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Sample records for evaluating breast cancer

  1. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  2. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  3. Evaluation of Metachronous Breast and Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Grzankowski, Kassondra S.; Szender, J. Brian; Spring-Robinson, Chandra L.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Frederick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The time interval between diagnoses of breast cancer (BC) and endometrial cancer (EC) is not well established in women with metachronous primary tumors. We sought to examine this interval and identify associations with treatment-related and clinicopathologic factors. Methods We identified 141 patients who developed both cancers during 1966 to 2013. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1, BC first, and group 2, EC first. Subanalysis performed of group 1 (59 patients) stratified around adjuvant tamoxifen use: pre-1990 BC diagnosis and post. Results Fifty-nine and 82 patients were in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean time interval was comparable (76 vs 74 months, P = 0.861). Subanalysis divided group 1 into pre- (n = 27) and post- (n = 32) 1990 and resulted in different mean time intervals between diagnosis of metachronous cancers (106 vs 50 months, respectively [P = 0.042]). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for EC were longer in the pre group (PFS, 51 vs 26 months [P = 0.169]; OS, 59 vs 27 months [P = 0.190]). Median PFS and OS for BC were also longer in this group (PFS, 147 vs 109 months [P = 0.005]; OS, 166 vs 114 months [P < 0.001]). Conclusions Our data indicate the mean time interval between the diagnosis of EC and BC was approximately 6 years. Disease-specific EC survival was worse for patients with a previous diagnosis of BC. Stratification around implementation of tamoxifen use shows comparable grade and stage but different time interval and survival, suggesting resulting effects from adjuvant therapy for BC. These results are useful in counseling women at risk. PMID:27648713

  4. Breast Retraction Assessment: an objective evaluation of cosmetic results of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Patterson, M.P.; Hill, L.R.; Vora, N.; Desai, K.R.; Archambeau, J.O.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Breast Retraction Assessment (BRA) is an objective evaluation of the amount of cosmetic retraction of the treated breast in comparison to the untreated breast in patients who receive conservative treatment for breast cancer. A clear acrylic sheet supported vertically and marked as a grid at 1 cm intervals is employed to perform the measurements. Average BRA value in 29 control patients without breast cancer was 1.2 cm. Average BRA value in 27 patients treated conservatively for clinical Stage I or II unilateral breast cancer was 3.7 cm. BRA values in breast cancer patients ranged from 0.0 to 8.5 cm. Patients who received a local radiation boost to the primary tumor bed site had statistically significantly less retraction than those who did not receive a boost. Patients who had an extensive primary tumor resection had statistically significantly more retraction than those who underwent a more limited resection. In comparison to qualitative forms of cosmetic analysis, BRA is an objective test that can quantitatively evaluate factors which may be related to cosmetic retraction in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer.

  5. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  6. [Evaluation of asymetric implants in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Couturaud, B; Laki, F; Alran, S; Salmon, R J

    2005-10-01

    Since more than twenty years, methods of breast reconstruction using implants have continued to evolve in order to improve their aesthetic results. Shapes and materials of these implants have also evolved to obtain contours similar to that of the natural opposite breast. Therefore it can be considered that the use of asymmetric implants is the last step in implant technology before using made to measure implants. Asymmetric implants allow obtaining different contours in harmony to the different breast shapes according to the side, left or right, of the reconstructed breast which maximise the naturalness of the result. Such implants have an axis directed towards the exterior and lower part of the chest wall, are wider than high with a thinner part on their inner edge and a concave rear side moulding the curves of the chest wall. In our own experience, we placed more than 500 asymmetric implants. When analysing retrospectively the medical records of 156 patients, no distinctive features were observed when compared to symmetric classic implants in easiness in the surgical procedure or in complications except a slightly higher rate of seroma formation. When compared to usual implants the main benefits of asymmetric implants are: to offer a wider breadth, to slope down gently on their upper and inner sides according to their concave rear side, and therefore to better match subtle curves of a normal breast. Moreover such contours allow a distribution of the volume which fit better to the usual natural breast configuration of patients who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma. At last, such implants are easy to place and a very low rate of secondary rotation has been observed. In summary, for all these reasons, asymmetric implants, can be considered to be the class one in the choice of implants for breast reconstruction after breast surgery. PMID:16198040

  7. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  8. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  9. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  10. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  12. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  13. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  14. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Theory-Based Physical Activity Guidebook for Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Jeffrey K.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Taylor, Lorian M.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Mackey, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This study's objective was to develop and evaluate the suitability and appropriateness of a theory-based physical activity (PA) guidebook for breast cancer survivors. Guidebook content was constructed based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) using salient exercise beliefs identified by breast cancer survivors in previous research. Expert…

  17. Axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients: sonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Denise Joffily Pereira da Costa; Elias, Simone; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Axillary staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer is essential in the treatment planning. Currently such staging is intraoperatively performed, but there is a tendency to seek a preoperative and less invasive technique to detect lymph node metastasis. Ultrasonography is widely utilized for this purpose, many times in association with fine-needle aspiration biopsy or core needle biopsy. However, the sonographic criteria for determining malignancy in axillary lymph nodes do not present significant predictive values, producing discrepant results in studies evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of this method. The present study was aimed at reviewing the literature approaching the utilization of ultrasonography in the axillary staging as well as the main morphological features of metastatic lymph nodes.

  18. Axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients: sonographic evaluation*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Denise Joffily Pereira da Costa; Elias, Simone; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Axillary staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer is essential in the treatment planning. Currently such staging is intraoperatively performed, but there is a tendency to seek a preoperative and less invasive technique to detect lymph node metastasis. Ultrasonography is widely utilized for this purpose, many times in association with fine-needle aspiration biopsy or core needle biopsy. However, the sonographic criteria for determining malignancy in axillary lymph nodes do not present significant predictive values, producing discrepant results in studies evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of this method. The present study was aimed at reviewing the literature approaching the utilization of ultrasonography in the axillary staging as well as the main morphological features of metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:25741091

  19. Evaluating the quality of internet information for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, A Z; Mahmoud, Y; Som, R

    2016-02-01

    The internet is frequently used by patients for researching information regarding breast cancer. This study aims to assess the quality of these websites using validated tools. The term 'breast cancer' was searched for in 3 search engines. The top 20 results were selected, and duplicates and irrelevant websites were excluded. 26/34 websites were analysed using the DISCERN Plus tool, HONcode and the JAMA benchmarks. 46% of the websites were classed as 'excellent' when assessed with the DISCERN tool. The range of DISCERN scores was wide (range: 25-74). Nine websites were found to be HONcode certified. Seven websites complied with all four JAMA benchmarks. This study shows the quality of breast cancer information on the internet is on the whole good; however the range of quality is wide. We recommend healthcare professionals use all 3 tools together to establish which websites are best to advise which websites patients should trust.

  20. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  1. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Lobular Carcinoma in Situ: A 29-Year Longitudinal Experience Evaluating Clinicopathologic Features and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    King, Tari A.; Pilewskie, Melissa; Muhsen, Shirin; Patil, Sujata; Mautner, Starr K.; Park, Anna; Oskar, Sabine; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Boafo, Camilla; Gooch, Jessica C.; De Brot, Marina; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Morrogh, Mary; Andrade, Victor P.; Sakr, Rita A.; Morrow, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The increased breast cancer risk conferred by a diagnosis of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is poorly understood. Here, we review our 29-year longitudinal experience with LCIS to evaluate factors associated with breast cancer risk. Patients and Methods Patients participating in surveillance after an LCIS diagnosis are observed in a prospectively maintained database. Comparisons were made among women choosing surveillance, with or without chemoprevention, and those undergoing bilateral prophylactic mastectomies between 1980 and 2009. Results One thousand sixty patients with LCIS without concurrent breast cancer were identified. Median age at LCIS diagnosis was 50 years (range, 27 to 83 years). Fifty-six patients (5%) underwent bilateral prophylactic mastectomy; 1,004 chose surveillance with (n = 173) or without (n = 831) chemoprevention. At a median follow-up of 81 months (range, 6 to 368 months), 150 patients developed 168 breast cancers (63% ipsilateral, 25% contralateral, 12% bilateral), with no dominant histology (ductal carcinoma in situ, 35%; infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 29%; infiltrating lobular carcinoma, 27%; other, 9%). Breast cancer incidence was significantly reduced in women taking chemoprevention (10-year cumulative risk: 7% with chemoprevention; 21% with no chemoprevention; P < .001). In multivariable analysis, chemoprevention was the only clinical factor associated with breast cancer risk (hazard ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.50). In a subgroup nested case-control analysis, volume of disease, which was defined as the ratio of slides with LCIS to total number of slides reviewed, was also associated with breast cancer development (P = .008). Conclusion We observed a 2% annual incidence of breast cancer among women with LCIS. Common clinical factors used for risk prediction, including age and family history, were not associated with breast cancer risk. The lower breast cancer incidence in women opting for chemoprevention highlights the

  4. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  5. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  6. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  7. Communication Assessment of the Most Frequented Breast Cancer Websites: Evaluation of Design and Theoretical Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Pamela; Smith, Sandi; Munday, Samantha; LaPlante, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The internet is a prominent source of health information for the public. This research evaluated both basic use and design tenets and the presence of theoretical components to motivate healthy breast cancer behavior for users of the most frequented breast cancer websites. Methodology Each website was evaluated with 2 sets of questions. The first attends to the basic use and design tenets of the website. The second coding form assessed the websites use of 3 behavior change theories. Results The majority of the websites fared well with regards to their use of basic tenet and design principles. Theoretical components were used sparingly on the majority of websites. Discussion The most frequented breast cancer websites are currently well equipped with basic use and design tenets. However, their lack of behavioral change components is likely to impede users’ motivations to protect themselves against breast cancer. PMID:26478694

  8. Evaluation of variation in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha oncogene and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, K N; Garcia-Closas, M; Fredericksen, Z; Kosel, M; Pankratz, V S; Hopper, J L; Dite, G S; Apicella, C; Southey, M C; Schmidt, M K; Broeks, A; Van ‘t Veer, L J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Hein, A; Ekici, A B; Johnson, N; Peto, J; dos Santos Silva, I; Gibson, L; Sawyer, E; Tomlinson, I; Kerin, M J; Chanock, S; Lissowska, J; Hunter, D J; Hoover, R N; Thomas, G D; Milne, R L; Pérez, JI Arias; González-Neira, A; Benítez, J; Burwinkel, B; Meindl, A; Schmutzler, R K; Bartrar, C R; Hamann, U; Ko, Y D; Brüning, T; Chang-Claude, J; Hein, R; Wang-Gohrke, S; Dörk, T; Schürmann, P; Bremer, M; Hillemanns, P; Bogdanova, N; Zalutsky, J V; Rogov, Y I; Antonenkova, N; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kataja, V; Kosma, V-M; Hartikainen, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Chen, X; Peterlongo, P; Bonanni, B; Bernard, L; Manoukian, S; Wang, X; Cerhan, J; Vachon, C M; Olson, J; Giles, G G; Baglietto, L; McLean, C A; Severi, G; John, E M; Miron, A; Winqvist, R; Pylkäs, K; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A; Grip, M; Andrulis, I; Knight, J A; Glendon, G; Mulligan, A M; Cox, A; Brock, I W; Elliott, G; Cross, S S; Pharoah, P P; Dunning, A M; Pooley, K A; Humphreys, M K; Wang, J; Kang, D; Yoo, K-Y; Noh, D-Y; Sangrajrang, S; Gabrieau, V; Brennan, P; McKay, J; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Couch, F J; Easton, D F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Somatic mutations in phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) are frequent in breast tumours and have been associated with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpression, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between inherited variation in this oncogene and risk of breast cancer. Methods: A single-nucleotide polymorphism from the PIK3CA locus that was associated with breast cancer in a study of Caucasian breast cancer cases and controls from the Mayo Clinic (MCBCS) was genotyped in 5436 cases and 5280 controls from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study and in 30 949 cases and 29 788 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Results: Rs1607237 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in MCBCS, CGEMS and all studies of white Europeans combined (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–0.99, P=4.6 × 10−3), but did not reach significance in the BCAC replication study alone (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.96–1.01, P=0.139). Conclusion: Common germline variation in PIK3CA does not have a strong influence on the risk of breast cancer PMID:22033276

  9. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  10. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  11. Screening for Chemical Contributions to Breast Cancer Risk: A Case Study for Chemical Safety Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Janet M.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Johnson, Dale; Navarro, Kathleen M.; Osborne, Gwendolyn; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Solomon, Gina M.; Zeise, Lauren; Janssen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Current approaches to chemical screening, prioritization, and assessment are being reenvisioned, driven by innovations in chemical safety testing, new chemical regulations, and demand for information on human and environmental impacts of chemicals. To conceptualize these changes through the lens of a prevalent disease, the Breast Cancer and Chemicals Policy project convened an interdisciplinary expert panel to investigate methods for identifying chemicals that may increase breast cancer risk. Methods Based on a review of current evidence, the panel identified key biological processes whose perturbation may alter breast cancer risk. We identified corresponding assays to develop the Hazard Identification Approach for Breast Carcinogens (HIA-BC), a method for detecting chemicals that may raise breast cancer risk. Finally, we conducted a literature-based pilot test of the HIA-BC. Results The HIA-BC identifies assays capable of detecting alterations to biological processes relevant to breast cancer, including cellular and molecular events, tissue changes, and factors that alter susceptibility. In the pilot test of the HIA-BC, chemicals associated with breast cancer all demonstrated genotoxic or endocrine activity, but not necessarily both. Significant data gaps persist. Conclusions This approach could inform the development of toxicity testing that targets mechanisms relevant to breast cancer, providing a basis for identifying safer chemicals. The study identified important end points not currently evaluated by federal testing programs, including altered mammary gland development, Her2 activation, progesterone receptor activity, prolactin effects, and aspects of estrogen receptor β activity. This approach could be extended to identify the biological processes and screening methods relevant for other common diseases. Citation Schwarzman MR, Ackerman JM, Dairkee SH, Fenton SE, Johnson D, Navarro KM, Osborne G, Rudel RA, Solomon GM, Zeise L, Janssen S. 2015

  12. Epidemiological evaluation of breast cancer in ecological areas of Kazakhstan--association with pollution emissions.

    PubMed

    Bilyalova, Zarina; Igissinov, Nurbek; Moore, Malcolm; Igissinov, Saginbek; Sarsenova, Samal; Khassenova, Zauresh

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of breast cancer in the ecological areas of Kazakhstan and assess the potential . A retrospective study of 11 years (1999 to 2009) was conducted using descriptive and analytical methods. The incidence of breast cancer was the lowest in the Aral-Syr Darya area (18.6±0.80/100,000), and highest in the Irtysh area (48.9±1.90/100,000), with an increasing trends over time in almost all areas. A direct strong correlation between the degree of contamination with high pollution emissions in the atmosphere from stationary sources and the incidence of breast cancer (r=0.77±0.15; p=0.026). The results indicate an increasing importance of breast cancer in Kazakhstan and an etiological role for environmental pollution.

  13. Active Smoking, Passive Smoking, and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingsong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Tamakoshi, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Kondo, Takaaki; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Nishio, Kazuko; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan; Yamamoto, Akio; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Mori, Mitsuru; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence is lacking regarding the relationship between cigarette smoking and breast cancer in Japanese women. We examined the association between breast cancer incidence and active and passive smoking in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk. Methods Our study comprised 34,401 women aged 40-79 years who had not been diagnosed previously with breast cancer and who provided information on smoking status at baseline (1988-1990). The subjects were followed from enrollment until December 31, 2001. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between breast cancer incidence and tobacco smoke. Results During 271,412 person-years of follow-up, we identified 208 incident cases of breast cancer. Active smoking did not increase the risk of breast cancer, with a HR for current smokers of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.32-1.38). Furthermore, an increased risk of breast cancer was not observed in current smokers who smoked a greater number of cigarettes each day. Overall, passive smoking at home or in public spaces was also not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among nonsmokers. Women who reported passive smoking during childhood had a statistically insignificant increase in risk (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 0.84-1.85), compared with those who had not been exposed during this time. Conclusion Smoking may not be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in this cohort of Japanese women. PMID:18403857

  14. Prospective evaluation of prognostic factors in operable breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, R. A.; Tesdale, A. L.; Killen, M. E.; Jack, W. J.; Chetty, U.; Dixon, J. M.; Hulme, M. J.; Prescott, R. J.; McIntyre, M. A.; Miller, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    In 215 patients with operable breast cancer (T1-T3, N0-1, M0) and no other or previous cancer, presenting to a single breast unit, sufficient tumour was available for the prospective determination of four putative biochemical markers of prognosis: oestrogen receptor (ER) activity, cathepsin D (cath D), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity and cyclic AMP-binding proteins (c-AMP-b). There were significant inter-relationships between ER and EGFR (r = -0.26), c-AMP-b and cath D (r = +0.32) and ER and c-AMP-b (r = +0.14). After follow-up (median 36.2 months), a total of 55 recurrences (18 locoregional only) and 35 deaths were recorded. By univariate analysis, up to 10 of 18 biochemical, clinical and histopathological variables of potential prognostic value were significantly related to disease-free interval or death, but by multivariate analysis only oestrogen receptor concentration and node status contributed significantly to risk of both distant recurrence/death; in addition, tumour size made a small contribution to the risk for a distant recurrence only. Only two parameters, tumour grade and ER concentration, were significantly related to risk of locoregional recurrence by univariate analysis, but by multivariate analysis, only tumour grade was important. It is concluded that tumour ER concentration, axillary nodal status and tumour grade remain as the most important prognostic factors in the early years after presentation of operable breast cancer, with a minor influence of tumour size. At this time, the prognostic significance of quantitative measurements of ER concentration, carefully controlled for the quality of both assay and tumour specimen, is probably greater than is generally appreciated. We have yet to identify other factors, which add significantly to the short-term prognostic value of these key features. PMID:8912547

  15. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Simulations and phantom evaluations of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-05-01

    MREIT is a new imaging modality that can be used to reconstruct high-resolution conductivity images of the human body. Since conductivity values of cancerous tissues in the breast are significantly higher than those of surrounding normal tissues, breast imaging using MREIT may provide a new noninvasive way of detecting early stage of cancer. In this paper, we present results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of breast MREIT. We built a realistic three-dimensional model of the human breast connected to a simplified model of the chest including the heart and evaluated the ability of MREIT to detect cancerous anomalies in a background material with similar electrical properties to breast tissue. We performed numerical simulations of various scenarios in breast MREIT including assessment of the effects of fat inclusions and effects related to noise levels, such as changing the amplitude of injected currents, effect of added noise and number of averages. Phantom results showed straightforward detection of cancerous anomalies in a background was possible with low currents and few averages. The simulation results showed it should be possible to detect a cancerous anomaly in the breast, while restricting the maximal current density in the heart below published levels for nerve excitation.

  17. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  18. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  19. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  20. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram YouTube 2,600 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Learn about risk factors, treatment options ... help hundreds of thousands of people affected by breast cancer. Donate Today Breast Cancer inFocus: Breast Cancer During ...

  1. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  2. Features of Undiagnosed Breast Cancers at Screening Breast MR Imaging and Potential Utility of Computer-Aided Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mirinae; Bae, Min Sun; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Chu, Ajung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the features of undiagnosed breast cancers on prior screening breast magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients who were subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as the potential utility of MR-computer-aided evaluation (CAE). Materials and Methods Between March 2004 and May 2013, of the 72 consecutive pairs of prior negative MR images and subsequent MR images with diagnosed cancers (median interval, 32.8 months; range, 5.4-104.6 months), 36 (50%) had visible findings (mean size, 1.0 cm; range, 0.3-5.2 cm). The visible findings were divided into either actionable or underthreshold groups by the blinded review by 5 radiologists. MR imaging features, reasons for missed cancer, and MR-CAE features according to actionability were evaluated. Results Of the 36 visible findings on prior MR images, 33.3% (12 of 36) of the lesions were determined to be actionable and 66.7% (24 of 36) were underthreshold; 85.7% (6 of 7) of masses and 31.6% (6 of 19) of non-mass enhancements were classified as actionable lesions. Mimicking physiologic enhancements (27.8%, 10 of 36) and small lesion size (27.8%, 10 of 36) were the most common reasons for missed cancer. Actionable findings tended to show more washout or plateau kinetic patterns on MR-CAE than underthreshold findings, as the 100% of actionable findings and 46.7% of underthreshold findings showed washout or plateau (p = 0.008). Conclusion MR-CAE has the potential for reducing the number of undiagnosed breast cancers on screening breast MR images, the majority of which are caused by mimicking physiologic enhancements or small lesion size. PMID:26798217

  3. Breast cancer education for Navajo women: a pilot study evaluating a culturally relevant video.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Priscilla R; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Baldwin, Julie A; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55-67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient-provider communication. PMID:20111913

  4. The Evaluation of WBP2NL-Related Genes Expression in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nourashrafeddin, Seyedmehdi; Aarabi, Mahmoud; Modarressi, Mohammad Hosein; Rahmati, Marveh; Nouri, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of mortality in women all around the world; therefore, study on molecular aspects of breast cancer is necessary for finding new biomarkers. Recent studies have shown that WW Binding Protein 2 (WBP2) is an important protein for the oncogenic property of cancer. We have previously evaluated the WW Binding Protein 2 N-Terminal Like (WBP2NL) gene expression in cancerous cell line and breast tumor tissues, and reported changes in expression, which could increase tumorigenic cell growth. However, the molecular mechanisms of WBP2NL and its clinical relevance have not been investigated. In this study, the expression of WBP2NL-related genes in the invasive breast carcinoma and normal breast tissues was evaluated for the first time. Analysis of WBP2NL-related genes expression was performed with reverse transcription-PCR and real time-PCR detection method. The target genes studied were as follow: WW domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1(WWP1), membrane associated guanylatekinase containing WW and PDZ domain-1 (MAGI1), neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 (NEDD4), formin binding protein-4 (FNBP4), BCL2-associated athanogene-3 (BAG3), WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX), yes-associated protein-1 (YAP1), WW domain containing transcription regulator (WWTR1), member RAS oncogene family (RAB2A), and small G protein signaling modulator 3 (SGSM3). The expression of WWP1, BAG3, and WWTR1 was significantly increased in breast cancer. In contrast, the expression of WWOX, YAP1, RAB2A, and SGSM3 was significantly decreased. The MAGI1 and NEDD4 expression was increased, while the expression of FNBP4 was unchanged. These findings lead us to suggest that WBP2NL might play roles as an anti-apoptotic factor or co-activator to promote breast cancer cell survival and proliferation.

  5. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  6. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  7. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery: an evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Thijs-Boer, F M; de Kruif, A T; van de Wiel, H B

    1999-04-01

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals that provide surgical treatment for these patients. Nursing care was defined to be optimal if it met the following criteria: (a) Specialized nursing support is provided to all patients during admission and in the outpatient departments both before and after surgery. (b) A protocol is in place outlining standard nursing procedures for breast cancer patients. (c) Formal communication about each breast cancer patient exists between the nurses involved. On the basis of this definition, it was found that optimal nursing care was provided in only 6% of the hospitals. Nursing care fell short mainly in the outpatient setting. This shortcoming also was recognized by most respondents, and many were already planning improvements. Nurses had varying opinions about their responsibility to provide the patient with information about the disease and its treatment, and consensus was lacking. In summary, nursing care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Dutch hospitals needs improvement, especially in the outpatient setting. PMID:10217034

  8. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  9. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  10. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  11. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  12. PET/CT Imaging for Monitoring Recurrence and Evaluating Response to Treatment in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Wang, Xiaojia; Chen, Zhanhong

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring recurrence and evaluating response to therapy are important aspects of clinical decision making in the treatment of breast cancer. In this literature review, the authors highlight several of the key areas where integrated fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) measurements are anticipated to have a significant impact on monitoring recurrence and evaluating response to therapy. These areas include comparing FDG PET/CT with conventional imaging for detecting breast cancer metastases; evaluating the role of FDG PET/CT in the presence of elevated tumor markers during follow-up period after the primary surgery; using FDG PET/CT to assess response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), targeted and endocrine therapies; using FDG PET/CT to predict response to NAC according to different molecular phenotypes of breast cancer; and applying PET/CT and some new breast-related PET tracers to evaluate response to anticancer treatment. The authors consider the relative advantages afforded by PET/CT and summarize current evidence as to the likely value of PET/CT in recurrence detection and anticancer treatment response prediction. PMID:27627573

  13. Developing a utility decision framework to evaluate predictive models in breast cancer risk estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Chen, Xianqiao; Liu, Jie; Page, David C.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Combining imaging and genetic information to predict disease presence and progression is being codified into an emerging discipline called “radiogenomics.” Optimal evaluation methodologies for radiogenomics have not been well established. We aim to develop a decision framework based on utility analysis to assess predictive models for breast cancer diagnosis. We garnered Gail risk factors, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and mammographic features from a retrospective case-control study. We constructed three logistic regression models built on different sets of predictive features: (1) Gail, (2) Gail + Mammo, and (3) Gail + Mammo + SNP. Then we generated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for three models. After we assigned utility values for each category of outcomes (true negatives, false positives, false negatives, and true positives), we pursued optimal operating points on ROC curves to achieve maximum expected utility of breast cancer diagnosis. We performed McNemar’s test based on threshold levels at optimal operating points, and found that SNPs and mammographic features played a significant role in breast cancer risk estimation. Our study comprising utility analysis and McNemar’s test provides a decision framework to evaluate predictive models in breast cancer risk estimation. PMID:26835489

  14. An evaluation report of the nurse navigator services for the breast cancer support program.

    PubMed

    Trevillion, Kris; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Wong, Frances; Sherriff, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to evaluate the effectiveness of breast cancer care support provided by breast cancer care navigators (BCCN) for women attending the breast health clinic (BHC). This evaluative process examined patients' satisfaction with the nurse navigator program that focused on addressing breast cancer patients' informational needs, emotional support, and guidance through the cancer trajectory. A survey approach using Likert-type scales and open-ended questions was utilized to gather data. Patients seen at the BHC between July 2011 and July 2013 were sent the surveys by mail. The 154 responses constituted a 69% response rate. More than 90% of participants understood the information provided by the BCCN and were satisfied with the information that had been received. Psychosocial support from patient/family counselling services at the agency and in the community were among the most common request for resources. Recommendations include contacting patients directly after their initial meeting at the clinic and at least once after their treatments began, to ensure continuity and support. BCCN role was identified as being valuable with a positive effect on patients' experience. PMID:26897864

  15. Evaluation of kinesthetic sense and hand function in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzsen, Tugba

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the functional ability and kinesthetic sense of the hands of women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-seven women experiencing lymphedema after breast surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were included. The patients were divided into two groups: women with hand edema (HE+, n = 29) and without hand edema (HE-, n = 28) after breast cancer treatment. Arm edema severity, hand size, functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hand, and daily living skills were evaluated. [Results] The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years. In both groups, functional mobility, kinesthetic sense, and daily living skills decreased significantly with increasing edema severity. However, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to functional mobility or daily living skills. The kinesthetic sense of the hand was better in the HE- group than the HE+ group. There was a significant negative relationship between the severity of edema and hand function. [Conclusion] Breast cancer-related lymphedema can negatively impact women's functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hands as well as daily living skills. PMID:26180295

  16. Evaluation of kinesthetic sense and hand function in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzsen, Tugba

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the functional ability and kinesthetic sense of the hands of women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-seven women experiencing lymphedema after breast surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were included. The patients were divided into two groups: women with hand edema (HE+, n = 29) and without hand edema (HE−, n = 28) after breast cancer treatment. Arm edema severity, hand size, functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hand, and daily living skills were evaluated. [Results] The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years. In both groups, functional mobility, kinesthetic sense, and daily living skills decreased significantly with increasing edema severity. However, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to functional mobility or daily living skills. The kinesthetic sense of the hand was better in the HE− group than the HE+ group. There was a significant negative relationship between the severity of edema and hand function. [Conclusion] Breast cancer-related lymphedema can negatively impact women’s functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hands as well as daily living skills. PMID:26180295

  17. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  18. Evaluation of the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool.

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool. PMID:23762182

  20. Evaluation of the Diagnostic Power of Thermography in Breast Cancer Using Bayesian Network Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool. PMID:23762182

  1. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tian; Zhou Jun; Yoshida, Emi J.; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Schiff, Peter B.; Wang, Tony J.C.; Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza; Zhang Pengpeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

  3. Evaluation of expert criteria for preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Carolyn E; Tumyan, Lusine; Gonser, Laura; Shaw, Sara L; Vora, Lalit; Paz, I Benjamin; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Yim, John H

    2014-08-01

    Despite 2 randomized trials reporting no reduction in operations or local recurrence at 1 year, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in diagnostic workup of breast cancer. We evaluated 5 utilization criteria recently proposed by experts. Of women (n = 340) newly diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer who underwent bilateral MRI, most (69.4%) met at least 1 criterion before MRI: mammographic density (44.4%), under consideration for partial breast irradiation (PBI) (19.7%), genetic-familial risk (12.9%), invasive lobular carcinoma (11.8%), and multifocal/multicentric disease (10.6%). MRI detected occult malignant lesion or extension of index lesion in 21.2% of index, 3.3% of contralateral, breasts. No expert criterion was associated with MRI-detected malignant lesion, which associated instead with pre-MRI plan of lumpectomy without PBI (48.2% of subjects): Odds Ratio 3.05, 95% CI 1.57-5.91 (p adjusted for multiple hypothesis testing = 0.007, adjusted for index-vs-contralateral breast and covariates). The expert guidelines were not confirmed by clinical evidence.

  4. Evaluation of breast cancer chemotherapy efficacy with multifractal spectrum analysis of magnetic resonance image.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hu, Wen-yong; Liu, Li-zhi; Pang, Ya-chun; Shao, Yuan-zhi

    2014-01-01

    Multifractal spectrum analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) breast MR images was used to establish a new quantitative analysis method for solid tumor blood perfusion and to explore its applicability in evaluating efficacy of breast cancer chemotherapy. Five randomly selected patients suffering from newly diagnosed malignant breast nodule lesions were enrolled in this study, and four of them were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Their DCE breast MR images were collected before and after treatment. Chemotherapeutic efficacy was analyzed using international response evaluation criteria for solid tumors (RECIST). Sandbox method for statistical number density was employed to measure and calculate multifractal spectra of DCE breast MR images with spatiotemporal characteristics. Multifractal spectral data of malignant lesions before and after chemotherapy were compared. Multifractal spectra of malignant lesions show an asymmetric bell-shape. Chemotherapy efficacy was assessed to be partial remission (PR) for three patients and their multifractal spectral width significantly increased after chemotherapy while to be stable disease (SD) for other patient and of her changed slightly. Multifractal spectral width correlates with blood-supply condition of tumor lesion before and after chemotherapy, providing a potential suitable characteristic parameter for evaluating chemotherapeutic efficacy quantitatively.

  5. Evaluation of the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale for early post-treatment breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Sohl, Stephanie J.; Levine, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The end of primary treatment for cancer patients is increasingly recognized as an important time of adjustment that may impact quality of life (QoL). A psychometrically sound QoL instrument that assesses the mix of acute and longer-term concerns present during this unique time has not yet been identified. This article evaluates the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale, originally developed for long-term (≥5 years) cancer survivors, as an appropriate QoL measure for this transition period. Methods Psychometric properties of the QLACS were evaluated in a sample of post-treatment breast cancer survivors 18–24 months post-diagnosis. This observational study consisted of women (n = 552) aged 25 years and older (mean = 55.4 years) who were diagnosed with stage I, II, or III breast cancer. The 47 items of the QLACS comprise 12 domains: seven domains are generic, and five are cancer specific. Results The QLACS demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha for the 12 domains ranged from 0.79 to 0.91) and good convergent and divergent validity (assessed by comparison with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy and other measures). Conclusions The QLACS appears to be consistent with other widely accepted measures in capturing QoL, while also allowing for more inclusive measurement of specific issues relevant to post-treatment cancer survivors. These data, in addition to previous data supporting use of the QLACS across different cancer sites, suggest that the QLACS is a promising comprehensive QoL measure appropriate for breast cancer survivors transitioning off active treatment. PMID:24996392

  6. Photoacoustic spectroscopy based evaluation of breast cancer condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Chandra, Subhas; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Ray, Satadru; Shetty, Prashanth; Mathew, Stanley; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-02-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy, a hybrid of optics and acoustics has been gaining popularity in the biomedical field very fast. The main aim in the present study was to apply this technique to detect and distinguish breast tumor tissues from normal and hence develop a tool for clinical applications. There were 224 photoacoustic spectra recorded from 28 normal and 28 breast tumor tissues using PZT detector at 281nm pulsed laser excitations from Nd-YAG laser pumped frequency doubled dye laser system. The recorded time domain photoacoustic spectra were fast Fourier transformed into frequency domain patterns in the frequency region 0-1250kHz and from each pattern, 7 features (mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, area under the curve & spectral residual after fitting with 10th degree polynomial) were extracted using MATLAB algorithms. These features were then tested for their significance between normal and malignant conditions using Student T-test and two of them (variance, std. deviation) showing significant variation were selected for further discrimination analysis using supervised quadratic discriminate analysis (QDA). In QDA, 60 spectra from each of the normal and malignant were used for making the respective calibration sets and the remaining 52 spectra from each were used for the validation. The performance of the analysis tested for the frequency region 406.25 - 625.31 kHz, showed specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 88.46% respectively suggesting possible application of the technique in breast tumor detection.

  7. Designing and Psychometric Evaluation of Adjustment to Illness Measurement Inventory for Iranian Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Sepideh; Mehrabi, Esmat; Simbar, Masoumeh; Houshyari, Mohammad; Zayeri, Farid; Hajian, Parastoo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer diagnosis for everybody may be perceived as crisis and breast cancer, as the most common malignancy in women, can influence their well-being and multiple aspects of their health. So understanding that how women in various contexts and communities adjust to the illness is necessary to facilitate this adjustment and improve their quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study was to: 1) identify the core components of coping strategies to adjust to the illness in Iranian women with breast cancer perspective, 2) to develop and determine psychometric properties of a native self-report instrument to assess coping behaviors and measure the degree of adjustment with the breast cancer. Methods The present exploratory mixed method study was conducted in two consecutive stages: 1) the hermeneutic phenomenological study was done to explore the life experiences of coping styles to adjust with the breast cancer using in-depth interviews with patients that lead to item generation; 2) psychometric properties (validity and reliability) of the instrument were evaluated recruiting 340 eligible women. The item pool was reduced systematically and resulted in a 49-item instrument. Results From the qualitative stage, item pool containing 78 items related to coping strategies to adjust with the breast cancer. After eliminating unwanted statements from the results, qualitative and quantitative face and content validity, the 10 factors extracted employing construct validity were: feeling of guilt, abstention-diversion, role preservation and seeking support, efforts for threat control, confronting, fear and anxiety, role wasting, maturation and growth, isolation, and fatalism. These factors accounted for the 59.1% of variance observed. The Cronbach reliability test was carried out and alpha value of 10 factors was calculated from 0.78 to 0.87 confirming all factors were internally consistent. The scale’s stability was tested using the test-retest method. Conclusions

  8. The Availability of Pre- and Intraoperative Evaluation of a Solitary Pulmonary Nodule in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junji; Ishii, Genichiro; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Wada, Masahiro; Aokage, Keiju; Nagai, Kanji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is clinically difficult to differentiate between primary lung cancer (PLC) and metastasis from breast cancer (MBC) in the diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) observed in a patient with past history of breast cancer. We evaluated several clinical, radiological and pathological variables in patients with SPN in an attempt to identify reliable markers to differentiate them. Methods: Retrospectively we reviewed the clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of 64 patients with a history of breast cancer resection who subsequently underwent surgical resection of an indeterminate SPN in our institute. Results: The patients with MBC were significantly younger (p = 0.01). Among CT findings, presence of a solid opacity (p <0.01), well-defined tumor (p <0.01) and absence of an air bronchogram (p <0.01) were significantly associated with MBC. Among the intraoperative frozen section pathologic findings, the absence of lepidic or papillary patterns (p <0.01) and the presence of strong fibrosis in the tumor (p <0.01) were significantly correlated with MBC. Conclusion: Although some cases are difficult to confirm the definitive diagnoses of SPN, combining CT and intraoperative pathological findings might enable us to distinguish SPN between MBC and PLC prior to postoperative examinations. PMID:24835922

  9. Exogenous progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanford, J L; Thomas, D B

    1993-01-01

    More research on the effect of exogenous progestins on breast cancer risk is clearly needed. Biologic evidence that progestins may act synergistically with estrogen to enhance proliferation of breast epithelial cells emphasizes the importance of further exploration of this issue, particularly given the increasing prevalence of exposure to contraceptive and noncontraceptive progestins. No specific type or dose of progestin in monophasic combination oral contraceptives has been linked to breast cancer. Based on the few epidemiologic studies of progestin-only oral contraceptives, there also is no evidence that they increase risk of breast cancer. Two studies found that longer-term use of progestin-only pills was associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. However, given the low prevalence of use of minipills, it is unlikely that this exposure substantially affects the incidence of breast cancer in the population as a whole. Use of the injectable contraceptive DMPA has been positively associated with risk of breast cancer in some subgroups of women, although no significant overall adverse effect has been observed in the two largest studies conducted to date. There is suggestive evidence that use at an early age or prior to a first term birth and recent use may increase risk of breast cancer. It remains unclear, however, whether or not surveillance bias may explain the positive association observed in recent users. Additional research on DMPA and breast cancer incidence is needed, since studies published to date have lacked sufficient power to evaluate risk in relation to long-term use. Future studies of breast cancer in relation to use of other long-acting progestational agents such as Norplant will also be important. There is concern about the relation between breast cancer incidence and use of combined estrogen-progestin replacement therapy, especially extended periods of use. At the present time, only one study (45) has estimated risk according to duration of

  10. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  11. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of the incidence of late effects in five-year survivors of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lash, Timothy L.; Thwin, Soe Soe; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Geiger, Ann M.; Bosco, Jaclyn; Quinn, Virginia P.; Field, Terry S.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Silliman, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Late effects of breast cancer affect the quality of survivorship. Using administrative data, we compared the occurrence of almost all ICD9 codes among older breast cancer survivors to that among a matched comparison cohort to generate new hypotheses. Methods Breast cancer patients sixty-five years or older diagnosed 1990–1994 in six integrated care settings and who survived at least five years were matched with a cohort of women without a history of breast cancer on care setting, age, and calendar time. We collected data on the occurrence of incident ICD9 codes beginning six years after the breast cancer diagnosis date and continuing to year fifteen, and comparable data for the matched woman. We calculated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer survivorship with incidence of each ICD9 code. We used semi-Bayes methods to address multiple comparisons. Results Older breast cancer survivors had about the same occurrence of diseases and conditions six to fifteen years after breast cancer diagnosis as comparable women. The median of 564 adjusted hazard ratios equaled 1.06, with interquartile range 0.92 to 1.3. The distribution of hazard ratios pertaining to cancer-related ICD codes was shifted towards positive associations, and the distribution pertaining to cardiovascular-related ICD codes was shifted towards negative associations. Conclusions In this hypothesis scanning study, we observed little difference in the occurrence of non-breast cancer-related diseases and conditions among older, long-term breast cancer survivors and comparable women without a history of breast cancer. PMID:24584822

  14. Cloud-Based Service Information System for Evaluating Quality of Life after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hao-Yun; Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Liang, Tyng-Yeu; Lee, King-The; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although recent studies have improved understanding of quality of life (QOL) outcomes of breast conserving surgery, few have used longitudinal data for more than two time points, and few have examined predictors of QOL over two years. Additionally, the longitudinal data analyses in such studies rarely apply the appropriate statistical methodology to control for censoring and inter-correlations arising from repeated measures obtained from the same patient pool. This study evaluated an internet-based system for measuring longitudinal changes in QOL and developed a cloud-based system for managing patients after breast conserving surgery. Methods This prospective study analyzed 657 breast cancer patients treated at three tertiary academic hospitals. Related hospital personnel such as surgeons and other healthcare professionals were also interviewed to determine the requirements for an effective cloud-based system for surveying QOL in breast cancer patients. All patients completed the SF-36, Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and its supplementary breast cancer measure (QLQ-BR23) at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. The 95% confidence intervals for differences in responsiveness estimates were derived by bootstrap estimation. Scores derived by these instruments were interpreted by generalized estimating equation before and after surgery. Results All breast cancer surgery patients had significantly improved QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 subscale scores throughout the 2-year follow-up period (p<0.05). During the study period, QOL generally had a negative association with advanced age, high Charlson comorbidity index score, tumor stage III or IV, previous chemotherapy, and long post-operative LOS. Conversely, QOL was positively associated with previous radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Additionally, patients with high scores for preoperative QOL tended to have high scores for QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23 and SF-36 subscales. Based on the results of

  15. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice.

  16. Standardization of radiological evaluation of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI: application in breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Furman-Haran, E; Feinberg, M Shapiro; Badikhi, D; Eyal, E; Zehavi, T; Degani, H

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI is applied as an adjuvant tool for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and follow-up of therapy. Despite improvements through the years in achieving higher spatial and temporal resolution, it still suffers from lack of scanning and processing standardization, and consequently, high variability in the radiological evaluation, particularly differentiating malignant from benign lesions. We describe here a hybrid method for achieving standardization of the radiological evaluation of breast dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols, based on integrating the model based three time point (3TP) method with principal component analysis (PCA). The scanning and image processing procedures consisted of three main steps: 1. 3TP standardization of the MRI acquisition parameters according to a kinetic model, 2. Applying PCA to test cases and constructing an eigenvectors' base related to the contrast-enhancement kinetics and 3. Projecting all new cases on the eigenvectors' base and evaluating the clinical outcome. Datasets of overall 96 malignant and 26 benign breast lesions were recorded on 1.5T and 3T scanners, using three different MRI acquisition parameters optimized by the 3TP method. The final radiological evaluation showed similar detection and diagnostic ability for the three different MRI acquisition parameters. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded a value of 0.88 ± 0.034 for differentiating malignant from benign lesions. This 3TP+PCA hybrid method is fast and can be readily applied as a computer aided diagnostic tool of breast cancer. The underlying principles of this method can be extended to standardize the evaluation of malignancies in other organs.

  17. Evaluating teaching techniques in the Hmong breast and cervical cancer health awareness project.

    PubMed

    Lor, Maichou; Bowers, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Cancer health disparities are a reality for Hmong women who are often diagnosed at a later stage and have low literacy and experienced care that are not culturally appropriate. Lack of attention to cultural appropriateness and literacy levels of cancer screening materials may contribute to disproportionately low levels of cancer screening among Hmong women. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the Hmong Health Awareness Project (HHAP), a program designed to create awareness and acceptance of breast and cervical cancer screening, and to examine participants' perceptions of the utility of the content of the workshops. Hmong researchers partnered with three Midwestern Hmong community centers to implement six workshops. Three teaching techniques: pictographs, videos, and hands-on activities were utilized to teach Hmong participants about cancer screening. Participants included 150 Hmong (male participants = 30 and female participants = 120). Teach-back method was used to assess the participants' understanding of cancer screening throughout the workshops. Qualitative data were collected in focus groups to assess the feasibility of teaching methods and participants' perceptions of the utility of the content of the workshops. Directed content analysis was used to analyze participants' responses. The three teaching techniques were helpful in increasing the Hmong people's understanding about breast and cervical cancer screening. Nearly, all participants perceived an increased in their understanding, greater acceptance of cancer screening, and increased willingness to be screened. Men expressed support for screening after the workshops. Findings can guide future interventions to improve health communications and screening and reduce diagnostic disparities among Hmong and immigrant populations.

  18. Evaluation of a national breast cancer information service: the Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, A; Haghighat, S; Vahdani, M; Jarvandi, S; Harirchi, I

    1999-05-01

    This descriptive study evaluates a newly established national breast cancer information service in Iran and reports data on the impact of contacting the service. Two instruments were used to collect data: a "call record form" and a "user survey" questionnaire. The call record was filled in after each inquiry, and during 1 year 1,000 forms were completed. The questionnaire was filled in 1 week after each inquiry and was completed for a random sample of 400 callers. Thus, the results are presented in two parts. Analysis of the call record forms (part one) showed that 95% of the callers were female, mostly married (82%) and with secondary or higher education (80%). Most callers reported that they had heard about the service through the mass media (69%). Benign breast diseases, mastalgia and breast masses were the most common subjects of the inquiries (28%, 27%, and 18%, respectively). The majority of callers (77%) said that the main reason for contacting the service was that they wanted more information about breast diseases. Examination of the questionnaires (part two) revealed that 97% of respondents described the service as "useful" or "very useful". The vast majority (80%) perceived the information given as "easy" or "very easy" to understand. When respondents were asked to compare their feelings before and after contacting the service, 86% said that they felt "much more" or "a little more cheerful" and 81% said that they felt "much less" or "a little less worried". Practically all (99%) were satisfied with the overall service provided. The findings indicate that the service is effective in providing information and support for patients, relatives and the general public. The real challenge is how to make the service more widely available, especially to breast cancer patients.

  19. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  20. The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program: development and evaluation of a course for specialist breast care nurses.

    PubMed

    Dixon, H; Hordern, A; Borland, R

    2001-02-01

    The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program is the first tertiary-based education program for specialist breast care nurses in Australia. The program covers current treatment options, psychosocial issues, and professional development issues relating to breast cancer nursing. For the first two student intakes (n = 53), precourse, postcourse, and 3-month follow-up surveys were conducted to assess the perceived value of the course, identify any limitations, and note changes in practice that arose. Before taking the course, most of the students had experience in breast cancer nursing, but lacked confidence and hoped to learn more about responding effectively to psychosocial issues through communication, counseling, and provision of support to patients and their carers. After taking the course, the students were very positive about the course content, resources, and teaching support. They reported learning new skills for addressing psychosocial issues and symptom management arising from a diagnosis of breast cancer, stating a desire to implement these new skills. Comparison between results from the three surveys indicated that students' confidence in providing breast cancer support increased significantly in most areas of practice, and was maintained at 3-month follow-up survey. Results suggest that students met the course objectives successfully, and in most cases subsequently translated their knowledge into improved practice.

  1. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  2. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  3. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  5. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  6. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  7. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  8. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  9. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, George L; Copeland, Trisha; Khaodhiar, Lalita; Buckley, Rita B

    2003-03-01

    Obesity, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle-all common conditions in breast cancer patients-are likely to be associated with poor survival and poor quality of life in women with breast cancer. Diet-related factors are thought to account for about 30% of cancers in developed countries. Most studies of diet and healthcare have focused on the role of single nutrients, foods, or food groups in disease prevention or promotion. Recent cancer guidelines on nutrition and physical activity emphasize diets that promote maintenance of a healthy body weight and a prudent dietary pattern that is low in red and processed meats and high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Except for dietary fat, few nutritional factors in adult life have been associated with breast cancer. Extensive data from animal model research, international correlations linking fat intake and breast cancer rates, and case-control studies support the hypothesis that a high-fat diet is conducive to the development of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Conflicting findings from cohort studies, however, have created uncertainty over the role of dietary fat in breast cancer growth and recurrence. Results from large-scale nutritional intervention trials are expected to resolve such issues. As new and improved data on dietary factors and patterns accumulate, dietary guidelines for cancer risk reduction will become more focused.

  10. Evaluation of radioinduced damage and repair capacity in blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, P A; da Silva, M A; Oliveira, E M; Suzuki, M F; Okazaki, K

    2001-02-01

    Genetic damage caused by ionizing radiation and repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from 3 breast cancer patients and 3 healthy donors were investigated using the comet assay. The comets were analyzed by two parameters: comet tail length and visual classification. Blood samples from the donors were irradiated in vitro with a 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.722 Gy/min, with a dose range of 0.2 to 4.0 Gy and analyzed immediately after the procedure and 3 and 24 h later. The basal level of damage and the radioinduced damage were higher in lymphocytes from breast cancer patients than in lymphocytes from healthy donors. The radioinduced damage showed that the two groups had a similar response when analyzed immediately after the irradiations. Therefore, while the healthy donors presented a considerable reduction of damage after 3 h, the patients had a higher residual damage even 24 h after exposure. The repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from the patients was slower than that of lymphocytes from healthy donors. The possible influence of age, disease stage and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are discussed. Both parameters adopted proved to be sensitive and reproducible: the dose-response curves for DNA migration can be used not only for the analysis of cellular response but also for monitoring therapeutic interventions. Lymphocytes from the breast cancer patients presented an initial radiosensitivity similar to that of healthy subjects but a deficient repair mechanism made them more vulnerable to the genotoxic action of ionizing radiation. However, since lymphocytes from only 3 patients and 3 normal subjects were analyzed in the present paper, additional donors will be necessary for a more accurate evaluation. PMID:11175491

  11. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  12. Spatially Varying Coefficient Inequalities: Evaluating How the Impact of Patient Characteristics on Breast Cancer Survival Varies by Location

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jeff Ching-Fu; Cramb, Susanna M.; McGree, James M.; Dunn, Nathan A. M.; Baade, Peter D.; Mengersen, Kerrie L.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have identified spatial differences in breast cancer survival. However little is known about whether the structure and dynamics of this spatial inequality are consistent across a region. This study aims to evaluate the spatially varying nature of predictors of spatial inequality in relative survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer across Queensland, Australia. All Queensland women aged less than 90 years diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1997 to 2007 and followed up to the end of 2008 were extracted from linked Queensland Cancer Registry and BreastScreen Queensland data. Bayesian relative survival models were fitted using various model structures (a spatial regression model, a varying coefficient model and a finite mixture of regressions model) to evaluate the relative excess risk of breast cancer, with the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo computation. The spatially varying coefficient models revealed that some covariate effects may not be constant across the geographic regions of the study. The overall spatial patterns showed lower survival among women living in more remote areas, and higher survival among the urbanised south-east corner. Notwithstanding this, the spatial survival pattern for younger women contrasted with that for older women as well as single women. This complex spatial interplay may be indicative of different factors impacting on survival patterns for these women. PMID:27149274

  13. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  14. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  15. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers. PMID:27382399

  16. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  17. A nomogram based on mammary ductoscopic indicators for evaluating the risk of breast cancer in intraductal neoplasms with nipple discharge.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Qi; Zhang, An-Qin; Zhang, Jiang-Yu; Han, Xiao-Rong; Yu, Hai-Yun; Xie, Si-Mei

    2015-04-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) is commonly used to detect intraductal lesions associated with nipple discharge. This study investigated the relationships between ductoscopic image-based indicators and breast cancer risk, and developed a nomogram for evaluating breast cancer risk in intraductal neoplasms with nipple discharge. A total of 879 consecutive inpatients (916 breasts) with nipple discharge who underwent selective duct excision for intraductal neoplasms detected by MD from June 2008 to April 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. A nomogram was developed using a multivariate logistic regression model based on data from a training set (687 cases) and validated in an independent validation set (229 cases). A Youden-derived cut-off value was assigned to the nomogram for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Color of discharge, location, appearance, and surface of neoplasm, and morphology of ductal wall were independent predictors for breast cancer in multivariate logistic regression analysis. A nomogram based on these predictors performed well. The P value of the Hosmer-Lemeshow test for the prediction model was 0.36. Area under the curve values of 0.812 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.763-0.860) and 0.738 (95 % CI 0.635-0.841) was obtained in the training and validation sets, respectively. The accuracies of the nomogram for breast cancer diagnosis were 71.2 % in the training set and 75.5 % in the validation set. We developed a nomogram for evaluating breast cancer risk in intraductal neoplasms with nipple discharge based on MD image findings. This model may aid individual risk assessment and guide treatment in clinical practice.

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  20. [Epidemiology of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cuevas, Sergio A; Capurso García, Marino

    2006-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor worldwide. In recent years there has been observed an increase in its frequency, especially in developing countries, as Mexico, where mortality is arriving to the first cause of death in females. This is, in part, due to a delayed diagnosis, most frequently done in locally advances stages with a low cure rate. This is a review of all risk factors: age, sex, personal and familial history, genetic syndromes, associated breast disease, geographic distribution, body structure and environmental, hormonal, reproductive and dietary factors. It is concluded that breast cancer is a public health problem in developed and developing countries, and the best methods to drop mortality for breast cancer is the wide use of screening mammography in women at risk, in order to find cancers at initial stages and offer the adequate treatment.

  1. Data mining approach to evaluating the use of skin surface electropotentials for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Sree, S Vinitha; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2010-02-01

    The Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) uses a score formed with measured skin surface electropotentials and a prior Level Of Suspicion (LOS) value (predicted by the physician based on the patient's ultrasound or mammography results) to calculate a revised Post-BDS LOS to indicate the presence of breast cancer. The demographic details, BDS test results, and the recorded electropotential values form a potentially useful dataset, which can be further explored with data mining tools to extract important information that can be used to improve the current predictive accuracy of the device. According to the proposed data mining framework, the BDS dataset with 291 cases was first pre-processed to remove outliers and then used to select relevant and informative features for classifier development and finally to evaluate the capability of the built classifiers in detecting the presence of the disease. Two popular feature selection techniques, namely, the filter and wrapper methods, were used in parallel for feature selection. A few statistical inference based classifiers and neural networks were used for classification. The proposed technique significantly improved the BDS prediction accuracy. Also, the use of prior LOS and, hence, the Post-BDS LOS, associates a mild subjective interpretation to the current prediction methodology used by BDS. However, the feature subset selected in our analysis that gave the best accuracy did not use either of these features. This result indicates the possibility of using BDS as a better objective assessment tool for breast cancer detection.

  2. Improving breast cancer control among Latinas: evaluation of a theory-based educational program.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S I; Chavez, L R; Magaña, J R; Nava, P; Burciaga Valdez, R; Hubbell, F A

    1998-10-01

    The study evaluated a theory-based breast cancer control program specially developed for less acculturated Latinas. The authors used a quasi-experimental design with random assignment of Latinas into experimental (n = 51) or control (n = 37) groups that completed one pretest and two posttest surveys. The experimental group received the educational program, which was based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory and Freire's empowerment pedagogy. Outcome measures included knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, attitudes, breast self-examination (BSE) skills, and mammogram use. At posttest 1, controlling for pretest scores, the experimental group was significantly more likely than the control group to have more medically recognized knowledge (sum of square [SS] = 17.0, F = 6.58, p < .01), have less medically recognized knowledge (SS = 128.8, F = 39.24, p < .001), greater sense of perceived self-efficacy (SS = 316.5, F = 9.63, p < .01), and greater adeptness in the conduct of BSE (SS = 234.8, F = 153.33, p < .001). Cancer control programs designed for less acculturated women should use informal and interactive educational methods that incorporate skill-enhancing and empowering techniques. PMID:9768384

  3. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  4. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  6. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27178684

  9. Evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing for personalized breast cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increasing number of targeted therapies, together with a deeper understanding of cancer genetics and drug response, have prompted major healthcare centers to implement personalized treatment approaches relying on high-throughput tumor DNA sequencing. However, the optimal way to implement this transformative methodology is not yet clear. Current assays may miss important clinical information such as the mutation allelic fraction, the presence of sub-clones or chromosomal rearrangements, or the distinction between inherited variants and somatic mutations. Here, we present the evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) to generate and interpret the molecular profile of 38 breast cancer patients from two academic medical centers. Methods We sequenced 47 genes in matched germline and tumor DNA samples from 38 breast cancer patients. The selected genes, or the pathways they belong to, can be targeted by drugs or are important in familial cancer risk or drug metabolism. Results Relying on the added value of sequencing matched tumor and germline DNA and using a dedicated analysis, UDT-Seq has a high sensitivity to identify mutations in tumors with low malignant cell content. Applying UDT-Seq to matched tumor and germline specimens from the 38 patients resulted in a proposal for at least one targeted therapy for 22 patients, the identification of tumor sub-clones in 3 patients, the suggestion of potential adverse drug effects in 3 patients and a recommendation for genetic counseling for 2 patients. Conclusion Overall our study highlights the additional benefits of a sequencing strategy, which includes germline DNA and is optimized for heterogeneous tumor tissues. PMID:24326041

  10. Women and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lippman, M E

    1987-01-01

    One in every 12 women will develop breast cancer; the incidence increases with age, dietary fat intake, caloric intake, height, and weight. The 10-year survival rate of breast cancer patients who refuse therapy is virtually zero. Segmental mastectomy plus radiation and lumpectomy, combined with systemic (adjuvant)chemotherapy, are alternatives under investigation at the National Institutes of Health that may increase the survival rate by decreasing metastatic complications.

  11. Continuity of Information for Breast Cancer Patients: The Development, Use and Evaluation of a Multidisciplinary Care-Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wersch, A.; Bonnema, J.; Prinsen, B.; Pruyn, J.; Wiggers, Th.; van Geel, A. N.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary care protocol was developed to achieve continuity and integration of information. The protocol integrates medical, nursing, and a variety of extramural events and activities into a comprehensive description of 15 "moments" in the care of breast cancer surgery patients. Implementation and evaluation are reported and discussed.…

  12. A Qualitative Evaluation of a Faith-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention for African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Alicia K.; Berrios, Nerida; Darnell, Julie S.; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a formative evaluation of a CDC Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 faith-based breast and cervical cancer early detection and prevention intervention for African American women living in urban communities. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of women (N = 94) recruited from each church…

  13. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  14. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  15. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  16. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Knowledge Among Health Promoters in Mexico Before and After Focused Training

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Nancy L.; Kouri, Elena M.; Ornelas, Héctor Arreola; Méndez, Oscar; Valladares, Laura Magaña

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Breast cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Mexico. We assessed the effectiveness of a train-the-trainer program in two Mexican states in improving knowledge among professional and nonprofessional community health workers. Materials and Methods. We worked with local organizations to develop and implement a train-the-trainer program to improve breast cancer knowledge among community health workers, including professional health promoters (PHPs) who were trained and then trained nonprofessional community health promoters (CHPs). We surveyed participants before and after training that included in-person and online classes and again approximately 3 months later. We used paired t tests and chi-square tests to compare survey responses at the different times. We also used logistic regression to assess whether promoter characteristics were associated with greater improvements in breast cancer knowledge after training. Results. Overall, 169 PHPs (mean age, 36 years) completed training and provided a 10-hour training course to 2,651 CHPs, who also completed the pre- and post-training survey. For both PHPs and CHPs, post-training surveys demonstrated increases in an understanding of breast cancer as a problem; an understanding of screening, treatment, and insurance coverage issues; and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, symptoms, and what constitutes a family history of breast cancer (all p < .05). These improvements were maintained 3 to 6 months after training. Conclusion. Train-the-trainer programs hold promise for leveraging community health workers, who far outnumber other health professionals in many low- and middle-income countries, to engage in health promotion activities for cancer and other noncommunicable diseases. PMID:25232041

  18. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  20. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  1. Yazd Breast Cancer Project Profile; A Community Based Trial for the Evaluation of Self-Examination and Physical Examination of the Breast Cancer Disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony B; Harirchi, Iraj; Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan; Noori, Mahmoud; Mirzaei, Mohsen; Jafarizadea, Majid; Sadeghian, Mohammad Reza; Minosepehr, Mojgan

    2015-11-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that a benefit might be derived from a program that incorporated both annual physical examination of the breast (BPx) and the teaching of breast self-examination (BSE). Current investigation presents the profile of a multicenter community based intervention for evaluating the effect of BSE+BPx on the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to breast cancer amongst women residing in urban areas of Yazd (Iran) from 2008 to 2018. There were three distinctive phases in this trial with 10 years duration: pilot phase with the duration of 1 year, active intervention phase with 4 rounds of annual screening of BPx+BSE and follow up phase with 5 years duration. Tools of enquiry included a pre-tested questionnaire, repeated annual physical examination of the breast and more importantly mammography, sonography, and fine needle aspiration (FNA). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequencies, percent, mean (SD), tests of chi-square and student t-test with 95% confidence level. Comparison of socio-demographic and socio-economic factors such as age, age at marriage, family size, number of live births, occupation, education level, total family income and marital status showed that no significant difference was seen between the groups (P>0.05). A response rate of 84.5% was seen by participants of the experiment group visiting the health centers for the first BPx. Our results showed that except for the education and marital status, the difference in other main demographic and socio-economic factors between the groups were not significant, and the response rate of individuals in the experiment group was at an acceptable level.

  2. Antiproliferative Evaluation of Isofuranodiene on Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lambertucci, Catia; Maggi, Filippo; Papa, Fabrizio; Santinelli, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The anticancer activity of isofuranodiene, extracted from Smyrnium olusatrum, was evaluated in human breast adenocarcinomas MDA-MB 231 and BT 474, and Caucasian prostate adenocarcinoma PC 3 cell lines by MTS assay. MTS assay showed a dose-dependent growth inhibition in the tumor cell lines after isofuranodiene treatment. The best antiproliferative activity of the isofuranodiene was found on PC 3 cells with an IC50 value of 29 μM, which was slightly less than the inhibition against the two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines with IC50 values of 59 and 55 μM on MDA-MB 231 and BT 474, respectively. Hoechst 33258 assay was performed in order to study the growth inhibition mechanism in prostate cancer cell line; the results indicate that isofuranodiene induces apoptosis. Overall, the understudy compound has a good anticancer activity especially towards the PC 3. On the contrary, it is less active on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) appearing as a good candidate as a potential natural anticancer drug with low side effects. PMID:24967427

  3. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  4. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    High income, high socioeconomic status, and affluence increase breast cancer incidence. Socioeconomic status in USA breast cancer studies has been assessed by block-group socioeconomic measures. A block group is a portion of a census tract with boundaries that segregate, as far as possible, socioeconomic groups. In this study, we used US Census income data instead of block groups to gauge socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients in relationship with incidence, prognostic markers, and survival. US state breast cancer incidence and mortality data are from the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011. Three-Year-Average Median Household Income by State, 2010 to 2012, is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2011 to 2013 Annual Social and Economic Supplements. County incomes are from the 2005-2009 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau. The American Community Survey is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population yearly. Its purpose is to provide communities the information they need to plan investments and services. Breast cancer county incidence and survival data are from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) data base. We analyzed SEER data from 198 counties in California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, Utah, and Washington. SEER uses the Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System. We have retained the SEER CS variables. There was a significant relationship of income with breast cancer incidence in 50 USA states and the District of Columbia in White women (r = 0.623, p < 0.001). There was a significant relationship between node involvement and income in Whites in 198 USA counties. Income was significantly correlated with 5-year relative survival in Whites with localized breast cancer. Income was not correlated with 5-year survival of Black race (p = 0.364) or other races (p = 0

  6. Evaluation of the contribution of the three breast cancer susceptibility genes CHEK2, STK11, and PALB2 in non-BRCA1/2 French Canadian families with high risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guénard, Frédéric; Pedneault, Christopher St-Laurent; Ouellette, Geneviève; Labrie, Yvan; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine

    2010-08-01

    Inactivating mutations of the CHEK2 and STK11 genes are responsible for Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, respectively, both autosomal dominant syndromes associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. The PALB2/FANCN gene encodes a nuclear partner of BRCA2 and acts as a linker between BRCA1 and BRCA2. Monoallelic PALB2 truncating mutations were shown to confer higher risk of breast cancer. To evaluate the proportion of French Canadian non-BRCA1/BRCA2 families with high risk of breast cancer potentially harboring alterations in these three breast cancer susceptibility genes, the whole coding and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed in a series of 96 high-risk breast cancer individuals. Despite no PALB2 deleterious truncating mutations being identified, the c.1100delC breast-cancer-associated CHEK2 mutation and a STK11 mutation reported to be the causative mutation in a Peutz-Jeghers family were identified. This extensive analysis also led to the identification of several variants in these genes. Ascertainment of allele frequency of these variants in a cohort of 96 healthy unrelated women suggests a difference in allele frequency for two STK11 intronic variants. In addition, large genomic rearrangements in both STK11 and PALB2 were also examined. Our analysis led to the conclusion that CHEK2, STK11, and PALB2 mutations or large genomic rearrangements of either STK11 or PALB2 are rare, and do not contribute to a substantial fraction of breast cancer susceptibility in high-risk French Canadian breast cancer families.

  7. Overdetection in breast cancer screening: development and preliminary evaluation of a decision aid

    PubMed Central

    Hersch, Jolyn; Jansen, Jesse; Barratt, Alexandra; Irwig, Les; Houssami, Nehmat; Jacklyn, Gemma; Thornton, Hazel; Dhillon, Haryana; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop, pilot and refine a decision aid (ahead of a randomised trial evaluation) for women around age 50 facing their initial decision about whether to undergo mammography screening. Design Two-stage mixed-method pilot study including qualitative interviews (n=15) and a randomised comparison using a quantitative survey (n=34). Setting New South Wales, Australia. Participants Women aged 43–59 years with no personal history of breast cancer. Interventions The decision aid provides evidence-based information about important outcomes of mammography screening over 20 years (breast cancer mortality reduction, overdetection and false positives) compared with no screening. The information is presented in a short booklet for women, combining text and visual formats. A control version produced for the purposes of comparison omits the overdetection-related content. Outcomes Comprehension of key decision aid content and acceptability of the materials. Results Most women considered the decision aid clear and helpful and would recommend it to others. Nonetheless, the piloting process raised important issues that we tried to address in iterative revisions. Some participants found it hard to understand overdetection and why it is of concern, while there was often confusion about the distinction between overdetection and false positives. In a screening context, encountering balanced information rather than persuasion appears to be contrary to people's expectations, but women appreciated the opportunity to become better informed. Conclusions The concept of overdetection is complex and new to the public. This study highlights some key challenges for communicating about this issue. It is important to clarify that overdetection differs from false positives in terms of its more serious consequences (overtreatment and associated harms). Screening decision aids also must clearly explain their purpose of facilitating informed choice. A staged approach to development and

  8. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    PubMed

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes. PMID:25561069

  9. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    PubMed

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes.

  10. Comparison of breast specific gamma imaging and molecular breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection: Evaluation in phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Breast specific gamma imaging or molecular breast imaging (BSGI) obtains 2D images of 99mTc sestamibi distribution in the breast. Molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) maps the tracer distribution in 3D by acquiring multiple projections over a limited angular range. Here, the authors compare the performance of the two technologies in terms of spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in phantom studies under conditions of clinically relevant sestamibi dose and imaging time. Methods: The systems tested were a Dilon 6800 and a MBT prototype developed at the University of Virginia. Both systems comprise a pixelated sodium iodide scintillator, an array of position sensitive photomultipliers, and a parallel hole collimator. The active areas and energy resolution of the systems are similar. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and CNR were measured using a Petri dish, a point source phantom, and a breast phantom containing simulated lesions at two depths, respectively. A single BSGI projection was acquired. Five MBT projections were acquired over ±20°. For both modalities, the total scan count density was comparable to that observed for each in typical 10 min human scans following injection of 22 mCi (814 MBq) of 99mTc-sestamibi. To assess the impact of reducing the tracer dose, the pixel counts of projection images were later binomially subsampled by a factor of 2 to give images corresponding to an injected activity of approximately 11 mCi (407 MBq). Both unprocessed (pixelated) BSGI projections and interpolated (smoothed) BSGI images displayed by default on the Dilon 6800 workstation were analyzed. Volumetric images were reconstructed from the MBT projections using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm and extracted slices were analyzed. Results: Over a depth range of 1.5–7.5 cm, BSGI spatial resolution was 5.6–11.5 mm in unprocessed projections and 5.7–12.0 mm in interpolated images

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  13. Preclinical evaluation of the AR inhibitor enzalutamide in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Francesco; Murray, Alyson; Madden, Stephen F; Synnott, Naoise C; Ryan, Elizabeth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John; Duffy, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is present in approximately 80% of invasive breast cancer patients and in up to 30% of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Therefore, our aim was to investigate the targeting of AR as a possible hormonal approach to the treatment of TNBC. Analysis of 2091 patients revealed an association between AR expression and poor overall survival, selectively in patients with the basal subtype of breast cancer, the vast majority of which are TNBC. IC50 values for the second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide across 11 breast cancer cell lines varied from 4 µM to >50 µM. The activity of enzalutamide was similar in TN and non-TN cell lines but was dependent on the presence of AR. Enzalutamide reduced clonogenic potential and cell growth in a 3D matrix in AR-positive cells. In addition, enzalutamide also inhibited cell migration and invasion in an AR-dependent manner. Enzalutamide appeared to mediate these processes through down-regulation of the transcription factors AP-1 and SP-1. The first-generation anti-androgen flutamide similarly blocked cell growth, migration and invasion. AR-positive TNBC cells clustered separately from AR-negative cells based on an androgen-related gene expression signature, independently of TNBC subtype. We conclude that targeting of the AR with drugs such as enzalutamide may provide an alternative treatment strategy for patients with AR-positive TNBC. PMID:26932782

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Estradiol Derivatives as Anti-Breast Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cooperwood, John S.; Edwards, Jesse; Musa, Musiliyu; Simmons, Devora; Mian, Abdul D.; Park, Kwon-kyun; Wan, Zhongliang

    2010-01-01

    3-N-alkyloxyestradiol derivatives were synthesized, characterized and tested for activity in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Among the compounds, the diisopropyl and piperidinyl derivatives were found to be more active than 4-hydroxytamoxifen (HO-Tam), the active metabolite of tamoxifen based upon IC50 values. The IC50s were correlated with structures using molecular modeling. PMID:20543998

  15. Preclinical evaluation of the AR inhibitor enzalutamide in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Francesco; Murray, Alyson; Madden, Stephen F; Synnott, Naoise C; Ryan, Elizabeth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John; Duffy, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is present in approximately 80% of invasive breast cancer patients and in up to 30% of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Therefore, our aim was to investigate the targeting of AR as a possible hormonal approach to the treatment of TNBC. Analysis of 2091 patients revealed an association between AR expression and poor overall survival, selectively in patients with the basal subtype of breast cancer, the vast majority of which are TNBC. IC50 values for the second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide across 11 breast cancer cell lines varied from 4 µM to >50 µM. The activity of enzalutamide was similar in TN and non-TN cell lines but was dependent on the presence of AR. Enzalutamide reduced clonogenic potential and cell growth in a 3D matrix in AR-positive cells. In addition, enzalutamide also inhibited cell migration and invasion in an AR-dependent manner. Enzalutamide appeared to mediate these processes through down-regulation of the transcription factors AP-1 and SP-1. The first-generation anti-androgen flutamide similarly blocked cell growth, migration and invasion. AR-positive TNBC cells clustered separately from AR-negative cells based on an androgen-related gene expression signature, independently of TNBC subtype. We conclude that targeting of the AR with drugs such as enzalutamide may provide an alternative treatment strategy for patients with AR-positive TNBC.

  16. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  17. Evaluation of MAGE-1 Cancer-Testis Antigen Expression in Invasive Breast Cancer and its Correlation with Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rastgoosalami, Mojtaba; Memar, Bahram; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Fanipakdel, Azar

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTA) in breast carcinoma tissue, and its natural expression in the testis, the tissue away from the immune system, makes them good candidates for cancer immunotherapy and vaccines designing. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the expression of a CTA (MAGE-1) in invasive breast cancer and its correlation with prognostic factors. Methods Paraffin blocks of breast cancer tissues from 113 patients operated in 2011 - 2013 were stained for MAGE-1expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The associations of MAGE-1 expression with known prognostic factors were assessed by statistical analysis using SPSS 16. Results MAGE-1 expression was found in cancer cell cytoplasms of 30.1% of patients, with different degrees of intensity, (23.9% moderate and 6.2% strong). Nuclear staining turned positive in 31.8%, stratified from moderate in 26.5%to to strong in 5.3%. There was a significant association between the number of lymph nodes involved and both nuclear (P = 0.042) and cytoplasmic (P = 0.003) MAGE-1 expression. There was also a significant correlation between the nuclear expression of MAGE-1 and tumor size (P = 0.018). Cytoplasmic expression of MAGE-1 increased with increasing pathologic grade of tumors although the association was not statistically significant (P = 0.119). Conclusions CTA MAGE-1 has significant association with some prognostic factors in breast cancer and may have the role of a prognostic factor. PMID:27761208

  18. Lifetime grain consumption and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Eliassen, A Heather; Chen, Wendy Y; Willett, Walter C

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated individual grain-containing foods and whole and refined grain intake during adolescence, early adulthood, and premenopausal years in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II. Grain-containing food intakes were reported on a baseline dietary questionnaire (1991) and every 4 years thereafter. Among 90,516 premenopausal women aged 27-44 years, we prospectively identified 3235 invasive breast cancer cases during follow-up to 2013. 44,263 women reported their diet during high school, and from 1998 to 2013, 1347 breast cancer cases were identified among these women. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of breast cancer for individual, whole and refined grain foods. After adjusting for known breast cancer risk factors, adult intake of whole grain foods was associated with lower premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintile: RR 0.82; 95 % CI 0.70-0.97; P trend = 0.03), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. This association was no longer significant after further adjustment for fiber intake. The average of adolescent and early adulthood whole grain food intake was suggestively associated with lower premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintile: RR 0.74; 95 % CI 0.56-0.99; P trend = 0.09). Total refined grain food intake was not associated with risk of breast cancer. Most individual grain-containing foods were not associated with breast cancer risk. The exceptions were adult brown rice which was associated with lower risk of overall and premenopausal breast cancer (for each 2 servings/week: RR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89-0.99 and RR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.85-0.99, respectively) and adult white bread intake which was associated with increased overall breast cancer risk (for each 2 servings/week: RR 1.02; 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), as well as breast cancer before and after menopause. Further, pasta intake was inversely associated with

  19. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  20. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Prognostic evaluation of the B cell/IL-8 metagene in different intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Lars C; Rody, Achim; Holtrich, Uwe; Pusztai, Lajos; Ruckhaeberle, Eugen; Liedtke, Cornelia; Ahr, Andre; Heinrich, Tomas M; Sänger, Nicole; Becker, Sven; Karn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that a ratio of high B cell and low IL-8 metagene expression identified 32 % of triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) with good prognosis and was the only significant predictor in multivariate analysis including routine clinicopathological variables. However, the clinical relevance of this signature in other breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. We compiled Affymetrix gene expression datasets from 4,467 primary breast cancer samples and excluded 329 triple negative samples which were used as discovery cohort in our previous study. Molecular classification of the remaining 4,138 samples was performed by two methods, including single genes (ER, PgR, HER2, and Ki67) and a centroid-based method using the intrinsic gene list. The prognostic value within the respective subtypes was assessed by analyzing the event-free survival of patients as a function of the B cell/IL-8 metagene ratio using previously published cutoff. ER-negative subtypes had the highest expression of the B cell and the IL-8 metagenes. The IL-8/B cell signature assigned a considerable fraction of samples (range 20.7-42.0 %) into the "good prognosis" group. However, a significant prognostic value was only observed in the subgroup of triple negative breast cancer (P = 0.035). The prognostic value of the B cell/IL-8 ratio is mainly confined to the basal-like and TNBC subtypes of breast cancer. This result underlines the importance of subtype-specific analyses and suggests a sequential multistep approach to developing and applying outcome predictors in the clinic.

  2. Preventive treatments for breast cancer: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Alés-Martínez, J E; Ruiz, A; Chacón, J I; Lluch Hernández, A; Ramos, M; Córdoba, O; Aguirre, E; Barnadas, A; Jara, C; González, S; Plazaola, A; Florián, J; Andrés, R; Sánchez Rovira, P; Frau, A

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a burden for western societies, and an increasing one in emerging economies, because of its high incidence and enormous psychological, social, sanitary and economic costs. However, breast cancer is a preventable disease in a significant proportion. Recent developments in the armamentarium of effective drugs for breast cancer prevention (namely exemestane and anastrozole), the new recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to use preventative drugs in women at high risk as well as updated Guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Society of Clinical Oncology should give renewed momentum to the pharmacological prevention of breast cancer. In this article we review recent major developments in the field and examine their ongoing repercussion for breast cancer prevention. As a practical example, the potential impact of preventive measures in Spain is evaluated and a course of practical actions is delineated.

  3. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  4. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of exquisite targeting SPIONs-PEG-HER in HER2+ human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Almaki, Javad Hamzehalipour; Nasiri, Rozita; Idris, Ani; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Salouti, Mojtaba; Wong, Tet Soon; Dabagh, Shadab; Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda

    2016-03-11

    A stable, biocompatible and exquisite SPIONs-PEG-HER targeting complex was developed. Initially synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were silanized using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) as the coupling agent in order to allow the covalent bonding of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the SPIONs to improve the biocompatibility of the SPIONs. SPIONs-PEG were then conjugated with herceptin (HER) to permit the SPIONs-PEG-HER to target the specific receptors expressed over the surface of the HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells. Each preparation step was physico-chemically analyzed and characterized by a number of analytical methods including AAS, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, FESEM, TEM, DLS and VSM. The biocompatibility of SPIONs-PEG-HER was evaluated in vitro on HSF-1184 (human skin fibroblast cells), SK-BR-3 (human breast cancer cells, HER+), MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) and MDA-MB-468 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) cell lines by performing MTT and trypan blue assays. The hemolysis analysis results of the SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG did not indicate any sign of lysis while in contact with erythrocytes. Additionally, there were no morphological changes seen in RBCs after incubation with SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG under a light microscope. The qualitative and quantitative in vitro targeting studies confirmed the high level of SPION-PEG-HER binding to SK-BR-3 (HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells). Thus, the results reflected that the SPIONs-PEG-HER can be chosen as a favorable biomaterial for biomedical applications, chiefly magnetic hyperthermia, in the future. PMID:26861770

  5. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of exquisite targeting SPIONs-PEG-HER in HER2+ human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehalipour Almaki, Javad; Nasiri, Rozita; Idris, Ani; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Salouti, Mojtaba; Wong, Tet Soon; Dabagh, Shadab; Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda

    2016-03-01

    A stable, biocompatible and exquisite SPIONs-PEG-HER targeting complex was developed. Initially synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were silanized using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) as the coupling agent in order to allow the covalent bonding of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the SPIONs to improve the biocompatibility of the SPIONs. SPIONs-PEG were then conjugated with herceptin (HER) to permit the SPIONs-PEG-HER to target the specific receptors expressed over the surface of the HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells. Each preparation step was physico-chemically analyzed and characterized by a number of analytical methods including AAS, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, FESEM, TEM, DLS and VSM. The biocompatibility of SPIONs-PEG-HER was evaluated in vitro on HSF-1184 (human skin fibroblast cells), SK-BR-3 (human breast cancer cells, HER+), MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) and MDA-MB-468 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) cell lines by performing MTT and trypan blue assays. The hemolysis analysis results of the SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG did not indicate any sign of lysis while in contact with erythrocytes. Additionally, there were no morphological changes seen in RBCs after incubation with SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG under a light microscope. The qualitative and quantitative in vitro targeting studies confirmed the high level of SPION-PEG-HER binding to SK-BR-3 (HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells). Thus, the results reflected that the SPIONs-PEG-HER can be chosen as a favorable biomaterial for biomedical applications, chiefly magnetic hyperthermia, in the future.

  6. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  7. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  8. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  10. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  11. Novel nanosystem to enhance the antitumor activity of lapatinib in breast cancer treatment: Therapeutic efficacy evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Shi-Jiang; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Zuo, Wen-Shu; Liu, Ping; Pang, Bo; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the therapeutic performance of polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles towards the delivery of lapatinib (LPT) in breast cancers. We have successfully developed the lapatinib-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanosystem and showed its therapeutic potential in in vitro and in vivo models of breast cancer. The nanoformulations consisted of a polymeric core (poly[lactide-co-glycolide]-D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [PLGA–TPGS]), which was then enveloped by a PEGylated lipid layer (DSPE-PEG) (PLPT) to maintain the structural integrity. The PLPT formulation controlled the drug release in pH 7.4 conditions and accelerated the release at pH 5.5 conditions. The PLPT showed a remarkable cellular internalization and efficiently killed the MCF-7 cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, LPT-loaded nanoparticles effectively induced apoptosis of cancer cells than compared to free LPT. Pharmacokinetic data suggested that nanoparticles could significantly enhance the blood circulation time of LPT by reducing the uptake by a reticuloendothelial system (RES). The prolonged blood circulation of PLPT could allow the preferential accumulation of drug in the tumor tissues. Importantly, PLPT significantly reduced the tumor burden of cancerous mice and effectively controlled the tumor cell proliferation. TUNEL assay further showed a greater apoptosis of tumor tissues in the PLPT treated mice group. Our results suggest that the use of a hybrid system may allow a decrease in the dosage regimen without the loss of therapeutic effect. Overall, lapatinib-loaded hybrid nanoparticles hold great potential for achieving an optimal therapeutic effect in breast cancer treatment. The present anticancer drug delivery system could be potentially applied for the treatment of other cancers. PMID:26177628

  12. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations. PMID:20703753

  13. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations.

  14. An evaluation of molecular markers for improved detection of breast cancer metastases in sentinel nodes

    PubMed Central

    Abdul‐Rasool, S; Kidson, S H; Panieri, E; Dent, D; Pillay, K; Hanekom, G S

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives In patients with breast cancer (BC), the sentinel node (SN) is the first node in the axillary basin that receives the primary lymphatic flow and can be used to accurately assess the axillary nodal status without removal of the axillary contents. Currently, histology and/or immunohistochemistry are the routine methods of SN analysis. The primary objective of this study was to develop a reproducible reverse transcription (RT) PCR assay, with emphasis on achieving high specificity for accurate detection of BC micrometastases in the SN. To correct for the heterogeneity of BC cells, a multimarker approach was followed, with the further aim of improving the detection rate of the assay. Methods In total, 73 markers were evaluated, of which 7 were breast epithelial markers and 66 were either cancer testis or tumour associated antigens. Twelve BC cell lines and 30 SNs (from 30 patients) were analysed using RT‐PCR to determine the in vitro and in vivo detection rates for each of the markers. In addition, 20 axillary nodes obtained from a patient with brain death were used as controls to optimise the PCR cycle numbers for all the markers. Results Of the 30 SNs, 37% (11/30) were positive on haematoxylin and eosin analysis. Extensive immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of the haematoxylin and eosin negative nodes confirmed the presence of very small numbers of BC cells in an additional 40% (12/30) of SNs. Molecular analysis with the hMAM‐A alone identified metastases in 70% (21/30) of SNs. Using MAGE‐A3 in combination with hMAM‐A identified metastases in 90% (27/30) of patients. Seven SNs (23%) were negative for micrometastases (with haematoxylin and eosin and IHC) but RT‐PCR positive for either hMAM‐A or MAGE‐A3. Conclusions As IHC analysis resulted in a 77% detection rate compared with 37% for haematoxylin and eosin analysis, we consider that IHC is essential in order not to miss SN micrometastases. Molecular analysis with hMAM‐A and

  15. Evaluation of Conceptual Framework for Recruitment of African American Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heiney, Sue P.; Adams, Swann Arp; Wells, Linda M.; Johnson, Hiluv

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the Heiney-Adams Recruitment Framework (H-ARF); to delineate a recruitment plan for a randomized, behavioral trial (RBT) based on H-ARF; and to provide evaluation data on its implementation. Data Sources All data for this investigation originated from a recruitment database created for an RBT designed to test the effectiveness of a therapeutic group convened via teleconference for African American women with breast cancer. Data Synthesis Major H-ARF concepts include social marketing and relationship building. The majority of social marketing strategies yielded 100% participant recruitment. Greater absolute numbers were recruited via Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act waivers. Using H-ARF yielded a high recruitment rate (66%). Conclusions Application of H-ARF led to successful recruitment in an RBT. The findings highlight three areas that researchers should consider when devising recruitment plans: absolute numbers versus recruitment rate, cost, and efficiency with institutional review board–approved access to protected health information. Implications for Nursing H-ARF may be applied to any clinical or population-based research setting because it provides direction for researchers to develop a recruitment plan based on the target audience and cultural attributes that may hinder or help recruitment. PMID:20439201

  16. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Novel sulfonanilide analogs decrease aromatase activity in breast cancer cells: synthesis, biological evaluation, and ligand-based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Tian, Ran; Darby, Michael V; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2008-03-13

    Aromatase converts androgens to estrogens and is a particularly attractive target in the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Previously, the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide and analogs decreased aromatase expression and enzyme activity independent of COX-2 inhibition. In this manuscript, a combinatorial approach was used to generate diversely substituted novel sulfonanilides by parallel synthesis. Their pharmacological evaluation as agents for suppression of aromatase activity in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells was extensively explored. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was elaborated for selective aromatase modulation (SAM) using the Catalyst HipHop algorithms. The best qualitative model consisted of four features: one aromatic ring, two hydrogen bond acceptors, and one hydrophobic function. Several lead compounds have also been tested in aromatase transfected MCF-7 cells, and they significantly suppressed cellular aromatase activity. The results suggest that both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms of these compounds are involved within the aromatase suppression effect. PMID:18271519

  18. Novel sulfonanilide analogs decrease aromatase activity in breast cancer cells: synthesis, biological evaluation, and ligand-based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Tian, Ran; Darby, Michael V; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2008-03-13

    Aromatase converts androgens to estrogens and is a particularly attractive target in the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Previously, the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide and analogs decreased aromatase expression and enzyme activity independent of COX-2 inhibition. In this manuscript, a combinatorial approach was used to generate diversely substituted novel sulfonanilides by parallel synthesis. Their pharmacological evaluation as agents for suppression of aromatase activity in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells was extensively explored. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was elaborated for selective aromatase modulation (SAM) using the Catalyst HipHop algorithms. The best qualitative model consisted of four features: one aromatic ring, two hydrogen bond acceptors, and one hydrophobic function. Several lead compounds have also been tested in aromatase transfected MCF-7 cells, and they significantly suppressed cellular aromatase activity. The results suggest that both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms of these compounds are involved within the aromatase suppression effect.

  19. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  20. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  1. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  2. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  3. Evaluation of FLT-PET-CT as an imaging biomarker of proliferation in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, D K; Beresford, M; Li, S P; Dowsett, M; Sanghera, B; Wong, W L; Sonoda, L; Detre, S; Amin, V; Ah-See, M-L; Miles, D; Makris, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: [18F]fluorothymidine (FLT) has been proposed as a positron emission tomography (PET)-imaging biomarker of proliferation for breast cancer. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the feasibility of FLT-PET-CT as a technique for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in primary breast cancer and to compare baseline FLT with Ki-67. Methods: Twenty women with primary breast cancer had a baseline FLT-PET-CT scan that was repeated before the second cycle of chemotherapy. Expression of Ki-67 in the diagnostic biopsy was quantified. From the FLT-PET-CT scans lesion maximum and mean standardised uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) were calculated. Results: Mean baseline SUVmax was 7.3, and 4.62 post one cycle of NAC, representing a drop of 2.68 (36.3%). There was no significant association between baseline, post chemotherapy, or change in SUVmax and pathological response to NAC. There was a significant correlation between pre-chemotherapy Ki-67 and SUVmax of 0.604 (P=0.006). Conclusions: Baseline SUVmax measurements of FLT-PET-CT were significantly related to Ki-67 suggesting that it is a proliferation biomarker. However, in this series neither the baseline value nor the change in SUVmax after one cycle of NAC were able to predict response as most patients had a sizeable SUVmax reduction. PMID:24832174

  4. Evaluation of the potential for lymph node metastasis using CRP 1846C>T genetic polymorphism in invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Terata, Kaori; Motoyama, Satoru; Kamata, Shuichi; Hinai, Yudai; Miura, Masatomo; Sato, Yusuke; Yoshino, Kei; Ito, Aki; Imai, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-01

    Lymph node status is a key indicator of the best approach to treatment of invasive breast cancer. However, the accuracy with which lymph node metastasis is diagnosed is not currently satisfactory. New and more reliable methods that enable one to know who has a greater potential for lymph node metastasis would be highly desirable. We previously reported that lymph node involvement in esophageal and lung cancer may have a genetic component: C-reactive protein (CRP) 1846C>T genetic polymorphism. Here we examined the diagnostic value of CRP 1846C>T polymorphism for assessing the risk of lymph node metastasis in cases of invasive breast cancer. The study participants were 185 women with invasive breast cancer who underwent curative surgery with lymph node dissection. Using DNA from blood samples and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, the utility of CRP genetic 1846C>T polymorphism (rs1205) for assessing the risk of lymph node metastasis was evaluated. Fifty-two (28 %) patients had lymph node metastasis. After the patients were divided into two groups based on their CRP 1846 genotypes (C/C+C/T and T/T), the clinical characteristics did not differ between the groups, but there was a significantly greater incidence of lymph node metastasis among patients in the T/T group. Moreover, the odds ratio for lymph node involvement in patients carrying the 1846 T/T genotype was more than 2.2 in multivariate logistic regression models. CRP genetic polymorphism may be a novel predictor of the risk of lymph node metastasis in invasive breast cancer.

  5. Evaluation of the Dutch BRCA1/2 clinical genetic center referral criteria in an unselected early breast cancer population.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Alexandra J; de Ruiter, Karen; van 't Veer, Laura J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Verhoef, Senno; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974-2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers identified met the criteria for referral to the CGC based on age, family history and synchronous multiple tumors; reflected by a combined sensitivity of 75.5% and specificity of 63.2%. More than half of the BRCA1 mutation carriers, that is, 58% had a triple-negative tumor. The highest AUC was obtained by shifting the age at diagnosis threshold criterion from 40 to 35 years and by adding a 'triple-negative breast cancer' criterion with an age threshold of 45 years; the specificity increased to 71.2%, whereas the sensitivity remained the same; that is, a referral of fewer patients will lead to the identification of at least the same number of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Two-thirds of the BRCA1/2 mutation carriers identified in this research setting had been referred for counseling and testing. Our results indicate that, awaiting a possibly more extended mutation screening of all breast cancer patients, the triple-negative status of a breast cancer should be added to the CGC referral criteria.

  6. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  7. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eloy, Josimar O.; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L.; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G.; Lee, Robert J.; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  8. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Josimar O; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Lee, Robert J; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  9. Evaluation of breast cancer service screening programme with a Bayesian approach: mortality analysis in a Finnish region.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jenny Chia-Yun; Anttila, Ahti; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Hakama, Matti; Saarenmaa, Irma; Sarkeala, Tytti; Malila, Nea; Auvinen, Anssi; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2010-06-01

    Evaluation of long-term effectiveness of population-based breast cancer service screening program in a small geographic area may suffer from self-selection bias and small samples. Under a prospective cohort design with exposed and non-exposed groups classified by whether women attended the screen upon invitation, we proposed a Bayesian acyclic graphic model for correcting self-selection bias with or without incorporation of prior information derived from previous studies with an identical screening program in Sweden by chronological order and applied it to an organized breast cancer service screening program in Pirkanmaa center of Finland. The relative mortality rate of breast cancer was 0.27 (95% CI 0.12-0.61) for the exposed group versus the non-exposed group without adjusting for self-selection bias. With adjustment for selection-bias, the adjusted relative mortality rate without using previous data was 0.76 (95% CI 0.49-1.15), whereas a statistically significant result was achieved [0.73 (95% CI 0.57-0.93)] with incorporation of previous information. With the incorporation of external data sources from Sweden in chronological order, adjusted relative mortality rate was 0.67 (0.55-0.80). We demonstrated how to apply a Bayesian acyclic graphic model with self-selection bias adjustment to evaluating an organized but non-randomized breast cancer screening program in a small geographic area with a significant 27% mortality reduction that is consistent with the previous result but more precise. Around 33% mortality was estimated by taking previous randomized controlled data from Sweden.

  10. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  11. Perceived Versus Objective Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Risk in Diverse Women

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Julia; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Jessica; Ozanne, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Prior research suggests that women do not accurately estimate their risk for breast cancer. Estimating and informing women of their risk is essential for tailoring appropriate screening and risk reduction strategies. Methods: Data were collected for BreastCARE, a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a PC-tablet based intervention providing multiethnic women and their primary care physicians with tailored information about breast cancer risk. We included women ages 40–74 visiting general internal medicine primary care clinics at one academic practice and one safety net practice who spoke English, Spanish, or Cantonese, and had no personal history of breast cancer. We collected baseline information regarding risk perception and concern. Women were categorized as high risk (vs. average risk) if their family history met criteria for referral to genetic counseling or if they were in the top 5% of risk for their age based on the Gail or Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium Model (BCSC) breast cancer risk model. Results: Of 1,261 participants, 25% (N=314) were classified as high risk. More average risk than high risk women had correct risk perception (72% vs. 18%); 25% of both average and high risk women reported being very concerned about breast cancer. Average risk women with correct risk perception were less likely to be concerned about breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.2–0.4) while high risk women with correct risk perception were more likely to be concerned about breast cancer (OR=5.1; 95%CI=2.7–9.6). Conclusions: Many women did not accurately perceive their risk for breast cancer. Women with accurate risk perception had an appropriate level of concern about breast cancer. Improved methods of assessing and informing women of their breast cancer risk could motivate high risk women to apply appropriate prevention strategies and allay unnecessary concern among average risk women. PMID:24372085

  12. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  13. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Evaluation of a Single-Isocenter Technique for Axillary Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beek, Suzanne van Jaeger, Katrien de; Mijnheer, Ben |; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technique for axillary radiotherapy that minimizes the risk of radiation-induced damage to the surrounding normal tissue (i.e., arm, shoulder, lung, esophagus, and spinal cord) while keeping the risk of a nodal recurrence to a minimum. A planning study was performed in 20 breast cancer patients. The target volume of the axillary treatment encompassed the periclavicular and axillary lymph node areas. The 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) information in this study was used to outline the lymph node areas and the organs at risk (i.e., the esophagus, spinal cord, brachial plexus, and lung). A conventional AP-PA technique (with a transmission plate placed in the AP beam) was evaluated. In addition, a new single-isocenter technique consisting of AP/PA fields using a gantry rotation of {+-}20 deg. and a medial AP segment was developed. Both techniques were compared by evaluation of the calculated dose distributions and the dose-volume histograms of the target volume and surrounding organs at risk. The field borders and humeral shielding were redefined based on the 3D anatomical references. Adapting the humeral shielding reduced the irradiated volume by 19% and might contribute to a reduction of the incidence of arm edema and impairment of shoulder function. The maximum radiation dose in the esophagus and spinal cord was reduced by more than 50% using the single-isocenter technique. The difference between both techniques with respect to the mean doses in the target volume and lung, and the maximum dose in brachial plexus, was not statistically significant. Moreover, the single-isocenter technique allowed a fast and easy treatment preparation and reduced the execution time considerably (with approximately 10 minutes per fraction)

  17. Breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Lubinski, Jan; Korzen, Marcin; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Jakubowska, Anna; Medrek, Krzysztof; Matyjasik, Joanna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Masojc, Bartlomiej; Lener, Marcin; Szymanska, Anna; Szymanska-Pasternak, Jolanta; Fernandez, Pablo Serrano; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Piegat, Andrzej; Ucinski, Michal; Domagala, Pawel; Kladny, Jozef; Gorecka, Barbara; Scott, Rodney; Narod, Steven

    2007-09-01

    In 1999 it has been recognized that 3 BRCA1 abnormalities - 5382insC, C61G and 4153delA - constitute almost 90% of all germline mutations of this gene in Poland. Due to the above findings we started performing the cheap and quick large scale testing for BRCA1 mutations and, these days, we have almost 4,000 carriers diagnosed and under direct or indirect supervision what is probably the largest number in the world. Additionally, the above results pushed us to hypothesize that genetic homogeneity will be seen in Poland in studies of other genes. Actually, the next studies allowed us to identify genes / changes associated with moderate / low breast cancer risk and showed, similarly to BRCA1, high level of genetic homogeneity. This series included BRCA2, C5972T, CHEK2 del5395; 1100delC, I157T or IVS2 + 1G > A, CDKN2A (p16) A148T, XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, CYP1B1 R48G, A119S and L43V. The results of the above studies led us in 2004 already to hypothesize that >90% of all cancers have genetic (constitutional) background. Two years later we were able to show a panel of markers covering 92% of consecutive breast cancers in Poland, and we formulated the hypothesis that all cancers have a genetic background. These days we are demonstrating for the first time that genetic components to malignancy play a role in all cancers. We are presenting it on examples of late-onset breast cancers from Poland, but it seems to be justified to expect that similar results can be achieved from other malignancies. PMID:17935274

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  19. [Screening for cervical and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Wilm, J; Schüler-Toprak, S; Ortmann, O

    2016-09-01

    Screening programs for cervical cancer and breast cancer lead to a clear reduction of mortality. Starting in 2018 screening for cervical cancer will be structured as an organized program as already exists for breast cancer. In future screening for cervical cancer will be primarily performed by human papillomavirus (HPV) testing at intervals of 5 years while cytological examination (Pap smear) will also be available as an additional or alternative procedure. For breast cancer screening in Germany an annual clinical examination with palpation and mammography screening at 2‑year intervals is provided for women aged between 50 and 69 years. In Germany only approximately 50 % of invited women have used the opportunity to participate in screening in recent years. Weighing the benefits against the harms of cancer screening programs is always important in the process of evaluation of different strategies. PMID:27577734

  20. [Neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ena, G

    2011-09-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment is the standard therapy for inflammatory and locally advanced breast cancer but is also applied in patients with primary operable breast cancer to facilitate breast-conserving surgery. Disease-free survival and overall survival are equivalent between patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and patient receiving the same regimen postoperatively. Nevertheless, pathologic complete response can be a predictive indicator of long-term outcomes. Initially encompassing chemotherapy, it is actually extended to hormonotherapy for hormonoresponsive tumor and to targeted therapy such as trastuzumab for the HER2 positive tumor. The neoadjuvant approach of breast cancer will provide better understanding of breast cancer biology and promote translational research. In this paper, a review of the role of preoperative treatment in the management of breast cancer disease is discussed.

  1. Breast cancer quality of life evaluation in Mexican Women at La Raza Hospital, Mexico City: A preliminary approach

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Hinojosa-Cruz, Juan Carlos; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death among Mexican women over 40 years of age. This study aimed to identify and examine the effects of cancer stage and surgical treatment on the quality of life (QOL) of Mexican women with early stage breast cancer (ESBC) treated with either modified radical mastectomy (MRM) or breast conservative surgery (BCS), plus adjuvant chemotherapy. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23 questionnaires were used to assess QOL. Sociodemographic characteristics and clinical factors of 102 women with early BC were also evaluated; analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed and a statistical significance of p < 0.05 was assumed. Most women were of reproductive age. Meaningful differences in QOL as a result of surgical treatment, in women receiving BCS compared with those receiving MRM, were limited to body image. We conclude that MRM and BCS are essentially equivalent choices in terms of QOL, with the exception of the impact on body image. In general, women who received BCS had a better perceived QOL. PMID:21935301

  2. Report: Evaluation on diagnosis significance of single high frequency Ultrasonography and mammography and combination on Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huifang; Wang, Bo; Ding, Changmao; Yu, Zhan; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis significance of single high-frequency ultrasonography and mammography and combination therapy of both on breast cancer. 352 cases of female breast cancer patients were selected from The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January 2012 to December 2014. Among the 352 patients, 124 patients had only performed high-frequency ultrasonography detection, 102 cases of patients were only conducted mammography, and 126 patients had applied the combination detection of high-frequency ultrasonography and mammography. The coincidence rate of single mammography detection was 79.4%, the misdiagnosis rate was 10.8%, and the missed diagnosis rate was 9.8%; the coincidence rate of single high frequency ultrasonography detection was 83.9%, the misdiagnosis rate was 11.5%, the missed diagnosis rate was 4.6%; the coincidence rate of combination of high frequency ultrasonography detection was 89.7%, the misdiagnosis rate was 6.3%, the missed diagnosis rate was 4.0%. The detection rate and missed diagnosis rate of combination diagnosis had statistical difference with single high frequency ultrasonography and single mammography. There was no statistical difference on misdiagnosis rate. mammography and high frequency ultrasonography respectively had their own advantages. The combination application of both had better diagnosis complementary, and could significantly improved the detection rate and accuracy rate on breast cancer, and decreased the misdiagnosis rate and missed diagnosis rate. PMID:27592481

  3. Use of indocyanine green for detecting the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer patients: from preclinical evaluation to clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chongwei; Ye, Jinzuo; Ding, Haolong; He, De; Huang, Wenhe; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in patients with early stage breast cancer is vital in selecting the appropriate surgical approach. However, the existing methods, including methylene blue and nuclides, possess low efficiency and effectiveness in mapping SLNs, and to a certain extent exert side effects during application. Indocyanine green (ICG), as a fluorescent dye, has been proved reliable usage in SLN detection by several other groups. In this paper, we introduce a novel surgical navigation system to detect SLN with ICG. This system contains two charge-coupled devices (CCD) to simultaneously capture real-time color and fluorescent video images through two different bands. During surgery, surgeons only need to follow the fluorescence display. In addition, the system saves data automatically during surgery enabling surgeons to find the registration point easily according to image recognition algorithms. To test our system, 5 mice and 10 rabbits were used for the preclinical setting and 22 breast cancer patients were utilized for the clinical evaluation in our experiments. The detection rate was 100% and an average of 2.7 SLNs was found in 22 patients. Our results show that the usage of our surgical navigation system with ICG to detect SLNs in breast cancer patients is technically feasible.

  4. MARIA M4: clinical evaluation of a prototype ultrawideband radar scanner for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Preece, Alan W; Craddock, Ian; Shere, Mike; Jones, Lyn; Winton, Helen L

    2016-07-01

    A microwave imaging system has been developed as a clinical diagnostic tool operating in the 3- to 8-GHz region using multistatic data collection. A total of 86 patients recruited from a symptomatic breast care clinic were scanned with a prototype design. The resultant three-dimensional images have been compared "blind" with available ultrasound and mammogram images to determine the detection rate. Images show the location of the strongest signal, and this corresponded in both older and younger women, with sensitivity of [Formula: see text], which was found to be maintained in dense breasts. The pathway from clinical prototype to clinical evaluation is outlined.

  5. MARIA M4: clinical evaluation of a prototype ultrawideband radar scanner for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Preece, Alan W; Craddock, Ian; Shere, Mike; Jones, Lyn; Winton, Helen L

    2016-07-01

    A microwave imaging system has been developed as a clinical diagnostic tool operating in the 3- to 8-GHz region using multistatic data collection. A total of 86 patients recruited from a symptomatic breast care clinic were scanned with a prototype design. The resultant three-dimensional images have been compared "blind" with available ultrasound and mammogram images to determine the detection rate. Images show the location of the strongest signal, and this corresponded in both older and younger women, with sensitivity of [Formula: see text], which was found to be maintained in dense breasts. The pathway from clinical prototype to clinical evaluation is outlined. PMID:27446970

  6. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of intraductally administered agents in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Vered; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Jacobs, Lisa K; Khouri, Nagi F; Gabrielson, Edward; Yoshida, Takahiro; Kominsky, Scott L; Huso, David L; Jeter, Stacie; Powers, Penny; Tarpinian, Karineh; Brown, Regina J; Lange, Julie R; Rudek, Michelle A; Zhang, Zhe; Tsangaris, Theodore N; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2011-10-26

    Most breast cancers originate in the epithelial cells lining the breast ducts. Intraductal administration of cancer therapeutics would lead to high drug exposure to ductal cells and eliminate preinvasive neoplasms while limiting systemic exposure. We performed preclinical studies in N-methyl-N'-nitrosourea-treated rats to compare the effects of 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel, and methotrexate to the previously reported efficacy of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) on treatment of early and established mammary tumors. Protection from tumor growth was observed with all five agents, with extensive epithelial destruction present only in PLD-treated rats. Concurrently, we initiated a clinical trial to establish the feasibility, safety, and maximum tolerated dose of intraductal PLD. In each eligible woman awaiting mastectomy, we visualized one ductal system and administered dextrose or PLD using a dose-escalation schema (2 to 10 mg). Intraductal administration was successful in 15 of 17 women with no serious adverse events. Our preclinical studies suggest that several agents are candidates for intraductal therapy. Our clinical trial supports the feasibility of intraductal administration of agents in the outpatient setting. If successful, administration of agents directly into the ductal system may allow for "breast-sparing mastectomy" in select women.

  7. Reproductive factors and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Gammon, M D; John, E M

    1993-01-01

    Early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and late age at first full-term pregnancy are linked to a modest increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Some evidence suggests that the earlier the full-term pregnancy, the earlier the period of decreased susceptibility of breast tissue changes begins. Nulliparity is related to an increased risk for breast cancer diagnosed after 40 years old. Multiple full-term pregnancies decrease the risk of breast cancers diagnosed after 40 years regardless of the age at first birth. On the other hand, they may increase the risk for breast cancers diagnosed before 40 years old. Surgical removal of the ovaries protects against breast cancer. Breast feeding apparently protects against breast cancer in China, but a protective effect has not been established in the US. Other than shorter intervals between menstrual periods, which tend to increase the risk, research has not yet made clear the etiologic roles of menstrual cycle characteristics. Other unclear etiologic roles include increased intervals between births, spontaneous and induced abortion, infertility, multiple births at last pregnancy, and hypertension during pregnancy. Researchers tend to accept a mechanism to explain the epidemiologic characteristics of menstrual activity and the increased risk of breast cancer, but no mechanisms have emerged for the other likely risk factors. Greater exposure to estrogen and progesterone simultaneously are linked to early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and shorter menstrual cycle length. So far, data show that long-term combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy and long-term use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of breast cancer. Moderately increased risks linked to longterm estrogen replacement therapy and obesity in postmenopausal women indicate that estrogen alone influences breast cancer risk. Since much of the research on breast cancer risk factors are inconclusive, more research is needed

  8. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model

  9. A Retrospective Study Evaluating the Impact of Preoperative Breast MRI on Surgical Decision-Making in Young Patients (≤50 Years) with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Som D.; Hodgson, Nicole; Lovrics, Peter J.; Dhamanaskar, Kavita; Minuk, Terry; Chambers, Shelley; Sussman, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a more sensitive diagnostic test for detecting invasive breast cancer than mammography or breast ultrasound. Breast MRI may be particularly useful in younger premenopausal women with higher density breast tissue for differentiating between dense fibroglandular breast tissue and breast malignancies. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of preoperative breast MRI on surgical decision-making in young women with breast cancer. METHODS A retrospective review of patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer and age of ≤50 years was performed. All patients underwent physical examination, preoperative mammogram, breast ultrasound, and bilateral breast MRI. Two breast cancer surgeons reviewed the preoperative mammogram report, breast ultrasound report, and physical examination summary and were asked if they would recommend a lumpectomy, a quandrantectomy, or a mastectomy. A few weeks later, the two surgeons were shown the same information with the breast MRI report and were asked what type of surgery they would now recommend. In each case, MRI was classified by two adjudicators as having affected the surgical outcome in a positive, negative, or neutral fashion. A positive impact was defined as the situation where breast MRI detected additional disease that was not found on physical examination, mammogram, or breast ultrasound and led to an appropriate change in surgical management. A negative impact was defined as the situation where breast MRI led the surgeon to recommend more extensive surgery, with less extensive disease actually found at pathology. No impact was defined as the situation where MRI findings did not alter surgical recommendations or outcomes. RESULTS Of 37 patients whose charts were reviewed, five patients were deemed to be ineligible due to having received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, having previous breast implants, or having had their tumor fully excised

  10. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  11. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, H; Mousavi, Y; Höckerstedt, K

    1992-01-01

    It is a general opinion that the Western diet plays a significant role in increasing the risk of breast cancer in the Western World. Recently some likely mechanisms involved in increasing the risk have been disclosed. It has been found that a Western-type diet elevates plasma levels of sex hormones and decreases the sex hormone binding globulin concentration, increasing the availability of these steroids for peripheral tissues. The same diet results in low formation by intestinal bacteria of mammalian lignans and isoflavonoid phyotestrogens from plant precursors. These diphenolic compounds seem to affect hormone metabolism and production and cancer cell growth by many different mechanisms making them strong candidates for a role as cancer protective substances. The sex hormone pattern found in connection with a Western-type diet combined with low lignan and isoflavonoid excretion was found particularly in postmenopausal breast cancer patients and omnivores living in high-risk areas, and to a lesser degree in areas with less risk. However, the pattern observed was not entirely due to diet.

  12. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P < .05). Compared to FP-FIF, IP-IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage

  13. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  15. Cathepsin-D in primary breast cancer: prognostic evaluation involving 2810 patients

    PubMed Central

    Foekens, J A; Look, M P; Vries, J Bolt-de; Gelder, M E Meijer-van; Putten, W L J van; Klijn, J G M

    1999-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the prognostic value of cathepsin-D in primary breast cancer. An increased level of cathepsin-D in tumour extracts has been found to be associated with a poor relapse-free and overall survival. Studies performed with immunohistochemistry or Western blotting have produced diverse results. We have analysed 2810 cytosolic extracts obtained from human primary breast tumours for cathepsin-D expression, and have correlated their levels with prognosis. The median follow-up of the patients still alive was 88 months. Patients with high cathepsin-D levels had a significantly worse relapse-free and overall survival, also in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Adjuvant therapy which was associated with an improved prognosis in node-positive patients in univariate analysis, also significantly added to the multivariate models for relapse-free and overall survival. There were no statistically significant interactions between the levels of cathepsin-D and any of the classical prognostic factors in analysis for relapse-free survival, suggesting that the prognostic value of cathepsin-D is not different in the various subgroups of patients. Indeed, multivariate analyses in subgroups of node-negative and -positive patients, pre- and post-menopausal patients, and their combinations, showed that tumours with high cathepsin-D values had a significantly poor relapse-free survival, with relative hazard rates ranging from 1.3 to 1.5, compared with tumours with low cathepsin-D levels. The results presented here on 2810 patients confirm that high cytosolic cathepsin-D values are associated with poor prognosis in human primary breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888472

  16. Targeting SH2 domains in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morlacchi, Pietro; Robertson, Fredika M; Klostergaard, Jim; McMurray, John S

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed cancer types in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer-related disease in the USA. SH2 domains recruit signaling proteins to phosphotyrosine residues on aberrantly activated growth factor and cytokine receptors and contribute to cancer cell cycling, metastasis, angiogenesis and so on. Herein we review phosphopeptide mimetic and small-molecule approaches targeting the SH2 domains of Grb2, Grb7 and STAT3 that inhibit their targets and reduce proliferation in in vitro breast cancer models. Only STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated in in vivo models and have led to tumor reduction. Taken together, these studies suggest that targeting SH2 domains is an important approach to the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25495984

  17. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  18. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Educating Hispanic Women About Breast Cancer Prevention: Evaluation of a Home-Based Promotora-Led Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Espinoza, Noah; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Thompson, Beti

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Trained community health promoters (i.e., promotoras) conducted home-based group educational interventions (home health parties) to educate Hispanic women from the Lower Yakima Valley of Washington state about breast cancer and mammography screening. Methods Women aged 40–79 participating in the parties completed baseline and follow-up surveys 6 months postintervention (n = 70). Changes in general cancer knowledge, breast cancer screening practices, and intentions to be screened among participants from baseline to follow-up were measured using McNemar's test for marginal homogeneity to evaluate the effectiveness of the parties. Results The average age of the sample was 50.0 years (standard deviation [SD] 10.0), 84% reported less than an eighth grade education, and 54% were covered by the state's Basic Health Care Plan. Significant changes between baseline and follow-up were observed with respect to (1) believing that risk of cancer could not be reduced (41% vs. 15%, respectively, p = 0.001), (2) ever having a mammogram (83% vs. 91%, p = 0.014), (3) discussing a mammogram with a doctor (37% vs. 67%, p < 0.001), and (4) intending to have a mammogram within the next few months among women who did not report having a mammogram between baseline and follow-up (61% vs. 81%, p = 0.046). Conclusions Participation in home-based group educational interventions delivered by promotoras may be associated with improved breast cancer screening practices among Hispanic women. PMID:20849288

  20. Proliferative activity in human breast cancer: Ki-67 automated evaluation and the influence of different Ki-67 equivalent antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ki67 labeling index (Ki67 LI), the percentage Ki67 immunoreactive cells, is a measure of tumor proliferation, with important clinical relevance in breast cancer, and it is extremely important to standardize its evaluation. Aim To test the efficacy of computer assisted image analysis (CAIA) applied to completely digitized slides and to assess its feasibility in routine practice and compare the results obtained using two different Ki67 monoclonal antibodies. Materials and methods 315 consecutive breast cancer routinely immunostained for Ki-67 (223 with SP6 and 92 with MM1 antibodies previously examined by an experienced pathologist, have been re-evaluated using Aperio Scanscope Xs. Results Mean human Ki67 LI values were 36%± 14.% and 28% ± 18% respectively for SP6 and MM1 antibodies; mean CAM Ki67 LI values were 31%± 19% and 22% ± 18% respectively for SP6 and MM1. Human and CAIA evaluation are statistically highly correlated (Pearson: 0.859, p<0.0001), although human LI are systematically higher. An interobserver variation study on CAIA performed on 84 cases showed that the correlation between the two evaluations was linear to an excellent degree. Discussion Our study shows that a) CAIA can be easily adopted in routine practice, b) human and CAIA Ki67 LI are highly correlated, although human LI are systematically higher, c) Ki67 LI using different evaluation methods and different antibodies shows important differences in cut-off values. PMID:21489202

  1. Response evaluation after primary systemic therapy of Her2 positive breast cancer – an observational cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tőkés, Tímea; Szentmártoni, Gyöngyvér; Torgyík, László; Kajáry, Kornélia; Lengyel, Zsolt; Györke, Tamás; Molnár, Béla Á.; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Kulka, Janina; Dank, Magdolna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate (I) trastuzumab-containing primary systemic therapy (PST) in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) overexpressing breast carcinomas; (II) compare the patients who achieved and those who did not achieve pathological complete remission (pCR), and (III) analyze the accuracy of different clinical-imaging modalities in tumor response monitoring. Methods 188 patients who received PST between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed and 43 Her2 overexpressing breast cancer patients (28 Luminal B/Her2-positive and 15 Her2-positive) were enrolled. 26 patients received mostly taxane-based PST without trastuzumab (Group 1) and 17 patients received trastuzumab-containing PST (Group 2). We compared the concordance between pCR and complete remission (CR) defined by breast-ultrasound, CR defined by standard 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography and computerized tomography (FDG-PET/CT) criteria (Method 1) and CR defined by a novel, breast cancer specific FDG-PET/CT criteria (Method 2). Sensitivity (sens), specificity (spec), and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated. Results 10 patients (38.5%) in Group 1 and 8 (47%) in Group 2 achieved pCR. pCR was significantly more frequent in Her2-positive than in Luminal B/Her2-positive tumors in both Group 1 (P = 0.043) and Group 2 (P = 0.029). PET/CT evaluated by the breast cancer specific criteria (PET/CT Method 2) differentiated pCR from non-pCR more accurately in both groups (Group 1: sens = 77.8%, spec = 100%, PPV = 100%, NPV = 71.4%; Group 2: sens = 87.5%, spec = 62.5%, PPV = 70%, NPV = 83.3%) than standard PET/CT criteria (Method 1) (Group 1: sens = 22.2% spec = 100% PPV = 100% NPV = 41.7%; in Group 2: sens = 37.5%, spec = 87.5%, PPV = 75% NPV = 58.3%) or breast ultrasound (Group 1, sens = 83.3% spec = 25% PPV = 62.5% NPV = 50%; Group 2, sens = 100% spec = 12.5% PPV = 41.6% NPV

  2. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  3. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Do fatty breasts increase or decrease breast cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the association of non-dense area or fatty breasts in conjunction with breast density and breast cancer risk. Two articles in a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research investigate the role of absolute non-dense breast area measured on mammograms and find conflicting results: one article finds that non-dense breast area has a modest positive association with breast cancer risk, whereas the other finds that non-dense breast area has a strong protective effect to reduce breast cancer risk. Understanding the interplay of body mass index, menopause status, and measurement of non-dense breast area would help to clarify the contribution of non-dense breast area to breast cancer risk. PMID:22277587

  5. Evaluation of lecithinized human recombinant super oxide dismutase as cardioprotectant in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Broeyer, Frederik J F; Osanto, Susanne; Suzuki, Jun; de Jongh, Felix; van Slooten, Henk; Tanis, Bea C; Bruning, Tobias; Bax, Jeroen J; Ritsema van Eck, Henk J; de Kam, Marieke L; Cohen, Adam F; Mituzhima, Yutaka; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    Aim Anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity is (partly) mediated by free radical overload. A randomized study was performed in breast cancer patients to investigate whether free radical scavenger super oxide dismutase (SOD) protects against anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity as measured by changes in echo, electrocardiography and an array of biomarkers. Method and Results Eighty female, chemotherapy-naïve breast cancer patients (median age 49, range 24–67 years) scheduled for four or five courses of adjuvant 3 weekly doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive 80 mg PC-SOD (human recombinant SOD bound to lecithin) or placebo, administered intravenously (i.v.) immediately prior to each AC course. The primary end point was protection against cardiac damage evaluated using echocardiography, QT assessments and a set of biochemical markers for myocardial function, oxidative stress and inflammation. Assessments were performed before and during each course of chemotherapy, and at 1, 4 and 9 months after completion of the chemotherapy regimen. In all patients cardiac effects such as increases in NT-proBNP concentration and prolongation of the QTc interval were noticed. There were no differences between the PC-SOD and placebo-treated patients in systolic or diastolic cardiac function or for any other of the biomarkers used to assess the cardiac effects of anthracyclines. Conclusion PC-SOD at a dose of 80 mg i.v. is not cardioprotective in patients with breast carcinoma treated with anthracyclines. PMID:24844787

  6. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. High resolution microendoscopy with structured illumination and Lugol's iodine staining for evaluation of breast cancer architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, Jessica; Kyrish, Matthew; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Grant, Benjamin; Kuerer, Henry; Yang, Wei; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative margin assessment to evaluate resected tissue margins for neoplastic tissue is performed to prevent reoperations following breast-conserving surgery. High resolution microendoscopy (HRME) can rapidly acquire images of fresh tissue specimens, but is limited by low image contrast in tissues with high optical scattering. In this study we evaluated two techniques to reduce out-of-focus light: HRME image acquisition with structured illumination (SI-HRME) and topical application of Lugol's Iodine. Fresh breast tissue specimens from 19 patients were stained with proflavine alone or Lugol's Iodine and proflavine. Images of tissue specimens were acquired using a confocal microscope and an HRME system with and without structured illumination. Images were evaluated based on visual and quantitative assessment of image contrast. The highest mean contrast was measured in confocal images stained with proflavine. Contrast was significantly lower in HRME images stained with proflavine; however, incorporation of structured illumination significantly increased contrast in HRME images to levels comparable to that in confocal images. The addition of Lugol's Iodine did not increase mean contrast significantly for HRME or SI-HRME images. These findings suggest that structured illumination could potentially be used to increase contrast in HRME images of breast tissue for rapid image acquisition.

  8. Carbon-11-methionine and PET in evaluation of treatment response of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huovinen, R.; Leskinen-Kallio, S.; Någren, K.; Lehikoinen, P.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Teräs, M.

    1993-01-01

    Uptake of L-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-methionine) in breast cancer metastases was studied with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients with soft tissue metastases were studied twice: before the onset of chemotherapy (4), hormonal therapy (3) or radiotherapy (1) and 3-14 weeks later. The radioactivity concentration of the low molecular weight fraction of venous plasma samples separated by fast gel filtration was used as input function. The input corrected uptake rate of 11C-methionine (Ki) in breast cancer metastases before the treatment ranged between 0.035 and 0.186 1 min-1 and the standardised uptake value (SUV) between 2.0 and 11.4. The uptake of 11C-methionine into the metastases decreased when clinical objective stability or regression of the metastases was later obtained and increased in cases where progressive disease was seen during treatment. We conclude that metabolic changes in the amino acid metabolism detected by PET precede the clinical response, and may be of clinical value in predicting the treatment response. Images Figure 1 PMID:8471437

  9. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  10. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  11. Digital dermatoglyphics and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, M H; Plato, C C; Engler, P E; Fletcher, H S

    1982-01-01

    Fingerprints of one hundred nineteen Caucasian females were obtained. Of these females, thirty-four had histologically proven breast cancer, fifty-three were at high risk for development of breast cancer, and thirty-two comprised a control group. The digital pattern frequencies and the pattern intensity index were significantly different between the three groups. The presence of six or more whorls appears significant as noted by 32.4% of breast cancer patients possessing this number of whorls as compared to 3.1% controls. Also of note is that 95% of subjects with six or more whorls either had cancer or were at high risk.

  12. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  13. Breast Cancer: Epidemiology and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZiQi; Shi, Aimin; Lu, Cuntao; Song, Tao; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequently occurring cancer in women, is a major public health problem, with 1,384,155 estimated new cases worldwide with nearly 459,000 related deaths. Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous in its pathological characteristics, some cases showing slow growth with excellent prognosis, while others being aggressive tumors. Current predictions and statistics suggest that both worldwide incidence of breast cancer and related mortality are on the rise. According to 2012 GLOBOCAN statistics, nearly 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer with 522,000 related deaths-an increase in breast cancer incidence and related mortality by nearly 18 % from 2008. According to American Cancer Society, one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It has been predicted that the worldwide incidence of female breast cancer will reach approximately 3.2 million new cases per year by 2050. These numbers reflect the magnitude of breast cancer incidence, its effect on society worldwide and the need for urgency for preventive and treatment measures. While technological advances in medical sciences and health care have made it possible to detect the disease early and to start the treatment early on to prevent the progress of the disease into a metastatic state, there are several unanswered questions with regard to the molecular mechanisms that underlie the aggressiveness of certain forms of this disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that addressing socio economical issues is utmost important, so that all women have equal access to medical care from screening to advanced treatment, and only such decisive action can help reduce the worldwide burden of breast cancer.

  14. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  15. Women's narratives of helpseeking for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Facione, N C; Dodd, M J

    1995-01-01

    One-third of women with self-discovered breast cancer are symptomatic for 3 months or more before seeking evaluation. Few studies examine women's accounts of this important time. Using narrative analysis in the style of Labov and Waletzky, breast cancer cases from a larger mixed-tumor sample of patients receiving chemotherapy were examined for the details of breast cancer symptom discovery and the events relevant to the timing of diagnosis and treatment. The majority (56.3%) of women in the sample sought evaluations within days, many proceeding to immediate diagnosis. Factors cited by women as influencing the delayed timing of initial provider evaluation were that they attributed the symptoms to a benign process, and they perceived gender role-related constraints. Many women in this younger-aged sample had false-negative mammographic examinations, and many reported receiving false reassurance from providers on initial consultation visits. Women who delayed evaluations sought them only as symptoms advanced.

  16. Evaluation of superficial dosimetry between treatment planning system and measurement for several breast cancer treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Das, Indra J.; Bartlett, Gregory K.; Zhang Hualin; Thompson, Elizabeth; Zook, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric accuracy in radiation treatment of breast cancer is critical for the evaluation of cosmetic outcomes and survival. It is often considered that treatment planning systems (TPS) may not be able to provide accurate dosimetry in the buildup region. This was investigated in various treatment techniques such as tangential wedges, field-in-field (FF), electronic compensator (eComp), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Under Institutional Review Board (IRB) exemption, radiotherapy treatment plans of 111 cases were retrospectively analyzed. The distance between skin surface and 95% isodose line was measured. For measurements, Gafchromic EBT2 films were used on a humanoid unsliced phantom. Multiple layers of variable thickness of superflab bolus were placed on the breast phantom and CT scanned for planning. Treatment plans were generated using four techniques with two different grid sizes (1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm{sup 2}) to provide optimum dose distribution. Films were placed at different depths and exposed with the selected techniques. A calibration curve for dose versus pixel values was also generated on the same day as the phantom measurement was conducted. The DICOM RT image, dose, and plan data were imported to the in-house software. On axial plane of CT slices, curves were drawn at the position where EBT2 films were placed, and the dose profiles on the lines were acquired. The calculated and measured dose profiles were separated by check points which were marked on the films before irradiation. The segments of calculated profiles were stretched to match their resolutions to that of film dosimetry. Results: On review of treatment plans, the distance between skin and 95% prescribed dose was up to 8 mm for plans of 27 patients. The film measurement revealed that the medial region of phantom surface received a mere 45%-50% of prescribed dose. For wedges, FF, and eComp techniques, region around the

  17. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  18. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  19. Formal evaluation of PYNK: Breast Cancer Program for Young Women—the patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L.; Hamer, J.; Helwig, C.; Fergus, K.; Kiss, A.; Mandel, R.; Dawson, B.; Landsberg, A.; Shein, K.; Kay, N.; Warner, E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to assess patient satisfaction with pynk: Breast Cancer Program for Young Women so as to determine how the program might be improved and to provide feedback to donors. Methods All pynk patients who had consented to have their information entered in our database and who supplied us with their e-mail address were invited to complete a 58-item online questionnaire consisting of multiple choice and open-ended questions. Domains included demographics, provision of written and spoken information, support, infertility risk, research awareness, attitudes toward discharge, and general feedback. Results Of 120 pynk patients approached, 61 (51%) participated. More than 90% were satisfied or very satisfied with the timing, usefulness, and clarity of spoken and written information given, and 69% found the service and support provided by the nurse navigator to be the most helpful component of the program. Of those who had received systemic therapy, 93% recalled a health care provider initiating a discussion of the risk of treatment-related infertility, and 67% were referred to a fertility clinic. On the negative side, 11%–27% were unaware of various services provided by pynk, and 11% were unaware of pynk’s ongoing research. One third of patients were unhappy or ambivalent about the prospect of discharge from the program. Conclusions Patient satisfaction with this novel program for young women with breast cancer is high. This study highlights the critical role that the nurse navigator plays in patient support and dissemination of information. In contrast to other reported surveys of young cancer patients, pynk patients are routinely given the opportunity to undergo fertility preservation. PMID:27122977

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  1. Economic evaluation of eribulin as second-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Majethia, Unnati; Breeze, Janis L; Kontoudis, Ilias; Park, Jeongae

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis, particularly for those patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative tumor. Similar to the rest of the world, treatment options are limited in South Korea following first-line chemotherapy with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This study examined the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of eribulin in South Korean patients with HER2-negative MBC who have progressed after usage of at least one chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced disease (second-line therapy). Methods A partition survival model was developed from the perspective of the South Korean health care system. The economic impact of introducing eribulin as second-line therapy for HER2-negative MBC was compared to that of capecitabine and vinorelbine. The analysis estimated incremental cost per life-year (LY), that is, cost-effectiveness, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), that is, cost-utility, of eribulin for management of HER2-negative MBC in South Korea. The model accounted for overall survival, progression-free survival, drug costs, grade 3/4 adverse events, and health care utilization. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to identify uncertainty in the results of the economic evaluation. Results Second-line eribulin was associated with greater benefits in terms of LY and QALY, compared to capecitabine and vinorelbine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ₩10.5M (approximately USD 9,200) per LY, and the incremental cost-utility ratio was ₩17M (approximately USD 14,800) per QALY in the basecase analysis. The incremental cost-utility ratio ranged from ₩12M (USD 10,461) to ₩27M (USD 23,538) per QALY in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, >99% of the simulations were below ₩50M (USD 42,300), and the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals were ₩3M (USD 2,600) and ₩24M (USD 20,900) per QALY

  2. Economic evaluation of eribulin as second-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Majethia, Unnati; Breeze, Janis L; Kontoudis, Ilias; Park, Jeongae

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis, particularly for those patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative tumor. Similar to the rest of the world, treatment options are limited in South Korea following first-line chemotherapy with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This study examined the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of eribulin in South Korean patients with HER2-negative MBC who have progressed after usage of at least one chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced disease (second-line therapy). Methods A partition survival model was developed from the perspective of the South Korean health care system. The economic impact of introducing eribulin as second-line therapy for HER2-negative MBC was compared to that of capecitabine and vinorelbine. The analysis estimated incremental cost per life-year (LY), that is, cost-effectiveness, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), that is, cost-utility, of eribulin for management of HER2-negative MBC in South Korea. The model accounted for overall survival, progression-free survival, drug costs, grade 3/4 adverse events, and health care utilization. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to identify uncertainty in the results of the economic evaluation. Results Second-line eribulin was associated with greater benefits in terms of LY and QALY, compared to capecitabine and vinorelbine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ₩10.5M (approximately USD 9,200) per LY, and the incremental cost-utility ratio was ₩17M (approximately USD 14,800) per QALY in the basecase analysis. The incremental cost-utility ratio ranged from ₩12M (USD 10,461) to ₩27M (USD 23,538) per QALY in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, >99% of the simulations were below ₩50M (USD 42,300), and the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals were ₩3M (USD 2,600) and ₩24M (USD 20,900) per QALY

  3. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  5. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα) dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  6. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  7. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  8. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  9. American Indian Breast Cancer Project: Educational Development and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Felicia Schanche; Casken, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of Pathways to Health, a breast cancer education program targeting American Indian women in California. Discusses initial focus group results concerning belief in breast cancer risk, barriers to cancer screening and treatment, culturally sensitive issues, and illness beliefs. Describes…

  10. Evaluation of data-dependent versus targeted shotgun proteomic approaches for monitoring transcription factor expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Charanjit; Hewel, Johannes A; Badis, Gwenael; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Liu, Jian; Hughes, Timothy R; Emili, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    In breast cancer, there is a significant degree of molecular diversity among tumors. Multiple perturbations in signal transduction pathways impinge on transcriptional networks that in turn dictate malignant transformation and metastatic progression. Detailed knowledge of the sequence-specific transcription factors that become activated or repressed within a tumor and comparison of their relative levels of expression in cancer versus normal tissue should therefore provide insight into disease mechanisms, improving patient stratification and facilitating personalized treatment. While high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry methods for global proteome profiling have been developed, existing approaches have limited sensitivity and are often unable to detect low-abundance transcription factors in a complex biological specimen like a biopsy or tumor cell extract. To this end, we have undertaken a systematic comparative evaluation of three MS/MS methods for the ability to detect reference transcription factors spiked in known amounts into a cell-free breast cancer nuclear extract: Data-Dependent Acquisition (DDA), wherein precursor ion intensity dictates selection for fragmentation; Targeted Peptide Monitoring (TPM), a directed approach using successive isolation and fragmentation of predefined m/ z ratios; and Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), in which specific precursor ion to product ion transitions are selectively monitored. Through a series of controlled, parallel benchmarking experiments, we have determined the relative figures-of-merit of each approach, and have established that prior knowledge of signature proteotypic peptides markedly improves overall detection sensitivity, reliability, and quantification.

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  12. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  13. Genetic evaluation of BRCA1-A complex genes with triple-negative breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Qiao, Feng; Yao, Ling; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Ye, Fu-Gui; Wu, Jiong; Hu, Xin; Wang, Bin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor BRCA1 plays a pivotal role in maintaining genomic stability and tumor suppression. The BRCA1-A complex is required for recruitment of BRCA1 to DNA damage sites, DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Since germline mutations of BRCA1 often lead to breast tumors that are triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) type, we aimed to investigate whether genetic deficiency in genes of the BRCA1-A complex is associated with risk to TNBC development. Results We found that rs7250266 in the promoter region of NBA1 confers a decreased risk to TNBC development, but not to non-TNBC susceptibility. In addition, the haplotypes containing two polymorphisms rs7250266 and rs2278256 are associated with a lower chance of TNBC development specifically. Our studies also showed that the protective alleles of rs7250266 (C > G) and rs2278256 (T > C) down-regulate promoter activity of NBA1 in mammary epithelial cells. Methods We investigated associations between the BRCA1-A complex genes and TNBC developing risk in first case-control study of Chinese Han Women population including 414 patients with TNBC and 354 cancer-free controls. We detected 37 common variants in ABRAXAS, RAP80, BRE, BRCC36 and NBA1/MERIT40 genes encoding the BRCA1-A complex and evaluated their genetic susceptibility to the risk of TNBC. An additional cohort with 652 other types of breast cancer (non-TNBC) cases and 890 controls was used to investigate the associations between TNBC-specific SNPs genotype and non-TNBCs susceptibility. Conclusions Genetic variants in NBA1 may be an important genetic determinant of TNBC susceptibility. Further investigation and validation of these SNPs in larger cohorts may facilitate in predication and prevention of TNBC and in counseling individuals for risk of TNBC development. PMID:26848770

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  16. Nonpalpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M C; Edge, S B; Cole, D D; deParedes, E; Frierson, H F

    1991-01-01

    The use of mammography has resulted in 1464 breast biopsies for nonpalpable abnormalities at the University of Virginia in the 10 years 1980 to 1989. Two hundred sixty-four cancerous lesions (18%) were found. One hundred seventy-eight of these (67%) were in situ lesions. Invasive cancer (86 of 264 lesions or 33%) forms the basis for this report. Mammographic findings leading to biopsy were a mass in 61 of 86 cases (71%), microcalcifications in 23 of 86 (27%), or both in 2 of 86 cases. Histologic subtypes were infiltrating ductal (63 of 86), infiltrating lobular (14 of 86), and other infiltrating (9 of 86). Mastectomy was performed in 71 of 86 lesions (82%), lumpectomy/radiation in 14 of 86 (16%), and lumpectomy alone in 1 of 86 lesions. Division of the tumors into size with nodal status revealed 19 of 86 lesions (22%) less than 0.5 cm with 0 of 14 positive nodes. Thirty-nine of eighty-six lesions (46%) measured 0.6 to 1.0 cm with 10 (26%) positive nodes. Twenty-eight of eighty-six lesions (32%) measured more than 1.0 cm with 8 of 28 (28%) positive nodes. Nodal status is unknown for eight patients. Overall 18 of 78 lesions (23%) had positive nodes. Median follow-up is 44 months. Disease-free survival rate is 92% (79 of 86 patients) and overall survival rate is 94% (81 of 86 patients). Six of seven recurrences occurred in node-positive patients. For those with negative or unknown nodes, the disease-free survival rate is 98% (67 of 68 patients). These findings emphasize the benefit of early detection of breast cancer through the use of mammography. PMID:2039291

  17. Evaluation of a dual-panel PET camera design to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Chinn, Gary; Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi; Olcott, Peter; Levin, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a novel, portable dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging. With a sensitive area of approximately 150 cm(2), this camera is based on arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals (1x1x3 mm(3)) coupled to 11x11-mm(2) position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). GATE open source software was used to perform Monte Carlo simulations to optimize the parameters for the camera design. The noise equivalent counting (NEC) rate, together with the true, scatter, and random counting rates were simulated at different time and energy windows. Focal plane tomography (FPT) was used for visualizing the tumors at different depths between the two detector panels. Attenuation and uniformity corrections were applied to images. PMID:17646005

  18. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  19. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  20. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  1. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  2. Evaluation of HER2 Gene Status in Breast Cancer Samples with Indeterminate Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization by Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Koudelakova, Vladimira; Berkovcova, Jitka; Trojanec, Radek; Vrbkova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Ehrmann, Jiri; Kolar, Zdenek; Melichar, Bohuslav; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-07-01

    Administration of drugs targeting HER2 (official symbol ERBB2) is an important component of therapy for breast cancer patients with HER2 amplification/overexpression as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In approximately 5% of breast cancers, ISH assays fail. In these cases, HER2 protein expression is evaluated by IHC alone that may yield false negatives/positives for poor-quality samples. Therefore, we developed a method that was based on quantitative real-time PCR applicable for DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Its limit of detection was determined with breast cancer cell lines and validated with 223 breast cancer patient samples. On the basis of comparisons with fluorescent ISH (FISH) and IHC data, the sensitivity of the new method was 94.2% and 95.1%, its specificity was 100% and 99.1%, and overall concordance between results obtained with the quantitative real-time PCR method and FISH/IHC was 97.6% for both methods. The quantitative real-time PCR method was then used to evaluate the HER2 status of 198 of 3696 breast cancer tissues that yielded indeterminate FISH results. The HER2 copy number was successfully determined in 69.2% of these indeterminate samples. Thus, the DNA-based technique appears to be a specific, sensitive method for determining HER2 copy numbers when the FISH assay fails, which may complement IHC tests. PMID:25956448

  3. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer risk prediction models are used to plan clinical trials and counsel women; however, relationships of predicted risks of breast cancer incidence and prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis are unknown. Methods Using largely pre-diagnostic information from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) for 37,939 invasive breast cancers (1996–2007), we estimated 5-year breast cancer risk (<1%; 1–1.66%; ≥1.67%) with three models: BCSC 1-year risk model (BCSC-1; adapted to 5-year predictions); Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT); and BCSC 5-year risk model (BCSC-5). Breast cancer-specific mortality post-diagnosis (range: 1–13 years; median: 5.4–5.6 years) was related to predicted risk of developing breast cancer using unadjusted Cox proportional hazards models, and in age-stratified (35–44; 45–54; 55–69; 70–89 years) models adjusted for continuous age, BCSC registry, calendar period, income, mode of presentation, stage and treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Results Of 6,021 deaths, 2,993 (49.7%) were ascribed to breast cancer. In unadjusted case-only analyses, predicted breast cancer risk ≥1.67% versus <1.0% was associated with lower risk of breast cancer death; BCSC-1: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.75–0.90); BCRAT: HR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.65–0.81) and BCSC-5: HR = 0.84 (95% CI = 0.75–0.94). Age-stratified, adjusted models showed similar, although mostly non-significant HRs. Among women ages 55–69 years, HRs approximated 1.0. Generally, higher predicted risk was inversely related to percentages of cancers with unfavorable prognostic characteristics, especially among women 35–44 years. Conclusions Among cases assessed with three models, higher predicted risk of developing breast cancer was not associated with greater risk of breast cancer death; thus, these models would have limited utility in planning studies to evaluate breast cancer mortality reduction strategies. Further, when offering

  4. Evaluation of serum CA27.29, CA15-3 and CEA in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, M F; Chen, Y L; Tseng, T F; Lin, C M; Chen, M S; Huang, C J; Huang, Y S; Hsieh, J S; Huang, T J; Jong, S B; Huang, Y F

    1999-09-01

    The Truquant BR radioimmunoassay (RIA) using monoclonal antibody BR 27.29 to recognize a peptide sequence on the MUC-1 gene product for quantification of the CA 27.29 antigen in serum was used in this report to evaluate in 145 patients with breast cancer and compared the other conventional serum markers such as CA15-3 and CEA. The upper limit of normal (25 u/ml) was determined from CA27.29 values 12.4 +/- 4.1 u/ml (mean +/- 3 S.D.) for 112 female subjects apparently free of disease. The CA15-3 levels above 25 u/ml and CEA levels above 5 ng/ml were considered positive values. Thirty-seven cases of 145 patients studied had elevated CA 27.29 levels (sensitivity: 25.5%), 35 of 145 had positive CA15-3 levels (sensitivity 24.1%) and 27 of 145 patients had positive CEA levels (sensitivity: 18.6%) (p < 0.05). One hundred and ten cases of the breast cancer patients (75.8%) did not have metastatic disease. In this group CA 27.29 sensitivity was 6.4%, while CA15-3 sensitivity was 5.5% and CEA sensitivity was 4.5% (p > 0.05). Mean values were 10.2 +/- 9.2 u/ml for CA 27.29, 14.1 +/- 5.6 u/ml for CA 15-3 and 1.7 +/- 1.5 ng/ml for CEA. Thirty-five patients (24.2%) had metastatic disease. In this group CA 27.29 sensitivity was 85.7%, CA15-3 sensitivity was 82.8% and CEA sensitivity was 62.8% (p < 0.05). Mean values for CA27.29 was 152.6 +/- 131.6 u/ml, CA15-3 was 123.1 +/- 107.6 u/ml and 21.8 +/- 36.9 ng/ml of CEA. With regard to the correlation of three tumor markers with clinical stages, patients had significantly higher levels of CA27.29 than CEA, but they were similar to CA 15-3 in metastatic breast cancer. These results suggest CA27.29 to be more sensitive and specific than CEA, but that it is similar to CA15-3 for metastatic breast cancer detection and monitoring.

  5. Evaluation of residual cellularity and proliferation on preoperatively treated breast cancer: a comparison between image analysis and light microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Corletto, V; Verderio, P; Giardini, R; Cipriani, S; Di Palma, S; Rilke, F

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo- or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB 1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (kappa(w)) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (kappa(w)). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category-specific kappa statistics (kappa(cs)). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical.

  6. Evaluation of Residual Cellularity and Proliferation on Preoperatively Treated Breast Cancer: A Comparison between Image Analysis and Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corletto, Valentina; Verderio, Paolo; Giardini, Roberto; Cipriani, Sonia; Di Palma, Silvana; Rilke, Franco

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo‐ or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (Kw) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (K~w). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category‐specific kappa statistics (Kcs). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical. PMID:9692682

  7. Triiodothyronine and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

  8. Androgens and breast cancer in men and women.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2011-09-01

    Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies support the notion that androgens inhibit mammary proliferation and, thus, may protect from breast cancer. On the other hand, administration of conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens and may, thus, enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk, but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  9. Epidemiology of susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulka, B S

    1996-01-01

    sequencing of BRCA1 will allow for its use in risk assessment, diagnostic evaluation and screening of high risk women. BRCA1 appears to be primarily responsible for early-onset breast cancer in high risk families. Rare alleles of H-ras could account for some of the late-onset cases in unselected populations since at least 85% of breast cancer appears to be sporadic, other genetic markers yet to be identified undoubtedly exist.

  10. 77 FR 16232 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women (ACBCYW)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young... evaluation of evidence-based activities designed to prevent breast cancer (particularly among those at... as breast health, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer in young women; and...

  11. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  12. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  13. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  14. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... proven. Studies look at things like smoking, diet, chemicals, and types of birth control pills. Talk to your provider if you are interested in joining a clinical trial for breast cancer prevention.

  15. A Bayesian model for censored positive count data in evaluating breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Wen; Jiang, Yu; Garrard, Lili; Lei, Yang; Gajewski, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Basic science researchers transplant human cancer tissues from patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to animals and observe the progression of the disease. Successful transplants show invasion of human tissues across mammary ducts in animal fat pads and cause DCIS-like lesions in one or more ducts. In this work, we consider data from a recent publication of breast cancer research where positive counts of affected ducts may be subject to censoring. We fit the data with zero-truncated Poisson (ZTP) models with an informative prior of gamma. Due to the zero-truncation and right censoring, posterior distributions may not be conventional gamma and are estimated through Markov chain Monte Carlo and grid approximation. For each of the two cell lines, we fit a model with group-specific parameters for DCIS subtypes classified by the cell surface biomarkers, and another model with a homogeneous parameter across groups. Models are compared by the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC). For the chosen prior parameter values, Bayes estimates are comparative to the maximum likelihood estimates, and the DIC favors the simpler model in both cell lines. PMID:23997758

  16. Comparative evaluation of novel biodegradable nanoparticles for the drug targeting to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mattu, C; Pabari, R M; Boffito, M; Sartori, S; Ciardelli, G; Ramtoola, Z

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine formulations such as biodegradable nanoparticles (nps) and liposomes offer several advantages over traditional routes of administration: due to their small size, nanocarriers are able to selectively accumulate inside tumours or inflammatory tissues, resulting in improved drug efficacy and reduced side effects. To further augment targeting ability of nanoparticles towards tumour cells, specific ligands or antibodies that selectively recognise biomarkers over-expressed on cancer cells, can be attached to the surface either by chemical bond or by hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. In the present work, Herceptin (HER), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) able to selectively recognise HER-2 over-expressing tumour cells (such as breast and ovarian cancer cells), was absorbed on the surface of nanoparticles through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. Nps were prepared by a modified single emulsion solvent evaporation method with five different polymers: three commercial polyesters (poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly (D,L-lactide) (PLA) and poly (D,L-lactide-co-.glycolide) (PLGA)) and two novel biodegradable polyesterurethanes (PURs) based on Poly(ε-caprolactone) blocks, synthesised with different chain extenders (1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) and N-Boc-serinol). Polyurethanes were introduced as matrix-forming materials for nanoparticles due to their high chemical versatility, which allows tailoring of the materials final properties by properly selecting the reagents. All nps exhibited a small size and negative surface charge, suitable for surface functionalisation with mAb through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. The extent of cellular internalisation was tested on two different cell lines: MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells showing a normal and a high expression of the HER-2 receptor, respectively. Paclitaxel, a model anti-neoplastic drug, was encapsulated inside all nps, and release profiles and cytotoxicity on SK-BR-3 cells were also assessed

  17. Dietary Fat in Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Nour; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.; Parekh, Niyati

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ≥200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, diseasespecific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer–specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fatmay exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality. PMID:23701588

  18. Ultrasound Guided Core Biopsy versus Fine Needle Aspiration for Evaluation of Axillary Lymphadenopathy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganott, Marie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Abrams, Gordon S.; Lu, Amy H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Chivukula, Mamatha; Carter, Gloria; Austin, R. Marshall; Bandos, Andriy I.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives. To compare the sensitivities of ultrasound guided core biopsy and fine needle aspiration (FNA) for detection of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with a current diagnosis of ipsilateral breast cancer. Materials and Methods. From December 2008 to December 2010, 105 patients with breast cancer and abnormal appearing lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axilla consented to undergo FNA of an axillary node immediately followed by core biopsy of the same node, both with ultrasound guidance. Experienced pathologists evaluated the aspirate cytology without knowledge of the core histology. Cytology and core biopsy results were compared to sentinel node excision or axillary dissection pathology. Sensitivities were compared using McNemar's test. Results. Of 70 patients with axillary node metastases, FNA was positive in 55/70 (78.6%) and core was positive in 61/70 (87.1%) (P = 0.18). The FNA and core results were discordant in 14/70 (20%) patients. Ten cases were FNA negative/core positive. Four cases were FNA positive/core negative. Conclusion. Core biopsy detected six (8.6%) more cases of metastatic lymphadenopathy than FNA but the difference in sensitivities was not statistically significant. Core biopsy should be considered if the node is clearly imaged and readily accessible. FNA is a good alternative when a smaller needle is desired due to node location or other patient factors. This trial is registered with NCT01920139. PMID:24649373

  19. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed. PMID:27060854

  1. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  2. Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M S; Weston, A

    1997-01-01

    Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in the United States, Finland, Mexico, and Canada. Other investigations have discovered associations between breast cancer risk and exposures to chemical emissions and some occupational exposures. Several points must be considered in evaluating the relationship of environmental exposure to breast cancer. Among these considerations are the mechanism of tumorigenesis, timing of environmental exposure, and genetic modulation of exposure. Epidemiologic and ecologic investigations must take into account the very complex etiology of breast cancer and the knowledge that tumorigenesis can arise from different mechanisms. Thus crucial exposures as well as reproductive events related to breast cancer may occur years before a tumor is evident. Moreover, environmental contaminants may alter reproductive development, directly or indirectly, and thereby effect the course of tumorigenesis. Such alterations include change in gender, change in onset of puberty, and inhibition or promotion of tumor formation. Timing of exposure is therefore important with respect to mechanism and susceptibility. Finally, genetic polymorphisms exist in genes that govern capacity to metabolize environmental contaminants. Higher risk may occur among persons whose enzymes either are more active in the production of procarcinogens or fail to detoxify carcinogenic intermediates formed from chemicals in the environment. PMID:9255576

  3. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  4. Nanosized tamoxifen-porphyrin-glucose [TPG] conjugate: novel selective anti-breast-cancer agent, synthesis and in vitro evaluations.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Heidari, Zahra; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Hajmohammadi, Mehdi; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Hekmat, Soheila; Alaei-Beirami, Mahmood; Saraji, Alireza Azizi; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Delbaz, Seyed Ali; Dashtbani-Roozbehani, Abolfazl; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-06-01

    Tumor and especially breast cancer is among the most common causes of death worldwide. Finding novel nanosized therapeutic compounds have important role to decrease the chance of death and increase the survival. Cancer cells are highly attractive to glucose [with a nanosize bimolecular structure 1nm] as an energy source more than normal cell and nanosized therapeutics due to possessing different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic have advantageous over classical dosage forms in cancer therapy. The aim of the study was to synthesize Glucosamin-Porphyrin-Tamoxifen [TPG] nanosized complex as a novel selective biocompatible anti breast cancer agent. After the synthesis procedure, this complex was purified and then tested In Vitro on breast cancer cells [MCF-7] in the absence or presence of the red light and found totally successful. The results showed a good anti breast cancer activity mediated by the activation of TNF-α and necrosis/apoptosis pathways for the nanosized complex with no alteration effects on blood PT/APTT and glucose or hexokinase levels/ activity. TPG nanoconjugate seems to be very good opponents to current anti breast cancer drugs and needs to be further investigated in near future. PMID:22974294

  5. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of Psychoeducational Support Interventions on Quality of Life in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors Post-Primary Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Karen; McNees, Patrick; Azuero, Andres; Loerzel, Victoria Wochna; Su, Xiaogang; Hassey, Lauren A.

    2010-01-01

    While most cancer survivors are at risk for being lost in the transition from treatment to survivorship, rural breast cancer survivors face special challenges that might place them at particular risk. This small scale preliminary study had two specific aims: (Aim 1) establish the feasibility of rural breast cancer survivors participation in a longitudinal quality of life (QOL) intervention trial; (Aim 2) determine the effects of the BCEI, the Breast Cancer Education Intervention, on overall QOL. Fifty-three rural breast cancer survivors were randomized to either an Experimental (n=27) or a Wait Control arm (n=26). Participants in the Experimental arm received the BCEI consisting of three face-to-face education and support sessions, two face-to-face and three telephone follow-up sessions along with supplemental written and audiotape materials over a six month period. BCEI modules and interventions are organized within a QOL framework. To address the possible effects of attention, Wait Control participants received three face to face sessions and three telephone sessions during the first six months of participation in the study, but not the BCEI intervention. Research questions addressing Aim 1 were: (a) can rural breast cancer survivors be recruited into a longitudinal intervention trial and (b) can their participation be retained. Research questions for Aim 2 were: (a) do participants who received the BCEI show improvement in overall QOL and (b) is the QOL improvement sustained over time. Data were analyzed using repeated measures general linear mixed models. Results demonstrated the ability to recruit and retain 53 rural breast cancer survivors; that the Experimental arm showed improvement in overall QOL (p=0.013), and; there were significant differences in overall QOL between the Experimental and Wait Control groups at both month 3 and month 6. Thus, it appears that at least some rural breast cancer survivors can and will participate in a larger trial, will

  7. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  8. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  9. Recurrent Breast Cancer in a Patient with a Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Copeland-Halperin, Libby R.; Cohen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with recurrent infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. We also review the current literature regarding reports of breast malignancy around a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, as well as the potential relevance of such shunts to the preoperative evaluation and management of patients with breast cancer. PMID:25648450

  10. Clinicopathological classification and traditional prognostic indicators of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Chen, Zhibai; Su, Ka; Zeng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with molecular subtypes that have biological distinctness and different behavior. The objective of this study is to evaluate the value of molecular subtypes in breast cancer management according to a retrospective analysis of breast carcinoma molecular subtypes, histopathological grade, and TNM stage. A retrospective study of 475 paraffin-embedded tissues of breast cancer samples from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University was performed. Expression of ER, PR, Her-2 and Ki-67 was analyzed to classify molecular subtypes of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry. The differences of molecular subtypes of breast cancers in regard to TNM staging and pathological grade were analyzed using χ2 tests. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. The frequency of luminal A, luminal B, HER2-positive luminal B, triple negative and non-luminal HER2-positive subtypes were: 35.5%, 22.5%, 13.1%, 15.2% and 13.7%, respectively. Among the five subtypes of breast cancer, the distribution of pathological grades showed a significant difference (P<0.001). There were significant differences in the distribution of TNM staging among the five subtypes of breast cancer (P<0.001). In addition to traditional prognostic indicators such as TNM staging and pathological grade, molecular subtype may aid clinical practice and research into breast cancer. Different molecular subtypes will lead to different prognosis and therapeutic option. Molecular subtyping is essential for breast cancer management. PMID:26339424

  11. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  12. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling.

  13. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  14. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  15. Synthesis and Anti-Breast Cancer Evaluation of Novel N-(Guanidinyl)benzenesulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa M.; El-Gazzar, Marwa G.; Alsaid, Mansour S.

    2014-01-01

    A series of 4-(substituted)-N-(guanidinyl)benzenesulfonamides bearing biologically active pyrazole, pyrimidine and pyridine moieties were prepared and evaluated for their anticancer activity against human tumor breast cell line (MCF7). These sulfonamides showed promising activity with IC50 values ranging from 49.5 to 70.2 μM. The structure-activity relationship of the synthesized compounds was studied. Interestingly, it was found that the most potent compounds in this study were the corresponding 2-cyanoacrylate 3, 3-oxobutanoate 4, pyrazole 6, pyridine 9 and pyrazole 13. Compounds 7 and 8 are nearly as active as Doxorubicin as reference drug with (IC50 values = 70.2, 68.1 μM), while compounds 5, 10 and 11 exhibited a moderate activity. PMID:24694543

  16. Main controversies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities

  17. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  18. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  19. Mammography and breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bassett, L W; Manjikian, V; Gold, R H

    1990-08-01

    Breast radiography should be performed only with film-screen mammography or xeromammography. At least two views of each breast should be obtained, and for film-screen mammography, at least one of these should be the oblique view. Quality assurance is becoming a significant concern in breast cancer screening. The ACR Mammography Accreditation Program takes into account the qualifications of the personnel, the performance of the x-ray equipment, and a peer review of the final product: the diagnostic image. The mammographic signs of malignancy can be divided into primary, secondary, and indirect. The accuracy of mammography depends on several factors, but the greatest limitation is the density of the breast tissue. Very dense tissue makes detection of breast cancer difficult, and a negative mammogram should never deter one from a biopsy of a clinically suspect mass. New consensus guidelines for breast cancer screening were developed to bring uniformity to the recommendations of the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and various professional medical societies. These new guidelines reflect the encouraging results from recent clinical trials, as well as some discouraging reports on breast self-examination and the baseline mammogram. The underutilization of screening mammography is a problem of significant concern to both private and public health agencies. Barriers to mammographic screening include lack of awareness of the benefits of screening, physicians' misconceptions about patient compliance, concerns about radiation risk and overdiagnosis, fear of mastectomy, a perception that a mammogram involves great discomfort, and relatively high cost. Nationwide educational programs are under way to counter misconceptions about mammography, and various strategies are evolving to overcome the other barriers. Sonography is a useful adjunct to mammography for cyst-solid differentiation, but mammography is the only imaging modality effective for the early

  20. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  1. Medical hypothesis: xenoestrogens as preventable causes of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D L; Bradlow, H L; Wolff, M; Woodruff, T; Hoel, D G; Anton-Culver, H

    1993-01-01

    Changes in documented risk factors for breast cancer and rates of screening cannot completely explain recent increases in incidence or mortality. Established risk factors for breast cancer, including genetics, account for at best 30% of cases. Most of these risk factors can be linked to total lifetime exposure to bioavailable estrogens. Experimental evidence reveals that compounds such as some chlorinated organics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), triazine herbicides, and pharmaceuticals affect estrogen production and metabolism and thus function as xenoestrogens. Many of these xenoestrogenic compounds also experimentally induce mammary carcinogenesis. Recent epidemiologic studies have found that breast fat and serum lipids of women with breast cancer contain significantly elevated levels of some chlorinated organics compared with noncancer controls. As the proportion of inherited breast cancer in the population is small, most breast cancers are due to acquired mutations. Thus, the induction of breast cancer in the majority of cases stems from interactions between host factors, including genetics and environmental carcinogens. We hypothesize that substances such as xenoestrogens increase the risk of breast cancer by mechanisms which include interaction with breast-cancer susceptibility genes. A series of major epidemiologic studies need to be developed to evaluate this hypothesis, including studies of estrogen metabolism, the role of specific xenoestrogenic substances in breast cancer, and relevant genetic-environmental interactions. In addition, experimental studies are needed to evaluate biologic markers of suspect xenoestrogens and biologic markers of host susceptibility and identify pathways of estrogenicity that affect the development of breast cancer. If xenoestrogens do play a role in breast cancer, reductions in exposure will provide an opportunity for primary prevention of this growing disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images p372-a Figure

  2. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  3. Genomic profiling of breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent advances in the application of advanced genomic technologies towards the identification of biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. Recent findings Advances in high-throughput genomic profiling such as massively parallel sequencing have enabled researchers to catalogue the spectrum of somatic alterations in breast cancers. These tools also hold promise for precision medicine through accurate patient prognostication, stratification, and the dynamic monitoring of treatment response. For example, recent efforts have defined robust molecular subgroups of breast cancer and novel subtype-specific oncogenes. In addition, previously unappreciated activating mutations in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have been reported, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. Genomic profiling of cell-free tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells has been used to monitor disease burden and the emergence of resistance, and such ‘liquid biopsy’ approaches may facilitate the early, noninvasive detection of aggressive disease. Finally, single-cell genomics is coming of age and will contribute to an understanding of breast cancer evolutionary dynamics. Summary Here, we highlight recent studies that employ high-throughput genomic technologies in an effort to elucidate breast cancer biology, discover new therapeutic targets, improve prognostication and stratification, and discuss the implications for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25502431

  4. Breast cancer and fertility preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Spectrometry techniques in diagnostics of hereditary breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, Olexander; Kruk, Tetjana; Voloshynska, Katerina; Gruia, Ion; Gavrila, Camelia; Yermolenko, Sergey; Ivashko, Pavlo; Ushakova, Olga

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to study the possibility of using polarimetry methods of performance evaluation of blood plasma of patients with breast cancer and spectroscopy method in the diagnosis of breast cancer and determine the criteria for their use of non-invasive screening for problems.

  7. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  8. [Normofractionated breast irradiation in breast cancer. Indications and benefits].

    PubMed

    Fourquet, A; Krhili, S-L; Campana, F; Chilles, A; Kirova, Y-M

    2016-10-01

    Whole-breast normofractionated irradiation following breast-conserving surgery is the reference treatment. It delivers a dose of 50Gy in 25 fractions of 2Gy to the reference point, and, in some patients, an additional dose of 16Gy in 8 fractions of 2Gy in the tumor bed. Long-term results and toxicity of this irradiation scheme was prospectively evaluated in several randomised trials and meta-analyses, in invasive cancers as well as in ductal carcinoma in situ. The average 10-year rate of in breast recurrences was 6 % in these trials, with limited cardiac and pulmonary toxicity and limited rate of severe fibrosis. Identification of risk factors of recurrences may help to design new irradiation schemes adapted to tumor biology. The new irradiation schemes must be rigorously evaluated in the long-term in the frame of prospective clinical trials, in order to validate them as new standards of treatment. PMID:27592268

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  12. PS2 in breast cancer--alternative or complementary tool to steroid receptor status? Evaluation of 446 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Gion, M.; Mione, R.; Pappagallo, G. L.; Gatti, C.; Nascimben, O.; Bari, M.; Leon, A. E.; Vinante, O.; Bruscagnin, G.

    1993-01-01

    The oestrogen induced pS2 protein was measured in the cytosol of 446 breast cancer samples by an immunoradiometric assay. The relationships between pS2 and several clinical and biological parameters were evaluated. pS2 was not correlated to age, pT and nodal status, while it was higher in pre- than in peri- and post-menopausal women. A statistically significant positive association was found between pS2 and ER, PgR and cathepsin D. However, the frequency of pS2 negative values in ER+ (25.6%), PgR+ (21.7%) and cathepsin D-(19.0%) cases suggests that pS2 provides information independent of the above parameters in a fairly high percentage of patients. The prognostic role of pS2 was evaluated in 267 cases (follow up time 24-102 months). pS2+ showed longer RFS (P = 0.016) and OS (P = 0.004) than pS2-. pS2+ cases were significantly associated with a better prognosis in N+ but not in N- cases. Multivariate analysis showed that pS2 is an independent prognostic factor being the second most effective indicator for OS after nodal status and the third for RFS after nodal status and cathepsin D. From the present findings, we conclude that pS2 probably provides additional biological information to steroid receptor status and cathepsin D in patients with primary breast cancer. PMID:8347494

  13. Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  14. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  15. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk On This Page Is there a relationship between pregnancy and breast cancer risk? Are any pregnancy-related factors associated with ...

  16. Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159762.html Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs Adaptive study design allows researchers to match ... provide a fighting chance for women with advanced breast cancer. The drugs, neratinib and veliparib, both appear effective ...

  17. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  18. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  19. Exposure to breast milk in infancy and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Newcomb, Polly A.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Hampton, John M.; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Early life exposures, such as being breastfed in infancy, may influence the risk of breast cancer in adulthood. We evaluated the risk of breast cancer in relation to ever having been breastfed in infancy among 9,442 women who participated in a population-based, case-control study. Cases were identified through cancer registries in three states (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin); controls were identified through statewide drivers’ license lists or Medicare lists. Data on known and suspected risk factors were obtained through telephone interview. We used unconditional logistic regression to assess the relation of breast cancer with ever having been breastfed and duration of breastfeeding (available for only 19% of breastfed women) in premenopausal women (1,986 cases and 1,760 controls) and postmenopausal women (2,600 cases and 2,493 controls). We found no evidence that ever having been breastfed in infancy was associated with breast cancer risk in either premenopausal women (odds ratio [OR]=0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.83–1.10) or postmenopausal women (OR=0.98; 95% CI=0.87–1.10). The association did not differ according to breast cancer stage, mother’s history of breast cancer, or any other reproductive factor assessed. Likewise, we found no association between breastfeeding duration and risk of breast cancer. Our results do not support the hypothesis that exposure to breast milk in infancy influences the risk of adult breast cancer. PMID:19330531

  20. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  1. PEGylated liposomes of anastrozole for long-term treatment of breast cancer: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shavi, Gopal Venkatesh; Sreenivasa Reddy, Meka; Raghavendra, Ramesh; Nayak, Usha Yogendra; Kumar, Averineni Ranjith; Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Behl, Gautam; Dave, Vivek; Kushwaha, Kriti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present study was to develop conventional and PEGylated (long circulating), liposomes containing anastrozole (ANS) for effective treatment of breast cancer. ANS is a third-generation non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor of the triazole class used for the treatment of advanced and late-stage breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Under such disease conditions the median duration of therapy should be prolonged until tumor regression ends (>31 months). Liposomes were prepared by the thin film hydration method by using ANS and various lipids such as soyaphosphatidyl choline, cholesterol and methoxy polyethylene glycol distearoyl ethanolamine in different concentration ratios and evaluated for physical characteristics, in vitro drug release and stability. Optimized formulations of liposome were studied for in vitro cytotoxic activity against the BT-549 and MCF-7 cell lines and in vivo behavior in Wistar rats. Preformulation studies, both Fourier transform infrared study and differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed no interaction between the drug and the excipients used in the formulations. The optimized formulations AL-07 and AL-09 liposomes showed encapsulation efficiencies in the range 65.12 ± 1.05% to 69.85 ± 3.2% with desired mean particle size distribution of 101.1 ± 5.9 and 120.2 ± 2.8 nm and zeta potentials of -43.7 ± 4.7 and -62.9 ± 3.5 mV. All the optimized formulations followed Higuchi-matrix release kinetics and when plotted in accordance with the Korsemeyer-Peppas method, the n-value 0.5 < n < 1.0 suggests an anomalous (non-Fickian) transport. Likewise, the PEGylated liposomes showed greater tumor growth inhibition on BT-549 and MCF-7 cell lines from in vitro cytotoxicity studies (p < 0.05). Pharmacokinetic study of conventional and PEGylated liposomes in Wistar rats demonstrated a 3.33- and 20.28-fold increase in AUC(0-∞) values when compared to pure drug (p < 0.001). Among the formulations

  2. [Breast cancer. Individualized therapy concepts].

    PubMed

    Harbeck, N; Wuerstlein, R

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine in the sense of individualized therapy concepts plays an important role in breast cancer. In early breast cancer the molecular subtypes luminal A and B and basal-like are important for planning adjuvant systemic therapy. Prognostic and predictive markers, such as hormone receptor status, HER2, Ki-67, uPA/PAI-1 or multiple gene tests, such as Oncotype DX® currently allow avoidance of an over therapy or under therapy. In early and also advanced breast cancer there are an increasing number of new targeted therapies which represent an augmentation of standard endocrine and chemotherapy and in the future could at least partially replace them. As a whole the therapy regimens for breast cancer have become more complex due to the inclusion of molecular information, new therapies and the withdrawal of conventional treatment concepts. Decisive for the future will be the confirmation of this development by modern study concepts contemporarily with adequate evidence. It could then be expected that a personalized therapy for early breast cancer and in particular adjuvant chemotherapy would only be used for those patients for whom it is really necessary. In advanced stage disease there is justified hope that the survival time in the sense of a chronic disease can be improved by the use of targeted therapy.

  3. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Breast cancer chemoprevention: beyond tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Carol J

    2001-01-01

    A large number of new potential chemoprevention agents are available that target molecular abnormalities found in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and/or ER-positive precancerous breast tissue and have side effect profiles that differ from tamoxifen. Classes of agents currently undergoing evaluation in clinical prevention trials or those for which testing is planned in the near future include new selective ER modulators, aromatase inactivators/inhibitors, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists, monoterpenes, isoflavones, retinoids, rexinoids, vitamin D derivatives, and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, cyclooxygenase-2, and polyamine synthesis. New clinical testing models will use morphological and molecular biomarkers to select candidates at highest short-term risk, to predict the response to a particular class of agent, and to assess the response in phase II prevention trials. If validated, morphological and molecular markers could eventually replace cancer incidence as an indicator of efficacy in future phase III trials. PMID:11250754

  5. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Contouring Guidelines for the Axillary Lymph Nodes for the Delivery of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: Evaluation of the RTOG Breast Cancer Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Michelle S.; Usman, Asad A.; Neuschler, Erin I.; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Hayes, John P.; Small, William

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the axillary lymph nodes on pretreatment diagnostic computed tomography (CT) of the chest to determine their position relative to the anatomic axillary borders as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans available for 30 breast cancer patients with clinically involved lymph nodes were fused with simulation CT. Contouring of axillary levels I, II, and III according to the RTOG guidelines was performed. Measurements were made from the area of distal tumor to the anatomic borders in 6 dimensions for each level. Results: Of the 30 patients, 100%, 93%, and 37% had clinical involvement of levels I, II, and III, respectively. The mean number of lymph nodes dissected was 13.6. The mean size of the largest lymph node was 2.4 cm. Extracapsular extension was seen in 23% of patients. In 97% of patients, an aspect of the involved lymph node lay outside of the anatomic border of a level. In 80% and 83% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the cranial (1.78 ± 1.0 cm; range, 0.28-3.58 cm) and anterior (1.27 ± 0.92 cm; range, 0.24-3.58 cm) borders of level I, respectively. In 80% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the caudal border of level II (1.36 ± 1.0 cm, range, 0.27-3.86 cm), and 0% to 33% of patients had tumor extension outside the remaining borders of all levels. Conclusions: To cover 95% of lymph nodes at the cranial and anterior borders of level I, an additional clinical target volume margin of 3.78 cm and 3.11 cm, respectively, is necessary. The RTOG guidelines may be insufficient for coverage of axillary disease in patients with clinical nodal involvement who are undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, incomplete axillary dissection, or treatment with intensity modulated radiation therapy. In patients with pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans, fusion with

  9. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  10. Do underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Gikas, Panagiotis D; Mansfield, Lucy; Mokbel, Kefah

    2004-01-01

    Although animal and laboratory studies suggest a possible link between certain chemicals used in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer development, there is no reliable evidence that underarm cosmetics use increases breast cancer risk in humans. This article reviews the evidence for and against the possible link between breast cancer and underarm cosmetics and highlights the need for further research to clarify this issue.

  11. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  12. Can We Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004–2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14–42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48–52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

  13. Secretory breast cancer. Case report

    PubMed Central

    LOMBARDI, A.; MAGGI, S.; BERSIGOTTI, L.; LAZZARIN, G.; NUCCETELLI, E.; AMANTI, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 – year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma. PMID:23660165

  14. Secretory breast cancer. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Maggi, S; Bersigotti, L; Lazzarin, G; Nuccetelli, E; Amanti, C

    2013-04-01

    Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 -year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma.

  15. Consanguinity Protecting Effect Against Breast Cancer among Tunisian Women: Analysis of BRCA1 Haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Medimegh, Imen; Troudi, Wafa; Omrane, Ines; Ayari, Hajer; Uhrhummer, Nancy; Majoul, Hamdi; Benayed, Farhat; Mezlini, Amel; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Sibille, Catherine; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of consanguinity on breast cancer incidence in Tunisia. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the involvement of heterozygote and homozygote haplotypes of BRCA1 gene SNPs according to consanguinity among 40 cases of familial breast cancer, 46 cases with sporadic breast cancer and 34 healthy controls. We showed significant difference in consanguinity rate between breast cancer patients versus healthy controls P = 0.001. Distribution of homozygous BRCA1 haplotypes among healthy women versus breast cancer patients was significantly different; p=0.02. Parental consanguinity seems to protect against breast cancer in the Tunisian population. PMID:25987085

  16. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  18. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Uden, D J P; van Laarhoven, H W M; Westenberg, A H; de Wilt, J H W; Blanken-Peeters, C F J M

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimodal therapeutic approach has significantly improved patient survival. However, the median overall survival among women with IBC is still poor. By elucidating the biologic characteristics of IBC, new treatment options may become available. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature on IBC through computerized literature searches. The objective of the current review is to present an overview of the literature related to the biology, imaging and multidisciplinary treatment of inflammatory breast cancer.

  19. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Goyal, Sharad; Harris, Lyndsay; Chung, Gina; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  20. PIP breast implants: rupture rate and correlation with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    MOSCHETTA, M.; TELEGRAFO, M.; CORNACCHIA, I.; VINCENTI, L.; RANIERI, V.; CIRILLI, A.; RELLA, L.; IANORA, A.A. STABILE; ANGELELLI, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence of Poly Implant Prosthése (PIP) rupture as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the prevalence of the detected signs and the potential correlation with breast carcinoma. Patients and methods 67 patients with silicone breast implants and clinical indications for breast MRI were evaluated for a total of 125 implants: 40 (32%) PIP in 21 patients and 85 non-PIP in 46 patients (68%), the latest considered as control group. A 1.5-T MR imaging device was used in order to assess implant integrity with dedicated sequences and in 6 cases a dynamic study was performed for characterizing breast lesions. Two radiologists with more than 5 years’ experience in the field of MRI evaluated in consensus all MR images searching for the presence of clear signs of intra or extra-capsular implant rupture. Results 20/40 (50%) PIP implants presented signs of intra-capsular rupture: linguine sign in 20 cases (100%), tear-drop sign in 6 (30%). In 12/20 cases (60%), MRI signs of extra-capsular rupture were detected. In the control group, an intra-capsular rupture was diagnosed in 12/85 cases (14%) associated with extra-capsular one in 5/12 cases (42%). Among the six cases with suspected breast lesions, in 2/21 patients with PIP implants (10%) a breast carcinoma was diagnosed (mucinous carcinoma, n=1; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=1). In 4/46 patients (9%) with non-PIP implants, an invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed. Conclusion The rupture rate of PIP breast implants is significantly higher than non-PIP (50% vs 14%). MRI represents the most accurate imaging tool for evaluating breast prostheses and the linguine sign is the most common MRI sign to be searched. The incidence of breast carcinoma does not significantly differ between the PIP and non-PIP implants and a direct correlation with breast cancer can not been demonstrated. PMID:25644728

  1. Therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garcia, José; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Cortés, Javier; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of HER2 and development of trastuzumab pioneered the field of targeted therapy in breast cancer. Hoping to emulate the same clinical success, pharmaceutical companies have developed several antibodies against newly identified membrane-bound targets. Unfortunately, none of these agents has yet matched the thousands of lives saved by trastuzumab. In this article we review the most advanced therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer. While acknowledging their unquestionable benefit, we emphasize the need to better understand their biology and mechanisms of action in order to optimize their use in defined patient populations.

  2. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  4. Initial clinical evaluation of radiolabeled MX-DTPA humanized BrE-3 antibody in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kramer, E L; Liebes, L; Wasserheit, C; Noz, M E; Blank, E W; Zabalegui, A; Melamed, J; Furmanski, P; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate radiometal-labeled humanized BrE-3 (huBrE-3) monoclonal antibody as a radioimmunolocalization and therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients, tumor localization, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity of (111)In-labeled combined 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 3-methyl- and 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 4-methyldiethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (MX-DTPA) huBrE-3 were studied. Seven women with BrE-3 antigen-positive, metastatic breast carcinoma underwent (111)In huBrE-3 infusion (5 mCi; 50 mg), followed by serial gamma camera imaging and plasma sampling. Region of interest analysis of images was used to make radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3. Data were extrapolated to 90Y huBrE-3. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response was measured in serum samples obtained up to 3 months after infusion. Patients tolerated infusions well. Seventy-six percent of 105 known sites of disease were identified on planar and single-photon emission computed tomography scans. For six of seven patients, a biexponential model fit the plasma time-activity curve best with an average T1/2alpha=10.6+/-8.5 (SD) h and average T1/2beta=114.2+/-39.2 h. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3 for whole body averaged 0.53+/-.08 rads/mCi. Dose estimates for 90Y huBrE-3 for marrow averaged 8.4+/-11.9 rads/mCi, and for tumors, 70+/-31.5 rads/mCi. Liver radioactivity uptake averaged 19.7+/-8.8% injected dose at 24 h after infusion, translating into an average radiation absorbed dose 21.1+/-12 rads/90Y mCi administered. Only one of seven patients demonstrated a low level of HAHA response. Although the plasma half-lives are longer and marrow dose higher for radiolabeled huBrE-3 compared with the murine construct, the excellent tumor localization, good tumor dosimetry, and low immunogenicity support the use of 90Y-huBrE-3 antibody for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer.

  5. Initial experience in a cancer hospital in Nepal with sentinel lymph node mapping and biopsy for evaluation of axillary lymph node status in palpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Nirmal; Pradhan, Manohar; Neupane, Prakash Raj; Shrestha, Bhakta Man; Dhakal, Hari Prasad; Thakur, Binay Kumar; Cox, Charles Evandor

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the performance and feasibility of sentinel lymph node biopsy in early breast cancer patients using patent blue dye. From March 2004, we are consecutively enrolling breast cancer patients with tumor size less than 5 cm with no clinically palpable axillary lymph nodes in this feasibility study. So far, 21 patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy using 1.0% patent blue dye injection around the tumor followed by axillary dissection. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was compared with axillary dissection for its ability to accurately reflect the final pathological status of the axillary nodes. Age of patients ranged form 32-67 years old with mean age of 46.72 years. Fifty seven percent of patients were postmenopausal. Patients with T1 lesions were 8 and T2 were 13. The sentinel lymph node/s were successfully identified in 20 out of 21 patients (95.0%). The number of sentinel lymph nodes ranged from 1 to 5 (average 2.0) and non-sentinel nodes ranged from 5-22 (average 12.0). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was diagnosed in 15 patients, DCIS with early invasion in 4 patients, invasive lobular carcinoma in 1 and medullary carcinoma in 1 patient. Of the 20 patients in whom sentinel lymph nodes were successfully identified, nodes were positive in 35.0% (7/20) of patients. All the positive nodes were detected in group with T2 lesions. SLNs were the only positive nodes in 2 patients. There were no false negative patients, yielding an accuracy of 100.0%. Lymphatic mapping using patent blue dye alone is technically feasible for patients with small (T1 or T2) palpable breast tumors. The sentinel node can be reliably identified in the majority of these patients, and its histology reflects that of the axilla with a high degree of accuracy. This method is very useful in economically backward countries as it involves less expensive material.

  6. Dragon boat racing and health-related quality of life of breast cancer survivors: a mixed methods evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer survivors who participate in physical activity (PA) are reported to experience improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, the quantitative research exploring the relationship between the team-based activity of dragon boat racing and the HRQOL of breast cancer survivors is limited. Given the rising number of breast cancer survivors, and their growing attraction to dragon boating, further exploration of the influence of this activity on HRQOL is warranted. Methods This study is designed to: 1) quantitatively assess whether and how breast cancer survivors’ participation in a season of dragon boat racing is related to HRQOL and 2) qualitatively explore the survivors’ lived experience of dragon boating and how and why this experience is perceived to influence HRQOL. A mixed methods sequential explanatory design was used with the purpose of complementing quantitative findings with qualitative data. Quantitative data measuring HRQOL were collected at baseline and post-season (N = 100); semi-structured qualitative interviews were used to elicit a personal account of the dragon boat experience (N = 15). Results Statistically significant improvements were shown for HRQOL, physical, functional, emotional and spiritual well-being, breast cancer-specific concerns and cancer-related fatigue. A trend towards significance was shown for social/family well-being. Qualitative data elaborated on the quantitative findings, greatly enhancing the understanding of how and why dragon boat racing influences HRQOL. Conclusions The use of a mixed methods design effectively captured the complex yet positive influence of dragon boating on survivor HRQOL. These findings contribute to a growing body of literature supporting the value of dragon boat racing as a viable PA intervention for enhancing survivor HRQOL. PMID:23915045

  7. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  8. Evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of Hypericum spp. on human glioblastoma A1235 and breast cancer MDA MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Madunić, Josip; Matulić, Maja; Friščić, Maja; Pilepić, Kroata Hazler

    2016-11-01

    Cytotoxic activity of 16 Hypericum ethanolic extracts was evaluated by MTT assay on two human cancer cell lines: glioblastoma A1235 and breast cancer MDA MB-231. Morphology and the type of induced cell death were determined using light and fluorescence microscopy. The majority of Hypericum extracts had no significant cytotoxic effect on MDA MB-231 cells. Eight extracts exhibited mild cytotoxic effect on A1235 cells after 24 h incubation, ranging from 8.0% (H. patulum) to 21.7% (H. oblongifolium). After 72 h of treatment, the strongest inhibition of A1235 viability was observed for extracts of H. androsaemum (26.4-43.9%), H. balearicum (25.8-36.3%), H. delphicum (14.8-27.4%) and H. densiflorum (11.2-24.1%). Micro-scopic examination of cells showed apoptosis as the dominant type of cell death. Due to observed high viability of treated cells, we propose that cytotoxic effects of Hypericum extracts could be related to alternations/interruptions in the cell cycle.

  9. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Print-Friendly Page April 2016 The Impact of Breast Cancer Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the ...

  10. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is no cancer. This is called a false-positive result. For women who have had cancer in ... easier to treat. Risks of screenings can include: False-positive results . This occurs when a test shows cancer ...

  11. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HP | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  12. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  14. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  15. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  16. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  18. Cording Following Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Jean; Miller, Cynthia L; Specht, Michelle C; Skolny, Melissa N; Jammallo, Lauren S; Horick, Nora; Elliott, Krista; Niemierko, Andrzej; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment for breast cancer may result in the formation of palpable cords in the axillary region. Our aim was to evaluate cording incidence, risk factors, and association with upper extremity functional impairment and measured arm volume change. Methods We included 308 patients with unilateral breast cancer prospectively screened for upper extremity lymphedema, symptoms and function. Patients were assessed pre- and post-operatively and at 3 – 8 month intervals with perometer arm measurements and the LEFT-BC questionnaire. Cording was determined by patient self-report. The cumulative incidence of cording and its association with clinicopathologic factors, upper extremity functional impairment, and measured arm volume change were analyzed. Results 31.5% (97/308) of patients reported cording, with a cumulative incidence of 36.2% at 24 months post-operative. Clinicopathologic factors significantly associated with cording by multivariate analysis included axillary lymph node dissection (p<.0001) and younger age at diagnosis (p=0.0005). Cording was associated with increased functional impairment (p=0.0018) and an arm volume increase of ≥5% (p=0.028). Conclusions Cording following breast cancer treatment is common, and may occur beyond the post-operative period. Our findings emphasize the importance of identifying patients at high risk for cording, and developing strategies to minimize functional impairment and arm volume elevation associated with cording. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions for cording following breast cancer treatment. PMID:23813304

  19. Sexuality After Breast Cancer: Need for Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Sh; Lotfi Kashani, F

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical experiences have revealed that patients with breast cancer experience various sexual problems following their treatment. Breast cancer negatively impacts the sexual life of the afflicted couples, and as a traumatic event can influence women’s psychosexual functioning and intimate relationship. This review focuses on sexuality after breast cancer and on a growing need for bio-psycho-social guidelines for breast cancer treatment. Methods This study aims to review the literature on management, psychological outcomes and sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. Results Although the benefits of the current treatment strategies are well established, many cancer survivors are at risk for developing psycho physiological symptoms including sexual dysfunction. Cancer and treatment-related factors can influence sexual functioning. We review current treatment-related side effects on sexual functioning such as desire, arousal and orgasm in breast cancer patients. Despite the impact of medical treatment on survival of patients with breast cancer, no satisfactory steps have been taken towards improving sexual functioning of these patients. Conclusion Breast cancer affects many aspects of sexuality, including changes in physical functioning and in the perception of feminity. Sexual dysfunction following breast cancer should be diagnosed and managed as a systematic approach with multidisciplinary inputs. Healthcare professionals should assess the effects of medical and surgical treatment on the sexuality of breast cancer survivors. PMID:25780533

  20. Evaluation of a hemi-spherical wideband antenna array for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, M.; Craddock, I. J.; Preece, A.; Leendertz, J.; Benjamin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Using similar techniques to ground penetrating radars, microwave detection of breast tumors is a potential nonionizing and noninvasive alternative to traditional body-imaging techniques. In order to develop an imaging system, the team at Bristol have been working on a number of antenna array prototypes, based around a stacked-patch element, starting with simple pairs of elements and progressing to fully populated planar arrays. As the system commences human subject trials, a curved breast phantom has been developed along with an approximately hemi-spherical conformal array. This contribution will present details of the conformal array design and initial results from this unique experimental imaging system as applied to an anatomically shaped breast phantom.

  1. [DNA aptamers selection for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zamay, G S; Belayanina, I V; Zamay, A S; Komarova, M A; Krat, A V; Eremina, E N; Zukov, R A; Sokolov, A E; Zamay, T N

    2016-05-01

    A method of selection of DNA aptamers to breast tumor tissue based on the use of postoperative material has been developed. Breast cancer tissues were used as the positive target; the negative targets included benign tumor tissue, adjacent healthy tissues, breast tissues from mastopathy patients, and also tissues of other types of malignant tumors. During selection a pool of DNA aptamers demonstrating selective binding to breast cancer cells and tissues and insignificant binding to breast benign tissues has been obtained. These DNA aptamers can be used for identification of protein markers, breast cancer diagnostics, and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  2. 76 FR 47590 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women (ACBCYW)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young..., development, implementation and evaluation of evidence-based activities designed to prevent breast cancer... breast cancer in young women including appropriate venues to educate women at increased risk...

  3. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Pelegrí-Martinez, Laura; Lopez-Aznar, Diego; Cózar-Santiago, María del Puig

    2015-01-01

    Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26854143

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  6. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  7. Heritable breast cancer in twins

    PubMed Central

    Mack, T M; Hamilton, A S; Press, M F; Diep, A; Rappaport, E B

    2002-01-01

    Known major mutations such as BRCA1/2 and TP53 only cause a small proportion of heritable breast cancers. Co-dominant genes of lower penetrance that regulate hormones have been thought responsible for most others. Incident breast cancer cases in the identical (monozygotic) twins of representative cases reflect the entire range of pertinent alleles, whether acting singly or in combination. Having reported the rate in twins and other relatives of cases to be high and nearly constant over age, we now examine the descriptive and histological characteristics of the concordant and discordant breast cancers occurring in 2310 affected pairs of monozygotic and fraternal (dizygotic) twins in relation to conventional expectations and hypotheses. Like other first-degree relatives, dizygotic co-twins of breast cancer cases are at higher than usual risk (standardised incidence ratio (SIR)=1.7, CI=1.1–2.6), but the additional cases among monozygotic co-twins of cases are much more numerous, both before and after menopause (SIR=4.4, CI=3.6–5.6), than the 100% genetic identity would predict. Monozygotic co-twin diagnoses following early proband cancers also occur more rapidly than expected (within 5 years, SIR=20.0, CI=7.5–53.3). Cases in concordant pairs represent heritable disease and are significantly more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive than those of comparable age from discordant pairs. The increase in risk to the monozygotic co-twins of cases cannot be attributed to the common environment, to factors that cumulate with age, or to any aggregate of single autosomal dominant mutations. The genotype more plausibly consists of multiple co-existing susceptibility alleles acting through heightened susceptibility to hormones and/or defective tumour suppression. The resultant class of disease accounts for a larger proportion of all breast cancers than previously thought, with a rather high overall penetrance. Some of the biological characteristics differ from those of

  8. Evaluation of psychosocial effects of pre-symptomatic testing for breast/ovarian and colon cancer pre-disposing genes: a 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arver, Brita; Haegermark, Aina; Platten, Ulla; Lindblom, Annika; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study of psychosocial consequences following predictive testing for inherited mutations in breast/ovarian and colon cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, and MSH2 was performed. Eighty-seven healthy women were tested for known family mutations and self-assessment scales were used to evaluate anxiety, depression and quality of life. Extensive pre- and post-test information was given. Questionnaires were responded before testing and four times after during the following year. A statistically significant decrease in anxiety mean scores over time was observed among the studied participants. The levels of depression in cancer genes carriers decreased over time while, surprisingly the levels in non-carriers increased. Compared to a normative Swedish sample all women tested showed similar levels of anxiety but women tested for breast cancer genes showed statistically lower levels of depression. Vitality dropped initially after disclosure of the testing of colon cancer genes carriers, followed by increasing levels. No change in vitality or in other quality of life parameters was seen in the other groups and the levels were similar to Swedish norm data. Most tested individuals were satisfied with the testing procedure including genetic counselling and testing and all of them but one would redo the testing. Healthy self-referred women going through predictive breast/ovarian or colon cancer gene testing, including extensive pre- and post-test information and support, in general, will not experience adverse psychological consequences. PMID:15340261

  9. Evaluation of a newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q25.1 in Iranian Azari-Turkish women

    PubMed Central

    Garehdaghchi, Ziba; Derakhshan, Siam Mansoori

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study A recent breast cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210 on 6q25.1 showing a strong association with breast cancer risk. Numerous association studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between this polymorphism and breast cancer risk in various populations. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer risk in different ethnic groups. For the first time, this study has investigated the association of rs2046210 SNP with breast cancer risk in Iranian Azari-Turkish women in North West Iran. Material and methods In this study 192 breast cancer subjects and 186 healthy controls were genotyped using Taqman SNP genotyping assays for different SNP rs2046210 alleles. Results No significant association between rs2046210 SNP alleles and the risk of breast cancer was detected in Iranian Azari-Turkish women. Conclusions The data suggests that rs2046210SNP does not play a role in the aetiology of breast cancer in the Iranian Azari-Turkish population, and it indicates possible genetic differences for breast cancer between different population ancestries. Our result is an important contribution to the literature about genetic susceptibility for breast cancer in Asian populations. Additional studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:27688728

  10. Aromatase and cyclooxygenases: enzymes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brueggemeier, Robert W; Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A

    2003-09-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE2 increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and previous studies in our laboratories have shown a strong linear association between aromatase (CYP19) expression and expression of the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in breast cancer specimens. To further investigate the pathways regulating COX and CYP19 gene expression, studies were performed in normal breast stromal cells, in breast cancer cells from patients, and in breast cancer cell lines using selective pharmacological agents. Enhanced COX enzyme levels results in increased production of prostaglandins, such as PGE2. This prostaglandin increased aromatase activity in breast stromal cells, and studies with selective agonists and antagonists showed that this regulation of signaling pathways occurs through the EP1 and EP2 receptor subtypes. COX-2 gene expression was enhanced in breast cancer cell lines by ligands for the various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), and differential regulation was observed between hormone-dependent and -independent breast cancer cells. Thus, the regulation of both enzymes in breast cancer involves complex paracrine interactions, resulting in significant consequences on the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:14623550

  11. Oral health after breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Amódio, Juliana; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Carrara, Helio Humberto Angotti; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimaraes; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; dos Reis, Francisco José Candido

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral health can affect a patient's general health and quality of life. Given the increase in breast cancer survival rates, investigations of factors influencing the quality of life of survivors have gained importance. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize oral health in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We conducted a matched case-control study. Forty-eight women who survived breast cancer (age 62.1±9.1 years) and 48 healthy controls (age 61.8±8.6 years) were included. For each case and control, a complete oral evaluation chart was completed. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic periodontal disease was 98% in breast cancer survivors and 87% in controls. The breast cancer survivors had a median of 16 remaining teeth, whereas controls had a median of 22 remaining teeth (p = 0.03). The percentage of sites with gingival bleeding was 16.05% (0-100%) in breast cancer survivors and 0% (0-72%) in controls (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chronic periodontal disease and tooth loss were highly prevalent in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. To improve survivors' quality of life, a preventive oral health evaluation should be available prior to cancer treatment. PMID:25518024

  12. Evaluation of Curcumin Capped Copper Nanoparticles as Possible Inhibitors of Human Breast Cancer Cells and Angiogenesis: a Comparative Study with Native Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Sonali; Utage, Bhimashankar; Mogle, Pratima; Kamble, Rahul; Hese, Shrikant; Dawane, Bhaskar; Gacche, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Synthesis of metal nanoparticles for improving therapeutic index and drug delivery is coming up as an attractive strategy in the mainstream of cancer therapeutic research. In the present study, curcumin-capped copper nanoparticles (CU-NPs) were evaluated as possible inhibitors of in vivo angiogenesis, pro-angiogenic cytokines involved in promoting tumor angiogenesis along with inhibition of cell proliferation and migration of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The antiangiogenic potential was assessed using in vivo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the effect of CU-NPs against proliferation of breast cancer cell line. The wound healing migration assay was used to evaluate the effects of CU-NPs on the migration ability of breast cancer cell line. Native curcumin (CU) was used as a reference compound for comparison purpose. The result of the present investigation indicates that CU-NPs could not demonstrate impressive antiangiogenic or anticancer activities significantly as compared to native CU. The possible mechanisms of experimental outcomes are discussed in the light of the methods of nanoparticle synthesis in concert with the current state of the art literature. PMID:26729534

  13. Evaluation of Curcumin Capped Copper Nanoparticles as Possible Inhibitors of Human Breast Cancer Cells and Angiogenesis: a Comparative Study with Native Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Sonali; Utage, Bhimashankar; Mogle, Pratima; Kamble, Rahul; Hese, Shrikant; Dawane, Bhaskar; Gacche, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Synthesis of metal nanoparticles for improving therapeutic index and drug delivery is coming up as an attractive strategy in the mainstream of cancer therapeutic research. In the present study, curcumin-capped copper nanoparticles (CU-NPs) were evaluated as possible inhibitors of in vivo angiogenesis, pro-angiogenic cytokines involved in promoting tumor angiogenesis along with inhibition of cell proliferation and migration of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The antiangiogenic potential was assessed using in vivo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the effect of CU-NPs against proliferation of breast cancer cell line. The wound healing migration assay was used to evaluate the effects of CU-NPs on the migration ability of breast cancer cell line. Native curcumin (CU) was used as a reference compound for comparison purpose. The result of the present investigation indicates that CU-NPs could not demonstrate impressive antiangiogenic or anticancer activities significantly as compared to native CU. The possible mechanisms of experimental outcomes are discussed in the light of the methods of nanoparticle synthesis in concert with the current state of the art literature.

  14. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  15. Male Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Comparison With Female Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, William F.; Jatoi, Ismail; Tse, Julia; Rosenberg, Philip S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Because of its rarity, male breast cancer is often compared with female breast cancer. Patients and Methods To compare and contrast male and female breast cancers, we obtained case and population data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for breast cancers diagnosed from 1973 through 2005. Standard descriptive epidemiology was supplemented with age-period-cohort models and breast cancer survival analyses. Results Of all breast cancers, men with breast cancer make up less than 1%. Male compared with female breast cancers occurred later in life with higher stage, lower grade, and more estrogen receptor–positive tumors. Recent breast cancer incidence and mortality rates declined over time for men and women, but these trends were greater for women than for men. Comparing patients diagnosed from 1996 through 2005 versus 1976 through 1985, and adjusting for age, stage, and grade, cause-specific hazard rates for breast cancer death declined by 28% among men (P = .03) and by 42% among women (P ≈ 0). Conclusion There were three intriguing results. Age-specific incidence patterns showed that the biology of male breast cancer resembled that of late-onset female breast cancer. Similar breast cancer incidence trends among men and women suggested that there are common breast cancer risk factors that affect both sexes, especially estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer. Finally, breast cancer mortality and survival rates have improved significantly over time for both male and female breast cancer, but progress for men has lagged behind that for women. PMID:19996029

  16. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  17. Evaluating a Bilingual Patient Navigation Program for Uninsured Women With Abnormal Screening Tests for Breast and Cervical Cancer: Implications for Future Navigator Research

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Laura S.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Murphy, Kara R.; Endress, Richard; Dong, XinQi; Feinglass, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The DuPage Patient Navigation Collaborative evaluated the Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) model for uninsured women receiving free breast or cervical cancer screening through the Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program in DuPage County, Illinois. Methods. We used medical records review and patient surveys of 477 women to compare median follow-up times with external Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program and Chicago PNRP benchmarks of performance. We examined the extent to which we mitigated community-defined timeliness risk factors for delayed follow-up, with a focus on Spanish-speaking participants. Results. Median follow-up time (29.0 days for breast and 56.5 days for cervical screening abnormalities) compared favorably to external benchmarks. Spanish-speaking patients had lower health literacy, lower patient activation, and more health care system distrust than did English-speaking patients, but despite the prevalence of timeliness risk factors, we observed no differences in likelihood of delayed (> 60 days) follow-up by language. Conclusions. Our successful replication and scaling of the PNRP navigation model to DuPage County illustrates a promising approach for future navigator research. PMID:25713942

  18. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells become cancerous because of changes (mutations) in DNA. Some DNA mutations are inherited. This means the mutations are ... cancers that run in some families. But most DNA changes related to breast cancer are acquired in ...

  20. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-07-21

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response.

  1. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  2. MET deregulation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) is an oncogene encoding for a trans-membrane tyrosine kinase receptor activated by the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). MET has a normal function in organ development during embryogenesis and in tissue homeostasis during adult life. Deregulation of HGF/MET signaling pathway is frequently observed in many cancer types, conferring invasive growth and tendency to progression. MET deregulation is due to gene amplification or increased copy number, gene mutation, receptor over-expression or ligand autocrine loops activation. These events lead to migration, invasion, proliferation, metastatic spread and neo-angiogenesis of cancer cells, suggesting that anti-HGF/MET agents may represent a potential antitumor strategy. In breast cancer (BC), preclinical and clinical data demonstrated the role of HGF/MET signalling pathway in carcinogenesis, disease progression and resistance features. Methods For this review article, all published data on HGF/MET in BC were collected and analyzed. Results Several evidences underline that, in early BC, MET over-expression has an independent negative prognostic significance, regardless of method used for evaluation and BC subtypes. Available data suggest that MET is a relevant target particularly in basal-like (BL) and in triple negative BC. Moreover, preclinical and retrospective data support the critical role of MET deregulation in the development of resistance to target-agents, such as anti-HER2 strategies. Conclusions MET is a promising new target in BC. Several anti-MET agents are under investigation and ongoing clinical trials will clarify its relevance in BC treatment. PMID:26366398

  3. Tendency to breast reconstruction after breast mastectomy among Iranian women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh; Najaf Najafi, Mona; Abbasi Shaye, Zahra; Salehi, Mahta; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women with the medical history of breast cancer constitute the biggest group of patients who survived cancer. Despite the high rate of mastectomy after breast cancer in Iran; only limited patients elect reconstruction surgery. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of tendency to breast reconstruction (BR) surgery among women with breast cancer who had mastectomy but not undergone reconstruction. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Mashhad, north east of Iran during 2013. A total of 108 patients with mastectomy due to breast cancer were selected through convenience sampling and completed the questionnaire. Demographic data collected and 21 items of questionnaire were compared between patients with and without tendency to BR. Data were analyzed using Chi square, t tests and logistic regression. Results: In this study 62 (57.4%) patients had a tendency to BR and 46 (42.6%) had not. The mean (±SD) age of patients in first group was 43.3±8.03 and 49.6±9.9 in the second group (p<0.001). Frequency of agreement about impact of BR on appearance and beauty, mood, family living conditions and their opinion (p<0.001), lack of sufficient information (p=0.01), physician's opinion (p<0.001) and priority of cancer breast treatment (p=0.02) were significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: More than half of the patients had a tendency to BR although they did not go under the surgery yet. Identification of factors that can increase the tendency and factors that help to change the intention to action are important and should be investigate in future research. PMID:26478882

  4. Metformin in breast cancer - an evolving mystery.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Laura; Dasgupta, Atreyi; Jiralerspong, Sao

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a diabetes drug with well-established side effect and safety profiles, has been widely studied for its anti-tumor activities in a number of cancers, including breast cancer. But its mechanism of action in the clinical arena remains elusive. In a window of opportunity trial of metformin in non-diabetic breast cancer patients, Dowling and colleagues examined both the direct actions of the drug on cancer cells (as mediated by AMP kinase), as well as its indirect actions (as mediated by circulating insulin). The data suggest that short-term administration of metformin in this setting has anti-tumor effects significantly involving the indirect, insulin-dependent pathway. The role of the direct pathway remains to be determined. This study represents an important step forward in establishing one of several possible mechanisms for metformin, information that will be useful in determining candidate biomarkers to evaluate in large clinical trials of metformin, such as the ongoing NCIC CTG MA.32 trial of adjuvant metformin. The potential significance of these data for metformin in the treatment of breast cancer is discussed here. PMID:26111812

  5. Targeting breast cancer with sugar-coated carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Hadimani, Mallinath; King, S Bruce; Torti, Suzy V; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the use of glucosamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (glyco-MWCNTs) for breast cancer targeting. Materials & methods Two types of glucosamine functionalized MWCNTs were developed (covalently linked glucosamine and non-covalently phospholipid-glucosamine coated) and evaluated for their potential to bind and target breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Results & conclusion Binding of glyco-MWCNTs in breast cancer cells is mediated by specific interaction with glucose transporters. Glyco-MWCNTs prepared by non-covalent coating with phospholipid-glucosamine displayed an extended blood circulation time, delayed urinary clearance, low tissue retention and increased breast cancer tumor accumulation in vivo. These studies lay the foundation for development of a cancer diagnostic agent based upon glyco-MWCNTs with the potential for superior accuracy over current radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26296098

  6. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. BRCA1-linked marker in postmenopausal breast cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, A.R.; Chen, P.L.; Sellers, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    A majority of breast and ovarian cancer families and half of the early-onset breast cancer families are linked to markers on 17q (BRCA1). While linkage has been demonstrated in families with premenopausal disease, few studies have tested these markers in families with postmenopausal breast cancer. In the Iowa Women`s Health Study, a population-based study of over 42,000 women, an association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was found predominantly in women with a positive family history -- this interaction was associated with a 3.2-fold elevated risk. This effect was even more pronounced when the definition of family history included breast and ovarian cancer, known to be linked to 17q markers. We evaluated evidence for linkage with D17S579, a BRCA-1-linked marker, in 13 families in which the index case had postmenopausal breast cancer. Genotyping for alleles at D17S579 was performed on 84 blood samples. Linkage analysis assumed that the breast cancer trait had an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with a penetrance of 80%. For the 13 families studied, the maximum lod score was 0.29 at a theta of 0.27. There was significant evidence against tight linkage of breast cancer with D17S579 (theta<0.4). Heterogeneity analysis suggested evidence for the presence of both linked and unlinked families. Partitioning informative families on WHR of the index case suggested heterogeneity. These data suggest that, in a subset of families identified by a postmenopausal breast cancer proband, risk of breast cancer may be mediated by BRCA1, with heterogeneity defined by WHR.

  8. Evaluation of wild yam (Dioscorea villosa) root extract as a potential epigenetic agent in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aumsuwan, Pranapda; Khan, Shabana I; Khan, Ikhlas A; Avula, Bharathi; Walker, Larry A; Helferich, William G; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of wild yam root extract (WYRE) as a potential demethylating agent using two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 (estrogen receptor positive; ER(+)) and MDA-MB-231 (Estrogen receptor negative; ER(-)), and a methylated gene, GATA3, as a potential marker of breast cancer development. The cells were treated with WYRE (0-50 μg/mL) for 72 h and used for viability, mRNA, and methylation analyses. WYRE significantly reduced viability of both cell lines and enhanced mRNA content of GATA3 in a concentration-dependent manner; however, DNMT mRNAs (DNMT1, 3A, 3B) were found to increase significantly only in MDA-MB-231 cells. Global DNA methylation, analyzed as 5'-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), showed a concentration-dependent enhancement of 5-mC with no alteration in 5-hmC level in MCF-7 cells; however, in MDA-MB-231 cells, in contrast to MCF-7 cells, 5-mC remained unaltered but 5-hmC reduced significantly in all WYRE concentrations (10-50 μg/mL) used in this study. Since 5-hmC is generated from 5-mC by ten-eleven-translocation (TET) enzymes, analysis of TET mRNAs (TET1, TET2, and TET3) in MDA-MB-231 cells indicated a concentration-dependent reduction in TET1 and induction of TET3; however, TET2 remained unaltered. No alterations in any of the TET mRNAs were found in MCF-7 cells. Methylation analysis of GATA3 promoter at specific locus indicates probable demethylating activity of WYRE in MDA-MB-231 cells. We conclude that activation of GATA3 gene in ER(-) MDA-MB-231 cells may occur by altering DNA methylation pattern on the promoter region which may be different from the mechanisms operated in ER(+) MCF-7 cells.

  9. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Biomarkers of residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Radosevic-Robin, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the decision of which adjuvant treatment should be given to patients with residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant therapy is based on the initial, pretreatment breast cancer molecular subtype and on the estimated residual tumour burden after neoadjuvant therapy. Substantial biological differences exist, however, between treatment-naive breast cancer and the residual tissue that remains after neoadjuvant therapy. In addition, the evaluation of relapse risk in patients is subject to a lack of uniformity in pathological qualification and quantification of remnant breast cancer following neoadjuvant treatment. In this Review, we present the recent recommendations for standardized evaluation of response to neoadjuvant therapy in patients with breast cancer, followed by a comprehensive overview of the pathobiological features of the residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy, which could serve as prognostic biomarkers or guide the choice of targeted adjuvant approaches. These biomarker candidates are at different stages of development, but some already have demonstrated superior prognostic value compared with biomarkers derived from pretreatment breast-cancer characteristics. The evidence presented herein indicates that further research on the biology of breast cancer that persists after neoadjuvant therapy is necessary to improve the management of this disease.

  11. Evaluation of cytokeratin-19 in breast cancer tissue samples: a comparison of automatic and manual evaluations of scanned tissue microarray cylinders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital image (DI) analysis avoids visual subjectivity in interpreting immunohistochemical stains and provides more reproducible results. An automated procedure consisting of two variant methods for quantifying the cytokeratin-19 (CK19) marker in breast cancer tissues is presented. Methods The first method (A) excludes the holes inside selected CK19 stained areas, and the second (B) includes them. 93 DIs scanned from complete cylinders of tissue microarrays were evaluated visually by two pathologists and by the automated procedures. Results and conclusions There was good concordance between the two automated methods, both of which tended to identify a smaller CK19-positive area than did the pathologists. The results obtained with method B were more similar to those of the pathologists; probably because it takes into account the entire positive tumoural area, including the holes. However, the pathologists overestimated the positive area of CK19. Further studies are needed to confirm the utility of this automated procedure in prognostic studies. PMID:26329009

  12. Performance assessment of a pendant-geometry CT scanner for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Shah, Nikula; Burkett, George; Seibert, J. A.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Roos, Gerhardt

    2005-04-01

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening worldwide, it is widely recognized that mammography has limitations, especially in women with dense breasts. In response to the need for a more sensitive approach to breast cancer screening, a CT scanner specifically for breast imaging in the pendant geometry was designed, fabricated, and is currently in clinical evaluation. The spatial resolution and noise properties are discussed, and breast images from a normal volunteer and a patient with breast cancer demonstrate very promising breast CT image quality from a qualitative perspective.

  13. Evolution of Imaging in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Crowley, James; Hagan, Catherine; Atkinson, Lisa L

    2016-06-01

    The following topics are discussed in this article. A historical review of the evolution of breast cancer imaging from thermography through digital breast tomosynthesis, molecular breast imaging, and advanced breast magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of multiple clinical trials, their strengths, and weaknesses. Historical perspective on the Mammography Quality Standards Act and its relationship with development and implementation of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). PMID:27029017

  14. Expression and prognostic significance of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Dong; Liu, Yanrong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Guang-Yin; Xu, Jin-Heng; Liu, Li-Yun; Hu, Yue-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) was not only found to play a key role in the development of tumor angiogenesis, but has also been located in tumor cells of a variety of tumors. This study investigated the expression pattern of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer tissue specimens in order to evaluate the role of VEGFR-2 in the prognosis of breast cancer. Expression and localization of VEGFR-2 in tumor cells of breast cancer specimens from 98 invasive breast cancer patients were determined by immunohistochemistry. The relationships between VEGFR-2 expression and clinicopathological features were also analyzed. The results showed that VEGFR-2 expression correlated positively with lymph node (LN) metastasis of breast cancer. Patients with high expression of VEGFR-2 had a significantly worse OS. It was also observed that the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, including Twist1 and Vimentin, was higher in the tumors with higher VEGFR-2 expression, while the E-cadherin expression was lower in the same tumors, suggesting that VEGFR-2 may serve as a possible mediator of EMT in breast cancer.

  15. Shift work, circadian gene variants and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Schuetz, Johanna M; Lai, Agnes S; Janoo-Gilani, Rozmin; Leach, Stephen; Burstyn, Igor; Richardson, Harriet; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J

    2013-10-01

    Circadian (clock) genes have been linked with several functions relevant to cancer, and epidemiologic research has suggested relationships with breast cancer risk for variants in NPAS2, CLOCK, CRY2 and TIMELESS. Increased breast cancer risk has also been observed among shift workers, suggesting potential interactions in relationships of circadian genes with breast cancer. Relationships with breast cancer of 100 SNPs in 14 clock-related genes, as well as potential interactions with shift work history, were investigated in a case-control study (1042 cases, 1051 controls). Odds ratios in an additive genetic model for European-ancestry participants (645 cases, 806 controls) were calculated, using a two-step correction for multiple testing: within each gene through permutation testing (10,000 permutations), and correcting for the false discovery rate across genes. Interactions of genotypes with ethnicity and shift work (<2 years vs ≥2 years) were evaluated individually. Following permutation analysis, two SNPs (rs3816360 in ARNTL and rs11113179 in CRY1) displayed significant associations with breast cancer and one SNP (rs3027188 in PER1) was marginally significant; however, none were significant following adjustment for the false discovery rate. No significant interaction with shift work history was detected. If shift work causes circadian disruption, this was not reflected in associations between clock gene variants and breast cancer risk in this study. Larger studies are needed to assess interactions with longer durations (>30 years) of shift work that have been associated with breast cancer.

  16. Pathogenicity evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 unclassified variants identified in Portuguese breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Santos, Catarina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Pedro; Bizarro, Susana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary breast/ovarian cancer syndrome is caused by germline deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. A major problem of genetic testing and counseling is the finding of variants of uncertain significance (VUS). We sought to ascertain the pathogenicity of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 VUS identified in Portuguese families during genetic testing. We performed cosegregation analysis of VUS with cancer in families, evaluated their frequency in unaffected controls, and looked for loss of heterozygosity in tumors. In addition, three different bioinformatic algorithms were used (Interactive Biosoftware, ESEfinder, and PolyPhen). Finally, six VUS located in exon-intron boundaries were analyzed by RT-PCR. We found that seven variants segregated with the disease, six variants co-occurred with a pathogenic mutation in the same gene, and four variants co-occurred with a deleterious mutation in the other BRCA gene. By RT-PCR, we observed that four variants (BRCA1 c.4484G>T, BRCA2 c.682-2A>C, BRCA2 c.8488-1G>A, and BRCA2 c.8954-5A>G) disrupted splicing. After the combined analysis, we were able to classify 4 splicing variants as pathogenic mutations, 16 variants as neutral, and 3 variants as polymorphisms; only 2 variants remained classified as VUS. This work highlights the contribution of DNA, RNA, and in silico data to assess the pathogenicity of BRCA1/2 VUS, which, in turn, allows more accurate genetic counseling and clinical management of the families carrying them. PMID:24607278

  17. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  20. Noncoding RNAs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Xipeng; Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhou, Qun

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian transcriptome has recently been revealed to encompass a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the best studied of the short noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), have been extensively characterized with regard to their biogenesis, function and importance in tumorigenesis. Another class of sncRNAs called piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) has also gained attention recently in cancer research owing to their critical role in stem cell regulation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of >200 nucleotides in length have recently emerged as key regulators of developmental processes, including mammary gland development. lncRNA dysregulation has also been implicated in the development of various cancers, including breast cancer. In this review, we describe and discuss the roles of sncRNAs (including miRNAs and piRNAs) and lncRNAs in the initiation and progression of breast tumorigenesis, with a focus on outlining the molecular mechanisms of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor ncRNAs. Moreover, the current and potential future applications of ncRNAs to clinical breast cancer research are also discussed, with an emphasis on ncRNA-based diagnosis, prognosis and future therapeutics.

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxic and chemotherapeutic properties of boldine in breast cancer using in vitro and in vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Looi, Chung Yeng; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2014-01-01

    To date, plants have been the major source of anticancer drugs. Boldine is a natural alkaloid commonly found in the leaves and bark of Peumus boldus. In this study, we found that boldine potently inhibited the viability of the human invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (48-hour IC50 46.5±3.1 μg/mL) and MDA-MB-468 (48-hour IC50 50.8±2.7 μg/mL). Boldine had a cytotoxic effect and induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells as indicated by a higher amount of lactate dehydrogenase released, membrane permeability, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, we demonstrated that boldine induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. The anticancer mechanism is associated with disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c in MDA-MB-231. Boldine selectively induced activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3/7, but not caspase-8. We also found that boldine could inhibit nuclear factor kappa B activation, a key molecule in tumor progression and metastasis. In addition, protein array and Western blotting analysis showed that treatment with boldine resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2 and heat shock protein 70 and upregulation of Bax in the MDA-MB-231 cell line. An acute toxicity study in rats revealed that boldine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight was well tolerated. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of boldine (50 or 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor size in an animal model of breast cancer. Our results suggest that boldine is a potentially useful agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24944509

  2. Evaluation of cytotoxic and chemotherapeutic properties of boldine in breast cancer using in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Looi, Chung Yeng; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2014-01-01

    To date, plants have been the major source of anticancer drugs. Boldine is a natural alkaloid commonly found in the leaves and bark of Peumus boldus. In this study, we found that boldine potently inhibited the viability of the human invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (48-hour IC₅₀ 46.5±3.1 μg/mL) and MDA-MB-468 (48-hour IC₅₀ 50.8±2.7 μg/mL). Boldine had a cytotoxic effect and induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells as indicated by a higher amount of lactate dehydrogenase released, membrane permeability, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, we demonstrated that boldine induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. The anticancer mechanism is associated with disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c in MDA-MB-231. Boldine selectively induced activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3/7, but not caspase-8. We also found that boldine could inhibit nuclear factor kappa B activation, a key molecule in tumor progression and metastasis. In addition, protein array and Western blotting analysis showed that treatment with boldine resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2 and heat shock protein 70 and upregulation of Bax in the MDA-MB-231 cell line. An acute toxicity study in rats revealed that boldine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight was well tolerated. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of boldine (50 or 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor size in an animal model of breast cancer. Our results suggest that boldine is a potentially useful agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24944509

  3. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  5. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment fact sheet ePublications Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet Print this fact sheet Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet (PDF, 943 KB) Related information ...

  6. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... be treated successfully. Differences affecting early detection of breast cancers in men and women There are many similarities ...

  7. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

  8. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  9. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesio taping application in a patient with secondary lymphedema in breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Zduńczyk, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is one of the complications resulting from treatment. It is defined as arm oedema in the breast cancer patients caused by interruption of the flow of the axillary lymphatic system from surgery or radiation therapy, which results in the accumulation of fluid in the subcutaneous tissue of the arm, with a decrease in tissue distensibility around the joints and an increased weight of the extremity. Decongestive lymphatic therapy is common management for lymphedema. A program combining skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and compression therapy (multilayer bandage or garment) is recognised as the best practice in lymphedema management. Kinesio taping (KT) for lymphatic drainage is a new choice in the field of physical therapy. The material and the original concept of the taping technique were introduced by Dr Kenso Kase in 1973. K-tape had been designed to allow 30-40% longitudinal stretch. It is composed of 100% cotton fibers and acrylic heat sensitive glue. Development of the technique for its administration is still ongoing. The paper discusses the case of a woman with breast cancer, in whom lymphedema occurred. The patient had three weeks of therapy. The treatment consisted of 12 manual lymphatic drainage, 12 pneumatic compressions and 3 applications of the KT method (due to the lack of standard multi-layer bandaging). During the measurement of oedema it was noted that KT had a significant effect on the reduction of lymphedema and accelerates healing effects compared to standard methods. PMID:26327833

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesio taping application in a patient with secondary lymphedema in breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taradaj, Jakub; Halski, Tomasz; Zduńczyk, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is one of the complications resulting from treatment. It is defined as arm oedema in the breast cancer patients caused by interruption of the flow of the axillary lymphatic system from surgery or radiation therapy, which results in the accumulation of fluid in the subcutaneous tissue of the arm, with a decrease in tissue distensibility around the joints and an increased weight of the extremity. Decongestive lymphatic therapy is common management for lymphedema. A program combining skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and compression therapy (multilayer bandage or garment) is recognised as the best practice in lymphedema management. Kinesio taping (KT) for lymphatic drainage is a new choice in the field of physical therapy. The material and the original concept of the taping technique were introduced by Dr Kenso Kase in 1973. K-tape had been designed to allow 30-40% longitudinal stretch. It is composed of 100% cotton fibers and acrylic heat sensitive glue. Development of the technique for its administration is still ongoing. The paper discusses the case of a woman with breast cancer, in whom lymphedema occurred. The patient had three weeks of therapy. The treatment consisted of 12 manual lymphatic drainage, 12 pneumatic compressions and 3 applications of the KT method (due to the lack of standard multi-layer bandaging). During the measurement of oedema it was noted that KT had a significant effect on the reduction of lymphedema and accelerates healing effects compared to standard methods.

  12. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  13. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  14. Diet and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  15. Long-Term Follow-Up of the E1199 Phase III Trial Evaluating the Role of Taxane and Schedule in Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Zhao, Fengmin; Martino, Silvana; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Perez, Edith A.; Saphner, Tom; Wolff, Antonio C.; Sledge, George W.; Wood, William C.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine long-term outcomes in a clinical trial evaluating the role of taxane type and schedule in operable breast cancer and evaluate the impact of obesity and black race on outcome. Patients and Methods A total of 4,954 eligible women with stage II to III breast cancer treated with four cycles of doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide were randomly assigned to receive paclitaxel or docetaxel every 3 weeks for four doses or weekly for 12 doses using a 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). Results are expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) from Cox proportional hazards models. All P values are two sided. Results When compared with the standard every-3-week paclitaxel arm, after a median follow-up of 12.1 years, DFS significantly improved and overall survival (OS) marginally improved only for the weekly paclitaxel (HR, 0.84; P = .011 and HR, 0.87; P = .09, respectively) and every-3-week docetaxel arms (HR, 0.79; P = .001 and HR, 0.86; P = .054, respectively). Weekly paclitaxel improved DFS and OS (HR, 0.69; P = .010 and HR, 0.69; P = .019, respectively) in triple-negative breast cancer. For hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–nonoverexpressing disease, no experimental arm improved OS, and black race and obesity were associated with increased risk of breast cancer recurrence and death. Conclusion Improved outcomes initially observed for weekly paclitaxel were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less pronounced with longer follow-up, although exploratory analysis suggested substantial benefit in triple-negative disease. Further research is required to understand why obesity and race influence clinical outcome in hormone receptor–positive disease. PMID:26077235

  16. An in vitro evaluation of graphene oxide reduced by Ganoderma spp. in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231)

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, JaeWoong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, graphene and graphene-related materials have attracted much attention due their unique properties, such as their physical, chemical, and biocompatibility properties. This study aimed to determine the cytotoxic effects of graphene oxide (GO) that is reduced biologically using Ganoderma spp. mushroom extracts in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Methods Herein, we describe a facile and green method for the reduction of GO using extracts of Ganoderma spp. as a reducing agent. GO was reduced without any hazardous chemicals in an aqueous solution, and the reduced GO was characterized using a range of analytical procedures. The Ganoderma extract (GE)-reduced GO (GE-rGO) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the toxicity of GE-rGO was evaluated using a sequence of assays such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, and reactive oxygen species generation in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Results The preliminary characterization of reduction of GO was confirmed by the red-shifting of the absorption peak for GE-rGO to 265 nm from 230 nm. The size of GO and GE-rGO was found to be 1,880 and 3,200 nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction results confirmed that reduction processes of GO and the processes of removing intercalated water molecules and the oxide groups. The surface functionalities and chemical natures of GO and GE-rGO were confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface morphologies of the synthesized graphene were analyzed using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy revealed single- and multilayer properties of GE-rGO. Atomic force microscopy images provided evidence for the formation of graphene

  17. 78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By... solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every... with breast cancer, and tens of thousands will die from it. As we observe National Breast...

  18. Breast cancer screening: controversy of impact.

    PubMed

    Berry, Donald A

    2013-08-01

    Few medical issues have been as controversial--or as political, at least in the United States-as the role of mammographic screening for breast cancer. The advantages of finding a cancer early seem obvious. Indeed, randomized trials evaluating screening mammography demonstrate a reduction in breast cancer mortality, but the benefits are less than one would hope. Moreover, the randomized trials are themselves subject to criticism, including that they are irrelevant in the modern era because most were conducted before chemotherapy and hormonal therapy became widely used. In this article I chronicle the evidence and controversies regarding mammographic screening, including attempts to assess the relative contributions of screening and therapy in the substantial decreases in breast cancer mortality that have been observed in many countries over the last 20-25 years. I emphasize the trade-off between harms and benefits depending on the woman's age and other risk factors. I also discuss ways for communicating the associated risks to women who have to decide whether screening (and what screening strategy) is right for them. PMID:24074796

  19. Do underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Gikas, Panagiotis D; Mansfield, Lucy; Mokbel, Kefah

    2004-01-01

    Although animal and laboratory studies suggest a possible link between certain chemicals used in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer development, there is no reliable evidence that underarm cosmetics use increases breast cancer risk in humans. This article reviews the evidence for and against the possible link between breast cancer and underarm cosmetics and highlights the need for further research to clarify this issue. PMID:15633477

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel triazole hybrids of curcumin mimics and their selective anticancer activity against breast and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Saini, Karan S; Gupta, Sonal; Sharma, Vikas; Yaseen Malik, Mohd; Chaturvedi, Swati; Bala, Veenu; Hamidullah; Thakur, Subhadra; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Konwar, Rituraj; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu Lal

    2016-09-01

    The anti-cancer property of curcumin, an active component of turmeric, is limited due to its poor solubility, stability and bioavailability. To enhance its efficacy, we designed a novel series of twenty-four monocarbonyl curcumin analogue-1,2,3-triazole conjugates and evaluated their anti-cancer activity towards endocrine related cancers. The new compounds (17-40) were synthesized through CuAAC click reaction and SAR analysis carried out. Out of these all, compound 17 showed most significant anti-cancer activity against prostate cancer cells with IC50 values of 8.8μM and 9.5μM in PC-3 and DU-145 cells, respectively. Another compound 26 showed significant anti-cancer activity against breast cancer cells with IC50 of 6μM, 10μM and 6.4μM in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells, respectively while maintaining low toxicity towards non-cancer originated cell line, HEK-293. Compounds 17 and 26 arrested cell cycle and induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells. Further, both of these compounds significantly down-regulated cell proliferation marker (PCNA), inhibited activation of cell survival protein (Akt phosphorylation), upregulated pro-apoptotic protein (Bax) and down-regulated anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2) in their respective cell lines. In addition, in vitro stability, solubility and plasma binding studies of the compounds 17 and 26 showed them to be metabolically stable. Thus, this study identified two new curcumin monocarbonyl-1,2,3-triazole conjugate compounds with more potent activity than curcumin against breast and prostate cancers. PMID:27496212

  1. [Survived breast cancer, but unemployed].

    PubMed

    Bruinvels, David J

    2014-01-01

    A recent Danish retrospective cohort study of 14,750 women concluded that the duration of the period of unemployment before breast cancer may be the most important determinant of unemployment following breast cancer treatment. This finding allows for the identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation. The generalizability of the findings of the Danish study is discussed in this article. Can these findings be applied to Dutch daily practice too? Further research is required to answer this question because of differences between the Danish and Dutch systems of social insurance. A similar Dutch retrospective cohort study is under way, and preliminary results are expected to be published in 2014. Findings from both studies may be used to develop rehabilitation and vocational therapy interventions aiming to prevent unemployment and to increase work participation. PMID:25004788

  2. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  3. Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kadakia, Kunal C.; Henry, N. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in premenopausal women. Multiple advances in local and systemic therapies have dramatically improved outcomes in women with HR+ early stage breast cancer. Despite these advances, early and late relapses occur. Therefore multiple adjuvant endocrine therapy trials have been conducted with the goal of decreasing breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Recently, large international trials evaluating extended endocrine therapy as well as ovarian suppression with and without tamoxifen or exemestane have been reported. These studies add to the large body of existing data related to adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer and provide additional therapeutic options in those at high risk of disease recurrence. This review will synthesize the most recent data and provide an evidenced based approach, highlighting quality-of-life concerns, when considering adjuvant endocrine therapies in premenopausal women. PMID:27058571

  4. Choices in Surgery for Older Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Vikram; Spiliopoulos, Markos K.; Audisio, Riccardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality worldwide. As the population ages and life expectancy increases, the burden of cancer on health services will increase. Older patients with breast cancer are becoming more suitable for surgery; tailored surgical techniques and increasing healthy life expectancy alongside improved assessment of patients are aiding this trend. Surgery is also becoming a favoured treatment of personal choice for older patient with breast cancer. Evidence shows that surgery is almost always feasible for the older patient with outcomes (survival, progression, and recurrence rates) comparable to younger groups and superior to non-surgical treatments. We aim to describe the current status of surgery for the older patient with breast cancer, showing it is an option that should not be denied. Surgery should always be considered regardless of age, after evaluation of co-morbidities. PMID:24715825

  5. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  7. Prognostic molecular markers in early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, Francisco J; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N

    2004-01-01

    A multitude of molecules involved in breast cancer biology have been studied as potential prognostic markers. In the present review we discuss the role of established molecular markers, as well as potential applications of emerging new technologies. Those molecules used routinely to make treatment decisions in patients with early-stage breast cancer include markers of proliferation (e.g. Ki-67), hormone receptors, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Tumor markers shown to have prognostic value but not used routinely include cyclin D1 and cyclin E, urokinase-like plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor, and cathepsin D. The level of evidence for other molecular markers is lower, in part because most studies were retrospective and not adequately powered, making their findings unsuitable for choosing treatments for individual patients. Gene microarrays have been successfuly used to classify breast cancers into subtypes with specific gene expression profiles and to evaluate prognosis. RT-PCR has also been used to evaluate expression of multiple genes in archival tissue. Proteomics technologies are in development. PMID:15084231

  8. RECQL4 helicase has oncogenic potential in sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek Ma; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Moseley, Paul; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Yt; Ellis, Ian O; Wang, Lisa L; Zhao, Yongliang; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-03-01

    RECQL4 helicase is a molecular motor that unwinds DNA, a process essential during DNA replication and DNA repair. Germ-line mutations in RECQL4 cause type II Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), characterized by a premature ageing phenotype and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is widely considered to be a tumour suppressor, although its role in human breast cancer is largely unknown. As the RECQL4 gene is localized to chromosome 8q24, a site frequently amplified in sporadic breast cancers, we hypothesized that it may play an oncogenic role in breast tumourigenesis. To address this, we analysed large cohorts for gene copy number changes (n = 1977), mRNA expression (n = 1977) and protein level (n = 1902). Breast cancer incidence was also explored in 58 patients with type II RTS. DNA replication dynamics and chemosensitivity was evaluated in RECQL4-depleted breast cancer cells in vitro. Amplification or gain in gene copy number (30.6%), high-level mRNA expression (51%) and high levels of protein (23%) significantly associated with aggressive tumour behaviour, including lymph node positivity, larger tumour size, HER2 overexpression, ER-negativity, triple-negative phenotypes and poor survival. RECQL4 depletion impaired the DNA replication rate and increased chemosensitivity in cultured breast cancer cells. Thus, although recognized as a 'safe guardian of the genome', our data provide compelling evidence that RECQL4 is tumour promoting in established breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  10. Breast cancer detection by holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woisetschlaeger, Jakob; Sheffer, Daniel B.; Mikati, H.; Somasundaram, Kavitha; Loughry, C. William; Chawla, Surendra K.; Wesolowski, Piotr J.

    1993-02-01

    The overall breast cancer mortality rate has remained unchanged the last 50 years. The most significant factor in the treatment is its early detection which will alter the mortality rate. In this investigation, the feasibility of holographic interferometry for the purpose of detecting breast cancer was examined. Optical setups were developed to enable the collection of holographic interferograms in vivo of asymptomatic breasts and those containing cancerous lesions. Different stressing concepts of holographic nondestructive testing and their applicability for the detection of breast cancer were tested.

  11. [Systemic therapy of breast cancer: practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsolt; Boér, Katalin; Dank, Magdolna; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Judit; Kövér, Erika; Pajkos, Gábor; Pikó, Béla; Rubovszky, Gábor; Eckhardt, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the practice guideline of systemic treatment of breast cancer and recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference. It reflects the recent international guidelines (ESMO, NCCN, ABC2, St Gallen's) irrespectively of the current financial opportunities. Here we follow the early - locally advanced - locally relapsed - metastatic breast cancer line for didactic considerations and we discuss the different subgroups of breast cancer based on hormone receptor and HER2 receptor status. Diagnosis and treatment options of rare clinical entities are summarised at the end of the paper. PMID:27579723

  12. Using hair to screen for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Kearsley, John; Irving, Tom; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Cookson, David

    1999-03-01

    We have studied hair using fibre X-ray diffraction studies with synchrotron radiation and find that hair from breast-cancer patients has a different intermolecular structure to hair from healthy subjects. These changes are seen in all samples of scalp and pubic hair taken from women diagnosed with breast cancer. All the hair samples from women who tested positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, which is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, also show these changes. Because our results are so consistent, we propose that such hair analyses may be used as a simple, non-invasive screening method for breast cancer.

  13. Choice of study endpoint significantly impacts the results of breast cancer trials evaluating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Hutton, Brian; Dranitsaris, George; Vandermeer, Lisa; Smith, Stephanie; Clemons, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endpoints can be used to evaluate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These endpoints reflect the various combinations of vomiting, nausea and rescue antiemetic use in the acute (0-24 h), delayed (>24-120 h) and overall (0-120 h) periods after chemotherapy. As the choice of outcome measure could potentially change the interpretation of clinical trial results, we evaluated CINV rates using different endpoints on a single dataset from a prospective cohort. Data from 177 breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy was used to calculate CINV control rates using the 15 most commonly reported CINV endpoints. As nausea remains such a significant symptom, we explored the frequency at which pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical company-funded studies included measures of nausea in their primary study endpoint. CINV control rates ranged from 12.5 %, 95 % (CI 7.6-17.4 %) for total control (no vomiting, no nausea and no rescue medication) in the overall period to 77.4 %, 95 % (CI 71.2-83.6 %) for no vomiting in the overall period. Similar differences were found in the acute and delayed periods. Non-pharmaceutical company-funded trials were more likely to include a measure of nausea in the primary study outcome (9/18, 50 %) than pharmaceutical-funded trials (1/12, 8.3 %). The choice of trial endpoint has an important impact on reported CINV control rates and could significantly impact on interpretation of the results. Primary endpoints of studies, including those mandated by regulatory bodies, should account for nausea to reflect patient experience. Reporting of endpoints should be more comprehensive to allow for cross-trial comparisons.

  14. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  15. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  16. Urban Endocrine Disruptors Targeting Breast Cancer Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-02-15

    Humans are exposed to a huge amount of environmental pollutants called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These molecules interfere with the homeostasis of the body, usually through mimicking natural hormones leading to activation or blocking of their receptors. Many of these compounds have been associated with a broad range of diseases including the development or increased susceptibility to breast cancer, the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Thus, this article presents a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) to evaluate the affinity of proteins related to breast cancer, such as ESR1, ERBB2, PGR, BCRA1, and SHBG, among others, with EDCs from urban sources. A blind docking strategy was employed to screen each protein-ligand pair in triplicate in AutoDock Vina 2.0, using the computed binding affinities as ranking criteria. The three-dimensional structures were previously obtained from EDCs DataBank and Protein Data Bank, prepared and optimized by SYBYL X-2.0. Some of the chemicals that exhibited the best affinity scores for breast cancer proteins in each category were 1,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, bisphenol A derivatives, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid, and benzo(a)pyrene, for catalase, several proteins, sex hormone-binding globulin, and cytochrome P450 1A2, respectively. An experimental validation of this approach was performed with a complex that gave a moderate binding affinity in silico, the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and bisphenol A (BPA) complex. The protein was obtained using DNA recombinant technology and the physical interaction with BPA assessed through spectroscopic techniques. BPA binds on the recombinant SHBG, and this results in an increase of its α helix content. In short, this work shows the potential of several EDCs to bind breast cancer associated proteins as a tool to prioritize compounds to perform in vitro analysis to benefit the regulation or exposure prevention by the

  17. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials.

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  19. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  20. Myeloperoxidase genotype, fruit and vegetable consumption, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Gaudet, Mia M; Britton, Julie A; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Josephy, P David; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2004-10-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an antimicrobial enzyme in the breast, generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) endogenously. An MPO G463A polymorphism exists in the promoter region, with the variant A allele conferring lower transcription activity than the common G allele. Because oxidative stress may play a role in breast carcinogenesis, we evaluated MPO genotypes in relation to breast cancer risk among 1,011 cases and 1,067 controls from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (1996-1997). We also assessed the potential modifying effects of dietary antioxidants and hormonally related risk factors on these relationships. Women over 20 years with incident breast cancer who were residents of Nassau and Suffolk Counties, NY, were identified as potential cases. Population-based controls were frequency matched by 5-year age groups. Genotyping was performed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) technology, and suspected breast cancer risk factors and usual dietary intake were assessed during an in-person interview. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Having at least one A allele was associated with an overall 13% reduction in breast cancer risk. When consumption of fruits and vegetables and specific dietary antioxidants were dichotomized at the median, inverse associations with either GA or AA genotypes were most pronounced among women who consumed higher amounts of total fruits and vegetables (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.97); this association was not noted among the low-consumption group (P for interaction = 0.04). Relationships were strongest among premenopausal women. Results from this first study of MPO genotypes and breast cancer risk indicate that MPO variants, related to reduced generation of ROS, are associated with decreased breast cancer risk, and emphasize the importance of fruit and vegetable consumption in reduction of breast

  1. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Non-Metastatic, Node Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer That is in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    HER2/Neu Negative; No Evidence of Disease; One or More Positive Axillary Nodes; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  3. International guidelines for management of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) from the European School of Oncology (ESO)-MBC Task Force: Surveillance, staging, and evaluation of patients with early-stage and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Thomssen, Christoph; Cardoso, Fatima; Cameron, David; Cufer, Tanja; Fallowfield, Lesley; Francis, Prudence A; Kyriakides, Stella; Pagani, Olivia; Senkus, Elzbieta; Costa, Alberto; Winer, Eric P

    2013-06-01

    In clinical practice, the surveillance and follow-up of patients with breast cancer (BC) is quite variable. At the 7th European Breast Cancer Conference, the ESO-MBC Task Force convened a series of lectures, followed by open debate, on the use of physical examination, imaging, and laboratory tests in patients with early-stage BC, and for restaging evaluations and follow-up among patients with MBC. Based on the available data, the Task Force recommends against intensive, routine radiologic or blood-based surveillance (with the exception of mammography) in patients with early-stage BC. As systemic therapies for MBC continue to improve, this question might be re-visited in the context of a carefully controlled clinical trial in specific BC subtypes. For patients with MBC, response to therapy should generally be assessed 2-3 months after initiation of treatment, and thereafter every 2-4 months for endocrine therapy or every 2-4 cycles for chemotherapy, depending on the dynamics of the disease, the location and extent of metastatic involvement, and type of treatment. Additional testing should be performed irrespective of the planned intervals if progression of disease is suspected (e.g. in the case of specific symptoms). Use of tumor markers is not recommended for surveillance of early-stage patients, but may be helpful in monitoring response to therapy in patients with metastatic disease. However, change in tumor markers alone should not be used for decision-making. Moving forward, enhanced efforts to document quality of life over time should be made in order to more fully evaluate the risk/benefit ratio of available options.

  4. Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159652.html Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too Women with BRCA1 may want to ... increased risk for a deadly form of uterine cancer, a new study finds. The BRCA1 gene mutation ...

  5. Breast cancer-specific mortality in small-sized tumor with node-positive breast cancer: a nation-wide study in Korean breast cancer society.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jai Min; Lee, Hyouk Jin; Yoon, Tae In; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Soo Jung; Jung, Jin Hyang; Chae, Byung Joo; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Se Kyung; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-10-01

    Tumor size and number of lymph node (LN) metastases are well known as the most important prognostic factors of breast cancer. We hypothesized that very small breast cancers with LN metastasis represent a progressive biologic behavior and evaluated tumor size stratified by LN metastasis. Data between 1990 and 2010 were obtained retrospectively from the Korean Breast Cancer Society Registry with inclusion criteria of female, non-metastatic, unilateral, and T1/2 breast cancer. We collected the following variables: age at surgery, tumor size, number of LN metastases, nuclear grade (NG), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status. Patient characteristics were compared by means of independent t-tests for continuous variables and the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Kaplan-Meier curves, with corresponding results of log-rank tests, were constructed for breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). Five- and eight-year breast cancer-specific mortality (BCSM) was obtained in groups of 300 patients, followed by smoothing according to the confidence interval using the lowess method. We identified 39,826 breast cancer patients who met the inclusion criteria. Among them, 1433 (3.6 %) patients died due to breast cancer. The median follow-up duration was 63.4 (3-255) months. In the multivariate analysis, age at surgery, NG, LVI, subtype, and tumor size-nodal interactions were independently associated with BCSM. The N1 group had lower BCSS for T1a than T1b. The N2+ group also had lower BCSS for T1b than T1c or T2. In the N1 group of tumors smaller than 10 mm, 5- and 8-year BCSM decreased with larger tumor size. Patients with very small tumors with LN metastasis have decreased BCSM according to increase tumor size. Small tumors with LN metastasis could have aggressive biological behavior. PMID:27590199

  6. Melatonin, environmental light, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, V; Spence, D W; Pandi-Perumal, S R; Trakht, I; Esquifino, A I; Cardinali, D P; Maestroni, G J

    2008-04-01

    Although many factors have been suggested as causes for breast cancer, the increased incidence of the disease seen in women working in night shifts led to the hypothesis that the suppression of melatonin by light or melatonin deficiency plays a major role in cancer development. Studies on the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea experimental models of human breast cancer indicate that melatonin is effective in reducing cancer development. In vitro studies in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line have shown that melatonin exerts its anticarcinogenic actions through a variety of mechanisms, and that it is most effective in estrogen receptor (ER) alpha-positive breast cancer cells. Melatonin suppresses ER gene, modulates several estrogen dependent regulatory proteins and pro-oncogenes, inhibits cell proliferation, and impairs the metastatic capacity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The anticarcinogenic action on MCF-7 cells has been demonstrated at the physiological concentrations of melatonin attained at night, suggesting thereby that melatonin acts like an endogenous antiestrogen. Melatonin also decreases the formation of estrogens from androgens via aromatase inhibition. Circulating melatonin levels are abnormally low in ER-positive breast cancer patients thereby supporting the melatonin hypothesis for breast cancer in shift working women. It has been postulated that enhanced endogenous melatonin secretion is responsible for the beneficial effects of meditation as a form of psychosocial intervention that helps breast cancer patients.

  7. Interactions between breast cancer susceptibility loci and menopausal hormone therapy in relationship to breast cancer in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Barrdahl, Myrto; Lindström, Sara; Travis, Ruth C; Auer, Paul L; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Eliassen, A Heather; Gapstur, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Gunter, Marc; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Peeters, Petra H M; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Yang, Xiaohong R; Prentice, Ross L; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Canzian, Federico; Kraft, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Current use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has important implications for postmenopausal breast cancer risk, and observed associations might be modified by known breast cancer susceptibility loci. To provide the most comprehensive assessment of interactions of prospectively collected data on MHT and 17 confirmed susceptibility loci with invasive breast cancer risk, a nested case-control design among eight cohorts within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium was used. Based on data from 13,304 cases and 15,622 controls, multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Effect modification of current and past use was evaluated on the multiplicative scale. P values <1.5 × 10(-3) were considered statistically significant. The strongest evidence of effect modification was observed for current MHT by 9q31-rs865686. Compared to never users of MHT with the rs865686 GG genotype, the association between current MHT use and breast cancer risk for the TT genotype (OR 1.79, 95 % CI 1.43-2.24; P interaction = 1.2 × 10(-4)) was less than expected on the multiplicative scale. There are no biological implications of the sub-multiplicative interaction between MHT and rs865686. Menopausal hormone therapy is unlikely to have a strong interaction with the common genetic variants associated with invasive breast cancer. PMID:26802016

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Initial Biological Evaluation of a Steroidal Anti-estrogen–Doxorubicin Bioconjugate for Targeting Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Kinh-Luan; Sawant, Rupa R.; Ronga, Victoria; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Hanson, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of our program to develop breast cancer specific therapeutic agents we have synthesized a conjugate-agent that is a conjugate of the steroidal anti-estrogen and the potent cytotoxin doxorubicin. In this effort we employed a modular assembly approach to prepare a novel 11β-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen functionalized with an azido-tetraethylene glycol moiety which could be coupled to a complementary doxorubicin benzoyl hydrazone functionalized with a propargyl tetraethylene glycol moiety. Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition chemistry gave the final hybrid that was evaluated for selective uptake and cytotoxicity in ER(+)-MCF-7 and ER(−)-MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. The results demonstrated that the presence of the anti-estrogenic component in the hybrid compound was critical for selectivity and cytotoxicity in ER(+)-MCF-7 human breast cancer cells as the hybrid was ~70-fold more potent than doxorubicin in inhibition of cell proliferation and promoting cell death. PMID:22404783

  9. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  10. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  11. Functional Radionuclide Imaging, In-Vitro Radioiodine Uptake Estimation and RT-PCR in the Evaluation of Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) Expression and Functionality in Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J K; Patel, R B; Damle, A A; Nair, N; Badwe, R A; Basu, S

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy in females, which is considered as a systemic disease, whose treatment involves combined modality including systemic as well as local treatment. Recent studies have shown that breast cancer also expresses Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) gene, like in the thyroid, which is the factor responsible for the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, enabling radioiodine therapy of thyroid disorders. This study aimed to evaluate various radionuclide imaging characteristics, in vitro radioiodine uptake (RAIU) and evaluation of NIS expression by using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) to explore sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression and iodine uptake in breast cancer and to explor e whether radioiodine can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Ways of differential regulation of NIS expression in breast cancer has also been explored. Female patients with palpable breast lump and histologically proven infiltrating duct carcinoma were taken up for the study, which included 50 females of mean age 49 years. (range: 23-73 years). The patients were categorized into different groups, depending on the type of the study performed. The uptake patterns in various imaging modalities were analyzed and compared with invitro and RT-PCR studies. 68 % of breast cancer cases showed (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake at the initial images. This finding could partly be due to tumor vascularity, which is usually higher compared to the normal tissues. The uptake in the delayed imaging could be related to that due to NIS in the breast. Use of perchlorate or stable iodine did not alter the pertechnetate uptake pattern in breast tumor. Good correlation between (99m)Tc-pertechnetate and (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin uptake in breast cancer was demonstrated. In vitro radioactive iodine uptake in the breast tumor was significantly higher than that in the normal breast tissue. Only 42 % of breast tumor samples studied using RT-PCR showed NIS

  12. Recent advances in breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Newman, J

    1999-01-01

    Mammography is the best technique currently available for early detection of breast cancer, but it has limitations. Several new techniques are under investigation that may provide valuable complementary images. This article discusses some of the most promising adjuncts to film-screen mammography, including digital mammography, ultrasound of the breast, breast MR, scintimammography and sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy.

  13. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer (Arabic) سرطان الثدي - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Breast Biopsy 乳房活检 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  14. Evaluation of the progesterone receptor status in breast cancer using three different antibodies: a comparison by Allred score system

    PubMed Central

    Daltoé, Renata Dalmaschio; Madeira, Klesia Pirola; de Carvalho, Alex Assis; de Rezende, Lucas Cunha Dias; Silva, Ian Victor; Rangel, Leticia Batista Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) hormonal receptors status is assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC), a specific, sensitive, and accessible method that guide breast cancer treatment. In this study, we evaluated progesterone receptor (PR) expression in 53 BC cases using 3 anti-PgR antibodies (AB): monoclonal (SP42 and PgR636) and polyclonal ab62621. Primary BC cases (with signed informed consent) were used to generate tissue microarray platforms, where PR expression was accessed by IHC and evaluated by the Allred score. Categorical and quantitative data are shown in percentage and mean, respectively. Concordance (CON) and correlation among ABs were analyzed by Kappa factor (Κ), Spearman’s correlation coefficient (ρ) or intraclass correlation coefficient. Staining patterns of each AB were compared by paired T-Test. We noted poor CON and Κ between ab62621 vs SP42 (CON=64.1%; Κ=0.247), and ab62621 vs PgR636 (CON=62.3%; Κ=0.204), but higher CON between SP42 vs PgR636 (CON 90.6%; Κ=0.738). Data were corroborated by Mc Nemar statistical test (p=0.019, p=0.014 and p>0.05, respectively). Regarding staining intensity (SI) among PgR+ samples, we found higher proportion of weak staining and lower SI for ab62621 (48.3%; mean IS=1.6), when compared to SP42 (20.0%, mean IS=2.1, T-test p<0.01) and PgR636 (2.3, 21.9%, T-test p<0.01). Within the entire sample, similar results were observed following ρ: SP42 vs PgR636 (ρ=0.8103); ab62621 vs SP42 (ρ=0.3524); ab62621 vs PgR636 (ρ=0.4075). As for proportion of stained cells and proportion score (PS), among PgR+ samples, the mean values for ab62621 (75.4%; 4.8) were significantly higher than those of SP42 (56.3%, 4.3; T-test p<0.01) and RPG636 (60.1%; 4.2; T-test p<0.01). Similar data were found after analyzing PS for the entire sample: SP42 vs PgR636 (ρ=0.8588); SP42 vs ab62621 (ρ=0.4832); RPG636 vs ab62621 (ρ=0.4050). Our data indicate that anti-PgR monoclonal ABs, PgR636 and SP42, are, unlike ab62621, equally suitable to test BC Pg

  15. 78 FR 57391 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women (ACBCYW)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young... and evaluation of evidence-based activities designed to prevent breast cancer (particularly among... Discussed: The agenda will include discussions on the current and emerging topics related to breast...

  16. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  17. Interleukin-8 in breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Todorović-Raković, Nataša; Milovanović, Jelena

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemokine that has an autocrine and/or paracrine tumor-promoting role and significant potential as a prognostic and/or predictive cancer biomarker. In breast cancer, which is mostly determined by expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), IL-8 could play a specific role. IL-8 is highly expressed in ER- breast cancers, but it increases invasiveness and metastatic potential of both ER- and ER+ breast cancer cells. It is also highly expressed in HER2+ breast cancers. Because of the complex crosstalk between these receptors and IL-8, its role is mainly determined by delicate balance in their signaling pathways. Therefore, the main point of this review was to analyze the possible influence of IL-8 in breast cancer progression related to its interaction with ER and HER2 and the consequent therapeutic implications of these relations.

  18. Angiogenic response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy evaluated with parametric histogram from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Lu, Yen-Shen; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate angiogenic compositions and tumour response in the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Thirteen patients with LABC underwent serial DCE MRI during the course of chemotherapy. DCE MRI was quantified using a two-compartment model on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Analysis of parametric histograms of amplitude, exchange rate kout and peak enhancement over the whole tumour was performed. The distribution patterns of histograms were correlated with the tumour response. Initial kurtosis and standard deviation of amplitude before chemotherapy correlated with tumour response, r = 0.63 and r = 0.61, respectively. Comparing the initial values with the values after the first course of chemotherapy, tumour response was associated with a decrease in standard deviation of amplitude (r = 0.79), and an increase in kurtosis and a decrease in standard deviation of kout (r = 0.57 and 0.57, respectively). Comparing the initial values with the values after completing the chemotherapy, tumours with better response were associated with an increase in kurtosis (r = 0.62), a decrease in mean (r = 0.84) and standard deviation (r = 0.77) of amplitude, and a decrease in mean of peak enhancement (r = 0.71). Our results suggested that tumours with better response tended to alter their internal compositions from heterogeneous to homogeneous distributions and a decrease in peak enhancement after chemotherapy. Serial analyses of parametric histograms of DCE MRI-derived angiogenic parameters are potentially useful to monitor the response of angiogenic compositions of a tumour throughout the course of chemotherapy, and might predict tumour response early in the course.

  19. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer.

  20. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer. PMID:26985847

  1. EGFR and HER2 signaling in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sirkisoon, Sherona R; Carpenter, Richard L; Rimkus, Tadas; Miller, Lance; Metheny-Barlow, Linda; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer occurs in approximately 1 in 8 women and 1 in 37 women with breast cancer succumbed to the disease. Over the past decades, new diagnostic tools and treatments have substantially improved the prognosis of women with local diseases. However, women with metastatic disease still have a dismal prognosis without effective treatments. Among different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, the HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes typically have higher rates of metastasis to the brain. Basal-like metastatic breast tumors frequently express EGFR. Consequently, HER2- and EGFR-targeted therapies are being used in the clinic and/or evaluated in clinical trials for treating breast cancer patients with brain metastases. In this review, we will first provide an overview of the HER2 and EGFR signaling pathways. The roles that EGFR and HER2 play in breast cancer metastasis to the brain will then be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the preclinical and clinical effects of EGFR- and HER2-targeted therapies on breast cancer metastasis.

  2. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  3. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  4. Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D L

    1997-01-01

    In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed.

  5. Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D L

    1997-01-01

    In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed. PMID:11541150

  6. Development and evaluation of an instrument to measure health-related quality of life in Cuban breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Josefina; Nápoles, Misleidy; Pérez, Inés; Ordaz, Niurka; Luzardo, Mario; Fernández, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although modern technology has extended the survival of breast cancer patients, treatment's adverse effects impact their health-related quality of life. Currently, no instrument exists capable of identifying the range of problems affecting breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Cuba's socioeconomic and cultural context. OBJECTIVES Construct and validate an instrument to measure the effects of breast cancer and radiotherapy on health-related quality of life in Cuban patients. METHODS The study was conducted at the Oncology and Radiobiology Institute, Havana, Cuba, from January 2010 through December 2011. Inclusion criteria were: adult female, histological diagnosis of breast cancer, treated with ambulatory radiotherapy, and written informed consent; patients unable to communicate orally or in writing, or who had neurologic or psychiatric conditions were excluded. Development phase: focus groups guided by a list of questions were carried out with 50 women. The patients reported 61 problems affecting their health-related quality-of-life. A nominal group (six oncologists and two nurses) identified the same problems. A syntactic analysis of the information was performed to create items for study and measurement scales. Content validity was determined by a nominal group of seven experts using professional judgment. Another 20 patients were selected to evaluate face validity. Validation phase: the instrument was applied to 230 patients at three different points: before radiotherapy, at the end of radiotherapy and four weeks after radiotherapy was concluded. Reliability, construct validity, discriminant validity, predictive validity, interpretability and response burden were evaluated. RESULTS The final instrument developed had 33 items distributed in 4 domains: physical functioning, psychological functioning, social and family relationships, and physical and emotional adverse effects of disease and treatment. There were two discrete items: perceived

  7. Evaluation of Four Techniques Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Comprehensive Locoregional Irradiation of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean; Marsh, Robin; Masi, Kathryn; Griffith, Kent A.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To establish optimal intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for treating the left breast and regional nodes, using moderate deep-inspiration breath hold. Methods and Materials: We developed four IMRT plans of differing complexity for each of 10 patients following lumpectomy for left breast cancer. A dose of 60 Gy was prescribed to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 52.2 Gy to the breast and supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes. Two plans used inverse-planned beamlet techniques: a 9-field technique, with nine equispaced axial beams, and a tangential beamlet technique, with three to five ipsilateral beams. The third plan (a segmental technique) used a forward-planned multisegment technique, and the fourth plan (a segmental blocked technique) was identical but included a block to limit heart dose. Dose--volume histograms were generated, and metrics chosen for comparison were analyzed using the paired t test. Results: Mean heart and left anterior descending coronary artery doses were similar with the tangential beamlet and segmental blocked techniques but higher with the segmental and 9-field techniques (mean paired difference of 15.1 Gy between segmental and tangential beamlet techniques, p < 0.001). Substantial volumes of contralateral tissue received dose with the 9-field technique (mean right breast V2, 58.9%; mean right lung V2, 75.3%). Minimum dose to {>=}95% of breast PTV was, on average, 45.9 Gy with tangential beamlet, 45.0 Gy with segmental blocked, 51.4 Gy with segmental, and 50.2 Gy with 9-field techniques. Coverage of the internal mammary region was substantially better with the two beamlet techniques than with the segmental blocked technique. Conclusions: Compared to the 9-field beamlet and segmental techniques, a tangential beamlet IMRT technique reduced exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target coverage.

  8. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique.

  9. Legitimising fatigue after breast-cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackereth, Peter; Farrell, Carole; Bardy, Joy; Molassiotis, Alexander; Finnegan-John, Jenny

    This study aimed to explore the experience of women living with fatigue following chemotherapy for breast cancer. Six focus groups were conducted (n=40); all participants had taken part in a multi-site acupuncture trial. There were three to seven people per focus group. Additionally, two people attended one-to-one interviews and four people provided written responses to the trigger questions. The audiotapes from these sessions were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. Participants raised concerns about fatigue possibly being a symptom of the cancer coming back or a sign of senility. Respondents described the effects of fatigue on relationships, sexuality, social life, home life and returning to work. The Coping with Fatigue booklet ( Macmillan Cancer Support, 2011 ) was discussed in terms of legitimising the experience of cancer-related fatigue and explaining symptoms to family and work colleagues. More research work is required to evaluate non-pharmaceutical interventions and advice to support women living with fatigue after chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  10. Male breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, IS

    2009-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

  11. Design and evaluation of a theory-based, culturally relevant outreach model for breast and cervical cancer screening for Latina immigrants

    PubMed Central

    White, Kari; Garces, Isabel C.; Bandura, Lisa; McGuire, Allison A.; Scarinci, Isabel C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Breast and cervical cancer are common among Latinas, but screening rates among foreign-born Latinas are relatively low. In this article we describe the design and implementation of a theory-based (PEN-3) outreach program to promote breast and cervical cancer screening to Latina immigrants, and evaluate the program’s effectiveness. Methods We used data from self-administered questionnaires completed at six annual outreach events to examine the sociodemographic characteristics of attendees and evaluate whether the program reached the priority population – foreign-born Latina immigrants with limited access to health care and screening services. To evaluate the program’s effectiveness in connecting women to screening, we examined the proportion and characteristics of women who scheduled and attended Pap smear and mammography appointments. Results Among the 782 Latinas who attended the outreach program, 60% and 83% had not had a Pap smear or mammogram, respectively, in at least a year. Overall, 80% scheduled a Pap smear and 78% scheduled a mammogram. Women without insurance, who did not know where to get screening and had not been screened in the last year were more likely to schedule appointments (p < 0.05). Among women who scheduled appointments, 65% attended their Pap smear and 79% attended the mammogram. We did not identify significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics associated with appointment attendance. Conclusions Using a theoretical approach to outreach design and implementation, it is possible to reach a substantial number of Latina immigrants and connect them to cancer screening services. PMID:22870569

  12. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  14. Unique features of breast cancer in Asian women--breast cancer in Taiwan as an example.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2010-02-28

    Breast carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in women and is known to arise from a multifactorial process, the effect of reproductive risk factors strongly supporting a hormonal role in its etiology. Breast cancer in Asia is characterized by a lower incidence than in Western populations, but is still the leading type of cancer in Asian women, and a significant increasing tread indicates that it is an issue of particular public health importance. Asian breast cancer is characterized by early tumor onset, showing a relatively younger median age at diagnosis. Recently, scientists began to explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying breast cancer formation at the molecular level. Both a candidate-gene approach and genome-wide association studies have yielded crucial insights into breast cancer susceptibility genes initiating breast tumorigenesis. As expected, ethnic/racial variation in the genotypic frequency of these genes results in differences in breast cancer incidence in different populations. Furthermore, the question of how important these genes are in Asian breast cancer remains to be explored. It has been demonstrated that gene expression profiles and gene sets are prognostic and predictive for patients with breast cancer. Originally, due to its early onset, it was speculated that Asian breast cancer would have a higher frequency of the basal-like subtype of breast cancer, a molecular subtype characterized by poor differentiation, resulting in a relatively poor progression; however, recent findings do not support this speculation. The frequency of the luminal-A subtype of breast cancer, characterized by estrogen receptor expression, is similar to that in breast cancer in Caucasian, supporting the usefulness of hormone-based therapy in Asian breast cancer.

  15. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. Materials and methods A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. Results All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. Conclusions The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy. PMID:23497676

  16. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  18. The Third International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive and deadly form of breast cancer. Disease-specific research and conferences have been organized since 2008 with the intent to bring together experts in various disciplines. This report focus on the Third International IBC Conference held in Philadelphia on December 2012. PMID:24188125

  19. Breast, Cervical Cancer More Deadly in Developing Nations: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Health News on: Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  20. Depression in older breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women .The 5-year survival rate for this tumour is nowadays 85%, and the 61% of these women are still alive at 15 years. When depression symptoms are present as a consequence of breast cancer treatments, they may interfere negatively with patients’ quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of breast cancer treatment on the quality of life and the impact of depression on the health-related life. Methods We enrolled 173 women aged 65-75 years with early stage breast cancer diagnosed over the last 10 years, initially recruited to participate in a study examining heath-related quality of life in the first 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Participants were divided into four groups: 1) 46 breast cancer survivors (aged 65-70); 2) 62 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 65-69); 3) 32 women with recurrent breast cancer after 10 years (aged 66-75); 4) 30 women in good health status (aged 60-70). The Geriatric Depression Scale was used as a routine part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Collection of data for the application of instruments, such as sociodemographic variables (age, educational level, social state) and clinical date (stage and time of the disease and treatment), was carried out by trained researcher assistants. Results Our results demonstrated the correlation between depression and previous cancer experiences. In fact, in patients with cancer experience, the grade of depression was significantly higher compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the patients with recurrent breast cancer were severely depressed compared to other groups. Conclusions A high percentage of participants were identified as having emotional and/or well being problems. Further investigations on the cause of depression problems cancer-related are needed. PMID:23173836

  1. Drinking green tea modestly reduces breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Shrubsole, Martha J; Lu, Wei; Chen, Zhi; Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Ying; Dai, Qi; Cai, Qiuyin; Gu, Kai; Ruan, Zhi Xian; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-02-01

    Green tea is a commonly consumed beverage in China. Epidemiological and animal data suggest tea and tea polyphenols may be preventive against various cancers, including breast cancer. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes catechol estrogens and tea polyphenols. The COMT rs4680 AA genotype leads to lower COMT activity, which may affect the relationship between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk. We evaluated whether regular green tea consumption was associated with breast cancer risk among 3454 incident cases and 3474 controls aged 20-74 y in a population-based case-control study conducted in Shanghai, China during 1996-2005. All participants were interviewed in person about green tea consumption habits, including age of initiation, duration of use, brew strength, and quantity of tea. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for green tea consumption measures and adjusted for age and other confounding factors. Compared with nondrinkers, regular drinking of green tea was associated with a slightly decreased risk for breast cancer (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.98). Among premenopausal women, reduced risk was observed for years of green tea drinking (P-trend = 0.02) and a dose-response relationship with the amount of tea consumed per month was also observed (P-trend = 0.046). COMT rs4680 genotypes did not have a modifying effect on the association of green tea intake with breast cancer risk. Drinking green tea may be weakly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer.

  2. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  3. No Association of the rs17822931 Polymorphism in ABCC11 with Breast Cancer Risk in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Na, Ann-Yae; Heo, Jin-Chul; Sung, Jin Young; Lee, Jong-Ha; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Kim, Dae-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    ABCC11 is reported to be associated with breast cancer. However, whether ABCC11 polymorphisms relate to breast cancer risk remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate any association of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17822931, in ABCC11 with breast cancer in Koreans. Genomic DNA samples of 170 women with breast cancer and 100 controls were assessed for SNP rs17822931 of ABCC11 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. A 27-bp deletion (Δ27) of ABCC11 was analyzed by PCR amplification. The genotype of SNP rs17822931 was confirmed to be AA in all samples from breast cancer patients and Δ27 was found in none of the samples. Our finding indicated that the SNP rs17822931 in ABCC11 is not associated with breast cancer. However, this study does provide information on fundamental genetic aspects of ABCC11 with regard to breast cancer risk in Koreans. PMID:27268641

  4. Reducing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast with a mobile, conformal shield during breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Macklis, R M; Crownover, R L; Crowe, J; Willoughby, T; Sohn, J

    1999-08-01

    During a standard course of breast radiotherapy, the contralateral breast generally receives approximately 2.5 to 6.0 Gy of scattered radiation. Although most studies have not found an overall increase in metachronous contralateral breast cancers in patients undergoing radiotherapy, a cohort of younger women may be genetically more susceptible to radiation-induced breast cancers and may thus be adversely affected by the scattered radiation. We are attempting to develop a simple, convenient, effective mechanism for minimizing the scattered radiation to the contralateral breast during the process of clinical breast radiotherapy. We therefore designed a conformal, platform-based breast shield consisting of 2.5 cm of molded lead in a mobile counterweighted polystyrene casing. This shield was intended to serve as a physical barrier to prevent both low and high energy scattered photons from the medial and lateral tangential fields. We conducted a prospective trial of 20 women, each woman serving as her own control. Each woman received breast radiotherapy with and without shield, and an array of thermoluminescent dosimeters was positioned across the contralateral breast to evaluate the in vivo dosimetry and the impact of the breast shield on surface absorption of scattered radiation. We found that the use of the breast shield reduced the median dose of scattered radiation by approximately 60% (p < 0.0001). This represented a median dose reduction of approximately 300 cGy at the nipple. The shield was easily positioned and added < 1 min to daily setup time. We conclude that the use of this sort of surface barrier shielding technique was feasible, effective, and practical for clinical use. The degree of scatter reduction accomplished through the use of this breast shield may be biologically significant, especially for those patients with biologic or epidemiologic risk factors that may predispose them to the development of radiogenic breast cancers. PMID:10440204

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of incidental irradiation to the axilla during whole breast radiotherapy for patients with left-sided early breast cancer in the IMRT era.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric parameters for incidental irradiation to the axilla during whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with WBRT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were enrolled in this study. Remnant breast tissue, 3 levels of the axilla, heart, and lung were delineated. We used 2 different radiotherapy methods: 3D-CRT with field-in-field technique and 7-field fixed-beam IMRT. The target coverage of IMRT was significantly better than that of 3D-CRT (Dmean: 49.72 ± 0.64 Gy vs 50.24 ± 0.66 Gy, P < 0.001; V45: 93.19 ± 1.40% vs 98.59 ± 0.30%, P < 0.001; V47.5: 86.43 ± 2.72% vs 95.00 ± 0.02%, P < 0.001, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). In the IMRT plan, a lower dose was delivered to a wider region of the heart and lung. Significantly lower axillary irradiation was shown throughout each level of axilla by IMRT compared to 3D-CRT (Dmean for level I: 42.58 ± 5.31 Gy vs 14.49 ± 6.91 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for level II: 26.25 ± 10.43 Gy vs 3.41 ± 3.11 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for level III: 6.26 ± 4.69 Gy vs 1.16 ± 0.51 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for total axilla: 33.9 ± 6.89 Gy vs 9.96 ± 5.21 Gy, P < 0.001, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). In conclusion, the incidental dose delivered to the axilla was significantly lower for IMRT compared to 3D-CRT. Therefore, IMRT, which only includes the breast parenchyma, should be cautiously used in patients with limited positive sentinel lymph nodes and who do not undergo complete axillary lymph node dissection. PMID:27368030

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of incidental irradiation to the axilla during whole breast radiotherapy for patients with left-sided early breast cancer in the IMRT era

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric parameters for incidental irradiation to the axilla during whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with WBRT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were enrolled in this study. Remnant breast tissue, 3 levels of the axilla, heart, and lung were delineated. We used 2 different radiotherapy methods: 3D-CRT with field-in-field technique and 7-field fixed-beam IMRT. The target coverage of IMRT was significantly better than that of 3D-CRT (Dmean: 49.72 ± 0.64 Gy vs 50.24 ± 0.66 Gy, P < 0.001; V45: 93.19 ± 1.40% vs 98.59 ± 0.30%, P < 0.001; V47.5: 86.43 ± 2.72% vs 95.00 ± 0.02%, P < 0.001, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). In the IMRT plan, a lower dose was delivered to a wider region of the heart and lung. Significantly lower axillary irradiation was shown throughout each level of axilla by IMRT compared to 3D-CRT (Dmean for level I: 42.58 ± 5.31 Gy vs 14.49 ± 6.91 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for level II: 26.25 ± 10.43 Gy vs 3.41 ± 3.11 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for level III: 6.26 ± 4.69 Gy vs 1.16 ± 0.51 Gy, P < 0.001; Dmean for total axilla: 33.9 ± 6.89 Gy vs 9.96 ± 5.21 Gy, P < 0.001, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). In conclusion, the incidental dose delivered to the axilla was significantly lower for IMRT compared to 3D-CRT. Therefore, IMRT, which only includes the breast parenchyma, should be cautiously used in patients with limited positive sentinel lymph nodes and who do not undergo complete axillary lymph node dissection. PMID:27368030

  7. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  8. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  9. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  10. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT.

  11. Is clinical breast examination important for breast cancer detection?

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, L.; Hogue, J.C.; Desbiens, C.; Poirier, B.; Poirier, E.; Boudreau, D.; Joyal, M.; Diorio, C.; Duchesne, N.; Chiquette, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening clinical breast examination (cbe) is controversial; the use of cbe is declining not only as a screening tool, but also as a diagnostic tool. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of cbe in breast cancer detection in a tertiary care centre for breast diseases. Methods This retrospective study of all breast cancers diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2010 at our centre categorized cases according to the mean of detection (cbe, mammography, or both). A cbe was considered “abnormal” in the presence of a mass, nipple discharge, skin or nipple retraction, edema, erythema, peau d’orange, or ulcers. Results During the study period, a complete dataset was available for 6333 treated primary breast cancers. Cancer types were ductal carcinoma in situ (15.3%), invasive ductal carcinoma (75.7%), invasive lobular carcinoma (9.0%), or others (2.2%). Of the 6333 cancers, 36.5% (n = 2312) were detected by mammography alone, 54.8% (n = 3470) by mammography and cbe, and 8.7% (n = 551) by physician-performed cbe alone (or 5.3% if considering ultrasonography). Invasive tumours diagnosed by cbe alone were more often triple-negative, her2-positive, node-positive, and larger than those diagnosed by mammography alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions A significant number of cancers would have been missed if cbe had not been performed. Compared with cancers detected by mammography alone, those detected by cbe had more aggressive features. Clinical breast examination is a very low-cost test that could improve the detection of breast cancer and could prompt breast ultrasonography in the case of a negative mammogram. PMID:27536182

  12. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  14. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-28

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  15. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Why Breast Cancer Risk by the Numbers Is Not Enough: Evaluation of a Decision Aid in Multi-Ethnic, Low-Numerate Women

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham; Aguirre, Alejandra; Smalletz, Cindy; David, Raven; Crew, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer risk assessment including genetic testing can be used to classify people into different risk groups with screening and preventive interventions tailored to the needs of each group, yet the implementation of risk-stratified breast cancer prevention in primary care settings is complex. Objective To address barriers to breast cancer risk assessment, risk communication, and prevention strategies in primary care settings, we developed a Web-based decision aid, RealRisks, that aims to improve preference-based decision-making for breast cancer prevention, particularly in low-numerate women. Methods RealRisks incorporates experience-based dynamic interfaces to communicate risk aimed at reducing inaccurate risk perceptions, with modules on breast cancer risk, genetic testing, and chemoprevention that are tailored. To begin, participants learn about risk by interacting with two games of experience-based risk interfaces, demonstrating average 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risk. We conducted four focus groups in English-speaking women (age ≥18 years), a questionnaire completed before and after interacting with the decision aid, and a semistructured group discussion. We employed a mixed-methods approach to assess accuracy of perceived breast cancer risk and acceptability of RealRisks. The qualitative analysis of the semistructured discussions assessed understanding of risk, risk models, and risk appropriate prevention strategies. Results Among 34 participants, mean age was 53.4 years, 62% (21/34) were Hispanic, and 41% (14/34) demonstrated low numeracy. According to the Gail breast cancer risk assessment tool (BCRAT), the mean 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risk were 1.11% (SD 0.77) and 7.46% (SD 2.87), respectively. After interacting with RealRisks, the difference in perceived and estimated breast cancer risk according to BCRAT improved for 5-year risk (P=.008). In the qualitative analysis, we identified potential barriers to adopting risk

  18. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  19. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  20. [Immunochemistry evaluation of HER2 status in infiltration breast cancer: technical protocol and interpretation guidelines].

    PubMed

    Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Balaton, André; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Le Doussal, Viviane

    2002-04-01

    In Europe, patients who may benefit from Herceptin((R)) (an HER2 targeted drug) are currently selected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Reliable detection of HER2 status is essential to the appropriate usage of Herceptin(R), because its specificity is limited to tumours overexpressing HER2. It is essential that the IHC evaluation of the HER2 status of a mammary carcinoma be optimized and reliable. This technical paper reviews the different steps of the IHC technique, the controls and, the rules for interpretation. The sensitivity of the IHC technique must be adjusted so as not to produce false negatives or false positives. As opposed to other methods, it can be carried out whatever the fixation conditions of the tissues. The interpretation of the immunostains also requires training; it is fraught with problems for intermediate positivities. The ideal score to evaluate HER2 status has not yet been defined. It will thus be necessary to report the percentage of stained cells, the intensity of the staining, and, in respect to Herceptin((R)) treatment, the HercepTest scoring system (recommended in the package insert). Once acquired, this knowledge must be perpetuated by the observation of rules of good technical practice (internal and external controls, quality assurance programs). FISH should be used for complementary assessment of 2+ cases (on condition that they have not been fixed in Bouin's liquid) and for the calibration of the IHC technique. PMID:12124503

  1. The Italian multi-centre project on evaluation of MRI and other imaging modalities in early detection of breast cancer in subjects at high genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Podo, F; Sardanelli, F; Canese, R; D'Agnolo, G; Natali, P G; Crecco, M; Grandinetti, M L; Musumeci, R; Trecate, G; Bergonzi, S; De Simone, T; Costa, C; Pasini, B; Manuokian, S; Spatti, G B; Vergnaghi, D; Morassut, S; Boiocchi, M; Dolcetti, R; Viel, A; De Giacomi, C; Veronesi, A; Coran, F; Silingardi, V; Turchett, D; Cortesi, L; De Santis, M; Federico, M; Romagnoli, R; Ferrari, S; Bevilacqua, G; Bartolozzi, C; Caligo, M A; Cilotti, A; Marini, C; Cirillo, S; Marra, V; Martincich, L; Contegiacomo, A; Pensabene, M; Capuano, I; Burgazzi, G B; Petrillo, A; Bonomo, L; Carriero, A; Mariani-Costantini, R; Battista, P; Cama, A; Palca, G; Di Maggio, C; D'Andrea, E; Bazzocchi, M; Francescutti, G E; Zuiani, C; Londero, V; Zunnui, I; Gustavino, C; Centurioni, M G; Iozzelli, A; Panizza, P; Del Maschio, A

    2002-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of the first phase (21 months) of a multi-centre, non-randomised, prospective study, aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography (XM) and ultrasound (US) in early diagnosis of breast cancer (BC) in subjects at high genetic risk. This Italian national trial (coordinated by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome) so far recruited 105 women (mean age 46.0 years; median age 51.0; age range 25-77 years), who were either proven BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or had a 1 in 2 probability of being carriers (40/105 with a previous personal history of BC). Eight cases of breast carcinomas were detected in the trial (mean age 55.3 years, median age 52.5; age range 35-70 years; five with previous personal history of BC). All trial-detected BC cases (8/8) were identified by MRI, while XM and US correctly classified only one. MRI had one false positive case, XM and US none. Seven "MRI-only" detected cancers (4 invasive, 3 in situ) occurred in both pre- (n = 2) and post-menopausal (n = 5) women. With respect to the current XM screening programmes addressed to women in the age range 50-69 years, the global incidence of BC in the trial (7.6%) was over ten-fold higher. The cost per "MRI-only" detected cancer in this particular category of subjects at high genetic risk was substantially lower than that of an XM-detected cancer in the general women population. These preliminary results confirmed that MRI is a very useful tool to screen subjects at high genetic risk for breast carcinoma, not only in pre-, but also in post-menopausal age, with a low probability of false positive cases.

  2. Evaluation and correlation of risk recurrence in early breast cancer assessed by Oncotype DX(®), clinicopathological markers and tumor cell dissemination in the blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Bahriye; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heubner, Martin; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2013-11-01

    The Oncotype DX(®) assay is a validated genomic test that predicts the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence, patient survival within ten years of diagnosis and the benefit of chemotherapy in early-stage, node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Further markers of recurrence include disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood, particularly stemness-like tumor cells (slCTCs). In this study, Oncotype DX, DTCs, CTCs and slCTCs were used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 68 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative, early-stage breast cancer. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were analyzed for the expression of 16 cancer genes and 5 reference genes by Oncotype DX, yielding a recurrence score (RS). G2 tumors were evaluated for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) and Ki-67. Two BM aspirates were analyzed by immunocytochemistry for DTCs using the pan-cytokeratin antibody A45-B/B3. CTCs and slCTCs in the blood were detected using the AdnaTest BreastCancer, AdnaTest EMT and the AdnaTest TumorStemCell. Oncotype DX was performed in 68 cases, yielding a low RS in 30/68 patients (44%), an intermediate RS in 29/68 patients (43%) and a high RS in 9/68 patients (13%). DTCs were detected in 19/68 patients (28%), CTCs in 13/68 patients (19%) and slCTCs in 26/68 (38%) patients. Moreover, 8/68 patients (12%) with G2 tumors were positive for uPA, 6/68 (9%) for PAI1 and 21/68 (31%) for Ki-67. Ki-67, progesterone receptor (PR) and G3 tumors were significantly correlated with RS (P<0.001; P=0.006; and P=0,002, respectively), whereas no correlation was identified between DTCs, CTCs, slCTCs and RS. Ki-67 may support therapeutic decisions in cases where Oncotype DX is not feasible. Larger patient cohorts are required to estimate the additional detection of DTCs and CTCs for the determination of risk recurrence.

  3. Lactation and the risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Purwanto, H; Sadjimin, T; Dwiprahasto, I

    2000-05-01

    Some factors are suggested to have an association with an increased risk of breast cancer, which are called risk factors. Lactation is one of the risk factors that still needs to be studied because of conflicting findings in epidemiological studies and also uncertainty regarding biologic plausibility. Our objective was to study the relationship between lactation and the risk of breast cancer. A pair of unmatched case control studies was held among parous women at Dr. Soetomo Hospital (general hospital) and some private hospitals in the Surabaya municipality. There are 219 (51.9%) cases and 203 (48.1%) controls analyzed in this study. Age, age at menarche, regular menstruation and number of parity between both groups are not statistical different. When we divided the age at menarche (below 13), it was statistically different. The cases consisted of more women with menarche below 13 (p = 0.00038). Other factors showing statistical differences in the risk of breast cancer between case and control are age at first delivery, family history of breast cancer and age at menopause. Women who have lactated (more than 4-month duration of breast feeding) show a "protective effect" against breast cancer, OR 0.57 (95% CI 0.33-0.99). However, there was no clear duration of lactation and the risk of breast cancer. Logistic regression analysis showed that lactation was not any independent factor. Lactation exerts a "protective effect" against breast cancer. However, the duration of lactation did not show an influence in reducing the risk of breast cancer, and logistic regression analysis did not show that lactation was an independent factor in the risk of breast cancer.

  4. Disparities in breast cancer and african ancestry: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of breast cancer disparities between African-American and White American women has generated exciting research opportunities investigating the biologic and hereditary factors that contribute to the observed outcome differences, leading to international studies of breast cancer in Africa. The study of breast cancer in women with African ancestry has opened the door to unique investigations regarding breast cancer subtypes and the genetics of this disease. International research efforts can advance our understanding of race/ethnicity-associated breast cancer disparities within the USA; the pathogenesis of triple negative breast cancer; and hereditary susceptibility for breast cancer.

  5. Breast Cancer Survivorship: Where Are We Today?

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and survivors with this diagnosis account for almost one fourth of the over 14 million cancer survivors in the US. After several decades of basic and clinical trials research, we have learned much about the heterogeneity of breast cancer and have evolved a complex and multidisciplinary treatment approach to the disease. Increasingly, we are paying attention to the long term and late effects of breast cancer treatment, and this is largely the subject of this volume. In this chapter, the authors introduce the topic of breast cancer survivorship and highlight the organization and content of this volume, briefly describing the contents of the subsequent chapters. PMID:26059925

  6. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Imran Haruna

    2013-01-01

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease. PMID:24665149

  7. Childhood and adolescent pesticide exposure and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Niehoff, Nicole M.; Nichols, Hazel B; White, Alexandra J.; Parks, Christine G.; D’Aloisio, Aimee A; Sandler, Dale P.

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, epidemiological studies have not strongly supported an association between pesticide exposure and breast cancer. However, few previous studies had the ability to assess specific time periods of exposure. Studies that relied on adult serum levels of metabolites of organochlorine pesticides may not accurately reflect exposure during developmental periods. Further, exposure assessment often occurred after diagnosis and key tumor characteristics, such as hormone receptor status, have rarely been available to evaluate tumor-subtype specific associations. We examine the association between pesticide exposure during childhood and adolescence and breast cancer risk in the prospective Sister Study cohort (N=50,844 women) to assess this relation by tumor subtype. Methods During an average 5-year follow-up, 2,134 incident invasive and in situ breast cancer diagnoses were identified. Residential and farm exposure to pesticides were self-reported at study enrollment during standardized interviews. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals for breast cancer risk were calculated with Cox proportional hazards regression. Results HRs were near null for the association between childhood/adolescent pesticide exposure and breast cancer risk overall or among ER+/PR+ invasive tumors. However, among women who were ages 0–18 before the ban of DDT in the U.S., exposure to fogger trucks or planes was associated with a HR=1.3 for premenopausal breast cancer (95% CI: 0.92, 1.7). Conclusion These findings do not support an overall association between childhood and adolescent pesticide exposure and breast cancer risk. However, modest increases in breast cancer risk were associated with acute events in a subgroup of young women. PMID:26808595

  8. Male breast cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Ron, Elaine; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Preston, Dale L; Tokuoka, Shoji

    2005-04-20

    To learn more about the role of ionizing radiation in the development of male breast cancer, we evaluated male breast cancer incidence among 45 880 male members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Male breast cancers, diagnosed between January 1, 1958, and December 31, 1998, were identified through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Tumor Registries. Nine male breast cancers were diagnosed among exposed Life Span Study members (crude rate = 1.8 per 100,000 person-years), and three were diagnosed among nonexposed cohort members (crude rate = 0.5 per 100,000 person-years). A statistically significant dose-response relation was observed (excess relative risk per sievert = 8, 95% confidence interval = 0.8 to 48; P = .01). Our finding of a statistically significant association between ionizing radiation and male breast cancer incidence adds to the very limited information that shows an association between radiation exposure and an increased risk of male breast cancer.

  9. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  10. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Luisa Matos; Marian, Catalin; Willey, Shawna; Sidawy, Mary; Da Cunha, Patricia A; Rone, Janice D; Li, Xin; Gusev, Yuriy; Haddad, Bassem R

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer.

  11. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957337

  12. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review).

  13. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanyuan; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and distant site metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. There is increasing evidence supporting the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cell progression, invasion, and metastasis. During the process of EMT, epithelial cancer cells acquire molecular alternations that facilitate the loss of epithelial features and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Such transformation promotes cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that EMT is associated with the increased enrichment of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and these CSCs display mesenchymal characteristics that are resistant to chemotherapy and target therapy. However, the clinical relevance of EMT in human cancer is still under debate. This review will provide an overview of current evidence of EMT from studies using clinical human breast cancer tissues and its associated challenges. PMID:26821054

  14. Heparan sulfate mediates trastuzumab effect in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trastuzumab is an antibody widely used in the treatment of breast cancer cases that test positive for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Many patients, however, become resistant to this antibody, whose resistance has become a major focus in breast cancer research. But despite this interest, there are still no reliable markers that can be used to identify resistant patients. A possible role of several extracellular matrix (ECM) components—heparan sulfate (HS), Syn-1(Syndecan-1) and heparanase (HPSE1)—in light of the influence of ECM alterations on the action of several compounds on the cells and cancer development, was therefore investigated in breast cancer cell resistance to trastuzumab. Methods The cDNA of the enzyme responsible for cleaving HS chains from proteoglycans, HPSE1, was cloned in the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and transfected into a breast cancer cell lineage. We evaluated cell viability after trastuzumab treatment using different breast cancer cell lines. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was investigated by confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The profile of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also investigated by [35S]-sulfate incorporation. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate HPSE1, HER2 and Syn-1 mRNA expression. HPSE1 enzymatic activity was performed using biotinylated heparan sulfate. Results Breast cancer cell lines responsive to trastuzumab present higher amounts of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface, but lower levels of secreted HS. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was proven by FRET analysis. The addition of anti-HS to the cells or heparin to the culture medium induced resistance to trastuzumab in breast cancer cells previously sensitive to this monoclonal antibody. Breast cancer cells transfected with HPSE1 became resistant to trastuzumab, showing lower levels of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface. In addition, HS shedding was increased significantly in

  15. Effectiveness of an Ongoing, Community-Based Breast Cancer Prevention Program for Korean American Women.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun; Choi, Ga-Young; Cho, Ji Young

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluates the effectiveness of an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program offered by a local social services agency in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Korean American women who participated in this breast cancer prevention program were compared with those who did not participate in their knowledge, attitude, and screening behaviors. The study found that the intervention group was more knowledgeable on breast cancer and related services and reported more positive attitudes toward breast cancer screening services than the comparison group. The participants in the intervention group were also more likely to plan to receive a mammogram than those in the comparison group. However, significant differences were not observed in the two groups in their intention to receive a clinical breast examination. The study findings suggest that an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program can be an effective method of addressing breast cancer prevention disparities observed among Korean American women. PMID:26946886

  16. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  17. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  18. Psychooncologic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neises, Mechthild

    2008-01-01

    Summary Around one third of all patients reveal signs of stress disorder and adaptation difficulties following breast cancer or during the course of the illness, often manifested clinically as fear and depression. Supportive treatment should be made available to all patients in the form of psycho-educative group sessions introducing information and assistance to help overcome the illness. The indication for extensive treatment, e.g. psychotherapy, can be deduced from the somatopsychic disorders presented. Individual or group therapy will be offered to the patient corresponding to her diagnostics and motivation. The aim of therapy should be discussed openly with the patient, that is, an improvement in the quality of life and the possibility to overcome the situation. In general, the various intervention programmes have proved to be beneficial for patients with cancer. These include relaxation therapy and stress management as well as behavioural therapy and supportive psychotherapy. Patients have high expectations of the therapy offered and this should be taken into careful consideration by all physicians, psychologists and others responsible for administering treatment. The aim of this work is mainly to present the clinical experience gained in a breast centre. PMID:20824031

  19. Suppression of Ovarian Function With Either Tamoxifen or Exemestane Compared With Tamoxifen Alone in Treating Premenopausal Women With Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  20. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063