexes agrees with experimental evidences related to cardiac autonomic modulations. Also, these parameters reflect more regularity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in HR patients. PMID:25585858

  18. A video Clinical Global Impression (CGI) in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Pelissolo, Antoine; Rotge, Jean-Yves; Jaafari, Nematollah; Machefaux, Sebastien; Quentin, Solene; Bui, Eric; Bruno, Nicolas; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Polosan, Mircea; Baup, Nicolas; Papetti, François; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Mallet, Luc; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas

    2011-03-30

    The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) is frequently used in clinical research because of its face validity and ease of use but data on its reliability are scarce. Our goal was to estimate the reliability of the scale and compare reliability between face-to-face and video scoring. We analyzed 50 different video interviews recorded during 5 visits of a crossover trial to study the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Six specialized clinicians rated the CGI using these videos, providing 300 different ratings. The intraclass correlation was lower at inclusion (0.30 [0.13-0.50]) than at later visits (0.68 [0.61-0.80]). Reliability was not influenced by the patients' stimulation status. The mean of at least two independent evaluations of the video is needed to achieve an ICC greater than 0.8. The video CGI is a valid clinical outcome measure suitable for clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377). PMID:20621362

  19. Evaluation through in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy of the cutaneous neurogenic inflammatory reaction induced by capsaicin in human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Căruntu, Constantin; Boda, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    We perform an in vivo analysis of the effects of capsaicin on cutaneous microvascularization. A total of 29 healthy subjects are administered a solution of capsaicin (CAP group) or a vehicle solution (nonCAP group) on the dorsal side of the nondominant hand. The evaluation is performed using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Ten minutes after administration, the area of the section, the perimeter, and the Feret's diameter of the capillaries in the dermal papillae become significantly larger in the CAP group as against the nonCAP group, and this difference is maintained until the conclusion of the experiment. In vivo RCM allows the investigation of cutaneous vascular reactions induced by capsaicin. As such, this method may constitute an useful technique both for research and clinical practice.

  20. Spatiotemporal Gait Patterns During Overt and Covert Evaluation in Patients With Parkinson´s Disease and Healthy Subjects: Is There a Hawthorne Effect?

    PubMed

    Robles-García, Verónica; Corral-Bergantiños, Yoanna; Espinosa, Nelson; Jácome, María Amalia; García-Sancho, Carlos; Cudeiro, Javier; Arias, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and aging lead to gait impairments. Some of the disturbances of gait are focused on step length, cadence, and temporal variability of gait cycle. Under experimental conditions gait can be overtly evaluated, but patients with PD are prone to expectancy effects; thus it seems relevant to determine if such evaluation truly reflects the spontaneous gait pattern in such patients, and also in healthy subjects. Thirty subjects (15 subjects with PD and 15 healthy control subjects) were asked to walk using their natural, preferred gait pattern. In half of the trials subjects were made aware that they were being evaluated (overt evaluation), while in the rest of the trials the evaluation was performed covertly (covert evaluation). During covert evaluation the gait pattern was modified in all groups. Gait speed was significantly increased (P = .022); step cadence and average step length were also significantly modified, the average step length increased (P = .002) and the cadence was reduced (P ≤ .001). Stride cycle time variability was unchanged significantly (P = .084). These changes were not significantly different compared between elderly and young healthy controls either. Due to the small sample size, a note of caution is in order; however, the significant results suggest that covert evaluation of gait might be considered to complement experimental evaluations of gait.

  1. Subjective diffuseness of music signals convolved with binaural impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Tronchin, Lamberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-07-01

    The spatial impression of sound in a hall can be quantified using sound field factors such as the interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) calculated from binaural impulse response (BIR), henceforth denoted by IACC IR. The subjective diffuseness for the listener is a spatial attribute which depends on factors associated both with the source signal and with the actual sound field, and is quantified using the IACC of the signal received by the listener, henceforth denoted by IACC SR. Therefore, the subjective diffuseness in a given hall may change with the music. The aims of this study are to estimate the IACC SR from the IACC IR and the factors, which is obtained from autocorrelation function (ACF) of music signal, and to evaluate the subjective diffuseness by these factors. First, the relationship between the IACC IR and IACC SR was investigated. Second, subjective diffuseness was measured by a psycho-acoustical experiment. As a result, the IACC SR could be estimated from the IACC IR of the BIR and the effective duration ( τe) from the ACF of music signal. It was found that the effects of BIRs on subjective diffuseness could be evaluated by IACC IR for almost all subjects, while the effects of music signals could be evaluated by the τe and the width of the peak at τ=0 ( Wϕ(0) ) of the ACF.

  2. Dissociable neural modulation underlying lasting first impressions, changing your mind for the better, and changing it for the worse.

    PubMed

    Bhanji, Jamil P; Beer, Jennifer S

    2013-05-29

    Unattractive job candidates face a disadvantage when interviewing for a job. Employers' evaluations are colored by the candidate's physical attractiveness even when they take job interview performance into account. This example illustrates unexplored questions about the neural basis of social evaluation in humans. What neural regions support the lasting effects of initial impressions (even after getting to know someone)? How does the brain process information that changes our minds about someone? Job candidates' competence was evaluated from photographs and again after seeing snippets of job interviews. Left lateral orbitofrontal cortex modulation serves as a warning signal for initial reactions that ultimately undermine evaluations even when additional information is taken into account. The neural basis of changing one's mind about a candidate is not a simple matter of computing the amount of competence-affirming information in their job interview. Instead, seeing a candidate for the better is somewhat distinguishable at the neural level from seeing a candidate for the worse. Whereas amygdala modulation marks the extremity of evaluation change, favorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of lateral prefrontal cortex and unfavorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of medial prefrontal cortex, temporal cortex, and striatum. Investigating social evaluation as a dynamic process (rather than a one-time impression) paints a new picture of its neural basis and highlights the partially dissociable processes that contribute to changing your mind about someone for the better or the worse. PMID:23719802

  3. Dissociable neural modulation underlying lasting first impressions, changing your mind for the better, and changing it for the worse.

    PubMed

    Bhanji, Jamil P; Beer, Jennifer S

    2013-05-29

    Unattractive job candidates face a disadvantage when interviewing for a job. Employers' evaluations are colored by the candidate's physical attractiveness even when they take job interview performance into account. This example illustrates unexplored questions about the neural basis of social evaluation in humans. What neural regions support the lasting effects of initial impressions (even after getting to know someone)? How does the brain process information that changes our minds about someone? Job candidates' competence was evaluated from photographs and again after seeing snippets of job interviews. Left lateral orbitofrontal cortex modulation serves as a warning signal for initial reactions that ultimately undermine evaluations even when additional information is taken into account. The neural basis of changing one's mind about a candidate is not a simple matter of computing the amount of competence-affirming information in their job interview. Instead, seeing a candidate for the better is somewhat distinguishable at the neural level from seeing a candidate for the worse. Whereas amygdala modulation marks the extremity of evaluation change, favorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of lateral prefrontal cortex and unfavorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of medial prefrontal cortex, temporal cortex, and striatum. Investigating social evaluation as a dynamic process (rather than a one-time impression) paints a new picture of its neural basis and highlights the partially dissociable processes that contribute to changing your mind about someone for the better or the worse.

  4. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  5. Morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender in subjects residing in Davangere, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Bhakti A.; Sujatha, G. P.; Lingappa, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the study was morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender and to establish its forensic importance and application. Materials and Method: The study group consisted of 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age groups 14-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-45 years, 45 years and above. Posteroanterior (PA) cephalogram radiographs were taken using standardized technique. The processed films were traced and frontal sinus pattern was established as per Yoshino's classification system. Results: The mean values for length, width, and area of the frontal sinus were found to be higher in males as compared to females and area of frontal sinuses increase with age except in males who were 45 years and above. The left width, left area, and bilateral asymmetry in relation to gender was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The morphologic evaluation of frontal sinus is a useful technique to determine gender and seems promising in personal identification. PMID:27051227

  6. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Arici, Ceyhun; Deger Bilgec, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Serap Arslan, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  7. Cell phones, clothing, and sex: first impressions of power using older African Americans as stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ross, Allison; Barker, Kathleen

    2003-12-01

    Sex, material possessions, and race have long been associated with prestige or status in American society, yet little research has examined this idea. Little is known about the effect of cell phones on first impressions. In a 2 (cell phone: present, absent) x 2 (clothing: jacket, no jacket) x 2 (sex) between-subjects design, 160 women from a predominantly Black college rated stimuli of older, African Americans on 15 items measuring perceived power on three power subscales: expert, legitimate, and coercive. Multivariate analysis of variance showed a 3-way interaction for clothing, cell phone, and sex of stimulus person.

  8. Impression material thickness in stock and custom trays.

    PubMed

    Bomberg, T J; Hatch, R A; Hoffman, W

    1985-08-01

    This study did not examine the accuracy of the resultant impressions. Rather, the impression material thickness in impressions made using both the highly advocated custom acrylic resin tray and in the highly used manufactured stock tray was examined. Comparison between the material thickness at the prepared tooth area revealed a mean difference in material thickness of less than 1 mm. The question of the significance of this difference remains to be answered. If the difference is not significant in the success of the impression and the resultant casting, then there are several advantages in using the manufactured stock tray; the first is economy. The average cost of a custom acrylic full arch impression tray is $3.65, compared with an average cost of slightly over $0.30 for the stock tray. The second advantage is the convenience factor. Making a custom tray requires planning, study models, laboratory time, curing interval, and finishing time. In contrast, the stock tray can be selected, adapted, and used in a single visit for both anticipated and unanticipated situations. If the difference in material thickness is significant, the custom tray is indicated. However, attention to detail in making and inserting the tray in the mouth must be observed to maximize the benefits of the custom tray.

  9. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method.

  10. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  11. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information.

  12. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  13. Custom sectional impression trays with interlocking type handle for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Aquaviva S; Mascarenhas, Kennedy; Aras, Meena A

    2009-01-01

    Making impressions in microstomia patients is often cumbersome. A modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. This article describes the fabrication of a custom sectional impression tray with interlocking type of a handle for definitive impression procedures in a microstomia patient.

  14. Long-term space flights - personal impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.

    During a final 4-month stage of a 1-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by the physician included an evaluation of adaptation reactions of the human body at different stages of space mission using clinicophysiological and biochemical methods; testing of alternative regimes of exercise and new countermeasures to prevent an unfavourable effect of long-term weightlessness.

  15. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions in pH-adjusted sodium hypochlorite. Part 2: Effect on gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, M L; Vandewalle, K S; Schwartz, R S; Charlton, D G

    1996-01-01

    Lowering the pH of sodium hypochlorite has been shown to greatly improve its efficacy as a disinfectant for irreversible hydrocolloid. This study evaluated the surface roughness and detail reproduction of gypsum casts recovered from impressions disinfected with sodium hypochlorite at altered pH levels. The experimental disinfectants were sodium hypochlorite 0.525% (10-minute immersion) at pH 11.5 (unaltered), pH 10, and pH 8. An additional group was tested at pH 10 for 5 minutes. There was a trend toward increased surface roughness as the pH was lowered, but a 5-minute immersion of impressions in sodium hypochlorite at pH 10 produced casts of equivalent surface roughness to impressions rinsed in water and poured immediately. The test for surface detail reproduction produced similar results. PMID:8957856

  16. Flexible Interior-Impression-Molding Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1991-01-01

    Device used inside combustion chamber of complicated shape for nondestructive evaluation of qualities of welds, including such features as offset, warping, misalignment of parts, and dropthrough. Includes flexible polypropylene tray trimmed to fit desired interior surface contour. Two neodymium boron magnets and inflatable bladder attached to tray. Tray and putty inserted in cavity to make mold of interior surface.

  17. Custom impression trays: Part I--Mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Breeding, L C; Dixon, D L; Moseley, J P

    1994-01-01

    Dimensional stability of custom impression trays is an important factor in determining the degree of accuracy achieved in forming a master cast. Such trays must remain stable over time and must not exhibit permanent deformation when a completed impression is removed from the oral cavity. Measurement of the mechanical properties allows comparison between various tray materials and is useful in interpreting data on stresses incurred during removal of the completed impression. In Part I of this three-part series, the various mechanical properties of five tray resins: one autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate, one light-polymerizing, and three brands of thermoplastic resins were recorded and compared. The thermoplastic resins studied in this investigation exhibited lower measured values for the strength and elastic modulus properties than the light-polymerizing resin and the autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin studied.

  18. Custom impression trays: Part I--Mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Breeding, L C; Dixon, D L; Moseley, J P

    1994-01-01

    Dimensional stability of custom impression trays is an important factor in determining the degree of accuracy achieved in forming a master cast. Such trays must remain stable over time and must not exhibit permanent deformation when a completed impression is removed from the oral cavity. Measurement of the mechanical properties allows comparison between various tray materials and is useful in interpreting data on stresses incurred during removal of the completed impression. In Part I of this three-part series, the various mechanical properties of five tray resins: one autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate, one light-polymerizing, and three brands of thermoplastic resins were recorded and compared. The thermoplastic resins studied in this investigation exhibited lower measured values for the strength and elastic modulus properties than the light-polymerizing resin and the autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin studied. PMID:8120842

  19. Impression formation and revision in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Haker, Ayala; Aderka, Idan M; Marom, Sofi; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Interpersonal relations are markedly impaired in social anxiety. Yet, little is known about the ways social anxiety affects social cognition. We examined impression formation and impression revision among individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 26) and non-anxious individuals (n = 29). Participants read initial descriptions of protagonists depicted as dominant, neutral or submissive and rated them on social rank and affiliation dimensions. Next, participants were presented with behavioral acts that were either congruent, incongruent or irrelevant to the initial descriptions, and re-rated the protagonists. Individuals with SAD (a) rated others as more extreme on social rank dimension, (b) rated others as lower on the affiliation dimension, and (c) revised their impressions of others to a greater extent than did the non-anxious individuals. Understanding the ways social anxiety affects the formation and revision of perceptions of others can improve our understanding of maintaining processes in SAD. PMID:23774009

  20. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.