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Sample records for evaluation post trial

  1. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Nollet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS) on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function. Design A process evaluation using data from an RCT. Patients Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22) or usual care (n = 22). Methods Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60–70% heart rate reserve). Results The attendance rate was high (median 89%). None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT) most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group. Conclusion Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371 PMID:27419388

  2. Protocol for process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial of family-led rehabilitation post stroke (ATTEND) in India

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hueiming; Lindley, Richard; Alim, Mohammed; Felix, Cynthia; Gandhi, Dorcas B C; Verma, Shweta J; Tugnawat, Deepak Kumar; Syrigapu, Anuradha; Ramamurthy, Ramaprabhu Krishnappa; Pandian, Jeyaraj D; Walker, Marion; Forster, Anne; Anderson, Craig S; Langhorne, Peter; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata Satyanarayana; Shamanna, Bindiganavale Ramaswamy; Hackett, Maree L; Maulik, Pallab K; Harvey, Lisa A; Jan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We are undertaking a randomised controlled trial (fAmily led rehabiliTaTion aftEr stroke in INDia, ATTEND) evaluating training a family carer to enable maximal rehabilitation of patients with stroke-related disability; as a potentially affordable, culturally acceptable and effective intervention for use in India. A process evaluation is needed to understand how and why this complex intervention may be effective, and to capture important barriers and facilitators to its implementation. We describe the protocol for our process evaluation to encourage the development of in-process evaluation methodology and transparency in reporting. Methods and analysis The realist and RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) frameworks informed the design. Mixed methods include semistructured interviews with health providers, patients and their carers, analysis of quantitative process data describing fidelity and dose of intervention, observations of trial set up and implementation, and the analysis of the cost data from the patients and their families perspective and programme budgets. These qualitative and quantitative data will be analysed iteratively prior to knowing the quantitative outcomes of the trial, and then triangulated with the results from the primary outcome evaluation. Ethics and dissemination The process evaluation has received ethical approval for all sites in India. In low-income and middle-income countries, the available human capital can form an approach to reducing the evidence practice gap, compared with the high cost alternatives available in established market economies. This process evaluation will provide insights into how such a programme can be implemented in practice and brought to scale. Through local stakeholder engagement and dissemination of findings globally we hope to build on patient-centred, cost-effective and sustainable models of stroke rehabilitation. Trial registration number CTRI/2013

  3. Evaluation of Post Cessation Weight Gain in a 1-Year Randomized Smoking Cessation Trial of Electronic Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Cristina; Cibella, Fabio; Caponnetto, Pasquale; Campagna, Davide; Maglia, Marilena; Frazzetto, Evelise; Mondati, Enrico; Caruso, Massimo; Polosa, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Stop smoking it is often associated to weight gain that is one of the most important causes for relapse. This is the first study to describe long-term changes in body weight in smokers invited to quit or reduce smoking by switching to ECs. Conventional cigarettes consumption and body weight were measured prospectively in a randomized controlled trial of smokers invited to switch to ECs. Post cessation weight changes from baseline at week-12, -24 and -52 were compared among 1) high, medium and zero nicotine strength products and 2) pooled continuous smoking failure, smoking reduction and abstinence phenotypes. Saliva cotinine levels and appetite levels were also measured. No significant changes in body weight were observed among high, medium and zero nicotine strength products. Differences among continuous smoking phenotypes were significant only at week-12 (p = 0.010) and week-24 (p = 0.012) with quitters gaining 2.4{plus minus}4.3 Kg and 2.9{plus minus}4.4 Kg respectively. However, weight gain at week-52 (1.5{plus minus}5.0 Kg) was no longer significant compared to Failures and Reducers. No confounding factors could explain the significant changes in body weight. Smokers who quit smoking by switching to ECs may limit their post-cessation weight gain, with substantial reversal in weight gain being manifest at late time points. PMID:26729619

  4. The complementary roles of Phase 3 trials and post-licensure surveillance in the evaluation of new vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi; DeStefano, Frank

    2015-03-24

    Vaccines have led to significant reductions in morbidity and saved countless lives from many infectious diseases and are one of the most important public health successes of the modern era. Both vaccines' effectiveness and safety are keys for the success of immunisation programmes. The role of post-licensure surveillance has become increasingly recognised by regulatory authorities in the overall vaccine development process. Safety, purity, and effectiveness of vaccines are carefully assessed before licensure, but some safety and effectiveness aspects need continuing monitoring after licensure; Post-marketing activities are a necessary complement to pre-licensure activities for monitoring vaccine quality and to inform public health programmes. In the recent past, the availability of large databases together with data-mining and cross-linkage techniques have significantly improved the potentialities of post-licensure surveillance. The scope of this review is to present challenges and opportunities offered by vaccine post-licensure surveillance. While pre-licensure activities form the foundation for the development of effective and safe vaccines, post-licensure monitoring and assessment, are necessary to assure that vaccines are effective and safe when translated in real world settings. Strong partnerships and collaboration at an international level between different stakeholders is necessary for finding and optimally allocating resources and establishing robust post-licensure processes.

  5. The complementary roles of Phase 3 trials and post-licensure surveillance in the evaluation of new vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi; DeStefano, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines have led to significant reductions in morbidity and saved countless lives from many infectious diseases and are one of the most important public health successes of the modern era. Both vaccines' effectiveness and safety are keys for the success of immunisation programmes. The role of post-licensure surveillance has become increasingly recognised by regulatory authorities in the overall vaccine development process. Safety, purity, and effectiveness of vaccines are carefully assessed before licensure, but some safety and effectiveness aspects need continuing monitoring after licensure; Post-marketing activities are a necessary complement to pre-licensure activities for monitoring vaccine quality and to inform public health programmes. In the recent past, the availability of large databases together with data-mining and cross-linkage techniques have significantly improved the potentialities of post-licensure surveillance. The scope of this review is to present challenges and opportunities offered by vaccine post-licensure surveillance. While pre-licensure activities form the foundation for the development of effective and safe vaccines, post-licensure monitoring and assessment, are necessary to assure that vaccines are effective and safe when translated in real world settings. Strong partnerships and collaboration at an international level between different stakeholders is necessary for finding and optimally allocating resources and establishing robust post-licensure processes. PMID:25444788

  6. Evaluating the efficacy of vilazodone in achieving remission in patients with major depressive disorder: post-hoc analyses of a phase IV trial.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie; Gommoll, Carl P; Tang, Xiongwen; Nunez, Rene; Mathews, Maju

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vilazodone using different definitions of remission. Post-hoc analyses were carried out using data from an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vilazodone 40 mg/day in adults with major depressive disorder (NCT01473394). The primary efficacy endpoint was a mean change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score; additional measures included the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA) scores. In addition to treatment response (MADRS≥50% improvement), post-hoc analyses were carried out for remission of depressive symptoms [MADRS score≤10; MADRS≤5 (complete remission)], anxiety symptoms (HAMA≤7), and combined depression and anxiety symptoms (MADRS/HAMA≤10/≤7), as well as for overall symptom severity (CGI-S=1). Odds ratios (ORs) and numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were also calculated. Significant outcomes were obtained with vilazodone versus placebo for MADRS response (50.6 vs. 33.3%, OR=2.04, P<0.001, NNT=6), remission (34.0 vs. 21.8%, OR=1.82, P=0.003, NNT=9), and complete remission (18.2 vs. 8.3%, OR=2.42, P=0.002, NNT=11). More patients receiving vilazodone rather than placebo also met remission criteria for HAMA (48.8 vs. 35.2%, OR=1.82, P=0.002, NNT=8), MADRS/HAMA (32.1 vs. 20.4%, OR=1.83, P=0.004, NNT=9), and CGI-S (24.1 vs. 11.5%, OR=2.41, P<0.001, NNT=8). Treatment with vilazodone 40 mg/day may help adult patients with major depressive disorder achieve remission of depression and/or anxiety symptoms.

  7. Effects of a Community-Based, Post-Rehabilitation Exercise Program in COPD: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial With Embedded Process Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Desveaux, Laura; Beauchamp, Marla K; Lee, Annemarie; Ivers, Noah; Goldstein, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death across the world and will become increasingly common with an aging population. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, nonpharmacological intervention for individuals with COPD, targeting the secondary impairments of the disease. Although the benefits of participation in PR are well established, improvements in exercise tolerance and health status typically deteriorate following discharge. Challenges with long-term adherence to recommended exercise regimens are thought to explain much of this decline. Therefore, we developed a community-based exercise maintenance program for patients with COPD following discharge from PR. Objectives This manuscript (1) outlines the intervention, (2) describes how its effectiveness is being evaluated in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial, and (3) summarizes the embedded process evaluation aiming to understand key barriers and facilitators for implementation in new environments. Methods Participating centers refer eligible individuals with COPD following discharge from their local PR program. Consenting patients are assigned to a year-long community exercise program or usual care using block randomization and stratifying for supplemental oxygen use. Patients in the intervention arm are asked to attend an exercise session at least twice per week at their local community facility where their progress is supervised by a case manager. Each exercise session includes a component of aerobic exercise, and activities designed to optimize balance, flexibility, and strength. All study participants will have access to routine follow-up appointments with their respiratory physician, and additional health care providers as part of their usual care. Assessments will be completed at baseline (post-PR), 6, and 12 months, and include measures of functional exercise capacity, quality of life, self-efficacy, and health care usage. Intervention

  8. Application of Balanced Scorecard in the Evaluation of a Complex Health System Intervention: 12 Months Post Intervention Findings from the BHOMA Intervention: A Cluster Randomised Trial in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Mutale, Wilbroad; Stringer, Jeffrey; Chintu, Namwinga; Chilengi, Roma; Mwanamwenge, Margaret Tembo; Kasese, Nkatya; Balabanova, Dina; Spicer, Neil; Lewis, James; Ayles, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In many low income countries, the delivery of quality health services is hampered by health system-wide barriers which are often interlinked, however empirical evidence on how to assess the level and scope of these barriers is scarce. A balanced scorecard is a tool that allows for wider analysis of domains that are deemed important in achieving the overall vision of the health system. We present the quantitative results of the 12 months follow-up study applying the balanced scorecard approach in the BHOMA intervention with the aim of demonstrating the utility of the balanced scorecard in evaluating multiple building blocks in a trial setting. Methods The BHOMA is a cluster randomised trial that aims to strengthen the health system in three rural districts in Zambia. The intervention aims to improve clinical care quality by implementing practical tools that establish clear clinical care standards through intensive clinic implementations. This paper reports the findings of the follow-up health facility survey that was conducted after 12 months of intervention implementation. Comparisons were made between those facilities in the intervention and control sites. STATA version 12 was used for analysis. Results The study found significant mean differences between intervention(I) and control (C) sites in the following domains: Training domain (Mean I:C; 87.5.vs 61.1, mean difference 23.3, p = 0.031), adult clinical observation domain (mean I:C; 73.3 vs.58.0, mean difference 10.9, p = 0.02 ) and health information domain (mean I:C; 63.6 vs.56.1, mean difference 6.8, p = 0.01. There was no gender differences in adult service satisfaction. Governance and motivation scores did not differ between control and intervention sites. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility of the balanced scorecard in assessing multiple elements of the health system. Using system wide approaches and triangulating data collection methods seems to be key to successful

  9. European randomized lung cancer screening trials: Post NLST.

    PubMed

    Field, John K; van Klaveren, Rob; Pedersen, Jesper H; Pastorino, Ugo; Paci, Eugino; Becker, Nikolauss; Infante, Maurizo; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J

    2013-10-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their trials at August 2010, which included 32,000 people, inclusion of UKLS pilot trial will reach 36,000. An interim analysis is planned, but the final mortality data testing is scheduled for 2015. PMID:23893464

  10. Mind the gap: An empirical study of post-trial access in HIV biomedical prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget; Jordens, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    The principle of providing post-trial access for research participants to successful products of that research is widely accepted and has been enshrined in various declarations and guidelines. While recent ethical guidelines recognise that the responsibility to provide post-trial access extends to sponsors, regulators and government bodies as well as to researchers, it is the researchers who have the direct duty of care to participants. Researchers may thus need to act as advocates for trial participants, especially where government bodies, sponsors, and regulatory bodies have complex interests vested in decisions about whether or not new interventions are made available, how, and to whom. This paper provides an empirical account of post-trial access in the context of HIV prevention research. It describes both access to the successful products of research and the provision antiretroviral drugs for trial participants who acquire HIV. First, we provide evidence that, in the current system, there is considerable variation in the duration and timeliness of access. We then argue that by analysing the difficulties faced by researchers to this point, and their efforts to meet this obligation, much can be learned about how to secure post-trial access in HIV biomedical preventions trials. While researchers alone have a limited obligation, their advocacy on behalf of trial participants may be necessary to call the other parties to account. PMID:26193849

  11. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  12. Cost-utility analysis of a one-time supervisor telephone contact at 6-weeks post-partum to prevent extended sick leave following maternity leave in The Netherlands: results of an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Working women of childbearing age are a vital part of the population. Following childbirth, this group of women can experience a myriad of physical and mental health problems that can interfere with their ability to work. Currently, there is little known about cost-effective post-partum interventions to prevent work disability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether supervisor telephone contact (STC) during maternity leave is cost-effective from a societal perspective in reducing sick leave and improving quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) compared to common practice (CP). Methods We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial. QALYs were measured by the EuroQol 5-D, and sick leave and presenteeism by the Health and work Performance Questionnaire. Resource use was collected by questionnaires. Data were analysed according to intention-to-treat. Missing data were imputed via multiple imputation. Uncertainty was estimated by 95% confidence intervals, cost-utility planes and curves, and sensitivity analyses. Results 541 working women from 15 companies participated. Response rates were above 85% at each measurement moment. At the end of the follow-up, no statistically significant between-group differences in QALYs, mean hours of sick leave or presenteeism or costs were observed. STC was found to be less effective and more costly. For willingness-to-pay levels from €0 through €50,000, the probability that STC was cost-effective compared to CP was 0.2. Overall resource use was low. Mean total costs were €3678 (95% CI: 3386; 3951). Productivity loss costs represented 37% of the total costs and of these costs, 48% was attributable to sick leave and 52% to work presenteeism. The cost analysis from a company's perspective indicated that there was a net cost associated with the STC intervention. Conclusions STC was not cost-effective compared to common practice for a healthy population of working mothers; therefore

  13. Protocol for the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-stroke (LEAPS) trial: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Pamela W; Sullivan, Katherine J; Behrman, Andrea L; Azen, Stanley P; Wu, Samuel S; Nadeau, Stephen E; Dobkin, Bruce H; Rose, Dorian K; Tilson, Julie K

    2007-01-01

    Background Locomotor training using body weight support and a treadmill as a therapeutic modality for rehabilitation of walking post-stroke is being rapidly adopted into clinical practice. There is an urgent need for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of this intervention. The objective of the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) trial is to determine if there is a difference in the proportion of participants who recover walking ability at one year post-stroke when randomized to a specialized locomotor training program (LTP), conducted at 2- or 6-months post-stroke, or those randomized to a home based non-specific, low intensity exercise intervention (HEP) provided 2 months post-stroke. We will determine if the timing of LTP delivery affects gait speed at 1 year and whether initial impairment severity interacts with the timing of LTP. The effect of number of treatment sessions will be determined by changes in gait speed taken pre-treatment and post-12, -24, and -36 sessions. Methods/Design We will recruit 400 adults with moderate or severe walking limitations within 30 days of stroke onset. At two months post stroke, participants are stratified by locomotor impairment severity as determined by overground walking speed and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a) LTP-Early; (b) LTP-Late or (c) Home Exercise Program -Early. The LTP program includes body weight support on a treadmill and overground training. The LTP and HEP interventions are delivered for 36 sessions over 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure include successful walking recovery defined as the achievement of a 0.4 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial severe gait impairment or the achievement of a 0.8 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial moderate gait impairment. LEAPS is powered to detect a 20% difference in the proportion of participants achieving successful locomotor recovery between the LTP groups and the HEP group, and a 0.1 m/s mean

  14. In vitro evaluation of glass fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Navneet; Singh, Harpal

    2012-01-01

    Statement of problem: Techniques and recommendations for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth have changed from the use of custom cast metal post and core system to glass fiber-reinforced (GFRC) post and composite core system. Has this latest prefabricated glass fiber reinforced post and composite core system increased the fracture resistance of teeth and reduced the incidence of unrestorable root fractures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of root fracture and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with two different post and core systems. Material and Methods: Forty maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups. (n=20). All teeth received endodontic treatment. First group was restored with custom cast post and core system. Second group was restored with glass fiber post and composite core system. In Both the groups posts were cemented with adhesive resin cement. Compressive load was applied at an angle of 130 to the long axis of teeth at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were analyzed with student “t” test P<.001. Results: The mean value for fracture resistance was (331.4025) N in Group -I Custom cast Ni-Cr post and core and (237.0625) N in Group -II Glass fiber reinforced post and composite core system. Students “t” test shows the significant difference in fracture resistance of two groups. Conclusion: This study showed that the incidence of root fracture was significantly higher in custom cast Ni-Cr post and core system than glass fiber post and composite core system. A more favourable mode of failure was observed in teeth restored with Group II glass fiber post system. Key words:Post-and-core technique, glass fiber post, cast post and-core system, fracture resistance, endodontically treated teeth. PMID:24558556

  15. Post-trial obligations in the Declaration of Helsinki 2013: classification, reconstruction and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Mastroleo, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    The general aim of this article is to give a critical interpretation of post-trial obligations towards individual research participants in the Declaration of Helsinki 2013. Transitioning research participants to the appropriate health care when a research study ends is a global problem. The publication of a new version of the Declaration of Helsinki is a great opportunity to discuss it. In my view, the Declaration of Helsinki 2013 identifies at least two clearly different types of post-trial obligations, specifically, access to care after research and access to information after research. The agents entitled to receive post-trial access are the individual participants in research studies. The Declaration identifies the sponsors, researchers and host country governments as the main agents responsible for complying with the post-trial obligations mentioned above. To justify this interpretation of post-trial obligations, I first introduce a classification of post-trial obligations and illustrate its application with examples from post-trial ethics literature. I then make a brief reconstruction of the formulations of post-trial obligations of the Declaration of Helsinki from 2000 to 2008 to correlate the changes with some of the most salient ethical arguments. Finally I advance a critical interpretation of the latest formulation of post-trial obligations. I defend the view that paragraph 34 of 'Post-trial provisions' is an improved formulation by comparison with earlier versions, especially for identifying responsible agents and abandoning ambiguous 'fair benefit' language. However, I criticize the disappearance of 'access to other appropriate care' present in the Declaration since 2004 and the narrow scope given to obligations of access to information after research.

  16. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Alison; Goodwin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome); and efficient working of trial components. Design and Setting A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012) was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres. Participants Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy. Interventions Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline) and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point). Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation. Results At discharge, 110 (44%) eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54%) patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD) RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58) leaflet and 10.52 (5.94) physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91) leaflet and 5.53 (4.49) physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD) change -4.53 (6.41), 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59), 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI) between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75). Mean difference (95%CI) between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04). Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both

  17. Intravenous dexamethasone versus ketamine gargle versus intravenous dexamethasone combined with ketamine gargle for evaluation of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Fariborzifar, Arghavan; Attari, Mohammadali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sore throat and hoarseness are the most frequent subjective complaints after tracheal intubation for general anesthesia. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle for reducing the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat (POST) and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: 140 patients (aged 16-65 year) scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into four groups of 35 subjects each: Group K, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline; Group D, were infused 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group KD, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline plus 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group P (placebo) that received saline (gargle and IV). POST was graded at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 h after operation on a four-point scale (0-3). Results: The incidence and severity of POST were significantly lower in Group KD, compared with the other groups at all times after tracheal extubation for up to 24 h (P < 0.05). Also the incidence and severity of hoarseness were significantly lower in each Groups of KD and K and D compared with group placebo (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prophylactic use of 0.2 mg/kg of IV dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle significantly reduced the incidence and severity of POST compared with using each of these drugs alone or using placebo. PMID:25371869

  18. Rationale and Design of the ATTRACT Study - A Multicenter Randomized Trial to Evaluate Pharmacomechanical Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for the Prevention of Post-Thrombotic Syndrome in Patients with Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Kahn, Susan R.; Julian, Jim; Magnuson, Elizabeth; Jaff, Michael R.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Cohen, David J.; Comerota, Anthony J.; Gornik, Heather L.; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Lewis, Lawrence; Kearon, Clive

    2013-01-01

    Background Current standard therapy for patients with acute proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) consists of anticoagulant therapy and graduated elastic compression stockings. Despite use of this strategy, the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) develops frequently, causes substantial patient disability, and impairs quality of life (QOL). Pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT), which rapidly removes acute venous thrombus, may reduce the frequency of PTS. However, this hypothesis has not been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial. Study Design The ATTRACT Study is an ongoing NIH-sponsored, Phase III, multicenter, randomized, open-label, assessor-blinded, parallel two-arm, controlled clinical trial. Approximately 692 patients with acute proximal DVT involving the femoral, common femoral, and/or iliac vein are being randomized to receive PCDT + standard therapy versus standard therapy alone. The primary study hypothesis is that PCDT will reduce the proportion of patients who develop PTS within 2 years by one-third, assessed using the Villalta Scale. Secondary outcomes include safety, general and venous disease-specific QOL, relief of early pain and swelling, and cost-effectiveness. Conclusion ATTRACT will determine if PCDT should be routinely used to prevent PTS in patients with symptomatic proximal DVT above the popliteal vein. PMID:23537968

  19. Memantine before Mastectomy Prevents Post-Surgery Pain: A Randomized, Blinded Clinical Trial in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Véronique; Joly, Dominique; Villatte, Christine; Dubray, Claude; Durando, Xavier; Daulhac, Laurence; Coudert, Catherine; Roux, Delphine; Pereira, Bruno; Pickering, Gisèle

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain following surgical treatment for breast cancer with or without chemotherapy is a clinical burden and patients frequently report cognitive, emotional and quality of life impairment. A preclinical study recently showed that memantine administered before surgery may prevent neuropathic pain development and cognitive dysfunction. With a translational approach, a clinical trial has been carried out to evaluate whether memantine administered before and after mastectomy could prevent the development of neuropathic pain, the impairment of cognition and quality of life. Method A randomized, pilot clinical trial included 40 women undergoing mastectomy in the Oncology Department, University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Memantine (5 to 20 mg/day; n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) was administered for four weeks starting two weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured on a (0–10) numerical rating scale at three months post-mastectomy. Results Data analyses were performed using mixed models and the tests were two-sided, with a type I error set at α = 0.05. Compared with placebo, patients receiving memantine showed at three months a significant difference in post-mastectomy pain intensity, less rescue analgesia and a better emotional state. An improvement of pain symptoms induced by cancer chemotherapy was also reported. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the beneficial effect of memantine to prevent post-mastectomy pain development and to diminish chemotherapy-induced pain symptoms. The lesser analgesic consumption and better well-being of patients for at least six months after treatment suggests that memantine could be an interesting therapeutic option to diminish the burden of breast cancer therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01536314 PMID:27050431

  20. Treatment trials for post-Lyme disease symptoms revisited.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S; Baker, Phillip J; Shapiro, Eugene D; Marques, Adriana; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Halperin, John J; Wormser, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    The authors of 4 National Institutes of Health-sponsored antibiotic treatment trials of patients with persistent unexplained symptoms despite previous antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease determined that retreatment provides little if any benefit and carries significant risk. Two groups recently provided an independent reassessment of these trials and concluded that prolonged courses of antibiotics are likely to be helpful. We have carefully considered the points raised by these groups, along with our own critical review of the treatment trials. On the basis of this analysis, the conclusion that there is a meaningful clinical benefit to be gained from retreatment of such patients with parenteral antibiotic therapy cannot be justified. PMID:23764268

  1. Benefits of post-operative oral protein supplementation in gastrointestinal surgery patients: A systematic review of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Crickmer, Mike; Dunne, Colum P; O’Regan, Andrew; Coffey, J Calvin; Dunne, Suzanne S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate published trials examining oral post-operative protein supplementation in patients having undergone gastrointestinal surgery and assessment of reported results. METHODS: Database searches (MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Trials, Cinahl, and CAB), searches of reference lists of relevant papers, and expert referral were used to identify prospective randomized controlled clinical trials. The following terms were used to locate articles: “oral’’ or “enteral’’ and “postoperative care’’ or “post-surgical’’ and “proteins’’ or “milk proteins’’ or “dietary proteins’’ or “dietary supplements’’ or “nutritional supplements’’. In databases that allowed added limitations, results were limited to clinical trials that studied humans, and publications between 1990 and 2014. Quality of collated studies was evaluated using a qualitative assessment tool and the collective results interpreted. RESULTS: Searches identified 629 papers of which, following review, 7 were deemed eligible for qualitative evaluation. Protein supplementation does not appear to affect mortality but does reduce weight loss, and improve nutritional status. Reduction in grip strength deterioration was observed in a majority of studies, and approximately half of the studies described reduced complication rates. No changes in duration of hospital stay or plasma protein levels were reported. There is evidence to suggest that protein supplementation should be routinely provided post-operatively to this population. However, despite comprehensive searches, clinical trials that varied only the amount of protein provided via oral nutritional supplements (discrete from other nutritional components) were not found. At present, there is some evidence to support routinely prescribed oral nutritional supplements that contain protein for gastrointestinal surgery patients in the immediate post-operative stage. CONCLUSION: The optimal level of protein

  2. Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial: study protocol for a phase II/III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kanako; Misawa, Sonoko; Sato, Yasunori; Sobue, Gen; Yabe, Ichiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kikuchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Ichiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Kohara, Nobuo; Kanda, Takashi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a fatal systemic disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia and the overproduction of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recently, the prognosis of POEMS was substantially improved by introduction of therapeutic intervention for myeloma. However, no randomised clinical trial has been performed because of the rarity and severity of the disease. Methods and analysis The Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial is a phase II/III multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 24-week treatment with thalidomide in POEMS syndrome, with an additional 48-week open-label safety study. Adults with POEMS syndrome who have no indication for transplantation are assessed for eligibility at 12 tertiary neurology centres in Japan. Patients who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive thalidomide (100–300 mg daily) plus dexamethasone (12 mg/m2 on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle) or placebo plus dexamethasone. Both treatments were administered for 24 weeks (six cycles; randomised comparative study period). Patients who complete the randomised study period or show subacute deterioration during the randomised period participate in the subsequent 48-week open-label safety study (long-term safety period). The primary end point of the study is the reduction rate of serum VEGF levels at 24 weeks. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each hospital. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, Japan (No. 22-1716). The J-POST Trial is currently ongoing and is due to finish in August 2015. The findings of this trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations and will also be disseminated to participants. Trial registration number

  3. Analgesic effect of magnesium in post-tonsillectomy patients: a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tugrul, S; Degirmenci, N; Eren, S B; Dogan, R; Veyseller, B; Ozturan, O

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic, bleeding and nausea/vomiting effects of magnesium with and without metamizol on post-tonsillectomy patients. This prospective and randomised clinical trial included 54 patients aged 18-63 years who were scheduled for elective tonsillectomy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups and administered either magnesium with metamizol or only metamizol. They had been classified as physical status class I and II using the American Society of Anesthesiologists guidelines. All patients underwent the same surgical procedure performed by a single surgeon. The groups did not differ according to age, sex, or duration of anaesthesia or surgery. Postoperative pain, bleeding and nausea/vomiting were evaluated using the VAS and bleeding and nausea/vomiting scores on the first, fifth and tenth days. On the first, fifth and tenth postoperative days, the VAS scores of the magnesium with metamizol group were significantly lower than those of the metamizol-only group (p1 = 0.001; p5 = 0.015; p10 = 0.015). There were no significant differences in postoperative bleeding and nausea/vomiting scores between the two groups (p = 0.425 and p = 0.258, respectively). This study showed that magnesium enhanced the analgesic effect on post-tonsillectomy pain. Use of magnesium with an analgesic drug may be beneficial for management of post-tonsillectomy pain.

  4. Challenges with participant reimbursement: experiences from a post-trial access study.

    PubMed

    Mngadi, Kathryn Therese; Frohlich, Janet; Montague, Carl; Singh, Jerome; Nkomonde, Nelisiwe; Mvandaba, Nomzamo; Ntombeka, Fanelesibonge; Luthuli, Londiwe; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Mansoor, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Reimbursement of trial participants remains a frequently debated issue, with specific guidance lacking. Trials combining post-trial access and implementation science may necessitate new strategies and models. CAPRISA 008, a post-trial access study testing the feasibility of using family planning services to rollout a prelicensure HIV prevention intervention, tried to balance the real-life scenario of no reimbursement for attendance at public sector clinics with that of a trial including some visits that focused on research procedures and others that focused on standard of care procedures. A reduced reimbursement was offered for 'standard of care' visits, meant primarily to cover transport costs to and from the clinic only. This impacted negatively on accrual, retention and participant morale, primarily due to the protracted delay in regulatory approval, during which time, the costs of living, including travel costs had increased. Relevant guidelines were reviewed and institutional policy was updated to incorporate the South African National Health Research Ethics Committee guidelines on reimbursement (taking into account participant time, travel and inconvenience). The reimbursement amount for 'standard of care' visits was increased accordingly. The question remains whether a trial that combines post-trial access with implementation science, with clear benefits for the participants and the provision of above standard medical care, should have reimbursement rates that approach those of a proof-of-concept trial, for 'standard of care' visits. PMID:26392172

  5. Post-perceptual processing during the attentional blink is modulated by inter-trial task expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Jocelyn L.; Elliott, James C.; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The selective processing of goal-relevant information depends on an attention system that can flexibly adapt to changing task demands and expectations. Evidence from visual search tasks indicates that the perceptual selectivity of attention increases when the bottom-up demands of the task increase and when the expectations about task demands engendered by trial history are violated. Evidence from studies of the attentional blink (AB), which measures the temporal dynamics of attention, also indicates that perceptual selectivity during the AB is increased if the bottom-up task demands are increased. The present work tested whether expectations about task demands engendered by trial history also modulate perceptual selectivity during the AB. Two experiments tested the extent to which inter-trial switches in task demands reduced post-perceptual processing of targets presented during the AB. Experiment 1 indexed post-perceptual processing using the event-related potential (ERP) technique to isolate the context sensitive N400 ERP component evoked by words presented during the AB. Experiment 2 indexed post-perceptual processing using behavioral performance to determine the extent to which personal names survive the AB. The results of both experiments revealed that both electrophysiological (Exp. 1) and behavioral (Exp. 2) indices of post-perceptual processing were attenuated when consecutive trials differed in terms of their perceptual demands. The results are consistent with the notion that the selectivity of attention during the AB is modulated not only by within-trial task demands, but also can be flexibly determined by trial-by-trial expectations. PMID:24115924

  6. Fish Oil and Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation – Results of the Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation (OPERA) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Marchioli, Roberto; Macchia, Alejandro; Silletta, Maria G.; Ferrazzi, Paolo; Gardner, Timothy J.; Latini, Roberto; Libby, Peter; Lombardi, Federico; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Page, Richard L.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Context Post-operative atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) is one of the most common complications of cardiac surgery and significantly increases morbidity and healthcare utilization. A few small trials have evaluated whether long-chain n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduce post-op AF, with mixed results. Objective To determine whether peri-operative n-3-PUFA supplementation reduces post-op AF. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational, clinical trial. Patients A total of 1,516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery across 28 centers in the US, Italy, and Argentina, enrolled between Aug 2010 and Jun 2012. Inclusion criteria were broad; the main exclusions were regular use of fish oil or absence of sinus rhythm at enrollment. Forty-eight percent of screened patients and 94% of eligible patients were enrolled. Intervention Patients were randomized to receive fish oil (1 g capsules containing ≥840 mg n-3-PUFA as ethyl esters) or placebo, with pre-operative loading of 10g over 3-5 days (or 8g over 2 days) followed post-operatively by 2g/d until hospital discharge or post-op day10, whichever first. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was occurrence of post-op AF >30 sec. We also evaluated post-op AF lasting >1hr, resulting in symptoms, or treated with cardioversion; other secondary post-op AF endpoints; other tachyarrhythmias; hospital utilization; and major adverse cardiovascular events, 30-day mortality, bleeding, and other adverse events. All endpoints and analyses plans were prespecified. Results At enrollment, mean±SD age was 64±13 years, 72.2% were male, and 51.8% had planned valvular surgery. The primary endpoint occurred in 233 (30.7%) and 227 (30.0%) patients assigned to placebo and n-3-PUFA, respectively (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.77-1.20; P=0.74). None of the secondary endpoints were significantly different, including post-op AF that was sustained, symptomatic, or treated (n=231 [30.5%] vs. n=224 [29.6%], P=0.70) or number of

  7. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  8. Post-trial flicker stimulation interferes with spatial memory in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Buresová, O; Panakhova, E; Bures, J

    1985-05-23

    Rats (n = 20) trained under monocular viewing conditions in the working memory version of Morris water maze task received daily a single acquisition trial with a new location of the invisible escape platform followed after 15 min by a single retrieval trial. Escape latency decreased by 50% during retrieval. Flash stimulation (20 Hz, 0.6 J) during the entire 15-min delay disrupted retention, but this effect was not observed when the flashes started 3 or 5 min after acquisition. It is concluded that successful place learning requires a brief interference-free post-acquisition interval.

  9. Longitudinal clinical evaluation of post systems: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Valdivia, Andréa Dolores Correia Miranda; da Silva, Gisele Rodrigues; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Menezes, Murilo de Souza

    2012-01-01

    In this survey, retrospective and prospective clinical studies dealing with cast-post-and core and fiber posts were reviewed regarding the rate of survival of restorations and the most prevalent failures. Electronic searches of the literature were performed in MEDLINE by crossing the key words: "Fiber post and clinical study", "Fiber post and clinical evaluation", "Cast post-and-core and clinical study", and "Root post and retrospective survival study". The cut-off dates were December 1990 through the end of December 2010. Review of literature showed that several interrelated biological, mechanical, and aesthetic factors are involved in the survival rate of restorative procedures in endodontically treated teeth, and post selection should fulfill and optimize these factors. Data based on long-term clinical studies are essential for the general practitioner when making clinical decisions. An adequate selection of teeth and post system must be made, and a minimal amount of existing tooth substance should be removed. A ferrule must be present for safe indication of the fiber posts. Fiber glass posts have demonstrated good survival in clinical studies, with similar performance to cast-post-and cores. Metallic posts have good clinical survival, but the associated failures are mostly irreversible, unlike what happens with the glass fiber posts.

  10. Dengue vaccine trial guidelines and role of large-scale, post proof-of-concept demonstration projects in bringing a dengue vaccine to use in dengue endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Singhasivanon, Pratap; Fernandez, Eduardo; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Amador, Juan Jose; Margolis, Harold S; Edelman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we consider the issues impacting conduct and design of dengue vaccine trials with reference to the recently published world Health Organization “Guidelines for Conduct of Clinical Trials of Dengue vaccines in endemic Areas.” We discuss logistic, scientific and ethical challenges concerning evaluation and introduction of dengue vaccines; these range from randomized trials that establish “proof of concept” of vaccine efficacy, to post-“proof of concept” trials, particularly demonstration projects likely to be required for licensure or for the introduction of an already licensed vaccine into public use. We clarify and define the meaning of “proof of concept” in the clinical trial context and the meaning of terms “phase 2b”, “phase 3b” and “demonstration project”, which are commonly used but have not been defined well in the clinical literature. PMID:20935506

  11. [Prevention of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease: a critical review of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of different therapeutic strategies].

    PubMed

    Margagnoni, Giovanna; Clemente, Valeria; Aratari, Annalisa; Fascì Spurio, Federica; De Gregorio, Angela Maria; Spagnolo, Annalisa; Koch, Maurizio; Papi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Surgery is an almost inevitable event in Crohn's disease but is not curative; post-operative recurrence follows a sequential and predictable course. Prevention of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease is therefore a relevant problem in the management of the disease. Several drugs have been evaluated to decrease the risk of recurrence: these include mesalazine, antibiotics, probiotics, budesonide, thiopurines and biologic agents. This review focuses on the randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses addressing different drugs and strategies for preventing post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease.

  12. A General Framework for the Evaluation of Clinical Trial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.; Alperson, Sunny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Flawed evaluation of clinical trial quality allows flawed trials to thrive (get funded, obtain IRB approval, get published, serve as the basis of regulatory approval, and set policy). A reasonable evaluation of clinical trial quality must recognize that any one of a large number of potential biases could by itself completely invalidate the trial results. In addition, clever new ways to distort trial results toward a favored outcome may be devised at any time. Finally, the vested financial and other interests of those conducting the experiments and publishing the reports must cast suspicion on any inadequately reported aspect of clinical trial quality. Putting these ideas together, we see that an adequate evaluation of clinical quality would need to enumerate all known biases, update this list periodically, score the trial with regard to each potential bias on a scale of 0% to 100%, offer partial credit for only that which can be substantiated, and then multiply (not add) the component scores to obtain an overall score between 0% and 100%. We will demonstrate that current evaluations fall well short of these ideals. PMID:19463104

  13. Improving Post-Hospitalization Transition Outcomes through Accessible Health Information Technology and Caregiver Support: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Gregory, Lynn A; Sumerlin, Denise L; DeSantis, Angela M; Gibson, Carolyn; Crause, Ingrid; Rouse, Marylena; Aikens, James E

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this trial is to evaluate a novel intervention designed to improve post-hospitalization support for older adults with chronic conditions via: (a) direct tailored communication to patients using regular automated calls post discharge, (b) support for informal caregivers outside of the patient’s household via structured automated feedback about the patient’s status plus advice about how caregivers can help, and (c) support for care management including a web-based disease management tool and alerts about potential problems. Methods 846 older adults with common chronic conditions are being identified upon hospital admission. Patients are asked to identify a “CarePartner” (CP) living outside their household, i.e., an adult child or other social network member willing to play an active role in their post-discharge transition support. Patient-CP pairs are randomized to the intervention or usual care. Intervention patients receive automated assessment and behavior change calls, and their CPs receives structured feedback and advice via email and automated calls following each assessment. Clinical teams have access to assessment results via the web and receive automated reports about urgent health problems. Patients complete surveys at baseline, 30 days, and 90 days post discharge; utilization data is obtained from hospital records. CPs, other caregivers, and clinicians are interviewed to evaluate intervention effects on processes of self-care support, caregiver stress and communication, and the intervention’s potential for broader implementation. The primary outcome is 30-day readmission rates; other outcomes measured at 30 days and 90 days include functional status, self-care behaviors, and mortality risk. Conclusion This trial uses accessible health technologies and coordinated communication among informal caregivers and clinicians to fill the growing gap between what discharged patients need and available resources. A unique feature of

  14. Controlled trials of antibiotic treatment in patients with post-treatment chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Some patients have persistence of profound fatigue, myalgias, arthralgias without arthritis, dysesthesia/paresthesia, and mood and memory disturbances after standard courses of antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease. This constellation of symptoms has been variously referred to as "chronic Lyme disease," "post-Lyme disease syndrome," and "post-treatment chronic Lyme disease." Persistent symptoms have been reported in patients who are seropositive for IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi as well as in patients who are seronegative. The cause or causes of persistent symptoms in these patients have not been clearly defined and are controversial. Because of the temporal association of these symptoms with infection with B. burgdorferi, some patients have been treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics. Case reports and uncontrolled trials have reported the efficacy of prolonged antibiotic therapy, often with relapse of the symptoms after discontinuation of therapy. To date, only one randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of antibiotic therapy for these patients has been published. An abstract of a second placebo-controlled trial of antibiotic therapy in a smaller cohort has also been presented. This paper will describe this patient population in detail and will review the clinical, microbiological, and selected biochemical and immunologic parameters and their responses to antibiotic treatment in the setting of a controlled trial.

  15. Prediction of responders for outcome measures of Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke trial

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H. K.; Nadeau, Stephen E.; Behrman, Andrea L.; Wu, Samuel S.; Rose, Dorian K.; Bowden, Mark; Studenski, Stephanie; Lu, Xiaomin; Duncan, Pamela W.

    2015-01-01

    The Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke rehabilitation trial found equivalent walking outcomes for body weight-supported treadmill plus overground walking practice versus home-based exercise that did not emphasize walking. From this large database, we examined several clinically important questions that provide insights into recovery of walking that may affect future trial designs. Using logistic regression analyses, we examined predictors of response based on a variety of walking speed-related outcomes and measures that captured disability, physical impairment, and quality of life. The most robust predictor was being closer at baseline to the primary outcome measure, which was the functional walking speed thresholds of 0.4 m/s (household walking) and 0.8 m/s (community walking). Regardless of baseline walking speed, a younger age and higher Berg Balance Scale score were relative predictors of responding, whether operationally defined by transitioning beyond each speed boundary or by a continuous change or a greater than median increase in walking speed. Of note, the cutoff values of 0.4 and 0.8 m/s had no particular significance compared with other walking speed changes despite their general use as descriptors of functional levels of walking. No evidence was found for any difference in predictors based on treatment group. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT00243919, “Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke Trial”; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:24805892

  16. Post-Operative Auto-Transfusion in Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Haien, Zhao; Yong, Jiang; Baoan, Ma; Mingjun, Guo; Qingyu, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip or knee arthroplasty is an elective procedure that is usually accompanied by substantial blood loss, which may lead to acute anemia. As a result, almost half of total joint arthroplasty patients receive allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT). Many studies have shown that post-operative auto-transfusion (PAT) significantly reduces the need for ABT, but other studies have questioned the efficacy of this method. Methods The protocol for this trial and supporting CONSORT checklist are available as supporting information; see Checklist S1. To evaluate the efficacy of PAT, we conducted a Cochrane systematic review that combined all available data from randomized controlled trials. Data from the six included trials were pooled for analysis. We then calculated relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous outcomes. Findings and Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis to compare the clinical results between PAT and a control in joint replacement patients. This meta-analysis has proven that the use of a PAT reinfusion system reduced significantly the demand for ABT, the number of patients who require ABT and the cost of hospitalization after total knee and hip arthroplasty. This study, together with other previously published data, suggests that PAT drains are beneficial. Larger, sufficiently powered studies are necessary to evaluate the presumed reduction in the incidence of infection as well as DVT after joint arthroplasty with the use of PAT. PMID:23372816

  17. The PAV trial: Does lactobacillus prevent post-antibiotic vulvovaginal candidiasis? Protocol of a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN24141277

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Marie; Gunn, Jane; Chondros, Patty; Grover, Sonia; Hurley, Susan; Garland, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicines are used by many consumers, and increasingly are being incorporated into the general practitioner's armamentarium. Despite widespread usage, the evidence base for most complementary therapies is weak or non-existent. Post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis is a common problem in general practice, for which complementary therapies are often used. A recent study in Melbourne, Australia, found that 40% of women with a past history of vulvovaginitis had used probiotic Lactobacillus species to prevent or treat post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis. There is no evidence that this therapy is effective. This study aims to test whether oral or vaginal lactobacillus is effective in the prevention of post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis. Methods/design A randomised placebo-controlled blinded 2 × 2 factorial design is being used. General practitioners or pharmacists approach non-pregnant women, aged 18–50 years, who present with a non-genital infection requiring a short course of oral antibiotics, to participate in the study. Participants are randomised in a four group factorial design either to oral lactobacillus powder or placebo and either vaginal lactobacillus pessaries or placebo. These interventions are taken while on antibiotics and for four days afterwards or until symptoms of vaginitis develop. Women self collect a vaginal swab for culture of Candida species and complete a survey at baseline and again four days after completing their study medications. The sample size (a total of 496 – 124 in each factorial group) is calculated to identify a reduction of half in post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis from 23%, while allowing for a 25% drop-out. An independent Data Monitoring Committee is supervising the trial. Analysis will be intention-to-treat, with two pre-specified main comparisons: (i) oral lactobacillus versus placebo and (ii) vaginal lactobacillus versus placebo. PMID:15046642

  18. [Standard Cancer Therapy Are Established by the Investigator-Initiated Post-Marketing Clinical Trials, Not by the Indication-Directed Clinical Trials].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The financial supports for investigator-initiated post-marketing clinical trial in clinical oncology are reduced after scandals related to the other fields of clinical trials in Japan. These clinical trials are the essential final steps of clinical development in newer cancer therapy, which should be conducted in the investigator-initiated clinical trial groups with well-organized infrastructure and continuous financial supports. The present problems are discussed and summarized. Future perspectives with the national viewpoints needed to be included the idea of "health technology assessment".

  19. [Standard Cancer Therapy Are Established by the Investigator-Initiated Post-Marketing Clinical Trials, Not by the Indication-Directed Clinical Trials].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The financial supports for investigator-initiated post-marketing clinical trial in clinical oncology are reduced after scandals related to the other fields of clinical trials in Japan. These clinical trials are the essential final steps of clinical development in newer cancer therapy, which should be conducted in the investigator-initiated clinical trial groups with well-organized infrastructure and continuous financial supports. The present problems are discussed and summarized. Future perspectives with the national viewpoints needed to be included the idea of "health technology assessment". PMID:27220797

  20. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  1. Nausea and Vomiting following Balanced Xenon Anesthesia Compared to Sevoflurane: A Post-Hoc Explorative Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V.; Stoppe, Christian; Cremer, Jan; Biener, Ingeborg A.; Peters, Dirk; Leuchter, Ricarda; Eisert, Albrecht; Apfel, Christian C.; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Like other inhalational anesthetics xenon seems to be associated with post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). We assessed nausea incidence following balanced xenon anesthesia compared to sevoflurane, and dexamethasone for its prophylaxis in a randomized controlled trial with post-hoc explorative analysis. Methods 220 subjects with elevated PONV risk (Apfel score ≥2) undergoing elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive xenon or sevoflurane anesthesia and dexamethasone or placebo after written informed consent. 93 subjects in the xenon group and 94 subjects in the sevoflurane group completed the trial. General anesthesia was maintained with 60% xenon or 2.0% sevoflurane. Dexamethasone 4mg or placebo was administered in the first hour. Subjects were analyzed for nausea and vomiting in predefined intervals during a 24h post-anesthesia follow-up. Results Logistic regression, controlled for dexamethasone and anesthesia/dexamethasone interaction, showed a significant risk to develop nausea following xenon anesthesia (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.02–5.19, p = 0.044). Early-onset nausea incidence was 46% after xenon and 35% after sevoflurane anesthesia (p = 0.138). After xenon, nausea occurred significantly earlier (p = 0.014), was more frequent and rated worse in the beginning. Dexamethasone did not markedly reduce nausea occurrence in both groups. Late-onset nausea showed no considerable difference between the groups. Conclusion In our study setting, xenon anesthesia was associated with an elevated risk to develop nausea in sensitive subjects. Dexamethasone 4mg was not effective preventing nausea in our study. Group size or dosage might have been too small, and change of statistical analysis parameters in the post-hoc evaluation might have further contributed to a limitation of our results. Further trials will be needed to address prophylaxis of xenon-induced nausea. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials EudraCT-2008-004132-20 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  2. Getting clinical trial results into practice: design, implementation, and process evaluation of the ALLHAT Dissemination Project

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, L Kay; Cushman, William C; Cutler, Jeffrey A; Davis, Barry R; Dawson, Glenna; Einhorn, Paula T; Graumlich, James F; Piller, Linda B; Pressel, Sara; Roccella, Edward J; Simpson, Lara; Whelton, Paul K; Williard, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Background Conventional dissemination of clinical trial results has inconsistent impact on physician practices. A more comprehensive plan to influence determinants of prescribing practices is warranted. Purpose To report the response from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s requirement for dissemination and evaluation of trials with potential immediate public health applicability. Methods ALLHAT’s dissemination plan had two-components: 1) a traditional approach of media coverage, scientific presentation and publication; and 2) a theory-based approach targeting determinants of clinician behavior. Strategies included (1) academic detailing, in which physicians approach colleagues regarding blood pressure management, (2) direct patient messages to stimulate communication with physicians regarding blood pressure control, (3) approaches to formulary systems to use educational and economic incentives for evidence-based prescription, and (4) direct professional organization appeals to clinicians. Results One hundred and forty-seven Investigator Educators reported 1698 presentations to 18,524 clinicians in 41 states and the District of Columbia. The pre- and post-test responses of 1709 clinicians in the face-to-face meetings indicated significant changes in expectations for positive patient outcomes and intention to prescribe diuretics. Information was mailed to 55 individuals representing 20 professional organizations and to eight formulary systems. Direct-to-patient messages were provided to 14 sites that host patient newsletters and Web sites such as health plans and insurance companies, 62 print mass media outlets, and 12 broadcast media sites. Limitations It was not within the scope of the project to conduct a randomized trial of the impact of the dissemination. However, impact evaluation using quasi-experimental designs is ongoing. Conclusions A large multi

  3. Evaluating Latent Variable Growth Models through Ex Post Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; George, Rani

    1998-01-01

    The use of ex post (historical) simulation statistics as means of evaluating latent growth models is considered, and a variety of simulation quality statistics are applied to such models. Results illustrate the importance of using these measures as adjuncts to more traditional forms of model evaluation. (SLD)

  4. Cross-system evaluation of clinical trial search engines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Silis Y; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities.

  5. [Learning-enhancing evaluation practice in post-graduate medicine].

    PubMed

    Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Klitmøller, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The article addresses the issue of evaluation in clinical supervisor interviews, and how learning outcomes can be increased in this setting. Based on a literature review the article demonstrates that a learning-enhancing evaluation is a context bound process that needs to take emotional, social and operational aspects in account, in order to be successful. The article contributes to an understanding of how to promote a learning-enhancing evaluation practice in post-graduate medicine in the Danish medical training.

  6. Pre-trial evaluation of the potential for unblinding in drug trials: a prototype example.

    PubMed

    Walter, S D; Awasthi, Shally; Jeyaseelan, L

    2005-08-01

    Blinding is an important design feature of randomised trials that may reduce bias in the results, compared to the situation where blinding is not possible or is not maintained. The literature provides some guidance for the evaluation of blinding in ongoing or completed studies, but the question of pre-trial assessment of the potential for unblinding has not been addressed. This paper describes the design and analysis of a prototype experiment for the pre-trial assessment of blinding in a drug trial. This work was motivated by a trial using antibiotic therapy, in which the investigators were concerned about the possibility of subjects being able to differentiate active medication from placebo, and thus become unblinded to their treatment assignment. A small experiment was mounted in which participants had to divide a random mixture of tablets into two groups. Statistical methods were developed to calculate the probability of a given number of similar tablets being classified into the same group by chance, with a modification to allow for some participants having constrained their responses to have equal numbers of tablets in each group. Differentiation of tablets by taste (the initial concern of the investigators) was not statistically different from chance. A smaller set of data on differentiation by appearance (a possibility not originally considered) had borderline statistical significance. After reviewing all these results, the investigators decided to proceed with the study without modifying the tablets, in part because subjects in the study would be unlikely to compare the two types of medication side-by-side. Our results suggest that blinding might sometimes be compromised in unexpected ways. Whenever possible, we suggest that similar and larger such experiments be carried out before the trial to assess whether blinding might be compromised. The methods proposed here could easily be adapted to evaluate the results of such experiments.

  7. Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale A.; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G.; Robinson, William S.; Taylor, Yhenneko J.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cancer Clinical Trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awareness and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Design Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCTs training-of-the trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs; a role-play describing one person's experience with CCTs; or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Results Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the Call and Response (n=22), Role-play (n=60), and Workshop (n=43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access to CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the Call and Response (p < 0.01) and Role-Play modules (p < 0.001), but not the Workshop module. Conclusion Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment. PMID:25564207

  8. Evaluating a community-partnered cancer clinical trials pilot intervention with African American communities.

    PubMed

    Green, Melissa A; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale A; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G; Robinson, William S; Taylor, Yhenneko J; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    Cancer clinical trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awarenesss and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCT training-of-the-trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs, a role play describing one person's experience with CCTs, or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the call and response (n = 22), role play (n = 60), and workshop (n = 43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and with a mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre- and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the call and response (p < 0.01) and role play modules (p < 0.001), but not the workshop module. Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment.

  9. Clinical trial of pantomography for the evaluation of mandibular trauma.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Doris, P E

    1980-08-01

    A trial study was conducted comparing the standard "four view" mandibular series and pantomography for th evaluation of mandibular trauma. During the six-month trial period a series of 17 patients with a total of 24 mandibular fractures was compiled. The pantomographs were more easily interpreted than the standard views because overlapping structures were blurred and spatial orientation was clear. In eight of the 17 patients the fractures were more clearly visualized by pantomography. Because the entire mandibule was seen so well on the pantomographs, no special views were required. Eleven patients had single fractures, which are in fact quite common.

  10. Low and high-frequency TENS in post-episiotomy pain relief: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Ana C. R.; Araújo, Rodrigo C.; Bezerra, Michelle J. S.; Ribeiro, Camila O.; Nakano, Ana M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of low-frequency TENS (LFT) and high-frequency TENS (HFT) in post-episiotomy pain relief. Method A randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial with placebo composed of 33 puerperae with post-episiotomy pain. TENS was applied for 30 minutes to groups: HFT(100 Hz; 100 µs), LFT (5 Hz; 100 µs), and placebo (PT). Four electrodes were placed in parallel near the episiotomy and four pain evaluations were performed with the numeric rating scale. The first and the second evaluation took place before TENS application and immediately after its removal and were done in the resting position and in the activities of sitting and ambulating. The third and fourth evaluation took place 30 and 60 minutes after TENS removal, only in the resting position. Intragroup differences were verified using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, and the intergroup analysis employed the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results In the intragroup analysis, there was no significant difference in the PT during rest, sitting, and ambulation (P>0.05). In the HFT and LFT, a significant difference was observed in all activities (P<0.001). In the intergroup analysis, there was a significant difference in the resting position in the HFT and LFT (P<0.001). In the sitting activity, a significant difference was verified in the second evaluation in the HFT and LFT (P<0.008). No significant difference was verified among the groups in ambulation (P<0.20). Conclusions LFT and HFT are an effective resource that may be included in the routine of maternity wards. PMID:24675915

  11. Trial-Based Economic Evaluations in Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    van Wier, Marieke F.; Tompa, Emile; Bongers, Paulien M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Bosmans, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    To allocate available resources as efficiently as possible, decision makers need information on the relative economic merits of occupational health and safety (OHS) interventions. Economic evaluations can provide this information by comparing the costs and consequences of alternatives. Nevertheless, only a few of the studies that consider the effectiveness of OHS interventions take the extra step of considering their resource implications. Moreover, the methodological quality of those that do is generally poor. Therefore, this study aims to help occupational health researchers conduct high-quality trial-based economic evaluations by discussing the theory and methodology that underlie them, and by providing recommendations for good practice regarding their design, analysis, and reporting. This study also helps consumers of this literature with understanding and critically appraising trial-based economic evaluations of OHS interventions. PMID:24854249

  12. Why caution is recommended with post-hoc individual patient matching for estimation of treatment effect in parallel-group randomized controlled trials: the case of acute stroke trials.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Nahid; Hearne, John; Churilov, Leonid

    2013-11-10

    A post-hoc individual patient matching procedure was recently proposed within the context of parallel group randomized clinical trials (RCTs) as a method for estimating treatment effect. In this paper, we consider a post-hoc individual patient matching problem within a parallel group RCT as a multi-objective decision-making problem focussing on the trade-off between the quality of individual matches and the overall percentage of matching. Using acute stroke trials as a context, we utilize exact optimization and simulation techniques to investigate a complex relationship between the overall percentage of individual post-hoc matching, the size of the respective RCT, and the quality of matching on variables highly prognostic for a good functional outcome after stroke, as well as the dispersion in these variables. It is empirically confirmed that a high percentage of individual post-hoc matching can only be achieved when the differences in prognostic baseline variables between individually matched subjects within the same pair are sufficiently large and that the unmatched subjects are qualitatively different to the matched ones. It is concluded that the post-hoc individual matching as a technique for treatment effect estimation in parallel-group RCTs should be exercised with caution because of its propensity to introduce significant bias and reduce validity. If used with appropriate caution and thorough evaluation, this approach can complement other viable alternative approaches for estimating the treatment effect. PMID:23761106

  13. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Liang, Feng; Barbier, Sylvaine; Islam, Muhammad; Bux, Rasool; Khan, Aamir Hameed; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Poulter, Neil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ebrahim, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP) is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE) and trained general practitioner (GP) intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care) in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up. Methods A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment) were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense) in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes. Findings After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1–0.1] mm Hg) compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04). Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl. Conclusions The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still

  14. Assessment of communication and swallowing post-laryngectomy: a telerehabilitation trial.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth; Crombie, Jane; Trickey, Megan; Hill, Anne; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Ten laryngectomy patients were assessed using a purpose-designed, multimedia videoconferencing system incorporating a freestanding, self-focusing camera. Swallowing, stoma and communication status were assessed simultaneously by a remote clinician and face-to-face, by a second clinician at the patient's site. The remote trial took place over a distance of approximately 1700 km using a commercial 3G phone network. A satisfaction questionnaire was also completed. There was excellent agreement between the two assessing clinicians. Image quality obtained via the freestanding camera was rated as lower than direct observation, but it was sufficient to assess the stoma and status of the voice prosthesis. During the trial, occasional difficulties with audio delays and image distortion were experienced, although these were manageable. Both patient and clinician satisfaction with remote assessment was high. The results provide further evidence to support the use of telerehabilitation for evaluating the speech and swallowing status of laryngectomy patients following discharge from acute care. PMID:19590028

  15. Global Health Diplomacy, Monitoring & Evaluation, and the Importance of Quality Assurance & Control: Findings from NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043): A Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial of Community Mobilization, Mobile Testing, Same-Day Results, and Post-Test Support for HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Sebastian; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Singh, Basant; Chingono, Alfred; Morin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Provision and scale-up of high quality, evidence-based services is essential for successful international HIV prevention interventions in order to generate and maintain intervention uptake, study integrity and participant trust, from both health service delivery and diplomatic perspectives. Methods We developed quality assurance (QAC) procedures to evaluate staff fidelity to a cluster-randomized trial of the NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043) assessing the effectiveness of a community-based voluntary counseling and testing strategy. The intervention was comprised of three components—Mobile Voluntary Counseling and Testing (MVCT), Community Mobilization (CM) and Post-Test Support Services (PTSS). QAC procedures were based on standardized criteria, and were designed to assess both provider skills and adherence to the intervention protocol. Supervisors observed a random sample of 5% to 10% of sessions each month and evaluated staff against multiple criteria on scales of 1–5. A score of 5 indicated 100% adherence, 4 indicated 95% adherence, and 3 indicated 90% adherence. Scores below 3 were considered unsatisfactory, and protocol deviations were discussed with the respective staff. Results During the first year of the intervention, the mean scores of MVCT and CM staff across the 5 study sites were 4 (95% adherence) or greater and continued to improve over time. Mean QAC scores for the PTSS component were lower and displayed greater fluctuations. Challenges to PTSS staff were identified as coping with the wide range of activities in the PTSS component and the novelty of the PTSS process. QAC fluctuations for PTSS were also associated with new staff hires or changes in staff responsibilities. Through constant staff monitoring and support, by Year 2, QAC scores for PTSS activities had reached those of MVCT and CM. Conclusions The implementation of a large-sale, evidence based HIV intervention requires extensive QAC to ensure implementation effectiveness

  16. Post-trial induction of conditioned apomorphine stimulant and inhibitory response effects: evidence for potent trace conditioning of drug effects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Breno Garone; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2015-02-01

    The Pavlovian conditioning of drug effects has frequently been demonstrated using protocols that are variants of Pavlovian delay conditioning. We undertook to determine if drug conditioning could be induced using a Pavlovian trace conditioning procedure. Rats were tested in a novel open-field environment for 5 min and in post-trial phase were injected either with vehicle, 2.0 mg/kg or 0.05 mg/kg apomorphine immediately or after a delay of 15 min. The procedure was repeated three times and subsequently a 30 min non-drug test was given. The vehicle and 15 min post-trial apomorphine groups did not differ and in the 30 min test their locomotion scores were equivalent to another vehicle group tested for the first time. The group that received 2.0 mg/kg apomorphine immediately post-trial had a progressive increase in activity over the three sessions and also initially in the 30 min test. The results for the 0.05 mg/kg immediate post-test group were a mirror image of the 2.0 mg/kg apomorphine group. Post-trial apomorphine treatments can induce potent conditioned effects indicative of the efficacy of trace conditioning of drug effects. These finding suggest that trace conditioning may be an important contributor to the potency of conditioned-drug effects in the development of drug addiction.

  17. Evaluation of Different Post Lengths’ Effect on Fracture Resistance of a Glass Fiber Post System

    PubMed Central

    Adanir, Necdet; Belli, Sema

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different post lengths upon root fracture resistance. Methods 78 maxillary central teeth with similar dimensions were mounted in acrylic blocks with artificial silicone periodontal ligaments. Combinations of post lengths of 6 mm (shorter than 1/1 clinical crown length), 9 mm (1/1 clinical crown length), and 12 mm (longer than 1/1 clinical crown length) made up 6 different groups consisting of 13 teeth each. The glass fiber posts (Snowpost) were cemented with Super-Bond C&B and Panavia F luting cement. Composite-resin cores were made with Clearfil PhotoCore. The specimens were tested in a universal test machine. The testing machine applied controlled loads to the core, 2 mm from its incisal edge, on the palatal side at an angle 135 degrees to the long axis of the root. The testing machine was set at a crosshead speed of 5mm per minute. All samples were loaded until failure. Results There was no statistically significant difference between cements (P>.05). Posts shorter than clinical crown length, demonstrated root fracture under significantly lower loading forces (P<.05). Conclusion Usage of posts shorter than clinical crowns should be avoided to eliminate clinical failure. PMID:19212505

  18. Clinical Hypnosis in the Treatment of Post-Menopausal Hot Flashes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Gary R.; Fisher, William I.; Johnson, Aimee K.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Keith, Timothy Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The use of estrogen and progesterone to manage vasomotor symptoms (i.e., hot flashes, night sweats) has declined due to concerns over their risks and there is an increased interest in alternate, effective, and low-risk treatments. This study reports the results of a randomized, controlled trial of clinical hypnosis in treating vasomotor symptoms among post-menopausal women. Methods Randomized, single-blind, controlled, clinical trial involving 187 post-menopausal women reporting a minimum of seven hot flashes per day, or at least 50 hot flashes a week at baseline between December 2008 and April 2012. Eligible participants received five weekly sessions of either clinical hypnosis or structured-attention control. Primary outcomes were hot flash frequency (subjectively and physiologically recorded) and hot flash score assessed by daily diaries at weeks 2–6, and 12. Secondary outcomes included measures of hot flash related daily interference, sleep quality and treatment satisfaction. Results In a modified intent-to-treat analysis that included all randomized participants that provided data, reported subjective hot flash frequency from baseline to week 12 showed a mean reduction of 55.82 hot flashes for the clinical hypnosis intervention (74.16%), versus a 12.89 hot flash reduction (17.13%) for the control (p<.001, 95% CI, 36.15–49.67). Mean reduction in hot flash score was 18.83 (80.32%) for the clinical hypnosis intervention as compared to 3.53 (15.38%) for the control (p<.001, 95% CI, 12.60–17.54). At 12 week follow-up, the mean reduction in physiologically monitored hot flashes was 5.92 (56.86%) for clinical hypnosis and .88 (9.94%) for the control (p<.001, 95% CI, 2.00–5.46). Secondary outcomes were significantly improved compared to control at 12 week follow-up in hot flash related interference (p<.001, 95% CI, 2.74–4.02), sleep quality (p<.001, 95% CI, 3.65–5.84), and treatment satisfaction (p<.001, 95% CI, 7.79–8.59). Conclusion Compared

  19. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Poornajafian, Alireza; Nikzad, Naghme

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST) in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group) or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable. PMID:25371873

  20. Evaluating Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Stage-Based Therapies in a Population-Based Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Friedman, Robert H.; Fava, Joseph L.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Keller, Stefan; Sun, Xiaowu; Ramelson, Harley; Prochaska, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation are typically evaluated using volunteer samples (efficacy trials) but should also be evaluated in population-based trials (effectiveness trials). Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone and in combination with behavioral interventions was evaluated on a population of smokers from a New England…

  1. Pharmaceutical companies vs. the State: who is responsible for post-trial provision of drugs in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Wang, Daniel Wei L; Ferraz, Octavio Luiz Motta

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the post-trial access to drugs for patients who participated in clinical trials in Brazil. The ethical guidance for clinical trials in Brazil is arguably one of the clearest in the world in attributing to research sponsors the responsibility for providing post-trial drugs to patients who participated in their experiments. The Federal Constitution recognizes health as a fundamental right to be fulfilled by the State. Based on the Brazilian constitution and on the National Health Council resolutions, courts have been accepting patients' claims and ordering the State and the pharmaceutical companies to provide these patients with the tested treatment in the quantity and duration they need it. This generous interpretation of the duties of the pharmaceutical companies and the State makes the Brazilian model for post-trial access unique when compared to the experience of other countries and thus should be followed with attention by future research in order to assess its consequences for patients, research sponsors, and the public health system. PMID:22789039

  2. Pharmaceutical companies vs. the State: who is responsible for post-trial provision of drugs in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Wang, Daniel Wei L; Ferraz, Octavio Luiz Motta

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the post-trial access to drugs for patients who participated in clinical trials in Brazil. The ethical guidance for clinical trials in Brazil is arguably one of the clearest in the world in attributing to research sponsors the responsibility for providing post-trial drugs to patients who participated in their experiments. The Federal Constitution recognizes health as a fundamental right to be fulfilled by the State. Based on the Brazilian constitution and on the National Health Council resolutions, courts have been accepting patients' claims and ordering the State and the pharmaceutical companies to provide these patients with the tested treatment in the quantity and duration they need it. This generous interpretation of the duties of the pharmaceutical companies and the State makes the Brazilian model for post-trial access unique when compared to the experience of other countries and thus should be followed with attention by future research in order to assess its consequences for patients, research sponsors, and the public health system.

  3. TELEPHONE-DELIVERED COLLABORATIVE-CARE FOR TREATING POST-CABG DEPRESSION: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Rollman, Bruce L.; Belnap, Bea Herbeck; LeMenager, Michelle S.; Mazumdar, Sati; Houck, Patricia R.; Counihan, Peter J.; Kapoor, Wishwa N.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Context Depressive symptoms commonly follow coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery and are associated with worse clinical outcomes. Objective To test the effectiveness of telephone-delivered collaborative care for post-CABG depression versus doctors’ usual care. Design Single-blind effectiveness trial. Setting Seven Pittsburgh-area university-based and community hospitals. Participants 302 depressed post-CABG patients and a non-depressed comparison group of 151 randomly sampled post-CABG patients recruited between 3/2004 and 9/2007 and followed as outpatients. Intervention 8-Months of telephone-delivered collaborative care provided by nurses working with patients’ primary care physicians and supervised by a study psychiatrist and study primary care physician. Main Outcome Measures Mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the SF-36 MCS at 8-months follow-up; secondary outcome measures included mood symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRS-D)), physical HRQoL (SF-36 PCS) and functioning (Duke Activity Status Index (DASI)); and hospital readmissions. Results Depressed intervention patients (N=150) reported greater improvements (all P ≤ 0.02) in mental HRQoL (SF-36 MCS: Δ 3.2 points; 95% CI: 0.5–6.0), physical functioning (DASI: Δ 4.6 points; 1.9–7.3), and mood symptoms (HRS-D: Δ3.1 points (1.3–4.9); and were more likely to report a ≥ 50% decline in HRS-D score from baseline (50.0% vs. 29.6%; NNT 4.9 (3.2–10.4)) than depressed patients randomized to their physicians’ usual care (N=152) (P<0.001). Depressed men were particularly likely to benefit from the intervention (SF-36 MCS: Δ 5.7 points (2.2–9.2); P=0.001) and tended to have a lower incidence of rehospitalization for cardiovascular causes than depressed men receiving usual care (13% vs. 23%; P=0.07) or depressed women (19% vs. 11%; P=0.22). However, the mean HRQoL and physical functioning of depressed intervention patients did not reach that of our non

  4. Randomized Trial of a Delirium Abatement Program for Post-acute Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Marcantonio, Edward R.; Bergmann, Margaret A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Orav, E John; Jones, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a Delirium Abatement Program (DAP) can shorten the duration of delirium among new admissions to post-acute care (PAC). Design Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting Eight skilled nursing facilities specializing in PAC within a single metropolitan region. Participants Four hundred fifty-seven participants with delirium at PAC admission. Intervention The DAP consisted of four steps: 1) assessment for delirium within 5 days of PAC admission, 2) assessment and correction of common reversible causes of delirium, 3) prevention of complications of delirium, and 4) restoration of function. Measurements Eligible patients were screened by trained researchers. Those with Confusion Assessment Method defined delirium were eligible for participation via proxy consent. Two weeks and one month after enrollment, regardless of location, participants were re-assessed for delirium by researchers blind to intervention status. Results Nurses at DAP sites detected delirium in 41% of participants vs. 12% in usual care (UC) sites (p<.001) and completed DAP documentation in most delirium-detected participants. However, the DAP intervention had no impact on delirium persistence based on two measurements at 2 weeks (DAP 68% vs. UC 66%) and 1 month (DAP 60% vs. UC 51%), adjusted p values ≥ 0.20. Adjusting for baseline differences between DAP and UC participants and restricting analysis to delirium-detected DAP participants did not alter the results. Conclusion Detection of delirium improved at the DAP sites, however, the DAP had no impact on the persistence of delirium. This effectiveness trial demonstrated that a nurse-led DAP intervention was not effective in typical PAC facilities. PMID:20487083

  5. Cranberry juice capsules and urinary tract infection post surgery: Results of a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Foxman, Betsy; Cronenwett, Ms. Anna E.W.; Spino, Cathie; Berger, Mitchell B.; Morgan, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) among women undergoing elective gynecologic surgery where a catheter is placed is high: 10 to 64% following catheter removal. We conducted the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the therapeutic efficacy of cranberry juice capsules in preventing UTI post surgery. Study Design We recruited patients from a single hospital between August 2011 and January 2013. Eligible participants were undergoing elective gynecologic surgery that did not involve a fistula repair or vaginal mesh removal. 160 patients were randomized and received two cranberry juice capsules two times a day, equivalent to two 8-ounce servings of cranberry juice, for 6 weeks after surgery, or matching placebo. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants who experienced clinically-diagnosed and treated UTI with or without positive urine culture. Kaplan-Meier plots and logrank tests compared the two treatment groups. Results The occurrence of UTI was significantly lower in the cranberry treatment group compared to the placebo group (15/80 (19%) versus 30/80 (38%); OR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.79; p=0.008). After adjustment for known confounders, including frequency of intermittent self-catheterization in the post- operative period, the protective effects of cranberry remained (OR=0.42; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.94). There were no treatment differences in the incidence of adverse events; including gastrointestinal upset (56% vs. 61% for cranberry vs. placebo). Conclusions Among women undergoing elective benign gynecologic surgery involving urinary catheterization, use of cranberry extract tablets during the postoperative period reduced the rate of UTI by half. PMID:25882919

  6. Comparison of indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream on post-episiotomy pain: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Delaram, Masoumeh; Dadkhah, Narges-Khaton; Jafarzadeh, Loabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most important problems after episiotomy is perineal pain which is more severe on the first day of postpartum period. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effects of indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream in the management of post-episiotomy pain. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, controlled trial, 60 primiparous women who had mediolateral episiotomy received 50 mg indomethacin suppository (n = 30) or 2% lidocaine cream (n = 30) in the postpartum period in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord (Iran). The mean severity of post-episiotomy pain was assessed with the first complaint and at 6, 12, and 24 h after the delivery, and compared in the two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain recording and data were analyzed with independent-samples t-test, χ2, and Fisher's exact tests, and significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results: With the first complaint of pain, the mean intensity of pain was 4.9 (1.9) in the indomethacin group and 4.9 (1.8) in the lidocaine group, and the difference was not significant (P = 0.25). Six hours after birth, it was 3.3 (1.3) in the indomethacin group and 3.2 (1.9) in the lidocaine group, and there was not a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.90). No significant difference was found between the two groups at 12 h after birth [2.3 (1.7) vs 2.5 (1.7); P = 0.59]. Also, the difference was not significant at 24 h after birth [1.5 (1.3) vs 1.8 (1.3); P = 0.31]. Conclusions: It was concluded from the study that indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream have similar efficacy on episiotomy pain relief on the first day of postpartum period. PMID:26257799

  7. An R package for simulation experiments evaluating clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Day, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an open-source application for evaluating competing clinical trial (CT) designs using simulations. The S4 system of classes and methods is utilized. Using object-oriented programming provides extensibility through careful, clear interface specification; using R, an open-source widely-used statistical language, makes the application extendible by the people who design CTs: biostatisticians. Four key classes define the specifications of the population models, CT designs, outcome models and evaluation criteria. Five key methods define the interfaces for generating patient baseline characteristics, stopping rule, assigning treatment, generating patient outcomes and calculating the criteria. Documentation of their connections with the user input screens, with the central simulation loop, and with each other faciliates the extensibility. New subclasses and instances of existing classes meeting these interfaces can integrate immediately into the application. To illustrate the application, we evaluate the effect of patient pharmacokinetic heterogeneity on the performance of a common Phase I "3+3" design. PMID:21347151

  8. Economic evaluation in long-term clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hlatky, Mark A; Boothroyd, Derek B; Johnstone, Iain M

    2002-10-15

    Economic endpoints have been increasingly included in long-term clinical trials, but they pose several methodologic challenges, including how best to collect, describe, analyse and interpret medical cost data. Cost of care can be measured by converting billed charges, performing detailed micro-costing studies, or by measuring use of key resources and assigning cost weights to each resource. The latter method is most commonly used, with cost weights based either on empirical regression models or administratively determined reimbursement rates. In long-term studies, monetary units should be adjusted to reflect cost inflation and discounting. The temporal pattern of accumulating costs can be described using a modification of the Kaplan-Meier curve. Regression analyses to evaluate factors associated with cost are best performed on the log of costs due to their typically skewed distribution.Cost-effectiveness analysis attempts to measure the value of a new therapy by calculating the difference in cost between the new therapy and the standard therapy, divided by the difference in benefit between the new therapy and the standard therapy. The cost-effectiveness ratio based on the results of a randomized trial may change substantially with longer follow-up intervals, particularly for therapies that are initially expensive but eventually improve survival. A model that projects long-term patterns of cost and survival expected beyond the end of completed follow-up can provide an important perspective in the setting of limited trial duration.

  9. Economic evaluation in long-term clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hlatky, Mark A; Boothroyd, Derek B; Johnstone, Iain M

    2002-10-15

    Economic endpoints have been increasingly included in long-term clinical trials, but they pose several methodologic challenges, including how best to collect, describe, analyse and interpret medical cost data. Cost of care can be measured by converting billed charges, performing detailed micro-costing studies, or by measuring use of key resources and assigning cost weights to each resource. The latter method is most commonly used, with cost weights based either on empirical regression models or administratively determined reimbursement rates. In long-term studies, monetary units should be adjusted to reflect cost inflation and discounting. The temporal pattern of accumulating costs can be described using a modification of the Kaplan-Meier curve. Regression analyses to evaluate factors associated with cost are best performed on the log of costs due to their typically skewed distribution.Cost-effectiveness analysis attempts to measure the value of a new therapy by calculating the difference in cost between the new therapy and the standard therapy, divided by the difference in benefit between the new therapy and the standard therapy. The cost-effectiveness ratio based on the results of a randomized trial may change substantially with longer follow-up intervals, particularly for therapies that are initially expensive but eventually improve survival. A model that projects long-term patterns of cost and survival expected beyond the end of completed follow-up can provide an important perspective in the setting of limited trial duration. PMID:12325104

  10. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial evaluating three implementation interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Implementation research is concerned with bridging the gap between evidence and practice through the study of methods to promote the uptake of research into routine practice. Good quality evidence has been summarised into guideline recommendations to show that peri-operative fasting times could be considerably shorter than patients currently experience. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three strategies for the implementation of recommendations about peri-operative fasting. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised trial underpinned by the PARIHS framework was conducted during 2006 to 2009 with a national sample of UK hospitals using time series with mixed methods process evaluation and cost analysis. Hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions: standard dissemination (SD) of a guideline package, SD plus a web-based resource championed by an opinion leader, and SD plus plan-do-study-act (PDSA). The primary outcome was duration of fluid fast prior to induction of anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes included duration of food fast, patients’ experiences, and stakeholders’ experiences of implementation, including influences. ANOVA was used to test differences over time and interventions. Results Nineteen acute NHS hospitals participated. Across timepoints, 3,505 duration of fasting observations were recorded. No significant effect of the interventions was observed for either fluid or food fasting times. The effect size was 0.33 for the web-based intervention compared to SD alone for the change in fluid fasting and was 0.12 for PDSA compared to SD alone. The process evaluation showed different types of impact, including changes to practices, policies, and attitudes. A rich picture of the implementation challenges emerged, including inter-professional tensions and a lack of clarity for decision-making authority and responsibility. Conclusions This was a large, complex study and one of the first national randomised

  11. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scapula alata (SA) is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT). Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9%) had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009), 6.1 (P = 0.016), and 6.1 (P = 0.005), respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036) and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046) among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature. PMID:22591589

  12. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  13. Protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an online intervention for post-treatment cancer survivors with persistent fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Teresa; Walsh, Jane C; Groarke, AnnMarie; Moss-Morris, Rona; McGuire, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many post-treatment cancer survivors experience persistent fatigue that can disrupt attempts to resume normal everyday activities after treatment. Theoretical models that aim to explain contributory factors that initiate and sustain fatigue symptoms, or that influence the efficacy of interventions for cancer-related fatigue (CrF) require testing. Adjustment to fatigue is likely to be influenced by coping behaviours that are guided by the representations of the symptom. Objectives This paper describes the protocol for a pilot trial of a systematically and theoretically designed online intervention to enable self-management of CrF after cancer treatment. Methods and analysis This 2-armed randomised controlled pilot trial will study the feasibility and potential effectiveness of an online intervention. Participants will be allocated to either the online intervention (REFRESH (Recovery from Cancer-Related Fatigue)), or a leaflet comparator. Participants 80 post-treatment cancer survivors will be recruited for the study. Interventions An 8-week online intervention based on cognitive–behavioural therapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in fatigue as measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale (revised). Quality of life will be measured using the Quality of Life in Adult Survivors of Cancer Scale. Outcome measures will be collected at baseline, and at completion of intervention. Results The feasibility of trial procedures will be tested, as well as the effect of the intervention on the outcomes. Conclusions This study may lead to the development of a supportive resource to target representations and coping strategies of cancer survivors with CrF post-treatment. Setting Recruitment from general public in Ireland. Ethics and dissemination This trial was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at National University of Ireland Galway in January 2013. Trial results will be communicated in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial

  14. Human evaluative conditioning: acquisition trials, presentation schedule, evaluative style and contingency awareness.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, F; Eelen, P; Crombez, G; Van den Bergh, O

    1992-03-01

    Two different processes may be operative in human Pavlovian conditioning: signal learning and evaluative learning. Whereas most studies on evaluative conditioning focused on a mere demonstration of the phenomenon or on a theoretical analysis of the underlying processes, some basic parameters of evaluative learning are still unexplored. Hence, using the standard neutral picture--(dis)liked picture pairing paradigm (Baeyens, Eelen & Van den Bergh, 1990), in this study the effect of two parameters of evaluative conditioning was assessed on a between-subjects base, namely the Number of Acquisition Trials (2/5/10/20) and the Presentation Schedule of the stimulus pairs (blockwise or random). Additionally, the study included an exploratory analysis of the potential effects of the Evaluative Style of subjects (Feelers vs Thinkers, operationalized in terms of speed of emitting evaluations). Finally, the relationship between contingency awareness and evaluative learning was reassessed. Neutral-liked conditioning was found to be quadratically related to the number of acquisition trials (increase in effect up to 10 trials, decrease from 10 to 20 trials), whereas neutral-disliked conditioning linearly increased with increasing numbers of trials. Randomized vs blockwise presentation schedules of the stimulus pairs did differentially affect the overall pattern of conditioning, but in a way which was both unexpected and difficult to account for theoretically. Both the Evaluative Style of subjects and contingency awareness were demonstrated to be generally orthogonal to conditioned shifts in CS valence. Based on these findings, some practical suggestions are provided for the application of evaluating conditioning based therapeutical interventions to affective-behavioral disorders which are centred around inappropriate (dis)likes.

  15. Evaluation of pre-fabricated root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Hew, Y S; Purton, D G; Love, R M

    2001-03-01

    In this in vitro study, properties of a titanium alloy post recently introduced to the market (IntegraPost), were compared with those of a clinically proven stainless steel post (ParaPost). The IntegraPost has a unique, perforated, spherical head and a microknurled shank surface. The posts were tested for rigidity, for retention within the root canals of extracted teeth and for ability to retain composite resin cores. The two post types exhibited similar properties in core and root canal retention, however, the IntegraPost was significantly less rigid than the ParaPost. PMID:11350574

  16. Results of the Ticlid or Plavix Post-Stents (TOPPS) trial: do they justify the switch from ticlopidine to clopidogrel after coronary stent placement?

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter B

    2000-01-01

    In the Ticlid or Plavix Post-Stents (TOPPS) trial, 1016 patients undergoing successful coronary stent placement were randomized to receive aspirin and either ticlopidine or clopidogrel. In this trial, the dosages and regimens of ticlopidine and clopidogrel resembled more closely those used in most catheterization laboratories than did the two previous randomized trials comparing ticlopidine and clopidogrel. The results of the TOPPS trial support the current practice of substituting ticlopidine for clopidogrel in stent patients.

  17. Post Landsat-D advanced concept evaluation /PLACE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, L. D.; Alvarado, U. R.; Flatow, F. S.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of the Post Landsat-D Advanced Concept Evaluation (PLACE) program was to identify the key technology requirements of earth resources satellite systems for the 1985-2000 period. The program involved four efforts: (1) examination of future needs in the earth resources area, (2) creation of a space systems technology model capable of satisfying these needs, (3) identification of key technology requirements posed by this model, and (4) development of a methodology (PRISM) to assist in the priority structuring of the resulting technologies.

  18. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  19. Evaluating Library Buildings: Principles and Procedures for Post-Occupancy Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    This manual provides the steps in planning a post-occupancy evaluation of library facilities to determine how effective the designed environment is for users. Evaluating a building provides a feedback loop to the planning process and can help fine tune the building or help others. The first actions of the planners are to clarify the purpose; gain…

  20. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  1. Dynamics of pre- and post-choice behaviour: rats approximate optimal strategy in a discrete-trial decision task.

    PubMed

    Fam, Justine; Westbrook, Fred; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2015-03-22

    We simulate two types of environments to investigate how closely rats approximate optimal foraging. Rats initiated a trial where they chose between two spouts for sucrose, which was delivered at distinct probabilities. The discrete trial procedure used allowed us to observe the relationship between choice proportions, response latencies and obtained rewards. Our results show that rats approximate the optimal strategy across a range of environments that differ in the average probability of reward as well as the dynamics of the depletion-renewal cycle. We found that the constituent components of a single choice differentially reflect environmental contingencies. Post-choice behaviour, measured as the duration of time rats spent licking at the spouts on unrewarded trials, was the most sensitive index of environmental variables, adjusting most rapidly to changes in the environment. These findings have implications for the role of confidence in choice outcomes for guiding future choices. PMID:25694623

  2. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals.

    PubMed

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of "phase opposition" between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  3. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of “phase opposition” between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  4. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of “phase opposition” between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  5. CATCH: physical activity process evaluation in a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, T L; Strikmiller, P K; Stone, E J; Woods, S E; Ehlinger, S S; Romero, K A; Budman, S T

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the process evaluation model for the physical activity intervention component of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) and describes the major procedures used to monitor CATCH PE, the physical education intervention. The paper focuses on CATCH PE teacher training and in-service support as well as on the curriculum implementation. Monitoring training and support included assessing the in-service training workshops and the follow-up on-site assistance provided by staff. Monitoring the implementation included assessing the quantity and quality of CATCH PE instruction in terms of student physical activity engagement and lesson context, the fidelity of the curricular implementation, and the opportunities for other physical activity by children throughout the school day.

  6. Randomised Trial Evaluation of the In:tuition Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Sarah; Styles, Ben; Poet, Helen; White, Richard; Bradshaw, Sally; Rabiasz, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This summary reports the findings from two cluster-randomised trials of Drinkaware's school-based In:tuition life skills and alcohol education intervention: one trial of the programme for 10-11 year olds in primary schools, and another for 12-13 year olds in secondary schools. The trials have been carried out by the National Foundation for…

  7. Randomized Clinical Trial of Pre-operative Feeding to Evaluate Intestinal Barrier Function in Neonates Requiring Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Nietert, Paul J.; Graham, Eric M.; Taylor, Sarah N.; Atz, Andrew M.; Wagner, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intestinal barrier function in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery using lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio measurements and to determine correlations with early breast milk feeding. Study design This was a single-center, prospective, randomized pilot study of 27 term neonates (≥37 weeks gestation) requiring cardiac surgery who were randomized to one of two pre-operative feeding groups: 1) nil per os (NPO) vs. 2) trophic (10 cc/kg/day) breast milk feeds. At three time points (pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14), subjects were administered an oral lactulose/mannitol solution and subsequent L/M ratios were measured using gas chromatography, with higher ratios indicative of increased intestinal permeability. Trends over time in the mean urine L/M ratios for each group were estimated using a general linear mixed model. Results There were no adverse events related to pre-operative trophic feeding. In the NPO group (n=13), the mean urine L/M ratios at pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14 were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.17, respectively. In the trophic breast milk feeds group (n=14), the mean urine L/M ratios at pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14 were 0.09, 0.19, and 0.15, respectively. Both groups had significantly higher L/M ratios at post-op day 7 and 14 compared with pre-op (p<0.05). Conclusions Neonates have increased intestinal permeability after cardiac surgery extending to at least post-op day 14. This pilot study was not powered to detect differences in benefit or adverse events comparing NPO with breast milk feeds. Further studies to identify mechanisms of intestinal injury and therapeutic interventions are warranted. Trial registration Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01475357. PMID:25962930

  8. Neuromuscular evaluation of post-orthodontic stability: an experimental protocol.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Marciandi, Paolo V; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Dellavia, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella

    2002-01-01

    To prevent relapse after orthodontic treatment, retention is often considered indispensable. Soft tissues are thought to have a significant influence on dental movements. To quantify the influence of masticatory muscles on post-treatment relapse, and in an attempt to avoid unnecessary procedures, 2 male orthodontic patients (13 and 30 years old at debonding) were followed up. The patients completed 2 years of fixed orthodontic treatment and received no post-orthodontic retention. After 1 week and again after 6 months, alginate impressions of dental arches and a surface electromyographic (EMG) assessment of the masseter and temporalis muscles during maximum voluntary clenching were performed. The younger patient received surface EMG monitoring once a month for the first 6 months and at the 1-year follow-up appointment. Arch dimensions and the 3-dimensional inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) were measured using a computerized digitizer. Symmetry in muscular contraction was measured by the percentage overlapping coefficient (POC), and potential lateral displacing components were assessed by the torque coefficient (TC). At the 6-month follow-up, no clinical modifications were observed. Quantitative evaluation assessed that arch dimensions had changed slightly (up to 1 mm). While the adolescent patient had no modifications in FACC inclinations, the 30-year-old patient showed significant alterations (up to 18 degrees). In all examinations of the adolescent patient, POC was higher than 86% and TC was lower than 10%. In the adult, POC was inside the normal range, while all TCs were higher than 10.5%. The larger TC measured in the adult may explain the larger modifications in the 3-dimensional position of his dental crowns. In conclusion, a surface EMG assessment may help in the detection of patients who might need post-orthodontic retention.

  9. Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need not be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sofaer, Neema; Strech, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background: researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug trial participants should, or need not be ensured PTA to the trial drug and the uses of such reasons. Data sources: databases in science/medicine, law and ethics, thesis databases, bibliographies, research ethics books and included publications’ notes/bibliographies. Publication selection: a publication was included if it included a reason as above. See article for detailed inclusion conditions. Data extraction and analysis: two reviewers extracted and analyzed data on publications and reasons. Results: of 2060 publications identified, 75 were included. These mentioned reasons based on morality, legality, interests/incentives, or practicality, comprising 36 broad (235 narrow) types of reason. None of the included publications, which included informal reviews and reports by official bodies, mentioned more than 22 broad (59 narrow) types. For many reasons, publications differed about the reason’s interpretation, implications and/or persuasiveness. Publications differed also regarding costs, feasibility and legality of PTA. Limitations: reason types could be applied differently. The quality of reasons was not measured. Conclusion: this review captured a greater variety of reasons and of their uses than any included publication. Decisions based on informal reviews or sub-sets of literature are likely to be biased. Research is needed on PTA ethics, costs, feasibility and legality and on assessing the quality of reason-based literature. PMID:21754950

  10. Effect of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and VO2 1 and 8 Days Post Loading

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Cameron P.; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E.; Guelfi, Kym J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 6 days of sodium phosphate (SP) (50 mg·kg·FFM-1·day-1) or placebo (PL) supplementation in trained cyclists on either 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) (~3-4 min) or 250 kJ (59.7 Kcal) (~10-12 min) time trials performances both 1 and 8 days post-supplementation. Trials were performed in a counterbalanced crossover design, with a 28-day washout period between supplementation phases. No significant differences, moderate-large ES (d) or likely (or greater) smallest worthwhile change (SWC) values were recorded for time to completion and mean power output on days 1 and 8 post-supplementation, both within and between SP and PL for either the 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) trials. In the 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) trial (only) first minute VO2 tended to be higher in SP8 than both PL8 (d = 0.60; 88/10/2 SWC) and SP1 (d = 0.47: 82/15/3 SWC), as was mean VO2 (PL8: d = 0.77; 93/6/1 SWC and SP1: d = 0.84; 90/8/3 SWC). No significant differences were found for heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate post-exercise within or between any trials, while serum phosphate values were not different before or after supplementation with SP or PL. In conclusion, this study showed a tendency for increased VO2 in a short duration (100 kJ/ 23.9 Kcal: ~3-4 min) cycling test on day 8 after SP supplementation, but no differences in 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) time trials performances were observed. Key Points Studies investigating the effects of sodium phosphate loading on shorter duration (<15 min) and higher intensity exercise performance are lacking, as is research on how long any ergogenic effect may last. Loading did not improve cycling time trial (~3-4 min and 10-12 min) performance either 1 or 8 days after supplementation. Future studies should investigate the effect of sodium phosphate loading on repeated sprints and simulated cycling road race performance over extended durations (>30 min), where it may be likely to have a more beneficial effect

  11. Honey Versus Diphenhydramine for Post-Tonsillectomy Pain Relief in Pediatric Cases: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Soroush; Kheiri, Soleyman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgeries done worldwide and often the first one a child sustains. Pain relief after tonsillectomy is helpful for oral feeding after surgery. Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine have been conventionally used for reducing pain. This study was conducted to compare the effect of honey and diphehydramine on pain relief after tonsillectomy. Materials and Methods: For this randomized clinical trial study, 120 patients of 5 to 12 years undergoing tonsillectomy were recruited. The patients were divided into four groups randomly. After tonsillectomy and beginning of eating, Group A took 5cc honey alone every hour, Group B was given 5 cc 50% honey (mixed with water) every hour, group C was treated with 1mg/kg diphenhydramine every 6 hours and group D was observed without any intervention. In all patients, severity of the pain was evaluated by ocher questionnaire at recovery, and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the repeated measures ANOVA (SPSS version 17). Results: The repeated ANOVA showed a significant decreasing trend of pain scores during the study for both pain scales (p <0.05), but the rate of trend was similar between the four groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant difference in pain was detected among the groups. Conclusion: Although honey can help the pain decrease, more research is supported for confirmation of this effect. PMID:25954673

  12. Suppository naproxen reduces incidence and severity of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: Randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of rectally administered naproxen for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: This double-blind randomized control trial conducted from January 2013 to April 2014 at the Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center in Rasht, Iran. A total of 324 patients were selected from candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP by using the simple sampling method. Patients received a single dose of Naproxen (500 mg; n = 162) or a placebo (n = 162) per rectum immediately before ERCP. The overall incidence of PEP, incidence of mild to severe PEP, serum amylase levels and adverse effects were measured. The primary outcome measure was the development of pancreatitis onset of pain in the upper abdomen and elevation of the serum amylase level to > 3 × the upper normal limit (60-100 IU/L) within 24 h after ERCP. The severity of PEP was classified according to the duration of therapeutic intervention for PEP: mild, 2-3 d; moderate 4-10 d; and severe, > 10 d and/or necessitated surgical or intensive treatment, or contributed to death. RESULTS: PEP occurred in 12% (40/324) of participants, and was significantly more frequent in the placebo group compared to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). Of the participants, 25.9% (84/324) developed hyperamylasemia within 2 h of procedure completion, among whom only 35 cases belonged to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). The incidence of PEP was significantly higher in female sex, in patients receiving pancreatic duct injection, more than 3 times pancreatic duct cannulations, and ERCP duration more than 40 min (Ps < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the procedures or factors that might increase the risk of PEP, sphincterotomy, precut requirement, biliary duct injection and number of pancreatic duct cannulations. In the subgroup of patients with pancreatic duct injection, the rate of pancreatitis in

  13. Post-Tooth Extraction Bacteraemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial on the Efficacy of Chlorhexidine Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Mario; Prada-López, Isabel; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Amaral, Barbas; de los Angeles, Casares-De-Cal María; Tomás, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the development of post-extraction bacteraemia (PEB) after the prophylactic use of chlorhexidine (CHX). Patients and Methods A total of 201 patients who underwent a tooth extraction were randomly distributed into four groups: 52 received no prophylaxis (CONTROL), 50 did a mouthwash with 0.2% CHX before the tooth extraction (CHX-MW), 51 did a mouthwash with 0.2% CHX and a subgingival irrigation with 1% CHX (CHX-MW/SUB_IR) and 48 did a mouthwash with 0.2% CHX and a continuous supragingival irrigation with 1% CHX (CHX-MW/SUPRA_IR). Peripheral venous blood samples were collected at baseline, 30 seconds after performing the mouthwash and the subgingival or supragingival irrigation, and at 30 seconds and 15 minutes after completion of the tooth extraction. Blood samples were analysed applying conventional microbiological cultures under aerobic and anaerobic conditions performing bacterial identification of the isolates. Results The prevalences of PEB in the CONTROL, CHX-MW, CHX-MW/SUB_IR and CHX-MWSUPRA_IR groups were 52%, 50%, 55% and 50%, respectively, at 30 seconds and 23%, 4%, 10% and 27%, respectively, at 15 minutes. The prevalence of PEB at 15 minutes was significantly higher in the CONTROL group than in the CHX-MW group (23% versus 4%; p = 0.005). At the same time, no differences were found between CONTROL group and CHX-MW/SUB_IR or CHX-MW/SUPRA_IR groups. Streptococci (mostly viridans group streptococci) were the most frequently identified bacteria (69–79%). Conclusions Performing a 0.2% CHX mouthwash significantly reduces the duration of PEB. Subgingival irrigation with 1% CHX didn’t increase the efficacy of the mouthwash while supragingival irrigation even decreased this efficacy, probably due to the influence of these maneuvers on the onset of bacteraemia. Clinical Relevance These results confirm the suitability of performing a mouthwash with 0.2% CHX before tooth extractions in order to reduce the duration of PEB. This practice

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  15. One versus two years of elastic compression stockings for prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome (OCTAVIA study): randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mol, G C; van de Ree, M A; Klok, F A; Tegelberg, M J A M; Sanders, F B M; Koppen, S; de Weerdt, O; Koster, T; Hovens, M M C; Kaasjager, H A H; Brouwer, R E; Kragten, E; Schaar, C G; Spiering, W; Arnold, W P; Biesma, D H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether stopping elastic compression stockings (ECS) after 12 months is non-inferior to continuing them for 24 months after proximal deep venous thrombosis. Design Multicentre single blind non-inferiority randomised controlled trial. Setting Outpatient clinics in eight teaching hospitals in the Netherlands, including one university medical centre. Participants Patients compliant with compression therapy for 12 months after symptomatic, ultrasound proven proximal deep venous thrombosis of the leg. Interventions Continuation or cessation of ECS 12 months after deep venous thrombosis. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome 24 months after diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis, as assessed by the standardised Villalta scale in an intention to treat analysis. The predefined non-inferiority margin was 10%. The main secondary outcome was quality of life (VEINES-QOL/Sym). Results 518 patients compliant with ECS and free of post-thrombotic syndrome were randomised one year after diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis to stop or continue ECS therapy for another year. In the stop-ECS group, 51 of 256 patients developed post-thrombotic syndrome, with an incidence of 19.9% (95% confidence interval 16% to 24%). In the continue-ECS group, 34 of 262 patients developed post-thrombotic syndrome (incidence 13.0%, 9.9% to 17%), of whom 85% used ECS six or seven days a week during the study period, for an absolute difference of 6.9% (95% confidence interval upper limit 12.3%). Because the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval exceeds the predefined margin of 10%, non-inferiority was not reached. The number needed to treat to prevent one case of post-thrombotic syndrome by continuing ECS was 14 (95% confidence interval lower limit 8). Quality of life did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion Stopping ECS after one year in compliant patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis seemed not to be non

  16. Study protocol for the evaluation of an Infant Simulator based program delivered in schools: a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a school based program developed to prevent teenage pregnancy. The program includes students taking care of an Infant Simulator; despite growing popularity and an increasing global presence of such programs, there is no published evidence of their long-term impact. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP) program by investigating pre-conceptual health and risk behaviours, teen pregnancy and the resultant birth outcomes, early child health and maternal health. Methods and Design Fifty-seven schools (86% of 66 eligible secondary schools) in Perth, Australia were recruited to the clustered (by school) randomised trial, with even randomisation to the intervention and control arms. Between 2003 and 2006, the VIP program was administered to 1,267 participants in the intervention schools, while 1,567 participants in the non-intervention schools received standard curriculum. Participants were all female and aged between 13-15 years upon recruitment. Pre and post-intervention questionnaires measured short-term impact and participants are now being followed through their teenage years via data linkage to hospital medical records, abortion clinics and education records. Participants who have a live birth are interviewed by face-to-face interview. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards regression will test for differences in pregnancy, birth and abortion rates during the teenage years between the study arms. Discussion This protocol paper provides a detailed overview of the trial design as well as initial results in the form of participant flow. The authors describe the intervention and its delivery within the natural school setting and discuss the practical issues in the conduct of the trial, including recruitment. The trial is pragmatic and will directly inform those who provide Infant Simulator based programs

  17. Immunotherapy trial as diagnostic test in evaluating patients with presumed autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eoin P.; Saito, Yuri A.; Lennon, Vanda A.; McKeon, Andrew; Fealey, Robert D.; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Murray, Joseph A.; Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.; Fox, Jean C.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic gastrointestinal dysmotility greatly impacts the quality of life. Treatment options are limited and generally symptomatic. Neural autoimmunity is an under-recognized etiology. We evaluated immunotherapy as an aid to diagnosing autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID). Methods 23 subjects evaluated at the Mayo Clinic for suspected AGID (August 2006-February 2014) fulfilled the following criteria: 1) prominent symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility with abnormalities on scintigraphy-manometry; 2) serological evidence or personal/family history of autoimmune disease; 3) treated by immunotherapy on a trial basis, 6-12 weeks (intravenous immune globulin, 16; or methylprednisolone, 5; or both, 2). Response was defined subjectively (symptomatic improvement) and objectively (gastrointestinal scintigraphy/manometry studies). Key Results Symptoms at presentation: constipation, 18/23; nausea or vomiting, 18/23; weight loss, 17/23; bloating, 13/23; and early satiety, 4/23. Thirteen patients had personal/family history of autoimmunity. Sixteen had neural autoantibodies and 19 had extra-intestinal autonomic testing abnormalities. Cancer was detected in 3 patients. Pre-immunotherapy scintigraphy revealed slowed transit (19/21 evaluated; gastric, 11; small-bowel, 12; colonic, 11); manometry studies were abnormal in 7/8. Post-immunotherapy, 17 (74%) had improvement (both symptomatic and scintigraphic, 5; symptomatic alone, 8; scintigraphic alone, 4). Nine responders reevaluated had scintigraphic evidence of improvement. The majority of responders who were re-evaluated had improvement in autonomic testing (6 of 7) or manometry (2 of 2). Conclusions & Inferences This proof of principle study illustrates the importance of considering an autoimmune basis for idiopathic gastrointestinal dysmotility and supports the utility of a diagnostic trial of immunotherapy. PMID:25039328

  18. Evaluation of post-mortem lateral cerebral ventricle changes using sequential scans during post-mortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Iwao; Shimizu, Akinobu; Saito, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hideto; Vogel, Hermann; Püschel, Klaus; Heinemann, Axel

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated post-mortem lateral cerebral ventricle (LCV) changes using computed tomography (CT). Subsequent periodical CT scans termed "sequential scans" were obtained for three cadavers. The first scan was performed immediately after the body was transferred from the emergency room to the institute of legal medicine. Sequential scans were obtained and evaluated for 24 h at maximum. The time of death had been determined in the emergency room. The sequential scans enabled us to observe periodical post-mortem changes in CT images. The series of continuous LCV images obtained up to 24 h (two cases)/16 h (1 case) after death was evaluated. The average Hounsfield units (HU) within the LCVs progressively increased, and LCV volume progressively decreased over time. The HU in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased at an individual rate proportional to the post-mortem interval (PMI). Thus, an early longitudinal radiodensity change in the CSF could be potential indicator of post-mortem interval (PMI). Sequential imaging scans reveal post-mortem changes in the CSF space which may reflect post-mortem brain alterations. Further studies are needed to evaluate the proposed CSF change markers in correlation with other validated PMI indicators.

  19. Evaluation of post-surface conditioning to improve interfacial adhesion in post-core restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sumitha, Mylswamy; Kothandaraman, Rajkumar; Sekar, Mahalaxmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the influence of different post-surface treatments on the interfacial strength between epoxy resin-based fiber posts and methacrylate-based resin composites that are employed as core build-up materials. Materials and Methods: Forty clear posts were divided into four groups of 10 each. The different surface treatments used were etching with alkaline potassium permanganate, 10% hydrogen peroxide, 37% phosphoric acid, and silanization alone. After etching and thorough rinsing, a single layer of silane was applied to the post surface. Then the post was placed in a rectangular plastic matrix and core bulid-up was done using Multi Core, a dual cured composite resin. A slab of uniform thickness, with the post in the center and the core build-up composite on either side was created. The specimens were cut so as to obtain microtensile sticks that were loaded in tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and the paired T test for post-hoc comparisons. Results: The results achieved with potassium permanganate had a significant influence on microtensile interfacial bond strength values with the tested material. Conclusion: Surface chemical treatments of the resin phase of fiber posts enhance the silanization efficiency of the quartz fiber phase, so that the adhesion in the post/core unit may be considered as a net sum of chemical and micromechanical retention. PMID:21691501

  20. Randomised field trial to evaluate serological response after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Bulut, A N; Gubbins, S; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2015-02-01

    Despite years of biannual mass vaccination of cattle, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains uncontrolled in Anatolian Turkey. To evaluate protection after mass vaccination we measured post-vaccination antibodies in a cohort of cattle (serotypes O, A and Asia-1). To obtain results reflecting typical field protection, participants were randomly sampled from across Central and Western Turkey after routine vaccination. Giving two-doses one month apart is recommended when cattle are first vaccinated against FMD. However, due to cost and logistics, this is not routinely performed in Turkey, and elsewhere. Nested within the cohort, we conducted a randomised trial comparing post-vaccination antibodies after a single-dose versus a two-dose primary vaccination course. Four to five months after vaccination, only a third of single-vaccinated cattle had antibody levels above a threshold associated with protection. A third never reached this threshold, even at peak response one month after vaccination. It was not until animals had received three vaccine doses in their lifetime, vaccinating every six months, that most (64% to 86% depending on serotype) maintained antibody levels above this threshold. By this time cattle would be >20 months old with almost half the population below this age. Consequently, many vaccinated animals will be unprotected for much of the year. Compared to a single-dose, a primary vaccination course of two-doses greatly improved the level and duration of immunity. We concluded that the FMD vaccination programme in Anatolian Turkey did not produce the high levels of immunity required. Higher potency vaccines are now used throughout Turkey, with a two-dose primary course in certain areas. Monitoring post-vaccination serology is an important component of evaluation for FMD vaccination programmes. However, consideration must be given to which antigens are present in the test, the vaccine and the field virus. Differences between these antigens affect the

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial of Motivational Enhancement of Substance Use Treatment among Incarcerated Adolescents: Post-Release Condom Non-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Golembeske, Charles; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Miranda, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Evaluated impact of motivational enhancement (ME) of substance abuse treatment compared to relaxation training (RT) on sex without condoms (overall and involving substance use) 3 months following release among incarcerated adolescents. This randomized clinical trial involved 114 incarcerated adolescents from the Northeast. Regression analyses…

  2. Evaluating cognitive effort in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Turner, Travis H; Renfroe, Jenna B; Morella, Kristen; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-09-01

    Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropsychiatric conditions involve cognitive outcome measures; however, validity of cognitive data relies on adequate effort during testing, and such screening is seldom performed. Given well-established rates of 10 to 30% poor effort in clinical settings, this is not a trivial concern. This preliminary study evaluated effort during cognitive testing in an RCT of omega-3 supplementation to reduce suicidality in a high-risk psychiatric population. An interim analysis of sustained attentions measures from the Connors Performance Test (CPT-2) at baseline for the first 60 participants was conducted. Previously validated cut points to detect insufficient effort on the CPT-2 were applied. At baseline, 12% (7) were identified as giving poor effort. Follow-up analyses indicated less psychiatric distress and suicidality among those who gave poor effort. Results suggest comparable likelihood of a poor effort on cognitive testing in clinical and RCT participation. Reduced psychiatric distress in the poor effort group raises concern regarding interpretation of other measures. The importance of screening cognitive data for effort in RCTs is highlighted. Future studies will examine effort at follow-up visits, and explore relationships to attrition, adherence, and response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. An evaluation of procedures for assessing competency to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Roesch, R; Golding, S

    1987-01-01

    In a field experiment involving 120 defendants at Bridgewater State Hospital in Massachusetts, the authors evaluated three instruments for assessing competency to stand trial: the Competency Screening Test (CST), Competency Assessment Instrument (CAI), and Interdisciplinary Fitness Interview (IFI). The CST (a paper-and-pencil test) was administered by a research assistant and scored by trained graduate students. Lawyers, psychologists, and social workers were recruited and trained in the use of the other instruments, then assigned as individuals (CAI) or teams (IFI) to conduct interviews and assess subjects. The performance of the project interviewers was compared against two yardsticks: (1) actual decisions reached by the regular Bridgewater staff, and (2) a consensus of two nationally respected experts who reviewed the cases and formed independent competency judgments. Both the CAI and IFI performed well under these conditions, indicating that one-time interviews by well-trained persons can lead to accurate competency decisions in the majority of cases. The authors conclude that hospitalization for competency assessment is rarely necessary.

  4. Comfort evaluation of maternity support garments in a wear trial.

    PubMed

    Ho, S S; Yu, W; Lao, T T; Chow, D H K; Chung, J W; Li, Y

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the wear comfort of eight commercially available maternity support garments. The thermophysiological, sensory/tactile and movement comfort were assessed in a wear trial using a 19-item questionnaire. Fourteen pregnant Chinese women aged 32.3 +/- 4.2 years were recruited from a local obstetric clinic. The results show that the tested garments generally provided greater sensory comfort than thermophysiological comfort. The thermophysiological comfort was mainly influenced by the fibre contents and breathability. Significant linear relationships were found between material appearance and hand feel (r = 0.86, p < 0.001), and between non-itchiness and no red mark (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Movement comfort was influenced by the garment type and style features. Overall, the soft, good-fit, cotton/elastane maternity brief was perceived as the best product. The findings of comfort needs in pregnant women and the effects of various garment attributes would be helpful for the development of maternity support garment design criteria that are required to satisfy critical ergonomic needs. Low back pain during pregnancy is a common and significant health problem. A maternity support garment is regarded as a convenient and safe device to stabilise the lumbar spine so as to relieve pain. However, patient compliance is likely to be affected by discomfort and inconvenience. The results of this study provide guidance for the optimal design of maternity support clothing.

  5. PROSPERA: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating rasagiline in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Nuebling, Georg; Hensler, Mira; Paul, Sabine; Zwergal, Andreas; Crispin, Alexander; Lorenzl, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    To date, pharmacological treatment options for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurodegenerative tauopathy, are limited. The MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline has shown neuroprotective effects in preclinical models of neurodegeneration. To evaluate the safety, tolerability and therapeutic effect of rasagiline on symptom progression in PSP. In this 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 patients fulfilling the NINDS-PSP criteria were randomized to 1 mg/d rasagiline or placebo. The combined primary endpoint included symptom progression as measured by the PSP rating scale (PSP-RS) and the requirement of L-dopa rescue medication. Secondary endpoints included Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SEADL), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Mini Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery and posturographic measurements. Of the 44 patients randomized, 26 completed the trial per protocol. Rasagiline was well tolerated, with a slight increase of known side effects (hallucinations, ventricular extrasystoles). No effect on the primary endpoint (p = 0.496) was detected. Symptom progression averaged at 11.2 (rasagiline) and 10.8 (placebo) points per year (ΔPSP-RS). No difference was seen in SEADL, depression, cognitive function, frontal executive function and posturographic measurements. Post hoc analyses of PSP-RS subdomains indicate a potential beneficial effect in the "limb motor" subdomain, whereas performance appeared lower in the "mentation" and "history" subdomains in the treatment group. While rasagiline is well tolerated in PSP, a beneficial effect on overall symptom progression was not detected. Post hoc analyses suggest the implementation of more specific endpoints in future studies. PMID:27230855

  6. Effect of post-trial L-NAME administration on cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Pudiak, Cindy M; Bozarth, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    This study determined if Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) administered after the cocaine-conditioning trial attenuated the development of sensitization to cocaine's locomotor-stimulating effect and secondly, determined if L-NAME blocked conditioned-locomotor activity (LMA) elicited by a saline-challenge injection. Results revealed that cocaine-injected animals (10 mg/kg, i.p.) showed enhanced locomotor activity across the three conditioning trials (all p's < .05). Cocaine-injected animals administered L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) after each conditioning trial showed a slight increase in cocaine-stimulated LMA from the first to the second conditioning trial (all p's < .05) and no further increases in LMA thereafter. A saline-challenge injection administered 72 hr after the last conditioning trial revealed that cocaine-injected animals displayed as much locomotor stimulation to a saline injection as they did during their initial exposure to cocaine on the first conditioning trial - indicating the development of cocaine-conditioned LMA. The present findings show that L-NAME administered after the cocaine-conditioning trial attenuates the development of sensitization to cocaine's locomotor-stimulating effect. The failure of L-NAME to block cocaine-conditioned LMA suggests that the pharmacological and conditioning mechanisms of sensitization can be dissociated. It is unlikely that L-NAME's effect is due to a sedative action produced by residual L-NAME since animals administered L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 consecutive days exhibited a similar responsiveness to a cocaine challenge administered 3 and 10 days following the termination of L-NAME administration. These data support a role for nitric oxide's involvement in the neuroadaptive responses that result from continued stimulant administration and demonstrate the importance of conditioned drug effects.

  7. Evaluation of cognitive restructuring for post-traumatic stress disorder in people with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Mueser, Kim T.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Xie, Haiyi; Lu, Weili; Yanos, Philip T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Duva, Stephanie Marcello; Minsky, Shula; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.; McHugo, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) programme designed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with severe mental illness, including breathing retraining, education and cognitive restructuring, was shown to be more effective than usual services. Aims To evaluate the incremental benefit of adding cognitive restructuring to the breathing retraining and education components of the CBT programme (trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00494650). Method In all, 201 people with severe mental illness and PTSD were randomised to 12- to 16-session CBT or a 3-session brief treatment programme (breathing retraining and education). The primary outcome was PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were PTSD diagnosis, other symptoms, functioning and quality of life. Results There was greater improvement in PTSD symptoms and functioning in the CBT group than in the brief treatment group, with both groups improving on other outcomes and effects maintained 1-year post-treatment. Conclusions Cognitive restructuring has a significant impact beyond breathing retraining and education in the CBT programme, reducing PTSD symptoms and improving functioning in people with severe mental illness. PMID:25858178

  8. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Deepa M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Dynan, William S.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M.; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M.

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  9. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Deepa M; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R; Costes, Sylvain V; Doetsch, Paul W; Dynan, William S; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D; Peterson, Leif E; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  10. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Deepa M; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R; Costes, Sylvain V; Doetsch, Paul W; Dynan, William S; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D; Peterson, Leif E; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  11. Glyceryl Trinitrate for Prevention of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis and Improve the Rate of Cannulation: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Liu, Shan; Li, Youming

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Several clinical trials used glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) to prevent the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, the results were still controversial. Objective To conduct a meta-analysis of published, full-length, randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of prophylactic GTN on the prevention of PEP, improve the rate of cannulation and the prevention of hyperamylasemia. Methods Literature searches were conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and Web of Knowledge databases, using keywords "post-ERCP" and "pancreatitis" and limited in randomized controlled trials. Results Twelve RCTs involving 2649 patients were included. Eleven RCTs compared GTN with placebo for PEP prevention. Meta-analysis showed the overall incidence of PEP was significantly reduced by GTN treatment (RR 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87). Nevertheless, GTN administration did not decrease the incidence of moderate to severe PEP (RR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.42-1.15). Subgroup analyses revealed that GTN administered by sublingual was more effective than transdermal and topical in reducing the incidence of PEP. Besides, the prophylactic effect of GTN was far more obvious in the group of high PEP incidence than in the group of low PEP incidence. Additionally, the incidence of hyperamylasemia was significantly reduced by GTN treatment (RR 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54-0.90). No differences of the successful cannulation rate of bile ducts (RR 1.03; 95% CI, 0.99-1.06) attributable to GTN were observed. Conclusion Prophylactic use of GTN reduced the overall incidence of PEP and hyperamylasemia. However, GTN was not helpful for the severity of PEP and the rate of cannulation. PMID:24098392

  12. Comparative evaluation of retention of prefabricated and conventional cast post: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Suchismita; Begum, Zubeda; Choudhary, Prashant; Tripathi, Siddhi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the retention of various prefabricated posts and to compare them with that of the conventional cast post. Materials and Methods: A sample of 60 freshly extracted single-rooted human mandibular first premolars were sectioned horizontally, 1 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into four groups consisting of carbon fiber posts, glass fiber posts, stainless steel posts and cast metal posts. Cast metal post was the control group. Each group contained 15 specimen. The post space of 9 mm depth was prepared using specific drill supplied by the manufacturer. Resin patterns of the prepared post spaces were fabricated for 15 specimen and were cast in nickel chromium base metal alloy. All the posts were cemented with self-adhesive resin cement and mounted in acrylic cylinders. The teeth were subjected to tensile pull-out test using a universal testing machine. The force required to dislodge each post from the teeth was recorded. The data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test. Results: The bond strength of all the prefabricated posts was significantly lower than the conventional cast post. Among the prefabricated posts highest bond strength was obtained for prefabricated stainless steel post and lowest for carbon fiber posts. There was no significant difference in the mean bond strength obtained for stainless steel and glass fiber post. Conclusion: Though no single prefabricated post could achieve results close to the control group, most retentive among the experimental group were the stainless steel posts. However, conditions where nonmetallic posts are indicated most preferred type of post can be the glass fiber posts. PMID:25254191

  13. Steps and Time to Process Clinical Trials at the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program

    PubMed Central

    Dilts, David M.; Sandler, Alan B.; Cheng, Steven K.; Crites, Joshua S.; Ferranti, Lori B.; Wu, Amy Y.; Finnigan, Shanda; Friedman, Steven; Mooney, Margaret; Abrams, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To examine the processes and document the calendar time required for the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) to evaluate and approve phase III clinical trials. Methods Process steps were documented by (1) interviewing CTEP and CIRB staff regarding the steps required to activate a trial from initial concept submission to trial activation by a cooperative group, (2) reviewing standard operating procedures, and (3) inspecting trial records and documents for selected trials to identify any additional steps. Calendar time was collected from initial concept submission to activation using retrospective data from the CTEP Protocol and Information Office. Results At least 296 distinct processes are required for phase III trial activation: at least 239 working steps, 52 major decision points, 20 processing loops, and 11 stopping points. Of the 195 trials activated during the January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2007, study period, a sample of 167 (85.6%) was used for gathering timing data. Median calendar days from initial formal concept submission to CTEP to trial activation by a cooperative group was 602 days (interquartile range, 454 to 861 days). This time has not significantly changed over the past 8 years. There is a high variation in the time required to activate a clinical trial. Conclusion Because of their complexity, the overall development time for phase III clinical trials is lengthy, process laden, and highly variable. To streamline the process, a solution must be sought that includes all parties involved in developing trials. PMID:19255315

  14. Pre-Study protocol MagPEP: a multicentre randomized controlled trial of magnesium sulphate in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In spite of continuing research, no pharmacologic agent capable of effectively reducing the incidence of ERCP-induced pancreatitis has found its way into clinical practise. A number of experimental studies suggest that intrapancreatic calcium concentrations play an important role in the initiation of intracellular protease activation, an initiating step in the course of acute pancreatitis. Magnesium can act as a calcium-antagonist and counteracts effects in calcium signalling. It can thereby attenuate the intracellular activation of proteolytic digestive enzymes in the pancreas and reduces the severity of experimental pancreatitis when administered either intravenously or as a food supplement. Methods We designed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study to test whether the administration of intravenous magnesium sulphate before and after ERCP reduces the incidence and the severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis. A total of 502 adult patients with a medical indication for ERCP are to be randomized to receive either 4930 mg magnesium sulphate (= 20 mmol magnesium) or placebo 60 min before and 6 hours after ERCP. The incidence of clinical post-ERCP pancreatitis, hyperlipasemia, pain levels, use of analgetics and length of hospital stay will be evaluated. Conclusions If magnesium sulphate is found to be effective in preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis, this inexpensive agent with limited adverse effects could be used as a routine pharmacological prophylaxis. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46556454 PMID:23320650

  15. Evaluation of multisystemic therapy pilot services in the Systemic Therapy for At Risk Teens (START) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for clinically effective and cost-effective methods to manage antisocial and criminal behaviour in adolescents. Youth conduct disorder is increasingly prevalent in the UK and is associated with a range of negative outcomes. Quantitative systematic reviews carried out for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have identified multisystemic therapy, an intensive, multimodal, home-based, family intervention for youth with serious antisocial behaviour, as one of the most promising interventions for reducing antisocial or offending behaviour and improving individual and family functioning. Previous international trials of multisystemic therapy have yielded mixed outcomes, and it is questionable to what extent positive US findings can be generalised to a wider UK mental health and juvenile justice context. This paper describes the protocol for the Systemic Therapy for At Risk Teens (START) trial, a multicentre UK-wide randomised controlled trial of multisystemic therapy in antisocial adolescents at high risk of out-of-home placement. Methods/Design The trial is being conducted at 10 sites across the UK. Seven hundred participants and their families will be recruited and randomised on a 1:1 basis to multisystemic therapy or management as usual. Treatments are offered over a period of 3 to 5 months, with follow-up to 18 months post-randomisation. The primary outcome is out-of-home placement at 18 months. Secondary outcomes include offending rates, total service and criminal justice sector costs, and participant well-being and educational outcomes. Data will be gathered from police computer records, the National Pupil Database, and interview and self-report measures administered to adolescents, parents and teachers. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis, using a logistic regression with random effects for the primary outcome and Cox regressions and linear mixed-effects models for secondary outcomes

  16. Field trial evaluation of a reo-coronavirus calf diarrhea vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, E T; Bass, E P; Beckenhauer, W H

    1977-01-01

    Field trials were conducted using an experimental, modified live virus, oral vaccine for prevention of reo- and coronavirus calf diarrhea. Prior to the trials, one or both of the specific causative agents were identified from affected calves in each participating herd. In 21 herds, sequential trials were conducted in which results of uninterrupted vaccination were compared with disease rates during a preceding or subsequent control period. In these herds there was a statistically significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality from disease in 1,598 vaccinates compared with the rates in 829 prevaccination control calves. Morbidity and mortality in 206 post-vaccination control calves rose marginally above the rates in the same vaccinates. In 26 other herds, where double blind trials were conducted, rates of morbidity and mortality from disease were virtually the same for 1,080 vaccinated calves and 355 placebo calves. Vaccinates in the sequential trials had the lowest morbidity and mortality rates of any test group in either field trial format. In a selected dairy herd, both field trial formats were implemented and the results compared. In the double blind trial, vaccinates and placebo calves had comparable rates of morbidity and mortality from disease. When a sequential trial was later implemented, a statistically significant reduction in morbidity and mortality occurred in vaccinates compared with rates in control calves. PMID:193622

  17. Post-trial administration of H1 histamine receptor blocker improves appetitive reversal learning and memory in goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Spieler, R E; Nelson, C A; Huston, J P; Mattioli, R

    1999-12-17

    Based on the hypothesis that neuronal histamine exerts an inhibitory influence on learning and reinforcement, goldfish were tested for post-trial effects of the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (CPA) on learning the location of a food source in one of two compartments, one black the other white, with a feeder located in each compartment. Testing was carried out over 6 days. On the training day a food pellet was placed into the feeder of one of the compartments. After consumption of the food the fish were injected i.p. with either vehicle or CPA either immediately after training or 3 h later. Twenty-four-hours later, food was placed in the same compartment and the time to begin feeding was recorded. On the next day the location of the food pellet was reversed, and testing was continued for 4 days. On the first test day the time to begin feeding was significantly longer for the vehicle injected fish as compared with those injected with CPA. The vehicle group also took longer to begin feeding than the CPA group on the first reversal test day. The results of the 3-h delay groups indicated no significant differences between vehicle and drug for any experimental session. These results suggest that post-trial blockade of the H1 histamine receptor can affect appetitive learning in goldfish either by improving long-term memory consolidation and/or by the additive reinforcing effects of CPA (known from previous studies) on behavior.

  18. Evaluation of Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing. Part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. S.; Iannello, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing Report was written in response to an action issued by the Ares Project Control Board (PCB). The action for the Ares I Avionics & Software Chief Engineer and the Avionics Integration and Vehicle Systems Test Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Manager in the Vehicle Integration Office was to develop a set of guidelines for electrical cable harnesses. Research showed that post-installation tests have been done since the Apollo era. For Ares I-X, the requirement for post-installation testing was removed to make it consistent with the avionics processes used on the Atlas V expendable launch vehicle. Further research for the report involved surveying government and private sector launch vehicle developers, military and commercial aircraft, spacecraft developers, and harness vendors. Responses indicated crewed launch vehicles and military aircraft perform post-installation tests. Key findings in the report were as follows: Test requirements identify damage, human-rated vehicles should be tested despite the identification of statistically few failures, data does not support the claim that post-installation testing damages the harness insulation system, and proper planning can reduce overhead associated with testing. The primary recommendation of the report is for the Ares projects to retain the practice of post-fabrication and post-installation cable harness testing.

  19. Evidence-based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Benedetta E; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    The NoTrap! (Noncadiamointrappola!) program is a school-based intervention, which utilizes a peer-led approach to prevent and combat both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the third Edition of the program in accordance with the recent criteria for evidence-based interventions. Towards this aim, two quasi-experimental trials involving adolescents (age M = 14.91, SD = .98) attending their first year at different high schools were conducted. In Trial 1 (control group, n = 171; experimental group, n = 451), latent growth curve models for data from pre-, middle- and post-tests showed that intervention significantly predicted change over time in all the target variables (victimization, bullying, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying). Specifically, target variables were stable for the control group but decreased significantly over time for the experimental group. Long-term effects at the follow up 6 months later were also found. In Trial 2 (control group, n = 227; experimental group, n = 234), the moderating effect of gender was examined and there was a reported decrease in bullying and cyberbullying over time (pre- and post-test) in the experimental group but not the control group, and this decrease was similar for boys and girls.

  20. Evidence-based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Benedetta E; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    The NoTrap! (Noncadiamointrappola!) program is a school-based intervention, which utilizes a peer-led approach to prevent and combat both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the third Edition of the program in accordance with the recent criteria for evidence-based interventions. Towards this aim, two quasi-experimental trials involving adolescents (age M = 14.91, SD = .98) attending their first year at different high schools were conducted. In Trial 1 (control group, n = 171; experimental group, n = 451), latent growth curve models for data from pre-, middle- and post-tests showed that intervention significantly predicted change over time in all the target variables (victimization, bullying, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying). Specifically, target variables were stable for the control group but decreased significantly over time for the experimental group. Long-term effects at the follow up 6 months later were also found. In Trial 2 (control group, n = 227; experimental group, n = 234), the moderating effect of gender was examined and there was a reported decrease in bullying and cyberbullying over time (pre- and post-test) in the experimental group but not the control group, and this decrease was similar for boys and girls. PMID:26879897

  1. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  2. Clinical evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced carbon endodontic post, glass fiber reinforced post with cast post and core: A one year comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Preethi, GA; Kala, M

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Restoring endodontically treated teeth is one of the major treatments provided by the dental practitioner. Selection and proper use of restorative materials continues to be a source of frustration for many clinicians. There is controversy surrounding the most suitable choice of restorative material and the placement method that will result in the highest probability of successful treatment. This clinical study compares two different varieties of fiber posts and one cast post and core in terms of mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology requiring crown removal over the period of 12months as evaluated by clinical and radiographical examination. Materials and Methods: 30 root canal treated, single rooted maxillary anterior teeth of 25 patients in the age range of 18–60 years where a post retained crown was indicated were selected for the study between January 2007 and August 2007; and prepared in a standard clinical manner. It was divided into 3 groups of 10 teeth in each group. After post space preparation, the Carbon fiber and Glass fiber reinforced posts were cemented with Scotch bond multipurpose plus bonding agent and RelyX adhesive resin cement in the first and second groups respectively. The Cast post and cores were cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement in the third group. Following post- cementation, the preparation was further refined and a rubber base impression was taken for metal-ceramic crowns which was cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement. A baseline periapical radiograph was taken once each crown was cemented. All patients were evaluated after one week (baseline), 3 months, 6 months and one year for following characteristics mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology

  3. A Crossover Trial Evaluating an Educational-Behavioral Joint Protection Programme for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, A.; Lincoln, N.; Sutcliffe, L.

    1999-01-01

    Joint protection, a self-management technique taught to people with rheumatoid arthritis, was used in a group education program. A crossover trial (N=35) was conducted. No significant changes in measures of pain, functional disability, grip strength, self-efficacy or helplessness occurred post-education, although this may have been due to the…

  4. Conducting Economic Evaluations Alongside Randomised Trials: Current Methodological Issues and Novel Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Dyfrig; Charles, Joanna; Dawoud, Dalia; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Holmes, Emily; Jones, Carys; Parham, Paul; Plumpton, Catrin; Ridyard, Colin; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Wood, Eifiona; Yeo, Seow Tien

    2016-05-01

    Trial-based economic evaluations are an important aspect of health technology assessment. The availability of patient-level data coupled with unbiased estimates of clinical outcomes means that randomised controlled trials are effective vehicles for the generation of economic data. However there are methodological challenges to trial-based evaluations, including the collection of reliable data on resource use and cost, choice of health outcome measure, calculating minimally important differences, dealing with missing data, extrapolating outcomes and costs over time and the analysis of multinational trials. This review focuses on the state of the art of selective elements regarding the design, conduct, analysis and reporting of trial-based economic evaluations. The limitations of existing approaches are detailed and novel methods introduced. The review is internationally relevant but with a focus towards practice in the UK. PMID:26753558

  5. Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Residual disability after stroke is substantial; 65% of patients at 6 months are unable to incorporate the impaired upper extremity into daily activities. Task-oriented training programs are rapidly being adopted into clinical practice. In the absence of any consensus on the essential elements or dose of task-specific training, an urgent need exists for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of a specific multidimensional task-based program governed by a comprehensive set of evidence-based principles. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) Stroke Initiative is a parallel group, three-arm, single blind, superiority randomized controlled trial of a theoretically-defensible, upper extremity rehabilitation program provided in the outpatient setting. The primary objective of ICARE is to determine if there is a greater improvement in arm and hand recovery one year after randomization in participants receiving a structured training program termed Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program (ASAP), compared to participants receiving usual and customary therapy of an equivalent dose (DEUCC). Two secondary objectives are to compare ASAP to a true (active monitoring only) usual and customary (UCC) therapy group and to compare DEUCC and UCC. Methods/design Following baseline assessment, participants are randomized by site, stratified for stroke duration and motor severity. 360 adults will be randomized, 14 to 106 days following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke onset, with mild to moderate upper extremity impairment, recruited at sites in Atlanta, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) time score is the primary outcome at 1 year post-randomization. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) hand domain is a secondary outcome measure. The design includes concealed allocation during recruitment, screening and baseline, blinded outcome assessment and intention to treat analyses. Our primary hypothesis is that the

  6. Evaluation of a complete denture trial method applying rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Kanazawa, Manabu; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2012-02-01

    A new trial method for complete dentures using rapid prototyping (RP) was compared with the conventional method. Wax dentures were fabricated for 10 edentulous patients. Cone-beam CT was used to scan the wax dentures. Using 3D computer-aided design software, seven 3D denture images with different artificial teeth arrangements were made and seven trial dentures per patient were fabricated accordingly. Two prosthodontists performed a denture try-in for one patient using both conventional and RP methods. The prosthodontists and patients rated satisfaction for both methods using a visual analogue scale. Satisfaction ratings with both conventional and RP methods were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Regarding prosthodontist's ratings, esthetics and stability were rated significantly higher with the conventional method than with the RP method, whereas chair time was rated significantly longer with the RP method than with the conventional method. Although further improvements are needed, the trial method applying RP seems promising.

  7. Clinical Trials Methods for Evaluation of Potential Reduced Exposure Products

    PubMed Central

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Hanson, Karen; Briggs, Anna; Parascandola, Mark; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; O'Connor, Richard; Shields, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Potential reduced exposure tobacco products (PREPs) may have promise in reducing tobacco-related morbidity or mortality or may promote greater harm to individuals or the population. Critical to determining the risks or benefits from these products are valid human clinical trial PREP assessment methods. Assessment involves determining the effects of these products on biomarkers of exposure and of effect, which serve as proxies for harm, and assessing the potential for consumer uptake and abuse of the product. This article raises the critical methodological issues associated with PREP assessment, reviews the methods that have been used to assess PREPs, and describes the strengths and limitations of these methods. Additionally, recommendations for clinical trials PREP assessment methods and future research directions in this area based on this review and on the deliberations from a National Cancer Institute sponsored Clinical Trials PREP Methods Workshop are provided. PMID:19959672

  8. Comparison of Single Visit Post Endodontic Pain Using Mtwo Rotary and Hand K-File Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kashefinejad, Mohamad; Harandi, Azade; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Pain is an unpleasant outcome of endodontic treatment that can be unbearable to patients. Instrumentation techniques may affect the frequency and intensity of post-endodontic pain. This study aimed to compare single visit post endodontic pain using Mtwo (NiTi) rotary and hand K-file instruments. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in 53 patients were selected and randomly assigned into two groups of 30 teeth. In group A, the root canals were prepared with Mtwo (NiTi) rotary instruments. In group B, the root canals were prepared with hand K-file instruments. Pain assessment was implemented using visual analog scale (VAS) at four, eight, 12 and 24 hours after treatment. The acquired data were analyzed using chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Student’s t-test (P<0.05). Results: Patients treated with rotary instruments experienced significantly less post-endodontic pain than those treated with hand instruments (P<0.001). Conclusions: The use of Mtwo (NiTi) rotary instruments in root canal preparation contributed to lower incidence of postoperative pain than hand K-files. PMID:27536323

  9. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  10. Evaluation of the Utility of a Discrete-Trial Functional Analysis in Early Intervention Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodak, Tiffany; Fisher, Wayne W.; Paden, Amber; Dickes, Nitasha

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a discrete-trial functional analysis implemented by regular classroom staff in a classroom setting. The results suggest that the discrete-trial functional analysis identified a social function for each participant and may require fewer staff than standard functional analysis procedures.

  11. New Relationship with Schools: Evaluation of Trial Local Authorities and Schools. RR689

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Karen; Judkins, Michelle; Atkinson, Mary; Rudd, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This summary outlines the key findings from a national evaluation of the first-year trials of the New Relationship with Schools (NRwS) carried out by a team at the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). The trials took place in the period September 2004 to July 2005 and involved 93 schools in eight local educational authorities…

  12. Functional Dyspepsia Treatment Trial (FDTT): A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of antidepressants in functional dyspepsia, evaluating symptoms, psychopathology, pathophysiology and pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Nicholas J.; Locke, G. Richard; Herrick, Linda M.; Silvernail, Vickie M.; Prather, Charlene M.; Lacy, Brian E.; DiBaise, John K.; Howden, Colin W.; Brenner, Darren M.; Bouras, Ernest P.; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Abraham, Bincy P.; Moayyedi, Paul; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common problem affecting up to 10–25% of individuals. FD accounts for significant health care costs and affects quality of life but has no definitive treatment. Objectives The Functional Dyspepsia Treatment Trial (FDTT) aims to test whether treatment with an antidepressant (amitriptyline or escitalopram) leads to improvement of symptoms in patients with moderate to severe FD. Design The FDTT is an international multicenter, parallel group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate whether 12 weeks of treatment with escitalopram or amitriptyline improves FD symptoms compared to treatment with placebo. Secondly, it is hypothesized that acceleration of solid gastric emptying, reduction of postprandial satiation, and enhanced gastric volume change with a meal will be significant positive predictors of short- and long-term outcomes for those on antidepressants vs. placebo. The third aim is to examine whether polymorphisms of GNβ3 and serotonin reuptake transporter influence treatment outcomes in FD patients receiving a tricyclic antidepressant, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy, or placebo. Methods The FDTT enrollment began in 2006 and is scheduled to randomize 400 patients by the end of 2012 to receive an antidepressant or placebo for 12 weeks, with a 6-month post-treatment follow-up. The study incorporates multiple validated questionnaires, physiological testing, and specific genetic evaluations. The protocol was approved by participating centers' Institutional Review Boards and an independent Data Safety Monitoring Board was established for monitoring to ensure patient safety and a single interim review of the data in December 2010 (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00248651). PMID:22343090

  13. Polypharmacy and effects of apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: post hoc analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Marc A; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Thomas, Laine; Lopes, Renato D; Washam, Jeffrey B; Lanas, Fernando; Xavier, Denis; Husted, Steen; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H; Granger, Christopher B; Verheugt, Freek W A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the treatment effect of apixaban versus warfarin differs with increasing numbers of concomitant drugs used by patients with atrial fibrillation. Design Post hoc analysis performed in 2015 of results from ARISTOTLE (apixaban for reduction in stroke and other thromboembolic events in atrial fibrillation)—a multicentre, double blind, double dummy trial that started in 2006 and ended in 2011. Participants 18 201 ARISTOTLE trial participants. Interventions In the ARISTOTLE trial, patients were randomised to either 5 mg apixaban twice daily (n=9120) or warfarin (target international normalised ratio range 2.0-3.0; n=9081). In the post hoc analysis, patients were divided into groups according to the number of concomitant drug treatments used at baseline (0-5, 6-8, ≥9 drugs) with a median follow-up of 1.8 years. Main outcome measures Clinical outcomes and treatment effects of apixaban versus warfarin (adjusted for age, sex, and country). Results Each patient used a median of six drugs (interquartile range 5-9); polypharmacy (≥5 drugs) was seen in 13 932 (76.5%) patients. Greater numbers of concomitant drugs were used in older patients, women, and patients in the United States. The number of comorbidities increased across groups of increasing numbers of drugs (0-5, 6-8, ≥9 drugs), as did the proportions of patients treated with drugs that interact with warfarin or apixaban. Mortality also rose significantly with the number of drug treatments (P<0.001), as did rates of stroke or systemic embolism (1.29, 1.48, and 1.57 per 100 patient years, for 0-5, 6-8, and ≥9 drugs, respectively) and major bleeding (1.91, 2.46, and 3.88 per 100 patient years, respectively). Relative risk reductions in stroke or systemic embolism for apixaban versus warfarin were consistent, regardless of the number of concomitant drugs (Pinteraction=0.82). A smaller reduction in major bleeding was seen with apixaban versus warfarin with increasing numbers

  14. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis: Post Hoc Analyses of Data from a Multicentre Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn; Perner, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. Methods We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer’s acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume and secondary outcome total fluid input administered from 24 hours before randomisation until the end of day 3 post-randomisation. We performed multivariate analyses with hospital and patient baseline characteristics as covariates to assess associations with fluid volumes given. Results We included 654 patients who were in the ICU for 3 days and had fluid volumes available. Individual trial sites administered significantly different volumes of fluid resuscitation and total fluid input after adjusting for baseline variables (P<0.001). Increased lactate, higher cardiovascular and renal SOFA subscores, lower respiratory SOFA subscore and surgery were all independently associated with increased fluid resuscitation volumes. Conclusions Hospital characteristics adjusted for patient baseline values were associated with differences in fluid resuscitation volumes given in the first 3 days of severe sepsis. The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis. PMID:27196104

  15. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behaviour therapy for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Sannibale, Claudia; Teesson, Maree; Creamer, Mark; Sitharthan, Thiagarajan; Bryant, Richard A; Sutherland, Kylie; Taylor, Kirsten; Bostock-Matusko, Delphine; Visser, Alicia; Peek-O'Leary, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Aims This study aimed to test the efficacy of integrated cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for coexisting post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD). Setting Clinics across Sydney, Australia.Design Randomized controlled trial of 12 once-weekly individual sessions of either integrated CBT for PTSD and AUD(integrated therapy, IT; n = 33) or CBT for AUD plus supportive counselling (alcohol-support, AS; n = 29). Blind assessments were conducted at baseline and post-treatment and at 5 [standard deviation (SD) = 2.25] and 9.16(SD = 3.45) months post-treatment. Participants Sixty-two adults with concurrent PTSD and AUD. Measurements Outcomes included changes in alcohol consumption (time-line follow-back), PTSD severity [clinician-administered PTSD scale (CAPS)], alcohol dependence and problems, and depression and anxiety. Findings Reductions in PTSD severity were evident in both groups. IT participants who had received one or more sessions of exposure therapy exhibited a twofold greater rate of clinically significant change in CAPS severity at follow-up than AS participants [IT60%, AS 39%, odds ratio (OR): 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 5.01]. AS participants exhibited larger reductions than IT participants in alcohol consumption, dependence and problems within the context of greater treatment from other services during follow-up. Results lend support to a mutually maintaining effect between AUD and PTSD. Conclusions Individuals with severe and complex presentations of coexisting post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) can derive substantial benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy targeting AUD, with greater benefits associated with exposure for PTSD. Among individuals with dual disorders, these therapies can generate significant, well-maintained treatment effects on PTSD, AUD and psychopathology.

  16. D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Exposure Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Difede, JoAnn; Cukor, Judith; Wyka, Katarzyna; Olden, Megan; Hoffman, Hunter; Lee, Francis S; Altemus, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Viewing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a disorder of emotional learning, this study used a cognitive enhancer synergistically with virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy for the treatment of PTSD. The main objective was to determine if a novel pharmacotherapy, D-cycloserine (DCS), enhanced the efficacy of the psychotherapy. Pre-clinical studies suggest that when fear extinction occurs during DCS administration, neuroplasticity may be enhanced. VRE therapy is a particularly promising format to test the hypothesis that DCS enhances extinction learning, as sensory fear cues are standardized across patients. In a pilot randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 100 mg of DCS or placebo was administered 90 min before each weekly VRE session, to ensure peak plasma concentrations during the sessions in 25 patients with chronic PTSD. The primary outcome measure was the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Secondary outcome measures included the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2. Assessments occurred at pre-treatment, following sessions 3, 6, 10, post-treatment, and at 6 months. The difference in CAPS between the VRE-DCS (n=13) and VRE-placebo (n=12) groups increased over time beginning at 6 weeks, with medium to large between-group effect sizes immediately post-treatment and 6 months later (d=0.68 and d=1.13, respectively). A similar pattern was observed for depression, anger expression, and sleep. PTSD remission rates were significantly greater for the VRE-DCS group (46% vs 8% at post-treatment; 69% vs 17% at 6 months). Patients in the VRE-DCS group showed earlier and greater improvement in PTSD symptoms compared with the VRE-placebo group. These results suggest a promising new treatment for PTSD. PMID:24217129

  17. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and in the CG (-4.1, -0.7, and -1.8 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). After the intervention period, the magnitude and pattern of this phenomenon for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were similar between groups (TG -8.8, -4.1, and -5.7 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05 vs CG -11.1, -5.8, and -7.6 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). These results indicate that a single session of resistance exercise promotes reduction in post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  18. Evaluation of post-ashed photoresist cleaning using oxidizing chemistries

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, P.J.; Matlock, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    The use of sulfuric acid based chemistries for the removal of photoresist ashing residue was investigated. Samples were prepared by ion-implanting patterned, UV-hardened photoresist. The efficacy of post-ash cleaning was determined by measuring organic, metallic, and particulate surface concentrations. Sulfuric-nitric mixtures and sulfuric-hydrogen peroxide mixtures were highly effective for the removal of metallic contaminants. Neither chemistry was very effective for particulate and organic residue. Highly effective overall cleaning was observed when a sulfuric acid based clean was followed with an RCA-type process sequence. Redundant cleans provided no additional benefits. Post-ash cleaning may be simplified by either reducing the number of sulfuric acid based cleans, or for certain post-ash applications, by replacing them with RCA-type processes.

  19. The efficacy of different pre- and post-operative analgesics in the management of pain after orthodontic separator placement: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, V.; Vinodhini, T. S.; Mohan, A. Mathan; Srinivasan, B.; Rajkumar, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain-free treatment to the patients is considered as an important treatment objective for orthodontic health care providers. However, many orthodontists underestimate the degree of pain experienced by the patients. Hence, this study was conducted as a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial with the following objectives. Objective: To study the pain characteristics after separator placement; to compare the efficacy of various commonly used analgesics in pain management and to determine the efficacy of pre- and post-operative analgesics in pain management. Subjects and Methods: Data were collected from 154 patients (77 males and 77 females, age group of 14-21 years, with mean age of 18.8 years) who reported to Department of Orthodontics. Patients were randomly divided in to four groups. Group 1: Paracetamol 650 mg, Group 2: Ibuprofen 400 mg, Group 3: Aspirin 300 mg, Group 4: Placebo and the study were conducted as a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial. The patients were instructed to take two tablets, one tablet 1 h before separator placement, and the other one after 6 h. The pain evaluations were made by the patients, when teeth not touching (TNT), biting back teeth together, chewing food (CF) using a 100-mm visual analogue scale for 7 days after separator placement. Patients were advised to record the severity of pain. Results: Group 3 (Aspirin 300 mg) showed lowest pain values, followed by Group 2 (ibuprofen 400 mg), and Group 1 (paracetamol 650 mg). All NSAID's achieved good pain control compared to Group 4 (placebo), where the intensity pain was maximum. Conclusion: Pre- and post-operative analgesics were found to be more effective in controlling orthodontic pain, after separator placement at all-time intervals. PMID:25210391

  20. The Effect of Prophylactic Antibiotics on Post Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Infectious Complications: A Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Darzi, Ali Asghar; Nikmanesh, Alieh; Bagherian, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is one of the most common surgeries in laparoscopic surgery. Although, it is believed that LC has low-risk for post-operative infectious complications, the use of a prophylactic antibiotic is still controversial in elective LC. Objective To determine the impact of prophylactic antibiotics on postoperative infection complications in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial, patients who were candidates for elective LC, from March 2012 to 2015, in four hospitals in Babol, Iran, were studied. Patients were allocated randomly to two groups, i.e., group C: Cefazolin (n = 182) and group P: placebo (n = 247). Group C received 1 g of Cefazolin 30 minutes before anesthesia and and then, six and 12 hours after anesthesia. Group P patients received 10 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution. Age, gender, type of gallbladder diseases (stone, polyp, or hydrops), the length of post-operative hospitalization, frequency of gallbladder rupture, the duration of surgery, and the kinds of complications associated with infections were collected for each patient in the two groups. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 20, using the t-test and the chi-squared test, and a p-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of gender (C versus P: 18 (9.9%) male versus 22 (9%); p = 0.74), age (C versus P: 43.75 + 13.30 years versus 40.91 + 13.05; p = 0.20), and duration of surgery (C versus P: 34.97 ± 8.25 min versus 34.11 ± 8.39; p = 0.71). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the incidences of post-operative infection (C versus P: 3 (1.7%) versus 5 (2%); p = 0.99) and rupture of the gallbladder (C versus P: 14 (7.8%) versus 17 (6.8%); p = 0.85). No other post-operative systemic infectious complications (e.g., sepsis, pneumonia, or urinary tract infection) were found

  1. Impact of Tai Chi exercise on multiple fracture-related risk factors in post-menopausal osteopenic women: a pilot pragmatic, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tai Chi (TC) is a mind-body exercise that shows potential as an effective and safe intervention for preventing fall-related fractures in the elderly. Few randomized trials have simultaneously evaluated TC's potential to reduce bone loss and improve fall-predictive balance parameters in osteopenic women. Methods In a pragmatic randomized trial, 86 post-menopausal osteopenic women, aged 45-70, were recruited from community clinics. Women were assigned to either nine months of TC training plus usual care (UC) vs. UC alone. Primary outcomes were changes between baseline and nine months of bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur and lumbar spine (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and serum markers of bone resorption and formation. Secondary outcomes included quality of life. In a subsample (n = 16), quiet standing fall-predictive sway parameters and clinical balance tests were also assessed. Both intent-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were employed. Results For BMD, no intent-to-treat analyses were statistically significant; however, per protocol analyses (i.e., only including TC participants who completed ≥ 75% training requirements) of femoral neck BMD changes were significantly different between TC and UC (+0.04 vs. -0.98%; P = 0.05). Changes in bone formation markers and physical domains of quality of life were also more favorable in per protocol TC vs. UC (P = 0.05). Changes in sway parameters were significantly improved by TC vs. UC (average sway velocity, P = 0.027; anterior-posterior sway range, P = 0.014). Clinical measures of balance and function showed non-significant trends in favor of TC. Conclusions TC training offered through existing community-based programs is a safe, feasible, and promising intervention for reducing multiple fracture risks. Our results affirm the value of a more definitive, longer-term trial of TC for osteopenic women, adequately powered to detect clinically relevant effects of TC on attenuation of BMD loss and

  2. Flourishing in people with depressive symptomatology increases with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Post-hoc analyses of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Lamers, Sanne M A; Fledderus, Martine

    2015-02-01

    Mental health is more than the absence of mental illness. Rather, both well-being (positive mental health) and mental illness are actually two related continua, with higher levels of well-being defined as "flourishing." This two-continua model and existing studies about the impact of flourishing on psychopathology underscore the need for interventions that enhance flourishing and well-being. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a model of cognitive behavioral therapy that aims not only to reduce psychopathology but also to promote flourishing as well. This is the first study to evaluate the impact of ACT on flourishing. A post-analysis was conducted on an earlier randomized controlled trial of a sample of adults with depressive symptomatology who participated in a guided self-help ACT intervention. This post-analysis showed a 5%-28% increase of flourishing by the participants. In addition, the effects on flourishing were maintained at the three-month follow-up. When compared to participants in a control group, the flourishing of the ACT-trained participants increased from 5% to about 14% after nine weeks. In addition to levels of positive mental health at baseline, an increase of psychological flexibility during the intervention was a significant predictor of flourishing at the three-month follow-up. PMID:25596344

  3. Weight Lifting and Physical Function Among Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of breast cancer may experience deterioration of physical function. This is important because poor physical function may be associated with premature mortality, injurious falls, bone fracture, and disability. We conducted a post hoc analysis to explore the potential efficacy of slowly progressive weight lifting to reduce the incidence of physical function deterioration among survivors of breast cancer. Methods Between October 2005 and August 2008, we conducted a single-blind, 12-month, randomized controlled trial of twice-per-week slowly progressive weight lifting or standard care among 295 survivors of nonmetastatic breast cancer. In this post hoc analysis of data from the Physical Activity and Lymphedema Trial, we examined incident deterioration of physical function after 12 months, defined as a ≥ 10-point decrease in the physical function subscale of the Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36-item questionnaire. Results The proportion of participants who experienced incident physical function deterioration after 12 months was 16.3% (24/147) in the control group and 8.1% (12/148) in the weight lifting group (relative risk, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.96; P = .04). No serious or unexpected adverse events occurred that were related to weight lifting. Conclusion Slowly progressive weight lifting compared with standard care reduced the incidence of physical function deterioration among survivors of breast cancer. These data are hypothesis generating. Future studies should directly compare the efficacy of weight lifting with other modalities of exercise, such as brisk walking, to appropriately inform the development of a confirmatory study designed to preserve physical function among survivors of breast cancer. PMID:25964257

  4. Community Post-Tornado Support Groups: Intervention and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    Post-tornado support groups were organized by the Greene County, North Carolina disaster coordinators and the Pitt County outreach workers from the Community Mental Health Center sponsored tornado follow-up project. The most significant intervention used was the emphasis on creating a climate of group support by establishing a forum for…

  5. Post Secondary Correctional Education: An Evaluation of Parolee Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Jerry; Moke, Paul

    Wilmington College (Ohio) conducted a study to determine if receiving college training during incarceration enhances offenders' post-release behavior. Three hundred residents of Lebanon Correctional Institution in Ohio, a medium-security prison for adults under 30, were studied. Of the group, 95 received associates degrees while in prison. These…

  6. Evaluation of Post-Arrival Programs and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Inst. of Multicultural Affairs, Melbourne (Australia).

    This book assesses the effectiveness of recommendations implemented after the release of the Australian government's "Report of the Review of Post-Arrival Programs and Services for Migrants" in 1977. In general, the implementation of the Report's proposals has been of substantial benefit to migrants (both newly arrived and longer resident), to…

  7. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC) provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements. PMID:20822530

  8. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemoirradiation (CRT) of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal Grades {>=}3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing patient-reported dysphagia (PRD) and objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF) in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods and Materials: A total of 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12 months post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and 'Overall Bother.' They underwent VF at 3 and 12 months, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results: Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared with 2 at 3 months but similar at 12 months. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12 months. Conclusions: Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia.

  9. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc; Worden, Francis; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemo-irradiation (CRT) of head and neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal grades ≥3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing 1) patient-reported dysphagia (PRD), and 2) objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF), in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12m post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and “Overall Bother”. They underwent VF at 3m and 12m, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared to 2 at 3m but similar at 12m. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12m. Conclusions Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia. PMID:19783380

  10. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  11. A Multi-Method Process Evaluation for a Skin Cancer Prevention Diffusion Trial

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Glanz, Karen; Hall, Dawn; Elliott, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This article describes process evaluation methods for the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial across four years. Pool Cool is a skin cancer prevention program that was found to improve behaviors and environments for sun protection at swimming pools in a randomized efficacy trial, which was followed by a national Diffusion Trial. The process evaluation focus shifted from measuring program satisfaction to assessing widespread program implementation, barriers and facilitators to implementation, and program maintenance and sustainability. Data collection methods include training surveys, database tracking, field coordinator activity logs, emails, surveys of parents, lifeguards and pool managers, and process evaluation interviews and site visits. The data revealed high levels of implementation of major program components when disseminated in the diffusion trial, including sun safety lessons, sun safety signs, and sunscreen use. This paper describes program features and participant factors that facilitated local implementation, maintenance and sustainability across dispersed pools such as linkage agents, a packaged program, and adaptations of program elements. PMID:19448162

  12. Defining, evaluating, and removing bias induced by linear imputation in longitudinal clinical trials with MNAR missing data.

    PubMed

    Helms, Ronald W; Reece, Laura Helms; Helms, Russell W; Helms, Mary W

    2011-03-01

    Missing not at random (MNAR) post-dropout missing data from a longitudinal clinical trial result in the collection of "biased data," which leads to biased estimators and tests of corrupted hypotheses. In a full rank linear model analysis the model equation, E[Y] = Xβ, leads to the definition of the primary parameter β = (X'X)(-1)X'E[Y], and the definition of linear secondary parameters of the form θ = Lβ = L(X'X)(-1)X'E[Y], including, for example, a parameter representing a "treatment effect." These parameters depend explicitly on E[Y], which raises the questions: What is E[Y] when some elements of the incomplete random vector Y are not observed and MNAR, or when such a Y is "completed" via imputation? We develop a rigorous, readily interpretable definition of E[Y] in this context that leads directly to definitions of β, Bias(β) = E[β] - β, Bias(θ) = E[θ] - Lβ, and the extent of hypothesis corruption. These definitions provide a basis for evaluating, comparing, and removing biases induced by various linear imputation methods for MNAR incomplete data from longitudinal clinical trials. Linear imputation methods use earlier data from a subject to impute values for post-dropout missing values and include "Last Observation Carried Forward" (LOCF) and "Baseline Observation Carried Forward" (BOCF), among others. We illustrate the methods of evaluating, comparing, and removing biases and the effects of testing corresponding corrupted hypotheses via a hypothetical but very realistic longitudinal analgesic clinical trial.

  13. Comparison of peritonsillar infiltration effects of ketamine and tramadol on post tonsillectomy pain: a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Vida; Behdad, Shekoufeh; Hatami, Maryam; Moshtaghiun, Hossein; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam

    2012-01-01

    Aim To assess the effect of peritonsillar infiltration of ketamine and tramadol on post tonsillectomy pain and compare the side effects. Methods The double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed on 126 patients aged 5-12 years who had been scheduled for elective tonsillectomy. The patients were randomly divided into 3 groups to receive either ketamine, tramadol, or placebo. They had American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I and II. All patients underwent the same method of anesthesia and surgical procedure. The three groups did not differ according to their age, sex, and duration of anesthesia and surgery. Post operative pain was evaluated using CHEOPS score. Other parameters such as the time to the first request for analgesic, hemodynamic elements, sedation score, nausea, vomiting, and hallucination were also assessed during 12 hours after surgery. Results Tramadol group had significantly lower pain scores (P = 0.005), significantly longer time to the first request for analgesic (P = 0.001), significantly shorter time to the beginning of liquid regimen (P = 0.001), and lower hemodynamic parameters such as blood pressure (P = 0.001) and heart rate (P = 0.001) than other two groups. Ketamine group had significantly greater presence of hallucinations and negative behavior than tramadol and placebo groups. The groups did not differ significantly in the presence of nausea and vomiting. Conclusion Preoperative peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol can decrease post-tonsillectomy pain, analgesic consumption, and the time to recovery without significant side effects. Registration No: IRCT201103255764N2 PMID:22522994

  14. COST EVALUATION OF AUTOMATED AND MANUAL POST- CONSUMER PLASTIC BOTTLE SORTING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluates, on the basis of performance and cost, two Automated BottleSort® sorting systems for post-consumer commingled plastic containers developed by Magnetic Separation Systems. This study compares the costs to sort mixed bales of post-consumer plastic at these t...

  15. A Neurofeedback-Based Intervention to Reduce Post-Operative Pain in Lung Cancer Patients: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Chiara; Casiraghi, Monica; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery appears to be the treatment of choice for many lung cancers. Nevertheless, depending on the type of surgery, the chest area may be painful for several weeks to months after surgery. This painful state has multiple physical and psychological implications, including respiratory failure, inability to clear secretions by coughing, and even anxiety and depression that have negative effects on recovery. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a neurofeedback-based intervention on controlling acute post-surgery pain and improving long-term recovery in patients who undergo thoracotomy for lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at an academic oncologic hospital. Methods This study will be based on a 2-parallel group randomized controlled trial design, intervention versus usual care, with multiple in-hospital assessments and 2 clinical, radiological, and quality of life follow-ups. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving a neurofeedback-based relaxation training and usual care, or to a control group receiving only usual care. Pain intensity is the primary outcome and will be assessed using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) in the days following the operation. Secondary outcomes will include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, daily opioid consumption, anxiety, patient engagement, blood test and chest x-ray results, and long-term clinical, radiological, and quality of life evaluations. Outcome measures will be repeatedly taken during hospitalization, while follow-up assessments will coincide with the follow-up visits. Pain intensity will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results We expect to have results for this study before the end of 2016. Conclusions The proposed innovative, neurofeedback- and relaxation-based approach to support post

  16. Library Design Analysis Using Post-Occupancy Evaluation Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Dennis C.; Stewart, Sharon L.

    1995-01-01

    Presents findings of a user-based study of the interior of Rodger's Science and Engineering Library at the University of Alabama. Compared facility evaluations from faculty, library staff, and graduate and undergraduate students. Features evaluated include: acoustics, aesthetics, book stacks, design, finishes/materials, furniture, lighting,…

  17. Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Methodologies for School Facilities: A Case Study of the V. Sue Cleveland High School Post Occupancy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Marcel; Larroque, Andre; Maniktala, Nate

    2012-01-01

    The New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority (NMPSFA) is the agency responsible for administering state-funded capital projects for schools statewide. Post occupancy evaluation (POE) is the tool selected by NMPSFA for measuring project outcomes. The basic POE process for V. Sue Cleveland High School (VSCHS) consisted of a series of field…

  18. One Year Post Collaborative Depression Care Trial Outcomes among Predominantly Hispanic Diabetes Safety Net Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Kathleen; Katon, Wayne; Xie, Bin; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Kapetanovic, Suad; Guterman, Jeffery; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine sustained effectiveness in reducing depression symptoms and improving depression care one year following intervention completion. Method Of 387 low-income, predominantly Hispanic diabetes patients with major depression symptoms randomized to 12-month socio-culturally adapted collaborative care (psychotherapy and/or antidepressants, telephone symptom monitoring/relapse prevention) or enhanced usual care, 264 patients completed two-year follow-up. Depression symptoms (SCL-20, PHQ-9), treatment receipt, diabetes symptoms, and quality of life were assessed 24 months post-enrollment using intent-to-treat analyses. Results At 24 months, more intervention patients received ongoing antidepressant treatment (38% v 25%, chi-square=5.11, df=1, P=0.02); sustained depression symptom improvement (SCL-20<0.5 (adjusted OR=2.06, 95%CI=1.09–3.90, P=0.03), SCL-20 score (adjusted mean difference −0.22, P=0.001), and PHQ-9 ≥50% reduction (adjusted OR=1.87, 95%CI=1.05–3.32, P=0.03). Over 2 years, improved effects were found in significant study group by time interaction for SF-12 mental health, SDS functional impairment, diabetes symptoms, anxiety, and socioeconomic stressors (P=0.02 for SDS, P<0.0001 for all others); however, group differences narrowed over time and were no longer significant at 24 months. Conclusions Socio-culturally tailored collaborative care that included maintenance antidepressant medication, ongoing symptom monitoring and behavioral activation relapse prevention was associated with depression improvement over 24 months for predominantly Hispanic patients in primary safety net care. PMID:21774987

  19. Using Multilevel Mixtures to Evaluate Intervention Effects in Group Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Fagan, Abigail A.; Jaki, Thomas; Brown, Eric C.; Hawkins, J. David; Arthur, Michael W.; Abbott, Robert D.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the effects of behavioral interventions may be limited to specific types of individuals, but methods for evaluating such outcomes have not been fully developed. This study proposes the use of finite mixture models to evaluate whether interventions, and, specifically, group randomized trials, impact participants…

  20. Theory-Driven Process Evaluation of a Complementary Feeding Trial in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jamie E.; Garces, Ana; Mazariegos, Manolo; Hambidge, K. Michael; Manasyan, Albert; Tshefu, Antoinette; Lokangaka, Adrien; Sami, Neelofar; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Bose, Carl L.; Pasha, Omrana; Goco, Norman; Chomba, Elwyn; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Wright, Linda L.; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a theory-driven process evaluation of a cluster randomized controlled trial comparing two types of complementary feeding (meat versus fortified cereal) on infant growth in Guatemala, Pakistan, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. We examined process evaluation indicators for the entire study cohort (N = 1236) using chi-square…

  1. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  2. 78 FR 36571 - Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 227

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Central Gulf of Mexico... Extend Post-Sale Evaluation Period. SUMMARY: This notice extends through July 18, 2013, the post-sale evaluation period for Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 227. BOEM will complete the...

  3. Impact of intercostal paravertebral neurectomy on post thoracotomy pain syndrome after thoracotomy in lung cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, Astrid; Poels, Marcel; Joppich, Robin; Lefering, Rolf; Wappler, Frank; Windisch, Wolfram; Ludwig, Corinna; Stoelben, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy leads to chronic neuropathic pain in up to 50% of patients and is responsible for an impaired quality of life. Intercostal nerve injury has been suggested to be responsible for this pain. In the present study the impact of paravertebral intercostal neurectomy on post thoracotomy pain was assessed. Methods In this single center parallel-group randomized controlled trial patients underwent muscle sparing anterolateral thoracotomy and anatomical lung resection for lung cancer. A subcostal approach was used for thoracotomy with single paravertebral neurectomy being performed at the beginning of the procedure at the level of the retracted intercostal space. For documentation of neuropathic pain the Leeds Assessment Score for Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) was used postoperatively. The primary endpoint was defined as LANSS ≥12 points on day 120. In addition, the numeric pain rating scale (NRS) was used to score pain intensity. Results Out of 172 patients initially randomized 161 patients were investigated following intraoperative and postoperative drop-out criteria. All patients required anatomical lung resection via thoracotomy. Five patients were lost for follow up. For the remaining 156 patients there was no difference between the two groups with regard to LANSS ≥12: 26.6% in patients with neurectomy and 28.8% in control-subjects (P=0.78). In addition, the NSR score at day 120 did not differ significantly at rest and during activity between the two groups (at rest: 21.7% vs. 15.8% P=0.439; activity: 24.5% vs. 21.9% P=0.735). Conclusions Neurectomy was not shown to reduce the post thoracotomy pain syndrome in patients with anatomical lung resection following anterolateral muscle sparing thoracotomy. PMID:27746994

  4. Health-economic evaluation in implant trials: design considerations.

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Szalay, Gabor; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    In today's world, demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and quality of a new treatment strategy is no longer sufficient in many countries for market entry and reimbursement in the public healthcare system. This implies that new implants in orthopedic and orthopedic trauma surgery not only must be shown to lead to better medical outcome compared with the standard of care implant, but also must be shown to exhibit "good value" for the money for the public health-care system based on sound economic data from health-economic studies. The purpose of this article is to elucidate a framework for health-economic aspects alongside implant trials, with the assumption that the new implant is more costly but potentially better than the control implant. Cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit studies are suitable for the assessment of the health-economic value of a new implant. The following criteria should be considered for a health-economic study design in the context with an implant: i) it should state medical benefits of the new implant compared with the control implant; ii) it should precise the type of health economic study; iii) it should define the methodological approach, perspective of the study, and types of costs; iv) if necessary, it should state discount costs and/benefits; and v) a sound sensitivity analysis should be included. Furthermore, close cooperation between researchers, clinicians, and health economists is essential.

  5. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Riley, William T; Brown, C Hendricks; Cuijpers, Pim; Duan, Naihua; Kwasny, Mary J; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Cheung, Ken

    2015-07-08

    In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the limitations of traditional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodologies for the evaluation of eHealth and mHealth interventions, and in particular, the requirement that these interventions be locked down during evaluation. Locking down these interventions locks in defects and eliminates the opportunities for quality improvement and adaptation to the changing technological environment, often leading to validation of tools that are outdated by the time that trial results are published. Furthermore, because behavioral intervention technologies change frequently during real-world deployment, even if a tested intervention were deployed in the real world, its shelf life would be limited. We argue that RCTs will have greater scientific and public health value if they focus on the evaluation of intervention principles (rather than a specific locked-down version of the intervention), allowing for ongoing quality improvement modifications to the behavioral intervention technology based on the core intervention principles, while continuously improving the functionality and maintaining technological currency. This paper is an initial proposal of a framework and methodology for the conduct of trials of intervention principles (TIPs) aimed at minimizing the risks of in-trial changes to intervention technologies and maximizing the potential for knowledge acquisition. The focus on evaluation of intervention principles using clinical and usage outcomes has the potential to provide more generalizable and durable information than trials focused on a single intervention technology.

  6. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Stephen M; Riley, William T; Brown, C Hendricks; Cuijpers, Pim; Duan, Naihua; Kwasny, Mary J; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Cheung, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the limitations of traditional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodologies for the evaluation of eHealth and mHealth interventions, and in particular, the requirement that these interventions be locked down during evaluation. Locking down these interventions locks in defects and eliminates the opportunities for quality improvement and adaptation to the changing technological environment, often leading to validation of tools that are outdated by the time that trial results are published. Furthermore, because behavioral intervention technologies change frequently during real-world deployment, even if a tested intervention were deployed in the real world, its shelf life would be limited. We argue that RCTs will have greater scientific and public health value if they focus on the evaluation of intervention principles (rather than a specific locked-down version of the intervention), allowing for ongoing quality improvement modifications to the behavioral intervention technology based on the core intervention principles, while continuously improving the functionality and maintaining technological currency. This paper is an initial proposal of a framework and methodology for the conduct of trials of intervention principles (TIPs) aimed at minimizing the risks of in-trial changes to intervention technologies and maximizing the potential for knowledge acquisition. The focus on evaluation of intervention principles using clinical and usage outcomes has the potential to provide more generalizable and durable information than trials focused on a single intervention technology. PMID:26155878

  7. Does post-identification feedback affect evaluations of eyewitness testimony and identification procedures?

    PubMed

    Douglass, Amy Bradfield; Neuschatz, Jeffrey S; Imrich, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Miranda

    2010-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test whether post-identification feedback affects evaluations of eyewitnesses. In Experiment 1 (N = 156), evaluators viewed eyewitness testimony. They evaluated witnesses who received confirming post-identification feedback as more accurate and more confident, among other judgments, compared with witnesses who received disconfirming post-identification feedback or no feedback. This pattern persisted regardless of whether the witness's confidence statement was included in the testimony. In Experiment 2 (N = 161), witness evaluators viewed the actual identification procedure in which feedback was delivered. Instructions to disregard the feedback were manipulated. Again, witnesses who received confirming feedback were assessed more positively. This pattern occurred even when witness evaluators received instructions to disregard the feedback. These experiments are the first to confirm researchers' assumptions that feedback effects on witnesses translate to changes in judgments of those witnesses. PMID:19585229

  8. Impact of copula directional specification on multi-trial evaluation of surrogate endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Shang, Hongwei; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of surrogate endpoints using patient-level data from multiple trials is the gold standard, where multi-trial copula models are used to quantify both patient-level and trial-level surrogacy. While limited consideration has been given in the literature to copula choice (e.g., Clayton), no prior consideration has been given to direction of implementation (via survival versus distribution functions). We demonstrate that evenwith the “correct” copula family, directional misspecification leads to biased estimates of patient-level and trial-level surrogacy. We illustrate with a simulation study and a re-analysis of disease-free survival as a surrogate for overall survival in early stage colon cancer. PMID:24905465

  9. The effect of intravenous Dexamethasone on post-cesarean section pain and vital signs: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Azar Danesh; Feizi, Awat; Jabalameli, Mitra; Nouri, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Any operation leads to body stress and tissue injury that causes pain and its complications. Glucocorticoids such as Dexamethasone are strong anti-inflammatory agents, which can be used for a short time post-operative pain control in various surgeries. Main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of administration of intravenous (IV) Dexamethasone on reducing the pain after cesarean. Methods: A double-blind prospective randomized clinical trial was performed on 60 patients candidate for elective caesarean section. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: A (treatment: 8 mg IV Dexamethasone) and B (control: 2 mL normal saline). In both groups, variables such as mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pain and vomiting severity (based on visual analog scale) were recorded in different time points during first 24 h after operation. Statistical methods using repeated measure analysis of variances and t-test, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for analyzing data. Findings: The results indicated that within-group comparisons including severity of pain, MAP, RR and HR have significant differences (P < 0.001 for all variables) during the study period. Between group comparisons indicated significant differences in terms of pain severity (P < 0.001), MAP (P = 0.048) and HR (P = 0.078; marginally significant), which in case group were lower than the control group. Conclusion: IV Dexamethasone could efficiently reduce post-operative pain severity and the need for analgesic consumption and improve vital signs after cesarean section. PMID:24991614

  10. Evaluating HPV‐negative CIN2+ in the ATHENA trial

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. Thomas; Johnson, Kristin; Quint, Wim; Ridder, Ruediger; Sideri, Mario; Wright, Thomas C.; Behrens, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    A post hoc analysis of the ATHENA study was performed to determine whether true HPV‐negative cervical lesions occur and whether they have clinical relevance. The ATHENA database was searched for all CIN2 or worse (CIN2+) cases with cobas HPV‐negative results and comparison was made with Linear Array (LA) and Amplicor to detect true false‐negative HPV results. Immunostaining with p16 was performed on these cases to identify false‐positive histology results. H&E slides were re‐reviewed by the study pathologists with knowledge of patient age, HPV test results and p16 immunostaining. Those with positive p16 immunostaining and/or a positive histopathology review underwent whole tissue section HPV PCR by the SPF10/LiPA/RHA system. Among 46,887 eligible women, 497 cases of CIN2+ were detected, 55 of which tested negative by the cobas® HPV Test (32 CIN2, 23 CIN3/ACIS). By LA and/or Amplicor, 32 CIN2+ (20 CIN2, 12 CIN3/ACIS) were HPV positive and categorized as false‐negatives by cobas HPV; nine of 12 false‐negative CIN3/ACIS cases were p16+. There were 23 cases (12 CIN2, 11 CIN3/ACIS) negative by all HPV tests; seven of 11 CIN3/ACIS cases were p16+. H&E slides were available for six cases for re‐review and all were confirmed as CIN3/ACIS. Tissue PCR was performed on the six confirmed CIN3/ACIS cases (and one without confirmation): four were positive for HPV types not considered oncogenic, two were positive for oncogenic genotypes and one was indeterminate. In summary, subanalysis of a large cervical cancer screening study did not identify any true CIN3/ACIS not attributable to HPV. PMID:26851121

  11. Evaluating HPV-negative CIN2+ in the ATHENA trial.

    PubMed

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Cox, J Thomas; Johnson, Kristin; Quint, Wim; Ridder, Ruediger; Sideri, Mario; Wright, Thomas C; Behrens, Catherine M

    2016-06-15

    A post hoc analysis of the ATHENA study was performed to determine whether true HPV-negative cervical lesions occur and whether they have clinical relevance. The ATHENA database was searched for all CIN2 or worse (CIN2+) cases with cobas HPV-negative results and comparison was made with Linear Array (LA) and Amplicor to detect true false-negative HPV results. Immunostaining with p16 was performed on these cases to identify false-positive histology results. H&E slides were re-reviewed by the study pathologists with knowledge of patient age, HPV test results and p16 immunostaining. Those with positive p16 immunostaining and/or a positive histopathology review underwent whole tissue section HPV PCR by the SPF10/LiPA/RHA system. Among 46,887 eligible women, 497 cases of CIN2+ were detected, 55 of which tested negative by the cobas(®) HPV Test (32 CIN2, 23 CIN3/ACIS). By LA and/or Amplicor, 32 CIN2+ (20 CIN2, 12 CIN3/ACIS) were HPV positive and categorized as false-negatives by cobas HPV; nine of 12 false-negative CIN3/ACIS cases were p16+. There were 23 cases (12 CIN2, 11 CIN3/ACIS) negative by all HPV tests; seven of 11 CIN3/ACIS cases were p16+. H&E slides were available for six cases for re-review and all were confirmed as CIN3/ACIS. Tissue PCR was performed on the six confirmed CIN3/ACIS cases (and one without confirmation): four were positive for HPV types not considered oncogenic, two were positive for oncogenic genotypes and one was indeterminate. In summary, subanalysis of a large cervical cancer screening study did not identify any true CIN3/ACIS not attributable to HPV. PMID:26851121

  12. Post STS-134 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-134. The following items were submitted for analysis: 1018 steel witness rods 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, and A-286 piston sleeves. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-134. All of the items were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the 1018 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch

  13. Post STS-135 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-135. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witnes rods, 304 sta inles steel caps, and tungsten pistons. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-135. The submitted samples were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  14. [Planning, realization and evaluation of post-marketing surveillance studies. Recommendations of the Society for Phytotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kraft, K; Loew, D; Schneider, B; Kemper, F H

    1997-08-01

    Post-marketing-surveillance studies with herbal drugs usually are prospective prescription-epidemiological studies, which should allow statements on quality, efficacy and safety. Until now neither laws nor concrete normative guidelines for the methodology and the evaluation of post-marketing-surveillance studies are existing which could be used for pharmacovigilance. In the present paper guidelines for planning, realisation and evaluation are presented which should allow studies of high quality. The essential components required for the investigational plan are focussed. Also recommendations on the obligatory, optional and special components of the study protocols are made. Additionally statistical methods which allow the evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy are presented.

  15. The State of Post-Occupancy Evaluation in the Practice of Educational Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackney, Jeffery A.

    Over the past decade, thousands of new school buildings and renovations have been planned, designed, and constructed in the United States. Of these, only a small fraction will ever be evaluated against the educational needs of students and teachers. This paper reflects on the state of post-occupancy evaluation (POE) in the practice of educational…

  16. Supporting the Consistent Implementation of Self-Evaluation in Irish Post-Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Shivaun; McNamara, Gerry; O'Hara, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores approaches to support the consistent implementation of school self-evaluation. The first part of the paper outlines the changing nature of self-evaluation in Irish post-primary schools and how a new approach introduced by the Department of Education and Skills in 2012 demonstrates real intentionality in terms of implementation.…

  17. Suicidal Thoughts and Reasons for Living in Hospitalized Patients With Severe Depression: Post-Hoc Analyses of a Double-Blind Randomized Trial of Duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Desaiah, Durisala; Raskin, Joel; Cairns, Victoria; Brecht, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate suicidal thoughts in relationship to depressive symptom severity and reasons for living in patients hospitalized for major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted of a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial involving hospitalized patients with MDD (DSM-IV criteria) who received duloxetine 60 mg once daily or duloxetine 60 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, the dose for nonresponders receiving 60 mg once daily could be increased to 60 mg twice daily (double-blind). The study was conducted between February 9, 2007, and August 26, 2008 at 43 centers in 4 countries across Europe and South Africa. Suicidal thoughts were assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) item 10, depression severity was assessed with the 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness scale, and protective factors were assessed with the patient-rated Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) assessing 6 domains. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, patients (N = 336) had varying severity of suicidal thoughts: 18% had a score ≥ 4. The proportion of patients with a score ≥ 4 decreased to 7% at week 1 and 1% at week 8 of treatment. The RFL scores at baseline were lower in patients with higher baseline suicidal thoughts and increased significantly during treatment (P < .0001). A regression model revealed that only 16% of variance in baseline total RFL score is explained by the different MADRS items. Eight patients had suicidal behavior or ideation recorded as an adverse event during the study; no consistent pattern was found in the different psychometric scores either at baseline or at the visit preceding the suicidal behavior/ideation. Conclusions: Suicidality rapidly decreased in hospitalized patients with severe depression treated with duloxetine. The RFL scores were low at baseline but

  18. A double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial of 3 and 10 mg sublingual melatonin for post-concussion syndrome in youths (PLAYGAME): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background By the age of sixteen, one in five children will sustain a mild traumatic brain injury also known as concussion. Our research found that one in seven school children with mild traumatic brain injury suffer post-concussion syndrome symptoms for three months or longer. Post-concussion syndrome is associated with significant disability in the child and his/her family and yet there are no evidence-based medical treatments available. Melatonin has several potential mechanisms of action that could be useful following mild traumatic brain injury, including neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study is to determine if treatment with melatonin improves post-concussion syndrome in youths following mild traumatic brain injury. Our hypothesis is that treatment of post-concussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury with 3 or 10 mg of sublingual melatonin for 28 days will result in a decrease in post-concussion syndrome symptoms compared with placebo. Methods/Design Ninety-nine youths with mild traumatic brain injury, aged between 13 and 18 years, who are symptomatic at 30 days post-injury will be recruited. This study will be conducted as a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled superiority trial of melatonin. Three parallel treatment groups will be examined with a 1:1:1 allocation: sublingual melatonin 3 mg, sublingual melatonin 10 mg, and sublingual placebo. Participants will receive treatment for 28 days. The primary outcome is a change on the Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory (Parent and Youth). The secondary outcomes will include neurobehavioral function, health-related quality of life and sleep. Neurophysiological and structural markers of change, using magnetic resonance imaging techniques and transcranial magnetic stimulation, will also be investigated. Discussion Melatonin is a safe and well-tolerated agent that has many biological properties that may be useful following a traumatic brain injury. This study will determine whether it is a

  19. Post STS-133 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA Structures engineers submitted main flame deflector witness materials for evaluation after the launch of STS-133. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, 17-4 precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel and A-286 piston sleeves, Medtherm Corporation calorimeters, and Nanmac Corporation thermocouples. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-133, and before they were reinstalled at the launch pad for future launches. The HY -80 witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, and the piston sleeves were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod and 304 stainless steel cap metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  20. An evaluation of post-injection transmission measurement in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Turkington, T.G.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology); Schubert, S.F.; Ganin, A. . GE Medical Systems)

    1994-08-01

    PET transmission scanning in the presence of emission activity has been investigated on two scanners with orbiting pin transmission sources. One phantom consisting of varying sized spherical inserts in a uniform background and another containing simulated lungs and spine, a myocardium insert, and uniform background were imaged at various emission activity levels. Insert radioactivity concentration levels varied up to 3.5 [mu]Ci/mL. Transmission acquisitions were performed with the phantoms aligned with the emission scan position, and with the phantoms shifted to simulate patient motion between scans. Images were reconstructed with and without compensation for the emission contamination. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the resulting image sets was performed. The emission correction resulted in no visible artifacts and [approximately]3% quantitative accuracy.

  1. A Systems Biology Approach Investigating the Effect of Probiotics on the Vaginal Microbiome and Host Responses in a Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bisanz, Jordan E.; Seney, Shannon; McMillan, Amy; Vongsa, Rebecca; Koenig, David; Wong, LungFai; Dvoracek, Barbara; Gloor, Gregory B.; Sumarah, Mark; Ford, Brenda; Herman, Dorli; Burton, Jeremy P.; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    A lactobacilli dominated microbiota in most pre and post-menopausal women is an indicator of vaginal health. The objective of this double blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study was to evaluate in 14 post-menopausal women with an intermediate Nugent score, the effect of 3 days of vaginal administration of probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 (2.5×109 CFU each) on the microbiota and host response. The probiotic treatment did not result in an improved Nugent score when compared to when placebo. Analysis using 16S rRNA sequencing and metabolomics profiling revealed that the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was increased following probiotic administration as compared to placebo, which was weakly associated with an increase in lactate levels. A decrease in Atopobium was also observed. Analysis of host responses by microarray showed the probiotics had an immune-modulatory response including effects on pattern recognition receptors such as TLR2 while also affecting epithelial barrier function. This is the first study to use an interactomic approach for the study of vaginal probiotic administration in post-menopausal women. It shows that in some cases multifaceted approaches are required to detect the subtle molecular changes induced by the host to instillation of probiotic strains. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02139839 PMID:25127240

  2. Evaluation of Oral Ginger Efficacy against Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Randomized, Double - Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Montazeri, Akram Sadat; Hamidzadeh, Azam; Raei, Mehdi; Mohammadiun, Malihe; Montazeri, Azam Sadat; Mirshahi, Reza; Rohani, Hosein

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postoperative nausea and vomiting is one of the most common side effects associated with surgical procedures. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ginger on intensity of nausea and vomiting after surgical procedures. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized, double blinded, clinical trial. 160 eligible patients were randomly assigned into experimental or placebo groups. The experimental group received 4 capsules containing 250 mg ginger and placebo group received 4 placebo capsules 1 hour before surgery. The severity of nausea and vomiting was measured at 2, 4, 6 hours post operation using visual analogue scale and a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed by independent t - test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi –square and GEE using SPSS 16 and STATA version 11. Results: Mean nausea score at 2 hours post operation was significantly lower in the experimental group (P= 0.04). Mean nausea score at 4 and 6 hours post operation was lower in the experimental group; however, there was no significant difference between the groups at any time post operation. The frequencies of nausea in the experimental group at 2 and 6 hours post operation were lower than that in the placebo group, however, at 2 hours post operation, it was borderline significant (P = 0.05) There was no significant differences between two group in the intensity of vomiting at any time. Conclusions: Use of ginger was effective at decreasing postoperative nausea. Ginger could be used as a safe antiemetic drug at post operation. PMID:24693389

  3. Randomised controlled trial of single, subacromial injection of methylprednisolone in patients with persistent, post-traumatic impingment of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, J; Dias, J; Durham, S; Evans, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact on recovery, of single subacromial injection of methylprednisolone in patients with persistent, post-traumatic impingement of the shoulder. Design: Randomised, controlled study. Setting: Large accident and emergency department in Leicester, UK. Participants: 98 patients with persistent, post-traumatic impingement of the shoulder. Intervention: Single subacromial injection of methylprednisolone with bupivicaine (group S, n=54) or bupivicaine only (group C, n=44). Main outcome measures: Pain using a 10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) and active shoulder abduction. Results: Comparison of pain scores by the 10 cm VAS between group and group C showed no statistical difference at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. Mean patient pain scores at 12 weeks were 1.38 in both groups (p=0.99). There were 16 patients in group S (mean age 52 years) with a 10 cm VAS greater than 1 (95% CI CI 0.17 to 0.43), compared with 13 patients (mean age 57 years) in group C (95% CI 0.17 to 0.45). Comparison of active shoulder abduction between group S and group C showed no statistical difference at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. Mean active abduction at 12 weeks was 168.9° in group S and 170.3° in group C (p=0.8). There were 10 patients in group S (mean age 60.5) with active abduction less than 170 at 12 weeks (95% CI 0.09 to 0.31), compared with five patients (mean age 62 years) in group C (95% CI 0.04 to 0.24). Conclusions: Single subacromial injection of methylprednisolone has no beneficial impact on reducing the pain, or the duration of immobility in patients with persistent post-traumatic impingement of the shoulder PMID:12748132

  4. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J.; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  5. Factors Influencing Hand Washing Behaviour in Primary Schools: Process Evaluation within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57).…

  6. Evaluating the Collaborative Strategic Reading Intervention: An Overview of Randomized Controlled Trial Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, John H.; Kurki, Anja; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph; Gersten, Russell

    2009-01-01

    When attempting to determine if an intervention has a causal impact, the "gold standard" of program evaluation is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). In education studies random assignment is rarely feasible at the student level, making RCTs harder to conduct. School-level assignment is more common but this often requires considerable resources…

  7. An Evaluation of Fresh Start as a Catch-Up Intervention: A Trial Conducted by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen; Siddiqui, Nadia; See, Beng Huat

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a randomised controlled trial conducted with 10 secondary schools in England to evaluate the impact and feasibility of Fresh Start as an intervention to help new entrants with low prior literacy. Fresh Start is a synthetic phonics programme for small groups of pupils, here implemented three times per week over 22 weeks. The…

  8. Component Evaluation of a Computer Based Format for Teaching Discrete Trial and Backward Chaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosik, Melissa R.; Williams, W. Larry

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of a multi-component computer based training package that consisted of competency based instructions, video modeling, and two forms of feedback was evaluated in terms of treatment integrity of two procedures across four staff. Treatment integrity in completing critical steps of discrete-trial and backward chaining procedures were…

  9. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  10. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  11. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  12. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  13. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  14. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  15. An Evaluation of Programmed Treatment-integrity Errors during Discrete-trial Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Regina A.; Kodak, Tiffany; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of programmed treatment-integrity errors on skill acquisition for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during discrete-trial instruction (DTI). In Study 1, we identified common treatment-integrity errors that occur during academic instruction in schools. In Study 2, we simultaneously manipulated 3…

  16. Carprofen provides better post-operative analgesia than tramadol in dogs after enucleation: A randomized, masked clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Cherlene; Bentley, Ellison; Hetzel, Scott; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare analgesia provided by carprofen or tramadol in dogs after enucleation. Design Randomized, masked trial Animals Forty-three dogs Procedures Client-owned dogs admitted for routine enucleation were randomly assigned to receive either carprofen or tramadol orally 2 hours prior to surgery and 12 hours after the first dose. Dogs were scored for pain at baseline, and postoperatively at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 30 hours after extubation. Dogs received identical premedication and inhalation anesthesia regimens, including premedication with hydromorphone. If the total pain score was ≥9, if there was a score ≥ 3 in any one category, or if the visual analog scale score (VAS) was ≥35 combined with a palpation score of >0, rescue analgesia (hydromorphone) was administered and treatment failure was recorded. Characteristics between groups were compared with a Student’s t-test and Fisher’s exact test. The incidence of rescue was compared between groups using a log rank test. Pain scores and VAS scores between groups were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Results There was no difference in age (p=0.493), gender (p=0.366) or baseline pain scores (p=0.288) between groups. Significantly more dogs receiving tramadol required rescue analgesia (6/21) compared to dogs receiving carprofen (1/22; p=0.035). Pain and VAS scores decreased linearly over time (p=0.038, p<0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in pain (p=0.915) or VAS scores (p=0.372) between groups at any time point (dogs were excluded from analysis after rescue). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This study suggests that carprofen, with opioid premedication, provides more effective post-operative analgesia than tramadol in dogs undergoing enucleation. PMID:25459482

  17. A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating clinical effects of platelet transfusion products: the Pathogen Reduction Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating Score (PREPAReS) trial

    PubMed Central

    Ypma, Paula F; van der Meer, Pieter F; Heddle, Nancy M; van Hilten, Joost A; Stijnen, Theo; Middelburg, Rutger A; Hervig, Tor; van der Bom, Johanna G; Brand, Anneke; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopaenia frequently experience minor and sometimes severe bleeding complications. Unrestrictive availability of safe and effective blood products is presumed by treating physicians as well as patients. Pathogen reduction technology potentially offers the opportunity to enhance safety by reducing bacterial and viral contamination of platelet products along with a potential reduction of alloimmunisation in patients receiving multiple platelet transfusions. Methods and analysis To test efficacy, a randomised, single-blinded, multicentre controlled trial was designed to evaluate clinical non-inferiority of pathogen-reduced platelet concentrates treated by the Mirasol system, compared with standard plasma-stored platelet concentrates using the percentage of patients with WHO grade ≥2 bleeding complications as the primary endpoint. The upper limit of the 95% CI of the non-inferiority margin was chosen to be a ≤12.5% increase in this percentage. Bleeding symptoms are actively monitored on a daily basis. The adjudication of the bleeding grade is performed by 3 adjudicators, blinded to the platelet product randomisation as well as by an automated computer algorithm. Interim analyses evaluating bleeding complications as well as serious adverse events are performed after each batch of 60 patients. The study started in 2010 and patients will be enrolled up to a maximum of 618 patients, depending on the results of consecutive interim analyses. A flexible stopping rule was designed allowing stopping for non-inferiority or futility. Besides analysing effects of pathogen reduction on clinical efficacy, the Pathogen Reduction Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating Score (PREPAReS) is designed to answer several other pending questions and translational issues related to bleeding and alloimmunisation, formulated as secondary and tertiary endpoints. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained in all 3

  18. Effects of Cinacalcet on Atherosclerotic and Nonatherosclerotic Cardiovascular Events in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis: The EValuation Of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; London, Gerard M.; Parfrey, Patrick S.; Block, Geoffrey A.; Correa‐Rotter, Ricardo; Dehmel, Bastian; Drüeke, Tilman B.; Floege, Jürgen; Kubo, Yumi; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Goodman, William G.; Moe, Sharon M.; Trotman, Marie‐Louise; Abdalla, Safa; Chertow, Glenn M.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Premature cardiovascular disease limits the duration and quality of life on long‐term hemodialysis. The objective of this study was to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, using adjudicated data collected during the EValuation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial. Methods and Results EVOLVE was a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled clinical trial that randomized 3883 hemodialysis patients with moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism to cinacalcet or matched placebo for up to 64 months. For this post hoc analysis, the outcome measure was fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events reflecting atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. During the trial, 1518 patients experienced an adjudicated cardiovascular event, including 958 attributable to nonatherosclerotic disease. Of 1421 deaths during the trial, 768 (54%) were due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden death was the most frequent fatal cardiovascular event, accounting for 24.5% of overall mortality. Combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events (adjusted relative hazard 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.96), while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Accepting the limitations of post hoc analysis, any benefits of cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in the context of hemodialysis may result from attenuation of nonatherosclerotic processes. Clinical Trials Registration Unique identifier: NCT00345839. URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:25404192

  19. Evaluating the first-in-human clinical trial of a human embryonic stem cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Audrey R; Scala, Courtney C

    2012-09-01

    Phase I clinical trials generally raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, suggesting a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials. In January 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Investigational New Drug application of Geron Corporation, a small California-based biopharmaceutical company, to initiate a clinical trial to assess GRNOPC1, a human embryonic stem cell-derived candidate therapy for severe spinal cord injuries. This article evaluates the ethical and human subject protection issues raised by the Geron FIH trial. It identifies problems with the approval process and with the conduct of the trial, and then recommends ways to improve review of future proposed trials with novel and high-risk therapies.

  20. In vitro evaluation of the fracture strength of all-ceramic core materials on zirconium posts

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Nihal; Sahin, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Objective: For most endodontically treated teeth, tooth-colored post-core systems are preferable for esthetic reasons. Therefore, improvements in material strength must also consider tooth colored post-core complexes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the difference in tooth colored post–core complex strengths. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 human maxillary central incisor teeth were used for this study, with three groups of 11 teeth. Three different methods were used to fabricate all-ceramic post-core restorations: zirconia blanks, Cerec 3D-milled to one-piece post-core restorations (Test Group 1); feldspathic cores (from feldspathic prefabricated CAD/CAM blocks) adhesively luted to CosmoPost zirconia posts (Test Group 2); and IPS Empress cores directly pressed to CosmoPost zirconia posts (Test Group 3). All-ceramic crowns from feldspathic ceramic were constructed using a CAD/CAM system (Cerec 3D) for all specimens. The post-core complexes were tested to failure with the load applied at 45° angled relative to the tooth long axis. The load at fracture was recorded. Results: The maximum fracture strength of the milled zirconia cores (Test Group 1) was 577 N; corresponding values for the milled feldspathic cores (Test Group 2) and the pressed cores (Test Group 3) were 586 and 585 N, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant at P < 0.05 (P = 0.669). Conclusions: All-ceramic cores adhesively luted on zirconia posts and one-piece all-ceramic zirconium post–core structures offer a viable alternative to conventional pressing. PMID:24932121

  1. Process evaluation for complex interventions in primary care: understanding trials using the normalization process model

    PubMed Central

    May, Carl R; Mair, Frances S; Dowrick, Christopher F; Finch, Tracy L

    2007-01-01

    Background The Normalization Process Model is a conceptual tool intended to assist in understanding the factors that affect implementation processes in clinical trials and other evaluations of complex interventions. It focuses on the ways that the implementation of complex interventions is shaped by problems of workability and integration. Method In this paper the model is applied to two different complex trials: (i) the delivery of problem solving therapies for psychosocial distress, and (ii) the delivery of nurse-led clinics for heart failure treatment in primary care. Results Application of the model shows how process evaluations need to focus on more than the immediate contexts in which trial outcomes are generated. Problems relating to intervention workability and integration also need to be understood. The model may be used effectively to explain the implementation process in trials of complex interventions. Conclusion The model invites evaluators to attend equally to considering how a complex intervention interacts with existing patterns of service organization, professional practice, and professional-patient interaction. The justification for this may be found in the abundance of reports of clinical effectiveness for interventions that have little hope of being implemented in real healthcare settings. PMID:17650326

  2. Evaluation of four cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Druck, Carolina Ceolin; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This trial used push-out testing to evaluate four different fiber post cementation strategies. Specimens of bovine mandibular teeth were randomly allocated into four groups according to cementation strategies (n = 10): ScotchBond MultiPurpose and RelyX ARC (Group 1); AdheSE and Multilink Automix (Group 2); phosphoric acid and RelyX U100 (Group 3); and RelyX U100 (Group 4). Four slices from each specimen (2.0 mm thick) were obtained for the push-out test. All slices were analyzed for failure mode after testing. A one-way ANOVA showed differences between the groups (P = 0.002). A Tukey test indicated that Group 1 had the highest bond strength values (13.96 ± 6.41 MPa). Groups 2 (6.58 ± 2.14 MPa), 3 (5.85 ± 2.57 MPa), and 4 (8.19 ± 2.28 MPa) had similar bond strengths, but all of them were lower than Group 1. A three-step total etching adhesive system, associated with a conventional resin cement, might be a good alternative for fiber post cementation.

  3. Developing a Framework for Evaluating Ethical Outcomes of Good Participatory Practices in TB Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Eley, Natalie T; Frick, Mike; Mingote, Laia Ruiz; Chou, Alicia; Seidel, Stephanie S; Hannah, Stacey; Hamilton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    Good Participatory Practice Guidelines for TB Drug Trials (GPP-TB) were issued in 2012, based on similar guidelines for HIV prevention and reflecting growing acceptance of the importance of community engagement and participatory strategies in clinical research. Though the need for such strategies is clear, evaluation of the benefits and burdens are needed. Working with a diverse group of global TB stakeholders including advocates, scientists, and ethicists, we used a Theory of Change approach to develop an evaluation framework for GPP-TB that includes a clearly defined ethical goal, a set of powerful strategies derived from GPP-TB practices for achieving the goal, and outcomes connecting strategies to goal. The framework is a first step in systematically evaluating participatory research in clinical trials. PMID:27368311

  4. Developing a Framework for Evaluating Ethical Outcomes of Good Participatory Practices in TB Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Eley, Natalie T; Frick, Mike; Mingote, Laia Ruiz; Chou, Alicia; Seidel, Stephanie S; Hannah, Stacey; Hamilton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    Good Participatory Practice Guidelines for TB Drug Trials (GPP-TB) were issued in 2012, based on similar guidelines for HIV prevention and reflecting growing acceptance of the importance of community engagement and participatory strategies in clinical research. Though the need for such strategies is clear, evaluation of the benefits and burdens are needed. Working with a diverse group of global TB stakeholders including advocates, scientists, and ethicists, we used a Theory of Change approach to develop an evaluation framework for GPP-TB that includes a clearly defined ethical goal, a set of powerful strategies derived from GPP-TB practices for achieving the goal, and outcomes connecting strategies to goal. The framework is a first step in systematically evaluating participatory research in clinical trials.

  5. The opportunities and challenges of pragmatic point-of-care randomised trials using routinely collected electronic records: evaluations of two exemplar trials.

    PubMed Central

    van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Dyson, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Padmanabhan, Shivani; Belatri, Rabah; Goldacre, Ben; Cassell, Jackie; Pirmohamed, Munir; Torgerson, David; Ronaldson, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan; Mahmood, Samhar; Baracaia, Simona; Round, Thomas; Fox, Robin; Hunter, Tommy; Gulliford, Martin; Smeeth, Liam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pragmatic trials compare the effects of different decisions in usual clinical practice. OBJECTIVES To develop and evaluate methods to implement simple pragmatic trials using routinely collected electronic health records (EHRs) and recruiting patients at the point of care; to identify the barriers and facilitators for general practitioners (GPs) and patients and the experiences of trial participants. DESIGN Two exemplar randomised trials (Retropro and eLung) with qualitative evaluations. SETTING Four hundred and fifty-nine English and Scottish general practices contributing EHRs to a research database, of which 17 participated in the trials. PARTICIPANTS Retropro aimed to recruit 300 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and high cardiovascular risk and eLung aimed to recruit 150 patients with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. INTERVENTIONS Retropro randomised between simvastatin and atorvastatin and eLung between immediate antibiotics and deferred or non-use. eLung recruited during an unscheduled consultation using EHR flagging. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Successful trial completion with implementation of information technology (IT) system for flagging and data processing and documentation of operational and scientific experiences. DATA SOURCES EHR research database. RESULTS The governance approval process took over 3 years. A total of 58.8% of the practices (n = 270) expressed interest in participating. The number of interested practices dropped substantially with each stage of the governance process. In Retropro, 6.5% of the practices (n = 30) were eventually approved and 3.7% (n = 17) recruited patients; in eLung, these numbers were 6.8% (n = 31) and 1.3% (n = 6) respectively. Retropro successfully completed recruitment (301 patients) whereas eLung recruited 31 patients. Retropro recruited 20.6% of all statin starters in recruiting practices and 1.1% in the EHR database; the comparable numbers for eLung were 32.3% and 0

  6. Can Pacing Be Regulated by Post-Activation Potentiation? Insights from a Self-Paced 30 km Trial in Half-Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Sebastián; Barros, Edilberto; Tonello, Laís; Oliveira-Silva, Iransé; Behm, David G.; Foster, Carl; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Given the co-existence of post-activation potentiation (PAP) and fatigue within muscle, it is not known whether PAP could influence performance and pacing during distance running by moderating fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of PAP on pacing, jumping and other physiological measures during a self-paced 30 km trial. Methods Eleven male endurance-trained runners (half-marathon runners) volunteered to participate in this study. Runners participated in a multi-stage 30 km trial. Before the trial started, determination of baseline blood lactate (bLa) and countermovement jump (CMJ) height was performed. The self-paced 30 km trial consisted of 6 × 5 km splits. At the end of each 5 km split (60 s break), data on time to complete the split, CMJ height, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) and blood lactate were collected while heart rate was continuously monitored. Results There was a significant decrease in speed (e.g. positive pacing strategy after the 4th split, p<0.05) with a progressive increase in RPE throughout the trial. Compared with baseline, CMJ height was significantly (p<0.05) greater than baseline and was maintained until the end of the trial with an increase after the 5th split, concomitant with a significant reduction in speed and an increase in RPE. Significant correlations were found between ΔCMJ and ΔSPEED (r = 0.77 to 0.87, p<0.05) at different time points as well as between RPE and speed (r = -0.61 to -0.82, p<0.05). Conclusion Our results indicates that fatigue and potentiation co-exist during long lasting endurance events, and that the observed increase in jump performance towards the end of the trial could be reflecting a greater potentiation potentially perhaps counteracting the effects of fatigue and preventing further reductions in speed. PMID:26934357

  7. [Opportunity and challenge of post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Xi; Song, Hai-Bo; Ren, Jing-Tian; Yang, Le; Guo, Xiao-Xin; Pang, Yu

    2014-09-01

    Post-marketing evaluation is a process which evaluate the risks and benefits of drug clinical application comprehensively and systematically, scientific and systematic results of post-marketing evaluation not only can provide data support for clinical application of traditional Chinese medicine, but also can be a reliable basis for the supervision department to develop risk control measures. With the increasing demands for treatment and prevention of disease, traditional Chinese medicine has been widely used, and security issues are also exposed. How to find risk signal of traditional Chinese medicine in the early stages, carry out targeted evaluation work and control risk timely have become challenges in the development of traditional Chinese medicine industry.

  8. Evaluation Effect of Shiatsu Technique on Labor Induction in Post-Term Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Teimoori; Shahin-Dokht, Navvabi-Rigi; Shahnaz, Rajabi; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Labor induction in post-term pregnancy is considered as a conventional process of mothers’ care. Shiatsu technique is one of the complementary methods which use for post-term pregnancy induction. Therefore, the researchers decided to examine the effect of Shiatsu technique on the induction of post-term pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This is a randomized control trials which conducted on 288 women with post-term pregnancy who referred to consulting clinic at Ali- Ibn- Abi -Talib Hospital, in Zahedan-Iran in 2010-2011. Participants were selected based on random table. The participants divided into two groups: the first was shiatsu technique and the second group was control group (routine procedure). Shiatsu technique was conducted on the participants of intervention group for 30s on three points by an experienced midwife. The gathered data analyzed by SPSS version 15.00 and comparing tests were t-students tests, chi-square. Results: Mothers ages range were between 16 to 42 yr (mean 26.5-5.7) in shiatsu and 17 to 43 yr (mean 24.5-5.1) in control group. Regarding spontaneous initiation of labor, 82 women (56.9%) in Shiatsu group had spontaneous initiation of labor, whereas the number of women was only 12 (8.3%) in control group. Women who have used Shiatsu technique were significantly more likely to have spontaneous labour than those women who did not. Conclusions: Results of the study showed that shiatsu technique can be used as one of safe complementary methods for post-term pregnancy induction. PMID:25948426

  9. The Collection of Post-Release Outcome Data for the Evaluation of Correctional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Ogle, J. Todd

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights several issues related to the collection of post-release outcome data in the evaluation of correctional education programs and identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods of collecting data related to recidivism, employment/earnings, and further education/training. The use of traditional follow-up in…

  10. Evaluation of an Innovative Post-Arrest Diversion Program: 12-Month Recidivism Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Wareham, Jennifer; Burgos, Catherimarty; Schmeidler, James; Hoge, Robert; Underwood, Lee

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of an evaluation study of a diversion program, operated by the Miami-Dade County Juvenile Assessment Center in Florida. The Post-Arrest Diversion (PAD) program represents an innovative approach to treatment and intervention within the juvenile justice system that utilizes standardized psychosocial risks and needs assessment…

  11. Assessing the Learning Value of Campus Open Spaces through Post-Occupancy Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, David

    2008-01-01

    The idea that the physical design and configuration of a campus can elicit and support studying behavior has important ramifications, as all academic institutions underscore learning in their mission statements. This article evaluates the learning value, or ability of a campus space to support studying behavior, through the use of a post-occupancy…

  12. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Escontrela Rodriguez, Blanca; Planas Roca, Antonio; Martínez Ruiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV) ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population. Methods and Findings A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015) and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02) measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02) from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events. Conclusions Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient’s decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33 PMID:27152748

  13. International clinical trials of HIV vaccines: II. phase I trial of an HIV-1 synthetic peptide vaccine evaluating an accelerated immunization schedule in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Forrest, B D; Li, Z; Xue, P; Hanson, C V; Duan, S; Cheng, H; Li, M; Wang, C Y; Koff, W C

    1997-06-01

    A Phase 1, double-blind, placebo controlled trial was conducted in Longchuan County, China, to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a prototype HIV-1 synthetic peptide vaccine in a target population at risk for HIV infection, and to establish the infrastructure for future large-scale HIV vaccine efficacy trials. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 100 microg or 500 microg of vaccine or alum placebo, and were given three injections at an accelerated 0, 1, and 2 month schedule. The vaccine was well tolerated with no significant local or systemic reactions observed in any subjects. Fifty-five percent (100 microg dose) and 64% (500 microg dose) of subjects who received the vaccine produced binding antibody to the immunogen as determined by ELISA. However, HIV-1 (MN) neutralizing antibody was detected in only 23% (3/13) of subjects with detectable HIV-1 specific binding antibody. It was concluded that this prototype HIV-1 synthetic peptide vaccine was well tolerated, safe and immunogenic, and that a 0, 1, 2 month schedule was not as effective in stimulating HIV-1 specific neutralizing antibodies compared with previous trials utilizing a 0, 1, 6 month schedule. Finally, this trial demonstrated that well-designed HIV vaccine trials can be performed at this clinical trials site in Yunnan, China, and that this site should be considered for conducting larger safety, immunogenicity and efficacy trials of candidate HIV vaccines.

  14. Safety and efficacy of tiotropium Respimat versus HandiHaler in patients naive to treatment with inhaled anticholinergics: a post hoc analysis of the TIOSPIR trial

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Robert; Calverley, Peter MA; Dahl, Ronald; Dusser, Daniel; Metzdorf, Norbert; Müller, Achim; Fowler, Andy; Anzueto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were naive to anticholinergics before the TIOtropium Safety and Performance In Respimat (TIOSPIR) trial may reflect patients seen in practice, in particular in primary care. In addition, investigating safety in these patients avoids the potential bias in patients who previously received anticholinergics and may be tolerant of their effects. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients naive to anticholinergic therapy who were treated with tiotropium Respimat 2.5 or 5 μg had different safety and efficacy outcomes than patients treated with tiotropium HandiHaler 18 μg. Methods: A post hoc analysis of patients who were not receiving anticholinergics before TIOSPIR (N=6,966/17,135) was conducted. Primary end points were risk of death from any cause and risk of COPD exacerbation. Secondary outcomes included severe exacerbation and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Additional analysis of exacerbations was carried out in anticholinergic-naive patients with moderate (GOLD II) disease. Results: Anticholinergic-naive patients had less severe disease than the total TIOSPIR population. Discontinuations because of anticholinergic side effects were infrequent (0.9% overall). Similar to the primary study, patients in the tiotropium Respimat groups had no difference in the risk of death or risk of any or severe exacerbation than patients treated with tiotropium HandiHaler. Risk of MACE was similar across the Respimat and HandiHaler groups. Rates of exacerbations in the subgroup of patients with moderate disease were similar across the Respimat and HandiHaler groups. Conclusions: Tiotropium Respimat and HandiHaler have similar safety and efficacy profiles in patients who are naive to anticholinergic therapy. PMID:26540491

  15. Quality and Reporting of Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Occupational Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokolahi, Ema; Hocking, Clare; Kersten, Paula; Vandal, Alain C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cluster randomized control trials (RCTs) in health care research requires careful attention to study designs, with implications for the development of an evidence base for practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the characteristics, quality, and reporting of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy interventions to inform future research design. An extensive search of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy was conducted in several databases. Fourteen studies met our inclusion criteria; four were protocols. Eleven (79%) justified the use of a cluster RCT and accounted for clustering in the sample size and analysis. All full studies reported the number of clusters randomized, and five reported intercluster correlation coefficients (50%): Protocols had higher compliance. Risk of bias was most evident in unblinding of participants. Statistician involvement was associated with improved trial quality and reporting. Quality of cluster RCTs of occupational therapy interventions is comparable with those from other areas of health research and needs improvement. PMID:27504689

  16. Post-approval evaluation of effectiveness of risk minimisation: methods, challenges and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anjan Kumar; Zomerdijk, Inge M; Wooder, Stella; Ingate, Simon; Mayall, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of drug risk-minimisation measures is mandatory for both risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) in the United States and risk management plans in the European Union (EU-RMPs). Such evaluations aim to assess the impact of risk-minimisation measures on the knowledge, attitudes or behaviours of healthcare professionals or patients, the incidence of safety concerns, and their impact on the overall benefit-risk balance. Although many effectiveness evaluation models and methods are available, regulatory guidance and policy are still evolving. This paper considers evaluation strategies, challenges in evaluating risk minimisation post-authorisation, possible outcome measures and their interpretation, and potential emerging regulatory policy issues. Particular challenges include appropriate data collection, perceived and real burdens of performing evaluation on clinical practice, lack of comparators and benchmarking, and uncertainty about the best outcome measures.

  17. Comparison of Two Techniques for Evaluation of Coronal Leakage Along of a Glass Fiber Post

    PubMed Central

    Sadighpour, L.; Rezaei, S.; Geramipanah, F.; Mohammadi, M.; Choubchian, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Contradictory results have been reported over microleakage studies of restorative materials and methods. Despite the number of publications on leakage there are few evidences comparing the different microleakage evaluation methods. The purpose of the present study was to compare the clearing technique and longitudinal sectioning in the evaluation of dye penetration along a glass fiber post. Materials and Methods: Fifteen single-rooted human teeth were endontically prepared and obturated with gutta percha points and a resin based sealer (AH26). A glass fiber post (Glassix) was cemented into each post space with a dual polymerizing resin cement (Varilink II) and the composite core (Tetric Ceram) was fabricated. Specimens were immersed in Indian ink solution for 72 hours after completion of 1500 cycles of thermal cycling. Then demineralized, cleared and evaluated for the deepest length of dye penetration using a stereomicroscope. Specimens were then cut longitudinally and the length of penetration was measured again by the same instrument. The mean difference of the penetrated length was analyzed by two methods using the paired t test and an analysis of correlation (α = 0.05). Results: No significant difference was found in the mean microleakage measured by the two methods (P= 0.07). Significant correlation was found between them (P=0.0001, r= 0.9) Conclusion: The clearing technique and longitudinal sectioning showed the same results in microleakage of Glassix post and composite core within the limitation of the present study. PMID:21998786

  18. Ten year research update (2001-2010): evaluations for competence to stand trial (adjudicative competence).

    PubMed

    Fogel, Michael H; Schiffman, Wendy; Mumley, Denise; Tillbrook, Chad; Grisso, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews and evaluates publications during 2001-2010 with relevance for assessments of competence to stand trial, referred to in this article as adjudicative competence. The review focuses specifically on articles that provide new concepts or data supported by research or case analyses. The studies are reviewed under the following headings: (i) systemic issues, (ii) conceptual guidelines for AC evaluations, (iii) AC assessment methods, (iv) empirical correlates of AC judgments and psycholegal abilities, (v) quality of AC evaluations and reports, (vi) interpretive issues, (vii) special populations (defendants who are elderly, defendants with intellectual disabilities), (viii) AC evaluations of juveniles, and (ix) treatment of incompetent defendants. Suggestions are offered for further research to advance the quality of clinical evaluations of adjudicative competence. PMID:23348511

  19. Post-Dilatation Intravascular Brachytherapy Trials on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits Using {sup 32}P-Phosphate Solutions in Angioplasty Balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Walichiewicz, Piotr Wilczek, Krzysztof; Petelenz, Barbara; Jachec, Wojciech; Jochem, Jerzy; Tomasik, Andrzej; Bilski, Pawel; Gaca, Pawel; Banaszczuk, Joanna; Ihnatowicz, Jerzy; Wodniecki, Jan

    2004-01-15

    Response of peripheral arteries to post-dilatation intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) using {sup 32}P liquid sources was studied in a rabbit model. The applied sources were angioplasty balloons filled with aqueous solutions of Na{sub 2}H{sup 32}PO{sub 4}, NaCl and iodinated contrast. Dose distribution was calibrated by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The uncertainty of in vitro determinations of the activity-dose dependence was {+-} 15-30%. The animal experiments were performed on rabbits with induced hypercholesterolemia. The {sup 32}P sources were introduced into a randomly chosen (left or right) iliac artery, immediately after balloon injury. Due to the low specific activity of the applied sources, the estimated 7-49 Gy doses on the internal artery surface required 30-100 min irradiations. A symmetric, balloon-occluded but non-irradiated artery of the same animal served as control. Radiation effects were evaluated by comparing the thicknesses of various components of irradiated versus untreated artery walls of each animal. The treatment was well tolerated by the animals. The effects of various dose ranges could be distinguished although differences in individual biological reactions were large. Only the 49 Gy dose at 'zero' distance (16 Gy at 1.0 mm from the balloon surface) reduced hypertrophy in every active layer of the artery wall. The cross-sectional intimal thicknesses after 7, 12, 38 and 49 Gy doses were 0.277, 0.219, 0.357 and 0.196 mm{sup 2} respectively, versus 0.114, 0.155, 0.421 and 0.256 mm{sup 2} in controls (p < 0.05). The lowest radiation dose on the intima induced the opposite effect. Edge intimal hyperplasia was not avoided, which agrees with other reports. The edge restenosis and the variability of individual response to identical treatment conditions must be considered as limitations of the post-dilatation IVBT method. Only application of highest irradiation doses was effective. The irradiation dose should be planned and calculated for

  20. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  1. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media. PMID:27220801

  2. Bihemispheric Motor Cortex Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Force Steadiness in Post-Stroke Hemiparetic Patients: A Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Rafael A.; Midgley, Adrian; Massaferri, Renato; Bernardes, Wendell; Okano, Alexandre H.; Farinatti, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke patients usually exhibit reduced peak muscular torque (PT) and/or force steadiness during submaximal exercise. Brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve neural plasticity and help to restore motor performance in post-stroke patients. The present study compared the effects of bihemispheric motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on PT and force steadiness during maximal and submaximal resistance exercise performed by post-stroke patients vs. healthy controls. A double-blind randomized crossover controlled trial (identification number: TCTR20151112001; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.in.th/) was conducted involving nine healthy and 10 post-stroke hemiparetic individuals who received either tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulus upon the motor cortex for 20 min. PT and force steadiness (reflected by the coefficient of variation (CV) of muscular torque) were assessed during unilateral knee extension and flexion at maximal and submaximal workloads (1 set of 3 repetitions at 100% PT and 2 sets of 10 repetitions at 50% PT, respectively). No significant change in PT was observed in post-stroke and healthy subjects. Force steadiness during knee extension (~25–35%, P < 0.001) and flexion (~22–33%, P < 0.001) improved after tDCS compared to the sham condition in post-stroke patients, but improved only during knee extension (~13–27%, P < 0.001) in healthy controls. These results suggest that tDCS may improve force steadiness, but not PT in post-stroke hemiparetic patients, which might be relevant in the context of motor rehabilitation programs.

  3. Bihemispheric Motor Cortex Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Force Steadiness in Post-Stroke Hemiparetic Patients: A Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Rafael A; Midgley, Adrian; Massaferri, Renato; Bernardes, Wendell; Okano, Alexandre H; Farinatti, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke patients usually exhibit reduced peak muscular torque (PT) and/or force steadiness during submaximal exercise. Brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve neural plasticity and help to restore motor performance in post-stroke patients. The present study compared the effects of bihemispheric motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on PT and force steadiness during maximal and submaximal resistance exercise performed by post-stroke patients vs. healthy controls. A double-blind randomized crossover controlled trial (identification number: TCTR20151112001; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.in.th/) was conducted involving nine healthy and 10 post-stroke hemiparetic individuals who received either tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulus upon the motor cortex for 20 min. PT and force steadiness (reflected by the coefficient of variation (CV) of muscular torque) were assessed during unilateral knee extension and flexion at maximal and submaximal workloads (1 set of 3 repetitions at 100% PT and 2 sets of 10 repetitions at 50% PT, respectively). No significant change in PT was observed in post-stroke and healthy subjects. Force steadiness during knee extension (~25-35%, P < 0.001) and flexion (~22-33%, P < 0.001) improved after tDCS compared to the sham condition in post-stroke patients, but improved only during knee extension (~13-27%, P < 0.001) in healthy controls. These results suggest that tDCS may improve force steadiness, but not PT in post-stroke hemiparetic patients, which might be relevant in the context of motor rehabilitation programs.

  4. Bihemispheric Motor Cortex Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Force Steadiness in Post-Stroke Hemiparetic Patients: A Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Rafael A; Midgley, Adrian; Massaferri, Renato; Bernardes, Wendell; Okano, Alexandre H; Farinatti, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke patients usually exhibit reduced peak muscular torque (PT) and/or force steadiness during submaximal exercise. Brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve neural plasticity and help to restore motor performance in post-stroke patients. The present study compared the effects of bihemispheric motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on PT and force steadiness during maximal and submaximal resistance exercise performed by post-stroke patients vs. healthy controls. A double-blind randomized crossover controlled trial (identification number: TCTR20151112001; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.in.th/) was conducted involving nine healthy and 10 post-stroke hemiparetic individuals who received either tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulus upon the motor cortex for 20 min. PT and force steadiness (reflected by the coefficient of variation (CV) of muscular torque) were assessed during unilateral knee extension and flexion at maximal and submaximal workloads (1 set of 3 repetitions at 100% PT and 2 sets of 10 repetitions at 50% PT, respectively). No significant change in PT was observed in post-stroke and healthy subjects. Force steadiness during knee extension (~25-35%, P < 0.001) and flexion (~22-33%, P < 0.001) improved after tDCS compared to the sham condition in post-stroke patients, but improved only during knee extension (~13-27%, P < 0.001) in healthy controls. These results suggest that tDCS may improve force steadiness, but not PT in post-stroke hemiparetic patients, which might be relevant in the context of motor rehabilitation programs. PMID:27601988

  5. Bihemispheric Motor Cortex Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Force Steadiness in Post-Stroke Hemiparetic Patients: A Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Rafael A.; Midgley, Adrian; Massaferri, Renato; Bernardes, Wendell; Okano, Alexandre H.; Farinatti, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke patients usually exhibit reduced peak muscular torque (PT) and/or force steadiness during submaximal exercise. Brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve neural plasticity and help to restore motor performance in post-stroke patients. The present study compared the effects of bihemispheric motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on PT and force steadiness during maximal and submaximal resistance exercise performed by post-stroke patients vs. healthy controls. A double-blind randomized crossover controlled trial (identification number: TCTR20151112001; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.in.th/) was conducted involving nine healthy and 10 post-stroke hemiparetic individuals who received either tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulus upon the motor cortex for 20 min. PT and force steadiness (reflected by the coefficient of variation (CV) of muscular torque) were assessed during unilateral knee extension and flexion at maximal and submaximal workloads (1 set of 3 repetitions at 100% PT and 2 sets of 10 repetitions at 50% PT, respectively). No significant change in PT was observed in post-stroke and healthy subjects. Force steadiness during knee extension (~25–35%, P < 0.001) and flexion (~22–33%, P < 0.001) improved after tDCS compared to the sham condition in post-stroke patients, but improved only during knee extension (~13–27%, P < 0.001) in healthy controls. These results suggest that tDCS may improve force steadiness, but not PT in post-stroke hemiparetic patients, which might be relevant in the context of motor rehabilitation programs. PMID:27601988

  6. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL) as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for incorporation of evidence provided through the WHO RHL. The hypothesis is that the RHL-EBM (clinically integrated e-learning) course will improve participants' knowledge, skills and attitudes, as well as institutional practice and educational environment, as compared to the use of standard postgraduate educational resources for EBM teaching that are not clinically integrated. Methods The study will be a multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial, carried out in seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand), involving 50-60 obstetrics and gynaecology teaching units. The trial will be carried out on postgraduate trainees in the first two years of their training. In the intervention group, trainees will receive the RHL-EBM course. The course consists of five modules, each comprising self-directed e-learning components and clinically related activities, assignments and assessments, coordinated between the facilitator and the postgraduate trainee. The course will take about 12 weeks, with assessments taking place pre-course and 4 weeks post-course. In the control group, trainees will receive electronic, self-directed EBM-teaching materials. All data collection will be online. The primary outcome measures are gain in EBM knowledge, change in attitudes towards EBM and competencies in EBM measured by multiple choice questions (MCQs) and a skills-assessing questionniare administered eletronically. These questions have been

  7. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, A. R.; Karuna, Y. M.; Yavagal, C.; Deepak, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before going ahead with the restoration. Thus, use of naturally occurring disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary minimum intervention dentistry. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of hand instruments in excavating dental caries and comparatively evaluate the roles of Aloe vera and propolis as potential cavity disinfecting agents after minimally invasive hand excavation of dental caries. Settings and Designs: Experimental, in vivo intergroup split mouth, randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: The study included Group I (Control), Group II (A. vera) and Group III (propolis). Ten patients with three teeth each have occlusal/occlusoproximal lesions suitable for ART were selected. Dentinal samples were collected three times from each tooth viz., preexcavation, postexcavation and postdisinfection of the cavities. These dentinal samples were subjected to microbiological analyses for total viable count. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. Results: In all the three groups, significant amount of bacteria were left behind after hand excavation. Group II and Group III, in which cavities were treated with A. vera and propolis extracts respectively, showed a significant reduction in the bacterial counts when compared to control the group. Conclusions: Hand excavation alone does not completely eliminate bacteria, which may predispose treated teeth to secondary caries. Both propolis and A. vera extracts can be used as potential natural disinfecting agents, thereby embracing the concept of phytotherapy in minimum intervention dentistry. PMID:25821369

  8. An Evaluation of a Two Week Teaching Trial Using Interactive Video Technology: Perceptions of Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, R. A.; Hansford, B. C.

    This report is concerned with an evaluation of a 2-week teaching trial in 1989 that utilized compressed data--interactive video technology. The trial was a collaborative venture of the University of New England (UNE), TELECOM, the Department of Education, Employment and Training (DEET), and SONY. In general, the University of New England supplied…

  9. Effect of Karamardādi Yoga versus diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hegana, Rahul; Toshikhane, Hemant Devaraj; Toshikhane, Sangeeta; Amin, Hetal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative pain is Nociceptive i.e., anticipated unavoidable physiological pain which is caused due to tissue trauma. Drugs such as NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and Opioids are used for post-operative pain management but are associated with their own drawbacks. Karamardādi Yoga has been in use in Ayurvedic practice for analgesia. It is known to relieve pain and can be used to supplement anaesthesia and also get rid of adverse effect of modern analgesic drugs. Aims and Objective: To study the comparative effect of Karamardādi Yoga and Diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management. Materials and Methods: Randomized clinical trial with Group A (Control Group: Tab Diclofenac sodium 50 mg as a single dose) and Group B (Trial Group: Cap Karamardādi Yoga 500 mg as a single dose). Those who had undergone haemorrhoidectomy operation under local anaesthesia were selected as per inclusion criteria. Vitals, desirable effect and undesirable effect, total surgical time, requirement of 1st dose of analgesic, requirement of rescue analgesic and pain determined by VAS (Visual Analog Scale) were the assessment criteria and were observed and recorded. Results: Karamardādi Yoga does not show any undesirable or serious ill effects and altered values of vitals as per statistical analysis. As per VAS scale, pain felt by Trial group was earlier than control group. Conclusions: Karamardādi Yoga has analgesic property but its analgesic property and pain threshold capacity is lesser than those of Diclofenac sodium. PMID:27621519

  10. Effect of Karamardādi Yoga versus diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hegana, Rahul; Toshikhane, Hemant Devaraj; Toshikhane, Sangeeta; Amin, Hetal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative pain is Nociceptive i.e., anticipated unavoidable physiological pain which is caused due to tissue trauma. Drugs such as NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and Opioids are used for post-operative pain management but are associated with their own drawbacks. Karamardādi Yoga has been in use in Ayurvedic practice for analgesia. It is known to relieve pain and can be used to supplement anaesthesia and also get rid of adverse effect of modern analgesic drugs. Aims and Objective: To study the comparative effect of Karamardādi Yoga and Diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management. Materials and Methods: Randomized clinical trial with Group A (Control Group: Tab Diclofenac sodium 50 mg as a single dose) and Group B (Trial Group: Cap Karamardādi Yoga 500 mg as a single dose). Those who had undergone haemorrhoidectomy operation under local anaesthesia were selected as per inclusion criteria. Vitals, desirable effect and undesirable effect, total surgical time, requirement of 1st dose of analgesic, requirement of rescue analgesic and pain determined by VAS (Visual Analog Scale) were the assessment criteria and were observed and recorded. Results: Karamardādi Yoga does not show any undesirable or serious ill effects and altered values of vitals as per statistical analysis. As per VAS scale, pain felt by Trial group was earlier than control group. Conclusions: Karamardādi Yoga has analgesic property but its analgesic property and pain threshold capacity is lesser than those of Diclofenac sodium.

  11. Results availability for analgesic device, complex regional pain syndrome, and post-stroke pain trials: comparing the RReADS, RReACT, and RReMiT databases.

    PubMed

    Dufka, Faustine L; Munch, Troels; Dworkin, Robert H; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine rests on the assumption that treatment recommendations are robust, free from bias, and include results of all randomized clinical trials. The Repository of Registered Analgesic Clinical Trials search and analysis methodology was applied to create databases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and central post-stroke pain (CPSP) trials and adapted to create the Repository of Registered Analgesic Device Studies databases for trials of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We identified 34 CRPS trials, 18 CPSP trials, 72 trials of SCS, and 92 trials of rTMS/tDCS. Irrespective of time since study completion, 45% of eligible CRPS and CPSP trials and 46% of eligible SCS and rTMS/tDCS trials had available results (peer-reviewed literature, results entered on registry, or gray literature); peer-reviewed publications could be found for 38% and 39%, respectively. Examining almost 1000 trials across a spectrum of painful disorders (fibromyalgia, diabetic painful neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, migraine, CRPS, CPSP) and types of treatment, no single study characteristic consistently predicts unavailability of results. Results availability is higher 12 months after study completion but remains below 60% for peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations to increase results availability include supporting organizations advocating for transparency, enforcing existing results reporting regulations, enabling all primary registries to post results, stating trial registration numbers in all publication abstracts, and reducing barriers to publishing "negative" trials. For all diseases and treatment modalities, evidence-based medicine must rigorously adjust for the sheer magnitude of missing results in formulating treatment recommendations.

  12. Results availability for analgesic device, complex regional pain syndrome, and post-stroke pain trials: comparing the RReADS, RReACT, and RReMiT databases

    PubMed Central

    Dufka, Faustine L.; Munch, Troels; Dworkin, Robert H.; Rowbotham, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence-based medicine rests on the assumption that treatment recommendations are robust, free from bias, and include results of all randomized clinical trials. The Repository of Registered Analgesic Clinical Trials search and analysis methodology was applied to create databases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and central post-stroke pain (CPSP) trials and adapted to create the Repository of Registered Analgesic Device Studies databases for trials of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We identified 34 CRPS trials, 18 CPSP trials, 72 trials of SCS, and 92 trials of rTMS/tDCS. Irrespective of time since study completion, 45% of eligible CRPS and CPSP trials and 46% of eligible SCS and rTMS/tDCS trials had available results (peer-reviewed literature, results entered on registry, or gray literature); peer-reviewed publications could be found for 38% and 39%, respectively. Examining almost 1000 trials across a spectrum of painful disorders (fibromyalgia, diabetic painful neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, migraine, CRPS, CPSP) and types of treatment, no single study characteristic consistently predicts unavailability of results. Results availability is higher 12 months after study completion but remains below 60% for peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations to increase results availability include supporting organizations advocating for transparency, enforcing existing results reporting regulations, enabling all primary registries to post results, stating trial registration numbers in all publication abstracts, and reducing barriers to publishing “negative” trials. For all diseases and treatment modalities, evidence-based medicine must rigorously adjust for the sheer magnitude of missing results in formulating treatment recommendations. PMID:25599303

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography Evaluation in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Domalpally, Amitha; Altaweel, Michael M.; Kempen, John H.; Myers, Dawn; Davis, Janet L; Foster, C Stephen; Latkany, Paul; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Stawell, Richard J.; Holbrook, Janet T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the evaluation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans in the Muliticenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial and report baseline OCT features of enrolled participants. Methods Time domain OCTs acquired by certified photographers using a standardized scan protocol were evaluated at a Reading Center. Accuracy of retinal thickness data was confirmed with quality evaluation and caliper measurement of centerpoint thickness (CPT) was performed when unreliable. Morphological evaluation included cysts, subretinal fluid,epiretinal membranes (ERMs),and vitreomacular traction. Results Of the 453 OCTs evaluated, automated retinal thickness was accurate in 69.5% of scans, caliper measurement was performed in 26%,and 4% were ungradable. Intraclass correlation was 0.98 for reproducibility of caliper measurement. Macular edema (centerpoint thickness ≥ 240um) was present in 36%. Cysts were present in 36.6% of scans and ERMs in 27.8%, predominantly central. Intergrader agreement ranged from 78 − 82% for morphological features. Conclusion Retinal thickness data can be retrieved in a majority of OCT scans in clinical trial submissions for uveitis studies. Small cysts and ERMs involving the center are common in intermediate and posterior/panuveitis requiring systemic corticosteroid therapy. PMID:23163490

  14. Evaluation of a cloud-based local-read paradigm for imaging evaluations in oncology clinical trials for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Bonnard, Eric; Charbonnier, Colette; Yamamichi, Junta; Mizobe, Hideaki; Kimura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Background Although tumor response evaluated with radiological imaging is frequently used as a primary endpoint in clinical trials, it is difficult to obtain precise results because of inter- and intra-observer differences. Purpose To evaluate usefulness of a cloud-based local-read paradigm implementing software solutions that standardize imaging evaluations among international investigator sites for clinical trials of lung cancer. Material and Methods Two studies were performed: KUMO I and KUMO I Extension. KUMO I was a pilot study aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of cloud implementation and identifying issues regarding variability of evaluations among sites. Chest CT scans at three time-points from baseline to progression, from 10 patients with lung cancer who were treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were evaluated independently by two oncologists (Japan) and one radiologist (France), through a cloud-based software solution. The KUMO I Extension was performed based on the results of KUMO I. Results KUMO I showed discordance rates of 40% for target lesion selection, 70% for overall response at the first time-point, and 60% for overall response at the second time-point. Since the main reason for the discordance was differences in the selection of target lesions, KUMO I Extension added a cloud-based quality control service to achieve a consensus on the selection of target lesions, resulting in an improved rate of agreement of response evaluations. Conclusion The study shows the feasibility of imaging evaluations at investigator sites, based on cloud services for clinical studies involving multiple international sites. This system offers a step forward in standardizing evaluations of images among widely dispersed sites. PMID:26668754

  15. A Community Consultation Survey to Evaluate Support for and Success of the IMMEDIATE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beshansky, Joni R.; Sheehan, Patricia R.; Klima, Kenneth J.; Hadar, Nira; Vickery, Ellen M.; Selker, Harry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The IMMEDIATE (Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care) Trial, a randomized controlled double-blind clinical effectiveness trial of glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) administered in ambulances in the out-of-hospital setting, used the Exception from Informed Consent Requirements (EFIC) for Emergency Research under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. EFIC requirements include community consultation that typically involves using a variety of communication methods and venues to inform the public of the research and to receive their feedback. Although not the primary purpose of the community consultation process, a common concern to research sponsors, staff, and institutional review boards (IRBs) is whether there will be a sufficient number of participants to justify mounting a study in their community. Information from community consultation regarding the community acceptance might inform this question. . Purpose We evaluated the utility of telephone survey data done as part of the EFIC process as a way to project the ultimate rate of trial participant enrollment. Methods A telephone survey community consultation process was undertaken in nine communities planning to be IMMEDIATE Trial sites using a representative sampling of the target population in the areas covered by participating emergency medical service (EMS) agencies. Survey respondents were read a description of the planned study and its informed consent approach that included the option for patients to decline participation in the trial while being transported for acute care in an ambulance. Survey respondents were then asked whether they would object to participating in the study. At the conclusion of actual trial enrollment, the Coordinating Center compared the survey results with the actual rates of enrollment at each site. Results Approximately 200 (range 200 - 271) respondents completed the survey in each of the study

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  17. Evaluation of program success for programs with multiple trials in binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meihua; Liu, G Frank; Schindler, Jerald

    2015-01-01

    A late-stage clinical development program typically contains multiple trials. Conventionally, the program's success or failure may not be known until the completion of all trials. Nowadays, interim analyses are often used to allow evaluation for early success and/or futility for each individual study by calculating conditional power, predictive power and other indexes. It presents a good opportunity for us to estimate the probability of program success (POPS) for the entire clinical development earlier. The sponsor may abandon the program early if the estimated POPS is very low and therefore permit resource savings and reallocation to other products. We provide a method to calculate probability of success (POS) at an individual study level and also POPS for clinical programs with multiple trials in binary outcomes. Methods for calculating variation and confidence measures of POS and POPS and timing for interim analysis will be discussed and evaluated through simulations. We also illustrate our approaches on historical data retrospectively from a completed clinical program for depression.

  18. Patient and carer experience of hospital-based rehabilitation from intensive care to hospital discharge: mixed methods process evaluation of the RECOVER randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Merriweather, Judith; Salisbury, Lisa; Rattray, Janice; Griffith, David; Walsh, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore and compare patient/carer experiences of rehabilitation in the intervention and usual care arms of the RECOVER trial (ISRCTN09412438); a randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention of post-intensive care unit (ICU) acute hospital-based rehabilitation following critical illness. Design Mixed methods process evaluation including comparison of patients' and carers' experience of usual care versus the complex intervention. We integrated and compared quantitative data from a patient experience questionnaire (PEQ) with qualitative data from focus groups with patients and carers. Setting Two university-affiliated hospitals in Scotland. Participants 240 patients discharged from ICU who required ≥48 hours of mechanical ventilation were randomised into the trial (120 per trial arm). Exclusion criteria comprised: primary neurologic diagnosis, palliative care, current/planned home ventilation and age <18 years. 182 patients completed the PEQ at 3 months postrandomisation. 22 participants (14 patients and 8 carers) took part in focus groups (2 per trial group) at >3 months postrandomisation. Interventions A complex intervention of post-ICU acute hospital rehabilitation, comprising enhanced physiotherapy, nutritional care and information provision, case-managed by dedicated rehabilitation assistants (RAs) working within existing ward-based clinical teams, delivered between ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Comparator was usual care. Outcome measures A novel PEQ capturing patient-reported aspects of quality care. Results The PEQ revealed statistically significant between-group differences across 4 key intervention components: physiotherapy (p=0.039), nutritional care (p=0.038), case management (p=0.045) and information provision (p<0.001), suggesting greater patient satisfaction in the intervention group. Focus group data strongly supported and helped explain these findings. Specifically, case management by dedicated RAs facilitated

  19. Inter-trial analysis of post-movement Beta activities in EEG signals using multivariate empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chih; Lee, Po-Lei; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lan, Gong-Yau

    2013-07-01

    Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is a technique to quantify subject's nonphase-locked neural activities underlying specific frequency bands, reactive to external/internal stimulus. However, conventional ERD/ERS studies usually utilize fixed frequency band determined from one or few channels to filter whole-head EEG/MEG data, which may inevitably include task-unrelated signals and result in underestimation of reactive oscillatory activities in multichannel studies. In this study, we adopted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) to extract beta-related oscillatory activities in performing self-paced right and left index-finger lifting tasks. The MEMD extracts common modes from all channels in same-index intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which allows the temporal-frequency features among different channels can be compared in each subband. The beta-band oscillatory activities were further bandpass filtered within trial-specific beta bands determined from sensorimotor-related channels (C3 and C4), and then rectified using amplitude modulation method to detect trial-by-trial beta rebound (BR) values in ERS time courses. The validity of the MEMD approach in BR values extraction has been demonstrated in multichannel EEG study which showed larger BR values than conventional ERS technique. The MEMD-based method enables the trial-by-trial extraction of sensorimotor oscillatory activities which might allow the exploration of subtle brain dynamics in future studies. PMID:23661320

  20. Assessing clinical trials of Internet addiction treatment: a systematic review and CONSORT evaluation.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel L; Delfabbro, Paul H; Griffiths, Mark D; Gradisar, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Although there is ongoing debate concerning the clinical status of Internet addiction, and the quality of the extant literature in this emerging field is not optimal, several clinical trials of both pharmacological and psychological treatments for Internet addiction have been published in recent years. A systematic review investigating the reporting quality of eight treatment studies is presented. Reporting quality was defined according to the 2010 Consolidating Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. An evaluation of the reviewed studies highlighted several key limitations, including (a) inconsistencies in the definition and diagnosis of Internet addiction, (b) a lack of randomization and blinding techniques, (c) a lack of adequate controls or other comparison groups, and (d) insufficient information concerning recruitment dates, sample characteristics, and treatment effect sizes. It is concluded that improvements in future studies' design and reporting would be of significant benefit to both researchers and clinicians, and to the overall positioning of Internet addiction in the behavioral addiction field.

  1. Trial design for evaluating novel treatments during an outbreak of an infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John; Olliaro, Piero; Lang, Trudie; Horby, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Tragically, the outbreak of Ebola that started in West Africa in 2014 has been far more extensive and damaging than any previous outbreaks. The duration of the outbreak has, for the first time, allowed the clinical evaluation of Ebola treatments. This article discusses the designs used for two such clinical trials which have recruited patients in Liberia and Sierra Leone. General principles are outlined for trial designs intended to be deployed quickly, adapt flexibly and provide results soon enough to influence the course of the current epidemic rather than just providing evidence for use should Ebola break out again. Lessons are drawn for the conduct of clinical research in future outbreaks of infectious diseases, where the sequence of events may or may not be similar to the West African Ebola epidemic. PMID:26768556

  2. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae) are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA) 95% CI: 85.09-117.26) more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151. PMID:22369511

  3. Evaluation of statistical methods for the evaluation of observer trials for the assessment of the effectiveness of signature measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunau, Patrick; Fitz, Daniel; Stein, Karin U.

    2015-10-01

    The statistical methods discussed in this paper are drawn from the area of machine learning or data mining as well as from descriptive statistics. These techniques are discussed with focus on their applicability to the results of observer trials in order to evaluate the effectiveness of signature measures. Signature measures aim at the change of the apparent signature of an object, e.g. a vehicle. So signature measures can be camouflage against infrared sensory, or they can be used for deception reasons. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of signature measures, observer trials provide an efficient method. The department of Signatorics of Fraunhofer IOSB developed a software tool named CARPET (Computer Aided inteRactive Performance Evaluation Tool) for the realization of observer trials. The benefit of this system is the reproducibility and uniformity of trials for every observer. The results from this system consist of marks, that were placed at particular times, as well as computer mouse positions recorded for each human observer. Based on the information gathered from these marks together with the known target object positions the statistical treatment can be done. For the statistics it has to be known to which target object the marks belong. The first problem considered in this paper concentrates on the correct labeling of the marks according to the target objects. The labeling is done using an expectation maximization scheme with the k-means clustering algorithm. The next step involves a second labeling. In this step a linear discriminant is used to decide whether a mark should be considered a hit or miss for every particular target object. After these decisions, a receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis is performed in order to evaluate the detectability of each target object. Furthermore the sample mean and sample covariance formulas are used on the so called hit sets in order to approximate Gaussian distributions for every hit set. These

  4. Considerations in the evaluation and determination of minimal risk in pragmatic clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, John D.; Wendler, David; Septimus, Edward; Wahba, Sarita; Madigan, Rosemary; Bliss, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    The classification system for categorizing the riskiness of a clinical trial is largely defined by the body of federal regulations known as the Common Rule (45 CFR 46, Subpart A) and by regulations governing the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) codified in 21 CFR 50. This rule is applied according to the interpretation of institutional review boards (IRBs) charged with overseeing the research. If a clinical trial is determined by an IRB to constitute “minimal risk,” there are important practical implications: the IRB may allow waiver or alteration of the informed consent process; the study may be carried out in certain vulnerable populations; or the study may be reviewed by IRBs using an expedited process. However, it is unclear how the risk levels of pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) should be assessed. Such trials typically compare existing, widely used medical therapies or interventions in the setting of routine clinical practice. Some of the therapies may be considered risky of themselves but the study comparing them may or may not add to that pre-existing level of risk. In this paper, we examine current research regulations and common interpretations of those regulations and suggest that current interpretation and application of regulations governing minimal-risk classification are marked by a high degree of variability and confusion, which in turn may ultimately harm patients by delaying or hindering potentially beneficial research. We advocate for a clear differentiation between the risks associated with a given therapy and the incremental risk incurred during research evaluating those therapies as a basic principle for evaluating the risk of a clinical study. We then examine two studies that incorporate aspects of PCTs and consider how various factors including patient perspectives, clinical equipoise, practice variation, and research methods such as cluster randomization contribute to current and evolving concepts of minimal risk, and how this

  5. Semiempirical evaluation of post-Hartree-Fock diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections for organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R

    2008-04-14

    Recent post-Hartree-Fock calculations of the diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer correction empirically show that it behaves quite similar to atomic nuclear mass corrections. An almost constant contribution per electron is identified, which converges with system size for specific series of organic molecules. This feature permits pocket-calculator evaluation of the corrections within thermochemical accuracy (10(-1) mhartree or kcal/mol). PMID:18412429

  6. Evaluation of a cohabitation challenge model in immunization trials for channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcein marking and cohabitation challenge have not been investigated in fish parasite research. This study evaluated a cohabitation challenge method in immunization trials against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) using calcein, a fluorescent dye, to mark channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus (Rafi...

  7. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernandez, Maria G. H.; Jasso, Jose L. C.

    2010-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p<0.001 and p<000) as in the amplitude (p<000 and p<000). Groups 3 and 4, which was stimulated at 100 mA and 100 ms latency showed no statistically significant difference (p>000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  8. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernández, María G. H.; Jasso, José L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p<0.001 and p<000) as in the amplitude (p<000 and p<000). Groups 3 and 4, which was stimulated at 100 mA and 100 ms latency showed no statistically significant difference (p>000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  9. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Conclusions: Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group. PMID:25713488

  10. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of the Welsh National Exercise Referral Scheme: protocol for trial and integrated economic and process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The benefits to health of a physically active lifestyle are well established and there is evidence that a sedentary lifestyle plays a significant role in the onset and progression of chronic disease. Despite a recognised need for effective public health interventions encouraging sedentary people with a medical condition to become more active, there are few rigorous evaluations of their effectiveness. Following NICE guidance, the Welsh national exercise referral scheme was implemented within the context of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Methods/Design The randomised controlled trial, with nested economic and process evaluations, recruited 2,104 inactive men and women aged 16+ with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and/or mild to moderate depression, anxiety or stress. Participants were recruited from 12 local health boards in Wales and referred directly by health professionals working in a range of health care settings. Consenting participants were randomised to either a 16 week tailored exercise programme run by qualified exercise professionals at community sports centres (intervention), or received an information booklet on physical activity (control). A range of validated measures assessing physical activity, mental health, psycho-social processes and health economics were administered at 6 and 12 months, with the primary 12 month outcome measure being 7 day Physical Activity Recall. The process evaluation explored factors determining the effectiveness or otherwise of the scheme, whilst the economic evaluation determined the relative cost-effectiveness of the scheme in terms of public spending. Discussion Evaluation of such a large scale national public health intervention presents methodological challenges in terms of trial design and implementation. This study was facilitated by early collaboration with social research and policy colleagues to develop a rigorous design which included an innovative approach to patient referral and

  11. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  12. In vitro evaluation of temperature rise during different post space preparations

    PubMed Central

    Gokturk, Hakan; Ozkocak, Ismail; Taskan, Mehmet Murat; Aytac, Fatma; Karaarslan, Emine Sirin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate temperature alterations on the outer root surface during post space preparation with six different post drills by using an infrared thermometer. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted single-rooted human mandibular incisor teeth were used. After root canal obturation, the specimens were divided into six groups (n = 10). During post space preparation, the temperature rises were measured in the middle third of the roots using a noncontact infrared thermometer with a sensitivity of 0.1°C. The temperature data were transferred from the thermometer to the computer and were observed graphically. Results: The maximum temperature rise was observed in Snowpost 2 (29.95 ± 10.2°C) (P < 0.001), but there were no significant differences among Snowpost 2 (29.95 ± 10.2°C), Snowpost 1 (24.6 ± 8.0°C), and Relyx 2 (17.68 ± 9.1°C) (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although water coolant used, the critical temperature rise was observed on the outer root surface in all post drill systems. PMID:26929693

  13. Single Trial Analysis of ERP Using Test Technique and Difference Evaluation of Modulated Vibratory Stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masafumi; Nozawa, Akio; Ide, Hideto

    The purpose of this study is to develop the tactile display which consists of a single vibrator by using the modulated vibration. To achieve this purpose, we must evaluate the stimulus difference of the tactile in the modulated vibratory stimuli. In this study, the stimulus difference has been estimated by detecting the P300 wave in the averaged waveform of the ERP. However, it is indispensable to evaluate the stimulus difference efficiently to make the differential limen in the frequency region to express the modulated vibration clear. In this paper, the single trial analysis on the ERP that the significant difference of the EEG before and after the stimulus presentation is evaluated by the test technique is proposed.

  14. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Recruitment Methods: The Staying Well after Depression Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Adele; Rudolf von Rohr, Isabelle; Muse, Kate; Duggan, Danielle; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as being the most efficient way of investigating the efficacy of psychological therapies. However, researchers conducting RCTs commonly report difficulties recruiting an adequate sample within planned timescales. In an effort to overcome recruitment difficulties, researchers often are forced to expand their recruitment criteria or extend the recruitment phase, thus increasing costs and delaying publication of results. Research investigating the effectiveness of recruitment strategies is limited and trials often fail to report sufficient details about the recruitment sources and resources utilised. Purpose We examined the efficacy of strategies implemented during the Staying Well after Depression RCT in Oxford to recruit participants with a history of recurrent depression. Methods We describe eight recruitment methods utilised and two further sources not initiated by the research team and examine their efficacy in terms of (i) the return, including the number of potential participants who contacted the trial and the number who were randomized into the trial, (ii) cost-effectiveness, comprising direct financial cost and manpower for initial contacts and randomized participants, and (iii) comparison of sociodemographic characteristics of individuals recruited from different sources. Results Poster advertising, web-based advertising and mental health worker referrals were the cheapest methods per randomized participant; however, the ratio of randomized participants to initial contacts differed markedly per source. Advertising online, via posters and on a local radio station were the most cost-effective recruitment methods for soliciting participants who subsequently were randomized into the trial. Advertising across many sources (saturation) was found to be important. Limitations It may not be feasible to employ all the recruitment methods used in this trial to obtain participation from other

  15. Evaluation of DICOM viewer software for workflow integration in clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, Daniel; Page, Charles E.; Kabino, Klaus; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) protocol is nowadays the leading standard for capture, exchange and storage of image data in medical applications. A broad range of commercial, free, and open source software tools supporting a variety of DICOM functionality exists. However, different from patient's care in hospital, DICOM has not yet arrived in electronic data capture systems (EDCS) for clinical trials. Due to missing integration, even just the visualization of patient's image data in electronic case report forms (eCRFs) is impossible. Four increasing levels for integration of DICOM components into EDCS are conceivable, raising functionality but also demands on interfaces with each level. Hence, in this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of 27 DICOM viewer software projects is performed, investigating viewing functionality as well as interfaces for integration. Concerning general, integration, and viewing requirements the survey involves the criteria (i) license, (ii) support, (iii) platform, (iv) interfaces, (v) two-dimensional (2D) and (vi) three-dimensional (3D) image viewing functionality. Optimal viewers are suggested for applications in clinical trials for 3D imaging, hospital communication, and workflow. Focusing on open source solutions, the viewers ImageJ and MicroView are superior for 3D visualization, whereas GingkoCADx is advantageous for hospital integration. Concerning workflow optimization in multi-centered clinical trials, we suggest the open source viewer Weasis. Covering most use cases, an EDCS and PACS interconnection with Weasis is suggested.

  16. A unified procedure for meta-analytic evaluation of surrogate end points in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Hughes, James P

    2012-09-01

    The meta-analytic approach to evaluating surrogate end points assesses the predictiveness of treatment effect on the surrogate toward treatment effect on the clinical end point based on multiple clinical trials. Definition and estimation of the correlation of treatment effects were developed in linear mixed models and later extended to binary or failure time outcomes on a case-by-case basis. In a general regression setting that covers nonnormal outcomes, we discuss in this paper several metrics that are useful in the meta-analytic evaluation of surrogacy. We propose a unified 3-step procedure to assess these metrics in settings with binary end points, time-to-event outcomes, or repeated measures. First, the joint distribution of estimated treatment effects is ascertained by an estimating equation approach; second, the restricted maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the means and the variance components of the random treatment effects; finally, confidence intervals are constructed by a parametric bootstrap procedure. The proposed method is evaluated by simulations and applications to 2 clinical trials.

  17. Evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy patients prior to a gene therapy clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Si-qi; Wang, Shuai-shuai; He, Heng; Zhao, Min-jian; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy may be a promising approach for the treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with this condition who were recruited into an upcoming gene therapy clinical trial and to assess any changes in the detection parameters to provide support for the clinical trial. Sixteen patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were evaluated using visual function tests 12 months before the initiation of gene therapy. Then, the results of visual acuity (VA), visual field (VF), RNFL (retinal nerve fiber layer) thickness, and Pattern-reversal Visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) were compared and analyzed. A total of 32 eyes of 16 patients were evaluated. Based on the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), 24 eyes were relatively stable compared with the baseline evaluation, and 8 eyes had significant changes, including 5 eyes that showed improvement and 3 eyes that showed impairment. In all eyes, the changes in the best-corrected visual acuity were significantly correlated with the changes in the visual field index (VFI), mean defect (MD), and P100 of the visual evoked potential. In the eyes with relatively stable BCVA and those with an obvious improvement in the BCVA, only the visual mean defect showed a significant change; the other indicators were not significantly different. Aside from the patients showing a tendency of spontaneous improvement, the others were in accordance with the requirement. The effects of Leber hereditary optical neuropathy (LHON) gene therapy should be evaluated primarily based on visual acuity. Additionally, visual field, neural fiber thickness, and electrophysiology should be considered in the evaluation. PMID:27749593

  18. Post-trial anatomical frame alignment procedure for comparison of 3D joint angle measurement from magnetic/inertial measurement units and camera-based systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Zhang, Jun-Tian

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units (MIMUs) have been widely used as an alternative to traditional camera-based motion capture systems for 3D joint kinematics measurement. Since these sensors do not directly measure position, a pre-trial anatomical calibration, either with the assistance of a special protocol/apparatus or with another motion capture system is required to establish the transformation matrices between the local sensor frame and the anatomical frame (AF) of each body segment on which the sensors are attached. Because the axes of AFs are often used as the rotational axes in the joint angle calculation, any difference in the AF determination will cause discrepancies in the calculated joint angles. Therefore, a direct comparison of joint angles between MIMU systems and camera-based systems is less meaningful because the calculated joint angles contain a systemic error due to the differences in the AF determination. To solve this problem a new post-trial AF alignment procedure is proposed. By correcting the AF misalignments, the joint angle differences caused by the difference in AF determination are eliminated and the remaining discrepancies are mainly from the measurement accuracy of the systems themselves. Lower limb joint angles from 30 walking trials were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed AF alignment procedure. This technique could serve as a new means for calibrating magnetic/inertial sensor-based motion capture systems and correcting for AF misalignment in scenarios where joint angles are compared directly.

  19. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. PMID:22819925

  20. Anti-triatomine saliva immunoassays for the evaluation of impregnated netting trials against Chagas disease transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Juarez, Jenny Ancca; Richards, Jean; Rath, Bruno; Machaca, Victor Quispe; Castro, Yagahira E.; Málaga, Edith S.; Levy, Katelyn; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Levy, Michael Z.

    2011-01-01

    Insecticide-impregnated nets can kill triatomine bugs, but it remains unclear whether they can protect against Chagas disease transmission. In a field trial in Quequeña, Peru, sentinel guinea pigs placed in intervention enclosures covered by deltamethrin-treated nets showed significantly lower antibody responses to saliva of Triatoma infestans compared with animals placed in pre-existing control enclosures. Our results strongly suggest that insecticide-treated nets prevent triatomine bites and can thereby protect against infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Anti-salivary immunoassays are powerful new tools to evaluate intervention strategies against Chagas disease. PMID:21426907

  1. Anti-triatomine saliva immunoassays for the evaluation of impregnated netting trials against Chagas disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Juarez, Jenny Ancca; Richards, Jean; Rath, Bruno; Machaca, Victor Quispe; Castro, Yagahira E; Málaga, Edith S; Levy, Katelyn; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Levy, Michael Z

    2011-05-01

    Insecticide-impregnated nets can kill triatomine bugs, but it remains unclear whether they can protect against Chagas disease transmission. In a field trial in Quequeña, Peru, sentinel guinea pigs placed in intervention enclosures covered by deltamethrin-treated nets showed significantly lower antibody responses to saliva of Triatoma infestans compared with animals placed in pre-existing control enclosures. Our results strongly suggest that insecticide-treated nets prevent triatomine bites and can thereby protect against infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Anti-salivary immunoassays are powerful new tools to evaluate intervention strategies against Chagas disease.

  2. Phase I trial evaluating the antiviral agent Cidofovir in combination with chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric; Haie-Meder, Christine; Bayar, Mohamed Amine; Mondini, Michele; Laporte, Mélanie; Mazeron, Renaud; Adam, Julien; Varga, Andrea; Vassal, Gilles; Magné, Nicolas; Chargari, Cyrus; Lanoy, Emilie; Pautier, Patricia; Levy, Antonin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This phase I trial aimed to assess the safety and determine the recommended Phase II dose (RP2D) of Cidofovir combined with chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Experimental design Incremental doses (1, 2.5, 5 and 6.5 mg/kg) of IV Cidofovir were administered weekly for two weeks, and then every 2 weeks from the start of chemoradiotherapy to the initiation of utero-vaginal brachytherapy. Biological expression of HPV was analyzed during treatment and tumor response was assessed according to RECIST v1.0 criteria. Results A total of 15 patients were treated with Cidofovir. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 2/6 patients at the 6.5 mg/kg dose level (G3 proteinuria, and G3 acute pyelonephritis with G3 febrile neutropenia). No toxicity occurred at the 5 mg/kg dose level, but only 3 patients received this dose due to trial interruption because of low accrual. The most frequent G3-4 adverse effects observed during the trial were: abdominal pain (n=3), infection (n=2), leuckoneutropenia (n=2), and others (n=6). No toxic death or major renal side effect occurred. The best response was that 8/9 evaluable patients achieved a complete response (89%). In the intention to treat population, the 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 93% and 76%, respectively. Biological monitoring of HPV-related markers (decreased p16 expression, and increased p53 and pRb levels) was possible on sequential tumor biopsy samples. The genomic alterations identified were PIK3CA (n=5; one also had a KRAS mutation), and HRAS (n=1) mutations. Conclusion Cidofovir at a dose of 5mg/kg combined with chemoradiotherapy appeared tolerable and yielded tumor regressions. Due to early trial interruption, the RP2D was not confirmed. PMID:27016411

  3. A randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of knowledge translation and exchange strategies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Context Significant resources and time are invested in the production of research knowledge. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three knowledge translation and exchange strategies in the incorporation of research evidence into public health policies and programs. Methods This trial was conducted with a national sample of public health departments in Canada from 2004 to 2006. The three interventions, implemented over one year in 2005, included access to an online registry of research evidence; tailored messaging; and a knowledge broker. The primary outcome assessed the extent to which research evidence was used in a recent program decision, and the secondary outcome measured the change in the sum of evidence-informed healthy body weight promotion policies or programs being delivered at health departments. Mixed-effects models were used to test the hypotheses. Findings One hundred and eight of 141 (77%) health departments participated in this study. No significant effect of the intervention was observed for primary outcome (p < 0.45). However, for public health policies and programs (HPPs), a significant effect of the intervention was observed only for tailored, targeted messages (p < 0.01). The treatment effect was moderated by organizational research culture (e.g., value placed on research evidence in decision making). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that under certain conditions tailored, targeted messages are more effective than knowledge brokering and access to an online registry of research evidence. Greater emphasis on the identification of organizational factors is needed in order to implement strategies that best meet the needs of individual organizations. Trial Registration The trial registration number and title are as follows: ISRCTN35240937 -- Is a knowledge broker more effective than other strategies in promoting evidence-based physical activity and healthy body weight programming

  4. A new cognitive evaluation battery for Down syndrome and its relevance for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    de Sola, Susana; de la Torre, Rafael; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Benejam, Bessy; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; del Hoyo, Laura; Rodríguez, Joan; Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Judit; Dueñas-Espin, Ivan; Hernandez, Gimena; Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Langohr, Klaus; Videla, Sebastia; Blehaut, Henry; Farre, Magi; Dierssen, Mara; Cuenca-Royo, Aida

    2015-01-01

    The recent prospect of pharmaceutical interventions for cognitive impairment of Down syndrome (DS) has boosted a number of clinical trials in this population. However, running the trials has raised some methodological challenges and questioned the prevailing methodology used to evaluate cognitive functioning of DS individuals. This is usually achieved by comparing DS individuals to matched healthy controls of the same mental age. We propose a new tool, the TESDAD Battery that uses comparison with age-matched typically developed adults. This is an advantageous method for probing the clinical efficacy of DS therapies, allowing the interpretation and prediction of functional outcomes in clinical trials. In our DS population the TESDAD battery permitted a quantitative assessment of cognitive defects, which indicated language dysfunction and deficits in executive function, as the most important contributors to other cognitive and adaptive behavior outcomes as predictors of functional change in DS. Concretely, auditory comprehension and functional academics showed the highest potential as end-point measures of therapeutic intervention for clinical trials: the former as a cognitive key target for therapeutic intervention, and the latter as a primary functional outcome measure of clinical efficacy. Our results also emphasize the need to explore the modulating effects of IQ, gender and age on cognitive enhancing treatments. Noticeably, women performed significantly better than men of the same age and IQ in most cognitive tests, with the most consistent differences occurring in memory and executive functioning and negative trends rarely emerged on quality of life linked to the effect of age after adjusting for IQ and gender. In sum, the TESDAD battery is a useful neurocognitive tool for probing the clinical efficacy of experimental therapies in interventional studies in the DS population suggesting that age-matched controls are advantageous for determining normalization of

  5. A new cognitive evaluation battery for Down syndrome and its relevance for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    de Sola, Susana; de la Torre, Rafael; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Benejam, Bessy; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; Del Hoyo, Laura; Rodríguez, Joan; Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Judit; Dueñas-Espin, Ivan; Hernandez, Gimena; Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Langohr, Klaus; Videla, Sebastia; Blehaut, Henry; Farre, Magi; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-01-01

    The recent prospect of pharmaceutical interventions for cognitive impairment of Down syndrome (DS) has boosted a number of clinical trials in this population. However, running the trials has raised some methodological challenges and questioned the prevailing methodology used to evaluate cognitive functioning of DS individuals. This is usually achieved by comparing DS individuals to matched healthy controls of the same mental age. We propose a new tool, the TESDAD Battery that uses comparison with age-matched typically developed adults. This is an advantageous method for probing the clinical efficacy of DS therapies, allowing the interpretation and prediction of functional outcomes in clinical trials. In our DS population the TESDAD battery permitted a quantitative assessment of cognitive defects, which indicated language dysfunction and deficits in executive function, as the most important contributors to other cognitive and adaptive behavior outcomes as predictors of functional change in DS. Concretely, auditory comprehension and functional academics showed the highest potential as end-point measures of therapeutic intervention for clinical trials: the former as a cognitive key target for therapeutic intervention, and the latter as a primary functional outcome measure of clinical efficacy. Our results also emphasize the need to explore the modulating effects of IQ, gender and age on cognitive enhancing treatments. Noticeably, women performed significantly better than men of the same age and IQ in most cognitive tests, with the most consistent differences occurring in memory and executive functioning and negative trends rarely emerged on quality of life linked to the effect of age after adjusting for IQ and gender. In sum, the TESDAD battery is a useful neurocognitive tool for probing the clinical efficacy of experimental therapies in interventional studies in the DS population suggesting that age-matched controls are advantageous for determining normalization of

  6. A new cognitive evaluation battery for Down syndrome and its relevance for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    de Sola, Susana; de la Torre, Rafael; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Benejam, Bessy; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; Del Hoyo, Laura; Rodríguez, Joan; Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Judit; Dueñas-Espin, Ivan; Hernandez, Gimena; Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Langohr, Klaus; Videla, Sebastia; Blehaut, Henry; Farre, Magi; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-01-01

    The recent prospect of pharmaceutical interventions for cognitive impairment of Down syndrome (DS) has boosted a number of clinical trials in this population. However, running the trials has raised some methodological challenges and questioned the prevailing methodology used to evaluate cognitive functioning of DS individuals. This is usually achieved by comparing DS individuals to matched healthy controls of the same mental age. We propose a new tool, the TESDAD Battery that uses comparison with age-matched typically developed adults. This is an advantageous method for probing the clinical efficacy of DS therapies, allowing the interpretation and prediction of functional outcomes in clinical trials. In our DS population the TESDAD battery permitted a quantitative assessment of cognitive defects, which indicated language dysfunction and deficits in executive function, as the most important contributors to other cognitive and adaptive behavior outcomes as predictors of functional change in DS. Concretely, auditory comprehension and functional academics showed the highest potential as end-point measures of therapeutic intervention for clinical trials: the former as a cognitive key target for therapeutic intervention, and the latter as a primary functional outcome measure of clinical efficacy. Our results also emphasize the need to explore the modulating effects of IQ, gender and age on cognitive enhancing treatments. Noticeably, women performed significantly better than men of the same age and IQ in most cognitive tests, with the most consistent differences occurring in memory and executive functioning and negative trends rarely emerged on quality of life linked to the effect of age after adjusting for IQ and gender. In sum, the TESDAD battery is a useful neurocognitive tool for probing the clinical efficacy of experimental therapies in interventional studies in the DS population suggesting that age-matched controls are advantageous for determining normalization of

  7. Economic support to improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes in South Africa: a qualitative process evaluation of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poverty undermines the adherence of patients to tuberculosis treatment. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the extent to which economic support in the form of a voucher would improve patients’ adherence to treatment, and their treatment outcomes. Although the trial showed a modest improvement in the treatment success rates of the intervention group, this was not statistically significant, due in part to the low fidelity to the trial intervention. A qualitative process evaluation, conducted in the final few months of the trial, explained some of the factors that contributed to this low fidelity. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with patients who received vouchers, nurses in intervention clinics, personnel in shops who administered the vouchers, and managers of the TB Control Programme. These interviews were analyzed thematically. Results The low fidelity to the trial intervention can be explained by two main factors. The first was nurses’ tendency to ‘ration’ the vouchers, only giving them to the most needy of eligible patients and leaving out those eligible patients whom they felt were financially more comfortable. The second was logistical issues related to the administration of the voucher as vouchers were not always available for patients on their appointed clinic dates, necessitating further visits to the clinics which they were not always able to make. Conclusions This process evaluation identifies some of the most important factors that contributed to the results of this pragmatic trial. It highlights the value of process evaluations as tools to explain the results of randomized trials and emphasizes the importance of implementers as ‘street level bureaucrats’ who may profoundly affect the way an intervention is administered. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50689131, registered 21 April 2009. The trial protocol is available at the following web address: http://www

  8. Evaluation of an interprofessional educational curriculum pilot course for practitioners working with post-stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Olaisen, Rho Henry; Mariscal-Hergert, Cheryl; Shaw, Alissa; Macchiavelli, Cecilia; Marsheck, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the design and evaluation of an interprofessional pilot training course aimed at pre-licensure practitioners working with post-stroke patients in community-based settings. The course was developed by community-based practitioners from nine health professions. Course learning activities included traditional methods (lectures) and interactive modules (problem-based learning and exchange-based learning). The study's aim was to assess the program's effectiveness in adapting and incorporating knowledge, skills and self-confidence when delivering tertiary care in therapeutic pool environments; gauge adoption of course principles into practice, and assess overall course satisfaction. Methods of evaluation included conceptual mapping of course format, pre- and post-questionnaires, daily reflection questionnaires, course satisfaction survey and adoption survey, 10 weeks follow-up. Overall, the findings indicate students' knowledge, skills and self-confidence in delivering effective post-stroke care increased following the training. Students reported adopting clinical practices in 10 weeks follow-up. Implications for designing interprofessional curricula are discussed. PMID:24195682

  9. Phase II Trial of Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide after Reduced-Intensity Busulfan/Fludarabine Conditioning for Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Alousi, Amin M; Brammer, Jonathan E; Saliba, Rima M; Andersson, Borje; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Jones, Roy; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Khouri, Issa; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Nieto, Yago; Shah, Nina; Ahmed, Sairah; Oran, Betul; Al Atrash, Gheath; Ciurea, Stefan; Kebriaei, Partow; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Champlin, Richard E

    2015-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (CY) after ablative HLA-matched bone marrow (BM) transplantation has been reported to have comparable rates of acute GVHD with an apparent reduction in chronic GVHD and infections when compared to historical prophylaxis with a calcineurin-inhibitor (CNI) and methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a phase II trial of post-transplantation CY (post-CY) after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) using intravenous busulfan (area under the curve of 4000 micromolar minute), fludarabine (40 mg/m(2)) for 4 days, and CY 50 mg/kg on days +3 and +4 after BM or peripheral blood (PB) transplantations from matched related (MRD) or unrelated donors (MUD). MUD recipients received antithymocyte globulin (ATG); however, a later amendment removed ATG. Forty-nine patients were treated (acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome, 82%). Median age was 62 years (range, 39 to 72). Fifteen patients received an MRD (9 PB/6 BM); 34 had a MUD (2 PB/32 BM). The cumulative incidence of grade II to IV acute GVHD, III to IV acute GVHD, and chronic GVHD was 58%, 22%, and 18%, respectively. A matched cohort analysis compared outcomes to tacrolimus/methotrexate GVHD prophylaxis and indicated higher rates of acute GVHD grade II to IV (46% versus 19%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; P = .02) and treatment-related mortality (HR, 3.3; P = .035) and worse overall survival (HR, 1.9; P = .04) with post-CY. The incidence of chronic GVHD and CMV reactivation did not differ. This study suggests that post-CY should not be used as sole GVHD prophylaxis after a RIC transplantation from HLA-matched donors. PMID:25667989

  10. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  11. [Establish research model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-ke; Liu, Zhi; Lei, Xiang; Tian, Ran; Zheng, Rui; Li, Nan; Ren, Jing-tian; Du, Xiao-xi; Shang, Hong-cai

    2015-09-01

    The safety of Chinese patent medicine has become a focus of social. It is necessary to carry out work on post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. However, there have no criterions to guide the related research, it is urgent to set up a model and method to guide the practice for related research. According to a series of clinical research, we put forward some views, which contained clear and definite the objective and content of clinical safety evaluation, the work flow should be determined, make a list of items for safety evaluation project, and put forward the three level classification of risk control. We set up a model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. Based this model, the list of items can be used for ranking medicine risks, and then take steps for different risks, aims to lower the app:ds:risksrisk level. At last, the medicine can be managed by five steps in sequence. The five steps are, collect risk signal, risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management, and aftereffect assessment. We hope to provide new ideas for the future research. PMID:26983223

  12. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Treating Degenerative Tendinopathies: A Randomized Control Trial with Synchronous Observational Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wesner, Marni; Defreitas, Terry; Bredy, Heather; Pothier, Louisa; Qin, Ziling; McKillop, Ashley B.; Gross, Douglas P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study aimed to inform future research evaluating the effectiveness of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection for tendinopathy. Design Randomized control trial (RCT) and synchronous observational cohort studies. For the RCT, consecutive consenting patients treated at an academic sports medicine clinic were randomly assigned to either a PRP or placebo control group. Setting The Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic, Edmonton, Canada. Patients The RCT included 9 participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The cohort study included 178 participants with a variety of tendinopathies. Interventions Patients receiving PRP were injected with 4 ml of platelets into the supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus, while patients in the placebo group were injected with 4ml of saline. All participants undertook a 3-month standardized, home-based, daily exercise program. Main Outcome Measures Participants in the RCT were re-evaluated 3, and 6 months post-injection. Change scores before and after injection on pain, disability and MRI-documented pathology outcomes were compared. In the cohort study, pain and disability were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months post-injection. Results For the RCT, 7 participants received PRP and 2 received placebo injections. Patients receiving PRP reported clinically important improvements in pain (>1.5/10 on VAS), disability (>15 point DASH change), and tendon pathology while those receiving placebo injections did not. In the observational cohort, statistically and clinically significant improvements in pain and disability were observed. Conclusion This pilot study provides information for planning future studies of PRP effectiveness. Preliminary results indicate intratendinous, ultrasound-guided PRP injection may lead to improvements in pain, function, and MRI-documented tendon pathology. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68341698 PMID:26849812

  13. The practice of ‘doing’ evaluation: lessons learned from nine complex intervention trials in action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition among trialists of the challenges in understanding how particular ‘real-life’ contexts influence the delivery and receipt of complex health interventions. Evaluations of interventions to change health worker and/or patient behaviours in health service settings exemplify these challenges. When interpreting evaluation data, deviation from intended intervention implementation is accounted for through process evaluations of fidelity, reach, and intensity. However, no such systematic approach has been proposed to account for the way evaluation activities may deviate in practice from assumptions made when data are interpreted. Methods A collective case study was conducted to explore experiences of undertaking evaluation activities in the real-life contexts of nine complex intervention trials seeking to improve appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria in varied health service settings. Multiple sources of data were used, including in-depth interviews with investigators, participant-observation of studies, and rounds of discussion and reflection. Results and discussion From our experiences of the realities of conducting these evaluations, we identified six key ‘lessons learned’ about ways to become aware of and manage aspects of the fabric of trials involving the interface of researchers, fieldworkers, participants and data collection tools that may affect the intended production of data and interpretation of findings. These lessons included: foster a shared understanding across the study team of how individual practices contribute to the study goals; promote and facilitate within-team communications for ongoing reflection on the progress of the evaluation; establish processes for ongoing collaboration and dialogue between sub-study teams; the importance of a field research coordinator bridging everyday project management with scientific oversight; collect and review reflective field notes on the progress of the

  14. Post-trial dopaminergic modulation of conditioned catalepsy: A single apomorphine induced increase/decrease in dopaminergic activation immediately following a conditioned catalepsy response can reverse/enhance a haloperidol conditioned and sensitized catalepsy response.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas Rangel; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; Santos, Breno Garone; Silva, Jade Leal Loureiro; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-09-15

    Haloperidol can induce catalepsy and this drug effect can be conditioned as well as sensitized to contextual cues. We used a paired/unpaired Pavlovian conditioning protocol to establish haloperidol catalepsy conditioned and sensitized responses. Groups of rats were given 10 daily catalepsy tests following administration of vehicle (n=24) or haloperidol (1.0mg/kg) either paired (n=18) or unpaired (n=18) to testing. Subsequently, testing for conditioning was conducted and conditioning and sensitization of catalepsy were observed selectively in the paired group. Immediately following a second test for catalepsy conditioning, the groups were subdivided into 4 vehicle groups, 3 unpaired haloperidol groups and 3 paired haloperidol groups and were given one of three post-trial treatments (vehicle, 0.05mg/kg or 2.0mg/kg apomorphine). One day later the conditioned catalepsy test 3 was carried out and on the next day, a haloperidol challenge test was performed. The post-trial apomorphine treatments had major effects on the paired groups upon both conditioning and the haloperidol challenge test. The low dose apomorphine post-trial treatment enhanced both the conditioned and the haloperidol sensitized catalepsy responses. The high dose apomorphine post-trial treatment eliminated conditioned catalepsy and eliminated the initial acute catalepsy response to haloperidol that was induced in the vehicle control groups. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of conditioned drug cues to modification by increases/decreases in activity of the dopamine system in the immediate post-trial interval after a conditioning trial. This demonstration that post-trial dopaminergic drug treatments can modify conditioned drug behavior has broad implications for conditioned drug effects.

  15. VITA-D: Cholecalciferol substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients: A randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the post-transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thiem, Ursula; Heinze, Georg; Segel, Rudolf; Perkmann, Thomas; Kainberger, Franz; Mühlbacher, Ferdinand; Hörl, Walter; Borchhardt, Kyra

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin D does not only regulate calcium homeostasis but also plays an important role as an immune modulator. It influences the immune system through the induction of immune shifts and regulatory cells resulting in immunologic tolerance. As such, vitamin D is thought to exert beneficial effects within the transplant setting, especially in kidney transplant recipients, considering the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in kidney transplant recipients. Methods/Design The VITA-D study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with two parallel groups including a total of 200 kidney transplant recipients, is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory and renoprotective effects of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) within the transplant setting. Kidney transplant recipients found to have vitamin D deficiency defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 < 50 nmol per liter will be randomly assigned to receive either oral cholecalciferol therapy or placebo and will be followed for one year. Cholecalciferol will be administered at a dose of 6800 International Units daily over a time period of one year. The objective is to evaluate the influence of vitamin D3 substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients on the post-transplant outcome. As a primary endpoint glomerular filtration rate calculated with the MDRD formula (modification of diet in renal disease) one year after kidney transplantation will be evaluated. Incidence of acute rejection episodes, and the number and severity of infections (analyzed by means of C-reactive protein) within the first year after transplantation will be monitored as well. As a secondary endpoint the influence of vitamin D3 on bone mineral density within the first year post-transplant will be assessed. Three DXA analyses will be performed, one within the first four weeks post-transplant, one five months and one twelve months after kidney transplantation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00752401 PMID

  16. A Randomised Control Trial on the Use of Topical Methicillin in Reducing Post-Operative Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Theophilus, Sharon Casilda; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2011-01-01

    Background: A double-blind randomised control study was conducted on all patients who were admitted or referred to the Department of Neurosurgery, Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, with a diagnosis of hydrocephalus where a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was indicated. Methods: The period of study was from November 2005 to May 2007, and the follow-up period was 3 months after surgery. Randomisation was carried out in the operating room prior to the procedure. The scrub nurse selected a sealed envelope, which contained the assignment of each patient to 1 of 2 treatment groups: Group 1 patients were treated with topical methicillin, and Group 2 patients were not treated with topical methicillin. Prophylactic antibiotic, cefuroxime (25 mg/kg) was given intravenously at induction. Standard sterile operative technique was followed in preparing and draping the patients. Results: A total of 90 patients were recruited in the study, and 13 (14.4%) patients developed an infection within 3 months post-operation. Group 1 had a 8.9% risk of infection, and Group 2 had a 20% risk; however, there was no statistically significant post-operative ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) infection reduction with the use of topical methicillin in VPS surgery (P = 0.230). Multivariate analysis showed that only duration of surgery had a significant influence on the incidence of post-operative VPS infection in the non-methicillin group (P = 0.02). The non-methicillin group had an 8 times greater risk of developing post-operative VPS infection than the methicillin group if surgery lasted longer than 1 hour. Conclusion: Topical methicillin had no significance in the reduction of post-operative VPS infection. PMID:22135571

  17. Design and Selection of Soy Breads Used for Evaluating Isoflavone Bioavailability in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Vodovotz, Yael

    2013-01-01

    To modulate isoflavone aglycone composition within a soy functional food, soy ingredients were processed and evaluated in a soy bread system intended for clinical trials. A soy flour/soy milk mixture (SM) was boiled, fermented, steamed, or roasted prior to dough preparation. The isoflavone compositions of five processed SM and their corresponding breads combined with and without β-glucosidase-rich almonds were examined using HPLC. Isoflavone malonyl-glucosides (>80%) were converted into acetyl and simple glucoside forms (substrates more favorable for β-glucosidase) in steamed and roasted SM. Their corresponding breads had isoflavones predominately as aglycones (∼75%) with soy–almond bread with steamed SM being more consumer acceptable than roasted. Isoflavone composition in soy bread was stable during frozen storage and toasting. A suitable glycoside-rich soy bread (31.6 ± 2.1 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using unprocessed SM and an aglycone-rich soy–almond bread (31.1 ± 1.9 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using steamed SM were developed to evaluate fundamental questions of isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials. PMID:23451757

  18. Design and selection of soy breads used for evaluating isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Vodovotz, Yael

    2013-03-27

    To modulate isoflavone aglycone composition within a soy functional food, soy ingredients were processed and evaluated in a soy bread system intended for clinical trials. A soy flour/soy milk mixture (SM) was boiled, fermented, steamed, or roasted prior to dough preparation. The isoflavone compositions of five processed SM and their corresponding breads combined with and without β-glucosidase-rich almonds were examined using HPLC. Isoflavone malonyl-glucosides (>80%) were converted into acetyl and simple glucoside forms (substrates more favorable for β-glucosidase) in steamed and roasted SM. Their corresponding breads had isoflavones predominately as aglycones (∼75%) with soy-almond bread with steamed SM being more consumer acceptable than roasted. Isoflavone composition in soy bread was stable during frozen storage and toasting. A suitable glycoside-rich soy bread (31.6 ± 2.1 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using unprocessed SM and an aglycone-rich soy-almond bread (31.1 ± 1.9 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using steamed SM were developed to evaluate fundamental questions of isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials.

  19. Design and selection of soy breads used for evaluating isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Vodovotz, Yael

    2013-03-27

    To modulate isoflavone aglycone composition within a soy functional food, soy ingredients were processed and evaluated in a soy bread system intended for clinical trials. A soy flour/soy milk mixture (SM) was boiled, fermented, steamed, or roasted prior to dough preparation. The isoflavone compositions of five processed SM and their corresponding breads combined with and without β-glucosidase-rich almonds were examined using HPLC. Isoflavone malonyl-glucosides (>80%) were converted into acetyl and simple glucoside forms (substrates more favorable for β-glucosidase) in steamed and roasted SM. Their corresponding breads had isoflavones predominately as aglycones (∼75%) with soy-almond bread with steamed SM being more consumer acceptable than roasted. Isoflavone composition in soy bread was stable during frozen storage and toasting. A suitable glycoside-rich soy bread (31.6 ± 2.1 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using unprocessed SM and an aglycone-rich soy-almond bread (31.1 ± 1.9 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using steamed SM were developed to evaluate fundamental questions of isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials. PMID:23451757

  20. Evaluation of agile designs in first-in-human (FIH) trials--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Itay; Bolognese, James A; Krishna, Rajesh; Wagner, John A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate alternatives to standard first-in-human (FIH) designs in order to optimize the information gained from such studies by employing novel agile trial designs. Agile designs combine adaptive and flexible elements to enable optimized use of prior information either before and/or during conduct of the study to seamlessly update the study design. A comparison of the traditional 6 + 2 (active + placebo) subjects per cohort design with alternative, reduced sample size, agile designs was performed by using discrete event simulation. Agile designs were evaluated for specific adverse event models and rates as well as dose-proportional, saturated, and steep-accumulation pharmacokinetic profiles. Alternative, reduced sample size (hereafter referred to as agile) designs are proposed for cases where prior knowledge about pharmacokinetics and/or adverse event relationships are available or appropriately assumed. Additionally, preferred alternatives are proposed for a general case when prior knowledge is limited or unavailable. Within the tested conditions and stated assumptions, some agile designs were found to be as efficient as traditional designs. Thus, simulations demonstrated that the agile design is a robust and feasible approach to FIH clinical trials, with no meaningful loss of relevant information, as it relates to PK and AE assumptions. In some circumstances, applying agile designs may decrease the duration and resources required for Phase I studies, increasing the efficiency of early clinical development. We highlight the value and importance of useful prior information when specifying key assumptions related to safety, tolerability, and PK.

  1. AAPL Practice Guideline for the forensic psychiatric evaluation of competence to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas; Noffsinger, Stephen G; Ash, Peter; Frierson, Richard L; Gerbasi, Joan; Hackett, Maureen; Lewis, Catherine F; Pinals, Debra A; Scott, Charles L; Sieg, Karl G; Wall, Barry W; Zonana, Howard V

    2007-01-01

    Competence to stand trial is a legal construct used to identify those criminal defendants who have the requisite mental capacity to understand the nature and objective of the proceedings against them and to participate rationally in preparing their defense. This Practice Guideline has described how psychiatrists should evaluate individuals concerning their competence to stand trial. The Guideline describes acceptable forensic psychiatric practice for such evaluations. Where possible, it specifies standards of practice and principles of ethics and also emphasizes the importance of analyzing an individual defendant's case in the context of statutes and case law applicable in the jurisdiction where the evaluation takes place. The recommendations in the Guideline both reflect and are limited by evolving case law, statutory requirements, legal publications, and the current state of psychiatric knowledge. The authors have taken note of nationally applicable case law, federal constitutional standards, statutory language, and federal and state interpretations of the rights or statutes, recognizing that jurisdictions may differ in their specific interpretation or application of statutes or general constitutional standards. The review of cases concerning specific psychiatric diagnoses illustrates general U.S. trends, and psychiatrists must remain cognizant of their jurisdictions' interpretations of statutes or constitutional requirements. By surveying a variety of practices and approaches to data gathering and case analysis, the authors believe that this Guideline will stimulate additional collegial discussion about what is necessary and sufficient for adequate evaluations of adjudicative competence. The notion that psychiatrists should apply expertise to competence assessments stems from the principal that, before allowing a defendant to face criminal prosecution and possible punishment, courts need reasonable assurance--based, if necessary, on a careful, individualized

  2. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-30

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  3. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  4. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  5. Lessons learnt from post EIS evaluations of national road schemes in Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    King, E.A.; O'Malley, V.P.

    2012-01-15

    The Irish National Roads Authority (NRA) recently completed over twenty post environmental impact assessment evaluations of noise chapters prepared as part of Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for new national road schemes in Ireland. The study focused on a range of issues including a review of noise monitoring procedures, noise prediction methodologies and an assessment of the effectiveness of noise mitigation measures currently in use on national road schemes. This review was carried out taking cognisance of best international practices for noise assessment and methodologies used to mitigate road traffic noise. The primary focus of the study was to assess the actual noise impacts of national road scheme developments and to revise, where necessary, methodologies recommended in the current NRA guidance document describing the treatment of noise on national road schemes. This paper presents a summary of the study and identifies a number of key areas that should be considered prior to the development of future guidance documents. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presents a post-EIS evaluation of noise assessments for national roads in Ireland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of some noise mitigation measures is critically evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues related to the current EIS noise assessment methodologies are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implications for alterations to the NRA noise guidelines.

  6. The Trial State Assessment: Prospects and Realities. The Third Report of the National Academy of Education Panel on the Evaluation of the NAEP Trial State Assessment: 1992 Trial State Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Education, Stanford, CA.

    The National Academy of Education Panel is providing the intellectual leadership and coordination for an independent evaluation of the 1990 and 1992 Trial State Assessments (TSA) of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). These instruments provide state-by-state comparisons of educational achievement, which is the first such use of…

  7. Quality and Utility: The 1994 Trial State Assessment in Reading. The Fourth Report of the National Academy of Education Panel on the Evaluation of the NAEP Trial State Assessment: 1994 Trial State Assessment in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Education, Stanford, CA.

    This report evaluates the conduct, validity, and uses of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Trial State Assessment (TSA). The report addresses such pressing problems as how participation in NAEP can be maintained and appropriate samples can be achieved; how errors can be minimized in the complex process of scaling and analyzing…

  8. Evaluating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of web-based indicated prevention of major depression: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) imposes a considerable disease burden on individuals and societies. Web-based interventions have shown to be effective in reducing depressive symptom severity. However, it is not known whether web-based interventions may also be effective in preventing the onset of MDD. The aim of this study is to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of an indicated web-based guided self-help intervention (GET.ON Mood Enhancer Prevention) on the onset of MDD. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted to compare the (cost-) effectiveness of the GET.ON Mood Enhancer Prevention training with a control condition exclusively receiving online-based psychoeducation on depression. Adults with subthreshold depression (N = 406) will be recruited from the general population and randomised to one of the two conditions. The primary outcome is time to onset of MDD within a 12-months follow-up period. MDD will be assessed according to DSM-IV criteria as assessed by the telephone-administered Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Time to onset of MDD will be assessed using life charts. Secondary outcomes include changes on various indicators of depressive symptom severity, anxiety and quality of life from baseline to post-treatment, to a 6-month and a 12-month follow up. Additionally, an economic evaluation using a societal perspective will be conducted to examine the intervention’s cost-effectiveness. Discussion This is one of the first randomised controlled trials that examines the effect of an indicated guided self-help web-based intervention on the incidence of major depression. If shown to be effective, the intervention will contribute to reducing the disease burden due to MDD in the general population. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Registration DRKS00004709. PMID:24485283

  9. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: a model post audit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Verplanck, Philip L.; Broshears, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H+, and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations.

  10. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: A model post audit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P.L.; Broshears, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H +, and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations.

  11. Randomized controlled evaluation of an early intervention to prevent post-rape psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Heidi; Acierno, Ron; Waldrop, Angela E; King, Lynda; King, Daniel; Danielson, Carla; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2007-10-01

    A randomized between-group design was used to evaluate the efficacy of a video intervention to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health problems, implemented prior to the forensic medical examination conducted within 72 h post-sexual assault. Participants were 140 female victims of sexual assault (68 video/72 nonvideo) aged 15 years or older. Assessments were targeted for 6 weeks (Time 1) and 6 months (Time 2) post-assault. At Time 1, the intervention was associated with lower scores on measures of PTSD and depression among women with a prior rape history relative to scores among women with a prior rape history in the standard care condition. At Time 2, depression scores were also lower among those with a prior rape history who were in the video relative to the standard care condition. Small effects indicating higher PTSD and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores among women without a prior rape history in the video condition were observed at Time 1. Accelerated longitudinal growth curve analysis indicated a videoxprior rape history interaction for PTSD, yielding four patterns of symptom trajectory over time. Women with a prior rape history in the video condition generally maintained the lowest level of symptoms.

  12. Neuropsychological assessment of competency to stand trial evaluations: a practical conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Kirkish, P; Sreenivasan, S

    1999-01-01

    Competency for adjudication is a complex concept that, despite judicial efforts to articulate functional criteria, has presented conscientious clinicians with the need to filter through multiple levels of psychological data to adequately evaluate and describe the germane functional capacities and deficits of a given defendant. Practitioners are confronted with preparing evaluations that are either psychologically inclusive and too broad to be judicially useful or too brief (opinions with inadequate descriptions of how a specific defendant's abilities and impediments affect the legal criteria). The trend toward harsh sentencing guidelines has further increased defendants' incentives either to postpone adjudication or to attempt to establish a foundation for an insanity plea. Therefore, accurate identification of malingered deficits has become a more significant problem in evaluating competency to stand trial than it previously was. When neuropsychological factors are introduced, competency assessment becomes complex. This article presents a methodology for managing these complexities. Strategies for preparing concise competency evaluations for defendants presenting neuropsychological symptoms are provided along with examples that help illustrate the evaluation process.

  13. Evaluating clinical trial design: systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials for determining efficacy of benzoyl peroxide topical therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    Lamel, Sonia A; Sivamani, Raja K; Rahvar, Maral; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-11-01

    Determined efficacies of benzoyl peroxide may be affected by study design, implementation, and vehicle effects. We sought to elucidate areas that may allow improvement in determining accurate treatment efficacies by determining rates of active treatment and vehicle responders in randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide to treat acne. We conducted a systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of acne. We compared response rates of vehicle treatment arms versus those in benzoyl peroxide arms. Twelve trials met inclusion criteria with 2818 patients receiving benzoyl peroxide monotherapy treatment and 2004 receiving vehicle treatment. The average percent reduction in total number of acne lesions was 44.3 (SD = 9.2) and 27.8 (SD = 21.0) for the active and vehicle treatment groups, respectively. The average reduction in non-inflammatory lesions was 41.5 % (SD = 9.4) in the active treatment group and 27.0 % (SD = 20.9) in the vehicle group. The average percent decrease in inflammatory lesions was 52.1 (SD = 10.4) in the benzoyl peroxide group and 34.7 (SD = 22.7) in the vehicle group. The average percentage of participants achieving success per designated study outcomes was 28.6 (SD = 17.3) and 15.2 (SD = 9.5) in the active treatment and vehicle groups, respectively. Patient responses in randomized controlled trials evaluating topical acne therapies may be affected by clinical trial design, implementation, the biologic effects of vehicles, and natural disease progression. "No treatment" groups may facilitate determination of accurate treatment efficacies.

  14. Evaluating clinical trial design: systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials for determining efficacy of benzoyl peroxide topical therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    Lamel, Sonia A; Sivamani, Raja K; Rahvar, Maral; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-11-01

    Determined efficacies of benzoyl peroxide may be affected by study design, implementation, and vehicle effects. We sought to elucidate areas that may allow improvement in determining accurate treatment efficacies by determining rates of active treatment and vehicle responders in randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide to treat acne. We conducted a systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of acne. We compared response rates of vehicle treatment arms versus those in benzoyl peroxide arms. Twelve trials met inclusion criteria with 2818 patients receiving benzoyl peroxide monotherapy treatment and 2004 receiving vehicle treatment. The average percent reduction in total number of acne lesions was 44.3 (SD = 9.2) and 27.8 (SD = 21.0) for the active and vehicle treatment groups, respectively. The average reduction in non-inflammatory lesions was 41.5 % (SD = 9.4) in the active treatment group and 27.0 % (SD = 20.9) in the vehicle group. The average percent decrease in inflammatory lesions was 52.1 (SD = 10.4) in the benzoyl peroxide group and 34.7 (SD = 22.7) in the vehicle group. The average percentage of participants achieving success per designated study outcomes was 28.6 (SD = 17.3) and 15.2 (SD = 9.5) in the active treatment and vehicle groups, respectively. Patient responses in randomized controlled trials evaluating topical acne therapies may be affected by clinical trial design, implementation, the biologic effects of vehicles, and natural disease progression. "No treatment" groups may facilitate determination of accurate treatment efficacies. PMID:26048131

  15. PHASE II TRIAL OF GVHD PROPHYLAXIS WITH POST-TRANSPLANTATION CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE FOLLOWING REDUCED-INTENSITY BUSULFAN/FLUDARABINE (BU/FLU) CONDITIONING FOR HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

    PubMed Central

    Alousi, Amin M.; Brammer, Jonathan E.; Saliba, Rima M.; Andersson, Borje; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Jones, Roy; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Khouri, Issa; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Nieto, Yago; Shah, Nina; Ahmed, Sairah; Oran, Betul; Atrash, Gheath Al; Ciurea, Stefan; Kebriaei, Partow; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Champlin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    GVHD-prophylaxis with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (CY) following ablative HLA-matched bone marrow (BM) transplantation has been reported to have comparable rates of acute GVHD with an apparent reduction in chronic GVHD and infections. We conducted a phase II trial of post-CY following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) using intravenous busulfan (AUC of 4,000 micromolar-minutes), Fludarabine (40mg/m2) for 4 days and CY 50mg/kg on days +3 and +4 following BM or peripheral blood (PB) transplants from matched related (MRD) or unrelated donors (MUD). MUD- recipients received anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG); however, a later amendment removed ATG. 49 patients were treated (AML/MDS: 82%). Median age was 62 years (range, 39–72). Fifteen patients received a MRD (9 PB/6 BM); 34 had a MUD (2 PB/32 BM). The cumulative incidence of grade II–IV, III–IV acute and chronic GVHD was 58%, 22% and 18%. A matched-cohort analysis compared outcomes to tacrolimus/methotrexate GVHD prophylaxis and indicated higher rates of acute GVHD grade II–IV (46% versus 19%, HR=2.8, p=0.02) and treatment-related mortality (HR 3.3, p=0.035) and worse overall survival (HR=1.9, p=0.04) with post-Cy. The incidence of chronic GVHD and CMV reactivation did not differ. This study suggests that post-transplant CY should not be used as sole GVHD-prophylaxis following a RIC transplant from HLA matched donors. PMID:25667989

  16. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial on the management of post-infective cough by inhaled ipratropium and salbutamol administered in combination.

    PubMed

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Lecchi, Marzia; Del Forno, Manuela; Fabbri, Elisa; Mastroroberto, Marianna; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Pisani, Lara; Pandolfi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria

    2014-12-01

    Post-viral cough is a type of cough originating from upper respiratory tract infections that persists after the infection is resolved. Although it was hypothesized that bronchodilators might have a role in the management of post-viral cough, a clear demonstration of their efficacy is missing. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of a combination of a β-agonist and an anticholinergic agent in reducing post-viral cough with a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated for 10 days with either a nebulized combination of salbutamol 1.875 mg/0.5 mL and ipratropium bromide 0.375 mg/0.5 mL, or a placebo, and followed up for another 10 days. Daytime and nighttime cough severity and spirometry testing were assessed before starting treatment, after 10 and 20 days. Ninety-two patients were randomized to receive placebo (n = 46) or the active treatment (n = 46); nine of them (4 in the placebo group, 5 in the active treatment group) dropped out from the study. Daytime and nighttime cough severity were significantly reduced in both groups during the study period, but the reduction was more prominent in the active treatment group vs. placebo after 10 days of treatment (P = 0.003 for day cough; P = 0.061 for night cough), whereas at the end of follow-up period cough severity was comparable between the two groups. Small but significant increases in spirometric parameters were observed in the active treatment vs. placebo group, although at the end of follow-up these values returned to be comparable to placebo. The frequency of adverse events was not significantly different between the two groups of patients. We concluded that a combination of a β-agonist and an anticholinergic agent can effectively reduce post-viral cough, and can thus represent a valid option for this type of cough.

  17. Post-Flight Back Pain Following International Space Station Missions: Evaluation of Spaceflight Risk Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Back pain during spaceflight has often been attributed to the lengthening of the spinal column due to the absence of gravity during both short and long-duration missions. Upon landing and re-adaptation to gravity, the spinal column reverts back to its original length thereby causing some individuals to experience pain and muscular spasms, while others experience no ill effects. With International Space Station (ISS) missions, cases of back pain and injury are more common post-flight, but little is known about the potential risk factors. Thus, the purpose of this project was to perform an initial evaluation of reported post-flight back pain and injury cases to relevant spaceflight risk factors in United States astronauts that have completed an ISS mission. METHODS All US astronauts who completed an ISS mission between Expeditions (EXP) 1 and 41 (2000-2015) were included in this evaluation. Forty-five astronauts (36 males and 9 females) completed 50 ISS missions during the study time period, as 5 astronauts completed 2 ISS missions. Researchers queried medical records of the 45 astronauts for occurrences of back pain and injury. A case was defined as any reported event of back pain or injury to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, or coccyx spine regions. Data sources for the cases included the Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record; Astronaut Strength, Conditioning and Rehabilitation electronic documentation; the Private Medical Conference tool; and the Space Medicine Operations Team records. Post-flight cases were classified as an early case if reported within 45 days of landing (R + 45) or a late case if reported from R + 46 to R + 365 days after landing (R + 1y). Risk factors in the astronaut population for back pain include age, sex, prior military service, and prior history of back pain. Additionally, spaceflight specific risk factors such as type of landing vehicle and onboard exercise countermeasures were included to evaluate their

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of a post-license education program for young novice drivers in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Brijs, Kris; Cuenen, Ariane; Brijs, Tom; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wets, Geert

    2014-05-01

    The disproportionately large number of traffic accidents of young novice drivers highlights the need for an effective driver education program. The Goals for Driving Education (GDE) matrix shows that driver education must target both lower and higher levels of driver competences. Research has indicated that current education programs do not emphasize enough the higher levels, for example awareness and insight. This has raised the importance of insight programs. On the Road (OtR), a Flemish post-license driver education program, is such an insight program that aims to target these higher levels. The program focus is on risky driving behavior like speeding and drink driving. In addition, the program addresses risk detection and risk-related knowledge. The goal of the study was to do an effect evaluation of this insight program at immediate post-test and 2 months follow-up. In addition, the study aimed to generalize the results of this program to comparable programs in order to make usable policy recommendations. A questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used in order to measure participants' safety consciousness of speeding and drink driving. Moreover, we focused on risk detection and risk-related knowledge. Participants (N=366) were randomly assigned to a baseline-follow-up group or a post-test-follow-up group. Regarding speeding and driving, we found OtR to have little effect on the TPB variables. Regarding risk detection, we found no significant effect, even though participants clearly needed substantial improvement when stepping into the program. Regarding risk-related knowledge, the program did result in a significant improvement at post-test and follow-up. It is concluded that the current program format is a good starting point, but that it requires further attention to enhance high level driving skills. Program developers are encouraged to work in a more evidence-based manner when they select target variables and methods to influence

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of a post-license education program for young novice drivers in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Brijs, Kris; Cuenen, Ariane; Brijs, Tom; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wets, Geert

    2014-05-01

    The disproportionately large number of traffic accidents of young novice drivers highlights the need for an effective driver education program. The Goals for Driving Education (GDE) matrix shows that driver education must target both lower and higher levels of driver competences. Research has indicated that current education programs do not emphasize enough the higher levels, for example awareness and insight. This has raised the importance of insight programs. On the Road (OtR), a Flemish post-license driver education program, is such an insight program that aims to target these higher levels. The program focus is on risky driving behavior like speeding and drink driving. In addition, the program addresses risk detection and risk-related knowledge. The goal of the study was to do an effect evaluation of this insight program at immediate post-test and 2 months follow-up. In addition, the study aimed to generalize the results of this program to comparable programs in order to make usable policy recommendations. A questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used in order to measure participants' safety consciousness of speeding and drink driving. Moreover, we focused on risk detection and risk-related knowledge. Participants (N=366) were randomly assigned to a baseline-follow-up group or a post-test-follow-up group. Regarding speeding and driving, we found OtR to have little effect on the TPB variables. Regarding risk detection, we found no significant effect, even though participants clearly needed substantial improvement when stepping into the program. Regarding risk-related knowledge, the program did result in a significant improvement at post-test and follow-up. It is concluded that the current program format is a good starting point, but that it requires further attention to enhance high level driving skills. Program developers are encouraged to work in a more evidence-based manner when they select target variables and methods to influence

  20. Enhancing the Application and Evaluation of a Discrete Trial Intervention Package for Eliciting First Words in Preverbal Preschoolers with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiouri, Ioanna; Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen; Paul, Rhea

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention package including a discrete trial program (Rapid Motor Imitation Antecedent Training (Tsiouri and Greer, "J Behav Educat" 12:185-206, 2003) combined with parent education for eliciting first words in children with ASD who had little or no spoken language. Evaluation of the approach…

  1. Qualitative methods in a randomised controlled trial: the role of an integrated qualitative process evaluation in providing evidence to discontinue the intervention in one arm of a trial of a decision support tool

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, M J; Thomson, R G; May, C R; Rapley, T; Heaven, B R; Graham, R H; Kaner, E F; Stobbart, L; Eccles, M P

    2007-01-01

    Objective To understand participants' experiences and understandings of the interventions in the trial of a computerised decision support tool in patients with atrial fibrillation being considered for anti‐coagulation treatment. Design Qualitative process evaluation carried out alongside the trial: non‐participant observation and semistructured interviews. Participants 30 participants aged >60 years taking part in the trial of a computerised decision support tool. Results Qualitative evidence provided the rationale to undertake a decision to discontinue one arm of the trial on the basis that the intervention in that arm, a standard gamble values elicitation exercise was causing confusion and was unlikely to produce valid data on participant values. Conclusions Qualitative methods used alongside a trial allow an understanding of the process and progress of a trial, and provide evidence to intervene in the trial if necessary, including evidence for the rationale to discontinue an intervention arm of the trial. PMID:17545351

  2. A pilot randomized clinical trial evaluating the impact of genetic counseling for serious mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hippman, Catriona; Ringrose, Andrea; Inglis, Angela; Cheek, Joanna; Albert, Arianne Y. K.; Remick, Ronald; Honer, William G.; Austin, Jehannine C

    2016-01-01

    Objective The serious mental illnesses schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder are complex conditions affecting 1–4% of the population. Individuals with serious mental illnesses express interest in genetic counseling; an intervention showing promise for increasing patient knowledge and adaptation. This trial aimed to evaluate the effects of genetic counseling for people with serious mental illnesses as compared to an educational intervention or waitlist. Methods A pilot three-arm (each n=40; genetic counseling, a control intervention involving an educational booklet, or waitlist), parallel group, randomized clinical trial was conducted from September 2008–November 2011 in Vancouver, Canada. Participants with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or schizoaffective disorder (DSM-IV) completed outcome measures assessing knowledge, risk perception, internalized stigma, and perceived control over illness at baseline and one-month follow-up. The Brief Symptom Inventory was administered to control for current symptoms. Analyses included linear mixed effects models and chi-squared tests. Results Knowledge increased for genetic counseling/educational booklet compared to waitlist at follow-up (LRT=19.33, df=1, Holm-adjusted p=0.0003, R2LMM(m)=0.17). Risk perception accuracy increased at follow-up for genetic counseling compared to waitlist (Yates’ continuity corrected χ2=9.1, df=1, Bonferroni p=0.003) and educational booklet (Yates’ continuity corrected χ2=8.2, df=1, Bonferroni p=0.004). There were no significant differences between groups for stigma or perceived control scores. Conclusions Genetic counseling and the educational booklet improved knowledge; and genetic counseling, but not the educational booklet, improved risk perception accuracy for this population. The impact of genetic counseling on internalized stigma and perceived control is worth further investigation. Genetic counseling should be considered for patients with serious mental

  3. Utility of an immunotherapy trial in evaluating patients with presumed autoimmune epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, M.; Britton, J.W.; McKeon, A.; Shin, C.; Lennon, V.A.; Quek, A.M.L.; So, E.; Worrell, G.A.; Cascino, G.D.; Klein, C.J.; Lagerlund, T.D.; Wirrell, E.C.; Nickels, K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a trial of immunotherapy as an aid to diagnosis in suspected autoimmune epilepsy. Method: We reviewed the charts of 110 patients seen at our autoimmune neurology clinic with seizures as a chief complaint. Twenty-nine patients met the following inclusion criteria: (1) autoimmune epilepsy suspected based on the presence of ≥1 neural autoantibody (n = 23), personal or family history or physical stigmata of autoimmunity, and frequent or medically intractable seizures; and (2) initiated a 6- to 12-week trial of IV methylprednisolone (IVMP), IV immune globulin (IVIg), or both. Patients were defined as responders if there was a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency. Results: Eighteen patients (62%) responded, of whom 10 (34%) became seizure-free; 52% improved with the first agent. Of those receiving a second agent after not responding to the first, 43% improved. A favorable response correlated with shorter interval between symptom onset and treatment initiation (median 9.5 vs 22 months; p = 0.048). Responders included 14/16 (87.5%) patients with antibodies to plasma membrane antigens, 2/6 (33%) patients seropositive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies, and 2/6 (33%) patients without detectable antibodies. Of 13 responders followed for more than 6 months after initiating long-term oral immunosuppression, response was sustained in 11 (85%). Conclusions: These retrospective findings justify consideration of a trial of immunotherapy in patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy, IVMP, IVIg, or both improve seizure control. PMID:24706013

  4. Open Evaluation: A Vision for Entirely Transparent Post-Publication Peer Review and Rating for Science

    PubMed Central

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The two major functions of a scientific publishing system are to provide access to and evaluation of scientific papers. While open access (OA) is becoming a reality, open evaluation (OE), the other side of the coin, has received less attention. Evaluation steers the attention of the scientific community and thus the very course of science. It also influences the use of scientific findings in public policy. The current system of scientific publishing provides only journal prestige as an indication of the quality of new papers and relies on a non-transparent and noisy pre-publication peer-review process, which delays publication by many months on average. Here I propose an OE system, in which papers are evaluated post-publication in an ongoing fashion by means of open peer review and rating. Through signed ratings and reviews, scientists steer the attention of their field and build their reputation. Reviewers are motivated to be objective, because low-quality or self-serving signed evaluations will negatively impact their reputation. A core feature of this proposal is a division of powers between the accumulation of evaluative evidence and the analysis of this evidence by paper evaluation functions (PEFs). PEFs can be freely defined by individuals or groups (e.g., scientific societies) and provide a plurality of perspectives on the scientific literature. Simple PEFs will use averages of ratings, weighting reviewers (e.g., by H-index), and rating scales (e.g., by relevance to a decision process) in different ways. Complex PEFs will use advanced statistical techniques to infer the quality of a paper. Papers with initially promising ratings will be more deeply evaluated. The continual refinement of PEFs in response to attempts by individuals to influence evaluations in their own favor will make the system ungameable. OA and OE together have the power to revolutionize scientific publishing and usher in a new culture of transparency, constructive criticism, and

  5. Open evaluation: a vision for entirely transparent post-publication peer review and rating for science.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The two major functions of a scientific publishing system are to provide access to and evaluation of scientific papers. While open access (OA) is becoming a reality, open evaluation (OE), the other side of the coin, has received less attention. Evaluation steers the attention of the scientific community and thus the very course of science. It also influences the use of scientific findings in public policy. The current system of scientific publishing provides only journal prestige as an indication of the quality of new papers and relies on a non-transparent and noisy pre-publication peer-review process, which delays publication by many months on average. Here I propose an OE system, in which papers are evaluated post-publication in an ongoing fashion by means of open peer review and rating. Through signed ratings and reviews, scientists steer the attention of their field and build their reputation. Reviewers are motivated to be objective, because low-quality or self-serving signed evaluations will negatively impact their reputation. A core feature of this proposal is a division of powers between the accumulation of evaluative evidence and the analysis of this evidence by paper evaluation functions (PEFs). PEFs can be freely defined by individuals or groups (e.g., scientific societies) and provide a plurality of perspectives on the scientific literature. Simple PEFs will use averages of ratings, weighting reviewers (e.g., by H-index), and rating scales (e.g., by relevance to a decision process) in different ways. Complex PEFs will use advanced statistical techniques to infer the quality of a paper. Papers with initially promising ratings will be more deeply evaluated. The continual refinement of PEFs in response to attempts by individuals to influence evaluations in their own favor will make the system ungameable. OA and OE together have the power to revolutionize scientific publishing and usher in a new culture of transparency, constructive criticism, and

  6. Method for the evaluation of stretch blow molding simulations with free blow trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Johannes; Stommel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Finite-Element (FE) simulations are a valuable tool to support the analysis and optimization of production processes. In order to achieve realistic simulation results, a consistent simulation set-up followed by an evaluation through experiments is crucial. Stretch Blow Molding (SBM) is a commonly applied forming method to produce thin walled bottles. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) preforms are biaxially stretched into a closed cavity to form a bottle. In this process the thermo-mechanical material behavior during forming greatly influences the performance of the end product and consequently plays a key role for a reliable process simulation. To ensure a realistic material representation in the simulation model, an adequate material model is calibrated with stress-strain curves from biaxial tests. Thin PET-sheets are stretched under defined temperatures and strain rates. These representative experiments include process simplifications regarding geometry, heating and deformation parameters. Therefore, an evaluation step subsequent to the simulation set-up is inevitable. This paper presents a method for extracting temperature dependent stress-strain-curves from experiments close to the production process which enables the crucial evaluation of a process simulation. In the SBM process, the wall thickness distribution of the bottle refers to the preform deformation over time but does not fully define the thermo-mechanical material behavior. In the presented method, PET-preforms receive thermal treatment with Infrared (IR)-heaters from an SBM-machine and are subsequently inflated into free air (free-blow-trial). An IR-camera is used to obtain the temperature distribution on the preform immediately before blowing. Two high speed cameras are synchronized with a pressure sensor to consequently calculate reliable stress-strain curves at any point on the preform surface. These data is finally compared to results from FE-simulations of the free blow trials.

  7. The Positive Outlook Study: A Randomised Controlled Trial Evaluating Online Self-Management for HIV Positive Gay Men.

    PubMed

    Millard, Tanya; Agius, Paul A; McDonald, Karalyn; Slavin, Sean; Girdler, Sonya; Elliott, Julian H

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online self-management program in improving health outcomes and well-being for gay men living with HIV in Australia. The online Positive Outlook Program was based on self-efficacy theory and used a self-management approach to enhance HIV-positive gay men's skills, confidence and abilities to manage the psychosocial issues associated with HIV in daily life. The 7-week program was delivered in closed groups and comprised information modules, action-planning activities, moderated discussion boards, and weekly peer-facilitated 'live chats'. A randomised controlled trial was conducted to establish the effectiveness of the Positive Outlook program compared to a 'usual care' control. Participants were HIV-positive gay men 18 years or older living in Australia. Primary outcomes were evaluated at three time-points (baseline, post-intervention and 12-week's post-intervention follow-up) and included HIV-related quality of life (PROQOL-HIV), outcomes of health education (HeiQ) and HIV specific self-efficacy (Positive Outlook Self-Efficacy Scale). A total of 132 gay men with HIV in Australia were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 68) or usual care control (n = 64) groups. Maximum likelihood marginal-linear modelling indicated significant improvement in the intervention group on the PROQOL-HIV subscales of body change (p = 0.036), social relationships (p = 0.035) and emotional distress (p = 0.031); the HeiQ subscales of health-directed activity (p = 0.048); constructive attitudes and approaches (p = 0.015); skill and technique acquisition (p = 0.046) and health service navigation (p = 0.008); and the Positive Outlook Self-Efficacy Scale on the subscales of relationships (p = 0.019); social participation (p = 0.006); and emotions (p = 0.041). Online delivery of self-management programs is feasible and has the potential to improve quality of life, self-management skills and domain

  8. Post-Traumatic, Drug-Resistant Epilepsy and Review of Seizure Control Outcomes from Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trials of Brain Stimulation Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. Michael; Szuflita, Nicholas S; Severson, Meryl A; Levine, Zachary T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) patients become resistant to medications. Nervous stimulation as a treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is an active area of clinical investigation. Objective: To summarize methods, reported seizure control outcome measures, and adverse events from blinded, randomized control trials (RCTs) for selected invasive brain stimulation (IBS) and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) treatment options in patients with DRE. Methods: PubMed was searched for articles from 1995-2014, using search terms related to the topics of interest. Available relevant articles reporting the outcomes of interest were identified and data was extracted. Articles in the reference lists of relevant articles and clinicaltrials.gov were also referenced. Results: Eleven articles were analyzed with a total of 795 patients identified. Studies showed that select nervous stimulation treatments significantly reduced seizure frequency in patients with DRE.  PMID:27672534

  9. Post-Traumatic, Drug-Resistant Epilepsy and Review of Seizure Control Outcomes from Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trials of Brain Stimulation Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. Michael; Szuflita, Nicholas S; Severson, Meryl A; Levine, Zachary T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) patients become resistant to medications. Nervous stimulation as a treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is an active area of clinical investigation. Objective: To summarize methods, reported seizure control outcome measures, and adverse events from blinded, randomized control trials (RCTs) for selected invasive brain stimulation (IBS) and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) treatment options in patients with DRE. Methods: PubMed was searched for articles from 1995-2014, using search terms related to the topics of interest. Available relevant articles reporting the outcomes of interest were identified and data was extracted. Articles in the reference lists of relevant articles and clinicaltrials.gov were also referenced. Results: Eleven articles were analyzed with a total of 795 patients identified. Studies showed that select nervous stimulation treatments significantly reduced seizure frequency in patients with DRE. 

  10. Evaluation of the endodontic apical seal after post insertion by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contardo, L.; De Luca, M.; Biasotto, M.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2005-08-01

    The commonly used methods for evaluating the endodontic apical seal, such as longitudinal and transversal section and diaphanization, show some operative difficulties and intrinsic limitation. This study suggests and describes a new method of analysis using a synchrotron radiation microtomography to analyse the root apex after post insertion, creating a three-dimensional image and analysing sections of the specimen every 5 μm. The study was performed at SYRMEP beam line at the Electra Synchrotron in Trieste using monochromatic X-rays of 32 KeV. Eleven monoradicular teeth were prepared using NiTi GT Rotary files instruments to an apical size 20 with conicity .06 and divided in four groups: in G1 ( n=4) and G2 ( n=2), the specimens were endodontically filled with guttapercha and a zinc-oxide sealer, in G3 ( n=3) and G4 ( n=2) guttapercha and a silicon-based sealer were used. An endodontic post was inserted in specimens of groups 1 and 3 following the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were analysed using monochromatic X-rays of 32 KeV. A CCD detector with pixel dimension pf 5×5 μm 2 was used for the acquisition process. Seven hundred and twenty projections were performed over 180° range using a high-resolution rotator. The projections were reconstructed using standard algorithms for tomographic reconstruction. The apical infiltration was evaluated by verifying if black spots were detectable on the images. The specimens of groups 3 and 4 showed a better apical seal than the ones of groups 1 and 2. Post insertion, when a ZOE-based sealer is used, increases the apical gap even if it does not seem to be clinically relevant and sufficient to be a cause of endodontic failure. The new method for analysis appeared to be effective to detect small defects in endodontic obturation, analysing guttapercha-sealer and sealer-dentin interfaces.

  11. Evaluation of an online Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT) for health professionals: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Continuous medical education is traditionally reliant to a large extent on self-directed learning based on individuals' perceived learning priorities. Evidence suggests that this ability to self-assess is limited, and more so in the least competent. Therefore, it may be of benefit to utilise some form of external assessment for this purpose. Many diabetes educational programmes have been introduced, but few have been assessed for their benefit in a systematic manner. As diabetes is an increasingly prevalent disease, methods for the dissemination and understanding of clinical guidelines need to be explored for their effectiveness. This paper describes the study design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of using an interactive online Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT), that builds a learning curriculum based on identified knowledge gaps, compared with conventional self-directed learning. The study assesses the effect of these interventions on health professionals' knowledge of diabetes management, evaluates the acceptability of this process of learning and self-reported changes in clinical practice as a result of this novel educational process. Methods Following a baseline assessment, participants will be randomised to undergo a 4-month learning period where they will either be given access to the diabetes learning modules alone (control group) or a Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT) plus the diabetes learning modules (intervention group). On completion of the DNAT, a personalised learning report will be created for each participant identifying needs alongside individualised recommendations of the most appropriate learning modules to meet those requirements. All participants will complete a Diabetes Knowledge Test before and immediately after the allocated learning and the primary outcome will be the state of knowledge at 4 months. Learners will also be surveyed immediately after the learning period to assess the

  12. Women's evaluation of abuse and violence care in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial (weave)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intimate partner abuse (IPA) is a major public health problem with serious implications for the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of women, particularly women of child-bearing age. It is a common, hidden problem in general practice and has been under-researched in this setting. Opportunities for early intervention and support in primary care need to be investigated given the frequency of contact women have with general practice. Despite the high prevalence and health consequences of abuse, there is insufficient evidence for screening in primary care settings. Furthermore, there is little rigorous evidence to guide general practitioners (GPs) in responding to women identified as experiencing partner abuse. This paper describes the design of a trial of a general practice-based intervention consisting of screening for fear of partner with feedback to GPs, training for GPs, brief counselling for women and minimal practice organisational change. It examines the effect on women's quality of life, mental health and safety behaviours. Methods/Design weave is a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Approximately 500 women (16-50 years) seen by the GP in the previous year are mailed a short lifestyle survey containing an item to screen for IPA. Women who indicate that they were afraid of a partner/ex-partner in the last year and provide contact details are invited to participate. Once baseline data are collected, GPs are randomly assigned to either a group involving healthy relationship and responding to IPA training plus inviting women for up to 6 sessions of counselling or to a group involving basic education and usual care for women. Outcomes will be evaluated by postal survey at 6 and 12 months following delivery of the intervention. There will be an economic evaluation, and process evaluation involving interviews with women and GPs, to inform understanding about implementation and outcomes. Discussion The

  13. Assessing the impact of microfinance programming on children: an evaluation from post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Stark, Lindsay; Kassim, Nafessa; Sparling, Thalia; Buscher, Dale; Yu, Gary; Boothby, Neil

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the long-term impact of microfinance programmes on Acehnese children during the post-tsunami recovery. The study, conducted from June to August 2010, examined the impact of microfinance programming six years after the tsunami. The sample consisted of 185 microfinance participants, with a comparison group of 192 individuals who did not participate in microfinance programmes. All respondents were parents, interviewed through a structured survey. The study used four child protection indicators-diet, health, childcare and education-in contrast to traditional repayment rate indicators. The primary results were insignificant with respect to all four child protection indicators, suggesting that, with respect to these indicators, there was no long-term difference between the impact of microfinance on beneficiaries' children and non-beneficiaries' children. These findings signify a need for microfinance actors to move beyond traditional indicators of economic success to evaluate the social changes microfinance programmes are presumed to effect.

  14. Assessing the impact of microfinance programming on children: an evaluation from post-tsunami Aceh

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Lindsay; Kassim, Nafessa; Sparling, Thalia; Buscher, Dale; Yu, Gary; Boothby, Neil

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the long-term impact of microfinance programmes on Acehnese children during the post-tsunami recovery. The study, conducted from June to August 2010, examined the impact of microfinance programming six years after the tsunami. The sample consisted of 185 microfinance participants, with a comparison group of 192 individuals who did not participate in microfinance programmes. All respondents were parents, interviewed through a structured survey. The study used four child protection indicators—diet, health, childcare and education—in contrast to traditional repayment rate indicators. The primary results were insignificant with respect to all four child protection indicators, suggesting that, with respect to these indicators, there was no long-term difference between the impact of microfinance on beneficiaries' children and non-beneficiaries' children. These findings signify a need for microfinance actors to move beyond traditional indicators of economic success to evaluate the social changes microfinance programmes are presumed to effect. PMID:25441225

  15. Assessing the impact of microfinance programming on children: an evaluation from post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Stark, Lindsay; Kassim, Nafessa; Sparling, Thalia; Buscher, Dale; Yu, Gary; Boothby, Neil

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the long-term impact of microfinance programmes on Acehnese children during the post-tsunami recovery. The study, conducted from June to August 2010, examined the impact of microfinance programming six years after the tsunami. The sample consisted of 185 microfinance participants, with a comparison group of 192 individuals who did not participate in microfinance programmes. All respondents were parents, interviewed through a structured survey. The study used four child protection indicators-diet, health, childcare and education-in contrast to traditional repayment rate indicators. The primary results were insignificant with respect to all four child protection indicators, suggesting that, with respect to these indicators, there was no long-term difference between the impact of microfinance on beneficiaries' children and non-beneficiaries' children. These findings signify a need for microfinance actors to move beyond traditional indicators of economic success to evaluate the social changes microfinance programmes are presumed to effect. PMID:25441225

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of personal resilience and enrichment programme (PREP) for HIV prevention among female sex workers: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Female sex workers (FSWs) are often considered as the vector, if not reservoir, of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Building upon the existing evidence on the role of psychological health in sexual health, the aim of this protocol is to describe a trial investigating the effectiveness of the Personal Resilience and Enrichment Programme (PREP), a resilience-promoting intervention that targets at psychological well-being i.e. self-esteem, self-efficacy and coping, to facilitate adaptation and ultimately safe sexual practices among FSWs, which could be an innovative strategy in controlling the spread of these infections. Methods A total of 132 FSWs will be recruited and randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care (control) groups in a multi-centred randomised controlled trial. Based on the resilience framework, this intervention is comprised of six weekly sessions focused on the awareness, expression and management of emotions, identifying roles and personal strengths, and effective problem-solving skills. Complex intervention assessment on both intervention process and effectiveness will be adopted when the primary outcome reduction of sexual risk behaviour and other psychological outcomes include their perceived stress, self-esteem, self-efficacy, coping overall resilience, and psychological distress will be measured at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month post-intervention and differences assessed by ANOVA. The relationship of resilience factors, psychological health and HIV preventive behaviours will be evaluated using structural equation modelling. Discussion It is anticipated that this study will increase our understanding of the relationships between individual resilience attributes, positive adaptation, psychological health and sexual health practices. If successful, this programme will provide an innovative direction for HIV prevention by applying the personal resilience factors to promote both psychological well

  17. A Post-Hospital Home Exercise Program Improved Mobility but Increased Falls in Older People: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R.; Vogler, Constance M.; Close, Jacqueline C. T.; Howard, Kirsten; Dean, Catherine M.; Heller, Gillian Z.; Clemson, Lindy; O'Rourke, Sandra D.; Ramsay, Elisabeth; Barraclough, Elizabeth; Herbert, Robert D.; Cumming, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Home exercise can prevent falls in the general older community but its impact in people recently discharged from hospital is not known. The study aimed to investigate the effects of a home-based exercise program on falls and mobility among people recently discharged from hospital. Methods and Findings This randomised controlled trial (ACTRN12607000563460) was conducted among 340 older people. Intervention group participants (n = 171) were asked to exercise at home for 15–20 minutes up to 6 times weekly for 12 months. The control group (n = 169) received usual care. Primary outcomes were rate of falls (assessed over 12 months using monthly calendars), performance-based mobility (Lower Extremity Summary Performance Score, range 0–3, at baseline and 12 months, assessor unaware of group allocation) and self-reported ease of mobility task performance (range 0–40, assessed with 12 monthly questionaries). Participants had an average age of 81.2 years (SD 8.0) and 70% had fallen in the past year. Complete primary outcome data were obtained for at least 92% of randomised participants. Participants in the intervention group reported more falls than the control group (177 falls versus 123 falls) during the 12-month study period and this difference was statistically significant (incidence rate ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.93, p = 0.017). At 12-months, performance-based mobility had improved significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group (between-group difference adjusted for baseline performance 0.13, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.21, p = 0.004). Self-reported ease in undertaking mobility tasks over the 12-month period was not significantly different between the groups (0.49, 95% CI −0.91 to 1.90, p = 0.488). Conclusions An individualised home exercise prescription significantly improved performance-based mobility but significantly increased the rate of falls in older people recently discharged from hospital. Trial Registration

  18. Treating Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Efficacy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and Relaxation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carletto, Sara; Borghi, Martina; Bertino, Gabriella; Oliva, Francesco; Cavallo, Marco; Hofmann, Arne; Zennaro, Alessandro; Malucchi, Simona; Ostacoli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease that imposes a significant emotional burden with heavy psychosocial consequences. Several studies have investigated the association between MS and mental disorders such as depression and anxiety, and recently researchers have focused also on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This is the first study that investigates the usefulness of proposing a treatment for PTSD to patients with MS. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with patients with MS diagnosed with PTSD comparing Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR; n = 20) and Relaxation Therapy (RT; n = 22). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of participants that no longer meet PTSD diagnosis as measured with Clinician Administered PTSD Scale 6-months after the treatment. Results: The majority of patients were able to overcome their PTSD diagnosis after only 10 therapy sessions. EMDR treatment appears to be more effective than RT in reducing the proportion of patients with MS suffering from PTSD. Both treatments are effective in reducing PTSD severity, anxiety and depression symptoms, and to improve Quality of Life. Conclusion: Although our results can only be considered preliminary, this study suggests that it is essential that PTSD symptoms are detected and that brief and cost-effective interventions to reduce PTSD and associated psychological symptoms are offered to patients, in order to help them to reduce the psychological burden associated with their neurological condition. Trial registration: NCT01743664, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01743664 PMID:27148134

  19. Metronidazole (Flagyl) and Arnica Montana in the prevention of post-surgical complications, a comparative placebo controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kaziro, G S

    1984-02-01

    A double blind trial, was designed, in which 118 patients undergoing the removal of impacted wisdom teeth were randomly divided into the following groups; 41 patients received Metronidazole, 39 patients received Arnica Montana, 38 patients received the placebo. Metronidazole was more effective in pain control than Arnica (p less than 0.001) and placebo (p less than 0.01). It prevented swelling better than Arnica (p less than 0.01) and placebo (p less than 0.05) and was more effective in promoting healing than Arnica (p less than 0.01) and placebo (p greater than 0.02). Arnica Montana appeared to give rise to greater pain than placebo (p less than 0.05) and caused more swelling than the placebo (p less than 0.01).

  20. The effect of a pre- and post-operative orthogeriatric service on cognitive function in patients with hip fracture. The protocol of the Oslo Orthogeriatrics Trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hip fractures mainly affect older people. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and in particular a high frequency of delirium. Incident delirium following hip fracture is associated with an increased risk of dementia in the following months, but it is still not firmly established whether this is an association or a causal relationship. Orthogeriatric units vary with respect to content and timing of the intervention. One main effect of orthogeriatric care may be the prevention of delirium, especially if preoperative and postoperative care are provided. Thus, the aim of Oslo Orthogeriatric Trial, is to assess whether combined preoperative and postoperative orthogeriatric care can reduce the incidence of delirium and improve cognition following hip fracture. Methods/design Inclusion and randomisation will take place in the Emergency Department, as soon as possible after admission. All patients with proximal femur fractures are eligible, irrespective of age, pre-fracture function and accommodation, except if the fracture is caused by a high energy trauma or the patient is terminally ill. The intervention is pre-and post-operative orthogeriatric care delivered on a dedicated acute geriatric ward. The primary outcome measure is a composite endpoint combining the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) and the 10 word memory task at four months after surgery. Secondary outcomes comprise incident delirium, length of stay, cognition, mobility, place of residence, activities of daily living and mortality, measured at 4 and 12 months after surgery. We have included 332 patients in the period 17th September 2009 to 5th January 2012. Discussion Our choice of outcome measures and our emphasis of orthogeriatric care in the preoperative as well as the postoperative phase will enable us to provide new knowledge on the impact of orthogeriatric care on cognition. Trials registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01009268 PMID:22817102

  1. Intravenous injection of low-dose flurbiprofen axetil for preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis in high-risk patients: An interim analysis of the trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuji; Hasegawa, Sho; Kato, Yuri; Ishii, Ken; Iwasaki, Akito; Sato, Takamitsu; Sekino, Yusuke; Hosono, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kubota, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Several meta-analyses and randomized control trials have demonstrated the efficacy of rectal nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). Diclofenac or indomethacin was administered at a dose of 100 mg in those studies, which may be too high for Asian population. In addition, rectal administration can be considered complicated. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with a PEP risk score ≥ 1 were randomly assigned to receive intravenous injection of 50 mg flurbiprofen axetil (flurbiprofen group) or saline only (placebo group). The primary outcome was reduced PEP. The secondary outcome was amylase level after 2 hours of ERCP as a predictor of PEP. (Clinical Trials.gov, ID UMIN000011322) Results: In total, 144 patients were enrolled from August 2013 to March 2015. We performed an interim analysis of the first 100 patients: 47 received flurbiprofen axetil and 53 received placebo. PEP occurred in 11 patients (11 %): 2 of 47 (4.3 %) in the flurbiprofen group and 9 of 53 (17 %) in the placebo group (P = 0.042). Relative risk reduction was 62.4 %. Hyperamylasemia did not differ significantly (17.0 % vs. 26.4 %, P = 0.109). This analysis resulted in early termination of the study for ethical reasons. Conclusions: Intravenous injection of low-dose flurbiprofen axetil after ERCP can reduce the incidence of PEP in high-risk patients PMID:27747282

  2. Strengthening And stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand (SARAH). A randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark A; Williamson, Esther M; Heine, Peter J; Nichols, Vivien; Glover, Matthew J; Dritsaki, Melina; Adams, Jo; Dosanjh, Sukhdeep; Underwood, Martin; Rahman, Anisur; McConkey, Christopher; Lord, Joanne; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effectiveness of exercise for improving hand and wrist function in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is uncertain. OBJECTIVES The study aims were (1) to estimate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adding an optimised exercise programme for hands and upper limbs to standard care for patients with RA; and (2) to qualitatively describe the experience of participants in the trial with a particular emphasis on acceptability of the intervention, exercise behaviours and reasons for adherence/non-adherence. DESIGN A pragmatic, multicentred, individually randomised controlled trial with an embedded qualitative study. Outcome assessors were blind to group assignment and independent of treatment delivery. SETTING Seventeen NHS trusts in England comprising 21 rheumatology and therapy departments. PARTICIPANTS Adults with RA who had pain and dysfunction of the hands and/or wrists and had been on stable medication for at least 3 months. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years old, had undergone upper limb surgery/fracture in the last 6 months, were on a waiting list for upper limb surgery or were pregnant. INTERVENTIONS Usual care or usual care plus an individualised exercise programme. Usual care consisted of joint protection education, general exercise advice and functional splinting if required. The exercise programme consisted of six sessions of strengthening and stretching exercises with a hand therapist, daily home exercises and strategies to maximise adherence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ) overall hand function subscale score at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included the full MHQ, pain, health-related quality of life (Short Form questionnaire-12 items), impairment (grip strength, dexterity and range of motion) and self-efficacy. European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, medication and health-care use were collected for the health economics evaluation. Follow

  3. Testing of evaluation bias for progression free survival endpoint in oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Wenting; Sargent, Daniel

    2016-09-30

    Progression-free survival is an increasingly popular end point in oncology clinical trials. A complete blinded independent central review (BICR) is often required by regulators in an attempt to reduce the bias in progression-free survival (PFS) assessment. In this paper, we propose a new methodology that uses a sample-based BICR as an audit tool to decide whether a complete BICR is needed. More specifically, we propose a new index, the differential risk, to measure the reading discordance pattern, and develop a corresponding hypothesis testing procedure to decide whether the bias in local evaluation is acceptable. Simulation results demonstrate that our new index is sensitive to the change of discordance pattern; type I error is well controlled in the hypothesis testing procedure, and the calculated sample size provides the desired power. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27089832

  4. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin Among Under Treatment Tuberculosis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Majid; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Kazempour Dizaji, Mehdi; Gorji Bayani, Pegah; Fahimi, Fanak; Tabarsi, Payam; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Hepatic toxicity is the most serious adverse effect of anti-tuberculosis drugs. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of silymarin as a hepatoprotective herbal agent. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 70 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into two groups. The intervention group was assigned to receive silymarin and the control group received placebo. Tuberculosis was treated by classic regimen consisting isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the frequency of drug induced liver injury or mild elevation of liver enzymes. Silymarin was safe without any major side effect. Our results showed no significant hepatoprotective effect of silymarin among patients on tuberculosis treatment. PMID:27610165

  5. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin Among Under Treatment Tuberculosis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Marjani, Majid; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Kazempour Dizaji, Mehdi; Gorji Bayani, Pegah; Fahimi, Fanak; Tabarsi, Payam; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic toxicity is the most serious adverse effect of anti-tuberculosis drugs. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of silymarin as a hepatoprotective herbal agent. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 70 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into two groups. The intervention group was assigned to receive silymarin and the control group received placebo. Tuberculosis was treated by classic regimen consisting isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the frequency of drug induced liver injury or mild elevation of liver enzymes. Silymarin was safe without any major side effect. Our results showed no significant hepatoprotective effect of silymarin among patients on tuberculosis treatment. PMID:27610165

  6. Two preclinical tests to evaluate anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to assessing preclinical anticancer activity do not reliably predict drug efficacy in cancer patients. Most of the compounds that show remarkable anticancer effects in preclinical models actually fail when tested in clinical trials. We blame these failures on the complexity of the disease and on the limitations of the preclinical tools we require for our research. This manuscript argues that this lack of clinical response may also be caused by poor in vitro and in vivo preclinical designs, in which cancer patients' needs are not fully considered. Then, it proposes two patient-oriented tests to assess in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical evaluation. PMID:25859551

  7. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin Among Under Treatment Tuberculosis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Majid; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Kazempour Dizaji, Mehdi; Gorji Bayani, Pegah; Fahimi, Fanak; Tabarsi, Payam; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Hepatic toxicity is the most serious adverse effect of anti-tuberculosis drugs. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of silymarin as a hepatoprotective herbal agent. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 70 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into two groups. The intervention group was assigned to receive silymarin and the control group received placebo. Tuberculosis was treated by classic regimen consisting isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the frequency of drug induced liver injury or mild elevation of liver enzymes. Silymarin was safe without any major side effect. Our results showed no significant hepatoprotective effect of silymarin among patients on tuberculosis treatment.

  8. Economic Evaluation of a Worksite Obesity Prevention and Intervention Trial among Hotel Workers in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Meenan, Richard T.; Vogt, Thomas M.; Williams, Andrew E.; Stevens, Victor J.; Albright, Cheryl L.; Nigg, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective Economic evaluation of Work, Weight, and Wellness (3W), a two-year randomized trial of a weight loss program delivered through Hawaii hotel worksites. Methods Business case analysis from hotel perspective. Program resources were micro-costed (2008 dollars). Program benefits were reduced medical costs, fewer absences, and higher productivity. Primary outcome was discounted 24-month net present value (NPV). Results Control program cost $222K to implement over 24 months ($61 per participant), intervention program cost $1.12M ($334). Including overweight participants (body mass index > 25), discounted control NPV was −$217K; −$1.1M for intervention program. Presenteeism improvement of 50% combined with baseline 10% productivity shortfall required to generate positive 24-month intervention NPV. Conclusions 3W’s positive clinical outcomes did not translate into immediate economic benefit for participating hotels, although modest cost savings were observed in the trial’s second year. PMID:20061889

  9. Evaluating predictive screening for children's post-injury mental health: New data and a replication

    PubMed Central

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Marsac, Meghan L.; García-España, J. Felipe; Winston, Flaura

    2015-01-01

    Background Recommended approaches for secondary prevention of posttrauma mental health difficulties in children require empirically sound predictive screening to determine which children require more intensive monitoring or targeted intervention. Although there are several promising screening tools for injured children, none has emerged as the gold standard, and little replication data are available regarding their performance. Objective To evaluate a predictive screening protocol for risk of later posttraumatic stress (PTS) and depression outcomes and address a crucial lack of replication studies by examining performance of two previously published screening tools (Screening Tool for Early Predictors of PTSD [STEPP] and Child Trauma Screening Questionnaire [CTSQ]). Method The study enrolled 290 children hospitalized after acute injury. A three-part screening protocol, including acute PTS and depression symptoms and other empirically derived risk factors, was administered in hospital as part of a stepped care study. PTS and depression symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed 6 months post-injury. Results The screening protocol demonstrated excellent sensitivity (1.00) and good specificity (0.73) for prediction of 6-month PTS, moderate sensitivity (0.64) and good specificity (0.74) for 6-month depression, and excellent negative predictive value for both outcomes. Among children screening at risk, HRQoL was poorer at 6 months post-injury. Replication analyses found predictive utility (sensitivity and specificity) was low for the STEPP and moderate for the CTSQ. Conclusions This study provides additional evidence that early post-injury screening could identify children at higher risk for persistent PTS symptoms and limited support for predicting post-injury depression. Findings support acute PTS symptoms as key early risk markers. The predictive value of a negative screening result (i.e., knowing who is not at risk) may be especially important

  10. Development and implementation of the Baltimore healthy carry-outs feasibility trial: process evaluation results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prepared food sources, including fast food restaurants and carry-outs, are common in low-income urban areas. These establishments provide foods high in calories, sugar, fat, and sodium. The aims of the study were to (1) describe the development and implementation of a carry-out intervention to provide and promote healthy food choices in prepared food sources, and (2) to assess its feasibility through a process evaluation. Methods To promote healthy eating in this setting, a culturally appropriate intervention was developed based on formative research from direct observation, interviews and focus groups. We implemented a 7-month feasibility trial in 8 carry-outs (4 intervention and 4 comparison) in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD. The trial included three phases: 1) Improving menu boards and labeling to promote healthier items; 2) Promoting healthy sides and beverages and introducing new items; and 3) Introducing affordable healthier combo meals and improving food preparation methods. A process evaluation was conducted to assess intervention reach, dose received, and fidelity using sales receipts, carry-out visit observations, and an intervention exposure assessment. Results On average, Baltimore Healthy Carry-outs (BHC) increased customer reach at intervention carry-outs; purchases increased by 36.8% at the end of the study compared to baseline. Additionally, menu boards and labels were seen by 100.0% and 84.2% of individuals (n = 101), respectively, at study completion compared to baseline. Customers reported purchasing specific foods due to the presence of a photo on the menu board (65.3%) or menu labeling (42.6%), suggesting moderate to high dose received. Promoted entrée availability and revised menu and poster presence all demonstrated high fidelity and feasibility. Conclusions The results suggest that BHC is a culturally acceptable intervention. The program was also immediately adopted by the Baltimore City Food Policy Initiative as

  11. A post-trial survey to assess the impact of dissemination of results and unmasking on participants in a 13-year randomised controlled trial on age-related cataract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Italian-American Clinical Trial of Nutritional Supplements and Age-Related Cataract was designed to assess the impact of a multivitamin-mineral supplement on age-related cataract. Trial results showed evidence of a beneficial effect of the supplement on all types of cataract combined, opposite effects on two of the three types of cataract (beneficial for nuclear opacities and harmful for posterior sub-capsular opacities) and no statistically significant effect on cortical opacities. No treatment recommendations were made. A post-trial survey was conducted on 817 surviving elderly participants to assess their satisfaction, their understanding of treatment assignment to supplement or placebo and the success of masking. Methods Trial results were communicated by letter and the level of satisfaction and of understanding of the results was assessed by a questionnaire. Participants were offered the option of being unmasked: a second questionnaire was administered to this subset to assess their understanding of the randomisation process and the success of masking. Results 610 participants (74.7%) responded to the survey: 94.6% thought the description of the results was "very clear" or "quite clear", 5.4% "not clear" or "do not know"; 89.8% considered the results "very interesting" or "quite interesting", 10.2% "not interesting" or "do not know"; 60.3% expressed "satisfaction", 17.2% "both satisfaction and concern", 2.6% "concern", 19.9% "indifference" or "do not know". 480 participants (78.7%) accepted the offer to be unmasked to their treatment assignment: 395 (82.3%) recalled/understood the possibility of assignment to vitamins or placebo, 85 (17.7%) did not. 68 participants (17.2%) thought they had taken vitamins (79.4% were correct; p = 0.0006), 47 (11.9%) thought they had taken placebo (59.6% were correct; p = 0.46) and 280 (70.9%) declared they did not know. Conclusions The results were made difficult to explain to study participants by the

  12. Process evaluation of the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial for skin cancer prevention across 2 years

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Glanz, Karen; Elliott, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Though process evaluation of health programs has received growing attention, few interventions have reported process evaluation over multiple years. This article describes 2 years of process evaluation (2003–04) for the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial. Pool Cool is a skin cancer prevention program designed to increase sun protection habits among children and improve organizational and environmental supports for sun protection at swimming pools. Each year, 80 telephone interviews and 40 site visits at pools across the United States were completed, to examine how fully the program was implemented and the extent of use of program components between the two study conditions. Major components of the Pool Cool program, including sun safety lessons, sun safety signs and sunscreen use, had high implementation. Between the 2 years, most of the core elements were either maintained or increased in use. There were no significant differences between the basic and enhanced conditions on implementation. Reasons given for successful implementation were the provision of a toolkit, ease of implementing the program, pool staff and children enjoying the program and the field coordinators' support. These data provide information on programmatic factors that contribute to successful program diffusion. PMID:17956884

  13. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  14. Competence to stand trial evaluations of sovereign citizens: a case series and primer of odd political and legal beliefs.

    PubMed

    Parker, George F

    2014-01-01

    Sovereign citizens hold a variety of beliefs that challenge the legitimacy of the United States government and criminal justice system. In criminal cases, sovereign citizens typically raise a variety of seemingly strange objections to the proceedings that can cause court participants to believe the defendant is not competent to stand trial. The author's case files were reviewed to identify all defendants who espoused sovereign citizen beliefs during a court-ordered competence-to-stand-trial evaluation. This case series consisted of nine evaluations completed between 2003 and 2012. A review of the outcomes in these cases showed that sovereign citizens typically have the capacity to understand criminal proceedings and assist an attorney.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block versus Continuous Wound Infusion for Post-Caesarean Analgesia: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chandon, Michel; Bonnet, Agnès; Burg, Yannick; Barnichon, Carole; DesMesnards-Smaja, Véronique; Sitbon, Brigitte; Foiret, Christine; Dreyfus, Jean-François; Rahmani, Jamil; Laloë, Pierre-Antoine; Fischler, Marc; Le Guen, Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) block versus Continuous Wound Infusion (CWI) with levobupivacaine after caesarean delivery. Methods We recruited parturients undergoing elective caesareans for this multicenter study. Following written informed consent, they received a spinal anaesthetic without intrathecal morphine for their caesarean section. The postoperative analgesia was randomized to either a bilateral ultrasound guided TAP block (levobupivicaine = 150 mg) or a CWI through an elastomeric pump for 48 hours (levobupivacaine = 150 mg the first day and 12.5 mg/h thereafter). Every woman received regular analgesics along with oral morphine if required. The primary outcome was comparison of the 48-hour area under the curve (AUC) pain scores. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption, adverse events, and persistent pain one month postoperatively. Results Recruitment of 120 women was planned but the study was prematurely terminated due to the occurrence of generalized seizures in one patient of the TAP group. By then, 36 patients with TAP and 29 with CWI had completed the study. AUC of pain at rest and during mobilization were not significantly different: 50 [22.5–80] in TAP versus 50 [27.5–130] in CWI (P = 0.4) and 190 [130–240] versus 160 [112.5–247.5] (P = 0.5), respectively. Morphine consumption (0 [0–20] mg in the TAP group and 10 [0–32.5] mg in the CWI group (P = 0.09)) and persistent pain at one month were similar in both groups (respectively 29.6% and 26.6% (P = 0.73)). Conclusion In cases of morphine-free spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery, no difference between TAP block and CWI for postoperative analgesia was suggested. TAP block may induce seizures in this specific context. Consequently, such a technique after a caesarean section cannot be recommended. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151943 PMID:25093663

  16. Linear Modeling and Evaluation of Controls on Flow Response in Western Post-Fire Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, S.; Hogue, T. S.; Hay, L.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigates the impact of wildfires on watershed flow regimes throughout the western United States, specifically focusing on evaluation of fire events within specified subregions and determination of the impact of climate and geophysical variables in post-fire flow response. Fire events were collected through federal and state-level databases and streamflow data were collected from U.S. Geological Survey stream gages. 263 watersheds were identified with at least 10 years of continuous pre-fire daily streamflow records and 5 years of continuous post-fire daily flow records. For each watershed, percent changes in runoff ratio (RO), annual seven day low-flows (7Q2) and annual seven day high-flows (7Q10) were calculated from pre- to post-fire. Numerous independent variables were identified for each watershed and fire event, including topographic, land cover, climate, burn severity, and soils data. The national watersheds were divided into five regions through K-clustering and a lasso linear regression model, applying the Leave-One-Out calibration method, was calculated for each region. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) was used to determine the accuracy of the resulting models. The regions encompassing the United States along and west of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the coastal watersheds, produced the most accurate linear models. The Pacific coast region models produced poor and inconsistent results, indicating that the regions need to be further subdivided. Presently, RO and HF response variables appear to be more easily modeled than LF. Results of linear regression modeling showed varying importance of watershed and fire event variables, with conflicting correlation between land cover types and soil types by region. The addition of further independent variables and constriction of current variables based on correlation indicators is ongoing and should allow for more accurate linear regression modeling.

  17. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  18. A comparative evaluation of semen parameters in pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina human population

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Caner; Hellstrom, Wayne J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    A natural disaster leading to accumulation of environmental contaminants may have substantial effects on the male reproductive system. Our aim was to compare and assess semen parameters in a normospermic population residing in the Southern Louisiana, USA area pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina. We retrospectively evaluated semen analyses data (n = 3452) of 1855 patients who attended the Tulane University Andrology/Fertility Clinic between 1999 and 2013. The study inclusion criteria were men whose semen analyses showed ≥ 1.5 ml volume; ≥15 million ml-1 sperm concentration; ≥39 million total sperm count; ≥40% motility; >30% morphology, with an abstinence interval of 2–7 days. After the inclusion criteria applied to the population, 367 normospermic patients were included in the study. Descriptive statistics and group-based analyses were performed to interpret the differences between the pre-Katrina (Group 1, 1999–2005) and the post-Katrina (Group 2, 2006–2013) populations. There were significant differences in motility, morphology, number of white blood cell, immature germ cell count, pH and presence of sperm agglutination, but surprisingly there were no significant differences in sperm count between the two populations. This long-term comparative analysis further documents that a major natural disaster with its accompanied environmental issues can influence certain semen parameters (e.g., motility and morphology) and, by extension, fertility potential of the population of such areas. PMID:25677132

  19. A comparative evaluation of semen parameters in pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina human population.

    PubMed

    Baran, Caner; Hellstrom, Wayne J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    A natural disaster leading to accumulation of environmental contaminants may have substantial effects on the male reproductive system. Our aim was to compare and assess semen parameters in a normospermic population residing in the Southern Louisiana, USA area pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina. We retrospectively evaluated semen analyses data (n = 3452) of 1855 patients who attended the Tulane University Andrology/Fertility Clinic between 1999 and 2013. The study inclusion criteria were men whose semen analyses showed ≥ 1.5 ml volume; ≥15 million ml -1 sperm concentration; ≥39 million total sperm count; ≥40% motility; >30% morphology, with an abstinence interval of 2-7 days. After the inclusion criteria applied to the population, 367 normospermic patients were included in the study. Descriptive statistics and group-based analyses were performed to interpret the differences between the pre-Katrina (Group 1, 1999-2005) and the post-Katrina (Group 2, 2006-2013) populations. There were significant differences in motility, morphology, number of white blood cell, immature germ cell count, pH and presence of sperm agglutination, but surprisingly there were no significant differences in sperm count between the two populations. This long-term comparative analysis further documents that a major natural disaster with its accompanied environmental issues can influence certain semen parameters (e.g., motility and morphology) and, by extension, fertility potential of the population of such areas. PMID:25677132

  20. A comparative evaluation of semen parameters in pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina human population.

    PubMed

    Baran, Caner; Hellstrom, Wayne J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    A natural disaster leading to accumulation of environmental contaminants may have substantial effects on the male reproductive system. Our aim was to compare and assess semen parameters in a normospermic population residing in the Southern Louisiana, USA area pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina. We retrospectively evaluated semen analyses data (n = 3452) of 1855 patients who attended the Tulane University Andrology/Fertility Clinic between 1999 and 2013. The study inclusion criteria were men whose semen analyses showed ≥ 1.5 ml volume; ≥15 million ml -1 sperm concentration; ≥39 million total sperm count; ≥40% motility; >30% morphology, with an abstinence interval of 2-7 days. After the inclusion criteria applied to the population, 367 normospermic patients were included in the study. Descriptive statistics and group-based analyses were performed to interpret the differences between the pre-Katrina (Group 1, 1999-2005) and the post-Katrina (Group 2, 2006-2013) populations. There were significant differences in motility, morphology, number of white blood cell, immature germ cell count, pH and presence of sperm agglutination, but surprisingly there were no significant differences in sperm count between the two populations. This long-term comparative analysis further documents that a major natural disaster with its accompanied environmental issues can influence certain semen parameters (e.g., motility and morphology) and, by extension, fertility potential of the population of such areas.

  1. Evaluation of early endoscopic realignment of post-traumatic complete posterior urethral rupture

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Yaser M; Abdalla, Medhat A; Safwat, Ahmad S; ElGanainy, Ehab O

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: to report our experience with 41 patients treated by early endoscopic realignment of complete post-traumatic rupture urethra. Materials and Methods: The study includes patients presented to our institute, between May 2004 and April 2009, with post-traumatic complete posterior urethral disruption. Preoperative retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and abdominopelvic CT were performed to evaluate the urethral defect length, the bladder neck competence, the prostate position, and the extent of the pelvic hematoma. Within the first week after trauma, antegrade and retrograde urethroscopy were performed to identify both urethral ends and insert urethral catheter. Patients were followed up by pericatheter retrograde urethrogram monthly postoperatively till catheter removal on disappearance of extravasation. Retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and urethroscopy were performed 1 month after the removal of the catheter. Follow-up abdominal ultrasound and uroflowmetry monthly till 6 months, bimonthly till 1 year, and every 3 months thereafter were encouraged. Urinary continence and postoperative erectile dysfunction were assessed by direct patient interview. Results: Forty one patients in the age group 17-61 years (mean 37.9) were treated. Patients were followed up for Conclusions: Early endoscopic realignment for complete posterior urethral rupture is a feasible technique with no or minimal intraoperative complications. The technique is successful as the definitive line of therapy in reasonable number of patients and seems to render further future interventions for inevitable urethral stricture easier. PMID:24082438

  2. [Research about re-evaluation of screening of traditonal Chinese medicine symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of post-marketing Chinese medicine re-evaluation is to identify Chinese medicine clinical indications, while designing scientific and rational of Chinese medicine symptoms items are important to the result of symptoms re-evaluation. This study give screening of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang re-evaluation as example that reference to principle dyslipidemia clinical research, academic dissertations, Xuezhikang directions, clinical expert practice experience etc. while standardization those symptom names and screening 41 dyslipidemia common symptoms. Furthermore, this paper discuss about the accoerdance and announcements when screening symptoms item, so as to providing a research thread to manufacture PRO chart for post-marketing medicine re-evaluation. PMID:22292395

  3. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is emerging as a promising approach for the treatment of several neoplasms. The term “oncolytic viruses” is generally employed to indicate naturally occurring or genetically engineered attenuated viral particles that cause the demise of malignant cells while sparing their non-transformed counterparts. From a conceptual standpoint, oncolytic viruses differ from so-called “oncotropic viruses” in that only the former are able to kill cancer cells, even though both display a preferential tropism for malignant tissues. Of note, such a specificity can originate at several different steps of the viral cycle, including the entry of virions (transductional specificity) as well as their intracellular survival and replication (post-transcriptional and transcriptional specificity). During the past two decades, a large array of replication-competent and replication-incompetent oncolytic viruses has been developed and engineered to express gene products that would specifically promote the death of infected (cancer) cells. However, contrarily to long-standing beliefs, the antineoplastic activity of oncolytic viruses is not a mere consequence of the cytopathic effect, i.e., the lethal outcome of an intense, productive viral infection, but rather involves the elicitation of an antitumor immune response. In line with this notion, oncolytic viruses genetically modified to drive the local production of immunostimulatory cytokines exert more robust therapeutic effects than their non-engineered counterparts. Moreover, the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy is significantly improved by some extent of initial immunosuppression (facilitating viral replication and spread) followed by the administration of immunostimulatory molecules (boosting antitumor immune responses). In this Trial Watch, we will discuss the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating the safety and antineoplastic potential of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23894720

  4. Evaluation of an automated sorting process for post-consumer mixed plastic containers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bubenick, D.V.; Faulstich, C.N.

    1993-09-01

    The report provides a detailed evaluation of a pilot-scale automated sorting system for mixed post-consumer plastic containers developed by Rutgers University Center for Plastics Recycling Research (CPRR). The five bottle types considered were natural high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), clear polyethylene terephthalate (PET), green polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and opague high gensity polyethylene (HDPE). Three series of tests were performed: single composition, short-term tests, mixed composition, short-term tests, and mixed composition, extended tests. Video taping one of the extended tests proved invaluable in providing insight into diagnosing the system's singulation performance and errors in station recovery. The material handling system had a greater effect than sensor performance on the overall performance of the system.

  5. Space shuttle post-entry and landing analysis. Volume 1: Candidate system evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, B. S.; Duiven, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The general purpose of this study is to aid in the evaluation and design of multi-sensor navigation schemes proposed for the orbiter. The scope of the effort is limited to the post-entry, energy management, and approach and landing mission phases. One candidate system based on conventional navigation aids is illustrated including two DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) stations and ILS (Instrument Landing System) glide slope and localizer antennas. Some key elements of the system not shown are the onboard IMUs (Inertial Measurement Units), altimeters, and a computer. The latter is programmed to mix together (filter) the IMU data and the externally-derived data. A completely automatic, all-weather landing capability is required. Since no air-breathing engines will be carried on orbital flights, there will be no chance to go around and try again following a missed approach.

  6. Effect of aliskiren on post-discharge outcomes among diabetic and non-diabetic patients hospitalized for heart failure: insights from the ASTRONAUT trial

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Greene, Stephen J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Böhm, Michael; Zannad, Faiez; Solomon, Scott D.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Baschiera, Fabio; Hua, Tsushung A.; Gimpelewicz, Claudio R.; Lesogor, Anastasia; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ramos, Silvina; Luna, Alejandra; Miriuka, Santiago; Diez, Mirta; Perna, Eduardo; Luquez, Hugo; Pinna, Jorge Garcia; Castagnino, Jorge; Alvarenga, Pablo; Ibañez, Julio; Blumberg, Eduardo Salmon; Dizeo, Claudio; Guerrero, Rodolfo Ahuad; Schygiel, Pablo; Milesi, Rodolfo; Sosa, Carlos; Hominal, Miguel; Marquez, Lilia Lobo; Poy, Carlos; Hasbani, Eduardo; Vico, Marisa; Fernandez, Alberto; Vita, Nestor; Vanhaecke, Johan; De Keulenaer, Gilles; Striekwold, Harry; Vervoort, Geert; Vrolix, Mathias; Henry, Philippe; Dendale, Paul; Smolders, Walter; Marechal, Patrick; Vandekerckhove, Hans; Oliveira, Mucio; Neuenschwande, Fernando; Reis, Gilmar; Saraiva, Jose; Bodanese, Luiz; Canesin, Manoel; Greco, Oswaldo; Bassan, Roberto; Marino, Roberto Luis; Giannetti, Nadia; Moe, Gordon; Sussex, Bruce; Sheppard, Richard; Huynh, Thao; Stewart, Robert; Haddad, Haissam; Echeverria, Luis; Quintero, Adalberto; Torres, Adriana; Jaramillo, Mónica; Lopez, Mónica; Mendoza, Fernan; Florez, Noel; Cotes, Carlos; Garcia, Magali; Belohlavek, Jan; Hradec, Jaromir; Peterka, Martin; Gregor, Pavel; Monhart, Zdenek; Jansky, Petr; Kettner, Jiri; Reichert, Petr; Spinar, Jindrich; Brabec, Tomas; Hutyra, Martin; Solar, Miroslav; Pietilä, Mikko; Nyman, Kai; Pajari, Risto; Cohen, Ariel; Galinier, Michel; Gosse, Philippe; Livarek, Bernard; Neuder, Yannick; Jourdain, Patrick; Picard, François; Isnard, Richard; Hoppe, Uta; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Rosocha, Stefan; Prondzinsky, Roland; Felix, Stephan; Duengen, Hans-Dirk; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Fischer, Sven; Behrens, Steffen; Stawowy, Philipp; Kruells-Muench, Juergen; Knebel, Fabian; Nienaber, Christoph; Werner, Dierk; Aron, Wilma; Remppis, Bjoern; Hambrecht, Rainer; Kisters, Klaus; Werner, Nikos; Hoffmann, Stefan; Rossol, Siegbert; Geiss, Ernst; Graf, Kristof; Hamann, Frank; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Schwinger, Robert; Tebbe, Ulrich; Costard-Jaeckle, Angelika; Lueders, Stephan; Heitzer, Thomas; Leutermann-Oei, Marie-Louise; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger; Roehnisch, Jens-Uwe; Muth, Gerhard; Goette, Andreas; Rotter, Achim; Ebelt, Henning; Olbrich, Hans-Georg; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schellong, Sebastian; Zamolyi, Karoly; Vertes, Andras; Matoltsy, Andras; Palinkas, Attila; Herczeg, Bela; Apro, Dezso; Lupkovics, Geza; Tomcsanyi, Janos; Toth, Kalman; Mathur, Atul; Banker, Darshan; Bharani, Anil; Arneja, Jaspal; Khan, Aziz; Gadkari, Milind; Hiremath, Jagdish; Patki, Nitin; Kumbla, Makund; Santosh, M.J.; Ravikishore, A.G.; Abhaichand, Rajpal; Maniyal, Vijayakukmar; Nanjappa, Manjunath; Reddy, P. Naveen; Chockalingam, Kulasekaran; Premchand, Rajendra; Mahajan, Vijay; Lewis, Basil; Wexler, Dov; Shochat, Michael; Keren, Andre; Omary, Muhamad; Katz, Amos; Marmor, Alon; Lembo, Giuseppe; Di Somma, Salvatore; Boccanelli, Alessandro; Barbiero, Mario; Pajes, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano; Greco, Dott Cosimo; De Santis, Fernando; Floresta, Agata; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Cavallini, Claudio; Di Biase, Matteo; Masini, Dott Franco; Vassanelli, Corrado; Viecca, Maurizio; Cangemi, Dott Francesco; Pirelli, Salvatore; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Branzi, Angelo; Percoco, Dott Giovanni; Severi, Silvia; Santini, Alberto; De Lorenzi, Ettore; Metra, Marco; Zacà, Valerio; Mortara, Andrea; Tranquilino, Francisco P.; Babilonia, Noe A.; Ferrolino, Arthur M.; Manlutac, Benjamin; Dluzniewski, Miroslaw; Dzielinska, Zofia; Nowalany-Kozie, Ewa; Mazurek, Walentyna; Wierzchowiecki, Jerzy; Wysokinski, Andrzej; Szachniewicz, Joanna; Romanowski, Witold; Krauze-Wielicka, Magdalena; Jankowski, Piotr; Berkowski, Piotr; Szelemej, Roman; Kleinrok, Andrzej; Kornacewicz-Jac, Zdzislawa; Vintila, Marius; Vladoianu, Mircea; Militaru, Constantin; Dan, Gheorghe; Dorobantu, Maria; Dragulescu, Stefan; Kostenko, Victor; Vishnevsky, Alexandr; Goloschekin, Boris; Tyrenko, Vadim; Gordienko, Alexander; Kislyak, Oxana; Martsevich, Sergey; Kuchmin, Alexey; Karpov, Yurii; Fomin, Igor; Shvarts, Yury; Orlikova, Olga; Ershova, Olga; Berkovich, Olga; Sitnikova, Maria; Pakhomova, Inna; Boldueva, Svetlana; Tyurina, Tatiana; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Mikhail; Novikova, Nina; Tereschenko, Sergey; Zadionchenko, Vladimir; Shogenov, Zaur; Gordeev, Ivan; Moiseev, Valentin; Wong, Raymond; Ong, Hean Yee; Le Tan, Ju; Goncalvesova, Eva; Kovar, Frantisek; Skalina, Ivan; Kasperova, Viera; Hojerova, Silvia; Szentivanyi, Miroslav; Stancak, Branislav; Babcak, Marian; Kycina, Peter; Poliacik, Pavol; Toth, Peter; Sirotiakova, Jana; de Sa, Esteban Lopez; Bueno, Manuel Gomez; Selles, Manuel Martinez; Cabrera, Jose Angel; Freire, Ramon Bover; Gonzalez Juanatey, Jose Ramon; Comin, Josep; Soriano, FranciscoRidocci; Lopez, Alejandro; Vicho, Raul; Lama, Manuel Geraldia; Schaufelberger, Maria; Brunotte, Richard; Ullman, Bengt; Hagerman, Inger; Cizinsky, Stella; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yu, Wen-Chung; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Ural, Dilek; Badak, Ozer; Akin, Mustafa; Yigit, Zerrin; Yokusoglu, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Abaci, Adnan; Ebinc, Haksun; Perlman, Richard; Parish, David; Bergin, James; Burnham, Kenneth; Brown, Christopher; Lundbye, Justin; Williams, Celeste; Eisen, Howard; Juneman, Elizabeth; Joseph, Susan; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Peura, Jennifer; Gupta, Vishal; Habet, Kalim; French, William; Mody, Freny; Graham, Susan; Hazelrigg, Monica; Chung, Eugene; Dunlap, Stephanie; Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Najjar, Samer; Katz, Richard; Murali, Srinivas; Izzo, Joseph L.; Callister, Tracy; Phillips, Roland; Lippolis, Nicholas; Winterton, John; Meymandi, Sheba; Heilman, Karl; Oren, Ron; Zolty, Ronald; Brottman, Michael; Gunawardena, D.R.; Adams, Kirkwood; Barnard, Denise; Klapholz, Marc; Fulmer, James

    2013-01-01

    Aims The objective of the Aliskiren Trial on Acute Heart Failure Outcomes (ASTRONAUT) was to determine whether aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor, would improve post-discharge outcomes in patients with hospitalization for heart failure (HHF) with reduced ejection fraction. Pre-specified subgroup analyses suggested potential heterogeneity in post-discharge outcomes with aliskiren in patients with and without baseline diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods and results ASTRONAUT included 953 patients without DM (aliskiren 489; placebo 464) and 662 patients with DM (aliskiren 319; placebo 343) (as reported by study investigators). Study endpoints included the first occurrence of cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 and 12 months, all-cause death within 6 and 12 months, and change from baseline in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at 1, 6, and 12 months. Data regarding risk of hyperkalaemia, renal impairment, and hypotension, and changes in additional serum biomarkers were collected. The effect of aliskiren on cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 months (primary endpoint) did not significantly differ by baseline DM status (P = 0.08 for interaction), but reached statistical significance at 12 months (non-DM: HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64–0.99; DM: HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.91–1.47; P = 0.03 for interaction). Risk of 12-month all-cause death with aliskiren significantly differed by the presence of baseline DM (non-DM: HR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50–0.94; DM: HR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.15–2.33; P < 0.01 for interaction). Among non-diabetics, aliskiren significantly reduced NT-proBNP through 6 months and plasma troponin I and aldosterone through 12 months, as compared to placebo. Among diabetic patients, aliskiren reduced plasma troponin I and aldosterone relative to placebo through 1 month only. There was a trend towards differing risk of post-baseline potassium ≥6 mmol/L with aliskiren by underlying DM status (non-DM: HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.71–1.93; DM: HR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.30

  7. Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Midilli, Tulay Sagkal; Eser, Ismet

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Reiki on pain, anxiety, and hemodynamic parameters on postoperative days 1 and 2 in patients who had undergone cesarean delivery. The design of this study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. The study took place between February and July 2011 in the Obstetrical Unit at Odemis Public Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Ninety patients equalized by age and number of births were randomly assigned to either a Reiki group or a control group (a rest without treatment). Treatment applied to both groups in the first 24 and 48 hours after delivery for a total of 30 minutes to 10 identified regions of the body for 3 minutes each. Reiki was applied for 2 days once a day (in the first 24 and 48 hours) within 4-8 hours of the administration of standard analgesic, which was administered intravenously by a nurse. A visual analog scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure pain and anxiety. Hemodynamic parameters, including blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse and breathing rates, and analgesic requirements also were recorded. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity (p = .000), anxiety value (p = .000), and breathing rate (p = .000) measured over time were found between the two groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the time (p = .000) and number (p = .000) of analgesics needed after Reiki application and a rest without treatment. Results showed that Reiki application reduced the intensity of pain, the value of anxiety, and the breathing rate, as well as the need for and number of analgesics. However, it did not affect blood pressure or pulse rate. Reiki application as a nursing intervention is recommended as a pain and anxiety-relieving method in women after cesarean delivery. PMID:26025798

  8. Imaging techniques in the evaluation of post-infarction function and scar.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Eduardo; Sanz, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Imaging techniques are essential in the clinical evaluation of patients with a myocardial infarction. They are of value for both initial assessment of the ischemic injury and for detection of the subgroup of patients at higher risk of developing cardiovascular events during follow-up. Echocardiography remains the technique of choice for the initial evaluation, owing to its bedside capability to determine strong predictors, such as ventricular volumes, global and regional systolic function, and valvular regurgitation. New techniques for evaluating ventricular mechanics, mainly assessment of ventricular deformation, are revealing important aspects of post-infarction ventricular adaptation. The main alternative to echocardiography is cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This technique is highly accurate for determining ventricular volumes and ventricular function and has the additional advantage of being able to characterize the myocardium and demonstrate changes associated with the ischemic insult such as necrosis/fibrosis, edema, microvascular obstruction, and intramyocardial hemorrhage. These features not only allow detection and quantification of the infarct size, but also reveal additional characteristics of the scar tissue with prognostic value. PMID:25172072

  9. Imaging techniques in the evaluation of post-infarction function and scar.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Eduardo; Sanz, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Imaging techniques are essential in the clinical evaluation of patients with a myocardial infarction. They are of value for both initial assessment of the ischemic injury and for detection of the subgroup of patients at higher risk of developing cardiovascular events during follow-up. Echocardiography remains the technique of choice for the initial evaluation, owing to its bedside capability to determine strong predictors, such as ventricular volumes, global and regional systolic function, and valvular regurgitation. New techniques for evaluating ventricular mechanics, mainly assessment of ventricular deformation, are revealing important aspects of post-infarction ventricular adaptation. The main alternative to echocardiography is cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This technique is highly accurate for determining ventricular volumes and ventricular function and has the additional advantage of being able to characterize the myocardium and demonstrate changes associated with the ischemic insult such as necrosis/fibrosis, edema, microvascular obstruction, and intramyocardial hemorrhage. These features not only allow detection and quantification of the infarct size, but also reveal additional characteristics of the scar tissue with prognostic value.

  10. Evaluation of new UV-cured adhesives and effects of post-cure UV exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, John G.

    2002-09-01

    Recent developments in adhesives have yielded products well suited for optical applications. Ultraviolet light-cured adhesives can be cured in seconds and are an attractive candidate. Selection of the adhesive properties can be made to achieve optimum performance. For improved alignment stability and reduced stress, low shrinkage adhesives have been needed. New UV-cured adhesives are evaluated with shrinkage values of less than 0.2%. In addition to controlled bonding for alignment stability, the effects of post-cure UV laser exposure (266 nm) are evaluated. Adhesives needed for systems employing UV lasers must consider off-axis exposure that can cause photo-reactive degradation. Relatively low power laser exposure is used as a simulated source for off-axis or scattered irradiation. None of these candidate adhesives are intended for in-the-light path use at 266 nm, but rather as structural adhesives. Evaluation of these candidates included a outgassing screening test that may be employed to select materials.

  11. An efficacy and mechanism evaluation study of Levosimendan for the Prevention of Acute oRgan Dysfunction in Sepsis (LeoPARDS): protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Organ dysfunction consequent to infection (‘severe sepsis’) is the leading cause of admission to an intensive care unit (ICU). In both animal models and early clinical studies the calcium channel sensitizer levosimendan has been demonstrated to have potentially beneficial effects on organ function. The aims of the Levosimendan for the Prevention of Acute oRgan Dysfunction in Sepsis (LeoPARDS) trial are to identify whether a 24-hour infusion of levosimendan will improve organ dysfunction in adults who have septic shock and to establish the safety profile of levosimendan in this group of patients. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled trial. Adults fulfilling the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to infection, and requiring vasopressor therapy, will be eligible for inclusion in the trial. Within 24 hours of meeting these inclusion criteria, patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio stratified by the ICU to receive either levosimendan (0.05 to 0.2 μg.kg-1.min-1 or placebo for 24 hours in addition to standard care. The primary outcome measure is the mean Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score while in the ICU. Secondary outcomes include: central venous oxygen saturations and cardiac output; incidence and severity of renal failure using the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria; duration of renal replacement therapy; serum bilirubin; time to liberation from mechanical ventilation; 28-day, hospital, 3 and 6 month survival; ICU and hospital length-of-stay; and days free from catecholamine therapy. Blood and urine samples will be collected on the day of inclusion, at 24 hours, and on days 4 and 6 post-inclusion for investigation of the mechanisms by which levosimendan might improve organ function. Eighty patients will have additional blood samples taken to measure levels of levosimendan and its active metabolites OR-1896 and OR-1855. A total of 516 patients

  12. An evaluation of recruitment methods utilized for a clinical trial with periodontal and diabetes enrollment criteria: the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Hyman, Leslie; Simpson, Leslie Long; Michalowicz, Bryan; Reddy, Michael; Gelato, Marie; Hou, Wei; Engebretson, Steven P; Hytner, Catherine; Lenton, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes and its complications are a major United States public health concern. Methods The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) evaluated whether non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease influenced diabetes management among persons with Type 2 diabetes and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate DPTT’s many recruitment strategies in terms of enrollment success. Results/Conclusion Targeted recruitment strategies were more effective in identifying individuals who met periodontal and diabetes eligibility criteria. Individuals eligible for a baseline visit/enrollment were more often male, had a younger age at diabetes diagnosis, a longer diabetes duration, more often Hispanic and less often African–American. Tracking and evaluating recruitment sources during study enrollment optimized recruitment methods to enroll a diverse participant population based upon gender, race and ethnicity. PMID:25574373

  13. Evaluation of a post-processing approach for multiscale analysis of biphasic mechanics of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sibole, Scott C; Maas, Steve; Halloran, Jason P; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the mechanical behaviour of chondrocytes as a result of cartilage tissue mechanics has significant implications for both evaluation of mechanobiological function and to elaborate on damage mechanisms. A common procedure for prediction of chondrocyte mechanics (and of cell mechanics in general) relies on a computational post-processing approach where tissue-level deformations drive cell-level models. Potential loss of information in this numerical coupling approach may cause erroneous cellular-scale results, particularly during multiphysics analysis of cartilage. The goal of this study was to evaluate the capacity of first- and second-order data passing to predict chondrocyte mechanics by analysing cartilage deformations obtained for varying complexity of loading scenarios. A tissue-scale model with a sub-region incorporating representation of chondron size and distribution served as control. The post-processing approach first required solution of a homogeneous tissue-level model, results of which were used to drive a separate cell-level model (same characteristics as the sub-region of control model). The first-order data passing appeared to be adequate for simplified loading of the cartilage and for a subset of cell deformation metrics, for example, change in aspect ratio. The second-order data passing scheme was more accurate, particularly when asymmetric permeability of the tissue boundaries was considered. Yet, the method exhibited limitations for predictions of instantaneous metrics related to the fluid phase, for example, mass exchange rate. Nonetheless, employing higher order data exchange schemes may be necessary to understand the biphasic mechanics of cells under lifelike tissue loading states for the whole time history of the simulation.

  14. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES REVIEW & EVALUATION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE REPAIR TRIALS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-09-01

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is generally ineffective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressure for pipe repaired with carbon fiber-reinforced composite liner was greater than that of the un-repaired pipe section with damage, indicating that this type of liner is effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the next phase of this project.

  15. Evaluation of biological aerosol stand-off detection at a field trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Elmqvist, Magnus; Gustafsson, Ove; Kullander, Fredrik; Persson, Rolf; Olofsson, Göran; Tjärnhage, Torbjörn; Farsund, Øystein; Haavardsholm, Trym Vegard; Rustad, Gunnar

    2009-09-01

    We have performed a field trial to evaluate technologies for stand-off detection of biological aerosols, both in daytime and at night. Several lidar (light detection and ranging) systems were tested in parallel. We present the results from three different lidar systems; one system for detection and localization of aerosol clouds using elastic backscattering at 1.57 μm, and two systems for detection and classification of aerosol using spectral detection of ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence (UV LIF) excited at 355 nm. The UV lidar systems were utilizing different technologies for the spectral detection, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) array and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), respectively. During the first week of the field trial, the lidar systems were measuring towards a semi-closed chamber at a distance of 230 m. The chamber was built from two docked standard 20-feet containers with air curtains in the short sides to contain the aerosol inside the chamber. Aerosol was generated inside the semi-closed chamber and monitored by reference equipments, e.g. slit sampler and particle counters. Signatures from several biological warfare agent simulants and interferents were measured at different aerosol concentrations. During the second week the aerosol was released in the air and the reference equipments were located in the centre of the test site. The lidar systems were measuring towards the test site centre at distances of either 230 m or approximately 1 km. In this paper we are presenting results and some preliminary signal processing for discrimination between different types of simulants and interference aerosols.

  16. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R.; Lee, Chung; Le, Chap T.; Han, Linda K.; Washington, Tara; Kinney, Michael; Bretzke, Margit; Tuttle, Todd M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  17. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Efficacy of Peer Mentors to Support South African Women Living with HIV and Their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Richter, Linda M.; van Heerden, Alastair; van Rooyen, Heidi; Tomlinson, Mark; Harwood, Jessica M.; Comulada, W. Scott; Stein, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluate the effect of clinic-based support by HIV-positive Peer Mentors, in addition to standard clinic care, on maternal and infant well-being among Women Living with HIV (WLH) from pregnancy through the infant's first year of life. Methods In a cluster randomized controlled trial in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, eight clinics were randomized for pregnant WLH to receive either: a Standard Care condition (SC; 4 clinics; n = 656 WLH); or an Enhanced Intervention (EI; 4 clinics; n = 544 WLH). WLH in the EI were invited to attend four antenatal and four postnatal meetings led by HIV-positive Peer Mentors, in addition to SC. WLH were recruited during pregnancy, and at least two post-birth assessment interviews were completed by 57% of WLH at 1.5, 6 or 12 months. EI's effect was ascertained on 19 measures of maternal and infant well-being using random effects regressions to control for clinic clustering. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated EI's overall efficacy. Findings WLH attended an average of 4.1 sessions (SD = 2.0); 13% did not attend any sessions. Significant overall benefits were found in EI compared to SC using the binomial test. Secondarily, over time, WLH in the EI reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms and fewer underweight infants than WLH in the SC condition. EI WLH were significantly more likely to use one feeding method for six months and exclusively breastfeed their infants for at least 6 months. Conclusions WLH benefit by support from HIV-positive Peer Mentors, even though EI participation was partial, with incomplete follow-up rates from 6–12 months. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00972699 PMID:24465444

  18. Insulin degludec does not increase antibody formation versus insulin glargine: an evaluation of phase IIIa trials

    PubMed Central

    Seufert, J.; Solberg, H.; Kinduryte, O.; Johansen, T.; Hollander, P.

    2016-01-01

    We examined insulin antibody formation in patients with type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with once‐daily insulin degludec (IDeg) or insulin glargine (IGlar) to evaluate the impact of antibody formation on efficacy and safety. Insulin antibodies were measured using subtraction radioimmunoassays in six phase IIIa clinical trials using IDeg (n = 2250) and IGlar (n = 1184). Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate associations between cross‐reacting antibodies and change from baseline glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin dose. IDeg‐ and IGlar‐specific antibodies remained low [<1% bound/total radioactivity (B/T)] and with low levels of antibodies cross‐reacting with human insulin in patients with T1D (<20% B/T) and T2D (<6% B/T). Spearman's correlation coefficients between insulin antibody levels and change in HbA1c or insulin dose were low in both treatment groups. No clinically meaningful differences in adverse event (AE) rates were observed in patients with >10% B/T or without an absolute increase in antibodies cross‐reacting with human insulin. IDeg treatment resulted in few immunogenic responses in patients with T1D and T2D; antibody formation was not associated with change in HbA1c, insulin dose or rates of AEs. PMID:26663320

  19. Evaluation of motor performances of hemiplegic patients using a virtual cycling wheelchair: an exploratory trial.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihisa; Abe, Makoto; Homma, Noriyasu; Seki, Kazunori; Handa, Nobuyasu

    2013-01-01

    Cycling is known to be an effective rehabilitation exercise for hemiplegic patients who face difficulty during walking because of stroke or other brain disorders. A cycling wheelchair (CWC) is a useful tool to provide exercise for these patients and improve their quality of life. In previous studies, our group developed a system that allows patients to safely practice driving a CWC in a virtual environment. However, it has been difficult to check their motor performances and determine the effects of the exercise on a daily basis. This study is an exploratory trial for developing a method to evaluate the motor performances of users based on their CWC pedaling patterns. An experiment with some hemiplegic patients and healthy subjects was conducted and their pedaling patterns were analyzed. Results showed a significant difference between the hemiplegic patients and healthy subjects in an index that reflects pedaling balance between the feet. This result indicates a possible method of evaluating the motor performances of users based on their pedaling patterns.

  20. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial: A Randomized Drinking Water Intervention Trial to Reduce Gastrointestinal Illness in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Joan F.; Wright, Catherine C.; Arnold, Benjamin F.; Saha, Sona; Wade, Timothy J.; Scott, James; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the relative rate of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) per year associated with active versus sham household water filtration devices among older adults in a community receiving tap water meeting current US standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 individuals), which used active and sham water filtration devices for 6 months each. We estimated the annual incidence rate ratio of HCGI episodes and the longitudinal prevalence ratio of HCGI days at population and individual levels with a generalized estimating equation (GEE) and generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs), respectively, adjusted for covariates associated with outcome. Results. The incidence rate ratios (active versus sham) were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77, 1.00) and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.76, 0.94) HCGI episodes per year estimated by GEE and GLMM models, respectively. The corresponding longitudinal prevalence ratios were 0.88 (95% CI = 0.74, 1.05) and 0.84 (95% CI = 0.78, 0.90) HCGI days per person per year. Conclusions. We observed reductions in population- and individual-level measures of HCGI associated with use of the active filtration device. These findings suggest the need for further research on the impact of drinking water on the health of sensitive subpopulations. PMID:19762663

  1. Associations between program outcomes and adherence to Social Cognitive Theory tasks: process evaluation of the SHED-IT community weight loss trial for men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite rising international rates of obesity, men remain reluctant to participate in weight loss research. There is a lack of evidence to guide the development of effective weight loss interventions that engage men. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive process evaluation of the SHED-IT (Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Information Technology) weight loss program for men, as delivered in the SHED-IT community weight loss trial, and to identify key components associated with success. Methods In an assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial, 159 overweight and obese men (BMI 25.0-40.0 kg/m2) were randomised to one of two gender-tailored weight loss interventions with no face-to-face contact, or a control group. The interventions were informed by Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) with men encouraged to complete a Support Book containing SCT-based tasks including goal setting, reward setting, creation of social support strategies and self-monitoring of: i) weight, ii) physical activity, and iii) diet. At post-test, compliance with SCT tasks was examined and men also completed a process evaluation questionnaire. Results Both SHED-IT intervention groups demonstrated greater weight loss during the intervention compared to the control, with no difference between intervention groups. Most men engaged with the SCT tasks although compliance declined over time and utilisation of social support networks and reward selection was poor. In a multiple regression model, the number of goals set (β [95% CI] = -0.3 [-0.6, -0.1], p = 0.01) and the number of weight records documented (β [95% CI] = -0.2 [-0.4, -0.0], p = 0.03) independently predicted weight loss. The process evaluation indicated that men found the programs to be supportive, enjoyable and beneficial. Conclusions This process evaluation provides valuable information to inform the development of obesity treatment strategies that engage men. Future studies with

  2. Evaluation of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Families for Health V2 for the treatment of childhood obesity: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective programs to help children manage their weight are required. Families for Health focuses on a parenting approach, designed to help parents develop their parenting skills to support lifestyle change within the family. Families for Health V1 showed sustained reductions in overweight after 2 years in a pilot evaluation, but lacks a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evidence base. Methods/design This is a multi-center, investigator-blind RCT, with parallel economic evaluation, with a 12-month follow-up. The trial will recruit 120 families with at least one child aged 6 to 11 years who is overweight (≥91st centile BMI) or obese (≥98th centile BMI) from three localities and assigned randomly to Families for Health V2 (60 families) or the usual care control (60 families) groups. Randomization will be stratified by locality (Coventry, Warwickshire, Wolverhampton). Families for Health V2 is a family-based intervention run in a community venue. Parents/carers and children attend parallel groups for 2.5 hours weekly for 10 weeks. The usual care arm will be the usual support provided within each NHS locality. A mixed-methods evaluation will be carried out. Child and parent participants will be assessed at home visits at baseline, 3-month (post-treatment) and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the change in the children’s BMI z-scores at 12 months from the baseline. Secondary outcome measures include changes in the children’s waist circumference, percentage body fat, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption and quality of life. The parents’ BMI and mental well-being, family eating/activity, parent–child relationships and parenting style will also be assessed. Economic components will encompass the measurement and valuation of service utilization, including the costs of running Families for Health and usual care, and the EuroQol EQ-5D health outcomes. Cost-effectiveness will be expressed in terms of incremental cost per

  3. Evaluating a Brief, Internet-Based Intervention for Co-Occurring Depression and Problematic Alcohol Use in Young People: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teesson, Maree; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Mills, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and alcohol misuse represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence is associated with increased risks and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective, however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it, particularly in young people. The increased availability of Internet-based programs to complement health care presents a unique opportunity in the treatment of these conditions. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate whether a brief, Internet-based, self-help intervention (the DEAL [DEpression-ALcohol] Project) can be effective in treating co-occurring depression and problematic alcohol use in young people (18-25 years old). Methods The evaluation will take the form of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), comparing the DEAL Project with an attention-control condition (HealthWatch). The RCT will consist of a four-week intervention phase and a 24-week follow-up. It will be entirely Internet-based and open Australia-wide to young people 18 to 25 years old. The primary outcomes will be change in depression symptoms and alcohol use at 5, 12, and 24 weeks post baseline. Secondary outcomes include change in general functioning and quality of life, anxiety/stress symptomatology, and a number of other depression/alcohol related outcomes. Process analysis will also measure engagement across the conditions. Results This study is currently ongoing with preliminary results expected in late 2014. Conclusions This study, to our knowledge, will be the first RCT of a Internet-based treatment for comorbid depression and problematic alcohol use in any age group. If successful, the program represents a novel and innovative approach to addressing the significant harms associated with these conditions and will be an invaluable resource to those not receiving help

  4. Clobazam is equally safe and efficacious for seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome across different age groups: Post hoc analyses of short- and long-term clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu-Tze; Conry, Joan; Mitchell, Wendy G; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Isojarvi, Jouko; Lee, Deborah; Drummond, Rebecca; Chung, Steve

    2015-05-01

    The peak age at onset of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is between 3 and 5years. Patients with LGS frequently experience multiple types of treatment-refractory seizures and require lifelong therapy with several antiepileptic drugs. Here, post hoc analyses of clinical trials (phase III trial OV-1012 and open-label extension trial OV-1004) provide short- and long-term efficacy and safety data of adjunctive clobazam in patients with LGS stratified by age at baseline (≥2 to <12years, ≥12 to <17years, and ≥17years). In OV-1012, 301 patients were screened, 238 were randomized, 217 comprised the modified intention-to-treat population, and 177 completed the study. A total of 267/306 patients (61 of 68 from phase II trial OV-1002 and 206 of 238 from phase III trial OV-1012) entered the open-label extension trial. Demographics and clinical characteristics were similar between different age groups in OV-1012 and OV-1004. No differences in efficacy or adverse events were observed across age groups in OV-1012 and OV-1004. The results of these post hoc analyses show that adjunctive clobazam over the short and longterm was similarly effective and well-tolerated in both pediatric and adult patients with LGS.

  5. Effect of a mobile phone-based intervention on post-abortion contraception: a randomized controlled trial in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thoai D; Gold, Judy; Edwards, Phil; Vannak, Uk; Sokhey, Ly; Machiyama, Kazuyo; Slaymaker, Emma; Warnock, Ruby; McCarthy, Ona; Free, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effect of a mobile phone-based intervention (mHealth) on post-abortion contraception use by women in Cambodia. Methods The Mobile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) study involved women who sought safe abortion services at four Marie Stopes International clinics in Cambodia. We randomly allocated 249 women to a mobile phone-based intervention, which comprised six automated, interactive voice messages with counsellor phone support, as required, whereas 251 women were allocated to a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was the self-reported use of an effective contraceptive method, 4 and 12 months after an abortion. Findings Data on effective contraceptive use were available for 431 (86%) participants at 4 months and 328 (66%) at 12 months. Significantly more women in the intervention than the control group reported effective contraception use at 4 months (64% versus 46%, respectively; relative risk, RR: 1.39; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.17–1.66) but not at 12 months (50% versus 43%, respectively; RR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.92–1.47). However, significantly more women in the intervention group reported using a long-acting contraceptive method at both follow-up times. There was no significant difference between the groups in repeat pregnancies or abortions at 4 or 12 months. Conclusion Adding a mobile phone-based intervention to abortion care services in Cambodia had a short-term effect on the overall use of any effective contraception, while the use of long-acting contraceptive methods lasted throughout the study period. PMID:26668436

  6. Using Administrative Data to Evaluate Impacts in a School-Randomized Trial of the 4Rs Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Juliette; Torrente, Catalina; Aber, J. Lawrence; Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.

    2010-01-01

    The 4Rs Program (Reading, Writing, Respect and Resolution) is a "dual focus" whole school universal intervention designed to promote literacy development and social-emotional learning, that is currently being rigorously evaluated using a school-randomized trial of 18 elementary schools (9 intervention, 9 control) in New York City. The present…

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of an After-School Prosocial Behavior Program in an Area of Socioeconomic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Liam; Biggart, Andy; Kerr, Karen; Connolly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the effects of a prosocial behavior after-school program called Mate-Tricks for 9- and 10-year-old children and their parents living in an area of significant socioeconomic disadvantage. The children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 220) or a control group (n = 198). Children were…

  8. Political Processes. Evaluation Report from a Limited School Trial of A Teaching Unit of the High School Geography Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogatz, Gerry Ann

    The methodology used in the evaluation of this unit is the same as that described in SO 000 433. The total number of students in the trial was about 2,100 seventh through twelfth grade students. The version of the unit used included nine activities, three of which were optional and designed to reinforce and supplement the required activities: 1)…

  9. Myopia Stabilization and Associated Factors Among Participants in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To use the Gompertz function to estimate the age and the amount of myopia at stabilization and to evaluate associated factors in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) cohort, a large ethnically diverse group of myopic children. Methods. The COMET enrolled 469 ethnically diverse children aged 6 to younger than 12 years with spherical equivalent refraction between −1.25 and −4.50 diopters (D). Noncycloplegic refraction was measured semiannually for 4 years and annually thereafter. Right eye data were fit to individual Gompertz functions in participants with at least 6 years of follow-up and at least seven refraction measurements over 11 years. Function parameters were estimated using a nonlinear least squares procedure. Associated factors were evaluated using linear regression. Results. In total, 426 participants (91%) had valid Gompertz curve fits. The mean (SD) age at myopia stabilization was 15.61 (4.17) years, and the mean (SD) amount of myopia at stabilization was −4.87 (2.01) D. Ethnicity (P < 0.0001) but not sex or the number of myopic parents was associated with the age at stabilization. Ethnicity (P = 0.02) and the number of myopic parents (P = 0.01) but not sex were associated with myopia magnitude at stabilization. At stabilization, African Americans were youngest (mean age, 13.82 years) and had the least myopia (mean, −4.36 D). Participants with two versus no myopic parents had approximately 1.00 D more myopia at stabilization. The age and the amount of myopia at stabilization were correlated (r = −0.60, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. The Gompertz function provides estimates of the age and the amount of myopia at stabilization in an ethnically diverse cohort. These findings should provide guidance on the time course of myopia and on decisions regarding the type and timing of interventions. PMID:24159085

  10. Comparative evaluation of effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber post and composite core

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei Yazdi, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Debonding of a composite resin core of the fiber post often occurs at the interface between these two materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber posts and composite core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-four fiber posts were picked in two groups (Hetco and Exacto). Each group was further divided into four subgroups using different surface treatments: 1) silanization; 2) sandblasting; 3) Treatment with 24% H2O2, and 4) no treatment (control group). A cylindrical plexiglass matrix was placed around the post and filled with the core resin composite. Specimens were stored in 5000 thermal cycles between 5℃ and 55℃. Tensile bond strength (TBS) test and evaluation using stereomicroscope were performed on the specimen and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, Post Hoc Scheffe tests and Fisher's Exact Test (α=.05). RESULTS There was a significant difference between the effect of different surface treatments on TBS (P<.001) but different brands of post (P=.743) and interaction between the brand of post and surface treatment (P=.922) had no significant effect on TBS. Both silanization and sandblasting improved the bonding strength of fiber posts to composite resin core, but there were not any significant differences between these groups and control group. CONCLUSION There was not any significant difference between two brands of fiber posts that had been used in this study. Although silanization and sandblasting can improve the TBS, there was not any significant differences between surface treatments used. PMID:22737316

  11. Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

    1998-09-16

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

  12. Effect of Dexamethasone Intraligamentary Injection on Post-Endodontic Pain in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Esnashari, Ehsan; Salmanzadeh, Reyhaneh; Fazlyab, Mahta; Fazlyab, Mahyar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this randomized-controlled clinical trial was to assess the effect of intraligamentary (PDL) injection of dexamethasone on onset and severity of post-treatment pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: A total number of 60 volunteers were included according to the inclusion criteria and were assigned to three groups (n=20). After administration of local anesthesia and before treatment, group 1 (control) PDL injection was done with syringe containing empty cartridge, while in groups 2 and 3 the PDL injection was done with 0.2 mL of 2% lidocaine or dexamethasone (8 mg/2 mL), respectively. Immediately after endodontic treatment patients were requested to mark their level of pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) during the next 48 h (on 6, 12, 24 and 48-h intervals). They were also asked to mention whether analgesics were taken and its dosage. Considering the 0-170 markings on the VAS ruler, the level of pain was scored as follows: score 0 (mild pain; 0-56), score 1 (moderate pain; 57-113) and score 3 (severe pain; 114-170). The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Chi-square tests and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: After 6 and 12 h, group 1 and group 3 had the highest and lowest pain values, respectively (P<0.01 and P<0.001 for 6 and 12 h, respectively). However, after 24 and 48 h the difference in the pain was not significant between groups 1 and 2 (P<0.6) but group 3 had lower pain levels (P<0.01 and P<0.8 for 24 and 48 h, respectively). Conclusion: Pretreatment PDL injection of dexamethasone can significantly reduce the post-treatment endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:27790253

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of the Retention of Tooth Coloured and Stainless Steel Endodontic Posts: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Rahul; Punga, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This in vitro study evaluated: a) the retention of stainless steel posts of 1.5 mm diameter which were cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement versus Glass fiber posts with 1.1 mm, 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm diameters which were cemented with resin cement and b) the effect of change in diameter on the retention of Glass fiber posts with 1.1 mm, 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm diameters. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted mandibular premolar teeth were endodontically treated and randomly assigned to four groups of fifteen teeth each. In Groups I, II and III glass fibre posts with diameters 1.1 mm, 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm were cemented by using resin cement. In Group IV, stainless steel posts with diameter 1.5 mm were cemented by using zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were tested for tensile loading at a cross head speed of 2.0 mm/min, on a universal testing machine. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey’s (post-hoc) test. Results: Mean tensile strength from highest to lowest was in the order of Group IV, Group II, Group III, Group I. Statistically significant differences were observed between the mean tensile strengths between Groups I and II, Groups I and III, Groups I and IV, Groups II and IV, Groups III and IV, while non significant differences were observed between Groups II and III. Conclusion: Stainless steel posts were more retentive than glass fibre posts. Glass fibre posts with 1.3 mm or 1.5 mm diameters provided significantly greater retention as compared to 1.1 mm diameter posts. PMID:24959506

  14. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Nayiga, Susan; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Nabirye, Christine; Haaland, Ane; Staedke, Sarah G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including ‘patient-centred services.’ A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and evaluate the implementation and programme theories of the intervention. This article evaluates one hypothesized mechanism of change within the programme theory: the impact of the Patient Centred Services component on health-worker communication. The theory-driven approach extended to evaluation of the outcome measures. The study found that the proximal outcome of patient-centred communication was rated 10 percent higher (p < 0.008) by care seekers consulting with the health workers who were at the intervention health centres compared with those at control health centres. This finding will strengthen interpretation of more distal trial outcomes. PMID:25983612

  15. A randomized, controlled trial of virtual reality-graded exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in active duty service members with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Wood, Dennis P; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; Spira, James L; Wiederhold, Mark D; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2011-04-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR)-based therapy has emerged as a potentially useful means to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but randomized studies have been lacking for Service Members from Iraq or Afghanistan. This study documents a small, randomized, controlled trial of VR-graded exposure therapy (VR-GET) versus treatment as usual (TAU) for PTSD in Active Duty military personnel with combat-related PTSD. Success was gauged according to whether treatment resulted in a 30 percent or greater improvement in the PTSD symptom severity as assessed by the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) after 10 weeks of treatment. Seven of 10 participants improved by 30 percent or greater while in VR-GET, whereas only 1 of the 9 returning participants in TAU showed similar improvement. This is a clinically and statistically significant result (χ(2) = 6.74, p < 0.01, relative risk 3.2). Participants in VR-GET improved an average of 35 points on the CAPS, whereas those in TAU averaged a 9-point improvement (p < 0.05). The results are limited by small size, lack of blinding, a single therapist, and comparison to a relatively uncontrolled usual care condition, but did show VR-GET to be a safe and effective treatment for combat-related PTSD. PMID:21332375

  16. Evaluation of Post-operative Complication Rate of Le Fort I Osteotomy: A Retrospective and Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sandeep; Kaur, Supreet

    2014-06-01

    Le Fort I osteotomy has become a routine procedure in elective orthognathic surgery. This procedure is often associated with significant but rare post-operative complications. The study was conducted to evaluate the rate of post-operative complications following conventional Le Fort I osteotomy. Twenty-five healthy adult patients who had to undergo Le Fort I osteotomy without segmentalization of maxilla were included in the study based on indications of surgery. All the patients were followed up for a period of 6 months post-operatively to assess the rate of various post-operative complications such as neurosensory deficit, pulpal sensibility, maxillary sinusitis, vascular complications, aseptic necrosis, unfavourable fractures, ophthalmic complications and instability or non-union of maxilla, etc. The results of our study showed a post-operative complications rate of 4 %. Neurosensory deficit and loss of tooth sensibility were the most common findings during patient evaluation at varying follow-up periods while one patient presented with signs and symptoms of maxillary sinusitis post-operatively. Neurosensory as well as sinusitis recovery took place in almost all the patients within 6 months. It was concluded that thorough understanding of pathophysiological aspects of various complications, careful assessment, treatment planning and the use of proper surgical technique as well as instrumentation may help in further reducing the complication rate.

  17. Evaluation of post-tensioning of a curved continuous girder using long-gauge fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Jaber, Hiba; Glisic, Branko

    2014-03-01

    Streicker Bridge is a pedestrian bridge on the Princeton University campus. It consists of a main span and four curved continuous girders (legs). The main span and the southeast leg of the bridge are equipped with fiber optic strain and temperature sensors, allowing the bridge to also function as an on-campus laboratory for the Structural Health Monitoring research group. Parallel sensors were embedded at critical cross-sections in the deck prior to the pouring of concrete. The deck of the southeast leg experienced early age cracking within a few days of concrete pouring, which was detected by the strain sensors. Post-tensioning was then performed and it is assumed that it closed off the cracks. Evaluation of post-tensioning forces is complex due to the existence of the cracks, and this paper researches a procedure to estimate the post-tensioning forces at cracked and uncracked locations. The obtained post-tensioning forces were compared to design forces and conclusions regarding the status of post-tensioning were made. This is important as it gives information on the actual health condition and performance of the structure. It also provides information on the safety of the structure. The objective of this paper is to present a methodology for the evaluation of the post-tensioning force along the deck based on strain measurements. The monitoring system, results, data analysis method, and conclusions regarding the bridge health condition and performance are presented in this paper.

  18. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children.

  19. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children. PMID:26069219

  20. Evaluating the Ozioma cancer news service: A community randomized trial in 24 U.S. cities

    PubMed Central

    Caburnay, Charlene A.; Luke, Douglas A.; Cameron, Glen T.; Cohen, Elisia L.; Fu, Qiang; Lai, Choi L.; Stemmle, Jonathan; Paulen, Melissa; McDaniels-Jackson, Lillie; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This community randomized trial evaluated effects of the Ozioma News Service on the amount and quality of cancer coverage in Black weekly newspapers in 24 U.S. cities. Method We created and operated Ozioma, the first cancer information news service specifically for Black newspapers. Over 21 months, Ozioma developed community- and race-specific cancer news releases for each of 12 Black weekly newspapers in intervention communities. Cancer coverage in these papers was tracked before and during the intervention and compared to 12 Black newspapers in control communities. Results From 2004-2007, we coded 9,257 health and cancer stories from 3,178 newspaper issues. Intervention newspapers published approximately 4 times the expected number of cancer stories compared to control newspapers (p12&21mo<.01), and also saw an increase in graphics (p12&21mo<.01), local relevance (p12mo=.01), and personal mobilization (p12mo<.10). However, this increased coverage supplanted other health topics and had smaller graphics (NS), had less community mobilization (p21mo=.01), and less likely to be from a local source (NS). Conclusion Providing news releases with localized and race-specific features to minority-serving media outlets can increase the quantity of cancer coverage. Results are mixed for the journalistic and public health quality of this increased cancer coverage in Black newspapers. PMID:22546317

  1. Quantitative tumor segmentation for evaluation of extent of glioblastoma resection to facilitate multisite clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cordova, James S; Schreibmann, Eduard; Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Guo, Ying; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Shim, Hyunsuk; Holder, Chad A

    2014-02-01

    Standard-of-care therapy for glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive primary adult brain neoplasm, is maximal safe resection, followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Because maximizing resection may be beneficial for these patients, improving tumor extent of resection (EOR) with methods such as intraoperative 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) is currently under evaluation. However, it is difficult to reproducibly judge EOR in these studies due to the lack of reliable tumor segmentation methods, especially for postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Therefore, a reliable, easily distributable segmentation method is needed to permit valid comparison, especially across multiple sites. We report a segmentation method that combines versatile region-of-interest blob generation with automated clustering methods. We applied this to glioblastoma cases undergoing FGS and matched controls to illustrate the method's reliability and accuracy. Agreement and interrater variability between segmentations were assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient, and spatial accuracy was determined using the Dice similarity index and mean Euclidean distance. Fuzzy C-means clustering with three classes was the best performing method, generating volumes with high agreement with manual contouring and high interrater agreement preoperatively and postoperatively. The proposed segmentation method allows tumor volume measurements of contrast-enhanced T 1-weighted images in the unbiased, reproducible fashion necessary for quantifying EOR in multicenter trials. PMID:24772206

  2. Factors influencing hand washing behaviour in primary schools: process evaluation within a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chittleborough, Catherine R; Nicholson, Alexandra L; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-12-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57). Pupils and staff in intervention and control schools demonstrated a similar level of understanding of how, when and why they should wash their hands. Lack of time, poor adult modelling of regular hand washing and unattractive facilities were seen as important barriers to regular hand washing. Reminders and explanations for the importance of hand hygiene were thought to have a positive impact. Influencing individual choices about hand washing through education and information may be necessary, but not sufficient, for initiating and maintaining good hand washing practices. Structural factors, including having time to wash hands using accessible, clean facilities, and being encouraged through the existence of hand washing opportunities in the daily routine and hand washing being viewed as the social norm, will also influence hand washing behaviour. The effectiveness of educational interventions at improving hand hygiene in primary schools may be improved by changing priorities of staff and increasing accessibility to quality facilities.

  3. Evaluation of herbal cannabis characteristics by medical users: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Mark A; Ducruet, Thierry; Robinson, Ann R

    2006-01-01

    Background Cannabis, in herbal form, is widely used as self-medication by patients with diseases such as HIV/AIDS and multiple sclerosis suffering from symptoms including pain, muscle spasticity, stress and insomnia. Valid clinical studies of herbal cannabis require a product which is acceptable to patients in order to maximize adherence to study protocols. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled crossover trial of 4 different herbal cannabis preparations among 8 experienced and authorized cannabis users with chronic pain. Preparations were varied with respect to grind size, THC content and humidity. Subjects received each preparation on a separate day and prepared the drug in their usual way in a dedicated and licensed clinical facility. They were asked to evaluate the products based on appearance (smell, colour, humidity, grind size, ease of preparation and overall appearance) and smoking characteristics (burn rate, hotness, harshness and taste). Five-point Likert scores were assigned to each characteristic. Scores were compared between preparations using ANOVA. Results Seven subjects completed the study, and the product with highest THC content (12%), highest humidity (14%) and largest grind size (10 mm) was rated highest overall. Significant differences were noted between preparations on overall appearance and colour (p = 0.003). Discussion While the small size of the study precludes broad conclusions, the study shows that medical cannabis users can appreciate differences in herbal product. A more acceptable cannabis product may increase recruitment and retention in clinical studies of medical cannabis. PMID:17101054

  4. Quantitative Tumor Segmentation for Evaluation of Extent of Glioblastoma Resection to Facilitate Multisite Clinical Trials12

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, James S; Schreibmann, Eduard; Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Guo, Ying; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Shim, Hyunsuk; Holder, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    Standard-of-care therapy for glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive primary adult brain neoplasm, is maximal safe resection, followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Because maximizing resection may be beneficial for these patients, improving tumor extent of resection (EOR) with methods such as intraoperative 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) is currently under evaluation. However, it is difficult to reproducibly judge EOR in these studies due to the lack of reliable tumor segmentation methods, especially for postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Therefore, a reliable, easily distributable segmentation method is needed to permit valid comparison, especially across multiple sites. We report a segmentation method that combines versatile region-of-interest blob generation with automated clustering methods. We applied this to glioblastoma cases undergoing FGS and matched controls to illustrate the method's reliability and accuracy. Agreement and interrater variability between segmentations were assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient, and spatial accuracy was determined using the Dice similarity index and mean Euclidean distance. Fuzzy C-means clustering with three classes was the best performing method, generating volumes with high agreement with manual contouring and high interrater agreement preoperatively and postoperatively. The proposed segmentation method allows tumor volume measurements of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in the unbiased, reproducible fashion necessary for quantifying EOR in multicenter trials. PMID:24772206

  5. One-year evaluation of a simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Joyce Figueira de; Barros, Thais Andrade de Figueiredo; Braga, Esther Marina França; Loretto, Sandro Cordeiro; Silva e Souza, Patrícia de Almeida Rodrigues; Silva e Souza, Mário Honorato Júnior

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical performance of adhesive restorations using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (TSER), a one-step self-etching adhesive (OSSE), and a simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique (EWBT) prior to the application of a composite resin in non-carious cervical lesions. Ninety-three restorations (31 for each group) were placed in 17 patients by a single operator. No cavity preparation was performed. After 6 and 12 months, the restorations were assessed by two previously trained examiners using modified Ryge criteria for retention (kappa=1.00) and marginal adaptation/staining (kappa=0.81), and the results were analyzed by Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests, respectively. No significant differences were observed among groups at the 6- and 12-month time points for any of the assessed criteria (p≥0.05). The intra-group analysis performed by Cochran's test (for retention) and Wilcoxon test (for marginal adaptation/staining) revealed significant differences between the baseline/12-month time intervals in marginal adaptation in OSSE (p=0.0180) and in marginal staining in TSER (p=0.0117). The survival analysis for retention criteria performed using a log-rank test did not show significant differences (p>0.05). The restorations placed using the simplified EWBT performed equally well as the other adhesive strategies employed. PMID:23969918

  6. Factors influencing hand washing behaviour in primary schools: process evaluation within a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chittleborough, Catherine R; Nicholson, Alexandra L; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-12-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57). Pupils and staff in intervention and control schools demonstrated a similar level of understanding of how, when and why they should wash their hands. Lack of time, poor adult modelling of regular hand washing and unattractive facilities were seen as important barriers to regular hand washing. Reminders and explanations for the importance of hand hygiene were thought to have a positive impact. Influencing individual choices about hand washing through education and information may be necessary, but not sufficient, for initiating and maintaining good hand washing practices. Structural factors, including having time to wash hands using accessible, clean facilities, and being encouraged through the existence of hand washing opportunities in the daily routine and hand washing being viewed as the social norm, will also influence hand washing behaviour. The effectiveness of educational interventions at improving hand hygiene in primary schools may be improved by changing priorities of staff and increasing accessibility to quality facilities. PMID:22623617

  7. Evaluation of the Department for Education School Exclusion Trial. Research Briefing No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Lynne; Hallam, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The Department for Education is running a three-year school exclusion trial, which started in autumn 2011 and continues until July 2014. The trial sees schools taking on responsibility for placing permanently excluded pupils in alternative provision and funding the placements from money devolved from.

  8. Design considerations for a pilot trial using a novel approach for evaluating smoking-cessation medication in methadone-maintained smokers.

    PubMed

    Winhusen, Theresa; Theobald, Jeffrey; Lewis, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of smoking in methadone-maintained (MM) patients is over 80% and smoking-abstinence rates are strikingly low, even with the use of first-line smoking-cessation medications. Research has found that cigarettes increase the reinforcing properties of methadone; this interaction may be an additional, daily, challenge to smoking cessation in MM-smokers. This paper describes a novel approach in which patients who experience a particular barrier to achieving smoking abstinence are selected, and the impact of smoking-cessation medications on the identified barrier is evaluated. This is a 7-week, outpatient, randomized, within-subject, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with a follow-up visit at week 8. MM-smokers, who smoke ≥40% of their total daily cigarettes in the 4-h post-methadone-dosing period, as assessed with a Quitbit electronic cigarette lighter, will be recruited from a methadone program in Cincinnati, Ohio. Eligible participants will be randomized to receive four interventions (nicotine nasal spray (1mg per dose, up to 40 times per day), placebo nicotine nasal spray, varenicline (2mg/day), and varenicline placebo) in one of four orders to mitigate potential order effects. The primary outcome analysis will consist of two sets of statistical analyses, one comparing the effect of nicotine nasal spray to its placebo, and one comparing the effect of varenicline to its placebo, on the proportion of daily cigarettes smoked during the 4-h post-methadone-dosing period. This trial is of interest both as an efficient, precision-medicine-based approach to testing smoking-cessation interventions and as a specific strategy for identifying effective smoking-cessation treatment for MM-smokers. PMID:26944021

  9. Pre- and post-operative cardiac evaluation of dogs undergoing lobectomy and pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kocatürk, Meriç; Salci, Hakan; Bayram, A. Sami; Koch, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of lobectomy and pneumonectomy on cardiac rhythm and on the dimensions and function of the right-side of the heart. Twelve dogs undergoing lobectomy and eight dogs undergoing pneumonectomy were evaluated preoperatively and one month postoperatively with electrocardiography and Doppler echocardiography at rest. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was estimated by the tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) via the pulse wave Doppler velocity method. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (SIRS) were also evaluated based on the clinical and hematological findings in response to lobectomy and pneumonectomy. Following lobectomy and pneumonectomy, we predominantly detected atrial fibrillation and varying degrees of atrioventricular block (AVB). Dogs that died within seven days of the lobectomy (n = 2) or pneumonectomy (n = 1) had complete AVB. Preoperative right atrial, right ventricular, and pulmonary artery dimensions increased gradually during the 30 days (p<0.05) following pneumonectomy, but did not undergo significant changes during that same period after lobectomy. Mean PASP was 56.0 ± 4.5 mmHg in dogs having significant TRJ after pneumonectomy. Pneumonectomy, but not lobectomy, could lead to increases (p<0.01) in the SIRS score within the first day post-surgery. In brief, it is important to conduct pre- and postoperative cardiac evaluation of dogs undergoing lung resections because cardiac problems are a common postoperative complication after such surgeries. In particular, complete AVB should be considered a life-threatening complication after pneumonectomy and lobectomy. In addition, pneumonectomy appears to increase the likelihood of pulmonary hypertension development in dogs. PMID:20706034

  10. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary; Shackley, Phil; Steen, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group) or upper limb therapy alone (control group). Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale); grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test); disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index); quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D) and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment successes between

  11. Reversal of apomorphine locomotor sensitization by a single post-conditioning trial treatment with a low autoreceptor dose of apomorphine: a memory re-consolidation approach.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro; Carey, Robert J; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; de Matos, Liana Wermelinger

    2011-07-01

    Sensitization is a common feature of psychostimulants and sensitization effects are generally considered to be linked to the addictive properties of these drugs. We used a conventional paired/unpaired Pavlovian protocol to induce a context specific sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of a high dose of apomorphine (2.0mg/kg). Two days following a 5 session sensitization induction phase, a brief 5min non-drug test for conditioning was conducted. Only the paired groups exhibited locomotor stimulant conditioned response effects. Immediately following this brief test for conditioning, the paired and the unpaired groups received injections of 0.05mg/kg apomorphine, 2.0mg/kg apomorphine or vehicle designed to differentially impact memory re-consolidation of the conditioning. Two days later, all groups received a sensitization challenge test with 2.0mg/kg apomorphine. The 2.0mg/kg apomorphine post-trial treatment potentiated sensitization while the 0.05mg/kg eliminated sensitization. These effects were only observed in the paired groups. The activation of dopaminergic systems by the high dose of apomorphine strengthened the drug/environment association whereas the inhibition of dopamine activity by the low auto-receptor dose eliminated this association. The results point to the importance of conditioning to context specific sensitization and targeting memory re-consolidation of conditioning as a paradigm to modify sensitization.

  12. Effect of smoking reduction and cessation on the plasma levels of the oxidative stress biomarker glutathione--Post-hoc analysis of data from a smoking cessation trial.

    PubMed

    Mons, Ute; Muscat, Joshua E; Modesto, Jennifer; Richie, John P; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-02-01

    Cigarette smoke contains high concentrations of free radical components that induce oxidative stress. Smoking-induced oxidative stress is thought to contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease and lung cancer through degenerative processes in the lung and other tissues. It is uncertain however whether smoking cessation lowers the burden of oxidative stress. We used data from a randomized controlled cessation trial of 434 current smokers for a post-hoc examination of the effects of smoking cessation on blood plasma levels of total glutathione (tGSH), the most abundant endogenous antioxidant in cells, and total cysteine (tCys), an amino acid and constituent of glutathione. Smoking status was validated based on serum cotinine levels. Multivariate linear mixed models were fitted to examine the association of smoking cessation and change in cigarette consumption with tGSH and tCys. After 12 months follow-up, quitters (n=55) had significantly increased levels of tGSH compared to subjects who continued to smoke (P<0.01). No significant change in tGSH was found for subjects who continued to smoke but reduced their intensity of smoking. No significant effect of smoking cessation or reduction was observed on levels of tCys. These results suggest that smoking cessation but not smoking reduction reduces levels of oxidative stress. PMID:26708755

  13. Enhanced early sensory outcome after nerve repair as a result of immediate post-operative re-learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosén, B; Vikström, P; Turner, S; McGrouther, D A; Selles, R W; Schreuders, T A R; Björkman, A

    2015-07-01

    We assessed the use of guided plasticity training to improve the outcome in the first 6 months after nerve repair. In a multicentre randomized controlled trial, 37 adults with median or ulnar nerve repair at the distal forearm were randomized to intervention, starting the first week after surgery with sensory and motor re-learning using mirror visual feedback and observation of touch, or to a control group with re-learning starting when reinnervation could be detected. The primary outcome at 3 and 6 months post-operatively was discriminative touch (shape texture identification test, part of the Rosen score). At 6 months, discriminative touch was significantly better in the early intervention group. Improvement of discriminative touch between 3 and 6 months was also significantly greater in that group. There were no significant differences in motor function, pain or in the total score. We conclude that early re-learning using guided plasticity may have a potential to improve the outcomes after nerve repair. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE II. PMID:25294735

  14. A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in terrorist-affected people in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Ekasawin, Suparat; Chakrabhand, Somchai; Suwanmitri, Soawaluk; Duangchun, Orawan; Chantaluckwong, Thananet

    2011-10-01

    Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is no evidence of its success with PTSD patients still under direct threat of terrorist attacks. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of CBT for PTSD terrorist-affected people. Twenty-eight survivors of terrorist attacks in southern Thailand were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT or treatment as usual (TAU). CBT was modified to accommodate the realistic threats facing patients. There were independent assessments conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months following treatment. Main outcome measures included symptoms of PTSD (PTSD Symptom Scale Interview), depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and complicated grief (Inventory of Complicated Grief). CBT resulted in significantly greater reduction in symptoms, including PTSD, depression, and complicated grief, at follow-up than TAU. Relative to TAU, CBT had stronger effect sizes at follow-up for PTSD, depression, and complicated grief. More patients in the CBT condition (75%) achieved high end-state functioning than participants in the TAU (33%). This preliminary evidence suggests that PTSD, depression, and complicated grief can be effectively treated despite ongoing threats of terrorism. Further, it demonstrates that non-specialist mental health workers in a non-western setting can be efficiently trained in using CBT, and this training can translate into successful treatment gains in trauma-affected individuals.

  15. International Pig-a gene mutation assay trial: evaluation of transferability across 14 laboratories.

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Phonethepswath, Souk; Weller, Pamela; Nicolette, John; Murray, Joel; Sonders, Paul; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Shi, Jing; Krsmanovic, Ljubica; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura; Henwood, Andrew; Sweder, Kevin; Stankowski, Leon F; Roberts, Daniel J; Giddings, Amanda; Kenny, Julia; Lynch, Anthony M; Defrain, Céline; Nesslany, Fabrice; van der Leede, Bas-jan M; Van Doninck, Terry; Schuermans, Ann; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hiwata, Yoshie; Tajima, Osamu; Wilde, Eleanor; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Gunther, William C; Thiffeault, Catherine J; Shutsky, Thomas J; Fiedler, Ronald D; Kimoto, Takafumi; Bhalli, Javed A; Heflich, Robert H; MacGregor, James T

    2011-12-01

    A collaborative international trial was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility and transferability of an in vivo mutation assay based on the enumeration of CD59-negative rat erythrocytes, a phenotype that is indicative of Pig-a gene mutation. Fourteen laboratories participated in this study, where anti-CD59-PE, SYTO 13 dye, and flow cytometry were used to determine the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-)) and CD59-negative reticulocytes (RET(CD59-)). To provide samples with a range of mutant phenotype cell frequencies, male rats were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) via oral gavage for three consecutive days (Days 1-3). Each laboratory studied 0, 20, and 40 mg ENU/kg/day (n = 5 per group). Three sites also evaluated 4 mg/kg/day. At a minimum, blood samples were collected three times: predosing and on Days 15 and 30. Blood samples were processed according to a standardized sample processing and data acquisition protocol, and three endpoints were measured: %reticulocytes, frequency of RET(CD59-) , and frequency of RBC(CD59-) . The methodology was found to be reproducible, as the analysis of technical replicates resulted in experimental coefficients of variation that approached theoretical values. Good transferability was evident from the similar kinetics and magnitude of the dose-related responses that were observed among different laboratories. Concordance correlation coefficients showed a high level of agreement between the reference site and the test sites (range: 0.87-0.99). Collectively, these data demonstrate that with adequate training of personnel, flow cytometric analysis is capable of reliably enumerating mutant phenotype erythrocytes, thereby providing a robust in vivo mutation assay that is readily transferable across laboratories.

  16. A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating rh-FGF-2/β-TCP in Periodontal Defects.

    PubMed

    Cochran, D L; Oh, T-J; Mills, M P; Clem, D S; McClain, P K; Schallhorn, R A; McGuire, M K; Scheyer, E T; Giannobile, W V; Reddy, M S; Abou-Arraj, R V; Vassilopoulos, P J; Genco, R J; Geurs, N C; Takemura, A

    2016-05-01

    Biological mediators have been used to enhance periodontal regeneration. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 3 doses of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) when combined with a β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold carrier placed in vertical infrabony periodontal defects in adult patients. In this double-blinded, dose-verification, externally monitored clinical study, 88 patients who required surgical intervention to treat a qualifying infrabony periodontal defect were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups-β-TCP alone (control) and 0.1% recombinant human FGF-2 (rh-FGF-2), 0.3% rh-FGF-2, and 0.4% rh-FGF-2 with β-TCP-following scaling and root planing of the tooth prior to a surgical appointment. Flap surgery was performed with EDTA conditioning of the root prior to device implantation. There were no statistically significant differences in patient demographics and baseline characteristics among the 4 treatment groups. When a composite outcome of gain in clinical attachment of 1.5 mm was used with a linear bone growth of 2.5 mm, a dose response pattern detected a plateau in the 0.3% and 0.4% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups with significant improvements over control and 0.1% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups. The success rate at 6 mo was 71% in the 2 higher-concentration groups, as compared with 45% in the control and lowest treatment groups. Percentage bone fill in the 2 higher-concentration groups was 75% and 71%, compared with 63% and 61% in the control and lowest treatment group. No increases in specific antibody to rh-FGF-2 were detected, and no serious adverse events related to the products were reported. The results from this multicenter trial demonstrated that the treatment of infrabony vertical periodontal defects can be enhanced with the addition of rh-FGF-2/β-TCP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01728844). PMID:26908630

  17. A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating rh-FGF-2/β-TCP in Periodontal Defects.

    PubMed

    Cochran, D L; Oh, T-J; Mills, M P; Clem, D S; McClain, P K; Schallhorn, R A; McGuire, M K; Scheyer, E T; Giannobile, W V; Reddy, M S; Abou-Arraj, R V; Vassilopoulos, P J; Genco, R J; Geurs, N C; Takemura, A

    2016-05-01

    Biological mediators have been used to enhance periodontal regeneration. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 3 doses of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) when combined with a β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold carrier placed in vertical infrabony periodontal defects in adult patients. In this double-blinded, dose-verification, externally monitored clinical study, 88 patients who required surgical intervention to treat a qualifying infrabony periodontal defect were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups-β-TCP alone (control) and 0.1% recombinant human FGF-2 (rh-FGF-2), 0.3% rh-FGF-2, and 0.4% rh-FGF-2 with β-TCP-following scaling and root planing of the tooth prior to a surgical appointment. Flap surgery was performed with EDTA conditioning of the root prior to device implantation. There were no statistically significant differences in patient demographics and baseline characteristics among the 4 treatment groups. When a composite outcome of gain in clinical attachment of 1.5 mm was used with a linear bone growth of 2.5 mm, a dose response pattern detected a plateau in the 0.3% and 0.4% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups with significant improvements over control and 0.1% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups. The success rate at 6 mo was 71% in the 2 higher-concentration groups, as compared with 45% in the control and lowest treatment groups. Percentage bone fill in the 2 higher-concentration groups was 75% and 71%, compared with 63% and 61% in the control and lowest treatment group. No increases in specific antibody to rh-FGF-2 were detected, and no serious adverse events related to the products were reported. The results from this multicenter trial demonstrated that the treatment of infrabony vertical periodontal defects can be enhanced with the addition of rh-FGF-2/β-TCP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01728844).

  18. A randomised trial to evaluate the Effects of low dose Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction (EAGeR): Design and baseline characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schisterman, Enrique F.; Silver, Robert M.; Perkins, Neil J.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Stanford, Joseph B.; Lesher, Laurie L.; Faraggi, David; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Browne, Richard W.; Townsend, Janet M.; White, Mark; Lynch, Anne M.; Galai, Noya

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin (LDA) has been proposed to improve pregnancy outcomes in couples experiencing recurrent pregnancy loss. However, results from studies of LDA on pregnancy outcomes have been inconsistent, perhaps because most studies evaluated LDA-initiated post-conception. The purpose of the Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction (EAGeR) trial was to determine whether preconception-initiated LDA improves live-birth rates in women with 1–2 prior losses. Methods We performed a multicenter, block randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Study participants were recruited using community-based advertisements and physician referral to four university medical centers in the US (2006–12). Eligible women were aged 18–40 years actively trying to conceive with 1–2 prior losses. Participants were randomised to receive daily LDA (81 mg/day) or a matching placebo, and all were provided with daily 400 mcg folic acid. Follow-up continued for ≤six menstrual cycles while attempting to conceive. For those that conceived, treatment was continued until 36 weeks gestation. The primary outcome was the cumulative live birth rate over the trial period. Results 1228 women were randomised (615 LDA, 613 placebo). Participants had a mean age of 28.7, were mostly white (95%), well educated (86% >high school education), and employed (75%) with a household income >$100,000 annually (40%). Characteristics of those in the treatment and placebo arms were well-balanced. Conclusions We describe the study design, recruitment, data collection, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in EAGeR, which aimed to determine the effect of LDA on live birth and other pregnancy outcomes in these women. PMID:24118062

  19. Change of SUVmax Slope in Dynamic Triphasic FDG-PET/CT Distinguishes Malignancy from Post-Radiation Inflammation in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma - a Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carryn M; Chang, Tangel; Graham, Michael; Marquardt, Michael D; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J; Menda, Yusuf; Sun, Wenqing; Pagedar, Nitin A; Buatti, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The positive predictive value (PPV) of post-radiation (RT) 3-month FDG-PET/CT imaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is limited. Dynamic data acquisition and analysis was evaluated for PPV improvement, utilizing a triphasic PET/CT technique. Methods and Materials We prospectively enrolled HNSCC patients who completed RT, with scheduled 3-month post-RT FDG-PET/CT. Patients underwent our standard whole-body PET/CT scan at 90 minutes, with the addition of head and neck PET/CTs at 60 and 120 minutes. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of regions of interest (ROI) were measured at 60, 90, and 120 minutes. SUVmax slope between 60 and 120 minutes, and change of SUVmax slope before and after 90 minutes were calculated. Data were analyzed by primary site and nodal site disease status using the Cox regression model and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test. Outcomes were based on pathologic and clinical follow-up. Results 84 patients enrolled, with 79 primary and 43 nodal evaluable sites. Twenty-eight sites were interpreted positive or equivocal (18 primary, 8 nodal, 2 distant) on 3-month 90-minute FDG-PET/CT. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. All measured SUV endpoints predicted recurrence. Change of SUVmax slope after 90 minutes more accurately identified non-recurrence in positive or equivocal sites than our current standard of SUVmax ≥ 2.5 (p=0.02). Conclusions The PPV of post-RT FDG-PET/CT may significantly improve using novel second derivative analysis of dynamic triphasic FDG-PET/CT SUVmax slope, accurately distinguishing tumor from inflammation on positive and equivocal scans. PMID:25680593

  20. Design and Organization of the Dexamethasone, Light Anesthesia and Tight Glucose Control (DeLiT) Trial: a factorial trial evaluating the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The perioperative period is characterized by an intense inflammatory response. Perioperative inflammation promotes postoperative morbidity and increases mortality. Blunting the inflammatory response to surgical trauma might thus improve perioperative outcomes. We are studying three interventions that potentially modulate perioperative inflammation: corticosteroids, tight glucose control, and light anesthesia. Methods/Design The DeLiT Trial is a factorial randomized single-center trial of dexamethasone vs placebo, intraoperative tight vs. conventional glucose control, and light vs deep anesthesia in patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Anesthetic depth will be estimated with Bispectral Index (BIS) monitoring (Aspect medical, Newton, MA). The primary outcome is a composite of major postoperative morbidity including myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis, and 30-day mortality. C-reactive protein, a measure of the inflammatory response, will be evaluated as a secondary outcome. One-year all-cause mortality as well as post-operative delirium will be additional secondary outcomes. We will enroll up to 970 patients which will provide 90% power to detect a 40% reduction in the primary outcome, including interim analyses for efficacy and futility at 25%, 50% and 75% enrollment. Discussion The DeLiT trial started in February 2007. We expect to reach our second interim analysis point in 2010. This large randomized controlled trial will provide a reliable assessment of the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery. The factorial design will enable us to simultaneously study the effects of the three interventions in the same population, both individually and in different combinations. Such a design is an economically efficient way to study the three interventions in one clinical trial vs three. Trial registration This trial is registered at Clinicaltrials

  1. Evaluation of the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PreCaP) for the hospitalized elderly: a prospective nonrandomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Asmus-Szepesi, Kirsten J; Flinterman, Linda E; Koopmanschap, Marc A; Nieboer, Anna P; Bakker, Ton J; Mackenbach, Johan P; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-01-01

    Background The hospitalized elderly are at risk of functional decline. We evaluated the effects and care costs of a specialized geriatric rehabilitation program aimed at preventing functional decline among at-risk hospitalized elderly. Methods The prospective nonrandomized controlled trial reported here was performed in three hospitals in the Netherlands. One hospital implemented the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PReCaP), while two other hospitals providing usual care served as control settings. Within the PReCaP hospital we compared patients pre-implementation with patients post-implementation of the PReCaP (“within-hospital analysis”), while our nonrandomized controlled trial compared patients of the PReCaP hospital post-implementation with patients from the two control hospitals providing usual care (“between-hospital analysis”). Hospitalized patients 65 years or older and at risk of functional decline were interviewed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months using validated questionnaires to score functioning, depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We estimated costs per unit of care from hospital information systems and national data sources. We used adjusted general linear mixed models to analyze functioning and HRQoL. Results Between-hospital analysis showed no difference in activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) between PReCaP patients and control groups. PReCaP patients did have slightly better cognitive functioning (Mini Mental State Examination; 0.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2–0.6]), lower depression (Geriatric Depression Scale 15; −0.9 [95% −1.1 to −0.6]) and higher perceived health (Short-Form 20; 5.6 [95% CI 2.8–8.4]) than control patients. Analyses within the PReCaP hospital comparing patients pre-and post-implementation of the PReCaP showed no improvement over time in functioning, depression, and HRQoL. One-year health care costs were higher for PRe

  2. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  3. Preliminary evaluation of PTSD Coach, a smartphone app for post-traumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Eric; Greene, Carolyn; Hoffman, Julia; Nguyen, Tam; Wald, Laura; Schmidt, Janet; Ramsey, Kelly M; Ruzek, Josef

    2014-01-01

    PTSD Coach is a mobile application (app) designed to help individuals who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms better understand and self-manage their symptoms. It has wide-scale use (over 130,000 downloads in 78 countries) and very favorable reviews but has yet to be evaluated. Therefore, this study examines user satisfaction, perceived helpfulness, and usage patterns of PTSD Coach in a sample of 45 veterans receiving PTSD treatment. After using PTSD Coach for several days, participants completed a survey of satisfaction and perceived helpfulness and focus groups exploring app use and benefit from use. Data indicate that participants were very satisfied with PTSD Coach and perceived it as being moderately to very helpful with their PTSD symptoms. Analysis of focus group data resulted in several categories of app use: to manage acute distress and PTSD symptoms, at scheduled times, and to help with sleep. These findings offer preliminary support for the acceptability and perceived helpfulness of PTSD Coach and suggest that it has potential to be an effective self-management tool for PTSD. Although promising, future research is required to validate this, given study limitations.

  4. Evaluation of cation-exchanged zeolite adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, TH; Hudson, MR; Mason, JA; Queen, WL; Dutton, JJ; Sumida, K; Micklash, KJ; Kaye, SS; Brown, CM; Long, JR

    2013-01-01

    A series of zeolite adsorbents has been evaluated for potential application in post-combustion CO2 capture using a new high-throughput gas adsorption instrument capable of measuring 28 samples in parallel. Among the zeolites tested, Ca-A exhibits the highest CO2 uptake (3.72 mmol g(-1) and 5.63 mmol cm(-3)) together with an excellent CO2 selectivity over N-2 under conditions relevant to capture from the dry flue gas stream of a coal-fired power plant. The large initial isosteric heat of adsorption of -58 kJ mol(-1) indicates the presence of strong interactions between CO2 and the Ca-A framework. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction studies reveal the precise location of the adsorption sites for CO2 in Ca-A and Mg-A. A detailed study of CO2 adsorption kinetics further shows that the performance of Ca-A is not limited by slow CO2 diffusion within the pores. Significantly, Ca-A exhibited a higher volumetric CO2 uptake and CO2/N-2 selectivity than Mg-2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate; Mg-MOF-74, CPO-27-Mg), one of the best performing adsorbents. The exceptional performance of Ca-A was maintained in CO2 breakthrough simulations.

  5. Evaluating the family nurse partnership in England: the Building Blocks trial.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Julia; Owen-Jones, Eleri; Robling, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) Programme is a structured intensive home visiting programme delivered by trained family nurses to nulliparous teenagers throughout pregnancy and until their child is two years old. Currently FNP is provided in over 60 primary healthcare sites in England with a planned capacity increase to 13,000 concurrent clients by 2015. Researchers from the South East Wales Trials Unit at Cardiff University are testing the effectiveness of FNP in England in the Building Blocks study--a randomised controlled trial funded by the Department of Health (DH). The trial team includes collaborators from the Universities of York, Bristol and Glamorgan. PMID:21853694

  6. Enrollment in YFV Vaccine Trial: An Evaluation of Recruitment Outcomes Associated with a Randomized Controlled Double-Blind Trial of a Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M; Shapiro, Eve T; Lu, Lu; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Keyserling, Harry L; Mulligan, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    This investigation evaluated several factors associated with diverse participant enrollment of a clinical trial assessing safety, immunogenicity, and comparative viremia associated with administration of 17-D live, attenuated yellow fever vaccine given alone or in combination with human immune globulin. We obtained baseline participant information (e.g., sociodemographic, medical) and followed recruitment outcomes from 2005 to 2007. Of 355 potential Yellow Fever vaccine study participants, 231 cases were analyzed. Strong interest in study participation was observed among racial and ethnically diverse persons with 36.34% eligible following initial study screening, resulting in 18.75% enrollment. The percentage of white participants increased from 63.66% (prescreened sample) to 81.25% (enrollment group). The regression model was significant with white race as a predictor of enrollment (OR=2.744, 95% CI=1.415-5.320, p=0.003).In addition, persons were more likely to enroll via direct outreach and referral mechanisms compared to mass advertising (OR=2.433, 95% CI=1.102-5.369). The findings indicate that racially diverse populations can be recruited to vaccine clinical trials, yet actual enrollment may not reflect that diversity. PMID:25221781

  7. 77 FR 59223 - Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 216/222 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior... and Environmental Enforcement and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico Region...

  8. [Guidance of FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy and enlightenment to drug risk management of post-marketing Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) aims to drugs or biological products known or potential serious risk management. Analysis with the example of the content of the Onsolis REMS named FOCOS. Our country can be reference for the analysis of relevant experience and establish a scientific evaluation mechanism, strengthen the drug risk consciousness, promote the rational drug use, organic combined with the before-marketing and post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine, and promote the evaluation of risk management of the drug development and improvement.

  9. Prevention of depression and anxiety in later life: design of a randomized controlled trial for the clinical and economic evaluation of a life-review intervention

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Jojanneke; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Smit, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Background Depressive and anxiety symptoms in older adults could develop into significant health problems with detrimental effects on quality of life and a possibly poor prognosis. Therefore, there is a need for preventive interventions which are at once effective, acceptable and economic affordable. Methods and design This paper describes the design of a study evaluating "The stories we live by", a preventive life-review group intervention, which was recently developed for adults of 55 years and over with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both clinical and economic effectiveness will be evaluated in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The participants in the intervention condition will receive the 8-session preventive intervention. The participants in the control condition will have access to usual care. Clinical end-terms are depressive and anxiety symptoms, current major depressive episode, quality of life and positive mental health post-treatment (3 months after baseline) and at follow-ups (6 and 12 months after baseline). Additional goals of this study are to identify groups for whom the intervention is particularly effective and to identify the therapeutic pathways that are vital in inducing clinical change. This will be done by analyzing if treatment response is moderated by demographics, personality, past major depressive episodes, important life events and chronically disease, and mediated by reminiscence functions, perceived control, automatic positive thoughts and meaning in life. Finally the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to care as usual will be assessed by computing incremental costs per case of depression and anxiety avoided (cost-effectiveness) and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) (cost utility). Discussion It is expected that both the life-review intervention and its evaluation will contribute to the existing body of knowledge in several ways. First, the intervention is unique in linking life-review with narrative therapy

  10. A Phase I, Open-Label Trial, Evaluating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Candidate Tuberculosis Vaccines AERAS-402 and MVA85A, Administered by Prime-Boost Regime in BCG-Vaccinated Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Satti, Iman; Hokey, David A.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Stockdale, Lisa; Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; Minhinnick, Alice; Wilkie, Morven; Vermaak, Samantha; Meyer, Joel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Pau, Maria Grazia; Versteege, Isabella; Douoguih, Macaya; Hendriks, Jenny; Sadoff, Jerald; Landry, Bernard; Moss, Paul; McShane, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background MVA85A and AERAS-402 are two clinically advanced viral vectored TB vaccine candidates expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens designed to boost BCG-induced immunity. Clinical trials with candidate malaria vaccines have demonstrated that adenoviral vector based priming immunisation, followed by MVA vector boost, induced high levels of immunity. We present the safety and immunogenicity results of the first clinical trial to evaluate this immunisation strategy in TB. Methods In this phase 1, open-label trial, 40 healthy previously BCG-vaccinated participants were enrolled into three treatment groups and vaccinated with 1 or 2 doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A; or 3 doses of AERAS-402. Results Most related adverse events (AEs) were mild and there were no vaccine related serious AEs. Boosting AERAS-402 with MVA85A significantly increased Ag85A-specific T-cell responses from day of vaccination. Two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A boost, resulted in a significantly higher AUC post-peak Ag85A response compared to three doses of AERAS-402 and historical data with MVA85A vaccination alone. The frequency of CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 was highest in the group receiving two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A. Conclusions Vaccination with AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A was safe and increased the durability of antigen specific T-cell responses and the frequency and polyfunctionality of CD8+ T-cells, which may be important in protection against TB. Further clinical trials with adenoviral prime-MVA85A boost regimens are merited to optimise vaccination intervals, dose and route of immunisation and to evaluate this strategy in the target population in TB high burden countries. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01683773. PMID:26529238

  11. Evaluation of a Musculoskeletal Model with Prosthetic Knee through Six Experimental Gait Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Mohammad; Stylianou, Antonis P.; Guess, Trent M.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the forces acting on musculoskeletal joint tissues during movement benefits tissue engineering, artificial joint replacement, and our understanding of ligament and cartilage injury. Computational models can be used to predict these internal forces, but musculoskeletal models that simultaneously calculate muscle force and the resulting loading on joint structures are rare. This study used publicly available gait, skeletal geometry, and instrumented prosthetic knee loading data [1] to evaluate muscle driven forward dynamics simulations of walking. Inputs to the simulation were measured kinematics and outputs included muscle, ground reaction, ligament, and joint contact forces. A full body musculoskeletal model with subject specific lower extremity geometries was developed in the multibody framework. A compliant contact was defined between the prosthetic femoral component and tibia insert geometries. Ligament structures were modeled with a nonlinear force-strain relationship. The model included 45 muscles on the right lower leg. During forward dynamics simulations a feedback control scheme calculated muscle forces using the error signal between the current muscle lengths and the lengths recorded during inverse kinematics simulations. Predicted tibiofemoral contact force, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces were compared to experimental measurements for six different gait trials using three different gait types (normal, trunk sway, and medial thrust). The mean average deviation (MAD) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) over one gait cycle are reported. The muscle driven forward dynamics simulations were computationally efficient and consistently reproduced the inverse kinematics motion. The forward simulations also predicted total knee contact forces (166 N < MAD < 404 N, 212 N < RMSD < 448 N) and vertical ground reaction forces (66 N < MAD < 90 N, 97 N < RMSD < 128 N) well within 28% and 16% of experimental loads respectively. However the

  12. Immunological evaluation of pediatric cancer patients receiving recombinant interleukin-2 in a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Truitt, R L; Piaskowski, V; Kirchner, P; McOlash, L; Camitta, B M; Casper, J T

    1992-05-01

    Immunological evaluations were performed on 14 pediatric cancer patients who received human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) as a bolus intravenous infusion every 8 h for 5 consecutive days in a phase I trial. Three-to-four patients were treated at dose levels of 10, 30, 60, and 100 x 10(3) Cetus U/kg. Six of the patients had stage D neuroblastoma; the remainder had other solid tumors or leukemias. Infusion of rIL-2 was associated with a rapid margination of IL-2-responsive cells followed by demargination and heightened proliferative and cytotoxic activity after therapy was completed. The predominant phenotypic change in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was an increase in CD2 expression by CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. Appearance of CD2+ CD56+ cells in the circulation correlated with increased lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activity as defined by the ability to kill NK-resistant Daudi tumor cells in vitro. Sustained LAK activity appeared to be dependent on the bioavailability of rIL-2 in vivo as well as in vitro. After rIL-2 therapy, PBMC that were highly responsive to rIL-2 (activated and "poised" LAK cells) persisted for at least 72 h. In the patients tested, increased lysis of autologous and/or allogeneic, histologically similar tumor cell lines was also observed after therapy. The immunoenhancing effects of rIL-2 occurred even at the lower doses used in this study. However, an objective tumor response was not observed in any of the patients.

  13. Evaluation of an intervention to improve blood culture practices: a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Pavese, P; Maillet, M; Vitrat-Hincky, V; Recule, C; Vittoz, J-P; Guyomard, A; Seigneurin, A; François, P

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention to improve blood culture practices. A cluster randomised trial in two parallel groups was performed at the Grenoble University Hospital, France. In October 2009, the results of a practices audit and the guidelines for the optimal use of blood cultures were disseminated to clinical departments. We compared two types of information dissemination: simple presentation or presentation associated with an infectious diseases (ID) specialist intervention. The principal endpoint was blood culture performance measured by the rate of patients having one positive blood culture and the rate of positive blood cultures. The cases of 130 patients in the "ID" group and 119 patients in the "simple presentation" group were audited during the second audit in April 2010. The rate of patients with one positive blood culture increased in both groups (13.62 % vs 9.89 % for the ID group, p = 0.002, 15.90 % vs 13.47 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.009). The rate of positive blood cultures improved in both groups (6.68 % vs 5.96 % for the ID group, p = 0.003, 6.52 % vs 6.21 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.017). The blood culture indication was significantly less often specified in the request form in the simple presentation group, while it remained stable in the ID group (p = 0.04). The rate of positive blood cultures and the rate of patients having one positive blood culture improved in both groups. The ID specialist intervention did not have more of an impact on practices than a simple presentation of audit feedback and guidelines.

  14. Evaluation of a musculoskeletal model with prosthetic knee through six experimental gait trials.

    PubMed

    Kia, Mohammad; Stylianou, Antonis P; Guess, Trent M

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of the forces acting on musculoskeletal joint tissues during movement benefits tissue engineering, artificial joint replacement, and our understanding of ligament and cartilage injury. Computational models can be used to predict these internal forces, but musculoskeletal models that simultaneously calculate muscle force and the resulting loading on joint structures are rare. This study used publicly available gait, skeletal geometry, and instrumented prosthetic knee loading data [1] to evaluate muscle driven forward dynamics simulations of walking. Inputs to the simulation were measured kinematics and outputs included muscle, ground reaction, ligament, and joint contact forces. A full body musculoskeletal model with subject specific lower extremity geometries was developed in the multibody framework. A compliant contact was defined between the prosthetic femoral component and tibia insert geometries. Ligament structures were modeled with a nonlinear force-strain relationship. The model included 45 muscles on the right lower leg. During forward dynamics simulations a feedback control scheme calculated muscle forces using the error signal between the current muscle lengths and the lengths recorded during inverse kinematics simulations. Predicted tibio-femoral contact force, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces were compared to experimental measurements for six different gait trials using three different gait types (normal, trunk sway, and medial thrust). The mean average deviation (MAD) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) over one gait cycle are reported. The muscle driven forward dynamics simulations were computationally efficient and consistently reproduced the inverse kinematics motion. The forward simulations also predicted total knee contact forces (166N

  15. The Method of the Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Processes Carried Out at Traffic Maintenance Subsystem Posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migawa, Klaudiusz

    2012-12-01

    In the systems of the exploitation of means of transport in order to assure correct carrying out of the assigned transport tasks, it is necessary to maintain the required number of vehicles in the state of task availability. It is obtained as a result of carrying out of service and repair processes at the traffic maintenance subsystem posts. From the point of view of the effectiveness of the operation of the systems of the exploitation of means of transport, the damaged technological objects should be serviced in the shortest possible time. In the case of the system of the exploitation of means of transport the task of the traffic maintenance subsystem is the servicing of the required number of damaged means of transport over the assigned time interval defined by the transport task timetable. One of the methods of the evaluation of the degree of carrying out of the processes at the traffic maintenance subsystem posts is defining the efficiency of the posts of the subsystem. This paper presents the method of defining the efficiency of traffic maintenance subsystem in the system of the exploitation of means of transport measured by the probability value of servicing of the required number of technological objects over the assigned time interval. The resulting characteristics were presented on a general basis as well as in the form of exponential distribution and Erlang distribution. Moreover, for the utilization data obtained in tests carried out in an actual means of transport system the values of the analyzed characteristics were defined. The evaluation of the efficiency of the traffic maintenance subsystem posts may serve as the basis of decision making as to the change of the number and type of the used service and repair posts in the tested system as well as modification of the carried out exploitation strategy. The suggested method may be used for individual post, a group of posts of a given type as well as for a subsystem of traffic maintenance analyzed as a

  16. PACE-UP (Pedometer and consultation evaluation - UP) – a pedometer-based walking intervention with and without practice nurse support in primary care patients aged 45–75 years: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most adults do not achieve the 150 minutes weekly of at least moderate intensity activity recommended for health. Adults’ most common physical activity (PA) is walking, light intensity if strolling, moderate if brisker. Pedometers can increase walking; however, most trials have been short-term, have combined pedometer and support effects, and have not reported PA intensity. This trial will investigate whether pedometers, with or without nurse support, can help less active 45–75 year olds to increase their PA over 12 months. Methods/design Design: Primary care-based 3-arm randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up and health economic and qualitative evaluations. Participants: Less active 45–75 year olds (n = 993) will be recruited by post from six South West London general practices, maximum of two per household and households randomised into three groups. Step-count and time spent at different PA intensities will be assessed for 7 days at baseline, 3 and 12 months by accelerometer. Questionnaires and anthropometric assessments will be completed. Intervention: The pedometer-alone group will be posted a pedometer (Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200), handbook and diary detailing a 12-week pedometer-based walking programme, using targets from their baseline assessment. The pedometer-plus-support group will additionally receive three practice nurse PA consultations. The handbook, diary and consultations include behaviour change techniques (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting, relapse prevention planning). The control group will receive usual care. Outcomes: Changes in average daily step-count (primary outcome), time spent sedentary and in at least moderate intensity PA weekly at 12 months, measured by accelerometry. Other outcomes include change in body mass index, body fat, self-reported PA, quality of life, mood and adverse events. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed by the incremental cost of the intervention to the National Health Service

  17. Results of a prospective randomized trial evaluating surgery versus thrombolysis for ischemia of the lower extremity. The STILE trial.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to evaluate intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy as part of a treatment strategy for patients requiring revascularization for lower limb ischemia caused by nonembolic arterial and graft occlusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with native arterial or bypass graft occlusion were randomized prospectively to either optimal surgical procedure or intra-arterial, catheter-directed thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) or urokinase (UK). Thrombolysis patients required successful catheter placement into the occlusion before infusion of either rt-PA at 0.05 mg/kg/hr for up to 12 hours or UK of 250,000 units bolus followed by 4000 units/min x 4 hours, then 2000 units/min for up to 36 hours. A composite clinical outcome of death, ongoing/recurrent ischemia, major amputation, and major morbidity was the primary endpoint. Additional endpoints were reduction in surgical procedure, clinical outcome classification, length of hospitalization, and outcome by duration of ischemia. RESULTS: Randomization was terminated at 393 patients because a significant primary endpoint occurred by the first interim analysis. Failure of catheter placement occurred in 28% of patients who were randomized to lysis, and thus, were considered treatment failures. Thirty-day outcomes demonstrated significant benefit to surgical therapy compared with thrombolysis (p < 0.001), primarily because of a reduction in ongoing/recurrent ischemia (p < 0.001). However, clinical outcome classification at 30 days was similar. Stratification by duration of ischemia indicated that patients with ischemic deterioration of 0 to 14 days had lower amputation rates with thrombolysis (p = 0.052) and shorter hospital stays (p < 0.04). Patients with ischemic deterioration of > 14 days who who were treated surgically had less ongoing/recurrent ischemia (p < 0.001) and trends toward lower morbidity (p = 0.1). At 6-month follow-up, there was improved amputation

  18. Enhancing the application and evaluation of a discrete trial intervention package for eliciting first words in preverbal preschoolers with ASD.

    PubMed

    Tsiouri, Ioanna; Schoen Simmons, Elizabeth; Paul, Rhea

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention package including a discrete trial program (Rapid Motor Imitation Antecedent Training (Tsiouri and Greer, J Behav Educat 12:185-206, 2003) combined with parent education for eliciting first words in children with ASD who had little or no spoken language. Evaluation of the approach includes specific intervention targets and functional spoken language outcomes (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). Results suggest that RMIA, with parent training, catalyzes development of verbal imitation and production for some children. Three of five participants acquired word production within the DTT framework and achieved milestones of early functional spoken language use (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). The implications of these findings for understanding the role of discrete trial approaches to language intervention are discussed. PMID:21918912

  19. Competence to stand trial evaluations of sovereign citizens: a case series and primer of odd political and legal beliefs.

    PubMed

    Parker, George F

    2014-01-01

    Sovereign citizens hold a variety of beliefs that challenge the legitimacy of the United States government and criminal justice system. In criminal cases, sovereign citizens typically raise a variety of seemingly strange objections to the proceedings that can cause court participants to believe the defendant is not competent to stand trial. The author's case files were reviewed to identify all defendants who espoused sovereign citizen beliefs during a court-ordered competence-to-stand-trial evaluation. This case series consisted of nine evaluations completed between 2003 and 2012. A review of the outcomes in these cases showed that sovereign citizens typically have the capacity to understand criminal proceedings and assist an attorney. PMID:25187287

  20. Effect of evaluations of competency to stand trial on the state hospital in an era of increased community services.

    PubMed

    Geller, J L; Fisher, W H; Kaye, N S

    1991-08-01

    The authors studied court-ordered inpatient evaluations of competency to stand trial at two Massachusetts state hospitals for the period from 1972 to 1987, with particular attention to the effects of a 1978 federal court consent decree that created an extensive system of community-based services in the catchment area of one of the hospitals. The authors found that the broad array of community services developed under the consent decree did not reduce commitments to the state hospital for evaluation of competency to stand trial at the same rate as it reduced civil commitments, with the result that the composition of the patient population changed to include a significantly larger proportion of patients referred by the criminal justice system. This proportion was as high as 17.8 percent in 1985. These patients used a disproportionate share of the hospital's resources, staying in the hospital for a median of 28 days, compared with 12 days for all other patients.

  1. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE) trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural south-west England: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of adults are not meeting the guidelines for physical activity despite activity being linked with numerous improvements to long-term health. In light of this, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a community-level physical activity intervention increased the activity levels of rural communities. Methods 128 rural villages (clusters) were randomised to receive the intervention in one of four time periods between April 2011 and December 2012. The Devon Active Villages intervention provided villages with 12 weeks of physical activity opportunities for all age groups, including at least three different types of activities per village. Each village received an individually tailored intervention, incorporating a local needs-led approach. Support was provided for a further 12 months following the intervention. The evaluation study used a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial design. All 128 villages were measured at each of five data collection periods using a postal survey. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of adults reporting sufficient physical activity to meet internationally recognised guidelines. Minutes spent in moderate-and-vigorous activity per week was analysed as a secondary outcome. To compare between intervention and control modes, random effects linear regression and marginal logistic regression models were implemented for continuous and binary outcomes respectively. Results 10,412 adults (4693 intervention, 5719 control) completed the postal survey (response rate 32.2%). The intervention did not increase the odds of adults meeting the physical activity guideline (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.17; P = 0.80), although there was weak evidence of an increase in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous-intensity activity per week (adjusted mean difference = 171, 95% CI: -16 to 358; P = 0.07). The

  2. An Occupational Therapy intervention for residents with stroke-related disabilities in UK Care Homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Barton, Garry R; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Care home residents with stroke-related disabilities have significant activity limitations. Phase II trial results suggested a potential benefit of occupational therapy (OT) in maintaining residents' capacity to engage in functional activity. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a targeted course of OT in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity for UK care home residents living with stroke-related disabilities. DESIGN Pragmatic, parallel-group, cluster randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation. Cluster randomisation occurred at the care-home level. Homes were stratified according to trial administrative centre and type of care provided (nursing or residential), and they were randomised 1 : 1 to either the intervention or the control arm. SETTING The setting was 228 care homes which were local to 11 trial administrative centres across England and Wales. PARTICIPANTS Care home residents with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, including residents with communication and cognitive impairments, not receiving end-of-life care. INTERVENTION Personalised 3-month course of OT delivered by qualified therapists. Care workers participated in training workshops to support personal activities of daily living. The control condition consisted of usual care for residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Outcome data were collected by a blinded assessor. The primary outcome at the participant level was the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (BI) score at 3 months. The secondary outcomes included BI scores at 6 and 12 months post randomisation, and the Rivermead Mobility Index, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels, questionnaire scores at all time points. Economic evaluation examined the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gain. Costs were estimated from the perspective of the NHS and Personal

  3. The Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Post-Partum Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Gestational Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Majid; Piri, Zahra; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Kamali, Koorosh; Amir Moghadami, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in many observational studies. Objectives We report the first study of the impact of prenatal vitamin D supplementation on postpartum dysglycemia in GDM patients in a randomized clinical trial. Patients and Methods Women with GDM at 12 - 32 weeks of gestation were assigned randomly to either the intervention group (in which serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25OHD] levels were measured immediately, n = 48) or the control group (in which the serum was stored and assayed at 6 - 12 weeks post-partum, n = 48). Participants with initial serum 25OHD < 30 ng/mL in the intervention group were instructed to take a total of 700,000 IU vitamin D3 during pregnancy. The primary outcomes were fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, 2-h post 75 g glucose load plasma glucose (2-hPLG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HbA1C, and 25 OHD at 6 - 12 weeks after delivery. Results The mean ± SD of serum 25OHD in the intervention group raised dramatically from 14.6 ± 6.3 to 32.4 ± 14.4 ng/mL, whereas no significant change occurred in the control group (from 17.7 ± 6.1 to 19.3 ± 9.6 ng/mL, P < 0.001). Thirteen participants developed dysglycemia in each group. Mean FPG, 2-hPLG, and HOMA-IR were not significantly different between the groups. There was no significant difference between the groups for maternal and neonatal outcomes. Conclusions Although the high vitamin D supplementation dose in the present study (compared to the 400 IU/day dose usually recommended for pregnancy) safely increases the serum 25OHD, in GDM cases, the higher dose does not affect the plasma glucose level or insulin resistance at short term follow-up after delivery. PMID:27679649

  4. Choice of study endpoint significantly impacts the results of breast cancer trials evaluating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Hutton, Brian; Dranitsaris, George; Vandermeer, Lisa; Smith, Stephanie; Clemons, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endpoints can be used to evaluate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These endpoints reflect the various combinations of vomiting, nausea and rescue antiemetic use in the acute (0-24 h), delayed (>24-120 h) and overall (0-120 h) periods after chemotherapy. As the choice of outcome measure could potentially change the interpretation of clinical trial results, we evaluated CINV rates using different endpoints on a single dataset from a prospective cohort. Data from 177 breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy was used to calculate CINV control rates using the 15 most commonly reported CINV endpoints. As nausea remains such a significant symptom, we explored the frequency at which pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical company-funded studies included measures of nausea in their primary study endpoint. CINV control rates ranged from 12.5 %, 95 % (CI 7.6-17.4 %) for total control (no vomiting, no nausea and no rescue medication) in the overall period to 77.4 %, 95 % (CI 71.2-83.6 %) for no vomiting in the overall period. Similar differences were found in the acute and delayed periods. Non-pharmaceutical company-funded trials were more likely to include a measure of nausea in the primary study outcome (9/18, 50 %) than pharmaceutical-funded trials (1/12, 8.3 %). The choice of trial endpoint has an important impact on reported CINV control rates and could significantly impact on interpretation of the results. Primary endpoints of studies, including those mandated by regulatory bodies, should account for nausea to reflect patient experience. Reporting of endpoints should be more comprehensive to allow for cross-trial comparisons.

  5. Tolerability and Clinical Activity of Post-Transplantation Azacitidine in Patients Allografted for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated on the RICAZA Trial.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Charles; Jilani, Nadira; Siddique, Shamyla; Yap, Christina; Khan, Josephine; Nagra, Sandeep; Ward, Janice; Ferguson, Paul; Hazlewood, Peter; Buka, Richard; Vyas, Paresh; Goodyear, Oliver; Tholouli, Eleni; Crawley, Charles; Russell, Nigel; Byrne, Jenny; Malladi, Ram; Snowden, John; Dennis, Mike

    2016-02-01

    Disease relapse is the major causes of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). As well as demonstrating significant clinical activity in AML, azacitidine (AZA) upregulates putative tumor antigens, inducing a CD8(+) T cell response with the potential to augment a graft-versus-leukemia effect. We, therefore, studied the feasibility and clinical sequelae of the administration of AZA during the first year after transplantation in 51 patients with AML undergoing allogeneic SCT. Fourteen patients did not commence AZA either because of transplantation complications or withdrawal of consent. Thirty-seven patients commenced AZA at a median of 54 days (range, 40 to 194 days) after transplantation, which was well tolerated in the majority of patients. Thirty-one patients completed 3 or more cycles of AZA. Sixteen patients relapsed at a median time of 8 months after transplantation. No patient developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. The induction of a post-transplantation CD8(+) T cell response to 1 or more tumor-specific peptides was studied in 28 patients. Induction of a CD8(+) T cell response was associated with a reduced risk of disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR], .30; 95% confidence interval [CI], .10 to .85; P = .02) and improved relapse-free survival (HR, .29; 95% CI, .10 to .83; P = .02) taking into account death as a competing risk. In conclusion, AZA is well tolerated after transplantation and appears to have the capacity to reduce the relapse risk in patients who demonstrate a CD8(+) T cell response to tumor antigens. These observations require confirmation in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26363443

  6. Monotherapy with pixantrone in histologically confirmed relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: post-hoc analyses from a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Sebban, Catherine; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Derigs, Hans Gunter; Kravchenko, Sergey; Singer, Jack W; Theocharous, Panteli; Wang, Lixia; Pavlyuk, Mariya; Makhloufi, Kahina M; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    This post hoc analysis of a phase 3 trial explored the effect of pixantrone in patients (50 pixantrone, 47 comparator) with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) confirmed by centralized histological review. Patients received 28-d cycles of 85 mg/m(2) pixantrone dimaleate (equivalent to 50 mg/m(2) in the approved formulation) on days 1, 8 and 15, or comparator. The population was subdivided according to previous rituximab use and whether they received the study treatment as 3rd or 4th line. Median number of cycles was 4 (range, 2-6) with pixantrone and 3 (2-6) with comparator. In 3rd or 4th line, pixantrone was associated with higher complete response (CR) (23·1% vs. 5·1% comparator, P = 0·047) and overall response rate (ORR, 43·6% vs. 12·8%, P = 0·005). In 3rd or 4th line with previous rituximab (20 pixantrone, 18 comparator), pixantrone produced better ORR (45·0% vs. 11·1%, P = 0·033), CR (30·0% vs. 5·6%, P = 0·093) and progression-free survival (median 5·4 vs. 2·8 months, hazard ratio 0·52, 95% confidence interval 0·26-1·04) than the comparator. Similar results were found in patients without previous rituximab. There were no unexpected safety issues. Pixantrone monotherapy is more effective than comparator in relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL in the 3rd or 4th line setting, independently of previous rituximab.

  7. Evaluation of the adhesion of fiber posts cemented using different adhesive approaches.

    PubMed

    Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Chieffi, Nicoletta; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesion of fiber posts cemented with luting agents that utilize three currently available adhesive approaches: etch-and-rinse, self-etch, and self-adhesive. Forty-two intact single-rooted human premolars were used in the study. Teeth were divided into six groups. In each group, a different resin cement with its adhesive system (if needed) and a fiber post were used. The groups were classified, according to the adhesive approach, into the following three categories. (i) Etch-and-rinse groups: Calibra resin cement/XPBond adhesive + self-curing activator (SCA)/RadiX Fiber Post (Dentsply Caulk), FluoroCore 2 core build-up material/XPBond + SCA/RadiX Fiber Post (Dentsply Caulk), and MultiCore Flow luting and core build-up material/Excite DSC adhesive/FRC Postec Plus fiber post (Ivoclar Vivadent). (ii) Self-etch group: Panavia F 2.0/ED primer (Kuraray)/RadiX Fiber Post (Dentsply Caulk). (iii) Self-adhesive groups: experimental self-adhesive cement/RadiX Fiber Post (Dentsply Caulk), and RelyX Unicem/RelyX Fiber Post (3M ESPE). The adhesion between the post and the root canal walls was assessed using the 'thin-slice' push-out test. In the test arrangement used, the self-etching approach may offer less favourable adhesion to root canal dentin in comparison with etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive approaches.

  8. Mid-way and post-intervention effects on potential determinants of physical activity and sedentary behavior, results of the HEIA study - a multi-component school-based randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge as to whether obesity prevention interventions are able to produce change in the determinants hypothesized to precede change in energy balance-related behaviors in young people. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multi-component intervention on a wide range of theoretically informed determinants of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Moderation effects of gender, weight status and parental education level and whether the perceived intervention dose received influenced the effects were also explored. Methods The HEIA study was a 20-month school-based, randomized controlled trial to promote healthy weight development. In total, 1418 11-year-olds participated at baseline and post-intervention assessment. Enjoyment, self-efficacy, perceived social support from parents, teachers and friends related to PA, perceived parental regulation of TV-viewing and computer/game-use and perceived social inclusion at schools were examined by covariance analyses to assess overall effects and moderation by gender, weight status and parental education, mid-way and post-intervention. Covariance analyses were also used to examine the role of intervention dose received on change in the determinants. Results At mid-way enjoyment (p = .03), perceived social support from teachers (p = .003) and self-efficacy (p = .05) were higher in the intervention group. Weight status moderated the effect on self-efficacy, with a positive effect observed among the normal weight only. At post-intervention results were sustained for social support from teachers (p = .001), while a negative effect was found for self-efficacy (p = .02). Weight status moderated the effect on enjoyment, with reduced enjoyment observed among the overweight. Moderation effects for parental education level were detected for perceived social support from parents and teachers. Finally, positive effects on several determinants were observed

  9. Reflections by contrarians on the post-CREST evaluation of carotid stenting for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Henry J M; Pelz, David M; Lownie, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting has become a popular alternative to carotid endarterectomy for the treatment of carotid stenosis in stroke. Evidence from early randomized controlled trials comparing these interventions revealed mixed results. The largest such trial, the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial recently showed equivalence of the procedures in a mixed cohort of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. These results have been heralded in North America as definitively demonstrating the safety and efficacy of carotid angioplasty and stenting, making it an attractive alternative to carotid endarterectomy. It is therefore probable that many more asymptomatic patients will be subjected to Carotid angioplasty and stenting, perceived by many to be less invasive than carotid endarterectomy. The authors argue that the design of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial was flawed by the mixture of two dissimilar patient groups, thus violating the principle of ceteris paribus, essential for the validity of a randomized controlled trials. The evidence for any invasive treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is weak, with recent data favouring purely medical management. The authors believe that carotid angioplasty and stenting in asymptomatic patients should cease until better evidence is available. PMID:21050401

  10. A pre- post-evaluation of implementing an inpatient warfarin monitoring and education program

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Edward P.; Chemodurow, Lucy; Christensen, Shanna; Johnson, E. Suzanne

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a new anticoagulation management program resulted in better monitoring of warfarin, increased warfarin patient education prior to discharge, and fewer bleeding complications associated with warfarin. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients who were inpatients and received warfarin from April 1, 2008 to July 31, 2008 (control group) and from April 1, 2009 to July 31, 2009 (after implementation of the new anticoagulation program). The frequency of warfarin-related laboratory orders that included international normalized ratios (INRs), complete blood counts (CBCs), and documented patient education by pharmacy, nursing, and dietary services were determined before and after program implementation. Also, data was collected to determine frequencies of bleeding complications associated with warfarin. Results There were 112 patients in the pre- and 115 patients in the post-program group. After implementation of the inpatient warfarin management program, obtaining baseline INRs increased from 74% to 90% (p=0.001). Orders for baseline CBCs increased from 85% to 94% (p=0.026). Obtaining CBCs every 3 days increased from 54% to 74%, (p<0.001). However, there was no significant change in orders for daily INRs (p=0.055). Education by nursing increased from 54% to 80%, (p<0.001), by pharmacy increased from 8% to 76%, (p<0.001), and by dietary increased from 11% to 79%, (p<0.001). Documentation by all three disciplines in each patient increased from 3.6% to 59%, (p<0.001). Significantly fewer patients received vitamin K and/ or fresh frozen plasma for supratherapeutic INRs with bleeding complications after the program was initiated compared to baseline (p=0.009). Conclusions The implementation of an inpatient warfarin management program led to better monitoring of patients receiving warfarin, and increased patient education. However, a larger and longer assessment is necessary to determine if these

  11. Perceptual and acoustic evaluation of individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux pre- and post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Selby, Julia C; Gilbert, Harvey R; Lerman, J W

    2003-12-01

    Thirteen individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) were studied pre- and post-treatment. The effect of treatment on perceptual ratings of voice quality and frequency and intensity measures was examined. Relationships between perceptual and acoustic parameters were assessed descriptively. Results showed a small, but significant improvement in the perception of voice quality post-treatment. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-treatment means for any of the acoustic measures except harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). Descriptive analyses showed some association between perceptual ratings and acoustic measures. Discussion of results focuses on severity of LPR.

  12. Study on the safety and efficacy of miltefosine for the treatment of children and adolescents with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis in Bangladesh, and an association of serum vitamin E and exposure to arsenic with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis: an open clinical trial and case–control study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, D; Hasnain, M G; Hossain, M S; Ghosh, D; Ghosh, P; Hossain, H; Baker, J; Nath, R; Haque, R; Matlashewski, G; Hamano, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a dermatological complication that occurs primarily among treated visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and sporadically in a few without a history of VL. It mostly affects children and adolescents but is also common in adults. The conventional treatment with 120 intramuscular injections of sodium stibogluconate (SSG) is phasing out. Miltefosine (MF) is the only eventual alternative to SSG; however, its efficacy and safety profiles for treatment of children and adolescents with PKDL are lacking. In addition, risk factors for PKDL are poorly investigated. Host genetic, nutritional and environmental factors could be potential risk factors. As such, here we propose to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MF for 12 weeks at an allometric dose for children and adolescents with PKDL, and also to explore potential risk factors for PKDL. Methods and analysis A cross-sectional survey will look for suspected participants with PKDL among treated VL children and adolescents, a subsequent open clinical trial with MF at allometric dose, with a follow-up at 12 months. A case–control study will be carried out for PKDL risk factors. Assuming 95% cure rate, 95% CI and α=0.05, a sample size of 73 children with PKDL is needed. Considering an attrition rate of 10%, the final sample size is 80 children in each group. Descriptive and analytical analyses will be performed. Primary outcome is safety and cure rate of 12 weeks of treatment with MF. Ethics and dissemination International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) Ethical Review Committee (ERC) approved the protocol (PR#013045). Written informed consent will be taken from all participants and their guardians (in case of minor). A Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) of ICDDR,B ERC will monitor all study activities to ensure the safety of the participants. Trial registration number NCT02193022; Pre-results. PMID:27188804

  13. Evaluation of light transmission through different esthetic posts and its influence on the degree of polymerization of a dual cure resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju; Gupta, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To measure the light transmission through different esthetic posts and to evaluate the degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement cured through these posts. Materials and Methods: The posts were divided into two experimental groups i.e. Group A (D.T. Light post); Group B (D.T. White post) and control i.e. Group C (metal post), each group having 10 samples. Posts of each group were illuminated with curing light and photographs were taken keeping the parameters standardized to evaluate the intensity of light transmission at different levels. The degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement was evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: D.T. Light post showed highest light transmission and degree of polymerization. The light intensity decreased from cervical to apical for both esthetic post but the decrease from middle to apical third was insignificant for D.T. White post group. No light transmission was detected in metal post but the degree of polymerization decreased significantly from cervical to middle third. Conclusion: Cementation of fibre post with superior light transmitting ability using dual cured resin cement resulted in increased degree of polymerization. PMID:23349573

  14. Refractory depression: mechanisms and evaluation of radically open dialectical behaviour therapy (RO-DBT) [REFRAMED]: protocol for randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, T R; Whalley, B; Hempel, R J; Byford, S; Clarke, P; Clarke, S; Kingdon, D; O'Mahen, H; Russell, I T; Shearer, J; Stanton, M; Swales, M; Watkins, A; Remington, B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Only 30–40% of depressed patients treated with medication achieve full remission. Studies that change medication or augment it by psychotherapy achieve only limited benefits, in part because current treatments are not designed for chronic and complex patients. Previous trials have excluded high-risk patients and those with comorbid personality disorder. Radically Open Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (RO-DBT) is a novel, transdiagnostic treatment for disorders of emotional over-control. The REFRAMED trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RO-DBT for patients with treatment-resistant depression. Methods and analysis REFRAMED is a multicentre randomised controlled trial, comparing 7 months of individual and group RO-DBT treatment with treatment as usual (TAU). Our primary outcome measure is depressive symptoms 12 months after randomisation. We shall estimate the cost-effectiveness of RO-DBT by cost per quality-adjusted life year. Causal analyses will explore the mechanisms by which RO-DBT is effective. Ethics and dissemination The National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee South Central – Southampton A first granted ethical approval on 20 June 2011, reference number 11/SC/0146. Trial registration number ISRCTN85784627. PMID:26187121

  15. Estimating the Single-Trial Characteristics of Event-Related Responses: Evaluation of the MCERP Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Truccolo, W. A.; Ding, M.; Bressler, S. L.; Schroeder, C. E.; Korsmey, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Single-trial event-related responses collected during the course of an experiment are typically averaged before analysis resulting in a rather crude picture of event-related brain dynamics. It has been quite clear for some time that these responses exhibit trial-to-trial variability: however, the computational techniques necessary to deal with such responses in noisy conditions have not been available. To this end we have developed the multiple-component, event-related potential model (mcERP), which assumes that the each event-related response consists of a sum of multiple evoked components each described by a stereotypical waveshape. These waveshapes are allowed to vary in amplitude and onset latency from trial to trial, which allows us to capture, to first-order, the trial-dependent variations in event-related brain dynamics. We have constructed many sets of synthetic data designed to simulate intracortical recordings from a 15 channel, linear-array multielectrode implanted acutely in V1 of an awake-behaving macaque undergoing visual stimulation with a red light flash. This synthetic data was used to characterize the performance of the mcERP algorithm. First we quantified the degree to which such trial-to-trial variability aids in the identification of multiple components, and we demonstrate that amplitude variability is a more important factor in component separation than latency variability. Second, we quantified the behavior of the algorithm under two distinct signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions: Gaussian noise independently present in each channel, and highly correlated (1/f distributed), far-field noise presented identically in each channel of the array. The mcERP algorithm was found to be robust to noise accurately identifying all component waveshapes and their associated single-trial characteristics down to SNR levels of -20dB for Gaussian noise and -7dB for 1/f far-field noise. Comparisons of the performance of this algorithm with factor analysis (FA

  16. Methods for testing theory and evaluating impact in randomized field trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C. Hendricks; Wang, Wei; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Muthén, Bengt O.; Petras, Hanno; Toyinbo, Peter; Poduska, Jeanne; Ialongo, Nicholas; Wyman, Peter A.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Sloboda, Zili; MacKinnon, David P.; Windham, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Randomized field trials provide unique opportunities to examine the effectiveness of an intervention in real world settings and to test and extend both theory of etiology and theory of intervention. These trials are designed not only to test for overall intervention impact but also to examine how impact varies as a function of individual level characteristics, context, and across time. Examination of such variation in impact requires analytical methods that take into account the trial’s multiple nested structure and the evolving changes in outcomes over time. The models that we describe here merge multilevel modeling with growth modeling, allowing for variation in impact to be represented through discrete mixtures—growth mixture models—and nonparametric smooth functions—generalized additive mixed models. These methods are part of an emerging class of multilevel growth mixture models, and we illustrate these with models that examine overall impact and variation in impact. In this paper, we define intent-to-treat analyses in group-randomized multilevel field trials and discuss appropriate ways to identify, examine, and test for variation in impact without inflating the Type I error rate. We describe how to make causal inferences more robust to misspecification of covariates in such analyses and how to summarize and present these interactive intervention effects clearly. Practical strategies for reducing model complexity, checking model fit, and handling missing data are discussed using six randomized field trials to show how these methods may be used across trials randomized at different levels. PMID:18215473

  17. A Sequential Phase 2b Trial Design for Evaluating Vaccine Efficacy and Immune Correlates for Multiple HIV Vaccine Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Grove, Douglas; Gabriel, Erin; Huang, Ying; Gray, Glenda; Hammer, Scott M.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Self, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Five preventative HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been conducted over the last 12 years, all of which evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) to prevent HIV infection for a single vaccine regimen versus placebo. Now that one of these trials has supported partial VE of a prime-boost vaccine regimen, there is interest in conducting efficacy trials that simultaneously evaluate multiple prime-boost vaccine regimens against a shared placebo group in the same geographic region, for accelerating the pace of vaccine development. This article proposes such a design, which has main objectives (1) to evaluate VE of each regimen versus placebo against HIV exposures occurring near the time of the immunizations; (2) to evaluate durability of VE for each vaccine regimen showing reliable evidence for positive VE; (3) to expeditiously evaluate the immune correlates of protection if any vaccine regimen shows reliable evidence for positive VE; and (4) to compare VE among the vaccine regimens. The design uses sequential monitoring for the events of vaccine harm, non-efficacy, and high efficacy, selected to weed out poor vaccines as rapidly as possible while guarding against prematurely weeding out a vaccine that does not confer efficacy until most of the immunizations are received. The evaluation of the design shows that testing multiple vaccine regimens is important for providing a well-powered assessment of the correlation of vaccine-induced immune responses with HIV infection, and is critically important for providing a reasonably powered assessment of the value of identified correlates as surrogate endpoints for HIV infection. PMID:23181167

  18. [Post-marketing clinical study of traditional Chinese medicine--lessons learned from comprehensive evaluation of Fufang Zaoren capsule].

    PubMed

    Qing, Shan; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Li; Jia, Jian-Ping; Liu, Xin-Min; Ji, Shao-Liang; Yang, Xiao-Hui

    2013-11-01

    By comprehensive review and analysis of post-marketing clinical research on the efficacy and safety,we concluded that Fufang Zaoren capsule has certain therapeutic effects for insomnia, although current clinical research design needs improving. The post-marketing clinical studies also showed that it causes several adverse reactions at the recommended doses, such as chills, fever, dizziness, nausea, shortness of breath, chest tightness and palpitations, whereas high doses of Fufang Zaoren capsule can cause delayed extrapyramidal symptoms. Health Canada government website also prompted the L-tetrahydropalmatine in Fufang Zaoren capsule caused liver damage in pregnant women. The authors summarized the risk points, factors and risk control in the clinical use of Fufang Zaoren capsule and also present their perspective on the research status, existing problems and corresponding countermeasures in the post-marketing clinical re-evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine.

  19. Rationale, design and methods for a randomised and controlled trial to evaluate "Animal Fun" - a program designed to enhance physical and mental health in young children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Children with poor motor ability have been found to engage less in physical activities than other children, and a lack of physical activity has been linked to problems such as obesity, lowered bone mineral density and cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, if children are confident with their fine and gross motor skills, they are more likely to engage in physical activities such as sports, crafts, dancing and other physical activity programs outside of the school curriculum which are important activities for psychosocial development. The primary objective of this project is to comprehensively evaluate a whole of class physical activity program called Animal Fun designed for Pre-Primary children. This program was designed to improve the child's movement skills, both fine and gross, and their perceptions of their movement ability, promote appropriate social skills and improve social-emotional development. Methods The proposed randomized and controlled trial uses a multivariate nested cohort design to examine the physical (motor coordination) and psychosocial (self perceptions, anxiety, social competence) outcomes of the program. The Animal Fun program is a teacher delivered universal program incorporating animal actions to facilitate motor skill and social skill acquisition and practice. Pre-intervention scores on motor and psychosocial variables for six control schools and six intervention schools will be compared with post-intervention scores (end of Pre-Primary year) and scores taken 12 months later after the children's transition to primary school Year 1. 520 children aged 4.5 to 6 years will be recruited and it is anticipated that 360 children will be retained to the 1 year follow-up. There will be equal numbers of boys and girls. Discussion If this program is found to improve the child's motor and psychosocial skills, this will assist in the child's transition into the first year of school. As a result of these changes, it is anticipated that

  20. A pilot randomised controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the Baby Triple P Positive Parenting Programme in mothers with postnatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Tsivos, Zoe-Lydia; Calam, Rachel; Sanders, Matthew R; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Few interventions for Postnatal Depression (PND) have focused on parenting difficulties; the aim of this research was to investigate the feasibility and evaluate a parenting intervention (Baby Triple P) in women with PND. This was a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate and determine the feasibility of the newly developed Baby Triple P compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in women with PND. In all, 27 female participants aged from 18 to 45 years (mean age = 28.4 years, standard deviation (SD) = 6.1), with a primary diagnosis of major depression and an infant under 12 months (mean age = 6.2 months, SD = 3.2 months), were recruited from primary care trusts in Greater Manchester, United Kingdom. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either eight Baby Triple P sessions in addition to TAU or TAU only. Outcomes were assessed at post-treatment (Time 2) and 3 months post-treatment (Time 3). Self-report outcomes were as follows: Beck Depression Inventory, Oxford Happiness Inventory, What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like, Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire and the Brief Parenting Beliefs Scale–baby version. An assessor-rated observational measure of mother–infant interaction, the CARE Index and measure of intervention acceptability were also completed. Significant improvements from Time 1 to Time 2 and Time 1 to Time 3 were observed across both groups. Although women allocated to Baby Triple P showed more favourable improvements, the between-group differences were not significant. However, the intervention was highly acceptable to women with PND. A large-scale RCT is indicated. PMID:24778436

  1. A pilot randomised controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the Baby Triple P Positive Parenting Programme in mothers with postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Tsivos, Zoe-Lydia; Calam, Rachel; Sanders, Matthew R; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-10-01

    Few interventions for Postnatal Depression (PND) have focused on parenting difficulties; the aim of this research was to investigate the feasibility and evaluate a parenting intervention (Baby Triple P) in women with PND. This was a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate and determine the feasibility of the newly developed Baby Triple P compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in women with PND. In all, 27 female participants aged from 18 to 45 years (mean age = 28.4 years, standard deviation (SD) = 6.1), with a primary diagnosis of major depression and an infant under 12 months (mean age = 6.2 months, SD = 3.2 months), were recruited from primary care trusts in Greater Manchester, United Kingdom. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either eight Baby Triple P sessions in addition to TAU or TAU only. Outcomes were assessed at post-treatment (Time 2) and 3 months post-treatment (Time 3). Self-report outcomes were as follows: Beck Depression Inventory, Oxford Happiness Inventory, What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like, Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire and the Brief Parenting Beliefs Scale-baby version. An assessor-rated observational measure of mother-infant interaction, the CARE Index and measure of intervention acceptability were also completed. Significant improvements from Time 1 to Time 2 and Time 1 to Time 3 were observed across both groups. Although women allocated to Baby Triple P showed more favourable improvements, the between-group differences were not significant. However, the intervention was highly acceptable to women with PND. A large-scale RCT is indicated.

  2. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Frances A; Hill, Keith D; Mackintosh, Shylie F; Said, Catherine M; Whitehead, Craig H

    2009-01-01

    Background Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home) project. Methods and design This randomised controlled